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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-ninth Annual Report 1959/60 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-ninth Annual Report
1959/60
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-ninth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1961.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1960
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.).
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc. B.Ed., Prince George.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Port Alberni.
J. Chell, M.A., Mission.
C E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Trail.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Kitimat.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Powell River.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Kelowna.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver.
J. I. Macdougall, M.A., M.Ed., D.Pasd.,
Kamloops.
D. B. McKenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Castlegar.
The late J. J. McKenzie, B.A., New
Westminster.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B. Peed., Victoria.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Dawson
Creek.
E. Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Cranbrook.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Rupert.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Hope.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Victoria.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Campbell River.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Courtenay.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Oliver.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Pasd., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Burnaby.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A.,
Ladner.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ocean Falls.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Assistant,
Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Cloverdale.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Smithers.
 X 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: T. Quayle.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and V. E. Rickard.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc. (H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Acting Director of Visual Education: N. M. Henderson, B.A.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc., M.S., D. Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
11
Report of the Superintendent of Education	
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)      3 7
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  39
Report of the Director of Curriculum  43
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  47
Report of the Director of Home Economics  50
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses	
Elementary Correspondence School	
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts
Report of the Director of Visual Education	
Report of the Director of the Text-book Branch	
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools	
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment.
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education .
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch	
Report of the Director of Night-schools	
52
56
57
59
62
66
70
72
86
92
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)  95
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  97
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act__ 106
Statistical Returns  107
Information re Examination Papers..
Inside back cover
 X 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Pace
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools _ 12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District- 17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District —  19
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils__ 22
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  24
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1959  26
Cost per Pupil, Calendar Year 1959  26
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1959  27
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1959 by School District  30
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various School Districts  109
Recapituation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  151
 The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., Minister of Education.
  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1959/60
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1961.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-ninth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1960.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
291,223 to 305,837, and the average daily attendance increased from 267,052 to
281,513.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 92.05.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
27,664
45,930
34,386
2,132
10,220
5,297
171,244
1,145
229
70
2,619
160
4,741
27,664
47,075
34,615
2,202
12,839
5,457
175,985
Totals                	
296,873
8,964
305,837
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 6,748 officially registered in other schools)
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students  	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction 	
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme-
Night-schools (high schools)	
Vancouver School of Art	
Vancouver Vocational Institute	
High School Correspondence (adults only)	
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only).
Carried forward.	
3,372
1,276
63
4,711
7,6971
40,867
2222
4,6213
7,184
295
65,597
1 Day, 3,892;   night, 3,805.
2 This figure includes 53 part-time students.
3 Day, 2,354;  night, 2,267.
11
 X 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Brought forward-
Adult education—Continued
65,597
Number of participants in recreational programmes  177,5134
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training
Victoria College, regular credit courses-
Arts, Science, Commerce	
  593
College of Education....        468
Evening   196
University of British Columbia
214
1,2575
5,0686
249,649
4 This figure does not include Vancouver.
5 This figure does not include an enrolment of 708 in the special evening classes.
6 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1959 summer session, 3,828;   1959/60 extra sessional
classes, 1,166;   correspondence courses, 1,030.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1959/60:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,888
18,038
16,703
15,422
14,877
14,539
14,451
14,893
12,560
11,073
9,447
7,741
5,827
795
1,811
16,020
15,094
14,227
13,927
13,807
13,542
13,995
11,993
10,412
9,130
7,679
5,553
393
3,699
(.rarir. T
34,058
rirarir. TT
31,797
f. Turin TTT
29,649
r.rariR TV
28,804
firaiifi V
28,346
Grade VI  	
27,993
Crradf VTT
28,888
Grade VIII            	
24,553
Grade IX.         ...       _
21,485
Grade X             ..    ~
18,577
Grade XI         -    -
15,420
11,380
1,188
Grade XTT
Grade XIII                              	
Totals
158,254
147,583
305,837
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils
per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
901
1,501
1,074
84
443
175
5,382
329
554
393
6
73
24
386
188
1,230
2,055
1,467
90
516
199
5,768
188
27,664
47,075
34,615
2,202
12,839
5,457
175,985
9.05              30.70
15.39              31.36
11.32              32.23
.72                26.21
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools.
Elementary schools	
Unclassified 	
4.20              28.98
1.78              31.18
57.54              32.70
Totals.	
9,560      ]        1,953
1
11,513
305.837
100.00              31.99
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
X 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
Type of School
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
975
1,399
807
16
146
65
580
75
255
656
660
74
370
134
5,188
113
1,230
2,055
1,467
90
516
199
5,768
188
Totals
4,063
7,450
11,513
 X 14                                  PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
Number
Number
Aggregate
Enrol-
Average
Percent
Government
Total
School-year
of
of
Daily
age of
Expenditure
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Atten
Atten
for
for Public
Employed
Districts
dance
dance
Education
Schools
1877/78
56
45
2,198
1,395
63.49
$48,411 141
1882/83                  	
69
59
2,693
1,383
51.36
60,758.75!
1887/88
128
104
6,372
3,093
48.54
113.679.361
1SQ9/9 .
267
169
11,496
7,111
61.85
174,775.43
$215,056.22«
1897/98
429
213
17,648
11,055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
1902/03	
607
268
24,499
16,357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
1907/08	
816
189
33,314
23,195
69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1912/13
1,597
359
57,608
43,274
75.12
1,663,003.34
4,658,894.97
1913/14 	
1,859
374
62,263
49,377
79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
1017/1S
2,246
575
67,516
54,746
81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
1922/23	
3,118
744
94,888
77,752
81.94
3,176,686.28s
7,630,009.54s
1927/28
3,668
788
108,179
91,760
84.82
3,532,518.95s
9,261,094.98s
1928/29    	
3,784
792
109,588
94,410
86.17
3,765,920.693
11,149,996.27s
1929/30 	
3,854
803
111,017
96,196
86.65
3,743,317.08s
10,008,255.66s
1930/31    	
3,948
811
113,914
99,375
87.23
3,834,727.19s
10,061,387.99s
1931/32 .. ..
3,959
830
115,919
103,510
89.29
4,015,074.37s
9,719,333.81s
1932/33	
3,912
821
116,816
104,978
89.86
2,849,972.02s
8,941,497.34s
1933/34          	
3,873
827
115,792
103,389
89.30
2,611,937.80s
8,213,369.04s
1934/35—	
3,942
762
117,233
101,893
86.91
2,835,040.74s
8,458,156.00s
1935/36. 	
3,956
773
116,722
101,873
87.27
2,972,385.04s
8,775,353.78s
1936/37 _
4,025
763
118,431
104,044
87.85
3,277,660.23s
9,593,562.64s
1937/38
4,092
741
120,360
106,515
88.49
3,524,962.69s
10,193,367.08s
1938/39 ....           .   	
4,194
721
120,934
107,660
89.02
3,630,670.78s
10,640,740.47s
1939/40 	
4,220
720
120,459
108,826
90.34
3,585,769.00s
10,521,684.92'
1940/41
4,248
730
119,634
103,192
86.26
3,963,848.24s
10,982,364.49s
1041 /_.">
4,224
696
118,405
102,085
86.22
4,028,397.88s
11,120,801.94s
1942/43 	
4,055
661
115,447
93,473
80.96
3,924,243.53s
11,502,291.35s
1943/44     _.. .
4,162
654
119,043
102,999
86.52
4,244,898.82s
12,231,029.35s
1944/45	
4,354
650
125,135
107,599
85.99
5,022,534.59s
13,683,538.18s
1945/46 	
4,512
86
130,605
114,590
87.74
5,765,205.50s
14,818,625.81s
1946/47	
4,833
89
137,827
121,334
88.03
9,398,473.46s
20,176,930.53s
1947/48— -	
5,116
93
146,708
129,859
88.51
12,468,653.18s
25,768,392.09s
1948/49 	
5,496
5,873
97
97
155,515
164,212
138,941
147,583
89.34
89.87
17,363,430.94s
22,809,631.23s
35,538,079.88s
47,726,750.37s
1949/50         	
1950/51	
6,272
98
173,354
154,077
88.88
25,830,076.88s
54,195,133.95s
1951/52
6,598
7,105
7,574
101
100
104
183,112
195,290
210,174
163,364
176,138
191,061
89.21
90.19
90.91
26,885,980.43s
26,555,080.24s
24,060,233.15s
57,881,559.48"
58,401,121.15s
70,791,844.25 s
1952/53          	
1953/54
1954/55    ..	
8,185
104
223,840
204,239
91.24
34,279,302.27 s
80,823,263.71s
1955/56      	
8,690
102
240,674
218,303
90.70
41,067,740.34*
69,314,181.24*
1956/57
9,474
103
260,069
235,396
90.51
43,989,524.32°
77,653,192.32*
1957/58 	
10,171
102
277,070
252,490
91.13
50,861,473.63°
90,483,765.63'
1958/59	
10,839
101
291,223
267,052
91.70
53,288,028.94'
101,351,107.94'
1959/60
11,513
98
305,837
281,513
92.05
59,472,055.068
115,941,018.068
1 The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
'■ This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
4 This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
6 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
6 This amount on calendar year 1957, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
' This amount on calendar year 1958, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
8 This amount on calendar year 1959, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
X 15
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1959/60:—
Municipal school districts  73
Rural school districts  25
Total number of districts
98
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 27,664; of
this number, 14,121 were boys and 13,543 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3. Kimberley—
7. Nelson	
11. Trail	
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops—
33. Chilliwack-
34. Abbotsford..
36. Surrey.	
38. Richmond.-
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster..
41. Burnaby..
42. Maple Ridge	
44. North Vancouver..
45. West Vancouver	
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert-
57. Prince George..
59. Peace River South-
61. Greater Victoria	
68. Nanaimo	
71. Courtenay	
75. Mission	
Totals..
38
12
18
32
20
23
29
32
24
93
25
103
41
106
20
60
36
12
10
15
15
111
28
15
21
901
19
24
43
31
29
37
41
32
124
35
146
51
138
26
77
46
17
15
24
23
162
40
22
28
1,230
369
548
883
685
658
836
939
779
2,974
841
3,409
1,153
3,121
583
1,765
1,081
366
286
499
449
3,504
830
471
635
27,664
 X 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 47,075;
of this number, 24,172 were boys and 22,903 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Pprnip
2
2
1
10
3
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
8
24
8
26
9
12
24
8
19
17
22
42
9
6
17
22
10
10
31
24
21
15
10
14
49
34
25
549
81
20
11
16
10
7
18
21
39
40
20
30
35
7
23
17
7
21
13
10
35
9
34
13
13
33
9
26
23
28
54
12
7
22
31
15
12
44
31
27
24
12
18
72
47
34
775
110
26
15
22
12
8
26
28
53
53
25
40
47
11
31
24
13
25
16
193
792
229
765
7. Nelson	
266
8. Slocan   _	
9. Castlegar
302
675
208
11. Trail   .  _	
534
17   Granri Forks
502
665
1,291
16. Keremeos.           	
18.  Onlripn
261
159
19. Revelstoke
488
744
329
22. Vernon
73. Kelowna
24. Kamloops       -      	
27. Williams Lake      ...
98   Oiipsnel
214
833
724
681
511
31. Merritt
283
395
1,594
37   Dplta
1,046
835
39. Vancouver            .. ~
18,619
2,604
46    Se.r-h. It
478
301
53. Terrace.            .
54. Smithers
471
271
200
583
616
1,144
1,221
521
805
1,141
242
737
492
292
497
321
Totals             . ...   	
73
1,501
2,055
47,075
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
X 17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 34,615; of
this number, 17,860 were boys and 16,755'were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3. Kimberley  - -  	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
6
2
2
1
4
2
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
2
1
19
21
22
30
28
15
42
30
84
47
64
46
115
31
78
47
3
22
17
34
15
149
8
49
20
23
15
25
30
31
40
37
22
54
44
107
63
93
63
157
42
105
60
3
30
25
47
24
214
10
66
26
29
.  20
553
642
11   Trail                                     	
698
910
921
494
33. Chilliwack .  -	
34. Abbotsford 	
1,375
1,051
2,746
38. Richmond    .	
1,512
2,178
1,599
3,632
42. Maple Ridge   	
973
2,447
1,298
46. Sechelt      	
75
665
581
1,079
477
5,208
229
1,491
70   Alberni
602
71. Courtenay     _	
675
504
Totals     	
51
1,074
1,467
34,615
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,202; of this
number, 1,149 were boys and 1,053 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1959/60 in
each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6. Kootenay Lake..
13. Kettle Valley—
27. Williams Lake._
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet ..
48. Howe Sound.	
51. Portland Canal.
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George_
58. McBride 	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay 	
 Unattached districts-
Totals 	
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
~22~
2
10
6
9
4
4
2
2
8
5
5
11
5
7
3
3
2
10
6
10
4
4
2
2
8
5
6
13
5
7
3
3
90
35
274
134
254
76
68
68
30
242
107
142
322
134
187
59
70
2,202
 X 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was
12,839; of this number, 6,553 were boys and 6,286 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table: —
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2    '
2
1
2
30
10
5
13
10
22
4
14
11
6
12
29
36
11
6
15
10
28
4
16
12
8
9
15        j
33
35
7
23
8
6
35
14
12
8
20
14
15
21
17
23
15
19
11         1
10        1
933
270
163
6. Kootenay Lake.      	
398
13. Kettle Valley 	
287
17. Princeton	
696
18. Golden	
88
20. Salmon Arm  	
398
300
190
26. Birch Island 	
236
28. Quesnel- _	
390
29. Lillooet
762
30. South Cariboo 	
3                    32
1                     7
925
32. Fraser Canyon	
179
20
7
5
29
14
10
7
18
12
12
17
14
19
13
15
9
9
592
47. Powell River _	
171
48. Howe Sound.	
111
800
50. Queen Charlotte   	
315
53. Terrace...                	
288
54. Smithers.. 	
223
56. Vanderhoof  .
58. McBride     _. 	
581
321
64.  Crnlf Islands
388
444
71. Courtenay  	
436
73. Alert Bay..... __	
509
348
76. Agassiz  __   ..     .	
79. Ucluelet-Toflno	
526
229
81.  Fnrt Nelson
342
Totals              	
44
443
516
12,839
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was
5,457; of this number, 2,813 were boys and 2,644 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
10. Arrow Lakes 	
11. Trail—	
14. Southern Okanagan..
15. Penticton	
33. Chilliwack 	
39. Vancouver	
41. Burnaby
50. Queen Charlotte.	
59. Peace River South..
69. Qualicum.. 	
Totals ..
3
35
17
12
9
23
40
4
20
12
l75~
3
42
19
14
9
26
49
4
20
13
~199~
73
1,107
545
369
286
768
1,309
87
585
328
5,457
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
X  19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 175,985; of
this number, 91,586 were boys and 84,399 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1959/60 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
Fernie -
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail- 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan .
Penticton	
Keremeos  -
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops	
Barriere    ~
Birch Island	
Williams Lake...
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo .
Merritt _.
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack -
Abbotsford	
Langley —
Surrey 	
Delta- 	
Richmond	
Vancouver  _.
New Westminster...
Burnaby  _.
Maple Ridge—	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River.	
Howe Sound-	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte ..
Prince Rupert	
Terrace.	
Smithers.—. 	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan 	
Lake Cowichan..
6
6
7
7
6
2
12
11
12
3
10
1
3
2
7
3
3
4
7
14
1
10
22
29
7
6
29
20
4
6
4
6
16
24
19
43
11
22
55
6
29
15
16
17
10
11
12
11
6
1
7
11
5
12
6
43
8
30
27
35
11
12
4
18
16
41
43
14
32
2
54
24
36
13
76
16
5
20
50
12
3
14
26
44
12
63
101
115
9
10
63
49
6
10
19
23
91
83
73
278
54
156
1,072
85
330
70
130
238
83
32
58
28
12
47
36
17
26
9
122
12
82
54
349
45
50
5
65
30
16
43
44
14
33
2
58
24
38
13
81
16
5
21
53
12
3
15
28
47
13
67
106
122
9
10
65
52
6
10
20
24
93
84
80
285
54
165
1,238
94
351
70
134
257
95
36
58
28
12
1
50
38
18
26
9
131
12
86
58
361
50
52
6
67
33
382
1,340
1,299
421
1,062
23
1,770
490
1,095
369
2,379
608
129
656
1,774
382
43
439
780
1,325
438
2,205
3,062
3,323
163
183
1,686
1,459
109
218
635
751
3,446
2,771
2,413
9,834
1,756
5,476
34,904
3,156
11,702
2,455
4,588
8,242
3,047
903
1,805
569
245
21
1,562
1,044
500
657
222
3,718
219
2,211
1,565
13,020
1,433
1,594
113
1,957
896
 X 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
67. Ladysmith..
68. Nanaimo...
69. Qualicum...
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino 	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz.-
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
 Unattached districts..
Totals-
973
6
28
21
107
7
11
12
84
13
53
13
46
5
6
7
9
17
48
3
5
2
18
7
15
3
5
3
34
4
6
4
5
15
59
5,383
32
112
11
87
57
46
6
9
48
5
19
15
5
37
7
5
65
5,768
1,011
3,282
311
2,897
1,776
1,473
124
171
1,501
127
644
426
90
1,067
152
83
1,808
175,985
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
X 21
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
District Number and Name
2.
3.
5.
8.
11.
20.
22.
23.
24.
28.
30.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
67.
68.
70.
71.
72.
75.
80.
Cranbrook
Kimberley _
Creston	
Slocan 	
Trail 	
Salmon Arm
Vernon	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops 	
Quesnel 	
South Cariboo
Chilliwack: 	
Abbotsford __.__
Langley 	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond 	
Vancouver 	
New Westminster
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver
West Vancouver _.
Sechelt 	
Powell River __
Howe Sound ._.
Prince Rupert
Terrace 	
Smithers 	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof __
Prince George
McBride 	
Peace River South _
Peace River North
Greater Victoria	
Ladysmith 	
Nanaimo 	
Alberni  	
Courtenay
Campbell River
Mission 	
Kitimat 	
Number of
Teachers
1
. 2
_ 1
. 1
_ 2
.      1
1
2
4
2
1
4
2
4
.      9
4
3
.    33
3
.    15
2
.    11
5
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
36
1
2
5
1
3
2
2
Total..
