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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Seventy-sixth Annual Report 1946-47 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1948

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy-sixth Annual Report
1946-47
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiakmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Seventy-sixth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
G. M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
December 15th, 1947.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1946-47.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable G. M. Weir.
Deputy Minister Assistant Superintendent of Education
and Superintendent of Education: and Chief Inspector of Schools:
F. T.Fairey, B.A. H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools: .
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
Greater Victoria. William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby. R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria. F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S. (Ed.), Telkwa.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Penticton. W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Trail.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo. V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver. A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Vancouver. H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks. F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Kamloops.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster. W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed.,
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Cranbrook. F.R.S.A., F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Pouce Coupe. H. D. Stafford, B.A., Courtenay.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm. L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Prince George.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Vernon.
Prince Rupert. A. S. ToWELL, M.A., Abbotsford.
F. A.. Jewett, B.A., Nelson. C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
A. Turnbull, B.A., M.C., M.M., Chilliwack.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver :
A. R. Lord, B.A., Principal. H. H. Grantham, M.A.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal. Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
F. C. Boyes, M.A. Miss M. McManus, M.A., Mus.Bac.
H. B. MacLean. Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
Enoch Broome, M.A. E. G. Ozard, B.A.
Mrs. M. Lee. Miss E. Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Victoria:
H. 0. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal. Miss M. E. Gordon, B.A.
H. C. Gilliland, B.A., Vice-Principal. Miss M. Perry.
J. F. Hammett, B.A. G. A. Brand.
D. B. Gaddes, B.Mus. Miss W. A. Copeland. Y 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar:  T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar:  H. M. Evans, B.A.
Officer in Charge of Industrial Education:  H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes:  C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics:   Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspector in Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.
Director, Education and Vocational Guidance:  H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Recreational and Physical Education:   Ernest Lee, B.A.
Director, Visual Education:  J. R. Pollock, B.A.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts:  Philip J. Kitley, B.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service:   Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education:  H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Tests and Standards:  C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director, School and Community Drama:  H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Officer in Charge of High School Correspondence:   Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Officer in Charge of Elementary School Correspondence:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Accountant: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: R.D.Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind:  C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education  9
Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Education and Chief Inspector of Schools 30
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver   32
Victoria   33
Report of the Director of Summer School of Education  36
Report of the Officer in Charge of Industrial Education  42
Report of the Director of Home Economics  48
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  50
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
Victoria   68
New Westminster  73
North Vancouver and West Vancouver  74
Burnaby   76
Surrey   77
Reports of District Inspectors -  79
Report of the Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind  105
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  107
Elementary Correspondence School  113
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  115
Report on Adult Education  118
Report of the Director of Physical Education and Recreation  128
Report of the Director of School and Community Drama  131
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  132
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "— 134
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  135
Report of the Director of School Radio Broadcasts  137
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  140
Report of the Director of Visual Education  144
. STATISTICAL RETURNS.
Page.
Number of Pupils enrolled by Type of School  9
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  10
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  10
Teachers' Certificates   11
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government  12
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases for the School-year 1946-47  13
Children of Foreign Parentage  14
Number of School Districts  14
Number of High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each
District    16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District 16
Summary of Enrolment in Senior High, Junior-Senior High, and Junior High
Schools    17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District  17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
each District   18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
each District   18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District ___ 19
Number of Schools and Number of Teachers in each Type of School  20
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  21
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  22
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1946-47 by Provincial Government  22
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1946-47—School Districts  26
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts   149
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  183
List of Teachers by District and Type of School, showing Salaries  184 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1946-47.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1948.
To the Honourable G. M. Weir,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventy-sixth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1947.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
130,605 to 137,827, and the average daily attendance increased from 114,590 to 121,334.
The percentage of regular attendance was 88.03.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder :—
Type of School.
Number of Pupils enrolled.
Municipal.
Large
Municipal.
Large
Rural.
Rural.
Total.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Totals	
8,925
5,445
3,478
1,382
33,626*
5,582
11,809
968
1,353
2,816
1,260
40,140
500
2,618
1,162
3,839
114
12,299
157
354
63,928
20,532
15,007
19,872
4,446
2,515
6,812
2,756
86,419*
137,827
* Includes 39 visited pupils.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the—
High Correspondence School classes, regular students  (exclusive of the 2,224 officially registered in high, superior, or
elementary schools) 	
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students
Classes formed under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools
Act" 	
1,390
1,597
12
2,999
Adult education—
Classes under the Canadian Vocation Training Programme 11,556
Night-schools   11,296
Vancouver School of Art  929
Vancouver School of Navigation   264
High Correspondence School (adults only)   2,068
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)   1,061
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  23,779
Carried forward
53,952 Y 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Brought forward   53,952
Adult education—Continued.
Summer School of Education (1946 session)   1,027
Normal School, Vancouver  219
Normal School, Victoria  117
Victoria College  732*
University of British Columbia  9,035f
Total   65,082
* Includes special winter and spring sessions.
t Includes special winter and spring sessions, but does not include enrolment of 2,368 in  Summer Session.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX.
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the year 1946-47:—
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
503
8,924
7,595
7,406
6,807
6,309
6,141
6.042
5,433
4,893
4,096
3.025
2.360
635
54
506
7,777
6,887
6,657
6,411
6,159
5,921
5,821
5,567
5,297
4.465
3,302
2,425
380
29
1,009
Grade I	
16,701
14,482
Grade II	
Grade III	
14,063
Grade IV	
13,218
Grade V	
12,468
Grade VI .'	
12 062
Grade VII	
11,863
Grade VIII	
11,000
Grade IX	
10,190
Grade X	
8,561
Grade XI   	
6,327
Grade XII	
4,785
Grade XIII	
1,015
83
Totals	
70.223
67,604
137,827
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE
DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Type of School.
Number op Teachers.
Grade.
Special
j Instructors.
Total.
Total
Pupils
Enrolled.
Percentage
of
Total
Enrolment.
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Totals	
509
644
141
86
229
87
2,732
4,428
105
143
35
11
9
102
614
787
176
86
240
96
2,834*
15,007
19.872
4,446
2,515
6,812
2,756
86,419t
4,833
137,827
10.89
14.42
3.23
1.82
4.94
2.00
62.70
100.00
29.48
30.86
31.53
29.24
29.75
31.68
31.62
31.13
* Includes 53 district supervisors, etc.
t Includes 39 visited pupils. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.                                        Y 11
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers employed, also the number with
or without university degrees:—
Type of School.
Number of Teachers.
With
University
Degrees.
Without  .
University
Degrees.
Total.
484
472
113
3
75
35
240
15
130
315
63
83
165
61
2,541
38
614
787
176
86
240
96
2,781
53
Totals	
1,437
3,396
4,833
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
No. of
Teachera
employed.
No. of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4.833
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741.
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.281:
3,532,518.951:
3,765,920.69.
3,743,317.08.
3,834,727.19.
4,015,074.371:
2,849,972.02.
2,611,937.801:
2,835,040.741:
2,972,385.041:
3,277,660.231
3,524,962.69.
3,630,670.781:
3,585,769.00+
3,963,848.241:
4,028,397.88:.
3,924,243.531:
4,244,898.821
5,022,534.591:
6,765,205.501
9,398,473.461
1882 83 	
1887 88    	
1892 93       ....         	
$215,056,221
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.541:
9,261,094.981
11,149,996.271
10,008,255.661
10,061,387.991
9,719,333.811
8,941,497.341
8,213,369.041
8,458,156.001
8,775,353.781
9,593,562.641
10,193,367.081
10,640,740.471
10,521,684.921
10,982,364.491
11,120,801.941
11,502,291.351
12,231,029.351
13,683,538.181
14,818,625.811
20,176,930.531
1897 98                      	
1902 03    	
1907 08                    	
1912 13     	
1913 14                    	
1929 30          	
1930 31         	
1935 36         	
1936 37       	
1938 39        	
1939 40    	
1940 41        	
1941 42                    	
1942 43      	
1943 44                    	
1944 45       	
1945 46 	
1946 47    	
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
J This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. Y 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last fourteen years and also
the cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1933-34	
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
$19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
29.81
33.97
36.56
58.24
$21.85
1934-35	
1935-36	
24 46
1936-S7	
1937-38	
1938-39	
1939^0	
1940-41	
1941-42	
1942-43	
36 59
1943-44	
1944-45	
39 51
1945-46             	
41 67
1946-47	
66.17 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. Y 13
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1946-47.
Grand total cost of education  $20,176,930.53
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College  $20,065.66
Special grant to Victoria College  20,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  884,499.16
Normal School, Vancouver  49,416.24
Normal School, Victoria  20,150.63
Cost of night-schools  16,068.98
Correspondence schools—
High school  93,550.90
Elementary school   31,191.19
Adult education  233,427.62
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act  1,904.00
       1,370,274.38
Net cost for total enrolment of 137,827 pupils  $18,806,656.15
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  136.45
Cost per pupil per school-day (195 days) on total enrolment  .70
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 121,334  154.99
Cost per pupil per school-day (195 days) on average daily attendance ___ .79
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 137,827 pupils
for year ($9,398,473.46—$1,370,274.38)       8,028,199.08
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment-__ 58.24
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (195 days) on
total enrolment  .42
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance    66.17
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (195 days) on
average daily attendance  .34
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,044,000 (1947 estimate)  18.01*
Cost per capita per school-day (195 days) on population of 1,044,000____ .09*
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,044,000   7.69+
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (195 days) on
population of 1,044,000 _  .04+
* Computed on the net total cost of $18,806,656.15.
t Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $8,028,199.08. Y 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1946-47 was as follows:—
Type of School.
ao
C
a
V
u
5
s
<
BO
V
2
o
u
o
_a
o
J3
-M
3
O
a
m
S
S
a
a
0J
s
s
s
h
O
m
3
■a
5
W
.2
+3
9
S
01
ft
4
►_
9
m
C
.5
'in
(O
3
oi
P
S
a
s
-3
a
a
o
ta
m
C
.2
CS
u
£
X
■3
g
II
o <u
n
la
o
224
462
76
35
121
74
1,227
323
96
58
6
50
18
907
36
16
4
8
4
1,148
61
88
27
15
25
9
451
128
229
47
23
122
40
1,441
193
631
36
317
371
32
3,080
28
26
16
2
12
1
291
188
346
74
21
206
11
975
109
190
1
17
236
679
139
252
25
35
91
12
1,028
221     603
356    912
71    214
38    158
144    261
32    145
1,506(3,975
244
414
95
29
107
20
1,618
483
821
155
230
256
69
3,999
2,980
4,839
899
934
Eiementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
2,006
463
22,325*
Totals	
2,219
1,458
1,216
67612,030
4,660
376
1,821
1,232
1,582
2,36816,268
2,527
6,013
34,446
* Includes 8 visited pupils.
