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The Abbotsford Post Aug 22, 1919

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 With which is incorporated "The Huntingdon Star"  -Vol. XVIII., No. 14.  .'. in '     ���������    ������  .ji^jayL.  JMWJ������_  A.BBOTSFO.RD. B, C.   FRIDAY, AUG  22. 1919  $1.00, per Year  tlie man who lias had h-is repairs done at the  PERSONALS  a meet  to sec  and he will tell you that "he had much better satisfaction  ���������GOT GOOD 'VALUE FOR HIS MONEY; and that is  what we give all our customers.  Oxy-Acetylene Welding a Specialty  CARS FOR HIRE  S. KRAVOSKI, Proprietor  Farmers' Phone���������One short, one long, one short  B. 0. Long Distance���������36. 1J> M���������Residence Phone  WESTMINSTERS   PEACE  EXHIBITION  A  SUCCESS  Now ���������Westminster,' August 20.���������  .All doubts regarding the success of  the great Peace Exhibition here this-  year were swept away recently when  President C. A. Welsh secured a promise from Col. Henderson that the  Prince of Wales would open-the-show  on Monday,  September 2 9.  Thousands of people from the Valley and district will flock to the city  that day to get a chance to see the  heir of the throne of the gret empire.of which British Columbia, forms  a -part, at .close range. The Prince  ��������� will spend.several hours in the city  and he 'will' open the fair from a  platform in-the centre of the new  athletic oval, affording everyone an  equal, opportunity to see the youthful celebrity.  One hundred thousand dollars is  the expenditure planned by the R.  A. & I. officials in improvements to  grounds and buildings at the park  and in prize awards, the latter totalling $60,000.  Every building on the grounds is  being extensively altered and improved; new cattle and sheep sheds  are going up, a gang of painters and  decorators are busy-,- and in all a  force of one hundred men are now  steadily employed puting everything  in shipshape for what is unduobtedly  going to'be the greatest exhibition  ever held in tho West.  Accommodation is being made for  nearly 200 head of stock and already  the officials are assured of entries of  fat and pure bred stock from all the  largest herds of the province including the famous Steves herd at Stev-  eston and the prize winning herds  from the Colony Farm at Essondalc  and the Experimental Farm at Agas-  Biz. S. H. Shannon of Cloverdale will  show many of his prize winning Ayr-  shires; in fact every farmer and  stockbreeder in the lower mainland-  has; assured the management of a  desire to be present.  Some idea of the magnitude of tho  exhibition may be gleaned from the  statement of Manager D. E. Mackenzie that 10,000 copies ef the  prize list, d booklet containging  pageq, are being distributed,  wholo drayload of tlie booklets  the It. A. & I'.offices last week for  post office and another goes in  week.  Negotiations are under way  bring the eastern lacrosse champions  to the coast to. play for the Minto  Cup and definite word as to this  attractive feature may be given very  shortly. It is expected here that the  champion royals will be able to defeat Vancouver, but-in any event,  lacrosse for the fair is assured.  Light Weight Oar is Canada Choice  The Ontario department of highway's annual report," which was issued a few clays go, shows that, of  101,599 passenger cars owned in tho  province last year, 84,018 -were listed as of 25 h. p. and less.  OLIVER GETS INTO PRINT  WITH  OTTAWA   PAPER  140  A  left  the  this  to  Mr.   Whitchelo   motored   to   Vancouver  on Wednesday  and   returned  with Mrs. Whitchelo and Mrs. Hartford. ,      ^j������i:-..I.'..;.*!  }  Opposition to the taking over of  the Pacific Great Eastern .Railway  manifested in the eastern press has  led Premier Oliver into a correspondence with the Ottawa Citiezn in  -which he assert s that the late Sir  Richard--McBride -told him. the railway was projected in 1912 "to provide a large campaign, fund to prevent the election of a single Liberal  to the provincial legislature."  .Summarizing the correspondence  and commenting on it, the Toronto  ��������� Globe says:.  "Hon. John Oliver, . premier of  British Columbia, proposes that the  Dominion government should take  over, complete and operate the Pacific Great Eastern a s a part  of the National Trancontinental Sys-  near Vancouver ,to Clinton, north of  Ash croft and one of the objects was  to extend it 300 or 400 miles farther  in order to tap the rich Peace River  Valley lands and make them tributary to the coast cities of Biritish Columbia. Tho government has already  acquired tho Canadian Northren Rail  way and will probably acquire the  Grand Trunk Pacific, and he urges  that it would be more advantageous  to British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan for the government to  take ove rthis project also than to  allow it to fall into the hands of tlie  C. P. R.  "The Pacific Great Eastern . has  had an unsavory record. Mr. Oliver,  in a letter to the Ott awa Citizen,  states that it was projected in 1912  iu order that the McBride-Bowser  government could rely on continued  lavish expenditure for support at a  general election, 'and also to provide a la.rge campaign fund to prevent (as Sir Richard McrBide assured me personally) tho election of a  single Liberal to the provincial legislature.' These were the political aims i  and Mr. Oliver continues:  "The private enterprise side was  the desire of the well known rail-  thatt ho firm of Foley Welch & Stew-  and proflited from tho exploitation  of twonsite lands, and still further  the fact that investigation showed  that the firm of Foley Welch���������Stewart had made a profit of approximately $5,000,000 from construction.will  show very clearly that the private enterprise to follow in the footsteps of  Mackenzie & Mann as great railway  builders and incidentally to amass  wealth by doing so. The fact that  D'Arcy Tate actually received .$6,-  250,000 of the capital stock of the  railway company (issued as being  fully paid up), together with $500,-  00 in cash, and further that he gave  evidence under oatth that he and  his associates expected to realize $10,  000,000 was a factor., by no riieans  negligible  "But dealing with the question  in the legislature last March, Mr.  Oliver claimed that though an investigation showed an approximate  profit of over $5,000,000, the contractors, Mssrs Foley, Welch and  Stewart had actually paid out $87,-  516 more than they received. What  then, became of the $5,000,000 In  profits? In his letter to the Citizen  Mr. Oliver adds:  " 'Your demand that before this  Mrs. William Faddon called  ing for Wednesday afternoon  the feeling of the' ladies of. Abbotsford about organizing a Women's  Institute, but .as there Avero not  many present a meeting is called Cor  Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock on  iScpt. 12th in tlie Presbyterian  church at which all ladies are asked  to attend.  