188
 X 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
9
7
9
10
8
5
15
14
13
6
15
2
7
4
9
4
4
6
8
17
2
13
27
33
8
7
33
24
7
9
5
8
20
27
21
54
13
26
73
8
37
18
19
22
13
14
15
14
8
4
1
9
14
8
14
8
48
10
35
28
46
14
15
5
20
9
8
54
65
74
32
63
17
102
36
60
24
184
33
25
59
104
21
25
24
43
80
22
123
183
194
15
18
90
85
39
42
29
44
174
137
122
455
88
253
1,831
172
591
121
211
376
166
55
99
48
41
18
2
74
64
42
38
32
182
29
132
72
609
74
89
17
105
50
58
62
79
90
34
74
19
125
38
71
25
225
39
25
68
121
24
31
26
50
95
28
151
218
228
17
19
98
103
43
46
32
49
201
162
156
525
105
300
2,334
211
710
140
255
444
202
66
117
54
47
19
2
91
75
47
41
36
219
32
157
85
773
88
105
21
120
58
73
1,508
2. Cranbrook  	
2,132
2,221
920
1,990
456
3,226
8. Slocan	
792
1,770
10. Arrow Lakes 	
650
11. Trail	
5,601
12. Grand Forks	
1,110
13. Kettle Valley   	
690
14. Southern Okanagan  	
1,866
3,434
16. Keremeos— ._	
643
739
18. Golden . 	
686
19. Revelstoke  __	
20. Salmon Arm 	
1,268
2,467
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen 	
767
4,014
23. Kelowna 	
5,474
24. Kamloops	
5,677
353
26. Birch Island. 	
419
2,501
28. Quesnel _. ,
2,614
29. Lillooet- _ _   	
947
30. South Cariboo 	
1,143
31. Merritt 	
918
32. Fraser Canyon  ,,
1,325
33. Chilliwack  	
6,046
34. Abbotsford-	
4,601
4,007
36. Surrey	
15,554
vi. r>fitfl
2,802
"\%    r.i>Mn.i.nrI
8,664
39. Vancouver  _ ■	
60,470
5,908
19,764
42. Maple Ridge __	
4,011
7,192
12,454
5,426
46. Sechelt.
1,456
3,007
1,049
49.  Ocean Falls
1,045
423
68
2,429
1,833
1,236
964
945
5,618
674
3,722
2,148
21,732
2,278
2,738
501
3,178
1,417
1,816
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
X 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
24
9
14
18
16
9
9
19
4
3
8
4
4
5
4
18
184
40
139
112
76
28
22
84
20
35
22
14
55
15
5
75
220
45
165
137
87
32
24
98
24
43
28
16
64
17
5
84
5,603
1,083
70. Alberni    ■ 	
71. Courtenay - _   	
72. Campbell River	
4,640
3,600
2,397
73. Alert Bay - -  ...           —
692
519
2,640
76. Agassiz                              .   ....
653
77. Summerland.      ~  	
1,136
78. Enderby 	
718
79. Ucluelet Tofino            	
319
80. Kitimat     .—    	
81. Fort Nelson              	
1,564
494
82. Chilcotin         _ _
  Unattached districts  	
83
2,199
1,214
9,562
ll,513i
305,837
1 Includes 188 district supervisory and instructional personnel.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1959/60:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Male
Female
38
73
51
22
44
13
973
1,230
2,055
1,467
90
516
199
5,768
188
27,664
47,075
34,615
2,202
12,839
5,457
175,985
14,121
24,172
17,860
1,149
6,553
2,813
91,586
13,543
22,903
16,755
1,053
6,286
2,644
84,399
24,819.82
42,896.91
32,057.01
Superior schools  ..     .
2,014.57
11,694.68
5,045.97
162,984.43
1,214
11,513
305,837
158,254
147,583
281,513.39
 X 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,100 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
901
1,501
1,074
84
443
175
5,382
$1,075
1,017
1,006
1,095
1,746
2,070
1,014
$8,700
9,360
8,716
9,291
10,154
9,548
9,875
$6,637
6,100
5,592
Superior schools 	
4,628
4,992
4,754
4,595
Supervising Principals
38
64
49
1
25
7
157
$9,318
6,964
8,649
6,452
6,470
8,912
3,750
$12,370
12,850
11,750
6,452
11,808
11,515
10,840
$10,645
10,151
10,231
Superior schools   '  —	
6,452
8,800
9,712
9,063
Special Instructors
291
490
344
5
48
17
229
188
$1,147
1,025
1,441
3,675
1,200
2,580
1,066
1,340
$10,560
10,400
10,450
5,960
9,540
10,101
8,985
11,515
$6,861
6,450
6,093
2,282
5,621
Elementary-junior high schools 	
6,061
4,042
6,460
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
X 25
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, including principals, supervising principals, and part-time teachers:—
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
Under $1,200  135
$1,200-$ 1,299    8
1,300- 1,399    8
1,400- 1,499 	
1,500- 1,599 	
1,600- 1,699 	
1,700- 1,799 	
1,800- 1,899 	
1,900- 1,999 	
11
11
7
18
15
2,000- 2,099   27
2,100- 2,199   25
2,200- 2,299   25
2,300- 2,399   31
2,400- 2,499   15
2,500- 2,599   27
2,600- 2,699   27
2,700- 2,799   43
2,800- 2,899   114
2,900- 2,999   141
3,000- 3,099   92
3,100- 3,199   111
3,200- 3,299   96
3,300-
3,400-
3,500-
3,600-
3,700-
3,800-
3,900-
4,000-
3,399
3,499
3,599
3,699
3,799
3,899
3,999
179
242
175
226
179
225
217
4,099   341
4,100- 4,199   215
4,200- 4,299   245
4,300- 4,399   177
4,400- 4,499   273
4,500- 4,599   309
4,600- 4,699
4,700- 4,799
4,800- 4,899
4,900- 4,999
5,000- 5,099
5,100- 5,199
5,200- 5,299
5,300- 5,399
256
265
242
264
217
324
360
471
5,400- 5,499   259
5,500- 5,599   231
Salary
$5,600-
5,700-
5,800
5,900-
6,000
6,100
6,200-
6,300
6,400-
6,500-
6,600-
6,700-
6,800-
6,900
7,000
7,100-
7,200-
7,300-
7,400-
7,500-
7,600-
7,700-
7,800
7,900-
8,000-
8,100-
8,200-
8,300-
8,400-
8,500-
8,600-
8,700-
8,800-
8,900-
9,000-
9,100-
9,200-
9,300-
9,400-
9,500-
9,600
9,700
9,800
9,900
10,000
Range
-$5,699 	
- 5,799 	
- 5,899 	
- 5,999 	
- 6,099 	
- 6,199 	
- 6,299   169
- 6,399   183
- 6,499   120
Number of
Teachers
.__ 296
.__ 318
.__ 171
.__ 150
.__ 160
- 135
6,599
6,699
6,799
6,899
6,999
7,099
7,199
7,299
7,399
98
87
122
88
172
159
142
100
93
>- 7,499   94
7,599
7,699
7,799
7,899
7,999
8,099
8,199
8,299
8,399
8,499
8,599
8,699
8,799
8,899
8,999
9,099
9,199
9,299
9,399
9,499
9,599
132
284
88
183
124
204
64
29
96
39
23
23
21
24
30
25
21
21
33
15
28
'- 9,699   16
- 9,799 __
- 9,899 ._
- 9,999 _
and over
24
26
42
154
 X 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1959
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts   $105,044,901.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration, grants to University of British Columbia, services, etc.   $7,092,224.39
Teachers' Pension Fund 6%      3,284,784.24
Free text-books, maps, etc. .        519,108.43
       10,896,117.06
Grand total expenditure   $115,941,018.06
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1959
Grand total cost of education  $115,941,018.06
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue $1,009,501.00
Debt charges on school district debt  12,989,710.00
Grant to University of British Columbia ____    4,195,168.00
Grant to Victoria College        269,447.00
High Correspondence School        154,068.10
Elementary Correspondence School  70,838.84
Night-schools   48,745.40
Adult education        851,102.96
       19,588,581.30
Total operating costs     $96,352,436.76
Operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 281,513-. $342.27
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
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 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT X 33
GENERAL REVIEW
A Philosophy of Education
No doubt the question is often asked, what is the primary purpose of elementary and secondary education and what should the schools be tyring to do? It might
be said that a school's main function is to prepare pupils for good citizenship; to
produce effective citizens by equipping them in various ways through experience
in the classroom, including basic training in certain fundamental skills and the
inculcation of such ideals as honesty, co-operation, and consideration for others.
It should be the aim of this programme to have pupils take their places in the world
of to-day, which we know, and in that of to-morrow, which we must envision;
and it should be the object of any current society, of which the schools are a part,
to have each generation of young people become more effective citizens than those
of any previous time.
It is my firm belief that an indispensable function of all schooling at every
level to-day, as in the past, must be to provide sound instruction in the fundamentals
of language, in mathematics, science, and history, and in the other disciplines which
may have been developed in the course of mankind's quest for usable knowledge.
Let us accept the primary fact that now, as always, the school is an agency for intellectual training. Schools exist to teach pupils something—the subjects in the curriculum and, in addition, good habits and healthy attitudes toward life in general.
Technical and Vocational Education
To keep pace with the continued expansion of the industrial and commercial
resources of the Province, the following developments in vocational education
occurred during the school-year 1959/60, details of which are found elsewhere in
this Report.
In Burnaby, on June 29th, one of the most up-to-date vocational schools on
the continent was declared open by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier of
the Province. This function was attended by a large and enthusiastic audience.
A few weeks later the initial step was taken to bring vocational training facilities to
the Interior of British Columbia when the Provincial Cabinet approved plans for
the commencement of a new vocational school at Prince George, the first unit of
which is expected to be completed in the autumn of 1961.
Following a previously announced survey of the needs of vocational and
advanced technological training in British Columbia, an appraisal undertaken by
Messrs. D. E. Bridge and J. S. White was concluded, and a report was presented
to the Royal Commission on Education for further study and recommendation.
Other important events in the field of vocational education during the school-
year included the inauguration of training programmes for fishermen and of management courses in the accommodation industry.
Teacher Education
The Colleges of Education at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver,
and at Victoria College, Victoria, are being carefully developed in respect to both
staff and curriculum to provide a high degree of efficiency in the training of teachers
for the Province. The enrolment since these colleges were established in 1956
has virtually doubled. The following figures illustrate the remarkable growth in
the past four academic years: 1956/57,1,136; 1957/58,1,390; 1958/59,1,845;
1959/60, 2,294.
3
 X 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
It would appear that we are well on the way toward providing sufficient
teaching personnel for the schools. However, quality as well as quantity must be
emphasized as our teacher-training institutions develop. In the elementary field we
are keeping pace with our requirements, but in the secondary schools there is some
shortage in such specialized areas as Physical Education, Industrial Arts, Home
Economics, Science, Senior English, and Commerce. A special effort must now
be made to meet these particular needs.
SCHOLARSHIPS AND HONOUR AWARDS FOR TEACHERS
This year, for the first time, the Government of British Columbia has provided
scholarships to teachers for advanced professional study. These scholarships will
be tenable for at least one year of formal study, preferably outside the Province.
They vary in value up to $2,500 each. Near the close of the school-year two
awards were made by the Honourable the Minister of Education, on the recommendation of a selection committee, as follows: Mr. Hugh Taylor, of the Nanaimo
District schools, was awarded a scholarship to assist him in a postgraduate programme of study at Stanford University, California (his work will involve a research
project in connection with the guidance and counselling service in British Columbia
schools); Miss Zona Joyce Fett, of the Vancouver school system, was also given
an award for postgraduate work at the University of Toronto, where she will
specialize in psychology.
These scholarships are intended to provide mature teachers of proven excellence with an opportunity for advanced professional study on the understanding
that the recipients will return to the Province to make a further contribution to the
public school system.
With a view to honouring annually the teaching profession of the Province,
the Honourable the Minister of Education instituted a system of honour awards in
recognition of long and outstanding service in the classroom. In due time the
presentation of these awards for the school-year 1959/60 will take place.
OBITUARY
The Department of Education and the New Westminster School District suffered a severe loss in March, 1960, in the sudden death of Mr. J. J. McKenzie, B.A.,
District Superintendent of Schools for New Westminster. Mr. McKenzie began his
teaching career in Victoria in September, 1926, and was successively teacher,
vice-principal, and principal in various Victoria elementary schools. In 1949 he
jointed the staff of the Department of Education, and after a year as relieving
Inspector served in the West Kootenay and on Vancouver Island. He was appointed
District Superintendent of Schools for New Westminster in July, 1957.
Mr. McKenzie was an outstanding teacher and principal, and later gave
splendid leadership as a District Superintendent. He served one year as president
of the British Columbia School Superintendents' Association. In his youth he was
quite active in athletics, being prominent in basketball and baseball circles. Mr.
McKenzie was highly respected by educators, as well as by the School Boards with
whom he was associated. In every walk of life he acquired a host of friends by
his natural charm and by his interest in people.
RETIREMENTS
At the close of the school-year three District Superintendents retired from
service in the Department of Education—Mr. William Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Mr.
Horace Hum, B.A., and Mr. Alex Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT X 35
Mr. Grant received his early schooling and teacher-training in Ontario. Later,
when he moved to British Columbia, he was for a time a district supervisor of
nature study and agriculture. In 1926 he was made principal of the Salmon Arm
High School, in which capacity he served until 1946, when he was appointed an
Inspector of Schools and assigned to the Prince George District. In 1951 he was
transferred to Abbotsford as District Superintendent of Schools, where, in addition
to his duties there, he acted as consultant in vocational agriculture for the Province.
Mr. Hum came into the Department of Education in 1947 as Director of School
and Community Drama. Prior to that time he had been a principal in the Victoria
elementary schools for some eighteen years. In the field of drama Mr. Hum was
prominent as a playwright, producer, and organizer. In 1954, subsequent to a
reorganization in the Department, he was transferred to the field and served as
District Superintendent of Education on Vancouver Island until the date of his
retirement.
Mr. Turnbull was appointed an Inspector of Schools in 1939 following a noteworthy career as teacher and principal in the schools of New Westminster. He
served at Prince Rupert until 1942. Subsequently he was located at Revelstoke,
Salmon Arm, Chilliwack, Penticton, and, since 1953, in Victoria, as Assistant
District Superintendent. In World War I Mr. Turnbull had a distinguished record
and was decorated with the Military Medal as well as with the Military Cross.
In March of this year Mr. P. G. Barr, for many years Officer in Charge of the
Text-book Branch, retired on pension. He came to the Department first as secretary to the Minister of Education in April, 1929. Two years later, in 1931, he
became Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch and has been largely responsible
for placing this division on a sound and efficient basis. During his period of service
he saw many changes in the Branch, the most important of which was the introduction of the school book rental plan, for which he himself was largely responsible.
This will always stand as a monument to his achievements.
These four gentlemen, in their various roles, have given many years of outstanding service to the Department of Education. Each has left his mark on the
school system of this Province, and as they depart from our midst we extend to
them and their families our best wishes for continued good health and happiness
during their retirement.
RESIGNATIONS
Mr. Bergie Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A., resigned in the early summer
to accept an appointment with the Federal Government as Superintendent of Education for the Northwest Territories. Mr. Thorsteinsson in his early career taught
in several rural schools and in the high school at Powell River from 1928 to 1942.
Following his appointment as Inspector of Schools, he served at Rossland, Prince
Rupert, Vernon, Abbotsford, Duncan, Powell River, Saanich, and during this last
year as District Superintendent of Schools at Delta. In 1955/56 he was relieved
of his duties in the field to work on the revision of the Public Schools Act. Recognized as an authority on many phases of education, Mr. Thorsteinsson made a very
definite contribution to our school system. We wish him every success as he takes
up his new duties with the Federal Government.
Mr. A. I. Thomas was appointed a District Superintendent of Schools in 1957
and served for two years in that capacity, at Smithers. For more than twenty years
he had been prominent as a successful teacher and principal. At the end of the
school-year 1959/60 he resigned to take postgraduate work at Stanford University.
 X 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
APPOINTMENTS
The following school principals have been appointed as District Superintendents of Schools as from August 1st: Mr. W. J. Logie, Kelowna Senior High School;
Mr. R. F. Lucas, Principal of the Booth Memorial High School at Prince Rupert;
Mr. Claude Bissell, Supervising Principal of the Kelowna Elementary Schools; Mr.
William Fromson, Director of Elementary Instruction for West Vancouver; and
Mr. Charles Cuthbert, Principal of Dawson Creek Elementary School.
Mr. Basil Wilson, in April, was appointed Director of the Text-book Branch,
in succession to Mr. P. G. Barr. Mr. Wilson for many years served as Chief Clerk
of the Text-book Branch and brings to his new position a wealth of experience in
the handling of school book problems.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the services of Mr. Grove Carter,
who returned to the Department for a period of six months as District Superintendent
in the Ladysmith and Lake Cowichan School Districts. This additional assistance
was very much appreciated by the Department and by the School Boards of the
above districts.
Once again I wish to thank all members of the Department of Education and
the District Superintendents of Schools in the field for their splendid co-operation
and devotion to duty during the school-year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH X 37
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION)
School Districts
The school districts of the Province now number ninety-eight. There are
seventy-three municipal districts and twenty-five rural school districts. Fifteen of
the latter, because of their small area, are referred to as unattached school districts.
A Board of School Trustees has jurisdiction over each district, except in the case
of twelve rural school districts, which are under official trustees appointed by the
Council of Public Instruction. The School Boards may have from three to nine
members. There are four three-member boards, twenty-seven five-member boards,
forty seven-member boards, and fifteen nine-member boards. In all, 562 trustees
and nine official trustees serve the school districts of the Province.
School Construction
During the past school-year thirty-two school districts passed referenda
amounting to $19,770,000. Seven referenda were defeated; however, when six
of these were resubmitted, four received the assent of the electors.
During the calendar year 1959 there were 655 teaching areas (classrooms and
special rooms) and fifty-seven gymnasium-activity rooms constructed at a cost of
approximately $17,700,000. Until December, 1959, school construction costs continued to rise at an average rate of approximately 3 per cent per year. However,
by June in 1960, building costs have shown a drop of approximately 10 per cent.
At the close of the term, the need for additional space was less than 1 per cent of
classroom accommodation.
The School Planning Division has provided Departmental plans for school
construction amounting to approximately $ 1,400,000 in twenty-four school districts
of the Province. This Division has expanded its programme to include the preparation of plans for smaller secondary schools.
Capital expenditures for school equipment continue to be approximately 10.5
per cent of the cost of the school buildings.
Transportation
Transportation facilities are provided in seventy-seven of the eighty-two large
school districts and in two of the fifteen unattached school districts. The operation
involves 400 district-owned buses and 155 contract buses and five water taxis.
These vehicles travel 31,000 miles daily and carry 48,000 pupils, of whom 27,000
are in secondary schools. The annual operating cost is approximately $2,400,000,
and the average operating cost per pupil mile is .7 cents. The capital expenditure
for new buses and replacement of buses was approximately $320,000 for the year.
There are approximately 1,500 pupils for whom transportation assistance is paid
by School Boards. The maximum amount accepted as a shareable cost for transportation assistance is $1 per day per pupil.
Assistance to Isolated Areas
In conjunction with the Correspondence Branch, classes authorized under
section 20 of the Public Schools Act have served sixty pupils in eleven isolated
areas.
 X 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Boarding allowance payments were increased to a shareable maximum of $30
per month. Fifty of the ninety-eight school districts pay boarding allowances to
pupils who are forced to live away from home in order that they may continue their
education. Approximately $80,000 was paid to the 400 pupils receiving this
allowance for the school term.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES X 39
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Instructional Services
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions: Curriculum;
Tests, Standards, and Research; High School Correspondence; Elementary School
Correspondence; Visual Education; School Radio Broadcasts; Home Economics;
and the Text-book Branch. The director of each of these divisions submits his
own annual report, but there are certain aspects of instruction which lie outside
the work of any single division.