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school year 1946-47:—
Municipal school districts _-_     7
Large municipal school districts  30
Large rural school districts  37
Rural school districts (unattached)   15
Total number of districts .  89 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 15
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 15,007; of this
number, 7,326 were boys and 7,681 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
9
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
4
1
7
11
4
3
2
4
5
1
6
8
8
2
2
4
6
12
216
26
12
3
22
2
2
2
2
60
2
4
14
16
2
8
12
4
3
2
4
6
1
9
9
10
2
2
4
10
16
274
37
18
3
23
2
2
2
2
96
3
4
20
24
2
214
345
59
77
48
12. Grand Porks	
120
123
18. Golden        	
16
175
225
252
28. Quesnel	
38
31. Merritt !.
49
33.  Chilliwack	
82
243
395
7,108
970
452
50
617
46. Sechelt	
52
34
49
48
2,190
47
98
382
409
40
Totals	
49
470
614
15,007 Y 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 19,872;
of this number, 9,755 were boys and 10,117 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
3. Kimberley ,	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
16
14
41
13
22
6
24
22
22
35
13
54
'          10
21
85
27
21
19
17
15
5
15
11
8
3
5
13
10
11
20
21
20
51
16
30
9
30
28
30
46
16
67
13
28
117
35
25
25
25
22
7
21
15
10
4
6
16
13
16
25
452
458
11. Trail	
1,510
431
15. Penticton	
720
179
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
33. Chilliwack	
844
882
706
1,161
456
36. Surrey	
1,802
37. Delta	
271
757
2,942
41. Burnaby	
908
657
595
567
474
49. Ocean Falls	
120
52. Prince Rupert	
478
369
238
62. Sooke Rural	
104
63. Saanich	
162
409
327
70.  Alberni	
596
Totals	
37
598
787
19,872
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 4,446; of this
number, 2,300 were boys and 2,146 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District-
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
2
3
1
12
75
28
17
18
101
36
21
392
2,560
918
576
Totals	
7
132
176
4,446 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 17
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN SENIOR HIGH, JUNIOR-SENIOR
HIGH, AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
Type of School.
Number of Pupils
enrolled.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Number op Pupils enrolled in Grades.
Total.
Boys.
Girls.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
XIII.
15,007
19,872
4,446
7,326
9,755
2,300
7,681
10,117
2,146
12,667.09
17,347.70
3,969.92
4,040
1,532
3,882
1,522
3,637
3,934
1,392
4,582
3,359
3,469
2,457
2,738
1,783
581
417
Totals	
39,325
19,381
19,944
33,984.71
5,572
5,404
8,963
7,941
5,926
4,521
998
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,515; of this
number, 1,260 were boys and 1,255 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
2
3
5
2
2
6
21
6
3
2
2
2
7
4
3
4
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
5
2
2
6
21
6
3
2
2
2
7
4
3
4
3
40
57
85
13. Kettle Valley	
52
18. Golden	
28
54
20.  Salmon Arm	
26. Birch Island	
112
58
27. Williams Lake	
25
30. Ashcroft	
165
955
46. Sechelt	
156
80
50
51
49
158
77
83
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay    	
91
89
Totals	
29
86
86
2,515 Y 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 6,812;
of this number, 3,387 were boys and 3,425 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
2
29
5
7
5
12
5
5
8
25
4
7
7
9
5
12
4
10
4
3
4
*
7
5
5
8
14
4
7
34
5
7
5
12
5
5
9
26
4
7
7
»
5
12
4
10
4
3
4
4
8
6
8
9
15
4
9
956
140
6. Kaslo	
189
13. Kettle Valley	
149
364
110
18. Golden	
146
22. Vernon	
274
847
103
191
236
29. Lillooet	
272
141
350
136
255
49. Ocean Falls	
94
87
139
58. McBride	
116
253
63. Saanich	
278
240
6,812
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 2,756;
of this number, 1,380 were boys and 1,376 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District,
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
22. Vernon	
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
41
35
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
48
40
1
1
45
32
16
21
12
1,382
1,215
14
19
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
41. Burnaby	
44. North Vancouver	
58. McBride	
Totals	
12
84
96
2,756 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 19
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 86,380; of this
number, 44,794 were boys and 41,586 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1946-47 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1. Fernie	
9
6
5
6
10
6
13
11
15
6
11
6
10
3
5
3
4
8
6
27
9
5
12
24
9
7
19
13
7
5
3
6
16
24
17
28
6
50
6
18
8
12
7
2
9
10
4
4
3
2
7
9
8
11
9
23
7
9
24
21
8
24
6
38
19
28
10
65
20
11
19
41
4
9
9
17
36
24
34
44
42
9
7
19
17
9
5
7
7
67
55
45
71
15
43
721
54
95
31
41
44
21
16
31
6
9
3
2
23
15
14
11
11
37
8
9
27
22
8
25
6
39
19
28
10
68
21
11
19
42
4
9
9
17
36
25
36
45
43
9
7
19
17
9
5
7
7
68
55
45
71
15
44
777
55
98
31
41
44
22
16
31
6
9
3
2
23
15
14
11
11
37
8
164
808
712
164
747
60
1,226
8. Slocan....	
618
815
279
11. Trail	
2,331
12. Grand Forks	
639
13. Kettle Valley	
189
700
1,522
105
306
18. Golden '     	
143
505
927
833
22. Vernon	
1,304
1,690
1,161
145
23. Kelowna	
26. Birch Island	
101
245
28. Quesnel	
350
29. Lillooet	
200
30. Ashcroft	
86
31. Merritt	
215
124
33. Chilliwack	
2,462
2,076
1,602
2,692
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
573
1,574
23,425
2,061
3,561
42. Maple Ridge	
1,065
1,442
1,582
791
46. Sechelt    	
462
881
129
245
56
30
698
351
315
137
189
1,004
58. McBride      .          	
163 Y 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued.
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
60. Peace River North	
30
15
20
10
10
8
14
«
2
13
8
8
13
14
41
16
195
20
25
8
29
19
15
44
8
39
44
20
8
6
20
41
16
201
20
25
8
29
19
16
48
8
41
45
20
8
6
20
953
308
6,990
62. Sooke Rural	
63. Saanich 	
532
686
141
65. Duncan	
G&. Lake Cowichan	
909
579
556
1,571
194
1,389
71. Courtenay	
1,512
481
73. Alert Bay	
149
74. Quatsino	
96
354
Totals	
783
2,688
2,781
86,380
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, VISITING
TEACHERS.
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
42
39
[           11
Totals	
53
39
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND NUMBER OF TEACHERS
IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the number of schools of each type and the number of
teachers employed in each for the school-year 1946-47:—
Type of School.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Teachers.
49
37
7
29
36
12
783
614
787
176
86
240
96
2,781
53
Totals	
953
4,833
* Districts 39 and 61. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 21
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers showing less than $1,000
are excluded.
Grade Teachers.
Type of School.
Number of
Teachers.
High
Salary.
Low
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Visiting and relieving teachers.
470
598
132
86
224
84
2,647
30
$4,150
3,850
3,600
2,862
4,100
3,650
4,450
2,550
I
$1,450
1,060
1,400
1,100
1,150
1,200
1,000
1,800
$2,994
2,332
2,701
1,698
1,944
1,995
1,887
2,361
Supervising Principals.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools..	
Visiting and relieving teachers.
$5,050
5,050
5,050
5
3
36
3,875
3,913
4,650
$2,950
2,800
3,100
2,600
3,633
2,250
$3,981
3,636
4,018
3,155
3,625
3,690
Special Instructors.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools	
Visiting and relieving teachers.
105
139
35
11
9
78
$4,050
3,850
3,250
2,600
2,900
3,100
$1,440
1,250
1,400
1,170
1,500
1,350
$2,751
2,330
2,622
2,139
2,228
2,214 Y 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers and
teachers earning less than $1,000 per annum:—
$1,000-1,099   4
1,100-1,199  37
1,200-1,299  143
1,300-1,399 327
1,400-1,499 238
1,500-1,599 276
1,600-1,699 297
1,700-1,799 296
1,800-1,899 289
1,900-1,999 316
2,000-2,099 258
2,100-2,199 242
2,200-2,299 216
2,300-2,399 201
2,400-2,499 394
2,500-2,599  179
2,600-2,699 133
2,700-2,799 109
2,800-2,899  84
2,900-2,999  84
Total number of teachers
$3,000-3,099  71
3,100-3,199  89
3,200-3,299  48
3,300-3,399  62
3,400-3,499  103
3,500-3,599  30
3,600-3,699  16
3,700-3,799  42
3,800-3,899  126
3,900-3,999  12
4,000-4,099  7
4,100-4,199  32
4,200-4,299  12
4,300-4,399  2
4,400-4,499  7
4,600-4,699  2
4,800-4,899  6
5,600-5,699  2
7,700-7,799  1
  4,793
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1946-47.
Minister's office:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc.__
General office:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc...
Text-book Branch:  Free text-books, maps, etc.
Correspondence schools—high:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Revision of courses, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Science equipment	
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services.
Incidentals 	
Less fees __.
$10,815.00
565.50
2,823.40
$40,407.65
2,503.62
1,375.95
$68,747.30
44,365.71
5,016.91
103.30
2,325.95
180.00
139.84
$120,879.01
27,328.11
$14,203.00
44,287.22
114,953.25
93,550.90 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 23
Correspondence schools—elementary:
Salaries	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Less revenue
Industrial education:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc.
Night-schools 	
Less Dominion Government grant
Visual education:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc.	
Travelling expenses, etc..
Purchase of films, etc	
$27,788.54
3,493.45
105.45
$31,387.44
196.25
$19,421.94
1,672.56
5,733.78
16,068.98
$42,897.26
8,391.05
$3,820.63
1,806.37
1,006.44
3,247.64
Inspection of schools:
Salaries   $115,048.08
Office supplies, etc  15,327.43
Travelling expenses, etc  42,829.39
$173,204.90
Less amount paid by School Boards  (to March
31st, 1947)  	
Normal School, Vancouver:
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468).
Office supplies, etc.	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Fuel, light, water, etc	
Books, bindings, periodicals, etc	
Allowance to demonstration school	
Programmes of Study, etc	
Nursing and health services	
Incidentals 	
Less Normal School fees
Normal School, Victoria:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc.
Transportation   of   students   to   outlying   practice-
schools 	
15,525.33
$46,185.00
3,763.97
989.97
2,524.81
1,434.37
2,874.99
270.86
1,000.00
1,517.27
$60,561.24
11,145.00
$21,300.64
1,602.06
820.79
389.73
$31,191.19
34,506.21
9,881.08
157,679.57
49,416.24 Y 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Normal School, Victoria—Continued.