Miss Emma -Trethewey has gone  to Edmonton. She has a school in the  city this year.  Mr. Mclnnes, ah aviator from New  Westminster and friend of Jack  Parton, in France, was a guest of the  Parton's last Sunday.  - Miss Parton is spending her holidays in Vancouver and Victoria.  Mr. Spring of New Westminster  visited his mother last week end.  Mr.' Kiddan'd Mr. Grant of Vancouver spent last week end' at Mc-  Menemy's.  The ladies aid will hold their  meeting at Mrs. Alex. McCallum's on  Wednesday afternoon 27th and 28th  at three o'clock.  Miss Jean Kirkpatrick- an d her  friend returned to Vancouver on  Sunday evening after holidaying at  her home here.  Charlie, Robert, Clark Trethewey  Willie and Norman Hutchison and  Oscar,Dodds spent Sunciay at Cultus*  Lake.  Mrs. Campbell' of New Westminster spent a few' days with her mother  Mrs.  Harkness.  Mrs. Mclnnes has been visiting In  New Westminster at .her sister's.  Mr. and Mrs. Eby returned on  Tuesday morning after touring tww  we eks at Bellingham, Maple Falls  Silver Lake, Glacier and other places  Mrs. Eby says Abbotsford gardens  look good to her.  Goldie Johnson from Vancouver  formerly of Abbotsford is ��������� having  holidays and staying at Mr. Dan  Smith's.  Mrs. Tapp, Hector, Gwen and  Gladys Hunt are camping at White  Rock for a few days.  Mr. and Mrs. Cassidy and George,-  Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, of Murrayville  were visitors at Mr. John McPhce's  on Sunday; their daughters returned, home with them.  Mr. Art Ward is home from the  hills and his father and brother ot  Michigan are guests of Mr. and Mrs.  Ward at present.  Something doing around "Abbotsford schoolhouse; paint on the outside and two furnaces in the basements; then next spring a few trees  planted in the yard would be putting  on finishhg touches.    .  Mrs. Swift and children and Miss  Lamb returned from Vancouver on  Wednesday evening after holidaying  nearly a week.  Mr. Allen. Hill-Tout arrived on  Monday with his bride. Some of the  young pepole gave them a surprise  party on Tuesday night at the Hill-  Tout home and had a jolly time.  Mrs. Hannah Eraser was hostess  at a reception at her home on Tuesday afternoon in honor of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. David Fraser. Mrs.  Chas. Crawford poured the tea, Miss  McMaster assisted Miss Fraser in tlie  serving. Tlie home was beautifully docoratod.  Mrs. Fraser was becomingly dressed in black silk, while the bride wore  l-.er wedding dress of white satin and  georgette crape trimmed with silk  gimp. There were a large number  of callers.  Miss Annie and Lenie McPhee have  been in New   Westminster    hospital  Mr. and Mrs.  Barrett are visiting  in Vancouver and Esquimau.  Mrs. Elmer Campbell is    visiting  her sisters Mrs Coogan and Mrs. W.  Roberts this week.  ���������   Mrs.  Alanson  wast  he  guest    of  Mrs. King un Wednesday.        ���������  extra burden of railway robbery is  accepted the people of Canada have  a right to know what the government has done to account for tho.  millions squandered or to put the  grafters in jail is very much to tluj  point and requires an answer. . .  Why the grafters were not put in  jail is a question which I as a layman am not competent to answer.'  "This mystery- must be cleared up  before the government can consider  the proposal to take over the P. G.  E. Railway."  ==k  ii^JK  SOME  IfAVM  JOJ.VKtt  VWi  A.WllAh  LEA'GCi;  VMW  -GO.C  "of  Kecorii)  M  r.:id  the   Aerial  in  the city  (From  the Frnsei  Mr. If. II. E. D. (  U. Fioldhcuso, both  League'of Canada, were  yesterday securing members for the  new branch of the Aerial League,  known as the Fraser Valley branch.  The object of this branch of the  league will be to purchase . -aeroplanes to be'used exclusively by the  "members. The machines will .be at  the disposal of any district or community, which gives this branch their  support, for stunting and passenger  carrying at the various exhibitions  and' fairs.  ���������All returned It. A. F. men will be  welcomed and may join free of  charge and will be given an opportunity to keep up their practice as a  pilot.  All civilians Avho are interested in  AVIATION may become members of  the league and all members will have  an opportunity to view this district  from aloft. Anyone wishing to. join  can get particulars from tho Secretary Mr. Cook, C-6 Y. M C. A. New  Westminster,'B. C, or from Mr Frost  of the Vancouver Milling & Grain Co.  of this cHy who is a returned It. A.  F. man himself.  The following gentlemen in this  .district have become members and  are giving -the League their hearty  support: Messrs Mr" F. Shook  :Catherwood, Lane King,  and Hargitt.  HAVE  COMPLETELY   ORGANIZED  J.  A.  Beach,  "Mr. Sid Saunders, .formerly police  offifiicer here, accompanied' by -iVlr������j.  Saunders were the guests of Mr. and  Mrs. .Reuiicr over the week end.  A meeting of the Mission City Foot  Ball Club was held in the Kitchener  Club Rooms on Monday night. After completing organization it was  decided to send delegates to a meeting at Abbotsford to arrange about a  Fraser Valley League. It was also  agreed to arrange for a Football  match on the day of Fall Fair as a  special attraction on that date.  The chief interest of the meeting  however centred round the question  of a match between thec'old timerG  and the young men of the fptobalh  club.  New comers ,to our city were sure ���������  that it would be a run away for the  young men but others who liad 3een  many of the oldtimers play thought  that nothing but barbed wire entanglements could keep the old timers out 'Of the goal.  Finally after much misgivings on  the part of the young men it was  decided to have the match on Monday, Sept 1st at il p.m.  Building operations  moving picture show  begin shortly is the  Abbotsford is to have  on    the    now  buildjng   will  report   today.  a fine moving  picture house and further it is tp  be-run by a real live wire Avho intends to make it just the very best  ef  its kind  in  the Fraser Valley.  of  ��������� Miss Nicholson was the    =ruei3  Mrs.  McMp'tpr last week end.   ;  Mr. P'irioitc and Mr. Know! took  a trip to Bellingham on Thursdiy.  Mrs. Hannah Fraser, Mr. and Mrs.  David and Miss Jna Fraser .spent  Wednesday and Thursday in Chilliwack. and had a-very enjoyable-time.  BEara  tosssssxasasisB!  12 pairs Ladies White Canvas rumps, Leather Soles, sizes  2y2 to 7, regular $3.00 value for SI,95  Children's'White Canvas Rubber Sole Shoes, sizes G to 10  for .- ��������� ��������� ���������- -75c  a pair  Boys' Golated Sailor Suits, size 3 to G years  Regular $3.50 .value for .....' $1.95  Don't  Miss  Baked  Bemis  at 10^  a  {'lu  Mica Axle Grease, 2 -for   ���������     ^5������  AND DOZENS OF OTHER CASH SPECIALS  sMwt Ma^onCXps?  sbs Tgelf" Secular Jbrarv&sc5^  Sb^M^l^on.