Instructional Services Staff Meetings
An innovation of this school-year was the quarterly meeting of all the directors
of divisions named above and the Superintendent of the Jericho Hill School. These
meetings were held to keep directors informed of the work being done by other
divisions and to maintain unity of purpose throughout the instructional services.
At each of the four meetings the work of one specific division was discussed. In
addition, representatives of other Departmental divisions and branches have attended to discuss matters of common interest. Programmes included discussions
on the report of the Manitoba Royal Commission on Education; a study of Departmental forms conducted by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research; a survey
of the services of the Division of Visual Education; and reports by the Co-ordinator
of Teacher Recruitment, the Director of Community Programmes, and the Superintendent of the British Columbia Library Commission.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered accrediting booklets from ninety-four
schools and accepted forty-five of these for accreditation, five for the first time.
Of the forty-five schools, two were accredited for terms of four years, eleven for
three years, fourteen for two years, and eighteen for one year. Three schools were
restored to the accredited list and two removed from it. Schools previously accredited for the year 1959/60 numbered fifty-six.
Organization of Secondary Schools
Two significant changes are evident in the organization of secondary schools.
In 1959/60, for the first time since the official adoption of the 6-3-3 grade system,
the number of separate junior and senior high schools was greater than that of
combined junior-senior high schools. At the same time there was a significant
increase in the number of secondary schools with enrolments of over 500 pupils
and a significant decrease in the number with enrolments of 100 pupils or less.
The following tables show the percentages of secondary pupils in various types of
schools in 1959/60. The relatively few pupils enrolled in Grades VII and VIII
of the surviving eight-grade elementary schools have been ignored in these tables.
 X 40
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
By Organizational Type
Number
. 39
. 50
. 71
Senior	
Junior	
Junior-senior 	
Elementary-senior   46
Elementary-junior   11
Superior   21
Per Cent of
Grade VII-XIII
Pupils
25.7
29.0
37.9
4.9
1.9
0.6
By Size of Enrolment
Over 2,000 ______
1,001 to 2,000
501 to 1,000 ___
251 to 500	
101 to 250 _____
51 to 100	
Under 51 	
Number
6
._ 18
_ 67
._ 54
._ 41
.. 25
.. 27
Per Cent of
Grade VII-XIII
Pupils
11.4
19.7
42.9
17.6
6.2
1.5
0.7
Advanced Electives Most Frequently Chosen
The ten advanced electives (Grades XI and XII level) with the highest enrolments of pupils in 1959/60 are compared below with those in 1953/54. Percentages shown are of the enrolment in Grade XII English (English 40 and 41), a
compulsory subject. There was no change in rank in the year 1959/60 from the
year 1958/59.
Rank
1959
1953
Advanced Elective
Per Cent of Enrolment in
Grade XII English
1959
1953
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
3
1
4
7
8
5
9
6
12
Chemistry 91	
Biology 91	
Mathematics 91..
English 91	
Physics 91	
Geography 91.	
History 91 —
Home Economics 91..
English 93 	
Industrial Arts 91	
62
53
58
48
56
54
41
32
34
25
28
21
24
27
22
18
20
25
13
14
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Special Classes in Public Schools
X 41
There was an increase of over 16 per cent in enrolment in special classes within
the public school system. The number of classes increased by approximately 20
per cent largely in the category of " slow learners." Enrolments shown are for
September of each year.
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
Type of Class
1959
1958
1959
1958
144
16
4
17
4
13
2
2
2
2
1
114
13
4
19
4
12
2
2
2
1
2,109                      1,753
246                         219
t1)           1              I1)
269
66
179
17
35
17
18
23
252
39
240
21
11
18
Pre-employment experimental	
Totals	
207          !              172
2,979
2,553
1 Varied.
Schools for Retarded Children
In September, 1960, three school districts—No. 39 (Vancouver), No. 61
(Greater Victoria), and No. 68 (Nanaimo)—will take over the classes for mentally
retarded children now operated by the local chapters of the Association for Retarded
Children. In Vancouver a new school has been built by the school district for that
purpose. The integration of these trainable retarded children into the public school
system in these communities is a significant advance, made possible by the amendments to the Public Schools Act passed in the 1958 Session of the Legislature.
The number of children in schools operated by chapters of the Association for
Retarded Children of British Columbia increased to 484 in December of 1959, from
431 in the previous December. Of this enrolment, 445 children were eligible for
the increased grant from the Department. The number of chapter schools increased
to thirty-eight from thirty-six. Schools were to be found in thirty-six school districts,
as compared with thirty-one in the previous year.
Local Supervisory Personnel
In September, 1959, the following teachers were employed in a supervisory
capacity by local school districts: Directors of instruction, with power to inspect
classrooms, eight; supervisors of instruction, fifty-three; teacher consultants, twenty-
eight. This showed a marked increase in one year in the first two categories from
a total of forty-seven to sixty-one, and a decrease from thirty-six to twenty-eight in
the third. The tendency to change from consultants to supervisors is more noticeable in the smaller areas.
Qualifications of Teaching Staff
With the appointment of a Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment, this section
of the Report will be taken over in future years by him. Data collected in September, 1959, by this Branch from the District Superintendents of Schools showed little
change in the general situation from the previous year.
 X 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
The general level of training of qualified teachers is improving steadily. Only
9.5 per cent of all teachers now hold the E-C certificate, while 16.5 per cent hold
the S-A or P-A qualification. The number of untrained persons teaching has shown
a further drop to 2.6 per cent.
In the elementary schools, one of every four teachers now has three or more
years of training, while approximately one of every six has one year or less. The
situation continues to improve.
At the secondary level, one of every four teachers has less than the qualifications normally required (five years of training past high school), although one of
every three has six or more years of training. As the number of secondary teachers
has now increased to more than 45 per cent of the total number of teachers employed
in the public schools, the magnitude of the problem of teacher-supply is obvious.
It is encouraging to note that the gap between the number of new positions required
and the number of qualified teachers recruited at least narrowed a little, a reverse
in the trend of recent years.
The Superior and Gifted Pupil
The accelerated class at West Vancouver has now become a regular part of the
school programme. The students there complete the five normal years from Grade
IX to Grade XIII on an enriched course in four years. This year the two leading
students of the Province in Grade XIII came from this group, a slim one-tenth of
a percentage point separating them. This class won four of the thirty-seven Government of British Columbia scholarships awarded Grade XIII students with average
marks over 80 per cent and seven of the 133 second-class scholarships. The third-
year accelerated class placed six candidates in the first-class scholarship list at the
Grade XII level, two of them leading Zone No. 10, and ten more in the second-class
scholarship list.
Penticton also placed one of its accelerated students in the scholarship list at
the Grade XIII level, and two at the Grade XII level.
The Vancouver school system continues with its subject acceleration programme in a number of schools. Next year will see some of its students advance to
the Grade XIII level.
Throughout the year Vancouver maintained the Berg Science Seminar. Twenty-
five students participated in thirty seminars, with an average attendance of over
ninety-eight per cent. Forty-three professional persons gave freely of their time.
Sixteen students embarked on research studies in the various sciences. A useful
by-product was the establishment of a special seminar library. It is hoped that
Vancouver's initiative in this respect will be followed by similar undertakings, not
necessarily in the same field, in other communities.
Conference in the Slocan Valley
Before the opening of school in September, the Sons of Freedom in the southeast section of the Province informed the authorities that their children would return
to school. In preparation for this event, a conference was held with the superintendents, principals, and teachers of schools where these pupils would be enrolled.
Many of these children had been away from their homes for a year or more and it
was felt they might find the problem of adjusting to a new school situation difficult.
There was no question involved of changing basic policies in schools, but rather
that of assuring an unemotional but understanding attitude and an atmosphere
which they would find suited to their further educational progress. The Department
wished to be certain that the steps necessary to attain this aim would be taken.   A
 curriculum and general educational services
X 43
full year of school attendance without incident has demonstrated that parents and
teachers can work together with respect and good feeling once it is understood that
the schools exist for the good of the children.
Promotional Policy for Secondary Schools
Two years ago a committee was set up to formulate a promotional policy for
secondary schools. It consisted of three experienced principals, each representing
a different type of school, a District Superintendent of Schools, the Chief Inspector
of Schools, and the Director of Curriculum. The Assistant Superintendent acted as
chairman. After asking for and receiving opinions from principals all over the Province, a tentative statement was formulated and sent to the Royal Commission on
Education for its study. It will also be submitted for discussion to the Provincial
Curriculum Advisory Board.
Kindergarten Study
At the request of the Minister of Education, a committee has, during the last
two years, studied all aspects of kindergartens as established in this Province and
submitted a report to the Royal Commission on Education. The committee consisted of the Chief Inspector, the Director of Curriculum, the Director of Tests,
Standards, and Research, and the Assistant Superintendent, with the Departmental
librarian acting as secretary.
Routine Duties
In addition to the above, the normal and miscellaneous duties of this office
were carried out.   These included the following:—
(1) Checking teacher entitlement for each school district in the Province:
(2) Preparing various analyses and reports:
(3) Representing the Department at various functions, as directed by the
Deputy Minister:
(4) Acting as Vice-Chairman of the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board:
(5) Acting on the Joint Board of the College of Education:
(6) Meeting in a consultant capacity with various groups of principals upon
request:
(7) Acting on various Departmental committees concerned with matters of
instruction:
(8) Organizing the work of the Physics 101 Revision Committee:
(9) Distributing to District Superintendents of Schools materials useful in the
improvement of instruction.
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
The curriculum for elementary and secondary schools covers fourteen major
subject fields and is organized into 223 courses, with 257 text-books issued on a
free or rental-plan basis. The work of preparing these courses and selecting textbooks for authorization by the Council of Public Instruction is undertaken in the
Division of Curriculum with the assistance of committees of teachers and university
professors. This Division is responsible for a continuing programme of revision in
order that courses and text-books be kept up to date and in line with sound educational research.
 X 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
During the year 1959/60 the curriculum changes made were not extensive
since the Royal Commission on Education was conducting an inquiry into curriculum matters generally. However, with the knowledge of the Commission, certain specific revisions and text-book adoptions were made in courses which had
become out of date or had otherwise proved unsatisfactory. Major attention was
devoted to revisions in courses and texts in the Health and Personal Development
Programme. Following a careful appraisal and survey of opinions, it was decided
to recommend a change of emphasis and a reorganization into courses in Guidance
and courses in Physical and Health Education. The former will be chiefly concerned
with guidance in school work, selection of courses, and planning for further studies
and careers; the latter is concerned with the development of physical fitness and
good health habits.
Experimental work in curriculum development was continued. The courses in
French beginning in elementary school referred to in previous Reports were continued in selected schools. The experimental course in advanced Mathematics at
the senior high-school level was taught, and revised in the light of experience with
the experimental classes. Provision was made for assisting in the development of
new mathematics courses for able pupils in junior high schools. An experimental
course was developed in the Russian language. It will be taught to selected classes
during the year 1960/61. All of these experimental projects may be considered as
a necessary part of the leadership function of the Department of Education in the
promotion of curriculum improvement.
A further development which merits special mention concerns revisions in the
field of arithmetic. For several years, authorization has been given to representation at the annual meeting of the Directors of Curricula in the four Western
Provinces. These conferences have been concerned with the matter of securing
closer co-ordination between the Provincial curricula. One particular result of
this work has been the establishment of an Interprovincial Arithmetic Committee
authorized jointly by the Ministers of Education in British Columbia and Alberta.
This Committee will assist in co-ordinating revisions in the elementary-school arithmetic courses and text-books now being undertaken by special committees in both
Provinces.
Since curriculum is the concern and interest of many people, efforts are made
to discuss curriculum matters with as many groups and individuals as time, staff,
and resources will permit. During the year under review the Department, through
the Division, was represented on the board of directors of the British Columbia
Safety Council and the St. John Ambulance Association, and at the Canadian Highway Safety Conference. Other activities included talks to several clubs and Parent-
Teacher Associations and meetings with the Provincial Conference of Directors of
Education, the Vancouver Administrators Association, the U.B.C. Alumni Association, and addresses to teachers' conventions in Penticton, Sidney, Kimberley, Vancouver, and Victoria. The Director was also privileged to act as a consultant to the
Canadian Education Association Short Course for Superintendents and Inspectors
from across Canada.
Acknowledgment
The policy of carrying on curriculum development work with the assistance of
special committees of teachers and others was continued. Fifteen committees with
a combined membership of 110 were engaged in curriculum development work
during the year. Sincere appreciation is extended to all teachers who, as members
of Department of Education committees or as members of Teachers' Federation
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES X 45
committees, have contributed their time and professional advice to the improvement
of our curriculum.
Special appreciation is also extended to the members of the College of Education and the Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, and Geography Departments at the
University of British Columbia. Professors and heads of various University departments have given valuable assistance to the Division in specific curriculum projects.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
This Board held four regular meetings during the year to consider reports on
curriculum developments and advise on curriculum policy. Acknowledgment is
made herewith of the very helpful advice and significant recommendations given by
the members of this Board during the year.
Curriculum Revision
The following summarizes the curriculum revision work undertaken during the
year:—
A. Elementary Schools
1. Arithmetic.—A revision of the arithmetic programme for Grades I to VI
was started.
2. Social Studies.—New text-books were selected for social studies for Grades
V and VI.
3. Elementary French.—The experimental courses for Grades V and VI were
continued. Courses for Grades VII and VIII were revised, and a tentative course
for Grade IX was planned.
4. Library.—Approximately 300 books for elementary-school libraries were
received, and approximately 200 were recommended, classified, and included in the
lists sent regularly to all schools.
B. Secondary Schools
1. Mathematics.—An experimental course in advanced mathematics was developed and taught to four selected classes in Penticton, Burnaby, New Westminster,
and Vancouver.
2. Guidance.—A series of guidance lessons was developed for Grades VII
and VIII.
3. Physical and Health Education.—A sequence of five courses was developed
for Grades VII to XII.
4. Chemistry.—A study of the Grade XIII course and text was begun.
5. Physics.—A study of the Grade XIII course and text was begun.
6. French.—The experimental work begun in Grade V was continued into
Grade VIII.
7. Russian.—An experimental course was developed in Russian for trial use
in selected classes in New Westminster, Grand Forks, and Slocan.
8. Bible Readings and Bible Literature.—Revision studies were continued.
9. Library.—Approximately 250 books were reviewed, and approximately 60
per cent of these were recommended, classified, and included in the lists of approved
books sent regularly to all schools.
 X 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
C. Selection of New Text-books
The following new text-books were authorized for use in the public schools:
1. Social Studies, Grade V:   Canada and Her Neighbours (Ginn).
2. Social Studies, Grade VI:  Lands of Europe and Asia (Ginn).
3. Home Economics 11, 32:
Experiences with Foods (Ginn).
Nutrition for Today (McLelland and Stewart).
4. Geography 91:   The Canadian Oxford School Atlas (Oxford).
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH X 47
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed., DIRECTOR
Work on the production and administration of standardized tests was curtailed
during the past year to two subject levels—reading in Grade IX and mathematics
in Grade XI—while several other activities of the Division received additional
emphasis, as follows:—
Extension of the study of kindergarten and non-kindergarten pupils to Grade
VII.
The modification and refinement of University Entrance and Senior Matriculation scales required by increasing holding power and greater numbers
of Provincial scholarship candidates.
Further analysis of Grade VII achievement data by mental age, size and type
of school, and geographical region.
The production of charts and graphs for public information purposes.
The compilation of early data on grade enrolments.
The distribution of commercially and locally produced standardized tests.
Sales volume and value reached a new high during 1959/60, although
it is becoming increasingly difficult to carry an adequate stock and obtain
sufficient space and temporary assistance to handle large orders.
Enrolment passed the 300,000 level during September, 1959.    The increase
was almost entirely due to increases in B.C. births and holding power as net immigration was very small in 1958 and 1959.   It should be noticed that the increase
from 100,000 in 1925 to 200,000 in 1953 occurred in a period of twenty-eight
years.   The increase from 200,000 to 300,00 required only seven years, and an
enrolment of 400,000 is expected by 1968.   The accompanying graph shows the
radical changes that have occurred in the relation of the working population to the
school and pre-school populations, and leads to speculation regarding the social
and economic effects that may be expected in the near future.
Consideration of quality rather than quantity is, of course, the major concern
of the Division. It is expected that far more testing for the determination of standards will be required in the future than is currently being carried out. But in 1953,
when the students in the Mathematics 30 (Grade XI) terminal course were tested,
two scores were obtained for each of 4,516 pupils. In 1960 a new set of Mathematics 30 terminal course tests was administered and four scores were obtained
for each of 9,351 pupils. The quadrupling of the number of scores was therefore
due to a realization of the need for measuring mathematical ability in fundamentals,
problems, and reasoning as well as achievement, in addition to the doubling of the
course enrolment. The number of distributions of scores for each school district
also was quadrupled because of differences in various aspects of mathematics that
previously had been noted between boy and girl students. (Girls excel in the computational aspects of mathematics, and boys in those involving concepts and problems.) It is hoped that out of investigations of this type will come measuring
devices that teachers may use not only to determine standards, but also to give
partial diagnoses, or answers to the question why some students have much higher
achievement than others.
Completion of the revision and standardization of the B.C. Reading Comprehension Test, Form S, for Grade IX provides an additional tool for teachers to use
in classifying pupils at that level.   It covers vocabulary, comprehension, and speed,
 X 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
and will supplement the tests of reading ability that were standardized previously
in the specific fields of mathematics, science, and social studies.
A tremendous mass of data has been accumulated in the kindergarten and
Grade VII achievement surveys, and analysis is proceeding as time permits. Many
factors have not been studied; for example, the ability of the teachers and the
socio-economic background of the pupils. Therefore, generalizations are dangerous, particularly when the differences are small. The evidence suggests, however,
that the highest achievement at the Grade VII level is found among pupils in most
of the equivalent mental age-groups who attended kindergarten and are now in
large rather than small schools, in junior high schools rather than in other types,
and live in the most densely populated areas of the Province. An interesting exception is the relatively high results which small elementary schools obtain with the
lowest mental age-group.
j PH SCKXX ';. SCHOOL >
POPULATION-
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
BIRTHS IN  BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1933 TO 1960
X 49
1935
1940 1945 1950
YEAR OF  BIRTH
1955
1960
H
I
O
c
>
z
400
/
350
I/.
1    300
ENROLMENT IN
- BRITISH COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS J
u_
O
§    250
1934-1960
Projected fcol97B
<
_.
o
f    200
150
100
50
400
350
300
X
o
c
250     q
200
150
100
50
1935 1940 1945 1950 1955
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
1960 1965 1970 1975
Division of Visual Education
 X 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools _ _   _	
1,638
27,493
Junior high schools _       	
29,131
In Grade VII                                 _        12,863
In Grade VIII  11,081
In Grade IX     5,170
Boys            8
Special class (Trail)             9
29,131
Senior high schools      ;      _ __                 .                  	