Books, periodicals, etc  282.04
Furniture and equipment  595.95
Incidentals   889.42
$25,880.63
Less Normal School fees  5,730.00
$20,150.63
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (less deductions for rent, $3,969.99)  $51,651.84
Office supplies, etc  556.61
Laundry and janitor supplies  1,515.75
Travelling expenses, etc  813.66
Fuel, light, water, etc  3,593.01
Furniture, fixtures, equipment, etc  2,894.70
Provisions, etc  11,266.90
Incidentals   949.49
$73,241.96
Less fees for extra-provincial children  680.00
72,561.96
Basic grants   $5,774,600.81
Less Dominion Government grant  52,281.52
       5,722,319.29
Special salary grant under section 13 (g) of the Act  1,904.00
Teachers' superannuation,  7 per cent, re " Special Assistance in the
Cost of Education Act "  693,460.66
Special aid to school districts  5,000.00
School buildings and equipment  641,157.99
Education of soldiers' dependent children :  12,872.47
School tests, high school and senior matriculation examinations         $32,689.02
Less fees for examinations and certificates  25,566.22
  7,122.80
Conveying children to central schools  407,149.28
Summer schools and teacher-training for Special certificates  :        $26,240.47
Less fees from outside teachers, sales of books,
etc.    5,639.56
  20,600.91
Board of Reference  544.60
Adult education:
Extension and adult education       $33,835.85
Less Dominion Government grant  18,554.91
  15,280.94
Recreational and physical education for youths over
school age        $68,486.81
Less Dominion Government grant  16,015.75
  52,471.06
Urban occupational training  14,461.15
Student-aid bursaries  69,556.16
Re-establishment training  7,937.34 REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 25
Division of Chief Inspector and Curriculum:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Printing and experimental curricula	
Division of Educational Reference and School Service:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Books, periodicals, etc	
Printing of " B.C. Schools " magazine	
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc	
Purchase of tests for resale	
Preparing,  purchasing,  administering,   and
tests 	
scoring
Less proceeds from sale of tests
Educational and vocational guidance:
Salaries 	
Office supplies, etc	
Printing and mimeographing	
Travelling expenses 	
Incidentals 	
Less Dominion Government grant.
Incidentals and contingencies	
University of British Columbia:
General grant	
Teacher-training  	
Interest on cost of stadium, etc._
$2,624.68
1,449.72
3,899.63
835.17
$2,215.00
1,843.64
946.24
54.46
$3,601.13
1,789.39
462.13
811.68
3,550.38
$5,459.84
1,919.35
211.86
5,251.35
5,177.28
$18,019.68
5,569.98
$4,535.00
1,172.38
300.00
434.05
301.80
$6,743.23
2.002.90
$868,484.19
15,924.97
90.00
$9,746.68
63,974.29
Adult education—Continued.
Apprentice training 	
Vocational schools assistance	
School radio broadcasts:
Salaries (less amount paid by Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation)  	
Office supplies, etc	
Scripts, actors' fees, etc	
Travelling expenses, etc _■	
8,809.20
5,059.34
10,214.71
12,449.70
4,740.33
9,266.99
884,499.16 Y 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Special grant to Victoria College  $20,000.00
Cost-of-living bonus  ,  55,492.26
Total cost to Government  $9,398,473.46
Amount expended by districts (including debt charges)  10,778,457.07
Grand total cost of education  $20,176,930.53
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
No. and Name of School District.
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
$152,317.29
140,006.90
144,102.40
31,620.59
145,603.12
38,126.54
247,057.86
69,155.87
72,446.81
51,993.57
370,522.44
87,119.90
40,479.47
267,556.58
250,396.19
47,369.35
74,042.22
37,100.42
86,478.43
142,223.64
119,536.36
249,740.69
342,813.42
255,919.67
17,993.27
22,977.46
64,577.83
73,121.81
46,999.33
49,726.53
26,090.76
82,509.15
344,320.55
367,448.70
198,618.30
375,140.81
83,707.06
314,542.80
5,569,998.38
506,238.13
716,942.62
158,882.74
230,387.56
362,159.38
194,550.98
69,012.54
176,165.04
57,622.17
57,567.64
10,339.38
$61,684.35
61,895.77
58,707.72
16,980.48
70,640.10
21,396.56
93,770.60
27,219.54
26,680.42
29,393.51
152,229.98
48,109.47
23,966.63
138,931.38
133,100.30
24,088.98
39,907.10
22,063.67
43,019.78
77,587.76
63,411.56
135,133.15
174,181.33
113,472.66
9,344.49
8,674.24
26,806.63
37,457.30
20,546.66
20,381.97
4,139.26
43,062.70
196,341.76
184,397.69
112,949.37
219,884.46
28,950.40
149,911.89
1,521,110.41
190,450.57
352,521.31
92,975.84
113,827.73
193,106.45
67,047.66
25,262.77
64,815.10
15,737.25
13,873.82
2,924.55
$90,632.94
78,111.13
85,394.68
14,640.11
74,963.02
16,729.98
153,287.26
41,936.33
45,766.39
22,600.06
11. Trail 	
218,292.46
39,010.43
13. Kettle Valley     	
16,512.84
128,625.20
117,295.89
23,280.37
34,135.12
18. Golden	
15,036.75
43,458.65
64,635.88
21. Armstrong	
56,124.80
114,607.54
168,632.09
142,447.01
8,648.78
26. Birch Island	
14,303.22
27. Williams Lake	
37,771.20
35,664.51
29. Lillooet	
26,452.67
30. Ashcroft	
29,344.56
21,951.50
39,446.45
147,978.79
183,051.01
85,668.93
33. Chilliwack __	
155,256.35
54,756.66
164,630 91
37. Delta	
4,048,887.97
315,787.56
364,421.31
65,906.90
116,559.83
169,052.93
127,503.32
43,749.77
111,349.94
41,884.92
43,693.82
7,414.83
46. Sechelt	
49. Ocean Falls	
* Includes debt and capital charges. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
Y 27
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS—Continued.
No, and Name of School District.
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
$11,124.31
152,535.13
55,483.38
51,742.40
36,254.51
36,902.38
188,874.15
74,496.38
169,784.14
73,542.70
1,448,153.68
99,358.74
136,884.34
41,378.40
160,283.53
114,763.19
83,979.26
266,875.25
87,242.60
252,192.39
230,977.91
87,361.02
28,123.13
28,189.00
2,704.83
25,731.04
1,138.84
1,971.21
1,700.00
2,026.82
1,975.01
3,277.10
1,465.10
1,372.87
2,171.81
6,221.18
6,595.56
26,386.75
5,854.23
$2,017.43
54,008.99
26,627.51
21,918.42
13,608.31
17,042.97
82,329.12
33,667.07
77,410.90
40,114.73
423,203.41
34,014.35
49,299.84
23,496.55
69,597.63
35,862.90
45,680.44
107,192.44
37,572.09
112,006.50
102,663.17
40,926.85
9,498.83
805.78
932.11
■ 11,498.61
1,085.40
1,572.00
$9,106.88
98,526.14
28,855.87
29,823.98
22,646.20
56. Vanderhoof	
19,859.41
106,545.03
58. McBride	
40,829.31
92,373.24
33,427.97
1,024,950.27
62. Sooke	
65,344.39
87,584.50
17,881.85
90,685.90
78,900.29
38,298.82
159,682.81
49,670.51
140,185.89
128,314.74
72. Campbell Eiver	
46,434.17
73. Alert Bay	
18,624.30
27,383.22
1,772.72
Unattached.
Atlin	
Bamfleld	
14,232.43
53.44
Camp Mile 300...	
399 21
1,700.00
938 48
1,088.34
1,037.49
816.56
1,252.82
659.60
1,634.10
4,028.51
1,997.11
5,629.37
2,134.52
937.52
2,460.54
212 28
713 27
537.71
Tofino 	
2,192.67
4,598.45
20,757.38
3,719.71
Totals	
$17,648,464.92
1
$6,870,007.85
$10,778,457.07
Includes debt and capital charges.
LEGISLATION.
Because this report covers a school-year, July 1st, 1946, to June 30th, 1947, it
presents an account of the first full year during which the schools were operating under
the new organization based upon the recommendations of the Cameron Report of 1944.
Large administrative areas were organized and a new system of grants instituted,
commencing April 1st, 1946.
The new organization is unquestionably much superior to the old one. Great
benefits, both educational and financial, were immediately apparent, particularly with
respect to the operation of the small rural school.
It is a pleasure to record the appreciation of the Department for the splendid work
done by the new Boards of School Trustees who were charged with instituting the
new organization and overcoming initial difficulties. That the change was made so
smoothly and continued to operate so efficiently is due in no small measure to the fine
spirit of the men and women composing the School Boards of the Province, and their
co-operation with the Departmental Inspectors who did remarkably efficient work in
putting the new scheme into operation. Y 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
It would be untrue to say that no difficulties have been encountered. There have
been a few complaints about unsatisfactory school boundaries. These have been
investigated, and changes made where it was shown to be desirable.
Equality of the tax burden upon various classes of taxpayers, which was one of
the objectives of the Cameron Report, has not been achieved, chiefly because the
legislation was made effective in a period of rising prices. Teachers' salaries and other
school costs were continually rising, until the total cost of education became considerably higher than the basic or standard educational programme referred to by
Dr. Cameron.
Mr. Carl Goldenberg was appointed a Commissioner to investigate municipal
finance. Amongst his recommendations were some which tended to breach the gap
between the actual cost of education and the cost of the basic programme. On April
1st, 1947, the recommendations of Mr. Goldenberg that the salary grant schedule be
increased $100 per teacher and that the current expense grant be increased $3 per
pupil was put into effect. The total effect was to increase grants over a full fiscal
year by approximately $850,000.
There still remains the vexed question of equalized assessments. Certain classes
of taxpayers—for example, farmers—seem to feel the increased tax burden more
heavily than other classes in the community. For this reason it is essential that some
form of tax commission be appointed to ensure that the computation for grant purposes
and for the sharing of school costs as between the component parts of a school district
shall be made upon the same values.    This the Government intends to do.
COMPULSORY MEMBERSHIP IN THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
.      TEACHERS' FEDERATION.
One of the most important amendments to the " Public Schools Act " passed at the
last session of the Legislature and made effective April 1st, 1947, was section 154.
It provides that every teacher shall, upon the enactment of this section, become and be.
a member of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. There was a provision,
however, which provided that teachers then employed in the schools of the Province
who did not wish to become members of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation
would have the right to withdraw. Such teachers were to notify the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation in writing. The privilege of withdrawal from the provisions
of the Act was limited to the first six months, and therefore, on October 1st, 1947,
all persons engaged as teachers who had not exercised their right in this respect
automatically became members of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. It is
understood there were very few who exercised this privilege.
VICTORIA COLLEGE.
The student enrolment at Victoria College has grown considerably in the past
few years, to such an extent that the accommodation provided by the Victoria School
Board in the old college building known as " Craigdarroch " proved inadequate.    The
Provincial Government, therefore, made arrangements to accommodate the staff and
students of Victoria College in the Provincial Normal School building at Mount Tolmie.
This building now houses both Victoria College and the Provincial Normal School,
Victoria.
VISUAL EDUCATION.