^51 .Without)  Win(T������A Rubber Pin,c\  - O. r    ^- 'O  "Self Sealing'  Jlasonlid  IIIUHPMCT|������MIU'jm������<"������������l������W!W*lWlff.]ft^BB������  BUTIEKICK  PA'  TEIOS FOR SEPTEMBER  Canada Food Board Licence No. 8-19707  B.   C.  Phone,   * Farmer'  Phone  too:  SBBBHSSHRNS^K^HEffi^K PAGE TWO  ^*x-"r<rm  f Me abbotsford post  '--:���������*  S������E  38.  39.  40.  41.  42.  4 3.  4 4  4 5.  4 6.  4 7.  48.  4il.  5i0:  i)J.  52.  f> 3.  54.  65.  58.  5 0.  60.  61.  62.  63.  64.  65.  66.  67.  68.  MISSION   CITY   PRIZE   LUST  (Continued from Page.Three)  ���������    .i   ���������  Clapp's Favorite, four ...:   Sekel,  four   '.   Sheldon,  four  '.'..'. ���������-  Boussock,   four    ' v���������  Four of any other variety of fall ....  Winter Nellis,. four ...'1 '. r...  Beurre   D'Anjou,   four    ..,  .  Bourre Clairgc.au,, four ...r.... .'.-.;-,  Howell,' four  :.'. '.'. ?.  Plate of any other variety  -  '  Plums  Grand   Duke,  dozen  ...., ���������- .-.  ltoine Claude, dozen   :  '  Italian prune, dozen  '.   Tragedy  prune,  dozen   '  Sugar prune,  dozen   Tennant prune, dozen  '.   ltobo do Sargent, dozen     Blue Damson, dozen   Other Fruits  Quince,   four    ���������  Grapes light,  two bunches     Grapes, dark two bunches    Peaches, Crawford, five  -   <  Peaches, any.other variety, five ....  Strawberries baskot    Blackberries,   basket      English  "Walnuts,  ten     Frankette Walnuts ten    Chestnuts,   ten    .-   Collection of Nuts correctly named-  Best box of apples, packing and  quality to count: prizes donated by  Bush & Keeves  '.   Best Box of pears,packing and quality to count  : -  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50.'  .50  ������0   ?  .50.  .5.0  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .5 0  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .5 0  .5 0  .50  DIVISION I.���������Flowers  Class  1.  2.  .i  o.  4.  1   5.  6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.  15.  6.00  3.00.  1st.  Collection house plants  .'$2.00  Best house plant  . 50  Table  bouquet    '.    -50  Best geranium   5 0  Best   fuchsia    '. ', ���������   -50  Wreath , 75  Display of sweet peas  50  Collection of Asters  75  75  50  Collection of Dahlias, 1 each   Best 6 variety cactus dahlias, 1 ca.  Best collection dahlies . from    seed  sown  in   1919    ,     -.75  Collection of Zinnias  (snowball) 50  Best arranged bowl of roses ..s     .50  Collectio nof cut flowers    1-00  Best display of flowers .quality and  arrangement to count  3.00  The following.specials  ���������    Mrs. L.  J.  Solloway  have been donated  .25'  .2!>'  .25  .25  .25  .25  .26  .25  .25  .25,  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25,  .25  2.00  2.00  2nd.  .25  .25  .25  .50  ; .2 5  .50  " .50  .25 =  .    .50  .25.  .25  ' .50  2.00  by  16. lDuchess apple tree for best display of pansies.  17. lsnowball shrub for best collection of dahlias.  18. 1 purple lilac for best display of sweet peas. .  19. 1  dyaletea for best collection oi asters.  DIVISION J.  1. Pair of socks or stockings  ....?!.00 $. .50  2. Man's working shirt  ���������........     .75 ..50  3. Ladies corset cover    1.00 .50  4. Ladies'   night  dress     1.00 .50  5. Ladies' work dress     1-00 .50  6. Bed spread  (full size)     1.00 .50  7. Patchwork quilt in silk       1.00 .50  8. Patchwork quilt in wool    1.00 .50  9. Patchwork  quilt in cotton     1.00 .50  10. Dresser   scarf    50* .25  11. Best embroidered sheet and piliow  slips to match    2.00 1.00  12. Child's dress  , 75 .50  13. Work   apron    50 .25  14. Fancy apron   75 .50  15. Sofa pillow top in crochet or em-'  broidery      1-00 .50  16. Ladies' plain shirt waists ...n 7 5 ���������  .50  17. Set of dining table mats  75 .50  18.'Hand-made  handkerchief    75 .50  19. Collection of tatting   1.50 1.00  20. White centre-piece  75 .50  21. Colored   centre-piece :    .7 5 .50  22. Collection of corchet    1.50. 1.00  23. Hardanger   embroidery    75 .50  24. Handmade live-o'clock tea cloth ....  1.00 .50  25.'Knitting  in cotton     1.00 .50  26. Boudoir cap or bonnet  , 75 .50  27. Pair embroidered guest towels 75 .50  28. Pin   cushion    75 .50  29. Infant's crocheted jacket & bpotees  1.00 . --.25 ���������  30. Hand-painting on silk or velvet ....  1.00 .50  31. Best bedroom slippers  '.   1.00 , .50  32. Best white tray cloth  75 .50  DIVISION   L  -Children's   Competition  Class 1st.  1.  Penmanship,  12  to  16 years   ?  .50  Penmanship, under 12  50  Handwriting,   pencil,- 9   years   and  under    <>0  Map drawing, Europe 12 to 16 yrs    .50  Map drawing (B. C.) under 12 yrs.  Drawing from design or object.. 12  to   16  years     .  Drawing from    design    or    obic-ct,  under    12   years    ' ....  The drawing in 6 and 7 to bo ���������.���������Mrtlficd by the  teacher as the work of the pupil during a  30-minute  period alotted  to drawing.  Collection of Canadian  wild  flowers    1  correctly   named -. ���������--  1.00       .50  2.  3.  6.  .50  .50  .50  2nd.  $  .25  .25  ..25  .2 5  .25  .25  .2 5  9.  Collection of native ferns  .0  0  School  Gardens Exhibits  Two carrots, pupil any age  ...    .50  Two parsnips,  pupil any age      -50  Two  cabbages,   pupil any  age 5 0  Two beets, pupil any age      -50  Best collection, flowers and vegetables, open to any . ungraded  school or any division: in a graded  school ,  3.00  Domestic Science  Best loaf of  bread,  open to  high  or public school pupil     1-00  Best collection of cookies and small  cakes, open to    high    or    public  school  pupils   , - -���������  1-00  Best exhibit of four articles of  plain needlework by high school  pupil   r��������� 1>0������  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  2.00  .5 0 .  .50  .50      I  4. .Best, exhibit of four articles plain  'needlework,' public, school   pupil.. 1.00      .5 0  ���������;   5.  Best exhibit of 6 buttonholes; work'  ,.   ed on cotton cloth',, open to. grades  '   up to.and including Junior IV..... 1.00      .50  .Manual  Training:  1. Exhibit of.Manual Training work  by high school o"a entrance pupil.. "1.00       .50  2. Exhibit of  Manual  Training work  by pupil- of lower grdaes  1.00       .50  .3." Exhibit of' Manual  Training work  ' I'oultrj���������Class A.  Iliirrcd Rocks  .   Birds hatched -frcru stock or from eggs owned  by the exhibitor.    Pupil any age.  Class 1st   ,2nd    3dr  1. Cock   I...:..'...'. 50 .30 ,.20  2. Hen     ^0, .30 .20  3. Cockerel  50 .30 .20  4. Pullet ....'. : '��������� 50 ,30 .20  5. Pen   :    .75:. .50 .2;)  ��������� '   White Wyandottes  6. Cock    - 50     .30     .20'  ��������� . 7.   Hen   ,  '   .50     .30 ,  .20  8*.  Cockerel    ........ ������3������ 50    .30    .20  9.  Pullet   .' 50     .30  , .20  10. Pen    ���������..." -     -75     .������0     2o  White Leghorn  11. Cock   .- 50 .30 .20  12. Hen    ���������. 50 .30 .20  13. .Cockerel   50 .30 .20  ��������� 14.   