12,870
High-school boys 	
Technical students        .
170
58
Jericho Hill School     _ 	
32
Indian schools           	
128
In elementary grades (Grades VII and VIII)  	
56
72
In senior grades	
128
Correspondence courses, taken under supervision of teacher who
is not Qualified to teach senior Home Economics
338
Total, public schools	
42,557
Private schools—
In elementary grades	
In senior grades                                     	
211
478
689
Grand total  	
43,246
There are 199 Home Economics centres in the Province, of which 184 are in
public schools, 12 in private schools, and 3 in Indian schools.    This shows an
increase of
15 over the total o
f last year.
Centres
Rooms
One-room centre	
     80
80
Two-r
Three
oom centre ____
     81
162
72
-room centre	
     24
Four-i
Five-r
Six-ro
Seven
■oom centre	
       6
24
20
18
7
oom centre
       4
om centre _ _ _   	
       3
-room centre
..      1
Totals 	
  199
383
 HOME ECONOMICS
X 51
Home Economics centres were included in the following new public schools,
which were opened during the 1959/60 session: Clearbrook Junior High School,
Abbotsford; Robb Road Junior High School, Comox; John Peterson Junior High
School, Kamloops; Garibaldi Junior High School, Maple Ridge; Mission Junior
High School, Mission; Balmoral Junior High School, North Vancouver; Prince
Rupert Senior High School, Prince Rupert; R. C. Palmer Junior High School, Richmond; Newton Junior High School and White Rock Junior High School, Surrey;
Esquimalt Junior High School, Victoria; Sir Charles Tupper Junior-Senior High
School, Vancouver; and George Elliot Junior-Senior High School, Winfield.
Some additional and (or) new Home Economics rooms were opened in Vancouver schools and Burnaby schools during the past year.
New Home Economics centres were opened for the first time in the following
communities: Hagensborg (Sir Alexander Mackenzie High School), Hazelton
(Hazelton Amalgamated High School), and 100 Mile House (100 Mile Junior-
Senior High School).
During the 1959/60 session there were 375 teachers of Home Economics in
British Columbia, showing an increase of twenty-five over the previous year.
For the third consecutive year, an extra-sessional course in Home Economics
was offered by the University of British Columbia. This year the course was given
at Abbotsford and was conducted by Mrs. Evelyn M. Philip, B.H.Sc.
Because of expansion, due to increased enrolment in the schools, and because
of the annual drop-out of Home Economics teachers, due to marriage and family
reasons, the supply of Home Economics teachers continues to be a problem.
A number of teachers holding Elementary certificates are working toward the
Bachelor of Education degree with a major in Home Economics at the summer
sessions of the University of British Columbia. This arrangement has been helpful
in training teachers for junior high Home Economics positions. However, the need
for university graduates in Home Economics, to teach senior high Home Economics
courses, continues to exceed the supply.
The growth in number of Grade XII students taking Home Economics 91
(the final course for the Home Economics major) in public schools during the
past five years is as follows: 1955/56, 1,476; 1956/57, 1,599; 1957/58, 1,878;
1958/59, 2,052; and 1959/60, 2,445.
As part of the in-service training for Home Economics teachers, this Division
has continued to provide mimeographed teaching aids, to make consultative visits,
and to have after-school conferences with teachers in their respective schools.
In addition to these services, conference-workshops of half a day's or a day's duration were held for groups of Home Economics teachers in three districts, last fall.
 X 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF DR. EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
Enrolment
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the
year 1959/60 was 17,304. This shows an increase of 915 students or 5.6 per cent
over 1958/59, when the enrolment was 16,389. (I regret that the enrolment figure
given in the 1958/59 report was incorrect. It should have read 16,389, not 17,887.)
1. Number of Students.—The enrolment by age over the last five years, and the
per cent increase in the total enrolment, is shown in the following table:—
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
3,720
6,539
4,382
7,579
5,460
8,967
9.8341
6,5552
10,120!
7,1842
10,259
11,961
16.6
14,427
20.3
16,389
13.6
17,304
5.6
1 Under 19 years.        2 Nineteen years and over.
2. School Students by Grade.—Students who could properly be called school
students (those registered in a school or taking a full grade by correspondence) were
classified by grade as follows:—
Number Per Cent
1,328 19.7
Grade X ._ _ 1,727 25.6
Grade XI   1,900 28.1
Grade XII  1,793 26.6
Totals   6,748
100.0
3. School Students Registered in a School.—A large number of school students
were registered in a school and took one or more courses by correspondence, as
follows:—
Number
Per Cent
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
271
1,624
3,793
225
4.6
27.4
64.2
3.8
1.6
Small high schools (fewer than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
Large high schools (more than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
9.4
22.0
1.3
Totals                                                                   	
5,913
100.0
34.3
Students registered in a school enrolled in correspondence courses for the
following reasons:—
Number Per Cent
Course not offered at school  3,771 56.5
Time-table difficulties  1,320 19.8
Failure in the course  1,565 23.4
Other reasons        22 0.3
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
X 53
4. Students Taking a Full Grade by Correspondence.—A total of 480 students
enrolled in a full grade by correspondence for the following reasons:—
Number
Living too far from a school  228
Too ill to attend school  101
In receipt of social assistance     21
Needed at home       7
Other  123
Totals
480
Per Cent
47.5
21.0
4.4
1.5
25.6
100.0
Classification of Students by Fees
Students may be classified according to the fee they paid for each course.
1. School-age Students Charged No Fees:
Not in attendance at school—
Because of illness	
Because of need at home	
Because of distance factor	
In receipt of social assistance	
In correctional institutions	
In attendance at a superior school
Totals
Number
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
234
1.3
16
0.1
359
2.1
30
0.2
186
1.1
271
1.5
1,096
6.3
2. School-age Students Charged Fees:
Number
In high schools with fewer than 140 students in
Grades IX to XII ($5 per course)  1,714
In high schools with more than 140 students in
Grades IX to XII ($8 per course)  3,993
In private schools ($8 per course)      225
Summer students enrolled in courses in which
they failed ($8 per course)      774
Gainfully employed ($5 per course)      889
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
9.9
Totals   7,595
23.1
1.3
4.5
5.2
44.0
Adult Students Charged No Fees:
Because of illness	
Number
_ 138
Because in receipt of social assistance     43
Because in a correctional institution  510
Enrolled in Preparation for Canadian Citizenship 307
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
0.8
0.2
2.9
1.8
Totals
998
5.7
 X 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
4. Adult Students Charged Fees:
Taking academic course— _..   t
° Number
Resident  in  British  Columbia   ($8   per
course)   4,805
Non-resident in British Columbia ($16 per
course)   163
Taking technical courses ($12 per course)—
Resident in British Columbia  821
Non-resident in British Columbia  184
Totals   5,973
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
27.8
0.9
4.8
1.1
34.6
5. Senior Matriculation Students Charged No Fees.—Two students situated
in remote areas took a full Senior Matriculation grade by correspondence, and were
charged no fees.
6. Senior Matriculation Students Charged Fees: Number
Resident in British Columbia ($20 per course)   1,044
Non-resident  in  British   Columbia   ($25   per
course)         26
Totals
1,070
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
6.0
0.2
6.2
7. Students Abroad.—British Columbia taxpayers living abroad and in other
Provinces of Canada were charged rates applicable to British Columbia residents
($8 per course).   Number, 196; percentage of total enrolment, 1.1.
Completion of Papers
The number of papers marked over the last five years and the per cent increase
per year is shown in the following table:—
1955/56
1956/57   1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
Number of papers marked-
Per cent increase per year—
124,469
130,941
5.2
158,236
20.8
178,246
12.7
196,618
10.6
It is noteworthy that in 1959/60 the enrolment increased by 5.6 per cent, but
the number of papers marked increased by 10.6 per cent, showing that students
are completing more papers.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of eighty-four instructors were employed during the year. The outside instructors were paid on a piecework basis.
New and Revised Courses
New and revised courses offered during the year were as follows: German 110
and 120 (not previously offered), Electricity 20, Latin 10, Steam Engineering
Third Class, Steam Engineering First Class (not previously offered), Bookkeeping
34, English Language 40, English Literature 100, History 91, Shorthand 21.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
X 55
Courses
The number of students who enrolled in each of the high-school subjects during
the year was as follows:—
Subject
School
Age
Adult
Total
1,374
1,056
2,430
1,488
1,272
2,760
1,335
419
1,754
710
38
748
2,393
2,126
4,519
862
107
969
715
368
1,083
495
198
693
406
82
488
208
122
330
182
40
222
406
127
533
777
43
820
523
95
618
1,085
203
1,288
293
80
373
65
33
98
6
21
27
17
625
642
261
59
320
133
86
219
63
50
113
33
53
86
1
2
3
609
103
712
201
77
278
215
413
628
61
15
76
223
335
558
71
100
171
192
169
361
119
139
258
2
7
9
180
51
231
136
76
212
156
157
313
101
144
245
53
15
68
8
4
12
33
51
84
108
35
143
1
12
13
11
11
4
20
24
2
13
15
2
2
1
13
14
10
113
123
3
5
8
2
12
14
2
346
348
79
79
2
309
311
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40, 100	
English Language 10, 20, 30, 31, 40, 101-
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33 	
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30-
Mathematics 10, 12, 20, 30, 91, 100, 101	
Science 10, 20...
French 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120 	
German 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120, 90-
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120	
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 110 	
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39	
Art 10, 20, 39. 	
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91-
Record Keeping 11	
Typewriting 10, 20._
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20.	
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40..
Extramural Music 11, 21	
English and Citizenship 19, 29_
Business Fundamentals 24	
Electricity 20...
Elementary Geology 29	
Frame House Construction 29..
Sheet-metal Work 20 	
Auto Mechanics 20, 30	
Shorthand 21, 31	
Bookkeeping 34, 91	
Economics 92  	
History 91, 101, 102	
Geography 91  	
English 32, 91, 93, 99..... 	
Radio and Wireless 30. 	
Metal-mining 30 	
Forestry 30 	
Biology 91	
Chemistry 91, 101	
Physics 91, 101	
Home Furnishing 23	
Secretarial Practice 92..
Diesel Engines 91	
Law 93 	
Air Navigation I, II
Aviation 	
Dressmaking..
Vocational Courses
Electricity for the Building Trades..
Glove-making..
House Painting and Decorating-
Industrial Mathematics 	
Mathematics for Steam Engineering Second Class..
Spherical Trigonometry-
Steam Engineering Fourth, Third, Second, and First Class..
Steam Heating for Plant Operators	
Preparation for Citizenship  	
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 2,731 students with new material from
our course in English and Citizenship I; 1,131 students were supplied with material
from English and Citizenship II; 166 with English and Citizenship III; 315 students took the course in English 19 and 327 students took the course in English 29
by correspondence. In addition, 311 students were enrolled in the course Preparation for Citizenship. Classes in English were held in fifty-one night-school centres, and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in eighty-five small
isolated places throughout the Province.
 X 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1959/60 there were 1,276 pupils enrolled in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 1,194 were enrolled in Victoria and the
remainder, 82, at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tables below show
the enrolment by month and grade for the two centres.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September	
118
104
88
73
92
67
57
61
660
October
153
122
108
94
105
80
78
96
840
November	
166
133
114
98
115
95
93
102
916
December 	
175
140
120
101
119
95
100
109
959
lamia ry
188
147
127
111
121
103
114
114
1,025
February	
191
154
138
113
115
111
119
119
1,070
March
199
155
142
124
128
112
122
128
1,110
205
159
144
126
129
114
129
134
1,140
May
200
169
149
132
131
118
135
141
1,175
Tune
195
176
152
137
132
119
138
145
1,194
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE
September	
9
10
8
6
2
4
4
43
October.	
10
12
8
7
2
4
3
6
52
November	
11
15
8
7
2
5
5
6
59
December	
11
14
9
7
2
5
5
6
59
January 	
12
14
9
10
3
8
7
6
69
February  _
14
14
10
10
3
8
6
7
72
March.....     . .
15
15
11
10
3
8
6
9
77
April     	
17
15
11
10
3
8
6
9
79
May	
18
15
11
10
3
8
6
9
80
June	
17
14
15
10
3
8
6
9
82
The number of papers marked were as follows: Victoria, 142,681; Pouce
Coupe, 9,386; total, 152,067.
In addition to the number of pupils and papers shown above, 295 students
were enrolled in the Adult Section and 7,252 papers marked.
Thus the services of the School were used by 1,571 individuals, and 159,319
papers were marked.
As an additional service, kindergarten kits were sent to ninety-seven preschool-age children, an increase of 26 per cent over the previous school-year.
During the school-year the study of lesson format, started in the previous year,
was continued and the revision for the primary grades completed.
The Victoria staff consisted of the Director, thirteen instructors, and a clerical
staff of five; at Pouce Coupe, one instructor in charge and one assistant. The
median active pupil load per instructor was eighty; the average number of pupils
handled per instructor in the year, 112.
In September, 1959, Miss Olive Aird retired after forty-two years of teaching
service in the Province, the last fifteen of which were spent in correspondence
instruction.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS X 57
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A., DIRECTOR
OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Work and Services of the Broadcasts Branch of the
Department of Education
The term " Radio Broadcasts Branch" has not been used, as television has now
become an added responsibility of this department.
Radio
One hundred and fifty-eight programmes were planned and prepared by this
department. Either the Director or the Assistant Director was present during
the production of each of these. For thirty-six additional Western Regional cooperative programmes, script analyses were made. For fifty-one there was representation on the National Advisory Committee for the C.B.C. National series.
A total of 245 programmes was made available for classroom participation. This
entailed the following operations:—■
1. Study of teacher recommendations and evaluations based on previous series
and discussions with teacher groups determined largely the plans for the year's
broadcasts.
2. Teachers' Bulletins outlining the year's broadcasts, with pre- and post-
broadcast suggestions of teachers, plus supplementary booklets for music, art, and
French, were prepared, packaged, and mailed in the following quantities: Teachers'
Bulletins, 10,000; Pictures in the Air, 3,000; Junior Music, 18,000; Intermediate
Music (Manitoba), 40,500; Ecoutez, 12,000; and Young Canada Listens (C.B.C),
6,500. (These quantities, especially for junior music and art, were not adequate
for the demand.)
3. Content and presentation of each script was discussed with selected freelance script-writers. Editing, revision, and rewriting in varying amounts was required on each script received.
4. Students and choirs used on broadcasts were auditioned and rehearsed.
5. The ever-increasing costs for professional talent demand that more use be
made of inexperienced student talent, sometimes with increased time expenditure
and hazardous performance. Responsibility for financing, for relations with schools,
and for decisions on educational points require either the Director or the Assistant
Director to be present at all production rehearsals. (Actual production is undertaken by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.)
6. Contact was maintained with schools through teacher evaluations of programmes and through promotional reminders of series, sent from time to time to
all schools in the Province.
The creative writing and the intermediate art series resulted in quantities of
written work and pictures being sent in to this department. Selections from the
writing were read on the programmes, and each picture received comment before
being returned.
7. Illustrated discussions of the use of school broadcasts were conducted with
classes of the College of Education both in Victoria and Vancouver during winter
and summer sessions.
 x 58 public schools report, 1959/60
Response to British Columbia School Broadcasts
1. Out of three programmes submitted to The Institute for Education by
Radio-Television, the Broadcasts Branch of the British Columbia Department of
Education won two first awards for in-school educational series.
2. The following figures are based on the Reports on Use of School Broadcasts,
1959/60, submitted by 82.4 per cent of British Columbia schools (64 per cent of
reporting schools participated in school broadcasts): Schools using, 651; classes
using, 2,946; pupils using, 93,635.
Numerically most popular was primary music, used by 1,199 classrooms.
Without a tape service for schools, series directed to high-school grades are not
economical (based on use), and so were not scheduled, with the exception of
Ecoutez, used by 288 reporting classrooms.
Television
Extensive planning and work was done in preparation for a B.C.-produced
series on physical geography, to be aired in November, 1960. This is a Western
Regional co-operative series for Grades VII to IX.
 division of visual education
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
X 59
REPORT OF N. M. HENDERSON, B.A., ACTING-DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1959, to August 31st, 1960.
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
416
434
411
445
59
220
787
359
95
121
306
226
115
453
252
120
192
239
432
506
171
312
964
1,886
173
213
665
720
112
142
220
702
1,307
1,063
1,259
473
331
854
2,819
812
234
270
257
195
33
114
527
208
26
54
193
76
71
285
184
48
107
198
223
318
89
171
511
1,125
35
124
318
422
49
96
94
347
837
623
741
268
188
471
1,917
555
174
39
687
243
49
309
923
241
503
14
186
31
195
684
289
94
4
612
355
895
228
1,193
1,608
1,030
381
150
691
506
61
248
107
897
597
1,155
391
1,399
724
1,325
997
1,012
769
1,060
1,684
197
126
1,063
1,216
64
423
251
128
30
520
177
5. Creston                              -        — —
41
228
697
162
463
10
11   Trail                                                             	
138
19    Grand F"rks
21
13. Kettle Valley                      	
157
504
247
69
3
18    -".nli-en
467
276
639
171
845
23. Kelowna     	
24. Kamloops..                 —                       ...
1,126
929
258
123
437
369   •
29. Lillooet            	
39
.0  Smith raribno
193
31. Merritt—                                   	
48
557
33. Chilliwack.     .         ~                   .
464
34. Abbotsford
907
291
957
37. Delta  	
567
.8    Rir.hmrmrl
956
771
758
1,712                   951
1,510                     812
594
689
824
730
474
674
1,215
199
617
545
426
503
356
283
679
118
338
412
1,149
165
100
46   Sechelt
753
895
54
49.  Ocean Falls
322
5(1   Oneen Charlotte
228
51. Portland Canal
194
499
260
191
281
1,120
112
1,002
500
106
291
113
126
142
412
62
592
247
105
202
137
17
46
641
80
625
59
88
168
66
55. Burns Lake     	
15
30
402
58. McBride 	
70
461
60. North Peace              	
42
 X 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
6,755
600
445
23
924
72
492
806
59(1
3,467
333
224
16
439
47
261
573
764
i
3                       3
62. Sooke   ....
63. Saanich                          	
796                   583
422                   333
191                    130
65. Cowichan                                                               ._   ...
1,494                   992
48                     41
67. Ladysmith-                                 ..	
68. Nanaimo
136        |            102
194                     144
491                     365
70. Alberni —               ~             	
660                    434
525                     411
71. Courtenay—     ..    -      	
603
1,434
226
526
979
137
314
128
0
348
707
138
237
738
70
196
81
0
234                     199
718        |          529
73    Alert Bay
200                   167
74. Quatsino. .    _   	
260                   156
952                   814
228                    182
117                     82
125                   Ul
79. Ucluelet-Tofino       —   —	
|
338         [            226
176        1            145
12
4
1,483
941
7
4
962
811
1
1,338
646
1
Unattached            —  	
. .. Miscellaneous     	
1,025
624
Totals      - 	
52,476              30,162
39,287
29,173
Picture sets
Dioramas ___
Stereos 	
Requested
Supplied
1,489
1,131
191
181
359
326
This Division supplied on schedule visual aids to 948 schools during the term.