During the year a Department of Visual Education was organized under the
directorship of Mr. J. R. Pollock, formerly doing similar work for the Vancouver School
Board. The demand for this type of assistance from all schools of the Province made
it necessary for the Department to organize a Department of Visual Education of its
own and not to rely upon the good offices of the Vancouver School Board, as had been
done in the past. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. Y 29
Arrangements were made to take over all equipment and stock of the Vancouver
system and to operate it from a new building in Vancouver, giving Provincial-wide
coverage.    Already the division is giving a much enlarged service and has proved most
successful
DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS.
This Division, under the direction of C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., has
operated under the handicap of having its Director responsible also for the organization
and administration of the Summer School of Education. It was felt that the Division
was of sufficient importance as to require the full attention of its Director. For this
reason Dr. Conway was relieved of the responsibility for conducting the Summer School
of Education and was asked to devote his full time to an expansion of the work of his
own division.
Mr. H. P. Johns, Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance, was asked to
assume the direction of the Summer School of Education. This reorganization has
proved beneficial to both divisions. The Division of Tests and Standards has been
able to undertake a much wider programme as a result.
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE DEPUTY MINISTER.
The establishment of large administrative areas imposed a great deal of extra
work on the part of the head-office staff. It was necessary to provide the Deputy
Minister with an executive assistant. Capt. R. C. Grant was appointed to this position.
He has succeeded in a most admirable manner in relieving the Deputy Minister of
a great deal of routine work and made it possible for a great volume of work to be
undertaken. I wish to express my appreciation to Captain Grant for the splendid
manner in which he rapidly worked into the organization and for his willing acceptance
of a heavy burden in the first year of his appointment.
OTHER NEW APPOINTMENTS.
We welcome to the staff the following:—
Mr. H. S. Hum, Organizer, School and Community Drama.
Mr. H. M. Evans, Assistant Registrar in Charge of Examinations.
Mr. Lome Brown, Supervisor of School Instruction in Health and Physical
Education.
Mr. S. E. Espley, Accountant.
Mr. Enoch Broome, Instructor, Vancouver Normal School.
Mr. E. G. Ozard, Instructor, Vancouver Normal School.
Mr. D. B. Gaddes, Instructor, Victoria Normal School.
Miss Margaret E. Gordon, Instructor, Victoria Normal School.
IN MEMORIAM.
Last year it was my pleasure to record the appreciation of myself and the Department to Dr. S. J. Willis, formerly Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education,
for his work in assisting in the framing of the amendments to the " Public Schools
Act," and for his great kindness and helpfulness shown in so many ways during a very
trying period.    It is now my sad duty to record his death.
No words of mine can express the great loss education in this Province, and indeed,
in Canada, has suffered through the death of Dr. Willis. He worked faithfully until
the last. On his retirement he consistently placed his great gifts at the disposal of
the Department, and he willingly undertook the chairmanship of Victoria College
Council, a post which he occupied with great distinction. After a short illness he died
on April 24th, 1947.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. FAIREY,
Superintendent of Education. Y 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION.
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION AND CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the school-year 1946-47 considerable progress was made in the professional
as well as in the administrative aspects of education in this Province. A brief
description of some of the more important developments follows:—
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research.—This Division was established under
the direction of Dr. C. B. Conway in order to provide valid information to the Department, Inspectors, principals, and teachers as to desirable academic standards and to
make available helpful remedial material.
An Advisory Council to the Division was appointed. Its membership consists of
Mr. H. L. Campbell, chairman; Dr. S. N. F. Chant, head, Department of Psychology,
University of British Columbia; Miss A. V. Turner, Child Study Department, Greater
Victoria Schools; Mr. R. Straight, Bureau of Measurements, Vancouver Schools;
Dr. F. T. Tyler, Department of Education, University of British Columbia; and the
Director of the Division, Dr. C. B. Conway.
Division of Educational Reference and School Service.—This Division, under the
direction of Mrs. M. A. Scace, is charged with the responsibility of making available
to officials of the Department and to curriculum committees the latest and most
authoritative books and other publications in all educational fields. The Division is
also responsible for " British Columbia Schools," the official publication of the Department of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary school
editions.
Division of Curriculum.—During the year a formal Curriculum Division of the
Department of Education was established. It was charged with the responsibility
for the continuing revision and development of courses of study for all schools. The
Central Curriculum Committee is advisory to the Honourable the Minister of Education
and to the Division of Curriculum.
Reorganization of Secondary-school Curriculum.—The Central Curriculum Committee proposed that a gradual reorganization of the curriculum for secondary schools
be undertaken. The major principles underlying the reorganization were: That the
number of constants or required courses for university entrance be reduced, that the
minimum university entrance requirements in certain subjects be made less, and that
advanced elective courses be provided in the major subject fields in order that students
might pursue their intellectual interest further in high schools than is now possible.
The result of these proposals, when they are implemented, will be that the student may,
if necessary, defer until Grade XI the decision to seek university entrance, and that
university entrance may be secured with extensive options or electives in technical and
commercial education.
These proposals were favourably received by the Board of Examiners, the
University authorities, and the Department of Education, and will be brought into
effect gradually.
Revisions of Curricula.—During the year a number of new revisions were initiated
and a number of those which had been commenced last year were completed. This is
a simple statement of fact, but behind it lies the effort, the enthusiasm, and the outstanding ability of all the people on all of the committees which have been set up to
revise or prepare curricula. The Department of Education and the teachers of the
Province are in their debt.
I EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION. Y 31
Mathematics.—The existing courses, Mathematics IV to VI, had been revised into
the new courses, Mathematics IV and V. The first of these came into effect at the
beginning of this school-year. These courses are to be followed by an advanced
elective course, Mathematics A, which is in preparation.
Kindergarten.—The establishment of kindergartens by several Boards of School
Trustees made necessary the preparation of a curriculum. This was prepared during
the year and is now ready for printing.
Bible Reading.—The prescribed readings as they had existed for several years
made no provision for age and grade levels. The new revision added material and
grouped the readings into primary, junior, intermediate, and senior sections.
Social Studies.—In November the Honourable the Minister of Education, Dr. G. M.
Weir, held public conferences in Vancouver and Victoria. At these the public was
invited to offer suggestions as to what should constitute the content and method of
courses in Social Studies which would adequately train young people for effective
Canadian citizenship. It was decided that the basic course in Social Studies should
consist of a fusion of history, geography, economics, and sociology. Committees are
now at work on an extensive revision of Social Studies I to V.
Health and Physical Education.—A complete revision of the programme for Grades
I to XII was initiated during the year.
Guidance.—The Guidance programme was enriched and completely revised during
the year, but it is not expected that it will be published until several related courses
are prepared.
Home and Family Living.—This is a new course which will be prepared during the
coming school-year. It will form part of a five-period block consisting of Health,
Guidance, and Home and Family Living.
Handbook for School Libraries.—This manual was prepared during the year and
awaits publication.
List of Library Books for all Grades.—A complete revision of the library list was
undertaken by the committee which prepared the handbook.
Revision of Time Allotments.—Subject time allotments for elementary and junior
high schools were revised during the year.
Pupils' Report Forms.—The report form for Grades IV to VI was revised, and one
specifically for Grades VII to IX is in preparation.
Departmental Conference.—During the week of April 28th the third general
Departmental conference was held. This conference was attended by Inspectors of
Schools and officials of the Department of Education. Matters of both an administrative and a professional nature were discussed. Special lectures relating to the
introduction of the new readers of the recently adopted Curriculum Foundation Series
were given by Miss Tillie Schlumberger, reading consultant of W. J. Gage & Company,
publishers of the new readers. Demonstration lessons were given by Miss Schlumberger with classes from the Victoria city schools. Y 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The forty-sixth session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September 9th,
1946, and closed on June 13th, 1947.    Attendance and results were as follows:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
51
48
168
150
219
198
During the first term an additional thirteen men, who were qualifying for Industrial Arts certificates, enrolled for courses in Educational Psychology and Principles of
Teaching.
Distinction standing was awarded to Miss Florence Muriel Brown, Kelowna;
Herbert Ernest Dahlquist, White Rock; Miss Edna Margaret Grimes, Nelson; William
Dwight MacLeod, Vancouver; Miss Annie Agatha Nancy Peters, Vancouver; Miss
Jean Norma Sanvido, Vancouver;   and Miss Ruby Victoria Scott, New Westminster.
Thirty-two students—twenty-seven men and five women—had been members of
one or other of the armed services. As in the two preceding years, they proved to be a
welcome strength to the school because of their dependability and real qualities of
leadership.
Two staff changes occurred. Mr. Enoch B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed., was appointed
in charge of Educational Psychology and Tests and Measurements, while Mr. E. G.
Ozard, B.A., became instructor in Art.    Both have given very satisfactory service.
A temporary change was rendered necessary when Miss Zella Manning, principal
of the Provincial Government Model School, suffered a serious injury at the beginning
of the fall term. Miss Manning's duties are so important and are discharged so
capably that it is scarcely possible to find a suitable substitute. We were, therefore,
fortunate in being able to secure Miss Marjorie Findlay for three months.
The general operation of the school remained largely unchanged. A rereading of
the annual reports for the past ten years reveals that a somewhat similar statement has
appeared in them with rather monotonous regularity, and it might be inferred that no
progress has been made. Such a conclusion would be all the more probable when the
notable changes in other phases of Provincial education are recalled. Administration
of school districts has been revolutionized in recent years and the whole school curricula
have undergone continuous and sometimes drastic revision. Yet it is not too far from
the truth to say that teacher-training remains much the same as ten years ago. An
explanation and a statement of policy would therefore seem to be necessary.
Eleven years ago the training given in this school was reorganized in several
important respects. The student-load of class instruction was reduced from thirty to
twenty-one hours a week for the purpose and with the result of eliminating lecture
methods of instruction; an adequate library and a qualified librarian were provided;
150 hours of practice-teaching in six separated weeks were replaced by two teaching-
practica, each of four consecutive weeks, and by other demonstration and participation
periods to a total of 275 hours.
These changes were drastic departures from tradition. They quickly proved their
worth and still constitute the bases of our training.    Weaknesses developed from time PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Y 33
to time, and attempts to correct these were responsible for many minor adjustments.
In the main, and subject to the usual occasional problems common to all schools, a
reasonably satisfactory type of embryo teacher was produced who was certainly superior
to her prototype of a decade before.
It is questionable if such a statement can still be made. New subjects have been
added to the curriculum and new, better, but more difficult methods of instruction have
been developed. At times the pendulum of innovation has swung far—too far—away
from conservative traditionalism and has had to be returned. This involved experimentation which the Normal Schools should have done and could not do. Through all
of this the Normal School year and, to too great an extent, the Normal School programme
remained unchanged.
A new teacher-training organization is needed in British Columbia. The details
will require much thought and investigation, but broad, general principles would seem
to be definite.    These would include:—
(a) Association in some form with both the University of British Columbia
and the Department of Education.
A two-year course (for an elementary-school certificate) from University
Entrance.