Pullet 5.0     .30     .2.0  .is. pen :...: : 75   .50   .20  Canadian Bankers'   Competition  For Boys and Girls under 17  1. Best calf, purebred or grade (grade bull calves  must-not be shown.)  '     1st,  $5;   2nd,  $4;   3rd,  $3;   4th,  $2;   5th,  $1.  0th, Ribbon.'  2;��������� Best two pigs, bacon type,.pure bred or grade;  (grade boar,pigs must not be shown:)  -1st,- $5;  2nd, $4;   3rd,  $3; ,4th,  $2;   5th,  $1;  6th, Ribbon.  ��������� For -full  paiuculars regarding this  competition  apply  to Mr.  W.  H.  Mathcwson  of  the  Canadian Bank of.Commerce.  .   , Contest   in. Physical   Culture  Contest   in   Physical   Drill,   open   to   teams . of  not les3 than 8 or more than 20 scholars from. an,y  ungraded  school  or  from, any  room   in  a   graded  ..'school:- 1st, $3.00,  2nd, $2.00.  SPORTS  It is-hoped that the-following will become annual events:  1.   100 yards dash:   1st, Goods to value of $5.00  2nd, Goods to value of $3.00  2   Quarter mile race:. 1st, Goods to value of $5.00  2nd,. Goods to value of $3.00  '   3.  One mile race 1st, Goods to value of $5.00  2nd, Goods to value of $3.00,  An entry of  2,:  cents' will  be charged .and  the  entTy  money will be  divided  between winners as  follows:   75 per cent, to 1st;  25 percent, to 2nd.  Entries  to  be  in   the  hands  of  the  society   by  September 15th.  4.  Tug of war:   1st,  $15.00  and'75  per  cent  of  entry money; .2nd, $5.00 and 25 per cent, of  entry money, open to teams of five men, entry  money $1.25..  (Other races and contest to be announced later)  Boys' Bicycle race 1st, Goods valued at $3.00  2nd, Goods valued at $2.00  Prizes donated  by Lawrence &  Bishop.  List  of  Contributors  to  Special   Prize   List  CASH  Hon.   John  Oliver         $20.00  King-Beach  Manufacturing  Co        10.00  C.  T. Mynors        Jjj-jjjj  Bankers'   Association           30.ou  M.  DesBrisay &  Co  5.00  W. P. & R. E. Mandale  ,  5.00  J.  Plumiri.lge & .Sons  :  5.00  J.   A.  Tuppcr  ..  5.00  Miss   Lambarcie           y^'1  J. A.. Catherwood   fj-������������  O.  Paton     .   - ������"  Lane   Bros. ' r  ������f  C.  McDiarmid   *���������"  J. B. Miller  , :  2-&0  W.  T. Abbott   2.00  A.   Stephen   -  2.00  C.   lllingworth  ���������������"������  Fraser & Dyer  , *       . 2.00  Mclntyre &, Hunter   2-0U  R-  C.  Boyes          2-f  H.  Alanson   ������.t>u  S.   H.   Wilson    :- 2--5 0  GOODS  Bush & Keeves       $10.00  Lawrence   &   Bishop     5.00  F;   Bannister    - 1-:,������  Empress Mfg. Co 5 lbs Tea  Bank of Commerce  -Bronze Medal  Merchants  Bank   Silver  Cup  Chas. Robinson  r  Silver Cup  S.   H.   Crosby            f-jjj  Vancouver Milling Co  t)-T)0  SPECIALS  Class A.���������Special of $4.00 b.y Mr. C. T. Mynors ,  for  best team, any  weight.  Class B. 1. Robinson Challenge Cup, presented  by Mr. Chas. Robinson for best dairy cow, any  breed. Cup to be won three times before becoming property  of  the winner.  A cash special of $10.00 is added this year by  the   association.  2. Merchants Bank Cup for the best two females,  any breed���������a cow and one of her daughters. To  bo won twice, not necessarily ,in succession.  3. Special of $2.00 by Mr .C.'T. Mynors for best  bull, any breed.  4. Special of $2.00 for best heifer calf.  5. Bronze medal from the Bank of Commerce to  the exhibitor taking most prizes in Fruit <and  Vegetables.  6:. Specials by Empress Mfg. Co.: 1st, Best exhibit  of 20 pickling cucumbers:  3 lbs. Empress Tea.  2nd,   Best', three  pickling  cauliflower:   2   lbs  Empress Tea.  7. Special $2.50 in goods by S. I-I. Crosby for  most prizes in Class  J.���������Ladles' Work.  8. Special $2.50 by Mr. S. Wilson for best col  lection of House Plants.  9. Special, Vancouver Milling Co., for most prizes  in Domestic Produce.  TELE  In the days that are ahead, the enterprising business man will  no doubt have his air machine. .'When he.wants to interview an  out-of-town customer,-a few minutes.' glide through the air will  bring him and his man together. ���������  Meantime, he has to be contentwith something short of that.-���������  He finds the most etlicient substitute in the Long Distance Telephone.  This'brings him voice-to-voicc with his customer, and gives all that  is necessary of the personal touch.  BRITISH "COLUMBIA TELEPHONE Co.  Limited  LI,OYI> GFOKGU'K MIKJM  r-'Ui'UltKS   INIHOATM   KU'IN  There is an enormous trade balance against the United Kingdom of  ������800,000,000,, which thcaleus to in-  c. i case.  lYnsiom-s cost, the government  ���������:1 'i0.000.000 yyarl.v.  One way of meeting the increase in  expenditure was to increase production, but the output is less in everything  except .agriculture.  The Premier declared that if the  country continues in " the way in  which it is going, the adverse trade  balance would reach ������1,000,000,000  compared to ������1.50,000,0000 before  the .war.  "We can not prosper," Mr. Lloyd  George said, "we can not even exist  without recovering and maintaining  our international trade. We must  bring up the trade balance, adding  to our exports and lessening our imports.  - "We have advanced some ������4,000,-  0 00,000 to the world, from which wc  are getting soriiething like ������200,000,-  ���������000 yearly in interest. W ehave sold  ������1,000,000,000 of foreign securities  to pay for war material for ourselves  ���������and "our allies. We have borrowed  ������1,200,000,000 from the United  States and Canada fpr the same purposes. Our allies including Russia,  owe us- ������1,8 00,000,000..  "At the present moment our adverse t rade balance is ������S00,000,000;  "We must bridge that chasm or at  the bottom of.it is ruin. We are  building a temporary bridge by borrowing not only through state borrowing but through borrowing for  raw material, food and so forth. That  will only add to the catastrophe.  "In every dihrection we are spending more. We are earning less. We-  are consuming more Tind we are producing less. Those are facts. It can  not last. "  He said that the outlook was  indeed   dark,   unless    the    conditions-  which existed were unchanged.      The  Premier continued:-  "In America the wages are higher  hours of labor are no longer, and.the  labor cost in proportion to the articles.produced is less. This being the  ct.se.competition is impossible and no  tariff will remedy  this."  After pointing out that the pound  at present was worth'in the United  States only 17 1-2 shillings, the Premier  said:  "We will never improve matters  unices   we   increase   production."  J. H. JONES  Funeral Dire eta ���������  YGENT   FOR, HEADSTONES  Phone Connection. Mission City  TtiBmfiTrirraiqiOTnmuii^^^^  L DASH WOOD-JONES  BARRISTER  and   SOLICITOR  809 Rogers Bldg. Vancouver  - Counsel, J. Milton Price.  Owing to the confusion in. mail  orders of this.,medicine we are advancing the-price from $5.20 to $5.50  and paying all charges. This will  give our many customers - quicker  service.  