On the shelves of the library were 3,310 motion pictures, 5,857 filmstrips, 885
picture sets, and 84 dioramas.
The Division also maintained a loan service of stereographs for rural schools
having no projection facilities.
Within the last year, in co-operation with the District Superintendents, visits
were made to Langley, Williams Lake, Quesnel, and Prince George. Here teachers
and principals had an opportunity to discuss specific problems.
The Division also assisted in the visual education programme of the College of
Education. Many students visited the visual-aids library and learned of the services
offered to schools. Visual aids were also provided to students when they undertook
their student teaching sessions during the fall and winter terms.
A permanent Department display, the responsibility of which rests with this
Division, is located in the British Columbia Building, Pacific National Exhibition.
During the year, as in the past, the display, which depicts various facets of education
in British Columbia, received several alterations and modifications in an effort to
keep it both timely and interesting.
A signal honour was bestowed on our Director of Visual Education during the
year. Mr. J. R. Pollock was selected by the Colombo Plan to visit Indonesia and
organize an audio-visual education programme for that government. The Department granted him a leave of absence for one year, and Mr. Pollock left on November
1st to commence his new duties in Bangdung.
On February 22nd the Division was honoured with the presence of Mr. Guy
Roberge, Film Commissioner and Chairman of the National Film Board of Canada.
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
X 61
District audio-visual education supervisors from the Lower Mainland, as well as
members of this staff, spent a most fruitful period with Mr. Roberge discussing
problems of mutual concern.
Within the last year the Division was honoured a third time. Miss Mary Field,
British authority on children's films and television, visited Vancouver during her trip
across Canada, and the Division played a role in several meetings with her.
In concluding this report I wish to express sincere appreciation to the Department of Education and others for their support, particularly during the months in
which I was Acting-Director.
 X 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
To purchase and distribute free books and supplies during the school-year
1958/59 to public schools, private schools, and to correspondence students required
an expenditure of $570,643.96. A total of 4,655 free requisitions was received and
completed.
For the school-year 1959/60 an expenditure of $519,550.09 was required to
complete 4,475 free requisitions. This is a decrease of $51,093.87 or 9 per cent
from the previous year, and a decrease in the number of requisitions serviced of
180 or 3.87 per cent.
A total of 20,906 purchase orders was received in 1958/59, and 21,481 were
received during the school-year 1959/60, an increase of 575 orders.
A total of 2,639 rental-plan requisitions was received in the school-year
1958/59, and 2,694 were received and serviced during the school-year 1959/60.
This is an increase of fifty-five requisitions or 2 per cent.
During the school-year 1958/59, $586,412.49 was received for rental fees and
remittances for lost and damaged books, including remittances covering fire losses;
and in the school-year 1959/60, $646,351.30 was received on the same basis. This
is an increase of $59,938.81 or 10.22 per cent over the previous year. In 1958/59
rental refunds amounted to $6,607.35, and in 1959/60 they amounted to $7,534.97,
an increase of $927.62 or 14.04 per cent.
In our library service department we employ five people on a permanent basis.
These are assisted by other members of our staff from time to time, as conditions
demand. During the school-year 1958/59, 608 orders were received, covering such
items as school library books, wall maps, globes, and other materials, and during
the school-year 1959/60 they received and serviced 602 purchase orders. To complete these orders, 1,848 orders were placed with our suppliers during 1958/59, and
1,951 orders were placed during 1959/60. There were 24,955 individual orders
for books, maps, and globes received during the school-year 1958/59, and 24,113
items received during the school-year 1959/60.
In our shipping department four men are employed on a permanent basis.
These men are assisted by as many as nineteen men who are employed on a part-time
basis during the peak periods. The total weights and number of pieces shipped via
various shipping agencies by this department are shown in the following tabulation:—
Freight (including rail, truck, or boat)— 1958/59 1959/60
Number of pieces shipped        23,687 29,024
Weight  lb. 1,289,960 1,285,285
Express—
Number of pieces shipped  1,040 384
Weight  lb.       21,597 10,605
Mail-
Number of pieces shipped        26,824 27,578
Weight  lb.       64,247 58,669
Total shipments for year—
Number of pieces shipped        51,551 56,986
Total weight lb. 1,375,804 1,354,559
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
X 63
In order to store shipments received from various suppliers, it is necessary to
use extra warehouse space some distance from our shipping-room. Although the
rental costs of this warehouse are absorbed by the Public Works Department, it
must be mentioned that the cost of handling this material from one end of town to
another is added to our cost of operation, not only in actual cash expended, but also
in time lost. It is our hope that at some time in the not too distant future we may
be equipped with adequate space under one roof to enable us to continue to give
the schools of the Province the service in keeping with the standard to which they
have become accustomed over the yast years.
In closing, I wish to express my appreciation for the wonderful co-operation
that has been given to me by my staff, and to thank the secretaries of the School
Boards throughout the Province for the splendid co-operation that they have shown,
without which our work would have been so much more difficult.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1960
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand
Cash in bank .
$100.00
1,200.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand
Consigned text-books _.
Less depreciation1
Accounts receivable
$1,403,664.55
676,871.08
Outstanding publishers' credit notes
$1,300.00
654,603.93
726,793.47
11,634.62
8.08
$1,394,340.10
1 Third year depreciation on 1957/58 inventory ...
Second year depreciation on 1958/59 inventory .
First year depreciation on 1959/60 inventory 	
$197,641.27
231,666.16
247,563.65
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $147.52
Outstanding publishers' invoices  29.60
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  1,300.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund  1,392,862.98
$1,394,340.10
 X 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1960
Sales
Revenue—Sales  $1,083,717.67
Less discount        207,850.59
Net sales      $875,867.08
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1959 $495,453.93
Purchases  for  year   (cost,
freight, duty)      885,083.19
  $1,380,537.12
Inventory, March 31st, 1960        654,603.93
Cost of sales        725,933.19
Gross profit      $149,933.89
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages         $44,702.78
Packing and general expenses  5,137.42
Freight and delivery  10,994.01
Sundry expenses  115.96
60,950.17
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1960        $88,983.72
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH X 65
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1960—Continued
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected      $633,108.73
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1959       $660,973.59
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S.
tax)         742,690.96
Inventory, March 31st, d^!328»»     $1,403,664.55
1958   $592,923.85
Lei's three years' depreciation at 33x/3 per
cent per annum ....    592,923.85 $197,641.27
Inventory, March 31st,
1959   $694,998.48
Less two years' depreciation at 331/. per
cent per annum ____    463,332.32    231,666.16
$231,666.16
Inventory, March 31st,
1960   $742,690.96
Less one year's depreciation at 33% per
cent per annum ____    247,563.65    247,563.65
$495,127.31
Closing rental inventory at March 31 st,
1960         726,793.47
Total depreciation for year
1959/60   $676,871.08     $676,871.08
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages     $41,264.10
Packing and general expenses         4,742.23
Freight and delivery       10,148.32
Sundry expenses  107.05
  56,261.70
733,132.78
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1960       $100,024.05
1 See footnote to balance-sheet.
 X 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ed.,
CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Supervision of Instruction
The programme for supervision of instruction in the British Columbia public
elementary and secondary schools has been under the direction of forty-seven District Superintendents of Schools and the Superintendent of Schools (Vancouver).
Including those employed in Indian day-schools, the Jericho Hill School, vocational
schools, and correctional institutions, there were more than 11,600 teachers under
supervision. Of these, 130 teachers of Indian day-schools were examined by the
District Superintendents on request by the Indian Affairs Branch, Department of
Immigration, Ottawa, and written reports were forwarded for 102 of them. There
were 4,100 written reports prepared on teachers during the school-year 1959/60.
These include written reports by the Inspectors of Elementary and High Schools
for School District No. 39 (Vancouver). In addition, reports were prepared by
principals of schools with ten or more classes on all probationary teachers and on
approximately one-third of the remainder.
Although no additional District Superintendents were appointed during the
school-year 1959/60, nevertheless an extension in the supervisory programme was
made possible by the appointments of more Directors of Instruction in some of the
larger districts. These include School Districts No. 61 (Victoria), No. 45 (West
Vancouver), No. 38 (Richmond), and No. 40 (New Westminster). Through the
growth of school district supervisory staff, including directors, supervisors, and
consultants, there are increased co-ordination of instructional services and improved
continuity of supervisory practices. District meetings of principals and supervisors
are held regularly in most areas of the Province. In addition, zone meetings are
being held in out-of-school hours to provide for in-service training at the administrative level. Guest speakers have included University and Department of Education personnel. District Superintendents Gurney, Phillipson, and Wright reported
on a principals' workshop in Terrace. District Superintendent Marriott's report
reveals that meetings of Main Line and Cariboo principals were held in Kamloops.
Zone meetings of principals in the Okanagan Valley, Nanaimo, Fraser Valley, and
North Central British Columbia were reported upon. In addition, the Chief
Inspector of Schools addressed the British Columbia Teachers' Federation annual
workshop on the subject " School District Supervisory Personnel." During this
school-year the plans were completed for the second principals' workshop on the
University of British Columbia campus at Point Grey.
An experimental project on supervision was undertaken by District Superintendent S. J. Graham in the J. Lloyd Crowe Senior High School. With co-operation
from other Departmental officials, a team evaluation of this large secondary school
was completed. Each member of the team, whose experience in teaching and
supervision of secondary schools averaged more than twenty years, prepared criteria
of evaluation and visited teachers in his special subject field. The team members
served as resource persons adding breadth of knowledge and experience to the
local District Superintendent, who prepared a thorough report of the examination.
The School Board, the teachers, and the team members reported favourably on
the experiment.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES X 67
An exceptionally fine example of a stimulating project for teachers in a particular subject field was the Burnaby Science Fair, undertaken by District Superintendent C. J. Frederickson and the Burnaby School District supervisory staff.
Burnaby Central Junior High School became the focal point on a Saturday for 1,500
teachers and administrators from many parts of the Province to observe projects
and demonstrations and to hear reports and lectures from scientists of school, university, and industry. Another valuable service was rendered by District Superintendent H. C. Ferguson, who organized an audio-visual workshop for the teachers
of the Jericho Hill School with the assistance of supervisory personnel in the metropolitan area. It is particularly gratifying to note the willingness with which supervisors from different districts are working together. The support given to continuing
programmes of in-service training by teaching personnel is demonstrated by the
report for 1959/60 in the Burnaby School District that " 25,000 teacher-hours of
voluntary participation occurred."
Trends in the Instructional Programme
Reports from the forty-seven District Superintendents and the Superintendent
of Schools (Vancouver) reveal some trends and aspects of special interest in the
Public Schools of British Columbia.
1. The regular attendance of the children of Sons of Freedom in the elementary and secondary schools is particularly gratifying. District Superintendents
Allen, McKenzie, and Ritchie report that there are now no truants among these
children, and that full co-operation is being given by the parents.
2. An extension in the selection of pupil deviates is observed in the public
school systems. There is a marked increase in the number of special classes for
slow learners on the one hand, and, on the other, there has been a greater application of homogeneous grouping for superior pupils with an accompanying modification of instructional procedures. The secondary-school acceleration programme
which began in 1954 has been continued and extended. Kamloops Senior High
School now has an acceleration programme along with West Vancouver, Penticton,
and selected Vancouver high schools. It was interesting to note that two accelerated
students from the West Vancouver High School were first- and second-place winners
in the Senior Matriculation examinations.
3. Of significance was the number of districts which undertook to provide
summer school for students. District Superintendent W. E. Lucas reported that
the Community Centre continued to co-operate with the North Vancouver School
Board in providing summer school. Other school districts which followed the lead
of North Vancouver included New Westminster, Vancouver, Richmond, Kamloops,
Duncan, and Victoria. All summer schools organized by the school districts were
with the approval of the Council of Public Instruction, and they were self-supporting.
4. Reports of the District Superintendents reveal the professional and public
interest in a variety of experimental courses. Mathematics 91e in Magee (Vancouver), Burnaby South, Penticton, and Lester Pearson (New Westminster) and
the Elementary French programme in a number of schools continued to receive
leadership from the Provincial Director of Curriculum. Several locally organized
experimental courses received closer evaluation this year, and a greater emphasis
on approved scientific procedures in educational research was noted. Of special
interest were the experiments with large classes of English in the Prince George
High School, the honours programme in the J. Lloyd Crowe Senior High School,
the Cuisinaire method of teaching arithmetic in Vancouver, Bumaby, and West
Vancouver, the pre-employment training programme in Victoria, the remedial
reading and arithmetic projects in Richmond and Burnaby.
 X 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
5. An increase in the emphasis on school libraries has been observed in many
districts of the Province. Several areas now have librarians appointed to the district
staff. Reports commented on the duties of district librarians in North Vancouver,
Nanaimo, and Delta. Bumaby School District has developed a bookmobile service,
with 18,000 "pool books" for distribution in boxes of twenty-five as graded
supplementary readers.
Administrative Duties of District Superintendents
All the District Superintendents of the Province have been appointed executive
officers of their School Boards. As there is an extreme variation in the size of the
districts, there are also differences in the assigned duties. All School Board and
most committee meetings were attended by the Superintendents. In general, they
were held responsible to the Boards for staff selection and placement, as well as for
transportation routes and school attendance zones. They made effective the
Board's educational policy throughout the district and directed the district supervisory staff. They generally assisted in the preparation of annual estimates, surveys
of school district needs, and public relations.
All but two districts which presented referenda during the year 1959/60
rceeived approval by the ratepayers. The number of classes on shift was almost
eliminated on the completion of building projects in North Vancouver and Victoria.
Periodic return to shifting classes appears inevitable for brief periods while projects
are being completed, but there are evidences of thorough planning in the school
districts to provide for the educational needs.
A noteworthy development in the administrative affairs of the school districts
is the use of information booklets or pamphlets to keep the public informed on
school affairs. These vary greatly in kind from the professionally prepared brochure
by the Vancouver School Board to the one-page mimeographed paper prepared in
some smaller districts. The monthly news-letter prepared by Victoria and North
Vancouver are effective. It is felt that these publications are meeting a distinct need
in educational affairs of the districts.
Liaison between Headquarters and District Staff
Zone meetings of District Superintendents of Schools were held in six areas
of the Province on a twice-yearly basis. These provide effective areas of communication with the Department of Education and aided the co-ordination of supervision
practices. In addition, several zones prepared papers or examined studies by their
colleagues. Criteria for supervision of the commercial subjects were prepared by
District Superintendent R. S. Price. Mr. D. L. Pritchard, Inspector of High Schools
(Vancouver), prepared a paper on the instruction of physical education. District
Superintendents Graham, McKenzie, and Beech prepared criteria for evaluating
secondary-school administration, social studies, and mathematics respectively. The
Okanagan zone of District Superintendents undertook to prepare and standardize
a spelling test for their areas. In addition, the zone meetings of District Superintendents provided a means by which specific problems could be answered by other
members of the headquarters staff.
In addition to the zone meetings, other procedures have been developed for the
in-service training of newly appointed District Superintendents. A three-day training period was arranged in Victoria, with an intensive study of the Provincial
organization. The new Superintendents have been visited early in the fall term,
and occasionally it has been possible to arrange joint inspections in the classrooms
as well as the examination of school and district organization.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
X 69
Mrs. M. Ricker, president of the British Columbia School Trustees Association, organized a panel presentation to each zone of trustees in the Province, to
which the District Superintendents and the secretary-treasurers were invited. This
proved to be a very effective means of presenting the roles of the trustees, District
Superintendents, and secretary-treasurers in school district affairs. The panel
members were very well received over the whole Province, and it was believed that
an increase resulted in the understanding and appreciation of educational needs.
In co-ordinating the work in the superintendencies, twenty-two regular or
special School Board meetings were attended during the year. In addition, principals' meetings and teachers' meetings were called, and a full-day conference was
held with the directors of elementary and secondary instruction. One meeting was
held with the staff of the College of Education. During the school-year 1959/60
visits were made to forty-six of the school districts in the Province.
In conclusion, may I use this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation
for the many courtesies extended by District Superintendents, trustees, and teachers.
In addition, may I acknowledge the co-operation of the executives of the trustees'
and teachers' associations and their staffs in my visits throughout this Province, in
the solution of many problems as they have developed.
 X 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
This Branch was originally organized in August of 1958 under the direction
of Mr. L. J. Wallace, who was then completing his work as General Chairman of
the British Columbia Centennial Committee. In November Mr. Wallace resigned
in order to accept an appointment as Deputy Provincial Secretary, and the position
of Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment was vacant until the late spring of 1959.
The Scope of the Branch
The main responsibilities of this Branch are the development of plans for the
recruiting of teachers and research in matters of teacher-supply, the promotion of
Future Teachers Clubs, the co-ordination of details of teacher-training, the supervision of scholarships for teachers, and general liaison with other groups interested
in the provision of an adequate teaching staff for the public schools of the Province.
The Co-ordinator acts as a Departmental representative on the Joint Board
of the College of Education, and at the Annual Western Canada Regional Conference on Teacher Education.
Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment
On this Committee sit representatives of the British Columbia School Trustees
Association, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and the College of Education, both at the University of British Columbia and Victoria College, as well as
representatives of the Department of Education. The Co-ordinator of Teacher
Recruitment acts as chairman.
The Committee held four meeting during the year. Its work has consisted
principally of submission and discussion of proposals for improving the supply of
teachers. Under its auspices a number of surveys have been undertaken. It serves
also as a liaison for the represented bodies in so far as their teacher-recruitment
activities are concerned.
Future Teachers Clubs
For several years the high schools of the Province have been encouraged to
form Future Teachers Clubs to provide opportunity for pre-training discussion,
study, and classroom observation to those students interested in teaching as a
career. This Branch is charged with encouraging and assisting such activities.
A complete register of the Future Teachers Clubs of the Province has been maintained, and handbooks and other materials have been provided for them. A selection of suitable books and films was made for club use. Two news-letters also went
out during the year. A number of visits were made to clubs, and on seven occasions addresses were given.
The Co-ordinator participated in the Future Teachers Club conference at the
University of British Columbia and assisted in planning a district conference held
at Victoria College.
At the close of the year there were ninety-nine Future Teachers Clubs in the
high schools of the Province, with a total membership of 1,951. Reports indicate
that club members spent an average of nearly seven hours each in observation of
teaching during the year, and six and one-half hours each engaged in teaching
activities. From incomplete returns at the time of writing it would seem that at
least 36 per cent of club members planned to proceed to teacher-training.
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT X 71
Scholarships for Teachers
During the year the Honourable the Minister of Education announced that two
to three scholarships would be awarded as a recognition of excellence of service in
the teaching profession to provide for postgraduate study. This Branch took care
of details, the Co-ordinator acting as secretary of the Selection Committee. A scholarship of $2,500 was awarded to Mr. Hugh Taylor, of Nanaimo, for further study
at Stanford University, and a scholarship of $2,000 to Miss Joyce Fett, of Vancouver, for study at the University of Toronto.