A school-year at least as long as the present Normal School year.
A curriculum which will provide academic courses better suited to the
needs of prospective teachers, adequate professional courses, and at least
400 hours of practical experience.
Recognition of all, or most, of the two-year course toward a standard
bachelor's degree.
Provision   of  a  demonstration-participation   school   conforming  to  the
accepted standards laid down for teachers colleges.
Such a school will be costly.    An entirely new plant will be required, as well as a
substantially larger staff.    British Columbia will, however, be provided with better
teachers.
(6)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(/)
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF H. 0. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL.
The thirty-third session of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, opened September 9th, 1946, and closed June 13th, 1947. The following table presents a summary of
the enrolment:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
22
2
2
2
85
1
3
107
3
5
2
28
89
117
Five students—Audrey Eva Bacon, Shirley Louise Davidson, Lawrence Victor
Lichty, Alexander David MacDonald, and Charles Robert Tudway—received honour
standing. Frank Wheetman Gower was the winner of the Dr. V. L. Denton Memorial
Award for 1946-47.    All four of the aforementioned men were veterans of World
. Y 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
War II. The two men listed as " partials " were teachers of Industrial Arts. They
obtained standing in Principles and Techniques of Education and in Psychology.
The St. John Ambulance Association issued certificates to those students who were
successful in the course in First Aid, as follows: Thirty-six First-aid certificates, one
Voucher award, two Medallion awards, and one Label award.
Life-saving classes were conducted during the second term. Fourteen students
received bronze medallions from the Royal Life Saving Society. Two students qualified
as instructors.
Two new instructors, Mr. Donald Boyce Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus. (Oregon), and
Miss Margot Elizabeth Gordon, B.A. (Toronto), joined the faculty September 1st, 1946.
Mr. Gaddes was appointed to provide instruction in Music and Arithmetic. Miss
Gordon assumed responsibility for instruction in English, Speech, Drama, and Library.
Through the courtesy of the Victoria School Board, the part-time services of Miss
Marian James, primary supervisor, and those of Mr. George Grant, supervisor of
physical education, were made available to the Normal School. The School is grateful
to the Victoria School Board for these concessions and to both Miss James and Mr.
Grant for the valuable instruction provided.
The health programme at the School was enriched by a series of lectures on health
topics. This series was arranged by Dr. J. L. Murray Anderson, school medical officer.
Among the medical authorities lecturing to the students were Dr. J. L. Murray
Anderson, Dr. J. M. Hershey, Dr. F. 0. R. Garner, and Miss Dorothy Tait.
At the beginning of the new term it became apparent that the Memorial Hall would
not accommodate the increased numbers enrolling at this Normal School, and, accordingly, orders were issued to re-establish the School in the Normal School building at the
intersection of Richmond and Lansdowne Roads. Reconversion of this building, which
had housed a military hospital from 1942 to 1946, required several months. During
this period class-room discussions were interrupted and at times drowned out by the
noise of electric drills and carpenters' hammers. However, in spite of these interruptions and other minor inconveniences, both the staff and the student-body welcomed the
opportunity to re-establish teacher-training in the beautiful setting provided at the old
Normal School.
During September, October, January, and February demonstration lessons were
conducted weekly in one or other of the auditoriums available at the various elementary
schools. Miss James and other experienced class-room teachers demonstrated the
techniques employed by efficient modern teachers. To these teachers, the Normal
School is deeply indebted.
During this session the students devoted approximately two months to observation
and practice-teaching. A total of 259 class-rooms in seventy-nine schools were used
during this year. Many of these class-rooms (108) were in rural schools in widely
separated districts on Vancouver Island and in other parts of Southern British
Columbia. During the periods when the students were obtaining this practical
experience, members of the faculty visited the various schools, observing the work of
the student-teachers and advising them when the need for advice became apparent.
Periods of teaching practice were provided during the months of November,
February, and April, and the great value of these periods was apparent to all those
associated with this teacher-training programme. It is significant that the degree of
correlation between the academic standing of the students and the measure of success
achieved by them in the class-rooms was not high. Each of the factors—mental
maturity, a sound philosophy of education, a pleasing personality, and proficiency in the
work of the elementary school—seems to contribute more to the success of the young
teacher than does the possession of additional academic credits. Since the enthusiasm
of any teacher is dependent upon the measure of success achieved, the factors directly PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS. Y 35
responsible for their success should not be overlooked during any revision of the
basic-training programme which provides teachers for our elementary schools.
Since the class-rooms in our public schools are the laboratories in which Normal
School students study children and teaching techniques, these class-rooms are an
essential part of our teacher-training programme. To the principals of these schools
and to the teachers of the classes with which our students worked, the faculty of the
Normal School extends sincere thanks. The school is indebted also to the School
Inspectors, both municipal and Provincial, to the lecturers from the Provincial Board
of Health, and to the staffs of the Provincial Museum, Archives, Provincial Library,
and Public Library, who gave so generously of their time to enrich our training
programme. Y 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
REPORT OF H. P. JOHNS, M.A., DIRECTOR.
One thousand and twenty-seven teachers were in attendance at the thirty-fourth
session of the Summer School of Education, held in Victoria and Vancouver from July
2nd to August 5th. This number represents a gain of 139 registrations over the total
for 1946.
A feature of the year's activities was the offering of special classes in English and
Canadian History to holders of Second- and Third-class Permanent certificates. This
policy was adopted as a means of encouraging these teachers to raise their certification
standing. By arrangement with the Vancouver School Board, classes in the above
subjects were held in connection with the Vancouver night-schools from January to
May. Financed and supervised by the Summer School, this procedure in itself represented a new departure. The courses were repeated at the Summer School in Victoria,
a total of 141 teachers enrolling in the two groups, as follows:— Number enrolled
Special classes, Vancouver (January to May)     60
Special classes, Victoria (July 2nd to August 5th)     81
Total  141
Another innovation in Summer School policy this year was the establishment of a
new section in Vancouver to care for the increased enrolment in Physical Education
classes. All Specialist courses in this field were offered at the Kitsilano Junior-Senior
High School because of the limited gymnasium accommodation at Victoria High School,
in which Physical Education classes were formerly held.
COURSES AND ENROLMENT.
The enrolment for all courses and the total enrolment are summarized below.
Instructors who taught for less than one week are not included in the tables, nor is the
enrolment for the special English and Canadian History classes held in connection with
the Vancouver night-schools.
Courses,
Instructors.
Enrolment.
Victoria Section, 1947	
36
41
24
20
692
335
77
73
64
64
44
43
39
32
1,027
888
Totals for 1946	
Totals for 1945	
830
Totals for 1944	
796
Victoria Section.
Methods and Philosophy of Education: Enrolment.
1.   Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  126
9.   Problems in Visual Education in Elementary and Rural
Schools  40
218.   Radio in Education   54
301.   Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades  134
Organization and Administration:
66.   Organization and Administration of the Elementary School    34 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. Y 37
Psychology and Measurement: Enrolment.
110.   Educational Psychology   104
Individual Development and Guidance:
152.   Child Guidance  60
155.   Principles of Guidance in the Personality Adjustment of
School Children  117
513.   Child and School Hygiene  40
English :
200.   The Language Arts in the Elementary School  104
213.   Senior Matriculation English   43
216.   Senior English (Special)   63
Graphic and Practical Arts:
353.   Practical Arts for Rural Schools  51
356.   Modern Art in the Middle and Upper Grades  49
604.   Practical Typewriting  34
Health and Physical Education:
512.   Red Cross Workshop  6
517.   Community Health and Home Nursing  6
520.   Physical Education for the Elementary Class-room Teacher 78
Home Economics:
651.   Problems in Fitting, Pattern Study, and Clothing Construction   34
653.   Foods and Nutrition   32
Library Service:
410. School Library Organization and Administration  29
411. Functions of the School Library  28
Music :
440i. Music in the Intermediate Grades  57
444.   Introduction to Music Literature and History  47
446.   Advanced Choral Music and Conducting  29
450.   Practice-teaching under Supervision  20
454. Music Problems in the Schools  17
455. Eye and Ear Training in Music  28
Primary Education:
543.   Primary Rhythmics, Games, and Folk-dancing  73
588. Methods in Kindergarten-Primary Education  48
589. Kindergarten-Primary Demonstration Class  51
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  95
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory  80
594.   Problems in Primary Methods  105
596.   Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  73
Social Studies:
313.   Senior Matriculation World History  59
315.   Canadian History (Special)  73
Vancouver Section.
General Courses:
1.   Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  50
110.   Educational Psychology   41
10.   Visual Education Workshop  15 Y 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Art Education: Enrolment.
391. Drawing and Painting II  38
392. Design and Colour II  35
Commercial Education :
624.   Typewriting Practice  17
626.   Advanced Book-keeping   18
630.   Commercial Arithmetic  21
633.   Office Routine, Business Forms, and Secretarial Practice   _ 15
Industrial Arts Education:
220.   Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School   15
238.   Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School   52
223.   Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  13
225.   Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  15
241. Practical Geometry  12
242. Free-hand Sketching  5
243. Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  28
227. Elementary Woodwork   3
228. Elementary Wood-turning   9
229A. Farm Mechanics   15
245. Advanced Woodwork (Bench-work)  11
246. Advanced Wood-turning  17
247. Practice in the use of Wood-working Machinery;  care and
maintenance   8
248a. Farm Mechanics   7
234. Art Metalwork   21
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  3
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  5
229c. Farm Mechanics   13
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  7
248b. Farm Mechanics   5
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  9
Physical Education and Recreation Courses:
501.   Organization and Administration of Physical Education.-- 49
511.   Methods in Health Education  84
523.   Teaching-practice   8
526.   Physical Education Activities  9
528.   High School Physical Education Laboratory  42
530.   Sports Education I (Men and Women)  67
536. Recreational Leadership  41
537. Recreational Activities  31
538. Community Recreation (Men and Women)  20
550. Rhythms for the Secondary School  35
551. Gymnastics   43
Student Courses.
Total in 1947  3,073
Total in 1946  2,613
Total in 1945  2,380
Total in 1944  2,394 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. Y 39
Courses per Student.
Average in 1947  2.9
Average in 1946  2.9
Average in 1945  2.9
Average in 1944  3.0
FACULTY.
Below is a list of the instructors at the 1947 session of the Summer School of
Education. The co-operation and ability of the staff members listed, and the many
other employees connected with the school, are deserving of the highest commendation.
In particular, the efficient manner in which Miss Muriel Johnson, B.H.Sc, managed
the cafeteria, and Mr. John Meredith, B.A., directed student activities and cared for
school supplies, always an onerous duty, are worthy of special note. To Miss Catherine
D. Cameron, Registrar, must go the gratitude of the entire faculty and student-body,
as well as that of the Director, for the capable and cheerful manner in which she carried out her difficult task.
Instructors.
Abercrombie,   William   T.,   B.A.,   Principal,   Fairview   High   School   of   Commerce,
Vancouver.