Sole  Manufacturers  MRS. GEO. S. ALMAS  524 4th Avenue,  North, Saskutooon  putation for eggs nd poultry; stand-  rdizing poultry products .-nd the establishment of a fair and just marketing system.  The all important feed question  and other such, problems, as .transportation and educational- propaganda will receive attention at the forthcoming gathering.  Tlie central board of dierctors for  1910 are as follows: President, M.  H. Ruttledge, ,Sardis, B. C; vice-  president, J. A. Thurston, Central  Park, B. C; secretary, L.. Harvey,  Langley Prairie, B. C; A. H. Henderson, Hammond, B. C; G. W. Dean  Ganges, B. C; W. H.. Mahon, Duncan, B. C; Rev. C. McDiarmid, Mission. B. C; C. P. Metcalfe, Hammond  B. C.; F. H. -Mileson, Chilliwack, B.  C;  Win. Tozer, Milner, B. C.  SPEEDING AUTOS REALLY  COSTS MORE  MONEY  POULTRYMEX TO  MEET  AT  FAIR  Coming to the conclusion that cooperation spells success in regard to  the poultry industry in British Columbia, arrangements are being made  for a meeting of the Poultrymen's-  Union of B. C. to be held at Queen's  Park, New Westminster, next month  in connection with the Provincial  ���������Imbibition. This organization came  into being on December 23rd 1918,  its object looking to the securing for  British   Columbia  an   unexcelled   re-  SAYS LEMON JUICE  WILL REMOVE FRECKLES  Girls!   Make this cheap beauty lotion  to clear and whiten your skin.  Squeeze the juice of two lemons into  a bottlo containing three ounces of  orchard white, shake"well,, and you have  a quarter pint of tho beBt freckle and  tan lotion, and complexion beautifier, at  very, very gmall cost.  Your grocer has the lemons and any  drug store or toilet counter will supply  three ounces oi" orchard white for, a few  cents. Massage this sweetly fragrant  lotion into the face, neck, arms and  hands each day and see how freckles'and  blemishes disappear and how clear, eoft  and white the skin bMome&_ Yea������,*.'!<)  is harmless.,  Speed cost money when you drive  an automobile, as shown in a series  of interesting fuel consumption tests  just completed.  Starting at fifteen miles an hour  on a boulevard which .was comparatively level and driving back and  forth over a five-mile course, it was  found that the car would run 29.8  miles to a gllon of fuel. ' When the  speed was increased to twenty-miles  per hour the gallon would take the  car 27 miles only. At 2,5 miles an  , hour the distance was shortened to  1 20.8 miles for each gallon, while at  30 miles an hour 25 miles per gallon  was the average obtained.  It was interesting to note during  the tesis that when the car was op-  crated at 15 and 20 mile speeds most  other cars on the boulevard passed  the test car, but at 25 miles an hour  she held her own with the traffic and  at 30 miles passed evey era .on, the  road.  This would indicate that the public is accustomed to travel in the  cities on good thoroughfares, where  the traffic is not dense, at 25 miles  per hour, which rate.is usually permissible, ..but that few of the average drivers run close to the 30 mile  mark on their speedometers.  FALL FAIRS  Agassi.z - ----- Sept 4th  Abbotsford  -- Sept. 17th  Mission,  Sept.  17th and 18th  Matsqui  Sept. 18th and. 19th  Maple Ridge   Sept 23 and 24 t^  THE ABBOTSFORD POST  PAGE THR^S  Mission)'City Agricultural  and Arts Association  PRIZE LIST  DIVISION, A.���������Draught Horses  ���������: Passes, will, be: granted to necessary help in Divisions A, B7 C, D.  Divisions A. B.C. D. shall be open only to members of the. Society.  Entry Fee,; Division A, and B. shall bo 25 cents  each entry.  Class      '      ' .      '     ,                                    1st. ' 2nd.  1. Stallion    , .....$5.00 $3.00  2. Brood mare, with foal at foot   5.00 3.00  3. Two-year-old   Colt   '.   3.00 2.00  .   4. OneJyear-old Colt  3.00 2.00  5. Sucking  Foal    ���������'. , ' 3.00    2.00  6. Best Team harnessed to wagon ....  5.00    3.00  Agricultural Horses  (between 1,200 and J,400 lbs.)  7. Stallion    $5.00  $3.f0  8.. Brood mare, with foal at foot .........  5.00     3.O0  9. Two-year-old   Colt    3.00    2.00  10. One-year-old  Colt  7  3.00 2.00  1.1. Sucking Colt  3.00 2.00  12. Team harnessed  to wagon ....,  5.00 3.00  13. Single horse or maro, in harness to  democrat    ,..'   5.00     3.00  General Purpose (under .1,200 lbs.)  14. Team  harnessed  to wagon ....: $5.00. $3.00  .15. Single horse or mare in harness.....  5.00.    3.00  DRIVING  16. Stallion    $5.00 $3 00  17. Brood mare, with foal at foot   5.00 3.00  18. Two-year-old colt ..: '..'  3.00 2.00  19. One-year-old  colt   3.00 2.00  20. Team in harness to rig   5.00 3.00  21. Single horse in harness to buggy.... 3.00 2.00  22. Saddle horse (under saddle)    3.00 2.00  23. Sucking colt   3.00 2.00  ' 24. Saddle pony under 14 hands   3.00 2.00  DIVISION B.  Cattle���������Shorthorn  All pure bred animals must be registered.. Exhibitors must hand in registered pedigree to- the  Judges, when they are examining the stock.  1. Bull, three years old and upwards..$4.00  $3.00  2. Bull, two years old  :-.. 3.00    2.00  3. Bull,  one  year  old     3.00     2.00  4. Cow, any age .,   3.00 ,  2.00  5. Heifer, two. years old    3.00    2.00  6. Heifer, one year old  ':.. .3.00    2.00  7. Calf    :   2.00    1.00  Shorthorn���������^rade  8. Cow,   any  age    7 :..!..$3.00. $2.00  9. Heifer, two years old    3.00    2.00  10. Heifer, one year old  -3.00    2.01)  11. Calf  ,...+. i :��������������������������� 2.00     1.00  Holstein  12. Bull, three years and .upwards  $4.00  $3.0,0  1.3. Bull, two-years old  r���������  3.00    2.00  14. Bull,  one  year old   3.00-2.00  15. Cow, any age ...,   3.00    2.00  1.6. Heifer, two years old    3:00    2.00  17.. Heifer, one year old  _..-. .3.00    2.00  18. Calf   2.00     1.00  Holstein���������Grade  19. Cow, any age $3.00: $2.00  20. Heifer, two" years old   3.00 -  2.00  21. Heifer, one year old    3.00     2 00  22. Calf    - ������������������   2.00     1.00  , Jersey  23. Bull,  three  years and  upwards....$4.00 $3.00  2 4. Bull, two years old  3.00 2.00  25. Bull, one year old  3.00 2.00  26. Cow, any age  .".3.00 2.00  27. Heifer, two years old -3.00 2.00  28. Heifer, one year old ^........ 3.00 2.00  29. Calf  -   2.00 1.00  Jersey���������Grade  30. Cow, any age  $3.00 $2.00,  31. Heifer,- two-years old  - 3.00 2.00  32. Heifer, one year.ol*  3.00 2.00  33. Calf   , ,   2.00 1.00  DIVISION C���������Sheep.  Entry Fee of .ten cents   single Entry, and  . twenty-five cents for. pens  1. Ram, two shears and over  $2.00 $1.00  2. Ewe, .two shears and over ....r .". 2.00 l.M)  3. Ram, shearling   2.00 1.0ft  4. Ewe, shearling  -,   2.00 1 00  5. Ram   Iamb      1-0J -���������  6. Ewe   lamb   ...^  1-00 -f  7. Three ewes  (pen)    3.00 2.00  8. Three ewe lambs  (pen)    2.00 l.OO  DIVISION D.  