Public Relations
On a number of occasions the Co-ordinator spoke to groups of trustees, Parent-
Teacher Associations, university students, and teachers. Interviews were held with
teachers-in-training and with a considerable number of other people interested in
teacher-training.
Educational and Vocational Guidance
The Department guidance services, initiated and developed by the late Dr.
H. P. Johns, are being carried on at present by this Branch. In the main, the work
consists of supplying schools with samples of available guidance material and keeping them informed of sources of information, and giving guidance to schools and
teachers in the matter of counsellors and counselling. During the year nearly 200
individual requests for occupational information were dealt with.
For some years the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade
has, in co-operation with the Pacific National Exhibition, conducted a job study
competition in the high schools of the Province and presented bursary awards.
This year 175 student job studies were judged by this Branch, and recommendations for awards were sent to the Vancouver Board of Trade. With the advice of
two committees of school counsellors, recommendations were prepared and forwarded to the Board of Trade for revision of the rules of the competition.
I
 X 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
The past year has not indicated any lessening in the demand for vocational
training in one form or another; in fact, as in previous years, the work of this
Branch has continued to grow.
We are indebted to the many individuals who serve on our various advisory
committees, and whose efforts enable us to provide training both of a high standard
and of the correct type.
The result of the Province-wide survey made last year is still in the hands of
the Chant Commission and is not available.
Both the Provincial vocational schools and the Vancouver Vocational Institute continue to operate at maximum capacity, and, indeed, if this Province is to
make the industrial and commercial progress anticipated, vocational and technical
training must continue to expand in order to provide the skilled labour and technical knowledge vital to such progress. Only this way can we raise our level of
productivity, compete with other countries, and assume our position in the international field.
At the present time we have three major schools catering to the needs of the
out-of-school personnel or the adult population of our Province, listed below.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute is administered by the Vancouver School
Board and is financed heavily both by the Provincial and Federal Governments
through the Department of Education. This school offers many excellent programmes catering to the service trades, the commercial fields, and the industrial
industries of our Province.
The British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo) is operated by the Provincial Department of Education, and is financed on a 50-50 basis by the Federal
Government. This school caters to the needs of the logging and heavy construction
industries of our Province. The courses offered in this school are heavy-duty
mechanics' training, automotive training, heavy-equipment operators' programme
(bulldozing), general welding, and pipe-line welding.
The British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby), administered by this
Branch of the Department and opened on June 29th, 1960, by the Honourable
W. A. C. Bennett in the presence of a large and distinguished audience, offers
courses in carpentry, bricklaying, metal lathing, plastering, sheet metal, plumbing
and steam-fitting, etc., general and specialized welding, automotive and heavy-duty
mechanics, air engineers' training for the air lines at Sea Island, etc. The rapidity
with which the Government is expanding these facilities is indicated when it is
pointed out that two additional buildings will be commenced this fall.
This latter school is a joint venture of the Federal and Provincial Governments, and is the most up-to-date centre of its kind on the North American Continent. In spite of this addition, some training programmes will continue in rented
quarters.
It should be emphasized that training in these schools is available to all suitable applicants in British Columbia, and such prospective trainees will not find that
they are unable to enter becau'se of financial stress.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 73
It is anticipated that our latest addition to the vocational training programmes
in this Province will shortly become a reality at Prince George, since plans for a
new school in that area are rapidly nearing completion in the Department of Public
Works.
Two new features of vocational training were introduced during the year in
the form of training for fishermen under Schedule P (Training in Primary Industries) and training in the accommodation industries under Schedule Q (Supervisory
Training).   Both these projects are dealt with in more detail later in this report.
Due to the increasing number of unemployed, this Branch has been and still
is faced with more and more demands for training, from persons wishing either to
improve their skills or undertake new vocations in an effort to obtain other work.
The Federal-Provincial Training Agreement (Schedule M), established to meet
such demands, continues to make such opportunities available, and we feel that
since many of the trainees are quickly placed in jobs on completion of training,
this programme is fulfilling its purpose.
Placement of students by all three schools continues to be good, but factors
beyond our control can make placing difficult; for example, strikes and recessions.
Students from the British Columbia Vocational School (Bumaby), under
direction of their instructors, erected a much-needed maintenance workshop as a
training project at the Nanaimo school. This will be of great help in the maintenance work, since so much of it is performed by the school's staff.
Vocational Training for Fishermen
Some 114 fishermen attended this new programme conducted at various centres, and with the co-operation of the Vancouver School Board.
A special effort was made to interest the Indian fishermen, and we were fortunate to be able to work with the United Church of Canada through its mission
boat, a vessel which operates along the coast of British Columbia. This enabled
us to offer training in navigation, amongst other features, to Indians at Klemtu and
Hartley Bay, with satisfactory results.
This kind of co-operation is vital to the fishing industry and to the Province
as a whole, and we are indebted to the United Church of Canada for it's very valuable contribution.
Accommodation Industries Staff Training
This is a new division of the Technical Branch, and again we have enlisted
the experience of the many authorities in this field in establishing an advisory committee. We acknowledge the invaluable co-operation of the following groups:
The Auto Courts and Resorts Association of British Columbia, the British Columbia Hotels Association, the Canadian Restaurant Association, the Hotel Operators'
and Innkeepers' Society of British Columbia, the Hotel and Restaurant Employees'
and Bartenders' International Union, Executive Stewards' and Caterers' Association, the Vancouver Vocational Institute, and the Department of Recreation and
Conservation. In addition, we receive assistance from several individuals who give
of their time and experience in support of this programme.
The primary objective of this form of education is " to determine how training
and educational material, primarily at the management level, can be established to
assist in up-grading the methods and standards of operation of the hotel, motel, and
restaurant industries in this Province."
 .■■■■■         ■        ■        ■         ■■      '     ':
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British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
Opening of British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, by
the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett on June 29th, 1960.
 Carpentry class at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
f i • i - /":; '_s
•'.
1
^*
Bricklaying class at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
 Steam-fitting and plumbing class at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
^■H-___nH^BHH_________H_i___H[
Industrial electronics class at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
 ■"'
Iron-workers' class at the British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.
The position of Tourist Services Consultant was established to promote this,
and became effective in January, 1960.
Initially, the various trade magazines were solicited for their help and co-operation in circularizing all operators in the Province with a questionnaire as to what type
of material or assistance they needed and in what form it should appear. Response
to this questionnaire gave some indication of these needs.
Many personal calls were made on individual operators throughout the Island
and in the Okanagan during February and March to advise them of this new division
and to assess the best ways of establishing a programme. Much assistance at this
time was given by zone directors of the various trade organizations to the Tourist
Services Consultant.
Two-day management clinics covering various subjects were held, as follows:
Campbell River, April 19th and 20th; Nanaimo, April 21st and 22nd; Kamloops,
 X 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
May 9th and 10th; Vemon, May 11th and 12th; Kelowna, May 13th and 14th;
Penticton, May 15th and 16th; Oliver, May 17th and 18th; and Hope, May 19th
and 20th.
Attendance was variable, but those who attended have indicated, through a
questionnaire, that they received much of value. From these talks six booklets
were compiled and published, as follows:—
(1) Textiles.
(2) Furnishings and Decorating.
(3) Elementary Food Costing and Portion Controlling.
(4) Restaurant Operational Sales Guide and Waitress Training Material.
(5) Liquor and Wine Service.
(6) Staff Training.
These booklets have been given to all who participated in the clinics and the B.C.
Hotels seminar, and have since been distributed to many other operators through
personal calls. A great deal of the month of June was taken up in composing, duplicating, collating, and mailing this material.
It was originally intended to hold management courses in the Vancouver and
Victoria areas as well, but further careful consideration was given, and it was decided
that we were running too close to the busier time of the year, so these, along with
other areas, we hope to cover in the fall.
It is expected that by fall there will be several other booklets composed covering
topics of more assistance to the motel operator, such as " Room Rate Pricing,"
" Housekeeping Check List," " Basic Pitfalls to Watch For When Building or Buying," and so on.
In April this office co-operated with the British Columbia Hotels Association
by participating in its management seminar held in Vancouver. Twenty-four individuals attended, representing twenty-two hotels located in all parts of the Province.
In February, participation was given to a food-handlers' course run by the
Metropolitan Health Unit in Vancouver; thirty-five attended.
In March this Department co-operated with the Director of Night-schools in the
Penticton area in working out a curriculum and locating a suitable instructress to
handle a basic waitress-training course. This was quite successful, with the attendance of twenty-five. It is hoped that more of these will be conducted in other night-
schools, and to that end this Division will co-operate in supplying curriculum materials and ensuring that the best possible instructor or instructress is located. In this
way a standardized programme should be evolved for the Province. In the class
of twenty-five, twelve were immediately placed in industry on completion of training.
A great need expressed by restaurant and hotel operators in all parts of the
Province is for more trained cooks and waitresses. To this end I hope we can
explore the possibility of evolving more vocational school training in conjunction
with the operators and the association concerned so that the individual will receive
partial school training and the balance on-the-job training through an apprenticeship
programme. It is very essential that the trade be supplied with students trained to
what they, the operators, need for their particular type of operation, area, or environment.
Management must also be made more cognizant of their responsibility toward
staff and staff training so that dignity and a sense of professionalism can be established throughout the service industries. Toward this end much work will be
directed.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
X 79
Vocational Curriculum Development
In common with the British Columbia Vocational School, this Branch occupied
its permanent quarters in the new school toward the end of the school-year. Notwithstanding the difficulty of operating under extremely crowded conditions for the
better part of the year, our work continued to grow both in size and in variety of
undertakings.
The library has been set up and continues to grow, so as to take care of all
needs in our efforts to keep abreast of new developments in the many vocational and
technical areas.
New courses of study have been prepared, and others revised as follows:—
Aeronautics: A series of thirty-two large wall charts has been completed and
distributed.
Auto Mechanics: Pre-indentured apprentice course (ten months) duplicated
and distributed, a six-month pre-indentured apprentice course now in
progress.
Boat-building: A revised pre-indentured apprentice course in progress now.
Bricklaying: Preparation of information and assignment sheets carried on
throughout the year. A section on refractory materials has been completed. A series of sixteen large wall charts was completed for bricklayers
on refractory processes and tools.
Carpentry: A revised course has been completed and distributed, and numerous information sheets printed.
Electrical: A revised apprenticeship training course has been completed and
distributed.
Gas-fitting: A course of study for night-school training leading to a Provincial
gas certificate has been prepared and distributed. Information sheets are
in progress and awaiting duplication.
Heavy-duty Mechanics: A six-month and ten-month pre-indentured apprentice
course of study has been prepared and distributed. An apprentice course
of study is now ready, awaiting duplication. Shop work order forms
applicable to both automotive and heavy-duty repairs are presently being
printed for the Nanaimo school.
Ironworkers: A series of information sheets is being prepared on rigging procedures and splicing, and an experimental filmstrip to accompany the
information sheets is being planned.
Lathing: A course of study for Years I, II, and III was prepared and printed
for this trade.
Millwork and Joinery: A trade analysis, pre-employment course of study, and
an apprentice course of study were developed and printed. A manual of
information sheets and assignment sheets were commenced (sixty pages
completed), and is still in progress.
Plumbing and Steam-fitting: A three-month pre-apprentice course of study
and a night-school (four-year) course of study for steam-fitting was
prepared and printed. A programme of information sheets and assignment sheets is in progress in co-operation with a National committee.
Our share of the project is about half completed.
Sheet Metal: A revision of the Sheet Metal Course was printed, and also some
forty-two additional plates on sheet-metal developments were printed on
8Vi" X 11" sheets and 12" X 18" (white prints).
 X 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
This Division participated in a variety of diversified projects, including:—
Vocational Training for Fishermen: A course offered under the terms of the
Special Vocational Training Projects Agreement; 12,000 copies of the
prospectus were printed.
Publicity flyers designed and printed for job training series in supervisory training.
Coloured slides taken for public relations slide library maintained by this
Division.
Photographs taken for use in preparing materials for information sheets and
prospectuses.
Prospectuses were printed for British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo),
Vancouver Art School, and Vancouver Vocational Institute (awaiting
printing). A programme was printed for the official opening of the British
Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby).
The Curriculum Division had " open house " on the night of the Burnaby
School opening (official count of visitors, 946).
A series of coloured photographs was prepared and mounted for the Apprenticeship Branch at the British Columbia Building, Pacific National Exhibition.
A commencement was made on the production of project sheets for Industrial
Arts instructors.   This promises to be a very worth-while venture.
Numerous and varied types of Departmental forms were printed.
A tradesman's qualification examination for auto mechanics was produced for
the Apprenticeship Branch and is now waiting final approval by an
advisory committee. A series of questions for National examination on
carpentry and sheet metal were also produced for the Apprenticeship
Branch.
Assistance was rendered to the Visual Aids Department in the preparation of
material for the Department of Education display in the British Columbia
Building, Pacific National Exhibition.
Hundreds of white-print copies were made from tracings made by instructors,
borrowed from local firms or supplied from school consultants. These
represented a wide range of topics, including boat-building, carpentry,
sheet metal, and school projects.
Schedule Q—Supervisory Training
Industry, business, and Government departments continue to respond enthusiastically to the management training programme sponsored jointly by the British
Columbia Department of Education and the Federal Department of Labour.
This programme, " The Fundamentals of Management," is based on the J series
of training for supervisors and stresses the importance of communications, human
relations, cost and quality control, and accident prevention.
Special Sessions (Introductory and Follow-up).—In commenting on the value
of the programme, top management has this to say: " Until this programme was
offered, the hard core of management, e.g., foremen, superintendents, supervisors,
and department managers, have not been exposed to formal training in their field.
The fundamentals of management are precisely what we required for our middle
management group."
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 81
During the year more emphasis was placed on smaller industrial centres in the
Interior of British Columbia and Vancouver Island. Plans for the 1960/61 term
will again include these and more northerly points where practical. Fifteen conferences are planned on a regular schedule for the Vancouver area.
Private Vocational Schools
There is an increasing number of students being directed to training in the
various private vocational schools throughout the Province, thus enabling all citizens
to take advantage of training under the Federal-Provincial Training Assistance Programmes—Schedules M and R.
Vocational-teacher Training
As in previous years, the raising of vocational-teacher standards has been
effected by further in-service training, some seven courses being offered in the Lower
Mainland area. In addition, seven instructors took part in a six weeks' summer
session at the University of Toronto, a total of fifty-four instructors participating in
one or more of the courses conducted in these two areas.
 X 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Student Enrolments
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)
day-school
Enrolment
Course
Pre-
apprentice
Apprentice
Pre-
employment
Total
17
35
88
8
17
42
12
113
Heavy-duty Mechanics—Diesel   	
52
42
Welding—■
12
26
52
88
79          1            945
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)
day-school
Course
Enrolment
Pre-
apprentice
Apprentice
Pre-
employment
Total
Aeronautics	
Boat-building	
Bricklaying	
Carpentry.	
Electrical	
Electronics	
Lathing-
Painting and Decorating.
Plastering	
Plumbing _	
Sheet Metal	
Steam-fitting..
Steel Erection (Ironworkers)..
Welding—
General	
Up-grading 	
Testing1	
6
12
21
11
14
7
11
9
12
8
40
Totals ..
24
90
41
19
43
44
32
28
9
23
31
3
1
18
3
4
1
1
1
2
2
22
89
31
9
37
129
55
18
26
43
56
42
41
19
65
22
410
846
1,849
1 Conducting of tests required by experienced welders who wish to qualify for certification.
NIGHT-SCHOOL
Apprentice 	
Technician	
Trade extension
852
125
561
1,538
Total     1,538
Number of persons attending technical meetings and industrial equipment and
sss demonstrations, 2,768.
J. 1 U._L___LI^WJL     \ji.    lyviouuj    UltVllV
process demonstrations, 2,768.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
X 83
Vancouver Vocational Institute
DAY-SCHOOL
Course
Number
Enrolled
Number Completing
Training
Advanced Technical..
Auto-body Repairs	
Auto Mechanics- _.
Barbering-
Beauty Culture	
Carpentry	
Chef Training	
Commercial—■
General	
Secretarial —
Diesel Operation-
Draughting  	
Electrical	
Electronics	
Engineering.
Machine Shop	
Navigation	
Power Sewing —
Practical Nursing.
Shoe Repairing	
Welding	
Carpentry1-
Sign Painting2.. —
Gas Engine Maintenance3
Ship's Cook3	
Electronics3— 	
Totals .
17
36
58
37
186
75
60
235
156
51
86
67
58
558
46
175
51
200
30
120
10
11
7
11
13
2,354
23
32
23
107
54
32
141
92
27
38
28
25
187
34
145
20
83
12
84
10
8
7
11
13
1,236
1 Special short-term apprentice class.
2 Special pre-apprentice class.
3 Special up-grading classes for fishermen.
Number of courses
Number enrolled —
NIGHT-SCHOOL
98
2,267
Schedule Q—-Accommodation Industries
Clinics Held at—
Campbell River
Nanaimo	
Kamloops 	
Vernon 	
Kelowna 	
Penticton 	
Oliver 	
Hope 	
Number
Attended
25
27
40
23
34
.    37
14
.    20
Total
220
Schedule Q —Supervisory Training
Ten-hour
Programme
Communications (job instruction training)   245
Human Relations (job relations training)      21
Cost and Quality Control (job methods training)  	
Accident Prevention (job safety training)      17
Forty-hour
Programme
164
77
77
Totals
283
Appreciation and follow-up sessions, 178.
318
 X 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
Schedule P—Primary Industries
Fishermen's course	
Dressmaking for Indians
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers
Male ___
Female
162
18
345
559
Total
904
Schedule R—Rehabilitation
Male _
Female
46
24
Total
70
High Schools
Course
1958/59
1959/60
Day
Night
Day
Night
5,880
2,966
101
4,304
6,344
89
6.020                 4.662
1,254
110
8,837
Agriculture  —        	
40
Totals                                             	
8,947
10,737
7,384
13,539
Sundry Courses
Automotive Air-brake1
Appraisal I2 	
Appraisal II	
Transit and Level	
Number
Enrolled
__ 36
_. 21
._ 17
.. 25
Number
Graduated
33
21
16
25
1 In co-operation with Railway Department.
2 In co-operation with Civil Service Commission.
Industrial Arts Teacher Training
The Department continues to operate the emergency teacher-training programme for the College of Education. The technical programme was held at the
Vancouver Vocational Institute and the professional courses at the University of
British Columbia during the evenings. In all, thirty-nine students were admitted
and thirty-seven completed the course, thus enabling them to attend subsequent
summer sessions toward the Bachelor of Education degree.
The summer session on technical training for Industrial Arts teachers was
held with the co-operation of the Vancouver School Board, and 160 teachers
participated.
Industrial Arts
New facilities for teaching Industrial Arts have been provided in Abbotsford,
Burnaby, Coquitlam, Terrace, Kamloops, Kelowna, Maple Ridge, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Prince Rupert, Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver, Victoria, and
Williams Lake.