Anderson, J. L. Murray, M.B.E., D.P.H., Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Binning, B.C., Dip. V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art., Vancouver.
Bose, Roy G., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Research and Guidance, Santa Monica City
Schools, Santa Monica, Calif.
Broome, Enoch B., M.A., B.Ed., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Brown,   Lome,   formerly   Physical   Education   Instructor,   Kitsilano   High   School,
Vancouver.
Bryson, Miss Ruth S., B.Sc.,(H.Ec), Instructor, John Shaw High School, Nanaimo.
Burton, J. Stuart, B.A., B.Paed., Vice-Principal, Burnaby North High School, Burnaby.
Campbell, Miss Mary N. K., B.Sc, Instructor, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Dickinson, Miss Emelyn, M.A., Primary Instructor, Queen Mary School, Vancouver.
Donaldson, J. Stanley, B.A., Magee High School, Vancouver.
Filmer, Frank, formerly Programme Director, Y.M.C.A.
Fraser, Miss Laura, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Gibson, W. S., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria.
Gillespie, Gordon, B.A., B.Sc, Physical Education Instructor, Kitsilano High School,
Vancouver.
Hammett, J. F., B.A., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Hewson, Alfred T., L.R.S.M., Director of Music, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School,
Vancouver.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Holmes, Roy, B.Sc, Physical Education Instructor, Kitsilano High School, Vancouver.
Hubbard, F. G., General Secretary, Y.M.C.A., Vancouver.
James, Miss Marian D., Supervisor of Primary Grades, Greater Victoria School District.
Johnson, Miss Muriel A., B.H.Sc, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Jones, H. A., Director of Technical Education, Victoria.
Keatley, Mrs. Hilda, Provincial Supervisor of Recreation  (Women), Vancouver.
Kilpatrick, Gordon, Director of Visual Education, Vancouver School Board.
Kitley,   Philip   J.,   B.A.,   Director   of   British   Columbia   School   Radio   Broadcasts,
Vancouver.
Kurth, Burton L., Chief Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver. Y 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Lee, Ernest, B.A., B.S. in P.E., Provincial Director of Physical Education and Recreation, Vancouver.
Lefever, David Welty, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Education, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, Calif.
Lythgoe, Ernest W., Industrial Arts Instructor, Mount View High School, Victoria.
Mathisen, Jerry, Provincial Supervisor of Recreation (Men), Vancouver.
Merilees, W. L., B.A., Industrial Arts Instructor, Kitsilano High School, Vancouver.
Miller, Edward F., B.A., Principal, Lonsdale School, North Vancouver.
Macdonald, Miss Margaret J., B.A., A.T.C.M., Instructor, Provincial Model School,
Vancouver.
McKee, Miss Enid M., B.A., Victoria High School, Victoria Summer School Librarian.
McKenzie, J. J., B.A., Principal, Burnside School, Victoria.
McKenzie, Miss Loma, Instructor, T. J. Trapp Technical School, New Westminster.
Nicol, Miss Synva K., M.A., Kindergarten Supervisor, Teacher-training Department,
Western Washington College of Education, Bellingham, Wash.
Palmer, Miss Margaret, Provincial Director, Canadian Junior Red Cross.
Pollock, J. R., B.A., Director of Visual Education, Department of Education, Victoria.
Preston, J. H., M.D., D.P.H., School Health Doctor, Victoria.
Pritchard, Vaughan G., B.A., Instructor, Central Junior High School, Victoria.
Quayle, Thomas A., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Rickard, V. C, Industrial Arts Instructor, Coquitlam Junior-Senior High School,
Coquitlam.
Russell, Albert E., Industrial Arts Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Scott, Charles H., A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A., Director, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Shadbolt, J. L., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Sleightholme, Mrs. Jean, M.A., formerly Physical Education Instructor, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver.
Simister, Norman A., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Stirling, Franklin M., Industrial Arts Instructor, John Shaw High School, Nanaimo.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Vancouver.
Thorson, J. Leonard, Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Thorsteinsson, B., B.A., M.B.A., Inspector of Schools, Vernon.
Wallace, Miss G. M., Primary Teacher, Beacon Hill School, Victoria.
White, John S., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
REGISTRATION.
The following tables give an interesting picture of the classes of teachers served by
the Summer School and the type of training sought by them:—
Table I.—Teaching Experience of those registered.
13 or more years  210 1 to 3 years  415
10 to 12 years     59 Less than 1 year     80
7 to 9 years    69 Unreported     67
4 to 6 years  127
Table II.—Basic Certificates held by those registered.
Temporary or Conditional  209
Second- and Third-class     93
First-class Interim  334
First-class Permanent   231
Academic Interim     17
Academic Permanent    33
Industrial Arts Permanent     10
Provincial Recreation certificate       3
Unreported      97 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. Y 41
Table III.—Type of School in which Teachers taught in 1946-47.*
More than 10 rooms  303 3 rooms     47
7 to 10 rooms  141 2 rooms       79
4 to 6 rooms  118 1 room   114
* Certain teachers registered at the Summer School had not taught in the year 1946-47;   hence the totals of the
above will not agree with the total enrolment.
Table IV.—Grades taught by Teachers enrolled.
Grade XIII  4 Grade VI  203
Grade XII   91 Grade V  225
Grade XI  112 Grade IV  246
Grade X  129 Grade III   259
Grade IX  149 Grade II  274
Grade VIII  250 Grade I  270
Grade VII   263 Pre-primary       6
Table V.—Types of Special Certificates sought.
(Candidates for First-class Permanent certificates are not shown.)
Art   48 Intermediate      63
Commercial   26 Library      28
Home Economics  33 Music      47
Industrial Arts and Tech- Physical Education     99
nical   98 Primary  148
HEALTH SERVICES.
Again the Summer School is indebted to Dr. J. L. Murray Anderson, M.B.E., for
his assistance in arranging the school's health services. Dr. Anderson was ably
assisted by Dr. J. H. Preston.
The following report of examinations and treatments has been submitted by
Dr. Anderson:—
Routine examinations   181 Chest X-rays  180
Special consultations     45 Haemoglobins      22
Treatments      14 Wassermans        5
STUDENT ACTIVITY SOCIETY.
As in 1946, expenditures on behalf of the Student Activity Society during the
session were approximately equal to receipts. The surplus on hand as of October,
1947, and subject to audit, is approximately $642.
The following statement deals with the affairs of the preceding or 1946 session,
and is taken from the report of the auditors, Ismay, Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered
accountants.
Receipts.
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $1,536.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)       959.53
Excess of disbursements over receipts       226.42
$2,721.95
Disbursements.
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $1,719.46
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, etc        770.37
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc        232.12
$2,721.95 Y 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, OFFICER IN CHARGE.
This report is for the school-year 1946-47 and covers the work of the following:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in junior
and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A" Woodwork and Draughting, and " B " Metalwork and Draughting—for University Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/)  Vancouver School of Art.
(g)  Night-schools.
(h)  Teacher-training.
(i)  Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
There has been some expansion this year in Industrial Arts under the leadership of
Lieut.-Col. C. J. Strong, Inspector of Technical classes. The veterans recently trained
as Industrial Arts teachers have been placed in schools which previously were closed
due to the lack of trained teachers. Other departments have expanded by adding to
their courses, and now more schools are offering the full training programme in
Industrial Arts.
The schools now are being staffed by young veterans who have brought new visions,
better standards, and better leadership ability. Instead of taking years of training at
Summer Schools, these men have been able to complete their training and obtain their
certificates in a much shorter time. Thus our schools are staffed by better-trained men
than ever before.
The vocational work in the secondary schools has expanded at a rapid rate, and
fifty-three high schools in this Province now are offering courses and receiving special
grants under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. Plans are being made
by many School Boards to start vocational courses in the near future. The difficulty at
the present time is the cost of building and the problem of providing suitable equipment.    The coming year should see considerable expansion in this field.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Lieutenant-
Colonel Strong.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools.
During the past year the outlook for Industrial Arts has been greatly improved.
The shortage of trained teachers has been met to a great extent by the release of
capable young men from the armed forces. These men have been trained under the
Canadian Vocational Training Programme, the Provincial Normal School in Vancouver,
and the Provincial Summer School. Twenty-nine new instructors were appointed to
schools during the summer of 1946. They brought an enlightened point of view into
the programme and have done a very satisfactory job during their first year of teaching.
An additional twenty men will start teaching when the schools open in September, 1947.
At the present time every Industrial Arts appointment in British Columbia has been
filled, with another group of veterans being trained for future expansion.
There are forty school districts in which Industrial Arts shops are established:
Abbotsford-Mission, Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay,
Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley, Lady- INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. Y 43
smith, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean
Falls, Penticton, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Revelstoke,
Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Southern Okanagan, Surrey, Trail,
University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Greater Victoria, and West Vancouver.
Senior High Schools.
The High School Graduation course includes options in Woodwork and Draughting,
Metalwork and Draughting, and Farm Mechanics and Draughting. Those centres
which are well equipped and have well-trained instructors have shown a marked increase
in the number of boys taking the Industrial Arts option in high school.
The consolidation of schools following the implementation of the Cameron Report
has made possible the offering of Industrial Arts courses in a constantly increasing
number of schools. Several rural schools which were previously too small to offer
Industrial Arts now are making plans to offer Industrial Arts this coming year.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS OPTIONS FOR UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE.
The Industrial Arts option for University Entrance continues to be a popular
course. Pupils may receive fifteen credits, and have a choice of Woodwork and Draughting, or Metalwork and Draughting. This course has proved to be very helpful for
those pupils planning to take Applied Science in the university.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province (of which forty-
five are general shops) is        158
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is        150
The total number of pupils participating is:—
Elementary school  3,392
Junior high school  7,797
Senior high school  4,427
  15,616
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
The following is an excerpt from a report prepared by Mr. E, M. White, B.A.Sc,
principal of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" Boys' Section.
" The day-time programme of the Vancouver Technical School may be divided into
three main sections:—
"(1)   High School Graduation (Matriculation) course.
"(2)  High School Graduation (Technical) course.
"(3)  Special Courses.
" Girls' Section.
" The Girls' Section of the Vancouver Technical School paralleled the operation
found in the Boys' Section. Courses were offered in Hairdressing, Sewing, and Foods,
each course leading to a high school diploma. As in the Boys' Section, graduates from
this school acquired sufficient skill in their respective courses to become preferred
beginners in their trades.
" The total number of students attending the Technical School in 1946-47 was
1,114." Y 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL AND AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
There has been a great demand during the past year for high school graduates who
have taken Commercial courses.    Placement has been very good.
Some students have taken regular Commercial courses as options, and others who
have spent 50 per cent, or more of their time on Commercial work have come under the
terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. Thirty-two high schools
offering Commercial work have been assisted under this agreement by additional
operating grants, and equipment grants have been given to the Commercial departments of nine high schools. This assistance has helped School Boards to provide new,
modern equipment, which has enabled them to make their Commercial departments
more efficient and to develop greater pupil interest and better standards of work to
conform to modern office practice.    The enrolment for the year 1946-47 was 10,153.