Pigs���������Berkshire and Grade  Entry fee ten cents, each single entry  Class l3t-    2n(l"  1. "Boar, any age , $2.00 $1.00  2. Sow, any age    *���������������"    *���������������"  3. Sow and litter ,  2.00    l.OO  4. Spring pig, eight months   *���������"������    A-uu  Yorkshire and Grade  5. Boar,  any "age  :.... : ,.;IJ.OO ll.OO  6. Sow,  any. age , 52.00 ?i.uu.  7. Sow, and litter -  2.00 l.OO  8. Spring'pig, eight months  &-W 1-uu  Any Other Breed  Class lst'    2nd'  9. Boar, any age  :���������:..- -���������^g.OO $1.00  10. Sow, any age ������ 2.00 J.uj  11. Sow and  litter   2.00 1.00  12. Spring pig, eight months 2.00 i.uu  13. Store hog, (any breed)  -  *-" lA)yj  DIVISION E.���������Poultry  Rules for Division E. ���������  All entries to be made on forms as supplied by  the Association. ,  An entry fee of ten cents for single entries, and  twenty-five cents on pens will be charged, and  must accompany entries in all cases. Pens to  consist of one male and three females ia any one  variety     Birds entered singly may compete as pecs  All birds to be cooped and in place on tho flrat  morning of the show, and a manager'will be appointed to look after the birds, whose duty it m11  be to'feed and water and take full chargo of the  3 'oultry" Department.  Coops will be furnished for all poultry.'  Class    . . ' *-at.  ��������� 1. Turkey,  cock, any variety  .$1.00  Turkey, hen, any variety  1.00  Goose, male, any variety ,  1.00  Goose, female, any variety   ,1.00  Ducks, pair,, Indian Runners   1.00  Ducks, $air, Pekins  - 1.  1.00  Plymouth Rock (Barred)  Cock '. -.:....:...:$1 30  Hen    :1'; '. : :   l-'JO  Cockerel -, _  i-00.  Pullet   ,...:       i-00  Breeding Pen   2.00  .'Plymouth Rocks (Any other variety)  Cock  --, S1-00  Hen :���������-'���������  1J0  Cockerel    - .--'���������-  1-00  Pullet   ... I..- :  200  Pen ��������� - ,  2.00  Wyandotte  (white)  Cock - - 51.00  Hen   10������  Cockerel   .- *-0  Pullet    3-00  2.  3.  4.  5.  ���������6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.'  13.  14.  15.  .16.  2nd.  \ :5 0  .50'  .5 0  .50  .50  .50  .no  .50  .50  .50  ..'���������0  .SO  .f0  'Klj  $  :->!  00  00  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.  Pen  .00  22.  23.  24.  25.  26.  27.  28.  29.  30.  31.  >  Wyandotte (Any other variety)  Cock   J....: ��������� $L0������  Hen   : :...-: -.  \\\  Cockerel    X-Q0  Pullet >���������  1-22  Pen  : ,     .'..-'���������- 2.00  Rhode Island Reds  Cock    '.  '- ' $1-00  Hen   100  Cockerel  ....,...���������;  i-00  Pullet   ::     ������������������--��������� ������������������-. 1-00.  Pen  ���������-���������  ...���������..���������....���������..-���������..- 2.00  Orpington (any variety)  $  Class  32.  33.  34.  35.  lst.  Cock  , .-.--��������� $100  Hen    Cockerel  Pxillet  1.00  1.  1  36. Pen :  2  Leghorns  (white)  Cock     Hen    Cockerel  00  00  00  h   .f-0  .5 0  ..50  .50  1 00  i  50  .50  .50  .50  1.00  $:.50  .50  .50  .50  1.00  2nd.  $   .50  ' .50  .50  .53  1.00  37.  38.  39.  '40.  41.  ...$1.00  ...$1.00  _ __ ... i:oo  Pullet" V. '--  1-00  .50  .50  .50  .50  Pen  2.00    .1.00  42.  43.  44.  45.  46.  47.  48.  49.  50;-  51..  52.  .53.  54.  55.  56.  57.  53.  59.  60.  61.  62.  63.  64.  65.  Leghorn  (any other variety)  cock :.._..: --'V���������  $  Hen  00  00  Cockerel    J-  Pullet ,..iv..., : '��������� ���������  H���������  Pen  2.00  Minorcas (black or white)  Cock   -   Cockerel -. - }���������<}"    1.00  $1.00  1.00  $  Pullet  ...-'. -- ���������   Pen  , -   Games (any variety)  \^ociv   .......'...........   .....-..........-.*.������������������  Hen  -..-.   Cockerel    ;   ���������Pullet    ������   Pen - r --  Any Other Variety (heavy class)  rj.ock- : ?l-00  -���������������������   : :    i.oo  Hen  , ���������-- n  Cockerel    J-JJ  .50  .50  ..50  .50  1 00  .50  .50  .50  .50  -2.00     1.00  ..$1.00  .. 1.00  .. 1-00  .. 1-00  ...  2.00  $  .50  .50  ;50  .50  1.00  $  Pullet   t -   Pen    Any Other Variety  (light class)  Cock    Hen  .' - '������������������---  Cockerel     Pullet - ,.--   2.00  66. Pen  $1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00  2.00  Bantams  67.  ���������68.  69.  70.  71.  72.  73.  Cock  ....������������������-  Hen  ,..  Cockerel  ..  Pullet     Pen   ���������Best-Buck  Best-'Doe .  Belgian Hares  '   Flemish Giants  .$1.00  . 1.00  .1.00  . 1.00  . 2.00  .$1.00  .  1.00  50  .50  .50  .50  1.00  ; .50  .50  .50  .50  1.00  i  ; .50  .50  .50  50  1.00  $   .50  .50  74".--Beat Buck %\\V W  75.!Best<-Doe .- -���������-.- 100 '50  :   New Zealand Reds  7 6. = Best Buck,., ~- S1'00  * '50  77. Best Doe    78.- Pigeons ���������*    -���������   79.: Any other variety of boy s pet   80.''Onevdozeri .eggs' (white)-    81.' One;dozen.eggs (brown)   -���������- --  82.: Song Birds  ���������   83. Any other variety pot bird ....,   84.- Dressed -Poultry  ...---  Domestic Produce  "������  Entry Fee 10 cents  Butter," three one-pound bricks ....$  Butter, one teri-pound crcok..._   Cheese  -  :   Bread, risin    Bread, white l. - ��������� '-  Bread,'brown   Buns, one dozen, bread    Buns, one dozen, fancy  ������������������   Collection of jams, raspberry  strawberry'and plum- ��������� --  Collection of jellies, black currant  red currant and apple -.. ......-----  Collection of .bottled fruit, fivo  varieties ......-....'.-������������������ ".- ;���������  Apple  pie ...-b-.������������������--���������������������������....������������������ --���������-���������  Layer- cake  I. ���������  Fruit  cake   ....-!.....���������������������������������������������������������������������������������-������������������-���������-  Pb'und   cake   ..-��������� '"il   Collection of yejgetbles, peas, beans  and corn   ^.............���������������������������.���������-���������������������������   Tomato ketchup  ���������   Cured bacon - ��������� ������������������*  Cured ham -���������-   Honey extract, 5 jars ���������������������������'-.  Honey In-comb, 5' sections   Honey in frame, 1 frame ������������������������������������������;-������������������  Exhibit of i jams, jellies, bottled  fruits; canned vegetables, one case  of each,- but number land varieties  unlimited: ���������������������������--   ���������������������������r���������  Exhibit of pickle, number of-varieties unlimited  -........--���������  Best plate of butter put up ior  table use  * v n   1:  2:  3.  4.  5.  6:  7.:  8;  9.:  i  10.  11-  12.  13.  ���������14.  15.  16.  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.  22.  23.  .24.  25.  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  50  1.00  ���������   .50  1.00  .50  2.00  $1.00  2.00  1.00  2.00  1.00  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  1.00  .50  .00  .4.00  3.00  2.00  2.00  1.00  1.  2.  , 3.  4,  5.  6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.  15.  1.6.  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.'  22.  23.  24.  2 5.  ���������2?.  f> ���������'  4  I .  2s;  2D.  .0 r\  UUl  31.  32.  