 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 85
Thirty-eight qualified and twelve untrained Industrial Arts teachers were
employed to staff the new accommodation and to replace those normally leaving
the profession. The lack of sufficient graduates from the teacher-training programme to fill School Board requirements throughout the Province is becoming
more acute. The demand for part-time Industrial Arts teachers and the trend
toward absorption of Industrial Arts teachers into other school duties shows a
marked increase.
Maximum advantage was taken of visits to secondary schools to acquaint
principals and counsellors with the training opportunities for senior students in the
Provincial vocational schools.
Total number of Industrial Arts teachers employed in the past year stands
at 443, an increase of sixteen over last year.
Pupils participating in Industrial Arts in the junior high schools numbered
33,518, while those in the senior high schools numbered 14,464, a total of 47,982.
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Dr. Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.)
Adult Education
Enrolment—
1958/59 1959/60
Total enrolment  16,389 17,304
Adult enrolment (19 years and over)     6,555 7,184
Percent adults       40.0 41.5
Employment—
Adults employed  5,810
Adults unemployed  1,374
7,184
Unemployed Students Exempt from Fees.—A number of unemployed students
were exempt from fees for the following reasons:—
Illness and hospital      138
Correctional institution      510
Social assistance        43
Other       335
Total 1,026
Adult Students Completing on the Interrupted Programme.—A total of 866
students was completing the University Entrance requirements under the Interrupted
Programme.
Enrolment in Courses.—The number of adult students enrolled in each course
will be found under my report of high school and vocational courses.
 X 86
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The Community Programmes Branch experienced another year of continued
expansion, with considerable experimentation concerning new procedure, regional
leadership training, and conferences.
The number of Recreation Commissions continued to increase, but after six
years of steady growth the rate of increase has become less due to the diminishing
number of communities without Recreation Commissions. The annual increase is
indicated as follows: 1954, 86; 1955, 140; 1956, 183; 1957, 216; 1958, 250;
1959, 266; 1960, 281.
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional Recreation Consultants.
(2) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(3) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(4) Drama library, materials, and advisory services.
(5) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, and regional
schools.
(6) Night-school grants for regularly organized night-school classes.
(7) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions to assist communities with
paid recreation help and expenses.
(8) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conducted summer
swimming and playground programmes.
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
1 Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford  	
Ainsworth  ..
* Alert Bay 	
Alexandria   	
Annual
Grant
... $300.00
_ 180.00
... 600.00
... 300.00
... 300.00
... 300.00
_. 180.00
... 240.00
_ 300.00
... 240.00
Barnston Island ...                      No grant
Bear Creek   240.00
Beaver Creek   300.00
Black Creek  240.00
Blue River   144.00
Bonnington-Corra Linn   240.00
Boston Bar   300.00
Boswell    300.00
Bouchie Lake   180.00
Bowen Island   240.00
*Bralorne    600.00
Recreation Commission
Bridesville	
Argenta-Johnsons Landing
Armstrong   	
Arrowhead-Sidmouth	
Arrow Park	
Ashcroft 	
Balfour  	
Annual
Grant
  $240.00
Brisco   _                              180.00
Britannia Beach  240.00
Brocklehurst   300.00
* Burnaby Parks   1,500.00
Burton   240.00
*Campbell River   600.00
Canal Flats  300.00
Canoe   240.00
Canyon   300.00
Cawston     240.00
Cedar   300.00
Celista   240.00
Central Saanich   300.00
Chase   300.00
Chehalis Crossing   300.00
Chehalis Reserve   240.00
Cherry Creek   300.00
Cherryville    240.00
Christina Lake   300.00
Connaught Heights   240.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
X 87
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Coombs   $240.00
*Courtenay     900.00
♦Cranbrook   900.00
Crawford Bay   300.00
Crescent Valley   240.00
*Creston
Decker Lake
Deep Cove ...
Delta 	
Deroche 	
Dewdney
Dragon Lake .
Eagle Valley __
East Kelowna
Edgewater 	
Elko 	
780.00
180.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
♦District of Coquitlam      600.00
District of Matsqui      300.00
District of Mission ....      300.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
180.00
180.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
No grant
240.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
. 300.00
300.00
*Giscome       300.00
Glenmore        240.00
Glenora         240.00
Golden       300.00
Grand Forks      300.00
Gray Creek      240.00
Great Central       300.00
Greenwood       300.00
Grindrod       300.00
Groundbirch       240.00
Haida-Masset        240.00
Halfmoon Bay      300.00
Harrison Hot Springs      300.00
Harrop and District      240.00
Emerald Mines
Enderby 	
Ferndale  	
Field  	
Forest Grove ....
Fort Fraser	
Fort St. John	
Francois Lake ...
Franklin River _
Fraser Lake 	
Fruitvale 	
Gabriola Island
Galloway 	
Genelle 	
Gibsons 	
Hatzic Prairie 	
Hazelton __
Hedley 	
Hixon 	
Hope 	
Horsefly __.
Houston —
Inonoaklin
Invermere
loco 	
Jordan River
Kaleden 	
Kaslo	
180.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
Annual
Grant
  $300.00
  240.00
  180.00
  240.00
  240.00
  900.00
  240.00
  240.00
  240.00
Kyuquot    240.00
Lac la Hache  300.00
Ladysmith   300.00
La France   240.00
Laidlaw   No grant
Lakeview Heights  240.00
Recreation Commission
Kelowna 	
Keremeos  	
Kersley	
Kettle Valley 	
Kilkerran  	
♦Kimberley 	
Kingfisher
Kitwanga Valley .
Kootenay Bay .
Langford
Langley 	
Lantzville 	
Lardeau District
Lavington  	
Lillooet 	
Lister 	
Little Fort	
Lone Butte 	
Lumby	
300.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
Lund          240.00
Lytton       240.00
Mahood Falls      180.00
Malaspina       300.00
Maple Ridge  No grant
Mara       240.00
Marysville      300.00
Merritt       300.00
Metchosin      300.00
Midway       300.00
Minstrel Island       240.00
Minto       240.00
Montney       180.00
Moose Heights       180.00
Mud River      180.00
McConnell Creek     240.00
Nakusp       300,00
*Nanaimo Civic Properties       900.00
Nanoose
Naramata 	
Narcosli Creek
Natal 	
*Nelson 	
  300.00
  300.00
  180.00
  300.00
  900.00
  240.00
  180.00
  180.00
*New Westminster  1,200.00
New Denver ...
New Hazelton .
New Masset _
Nicomen Island	
Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount
North Bend	
♦North Cowichan	
Northfield 	
North Kamloops	
300.00
240.00
240.00
696.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
600.00
Oak Bay      300.00
North Shore (Nelson)
♦North Vancouver	
 X 88
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Okanagan Centre   $120.00
Okanagan Falls   240.00
Okanagan Mission   240.00
Oliver   300.00
100 Mile House  180.00
150 Mile House  240.00
Osoyoos   300.00
Oyama   240.00
Palling  240.00
Parksville   300.00
Peachland   180.00
Pemberton and District  300.00
Pendleton Bay   180.00
Pender Harbour
♦Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Popkum
300.00
300.00
. No grant
.     300.00
.     216.00
.     300.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
. No grant
.     600.00
900.00
240.00
Progress ....      240.00
Quadra       300.00
Qualicum Beach      300.00
Queen Charlotte      180.00
Quesnel      300.00
Red Bluff       240.00
Port Clements ...
Port Coquitlam
Port Mellon	
Port Moody	
Port McNeill _
Pouce Coupe 	
Powell River	
♦Prince George .
♦Prince Rupert ~.
Procter 	
Redwell 	
Revelstoke _
♦Richmond ...
Riondel 	
Riske Creek
Riverside 	
Roberts Creek
Robson 	
Rock Creek	
Roe Lake 	
Rose Lake	
Round Lake
Rutland 	
Salmo 	
240.00
300.00
1,200.00
300.00
180.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
Salmon Arm	
Sandspit 	
Savona District   300.00
Sayward   300.00
Sechelt  300,00
70 Mile and Watch Lake  180.00
Shalalth   180.00
Shawnigan Lake  300.00
Shirley   240.00
Sidney   300.00
Silverton   240.00
Skidegate Mission   240.00
Slocan   300.00
Recreation Commission
Smithers 	
Soda Creek	
Sooke 	
Southbank  	
Southern Cortes
South Hazelton _
South Kelowna __
South Saltspring Island
South Slocan	
South Taylor 	
Spences Bridge	
Squamish
Squamish Indian Band
Straiton 	
Sumas Municipality
Summerland 	
Sunnybrae 	
Sunrise-Two Rivers .
Sunset Prairie	
Tahsis	
Tappen
Tarrys and District
Tatla Lake 	
Tatlayoko Lake	
Tchesinkut Lake	
Telkwa 	
Terrace	
Tofino 	
Topley 	
♦Trail-Tadanac
Tulameen  	
Ucluelet 	
University Area
Valemount 	
♦Vancouver Board  of Parks  and
Public 	
Vernon	
Village of Mission 	
Wardner	
Warfield 	
Westbank 	
West Bench	
Westbridge 	
West Creston	
West Vancouver	
Whaletown Community
White Lake	
Willow Point	
Willow River	
Wilson Creek	
Windermere 	
Winfield 	
Winlaw	
Wistaria  	
Wynndel	
Yale	
Ymir	
Zeballos	
Annual
Grant
_ $300.00
_ 240.00
. 300.00
_ 300.00
. 300.00
. 240.00
. 180.00
. 300.00
. 180.00
. 180.00
. 180.00
. 300.00
. No grant
_ 300.00
_ 300.00
. 300.00
_ 180.00
_ 180.00
_ 240.00
. 300.00
_ 180.00
_ 300.00
_ 300.00
_ 120.00
. 300.00
.. 240.00
_ 600.00
_ 240.00
. 240.00
. 900.00
. 240.00
. 300.00
.No grant
240.00
2,700.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
180.00
2,400.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
216.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
300.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
X 89
During the 1959/60 year, figures were compiled from the quarterly reports
submitted by Recreation Commissions. These figures are concerned only with
activities sponsored or assisted in any way by the Recreation Commissions throughout the Province; they are not indicative of the total community recreation programmes, many facets of which are organized and conducted without any assistance
from the Recreation Commissions or Community Programmes Branch.
The figures on quarterly reports are subject to the many inconsistencies of
interpretation by people completing the reports; they do indicate the wide scope,
interest, and importance of community recreation.
The City of Vancouver is not included in the figures listed below.
Total number of participants in programmes  177,513
Total number of participations in programmes (this includes
one individual participating several times)       2,770,334
Number of activities throughout the year (an activity is
counted each quarter it is reported)  6,121
Reported income of Recreation Commissions  $336,387.30
Reported expenses of Recreation Commissions  $415,613.53
Staff
Recreation Consultant W. C. Patrick resigned in August of 1959, and Mr.
J. M. MacKinnon was appointed in October and assigned to the East Kootenay
office in Cranbrook.   Mr. J. B. Ostrom took over the duties of the Vancouver office.
The consultative staff and their regions are as follows:—
Consultant
Headquarters
Region
G. J. Pyrin  „ .
Victoria  - , .   	
Vancouver Island.
J. B. Ostrom_   „ 	
D. M. McCooey  	
K. K. MaLtman 	
W. Mayers  	
Vancouver    	
Quesnel. - ,, - 	
Kelowna   	
Kamloops  -	
Greater Vancouver and District.
Northern British Columbia.
Okanagan.
Central British Columbia.
J. R. McKeen  __ - -	
Nelson  -
West Kootenay.
Leadership
Regional
Clinics,
Workshops
Conferences
Leadership
Schools
42
2,151
101
13
567
108
2
105
26
Provincial
7
1,605
14
t
44
32
 X 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
There were three significant decisions made during the year; they were designed
to make the Community Programmes Branch approach to leadership more effective
and to increase interest and participation on the part of local recreation commissions.
(1) The discontinuance of the annual summer school, effective 1960.
(2) The placing of emphasis on regional training for volunteer leaders. This
is being done to take the place of the former summer school, which was
unable to attract enough of the volunteer type of leaders to warrant the
expense of the school. Regional schools are still very much in the experimental stage, and when developed should provide more opportunity at
less cost and time for volunteer recreation workers to receive leadership
training.
(3) The development of an annual recreation conference designed to assist
administrative personnel, such as commission members, Municipal Council personnel, and professional people. The Provincial conference plus
regional and zone conferences should provide excellent opportunity for
the dissemination of information and ideas among recreation people.
Special aid to encourage leadership and development of swimming and water
safety and playground programmes was given to eighty communities. A total of
$5,500 was provided to assist fifty-five aquatic programmes and fourteen playground
programmes.
Surveys
A comprehensive survey of recreation in the municipalities of Trail, Tadanac,
and Warfield was completed by the Community Programmes Branch. This project
was conducted by staff members J. B. Ostrom and J. R. McKeen, and resulted in
a reorganization of the total recreation structure in Trail and Tadanac. A detailed
publication of the survey was published by the Trail-Tadanac Board of Parks
Commissioners.
Library Services
Under the supervision of Mr. G. J. Pynn, the Community Programmes Branch
library was completely reorganized during the 1959/60 year. More than 600 new
publications were added, and many out-of-date books were deleted. The completion of this job has provided the Community Programmes Branch with the most
modern and up-to-date resource material available in the field of recreation.
During the year 358 films and more than 10,000 books were sent to British
Columbia communities. A great majority of the books were drama plays and
publications for which there is a very great demand in the Province.
A revised library catalogue was also completed in conjunction with the library
reorganization.
Publications
An experiment designed to ascertain the feasibility of a Branch publication was
undertaken in the form of a mimeographed magazine. Mr. K. K. Maltman was
responsible for the production, but the costs involved and time required for a
bi-annual publication precluded continuance in the original form; as a result, a
more frequent quarterly service in bulletin form was adopted.
A revised edition of the Community Programmes Branch " Guide to Recreation
Commissions " was completed in March of 1960.
Drama
The drama services of the Community Programmes Branch continued to be
taxed to the limit. Between eight and nine thousand books, including plays, pamphlets, magazines, etc., were sent to communities.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH X 91
Over 200 active drama groups operated on a yearly schedule, many doing five
full plays during the year as well as several one-act and workshop plays.
A total of sixteen groups applied to enter the 1959 British Columbia Regional
Festival, which was limited to six for competition.
Thirty drama festivals were held during the year. Of these, eleven were for
schools only, eight for adults only, and eleven a combination of both. These festivals combined music and drama, and eight had a speech-arts section.
The Community Programmes Branch provides excellent service to British
Columbia drama and the British Columbia Drama Association. The drama section
of the Community Programmes Branch, through the office of Drama Supervisor,
Miss Anne Adamson, is the focal point of British Columbia drama and responsible
for much of the operation of drama on a Provincial basis. The Community Programmes Branch provides the co-ordination and service necessary to maintain a
high standard of drama activity in the Province.
Conclusion
The Community Programmes Branch has reached the stage where more
emphasis is being placed on the establishment of good procedure in Recreation
Commissions. Through lack of good communication, many communities are not
receiving the maximum aid possible through the services of the Community Programmes Branch. The full realization of the importance of recreation to the people,
and the opportunities available to provide adequate participation, is brought about
through good educational programmes. The Community Programmes Branch is
endeavouring to establish a better approach to this problem in the communities of
British Columbia.
 X 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The annual growth of the adult education programme in British Columbia
indicates a wide acceptance and increasing need for the provision of learning opportunities for adults. The many programmes in the Province encompass a wide
variety of activities which appeal to nearly every segment of the adult population.
Courses offered are of two types, namely:—
(1) Vocational, technical, or industrial courses operating under Dominion-
Provincial agreements. These courses include such subjects as typing,
book-keeping, engineering, mechanics, commercial art, carpentry, or any
subject an individual takes to increase his ability in this vocation.
(2) Cultural, recreational, or academic courses which fall into the general
field of adult education. Courses in this category include almost all
academic subjects, and all sports, hobbies, crafts, arts, and other leisure-
time pursuits.
Grants on behalf of instructors' and directors' salaries are paid to School
Boards for classes which are approved by the Department of Education. Under
a Dominion-Provincial agreement, additional grants are provided for instructors'
salaries and equipment for vocational courses only.
The following School Boards conducted night-school programmes during the
academic year 1959/60:—
Abbotsford.
Alberni.
Alert Bay.
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Arrow Lakes.
Burnaby.
Campbell River.
Castlegar.
Coquitlam.
Courtenay.
Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Delta.
Fernie.
Fraser Canyon.
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Howe Sound.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Kettle Valley.
Kimberley.
Kitimat.
Lake Cowichan.
Langley.
Maple Ridge.
Merritt.
Mission.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls.
Peace River North.
Peace River South.
Penticton.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Quesnel.
Richmond.
Saanich.
Salmon Arm.
Sechelt.
Slocan.
Smithers.
Southern Okanagan.
Summerland.
Surrey.
Trail.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
West Vancouver.
Windermere.
Growth in Night-school Programme
Year
Number of
School District
1953/54  49
1954/55  55
1955/56  57
1956/57  60
1957/58  62
1958/59  64
1959/60  58
Number of
Enrollees
19,969
22,280
29,335
33,565
36,611
39,108
40,867
Number of
Instructors
842
948
1,186
1,328
1,401
1,578
1,796
Number of courses, 1,578.
 NIGHT-SCHOOLS
X 93
Vocational
Year
1955/56	
1956/57	
1957/58	
1958/59	
1959/60  13,539
Number of courses, 322.
Number of
Enrollees
9,040
11,582
11,118
10,761
Number of
Instructors
357
440
477
454
540
Non-vocational
Number of
Enrollees
20,291
Number of
Instructors
829
888
924
1,124
1,256
Year
1955/56	
1956/57  21,983
1957/58  25,493
1958/59  28,427
1959/60  27,328
Number of courses, 1,256.
One hundred and four different non-vocational courses were offered in the
total programme during the year. Some of these courses could be broken down
into separate courses, making a much higher total. When vocational courses are
added, the number of different courses is in the vicinity of 150. The four largest
enrolment activities in the non-vocational programme were: (1) sewing, 3,699;
(2) dancing, 2,484; (3) English (new Canadians), 1,654;  (4) art, 1,558.
As a result of a survey made in early 1959, a series of conferences were held
for night-school directors. The conferences convened at Kelowna, Nanaimo, and
Abbotsford; they were designed to discuss night-school problems and policies with
the objective of establishing a better understanding between the Department of
Education and the directors throughout the Province.
Resource personnel at all conferences included leading British Columbians in
the field of adult education. Dr. B. F. Wales, Director of Vancouver Night-schools;
Dr. John Friesen, Director of the University of British Columbia Department of
Extension; Dr. C. Verner, Florida State University; Mr. J. Dalgleish, Director of
Victoria Night-schools; and Mr. J. E. White, Director of Technical and Vocational
Education, provided invaluable resource information to the various conferences.
The conferences enabled new night-school directors to obtain useful suggestions
and programme ideas. The discussion of problems and procedure should reflect on
a better approach to adult education in many communities in British Columbia.