Agriculture as a high school option has been offered in many centres. The work
has been limited in scope. In most cases it has meant text-book study and some
working experience with a school garden-plot or greenhouse. A few School Boards
now are showing interest in offering vocational Agriculture under the Vocational
Schools' Assistance Agreement, in which case the pupils would spend at least 50 per
cent, of their time on this subject. Schools are being planned which will offer Agricultural Science and Farm Mechanics, and working experience will be arranged on
local farms or on school acreage.
Agricultural courses were offered in the last school-year in the high school grades
to 853 students.
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF ART.
The following is an excerpt from a report prepared by the principal of the school,
Mr. Charles H. Scott, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A. (Lond.), Dip. G.S.A. :—
" I beg to submit my annual report for the session 1946-47.
" The day-school enrolment at the Vancouver School of Art is the largest in the
history of the school and is mainly due to the number of rehabilitation students
attending. This enrolment is likely to decrease within the next two years, leaving
a probable day-school registration of from 120 to 150 students. The increase in the
student-body necessitated an increase in staff, and the problem has been met by the
use of ' long-term substitute ' instructors, carefully chosen for their knowledge of Art
and their ability to impart it.
" British Columbia has reached the stage when specialized training in the Sciences
and the Arts is a necessity if its citizens are to hold their place in a world which faces
hard competition in the sale of its products. In this competition the artist has his
place, and that place can be held only if he receives the best in Art education.
" The following was the student enrolment during the school-year 1946-47:—
Day-school   246
Night-school and Saturday classes  638
Summer School      45
Total   929 "
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
During the past year night-schools have expanded and have offered a great variety
of courses to suit the needs of a great number of people. Some people have gone to
night-school to complete their general education, others have attended in order to start
hobbies and develop leisure-time interests, while others have enrolled at night-school
in order to add to their vocational knowledge and skills. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. Y 45
School Boards are trying to make full use of school facilities by offering night-
school classes so that education will be available for young and old. A uniform grant
has been given to School Boards for any night-school class they wish to offer.
Additional grants have been given for vocational classes operated under the Dominion-
Provincial Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. Special vocational equipment
grants have been given to some School Boards under the same agreement to help them
provide the most modern type of equipment for their vocational classes. It has been
suggested that School Boards should form advisory committees for each vocational
course offered, so that proper standards of training may be set up with the advice and
co-operation of management and labour.
Instruction in 120 subjects was given to 11,296 students.
TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS.
All the veterans selected for training last year as Industrial Arts teachers now
have been placed in positions in various schools of this Province, and the majority have
completed the requirements for the junior high school Industrial Arts teachers'
certificate. The second group of veterans have completed one year of training, and
all have been placed in positions. A third group now is being selected to take
instruction.
This rehabilitation training was arranged by the Department of Veterans' Affairs
and undertaken by the Canadian Vocational Training Programme under the direction
of Mr. Henry Hill. The training was supervised by Lieut.-Col. J. W. Inglis, of the
Canadian Vocational Training Programme, and Lieut.-Col. C. J. Strong, Provincial
Inspector of Technical Classes. Mr. A. R. Lord, principal of the Vancouver Normal
School, arranged the programme of training in Pedagogy, and the Vancouver, New
Westminster, and West Vancouver School Boards co-operated by allowing the men to
use their schools for practice-teaching.
The veterans have worked hard and have attained a high standard. The sterling
qualities they have shown by application to their training will have a good effect on
their pupils in the various schools of this Province.
Courses for the senior high school Industrial Arts teacher's certificate will be
given at Summer School. The High School Correspondence Branch, under Dr. E.
Lucas, and the Summer School of Education, under Mr. H. P. Johns, have assisted by
offering correspondence courses which the men may take during the winter months.
The enrolment at Summer School numbered ninety-seven.
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS' ASSISTANCE AGREEMENT.
In 1946 all School Boards in British Columbia were notified that the Vocational
Schools' Assistance Agreement was in operation. It was pointed out that grants under
this agreement could only be paid if it were shown that the students taking vocational
courses were spending at least 50 per cent, of their time on vocational work. Forms
were sent out to School Boards, and principals were asked to list the courses being
offered which met the requirements. As a result, many schools were given grants
to assist them in expanding vocational courses in day-schools. The money received
by School Boards was used to purchase additional equipment, so that vocational courses
could be offered in a more effective and efficient manner.
Night-schools have expanded by offering additional vocational courses to suit the
needs of their particular districts. This has been very noticeable in the Vancouver
area.
Two hundred and eighty-five vocational films have been purchased and placed in
the hands of the Director of Visual Education, so that distribution can be made to all
schools in British Columbia offering vocational courses. Y 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
The Vancouver School Board now is considering the building of a vocational
school in the centre of the city, and therefore decided to send the School Board architect
and the principal of the future vocational school to visit the United States in order to
make a thorough survey of vocational schools operating there. The Provincial Director
of Technical Education accompanied these two officials. As a result of this inspection
trip, a report has been prepared for the Department of Education and for the Vancouver School Board, which has indicated the need for a thorough survey of the
Vancouver area and the formation of advisory committees consisting of employers and
employees. The function of these committees will be to inform the School Board of
trends in particular trades and to advise them concerning the operation of trade classes.
Throughout the United States there is definite evidence that successful schools are
operated only when such committees are functioning. Co-ordinators also are appointed
by the School Boards to screen applicants who apply for vocational training, to watch
their placement, and to follow their progress on the job, so that the efforts of the
schools are directed fully toward efficient training of workers for the employer. After
a vocational course has been completed, a certificate is issued by the school, and, after
the co-ordinator has placed the individual on the job, his records are kept and his final
diploma is not issued to him until it has been proved that he is completely satisfactory
to the employer.
It is fully realized that the Vancouver vocational school will have to provide courses
for students from other parts of the Province, and it is hoped that it will be possible
to provide bursaries under the agreement to assist able students to attend this school.
As a result of surveys now being made in different centres throughout the Province,
provision will be made to offer courses in the three fields of industry, commerce, and
agriculture. The commercial field already is being taken care of, and we are hoping
for expansion in the agricultural areas at such points as Chilliwack, Creston, and the
Okanagan Valley.
All the proposals so far received from School Boards are in the exploratory stage.
The limiting factors during the next few months will be the cost of building, the
difficulty of obtaining suitable equipment, and the time required for organization of
vocational courses throughout the Province. This Department will have to pay particular attention to the training of vocational teachers, as it is generally recognized that
the only person suitable to teach a vocational course is a fully experienced and well-
qualified craftsman, who should be appointed on the recommendation of the employer
and the union, so that the trainees will receive the full support of both when they
commence working.
We hope that in the future when these vocational courses are fully established,
they will offer training of at least five types to suitable students on the secondary-
school level:—
(1) Day trade-preparatory classes for students in Grades X to XII, inclusive,
or for those who have graduated from the regular high schools. These
courses will be of a pre-employment type, but will follow the requirements
laid down by the Dominion and Provincial Governments.
(2) Apprentice-training operated in these schools during certain hours of
the day or night to suit the needs of the various industries.
(3) Co-operative training, where a student may spend part of his time on
the job with an employer in addition to the training given in the
vocational school.
(4) Terminal or " short-term" courses which may develop to satisfy a
particular need in any given area.
(5) Vocational technical courses, providing training in a major and related
shops, with specialized training in a major shop in the last year.    Only INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
Y 47
selected students could take this course to become potential technicians,
and, if the demand increases, this training may continue through to
Grade XIV or the technical-institute level.
British Columbia has a problem in providing vocational training which is distinct
and different from that of other Provinces and States. Our basic industries are fishing,
mining, agriculture, and forest products. Our manufacturing consists of small production units and maintenance plants.
The key to successful vocational work lies, in the beginning, with the advisory
committees, and is further developed by co-ordination, by which continuous contact is
maintained with business and industry. A vocational school must develop not from
the " inside out," but from the " outside in." Any evaluation of results must be
determined by a study of what happens in business and industry to the people whom
it trains.
The enrolment in day and evening classes operated under the terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, together with the number of vocational teachers,
is shown below:—
Number
of Pupils.
Number op Teachers.
Part-time.
Full-time.
3,560
4,053
183
54
195
Totals	
7,613
183
249 Y 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION — HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, M.A., DIRECTOR.
This year has brought its progress, as well as its problems, in the field of Home
Economics.
Lack of trained teaching personnel is still a major difficulty, and this has been
accentuated by the growing demand for additional Home Economics instructors in
established centres. Eleven of the graduates in Home Economics from the University
of British Columbia elected the teaching option, and we are glad to welcome them,
together with three from the 1946 class, to our staff. Measured against the total of
139 Home Economics teachers in the Province, this seems a small percentage, but we
have for so many years looked forward to the time when we should have teachers
trained in our own system that it is encouraging to feel that at last our ambition is
materializing. We owe a great deal to Miss Charlotte Black, A.M., head of the Home
Economics Department at the University, for the interest she has shown and the help
she has given us in securing teachers for our schools.
There are 108 Home Economics centres in operation in the Province. Some of
these are comprised of one room only, equipped to teach the different phases or aspects
of the subject. Others have separate foods and clothing rooms. In all, there are 148
rooms equipped for the teaching of Home-making. The difference between the number
of rooms and number of teachers is accounted for by part-time centres, so that one
teacher may teach in more than one centre.
Several of the established centres are making plans for expansion. Additional
rooms are to be opened at Penticton and Oliver, in September, 1947, and new departments are being put into operation in Hope, Dawson Creek, and Lake Cowichan. Home
Economics was included for the first time in the school programme at Lumby during
the past year, and satisfactory progress has been made.
Mount Newton centre, in Saanich, was moved to an army hut, set on the school-
grounds, and renovated in line with newer trends in Home Economics rooms, including
unit kitchens.
With the increased enrolment in the high school classes in the rural areas, it has
not been possible in every case to accommodate all the students eligible to take Home
Economics. It has been found necessary in some schools to eliminate the Grade VII
classes from the Home Economics programme or to reduce the time allotment for this
grade. The shift system, too, which has been essential in some areas, has meant the
reduction of some classes, as only one Home Economics teacher was available for
instructional purposes.
The Director of Home Economics and the Assistant Inspector, accompanied by
Miss Mabel Allan, Supervisor of Home Economics for Vancouver, visited new and
renovated centres in Bremerton and Seattle to observe Home Economics classes in
session. This proved to be a most interesting and helpful expedition. Of special
interest was the flexibility in the arrangement of the equipment in the Home-making
rooms and the attractive use of colour to give the more homelike atmosphere.
Thirty-six teachers attended the Home Economics classes at Summer School during
July-August, 1947. The courses offered were Foods and Nutrition, and Clothing Construction. Miss Ruth Bryson, B.Sc, of the John Shaw High School, Nanaimo, and
Miss Mary Campbell, B.Sc, of Lord Byng High School, Vancouver, were the instructors.