33.  34.  35.  36.  37.  38.  39.  ���������40.  41.  42.  43.  44.  45.  46.  .47.  48.  49.  50'.  51.  52.  53.  54.  55.  56.  57.  58.  59.  .60.  61.  62.  63.  64;  65.  66.  67.  68.  69.  70.  71.  72:  73.  74.  75.  76.  77.  78.  79.  80.  81.  82.  83.  84.  1.  2.  3.  1.  2.  3.  4.  0.  6.  7.  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.  15.  16.  17.  18.  1.9.  20.  21.  22.  23.  24.  25.  26.  27.  28.  29.  30.  31,  32,  33,  ���������34.  35,  36  37  ��������� DIVISION G.���������Table Vegetables  Entry, Five Cents  Lettuce, two heads'..... ~.. $  .50  !  Radishes,   twelve ��������� '.... .' $  .50  :  Cucumbers,  two   .....' 50  Cucumbers, twelve, dill     ..50  Cucunibers,  twenty,   pickling   50  Tomatoes,   five    '. 50-.  Beans, scarlet runner, twelve pods .50  Beans, bush wax. podded, 15 pods .50  Beans, bush green podded 15 pods    .50  Peas, green in pod, fifteen  50  Corn, table, white five ..:.-. 50  Corn, table, yellow, five  5 0  Onions,   red   five 50  Onions, white, five  50  Onions, yellow, five 50 r  Onions,  brown, five 50  Onions, pickling, 1 quart  50 ,  Leeks,  live   - ,     50  Carrots, long, five  -......��������� 50  Carrots,' intermediate, five ...Y.......    .50 ,  Carrots,   short   five    .'.-    -50  Beets, half long,  five ��������� 50  Beets, Globe, five ���������    -50 .  Prrrnlps,   five   '...-.. 50  Turiiips, table Swedes, three  :    -50  Turnips, lalbe any other variety, 3    .50  Celery, (hrep.  '���������-'   -50-  Cabbage; pointed, two      .50  Cabbage, flat, two   50  -Cabbage, Savoy,  two   50  Cabbage, red two  r 50  Kale, S'cotch curled, two  ������0  Brussel Sprouts, two stalks  50  Cauliflower, two  7���������  . -5������  Muskmelons,  two   : 5 0  Citron, two  , 50  Squash,  scalloped,  two     -50  Squash, any other variety, summer    .50  Squash,  Hubbard,  two 50  Vegetable   Marrow,   two     .50  Pumpkin, sugar, two .:....., 50  Pumpkin, Mammouth, two '  .50  Rhubarb,   twelve    5 0  Herbs, collection correctly named.. .50  Best display garden  produce from  above classes    5.00  Field Produce  Wheat, One bushel -. $1.00  .Barley,  one bushel      1.00.  Oats, white,  one bushel   1-00  Peas, blue, one bushel   1-00  Peas, white,  one bushel     1-00  Beans, white, one quart ,   1-00  Beans, any other variety, one quart 1.00  Oats, two sheaves  1-00  Wheat, two sheaves  - "1-00  Barley, two sheaves    1-00  Ensilage corn, six stalks   1-00  Kale thousand headed, two stalks...  1.00  Mangold  Wurtzels,   Globe,  5      1.00  ���������Mangold Wurtzels, long red, 5    1.00  Beets,   sugar,   5    1���������v   I-00  Carrots, white,  5     1-00  Carrots,   red,   5   ...,   I-00  Turnips, Swede, 5    I-00  Turnips, any other variety, 5  '..  1.00-'  Corn,   5    "L-00  Potatoes, Early Rose, 15 lbs  '1.00  Potatoes, Lightning Express, 15 lbs  1.00  Potatoes, Irish Cobbles, 15 lbs   1.00  Potatoes, Beauty of Hebron, 15 lbs. 1.00  Potatoes, Early Moonlight, 15 lbs..  1.00  Potatoes, Carman, 15 lbs   1-00  Potatoes, Money Maker, 15 lbs   1.00  Potatoes, Gold Coin,  15  lbs. :  1.00  Potatoes, Dakota Red, 15 lbs   1.00  Potatoes, Netted Gem, 15 lbs   1.00  Any other variety of white, 15 lbs. 1.00  Potatoes Any other variety, 15 lbs. 1.00  Collection, early   variety   correctly   .  ' named, 6 each   1-00  Collection   late   variety     correctly  named,   6  each  ,       1-Q0  Best display of field produce   5.00  Potaoes, any variety, one sack   5.00  Tomatoes,  20  lbs.,   '. ,��������� 2.00  Onions, one sack, 50 lbs    3.00  Special by Mr. E. Osborne, best ex-   ���������  hibit potatoes grown    from    seed  given to members of W. 1   3.00  SEEDS  Collection  of   Garden  Seeds,     not  less than two ounces of each  ....$1.00  Collection of Field Vegetable Seeds  not less than  one pound     1.00  Collection of Flower Seeds    1.00  DIVISION H. Fruit���������Apples  Entry, Five Cents  Gravenstein, four  $ -50  Duchess of Oldenburg, four  o0  Alexander,  four    50  .Wealthy, four ������"  Glori Mundi, four  ^  Tolman Sweet, four  50  Plate of any other kind.of Fall.four    .oO  Golden Russet, four  ������jj  Roxbury Russet, four  ,     .50  Bldwin, four  ������������  Wolf River, four  f ������"  Northern Spy, four  , 50  King of Tompkins,  four  2j  Ben Davis, four  21  Greenings,   four   , 2���������  Hubbartson Nonsuch, four  =j0  Canada Rcinette, four  ^0  Twenty-ounce Pippin, four f>0  Orenko,   four    ������������������������������������ -...������������������    -^  Ontario,   four ��������� ������"  Bismark,   four ���������     -���������  Cox's Orange Pippin, four     ...&u  Winter Banana, four     -00  Jonathan,  four ������������������ -������������������ jjjj  Mcintosh Red, four ������"  Gano,   four ���������  -.���������?"  Black Ben Davis, four ������u  Delicious,  four ���������>���������-    -������v  Grimes Golden, four ������������������--    ���������������"  , Oregon, red, winter, four     -^  .Any other variety of winter, four.,    .ou  ! Hyslop  crab,   plate        ������������  Transcendant crab, plate ���������  Any other variety of crab, dozen ....    .00  .Collection of apple, correctly nam-  ed, five of each variety   ������*.uu  Pears  . Bonne Louise de Jersey, four      .50  . Bartlett,  four ���������-- oU  (Continued on Page Fcur)  .25  .'25  .25  .25  .25 ,  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  2?  ��������� 25  .25  .25  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  - .50  . .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  ..50  .50  .50  ..'.50  ' ���������.50  '- .50  .50  :   .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  .50  i  .50  .50  3.00  1.00  2.00  2.00  $  .50  .50  .50  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .2 5  .25  .2 5  .25  .25  .25  ' ,25  .25  2.00  .25  .25 PAGE SIX  f BE  ABBOTSFORt) POST,  ABfeOTSPOBD, B.  &  -N  r���������vmaaaaoiitasstiaaBtBBtaaaaaitcaiaiBasaai  BZS08B9EBSB  n^njfftiartf durn iii-rtfT^**1*'^''  THAN, THE BEEF, PORK, VEAL and other Fresh Meats  Purchased from' t  WHITE & CARMICHAEL  Successors to C. Sumner'  GIVE US A TRIAL FOR A MONTH AND BE CONVINCED  B.   C.   Phone '4 1.  Farmers'  Phone 1 900  License No. !M2������!!S  TAYLOI  , .'  (Late. Henderson & Taylor)  CIVIL ENGINEERS & SURVMYORR  Box  II. AbbotslWl, IJ. C. Phone 3.1 X  Dr.G.A.Pollard  Abbotsford, B.C.  .ILlSt  should  aBagWgagtB3MW53ICBaBSil  Your   Buildings   against   Fire.   ��������� Because   rebuilding   costs  cent  more  than  a  few  years  ago.    Yet   Insurance-rates  have  noi  increased.  //. 0. HARTLEY, Abbotsford, B. C.  Keprrseating  Hoard  Companies  Only  SAYS  BlilTISH   COLUMBIA  ItOA5>y NOT  UP TO YiVCU  After a motor tour of over 10,-  000 miles extending to the southwestern portion of the United States,  avid which required nearly a year to  complete, J. V.. llowson, of Medicine  Hat, arrived in Vancouver last wocK  strongly convinced that the city of  Vancouver' has all the possibilities  of  any   city  on   the  Pacilic  coast.  "But do something to bring the  tourists to your city," said Mr. How-  son to a Sun reporter. "Vancouver  ��������� has everything except good roads.  Tliis is the day of the automobile  and if this city had good roads extending into its hills, winding their  way to her famous fishing resorts  and connecting with the smooth  highways to the south, no greater  asset is possible for any cit.y."  IS3E  "The   trip,  glorious  o Harrison Lake was  One of the grandest trips  I ever made, as far,as scenery was  concerned, but 1 will never go again  until the roads are put in a fit condition to motor over'. Talking a-  bouf roads, in all the 3 0,000 miles  V have travelled I have never conic  across- a worse stretch of road than  that portion between Blaine and  New Westminster. '   ,  "Spend a little money and share  your beautiful heritage of natural  beauty with the world. If you encourage tourists your initial investment in good roads, togther with  munificent interest, will be returned  to you.  "It is nothing for 50,000 to 100,-  0 00 automobiles to visit California  in a year, and none of .these cars  leve less than $5 0 in a., city -where  they make their headquarters. it  Vancouver had l'OO.OOO cars making  430 HASTINGS Street, \V\  . ,(Ovcr C.l'.K.  Tick.  &  Tel.  OMcos)  VANCOUVER - B.C.  it i.-s iihvnys wi'Il to write or phone  for  iippoinlnu'iits  this city their headquarers'for a few  wcekfi and running out on fishing  trips into the mountains, and at the  very least each car left $50 cash in  the city it would mean $5,000,000  a year. Now, how could you earn  money easier than that? Many of (ho  cars leave several hundred dollars  each if you make it pleasant for  thorn.  "This wonderful country is capable of enormous tourist development, but you have got to get flic  monied interests of the country to  release their hold and let. a lit.llc of  Iho money flow into channels where  it. will improve'the country and bring  people in who also have money. Thf  banks have to open up and decide on  development loans in the west, where  the question is vital. Those matters should not be dicided in the  casl, whore all the interests of 'the  directors is centred on the Atlantic  seaboard or in Ontario.  "These banks want deposits in the  west.; let, them give a little in return  and help the country along. If they  don't, do that they will have to inaugurate a policy whereby we get. an  influx of monied Americans from'a-  crcss the line who know how to Ae-  velop a country and put some 'pep'  into ti.'J,  Lieut. Frank Machell and bride- returned last Thursday from overseas  and are staying with" Mr. MacheM's  parents at Matsqui.  ^iw^^,?^ *:���������*<��������� ���������:=:������������������-.���������:  l?*;^.-'^'-*.':''   v������  "   ['~~   lent roads to Spokane, or' eastwards  through .the Crow's Nest ������ass, and  Lack to" Calgary. The Good Roads,  Association of Alberta is enthusiastic  over The prospect a.s this will mean  the iv.ivent of many tourists from all  also  Col-  rac-  the  for  ���������rming. Tins vauey is served  by the Kcoteoay Central Railway, a  reoerily constructed branch of the  Canadian Pacilic.  reso  ies  waters  R  spectacular    beauty,      forming     part a  of    the    Great    Divide.      This    rid-sre  ������  Is   penetrated   by   two   comparatively [.  easy passes, the S!iti'>son, and the Ver- C,r,  million   which lead into  the  Valley of l������f  the Kcotcuay River, a region abound- fc|  {���������fig in   -arae on  accoumt of its  Nair.g Sj.,  Well   south   of   the   m������..;n   line   of   the |H  Canadilan   Pacific   Railway.     Between  5  the Kootenay River and the Columbia i  River Is a small  r?-7i of mountain's &  through  which the'Sinclair Pass and |  Canyon  provide an easy road.    When  .the   first  survey**   v;< ���������:<������������������   mjuls   \n-   an  %���������  automobile   road   between   Banff -r.r:d  }%  i\V in derm ere it .was planned to use tho #';  Simpson Pass, named after Sir Goorpo fe  'Simpson-,   Governor   of   tho   Hudson's w,  JBay Company, who made this crossing  /In 1841.    But the route over tlie Ver-  itoiMoo was found to be easier and at  fthe samo time more beautiful, and con-  ��������� tttru-cttcm of the Highway of the Great  plrl'de was conunenced  from opposite  ' JCM-ble Mountain'in  this direction.   At  the same time the road from Witnler-  rnere (ihrougli the Sinclair Canyon was  also  co<mmonice<l  and at   tho  time-  of  the  outbreak  of  war  a   gap   of  only f:'-  thirty miles separated the {wo roads.  ;War put an end to construction, and  a   great    washout    destroyed   several  miles of the western end, so that the  project seemed to have b9en abandoned.  Mow, however, the Dominion  O-overn-     .���������...       .  ment has made an arrangement with $'tyM$MJ0tM  tho  Brltlsih  Columbia  GowTirxvi!:  by  Which the route of the road comes under the Jurisdiction' of the Dominion  Parka, and a substantial appropriation  has been allotted to finish the work.  In this way there Is every prospect of  the early completion of what will be  &e most^ wonderful automobile road  V :-,.^^^^pF|"-i:i  w%.  JiM&^wty/. ;'.;:-':''.:':::.  -���������^���������'?���������'"' '���������'������������������*.���������'������������������>���������' -���������  ���������'-���������  ������&$?xi&8''' "���������;'    '���������?������$%��������� ������������������������������������:  %'$*  MMt-'fA-,..  A<;  Our bread.conies fresh from the oven  each morning, but we don't let it remain here long, we proceed'at once to  distribute on prompt schedule'time.  Use Lee's Pure Food Bread and save  the hot job. of baking bread, during the  warm days.  Place your- order' with us for that  Wedding Cake, or any other delicacies. ���������  Liconso  No.   8-!i85.'J8  License No.  5-1088  ALBERT   LEE,   Grocer   and   BaKer  SStete:  ^^^^m^Ms^^s^ss^'-  See me now about that Insurance  I have a larg'e>nd;;sp]eridid supply of  Raspberry Canes for sale at low prices.  Finest quality.$$jj  McCallum  Abbotsford  \ Oil the claim that it is "Cheaper Advertising" than  i newspaper advertising, a good many unnecessary adver-  I Using schemes are sold to business men.  The plans for buying are usually made in the home at  \ the warm fireside, not when tfre family is on an amuse-  v ment jaunt.  Supplementary advertising includes all advertising  \ outside of newspaper advertising.  lexandna  Farmers' and Travelers'  trade solicited.  Newly Furnished  Thoroughly Modern  M.   MURPHY,  PROPRIETOR  HUNTINGDON,  B^ C.  (1) Sinclair Pass, Highway of the Great Divide.  (2) Sinclair Canyon, Highway of the Great Dividea  Now. is the time to get your supply of Butter Wrappers for  summer months.  Get them at BATES' PRINTING OFFICE.  lAWjEiaJ-'SviicSiiS-- T^^-���������*~  I  f  .'���������4

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