One outcome of the conferences was the formation of a Night-school Directors'
Committee to draw up a brief concerning the desirability of an Interrupted General
Programme of Academic Courses. Members of the Committee are as follows: Dr.
B. E. Wales, Director of Vancouver Night-schools; Mr. C. Watson, Director of
Burnaby Night-schools; Mr. J. Morrow, Director of New Westminster Night-schools;
and Mr. N. L. Day, Director of Maple Ridge Night-schools.
The Committee made a study of the problem and drew up a brief which was
presented to the Department of Education in June.
The three conferences covered many aspects of night-school procedure and
programming. The information compiled from the conferences was listed in report
form. The reports constitute a comprehensive outline of the problems which are
confronting night-school directors in British Columbia.
 X 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Regional Conference Data
Place
Date
Total
Participants
Directors
District
Superintendents
School
Board
Personnel
25-4-59
3-10-59
10-2-60
17
15
38
8
8
17
2
1
6
3
Nanaimo
0
10
Besides the Interrupted General Programme Committee, other aspects of
British Columbia night-schools which have been studied are:—
(1) Definition of a night-school director and his work.
(2) Grant system.
(3) Liaison among night-school directors.
(4) Reports and brochures.
(5) Salaries and directors.
(6) Distribution of teaching load and night-school work.
(7) Change of name to adult education.
(8) Programme publicity.
(9) University of British Columbia Extension Department.
(10) Value and type of conferences.
The field of adult education is continually expanding. Requests for courses
and the wide variety of types of courses indicate the importance of sound adult
education development. The highly competitive society we live in with its emphasis
on the need for education, added to the problem which increased leisure is presenting, has focused more attention on better individual preparation. As a result, more
people are turning to adult education programmes to advance themselves academically and vocationally or to become more proficient in leisure-time pursuits.
The many adult education programmes in British Columbia are accepting this
challenge and expanding to meet the increased demand; however, we must be
prepared for continued growth with sound organization and administrative policies,
both on the local and Provincial level.
 JERICHO HILL SCHOOL X 95
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the 1959/60 school-year was as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
35
88
43
96
78
184
Totals - 	
123
139
262
Of the pupils enrolled in the Braille Department, thirty-three were boys and
forty-five were girls. In the Deaf Department there were ninety-four boys and ninety
girls. There were seven extra-provincial pupils in attendance—five beginner blind
from the Province of Alberta and two small deaf Eskimo girls. Magna-type textbooks were made available on loan to twenty-seven partial-sighted children in various parts of the Province. In co-operation with the Canadian National Institute for
the Blind, guidance and home training were provided for the parents of pre-school
blind children and others.
There has been a continuous increase in the school enrolment, except for
1940/41, as is evidenced by the following table:—
1920/21     51 1950/51  141
1925/26     79 1955/56  184
1930/31     85 1956/57  203
1935/36     92 1957/58  225
1940/41     88 1958/59  242
1945/46  111 1959/60  262
General Remarks
The general health of the children in residence was very good, with emphasis
being given throughout the year to immunization and dental care.
In co-operation with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, a counselling programme was developed for senior blind pupils and became operative in the
late fall.
A surprise party was arranged by staff members for the evening of December
4th, to celebrate twenty-five years of service to the school by Dr. and Mrs. Mac-
Donald. There were about 275 former pupils, staff, and friends of the school in
attendance. The Honourable the Minister of Education spoke on behalf of the
Department, Colonel Burnett for the Advisory Committee, Captain Robinson for
the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, and Mrs. Comyn and Mr. Bodkin
for their respective P.-T.A. groups.
During the Christmas holidays a stainless-steel dish-washer was installed by
the Public Works Department, replacing the old wartime unit.
Our school was invited to participate on an enrolment basis in the Canadian
Provost Corps fund for blind children. Donations from this fund are to be used
at the discretion of superintendents of blind schools for the direct personal interest
and pleasure of children up to 13 years of age.
 X 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
A Band Committee was formed of parents and school staff to plan and supervise the activities of the Blind Department band of thirty pieces.
The Superintendent attended an invitational conference in Edmonton on May
5th and 6th on the preparation of teachers of handicapped children, as one of the
representatives from British Columbia. Other participating members of the conference were from the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.
In the interests of safety, as recommended by the Fire Marshal, the Public
Works Department installed an automatic sprinkler system in the main building
this spring.
Two Grade XII pupils and five Grade XI pupils of the Blind Department wrote
one or more Government examinations, and all successfully passed.
Under the leadership of the District Superintendent of West Vancouver schools,
Mr. H. C. Ferguson, a group of primary and intermediate specialists visited our
school and conducted a two-day workshop. Numerous useful teaching aids were
demonstrated and helpful suggestions offered. All in all, it was a very worth-while
and stimulating experience for our teachers participating in the workshop.
Two blind pupils, Lois Goodine and Walter Hendrickson, received academic
diplomas at the graduation ceremony held in the school auditorium on June 10th.
Miss Mabel Blake, retired vice-principal, addressed the graduates and Reverend
Father O'Reilly pronounced the benediction.
In conclusion, I gratefully acknowledge the co-operation and assistance received from the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee, and staff
throughout the school-year.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS X 97
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
As there has been no annual report from this office for some years, for reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate, and
this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual
record for each person, including teaching service. The following table shows
developments in the past ten years, and indicates that the number of individual
service records to be maintained has increased by approximately 97 per cent in
this period:—
1  	
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
2a „ .,„	
2b 	
2c „	
5,873
(?)
6,250
(?)
377
6.4
835
14.2
6,622
126
372
6.0
895
14.3
1,267
20.3
7,116
158
494
7.5
829
12.5
1,323
20.0
7,560
154
444
6.2
965
13.6
8,223
229
663
8.8
974
12.9
8,757
176
534
6.5
(?)
(?)
287
(?)
(?)
9,482
221
725
8.3
1,135
13.0
310
1,860
21.2
10,119
297
637
6.7
1,165
12.3
313
1,802
19.0
10,856
332
737
7.3
1,270
12.6
348
2,007
19.8
11,547
369
691
2d
6.4
3a...
1,357
3b.	
12.5
4..	
388
5a 	
1,212
20.6
1,409
19.8
1,637
21.7
2,048
5b    .
19.0
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Includes regular staff of Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Vancouver School of Art, and, up to 1955/56, a portion of Victoria College. Includes
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates for lack of qualifications, or qualified but over age, included in 2a.
A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown; that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4.    Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried out
in Normal Schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the University. Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since 1956/57
such training has been in the College of Education, and enrolment figures are more
difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training programme as enrolments
cover all years of training. The following tables, however, covering some ten years,
permit of useful comparisons:—
 X 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1959/60
1949/50
M. F.   T.
1950/51
M. F.   T.
1951/52
M.l F.   T.
1952/53
M. F.   T,
1953/54
M. F.   T.
1954/55
M. F.   T
1955/56
M. F.     T.
la-
lb-
lc.
ld-
2a..
2b-
2c_
2d..
3a_
3b..
3c-
3d-
4—
211
368
182
761
184
345
161
690
170
124
79
473
137
110
66
313
9
2
2
13
300
141   77
336 116
861 22
114,219
108
91
22
113
72
333
204
342
546
196
165
90
155
245
99
606
385
519
904
367
91
74
17
91
55
306
185
322
507
177
156
83
150
233
93
553
342
489
831
325
8
2
2
3
18
2
8
10
12
5
3
3
6
31
4
11
15
21
522
338
478
816
304
50
i 393
1228
'671
44
'369
. 222
i 635
2
11
6
19
1616
122
589
327
1,038
99
546
315
960
5
23
12
40
920
References:   M.^male; F.=female; T.=total;  a=University of British Columbia;  b= Vancouver Normal;
c=:Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at October.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as as June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.   Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;   that is,
supply from training institutions.
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
M.
F.
T.
M.
T.
F.
la:..   -	
lb              . .   	
766
378
1,144
548
131
679
487
120
607
9
9
525 !
?
?
?
159
7
166
12
23
35
377
9
386
34
102
136
985
410
1,395
635
135
770
657
119
776
589
16
605
46
125
171
279
18
297
39
19
58
......
508
28
536
60
95
155
1,353
523
1,876
827
177
1,004
835
199
1,034
787
46
833
99
114
213
1,635
666
lc                   . . .
2,301
2a               	
981
2b -
2c                      	
200
1,181
3p
1,026
3b
216
3c  -     	
1,242
4a
4b
4c      -   - - -
5a         .     .      	
900-9502
5b               - -
5c
1 Approximately. 2 Anticipated.
References:   M.=male;   F.=female;   T.—total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in ali years;   (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
2. Enrolled in training programmes leading to a certificate at end of year, and therefore considered likely to
teach.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases).
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training; (a)
numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November, but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency Industrial Arts and summer session Home Economics training programmes.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
X 99
The certification of those listed in the preceding table as undertaking teacher-
training in 1958/59, who were teaching as at November, 1959, was as follows, and
includes adjustments through supplemental or summer session courses taken in
1959:—
Certificate
Total
E-T
EC
E-B
E-A
S-T
PC
P-B
P-A
17
28
61
150
54
238
32
36
1
20
38
110
45
2
1
297
Female  	
536
Totals ....
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
833
From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-colleges
as a percentage of demand:—
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
la 	
lb 	
2
690
(?)
1,212
56.9
(?)
731
708
1,267
57.7
55.9
581
543
1,323
43.9
41.0
668
649
1,409
47.4
46.1
553
522
1,637
33.8
31.9
831
816
(?)
(?)
(?)
960
920
1,860
51.6
49.5
607
525
1,802
33.7
29.1
776
605
2,007
38.7
29.9
1,034
833
2,048
3a 	
3b	
50.5
40.7
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher-demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June as a percentage of demand;  that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of
3—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
The employment of teachers with temporary certificates in 1959/60, as at
October 31st, was as follows:—
Temporary Elementary
Temporary Secondary
E-T
EC
Total
S-T
SC
SB
V-C
Total
127
82
13
1
140
83
9
83
2
8
2
8
11
Secondary schools.       	
101
209
8
14
223
8
92
10
3
2
8
23
112
3
23
217    |      14    |    231
92
13    |        2    |      31
138
	
1      ""    1
—
369
Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School Boards
to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and has sent an interview officer
in the early spring to select and recommend individuals for appointments. Applications are recorded, certificate and experience classifications are made in this
office before or after interview, and exceed by far the number of interviews and
numbers appointed. Replies to advertisements have in some years exceeded a
thousand. A number of individuals annually proceed independently to this Province. The numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as
follows:—
 X 100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
School-year
-
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
21
41
30
35
48
33
61
30
33
35
Tnfals
62
65
81
91
68
Teacher-exchange applications proceed through this office. The numbers of
applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange positions
available.   Exchanges in recent years were as follows:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
22
4
3
22
4
5
23
1
1
26
2
1
26
2
Totals	
29
31
25
29
28
Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued, to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certificates or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces
or countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do
not arrive. General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in
the thousands. In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning
of specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Since 1958 an individual teacher-docket system has been possible, leading to
significant improvement in correspondence handling. There is difficulty in keeping
up with significant annual correspondence volume increase.
Division of Examinations
There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
and August University Entrance (Grades XI-XII) and for Grade XIII examinations. Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible for
arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of records.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
The following tables give significant data:—
Number of Markers
X 101
1951/5211952/53
1
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/581 1958/59
1959/60
181
29
193
34
210
33
220
42
234
39
243
41
246
44
290
48
301
50
Totals 	
210|         227|         243
2621         27 31         284
290
338|         351
$74,300
$81,700
$88,400
$90,000
$96,000 $113,000
$123,000
$153,000
$168,000
Number of Candidates (June)
7,503
1,712
9,048
1,336
7,985
1,375
9,159
1,653
9,418
1,765
10,924
1,565
13,014
1,797
14,933
2,204
16,786
Grade XIII     	
2,673
Totals    	
9,215
10,384
9,360
10,814
11,183
12,489
14,811
17,137
19,459
Number Completed in
June
2,704
284
1
2,328       2,594
3,139
3,160
410
3,433
383
4,025
341
4,215
464
4,720
Grade XIII	
269j         304
399
587
Totals 	
2,988
2,697
2,898
3,538
3,570
3,816
4,366
4,679
5,307
Papers Marked in June
16,399
4,516
20,311
5,669
21,042
6,028
24,024
5,647
29,765
6,388
36,236
8,055
41,963
Grade XIII       _.
9,751
Totals 	
21,642
20,915
23,280
25,980
27,070
29,671
36,153
44,291
51,714
Papers Marked in August
6,844
1,727
8,931
Grade XIII       .	
1,869
4,022
5,134
4,663
4,914
5,185
5,789
7,031
8,571
10,800
In 1958/59 there were 5,342 August candidates, 5,178 University Entrance,
and 1,164 Grade XIII.
Total papers for June and August, 1951/52-59/60, were as follows: 1951/52,
25,664; 1952/53, 26,049; 1953/54, 27,943; 1954/55, 30,894; 1955/56,
32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862; 1959/60,
62,514.
For 1959/60, examinations were prepared for June and August in twenty-one
University Entrance subjects and in eighteen Grade XIII subjects. In June, 1960,
182 examination centres were established in the Province and thirty-five outside
British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being in Denmark, Israel, and
Switzerland.
There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations
of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia high schools
or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete requirements, as well
as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter similar professional
courses.   A very large number of persons have sought evaluations and permission to
 X 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
follow the Interrupted Programme for adult students. These numbers are increasing
rapidly with expansion in the number of areas offering academic courses through
night-schools.
Scholarship Awards, 1960
University Entrance.—The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of
$500, awarded jointly by the University of British Columbia and the Chris Spencer
Foundation were won by the following:—■
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.	
94.125
2nd in B.C.
William Murray M. Fairweather.... 	
Lome Barry Mullett.._ 	
93.75
Area 1 	
Sparwood Junior-Senior High	
Summerland Junior-Senior High....     _
87.75
90.625
Ross Douglas MacKinnon.  	
Frederick Patrick Healey 	
86.375
87.75
Lord Tweedsmuir Senior High 	
Vancouver Technical Junior-Senior High	
90.0
90.625
92.25
John Edward Chamberlin   ~
Jeanette Yvonne Quiring 	
93.25
Burnaby Central High 	
West Vancouver Senior High _ 	
90.875
Area 10
91.625
Michael Gibbins  _
84.375
93.0
Charles Corrie Pentland..... 	
92.5
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Terrence Chew Leung. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing was won by William Murray M.
Fairweather.
Grade XIII.—-The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded
by the University of British Columbia for general proficiency were won by the
following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Juanita Rooke Cowell	
James Alexander Inkster..-	
Kathleen Margaret Coxworth	
Marilyn Frances Carter	
Richard John Williams	
Robert Jeppesen  	
West Vancouver Senior High-
West Vancouver Senior High..
Chilliwack Senior High	
Chilliwack Senior High	
Courtenay Senior High	
Prince George Senior High	
88.1
88.0
87.0
86.9
86.7
84.5
Financial Assistance
In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to high-school graduates, Grade XIII students,
and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College. To
qualify, candidates must be domiciled in the Province, are required to apply, and
must undertake a full-year winter session undergraduate programme at the University
or Victoria College or in Grade XIII in public high schools of the Province to
receive the award. Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final Grade XII,
or Grade XIII, or University of British Columbia or Victoria College examinations.
There are two awards—first class, for all students who obtain an average of 80
per cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class, available for
up to 2,000 top-ranking students with high second-class standing. The second-class
awards are divided among Grade XII (University Entrance), Grade XIII, Univer-
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
X 103
sity undergraduate students and Victoria College undergraduate students, and among
the various faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class
awards amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate study,
and second-class awards similarly to one-third the tuition fee. An average of at
least 70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for
a second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and
faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
was continued for those writing at the end of 1959/60 wishing to proceed further.
Regulations appear annually.
Candidates writing University Entrance or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, University students through the University,
and Victoria College students through that institution. Notification to all candidates is made from the Registrar's office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based
on applications received:—
Original Applications
Final Awards
Exam-year
Number
Received
** as
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59
1959/60
2,703
3,466
1,860           552
2,300           635
1,308
1,665
1,782
531
1,251
$229,175.16
University Entrance
Examinations
Grade XIII Examinations
1958/59
1959/60
1958/59
1959/60
Pirst rlsiss   RD fn 100
268
337
189
82
298
492
290
113
26
104
53
47
37
".ernnrl class, 70 fn 79 9
133
SO fr. fiQ q
90
Tneligihle
80
876
1,193
230
340
The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $100 to $150. These awards may be made available to
those undertaking University of British Columbia or Victoria College undergraduate
study, recognized nurse's training in the Province, and for recognized university
study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available
in this Province; for example, dentistry, veterinary.
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and notification to all candidates is made from this office, with cheque issue through the Departmental Comptroller.
 X 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the dead-line. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Original Applications
Final Awards
Year
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959  	
19fi0
821
1,071
693
904
653
$82,650
In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance. By
amendment to the University of British Columbia Act, authority was given for
establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to $2,000,000. A joint committee composed of two representatives of the University and two representatives
of the Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the Departmental
Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides
loans. Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at
the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, the Vancouver School of Art,
or recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such
training is not available in British Columbia.
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates issued were
as follows:  1955,57; 1956,62; 1957, 16; 1958, 18; 1959, 10.
Correspondence
Volume and detail continue to be two major problems because of continual
growth. New filing procedures have not permitted the maintenance of records
indicating correspondence volume. For some years, records were maintained of
letter volume, as shown below. These figures do not include application and other
forms, circulars, instructions, examination papers, and similar items, but refer to
correspondence volume only.
Normally Require Reply
Initiated
by Branch
Year
Exams
Inward
Registrar
Inward
Total
Exams and
Registrar
Outward
Total
1Q50
5,920
6,278
6,071
7,220
7,465
8,222
8,339
8,130
9,084
10,113
7,756
8,092
8,900
10,111
12,165
13,398
14.671
13,676
14,370
14,971
17,231
19,630
21,620
23.010
3,649
4,802
4,923
5,187
5,726
5,628
6.680
17,709
1951 _      	
1952                                   —-      ~ 	
19,777
20,555
1953                                            - 	
23,352
1954  	
1955      	
26,842
29,249
1956      	
30.537
1957..               	
1958                                    	
1959         -       	
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS X 105
In those years for which accurate figures are no longer available, it is known
that volume exceeded 41,000 in 1958, and similar increases continue.
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp
at Vernon, for cadet rifle shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets
attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district superin-
tendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the schools
showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These awards
were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by the
winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value.   Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings and five on 1959/60.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
 X 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1959/60
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1959/60 a total of 230 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, thirty-six were turned down, the chief reason being that
family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
One hundred and ninety-four applications were approved for grants. Students
were distributed by grades, as follows: Grade IX, 48; Grade X, 63; Grade XI, 43;
Grade XII, 40. During the year fourteen students dropped out and grants were
discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $112.60 for the year; the
balance received $97.60. In addition, nineteen students who showed outstanding
ability were granted a bonus of $25.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
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