Miss Muriel Johnson, B.Sc, of the Victoria High School staff, directed the work of
the cafeteria. Those who attended the courses felt that the time had been very well
spent, and went away with enthusiasm and much help. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS. Y 49
This past year marked the beginning of Home Economics instruction in Victoria
College. The classes were taken in the Victoria High School centre, under the direction
of Miss Beth Ramsay, M.A., and Miss Muriel Johnson, B.Sc. Miss Nellie Salamandick
has now been appointed to the staff of Victoria College, and will take over the work in
the coming term, when it is planned to offer the first two years of the course required
for the degree in Home Economics.
Miss Jessie L. McLenaghen, B.Sc, former Director of Home Economics, was the
guest of honour at a luncheon given by the Home Economics teachers of the Province
during convention week. The selection of this time made it possible for many of the
teachers from outside points to attend. A presentation was made, expressing the
esteem of all those who worked under Miss McLenaghen during her term of office, and
showing their appreciation of the inspiration and help she so readily gave.
Miss Helen Ross, nutritionist for the metropolitan area, has been appointed Provincial representative of the Canadian Home Economics Association.
Four new members have been added to the Home Economics staff at the University
of British Columbia—Miss Doris Hurren, Miss Margaret MacFarlane, Miss Orene
Ross, and Miss Nancy-Ruth Rutherford. The Home Economics Faculty now consists
of nine members.
Home Economics teachers have been encouraged to adapt the courses outlined to
fit the needs of their students. In order to do this, they have to know the homes of
their communities. The heavy teaching-load carried by the majority of Home Economics instructors makes this difficult, but if this subject is going to function to the
fullest extent for the benefit of the girls of the Province, it is most important that
these contacts should be made. Y 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS.
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS.
ENROLMENT.
Table I.—Enrolment.
(October of each year.)
Year.
Elementary.
Junior High.
Senior High.
Total.
1929	
27,522
27,663
27,953
27,593
26,723
26,335
25,978
25,833
25,348
24,338
23,556
23,032
23,091
22,014
22,383
22,394
22,737
23,338
4,363
4,351
4,382
4,417
4,639
4,635
4,578
4,454
4,266
4,165
4,080
4,149
4,354
4,175
4,540
4,396
4,294
4,013
6,012
6,801
7,614
8,051
8,131
8,493
8,772
9,131
9,506
10,016
9,856
9,471
8,741
7,166
7,139
7,913
8,295
8,375
37,897
38,815
39,949
1930                                        	
1931	
1932	
40,061
1933	
39,493
1934	
39 463
1935	
39,328
39,418
39,120
38,519
37,492
1936	
1937            	
1938	
1939	
1940	
36,652
36,186
33,355
34,062
34,703
35,326
35,726
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
Table II.—Enrolment Variation.
(From table above.)
Years compared.
Elementary.
Junior High.        Senior High.
Net Result.
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35.
1935-36.
1936-37.
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40.
1940-41.
1941-42.
1942-43.
1943-44.
1944-45.
1945-46.
141
290
—360
— 870
—388
— 357
— 145
— 485
-1,010
— 782
— 524
59
-1.077
369
11
— 12
31
35
222
— 4
— 57
-124
-188
-101
-85
69
205
-179
365
-144
-102
-281
* Japanese withdrawal and war conditions.
789
813
437
80
362
279
359
375
510
— 160
—385
-730
-1,575
— 27
774
382
77
918
1,134
112
—568
—30
— 135
— 90
— 298
— 601
— 1,027
— 840
—466
— 2,831*
707
641
623
397
From Table I it is observed that the highest enrolment in the elementary school
was reached in 1931, in the junior high school in 1933, in the senior high school in 1938.
The total enrolment for the system reached its highest point in 1932. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 51
From Table II the large continuous decrease from 1937 to 1942, inclusive, can be
attributed to the following causes:—
(a) Low birth-rate during the depression years of the early thirties.
(b) The removal of the Japanese from the Pacific Coast area (war with Japan).
(c) The withdrawal of a large number of senior high school students to enlist
in the armed services and to accept employment in war-time industries.
From Table II it is very noticeable that for the last four years there has been an
average annual increase in total enrolment of approximately 600. There are three main
reasons for this upward trend in enrolment:—
(a)  The increase in births in 1939 and 1940.
(6)  Natural increase in general city population.
(c)   The policy of National Selective Service.    The officials of this department
of the Federal  Government, through their guidance programme, have
encouraged the boys and girls 16 and 17 years of age to continue their
secondary education.    On the other hand, there is a strong desire by these
students  to  acquire  a  better  education  before  they  enter  the highly
competitive field of post-war employment.
It should be pointed out  (Table I)  that the maximum total enrolment of 40,061
was reached in October, 1932.    This maximum was 4,335 above the October,  1946,
enrolment of 35,726.    It might appear from these figures that there should be sufficient
accommodation for the present school enrolment.    Because of shifting population areas
within the city, this is not the case.    For example, the old Central School once accommodated twenty-four classes of elementary pupils.    To-day there are three such classes.
The remainder of the accommodation has been taken by the administration offices and
the art school.    Further, the school population of the West End and some of the sections
of the old Fairview area are on the decrease.    The population has shifted to the south
and south-eastern part of the city.    Many schools in some of these newer developed
areas, to provide the necessary accommodation, are operating a double shift.
The problem of shifting school population within the city is best illustrated by the
fact that on the opening of school in September, 1946, it was necessary to increase the
staff (because of increased enrolment) in thirty-one schools, while in fourteen others a
decrease in staff was necessary (because of decreased enrolment). Further, during the
past fifteen years in particular, certain features necessary to the modernization of our
school programme have been introduced. As a result of these alterations, many of our
old class-rooms have been changed to craft-rooms, music-rooms, libraries, and gymnasiums. This broader educational plan provides in a better way for the development
of the whole child. It has improved beyond question our entire educational system.
In estimating school enrolment, other features than resident births and student
employment must be carefully tabulated and studied. The influx of school population
from places outside our city must be considered. The table below gives the geographical origin of new pupils enrolled in the Vancouver city schools between September 3rd,
1946, and November 30th, 1946:—- Y 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Origin.
Number.
t
Elementary.
Secondary.
Total.
852
241
206
142
18
154
50
28
13
2
1
2
29
316
90
103
69
3
83
22
10
12
1
4
1,168
2. Alberta	
331
309
211
21
237
72
38
25
3
11. China	
1
6
29
Totals	
1,738
713
2,451
For the past eleven years our Bureau of Measurements, under the direction of
Inspector R. Straight, has made this summary of added school population. The figures
listed below show the trends:—
Year.
1936
Number.
2,012
1937  2,249
1938  1,865
1939  1,760
1940  2,294
1941  2,931
Year. Number.
1942  3,372
1943  2,388
1944  2,420
1945  2,008
1946  2,451 VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS.
Y 53
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0) Y 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
A study of the foregoing graph, showing the relationship of school population to
births, reveals the basis for comparing the elementary-school enrolment, Grades I to VI,
of September 30th, 1946, with that of September 30th, 1952. The increase is 15,745,
or approximately 80 per cent. This increased enrolment will require upwards of 400
class-rooms. A large long-term building programme will be necessary to provide the
required facilities.
ACCOMMODATION.
Additional school accommodation was provided this year by the opening of the
following centres:—
(a) Begbie Annex (Seventh Avenue East and Rupert Street) :   A five-room
building opened January, 1946, for primary classes.
(6) David   Lloyd   George   Annex   (Sixty-second   Avenue  West   and   Adera
Street) :   A five-room building similar to  (a) above, opened April, 1946.
(c) Templeton  Junior  Secondary  School  Addition   (Templeton  Drive  and
Georgia Street East) :   This new unit consists of six standard classrooms and a library which will seat over 100 students.    It was opened in
September, 1946.
Crowded conditions exist in several sections of the city, such as at the following
schools:   John Oliver, Van Home, Sexsmith, Mackenzie, Tecumseh, Carleton, Begbie,
King Edward, Magee, Kerrisdale, Kitchener, Byng, and Britannia.
Provision has been made by the School Board in its long-term building plan to
relieve the situation in all the schools mentioned. In the meantime, because of the
difficulty of building construction, it will be necessary to have many " shift " classes.
Moberly reconstructed.
The rebuilding of the Moberly Elementary School, destroyed by fire in July, 1945,
should not pass without special mention. Under the able direction and planning of
our own building superintendent, Mr. F. J. Beechey, this building was completed and
ready for the opening of school in September, 1946. At Moberly a new gymnasium-
auditorium (authorized under the school by-law of December, 1945) is at present under
construction. When this unit is completed, the Moberly School will be one of the most
modern elementary schools in the entire city. Great credit must be given to Mr.
Beechey and his staff for this magnificent piece of work.
I should not let this opportunity pass without commending Mr. E. Williams, of the
Purchasing Department; Mr. E. D. King, our school architect; Mr. P. Goepel, our
chief engineer; Mr. H. F. Hines, our secretary; and Mr. T. Brooks, chairman of the
New Buildings Committee, for excellent assistance given to Mr. Beechey while in charge
of the reconstruction of the Moberly School.
The Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, Lieut.-Col. F. T. Fairey,
with his assistant, Mr. Harold Campbell, Chief Inspector of Schools, recently inspected
the Moberly plant. They were delighted with the completeness of the plan and the good
job of reconstruction just finished.
New School Buildings.
1. Trafalgar Elementary (Twenty-fourth Avenue West and Trafalgar Street).—
Work has commenced on the first unit of a new elementary school at Twenty-fourth
Avenue West and Trafalgar. This five-room addition with a gymnasium-auditorium
should be completed in part for the opening of school in September, 1947. Much
depends upon the possibility of obtaining the necessary supplies and skilled labour.
2. Gladstone Secondary (Twenty-seventh Avenue East and Gladstone Avenue).—
The plans of the first unit of this school are in the advanced stage. A committee of
secondary-school principals met early in September to study the rough-draft plans. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 55
Many fine suggestions were made by this committee. These have been incorporated
into the final plans by our architect, Mr. King, and his assistant, Mr. George Peck.
The tentative plans have been approved by the Department of Education. A great deal
of the work on these plans has been done by Mr. Peck, who joined our staff in June,
1946. Mr. Peck was on the architectural staff of the Canadian National Railways prior
to his service overseas with the Royal Canadian Engineers. He has made a very fine
contribution already to our building programme.
3. Other New Units (authorized by School By-laws) :—
(a) First unit of an elementary school (Forty-third Avenue West and Montgomery) .
(b) First unit of new administration building.
(c) An addition to Begbie Elementary School (Kitchener and Lillooet
Streets).
(d) An addition to King Edward Secondary School (Twelfth Avenue West
and Oak).
(e) An addition to Lord Byng Secondary School (Sixteenth Avenue West and
Crown).
(/) An addition to the Livingstone Elementary School (Twenty-third Avenue
and Sophia), so it can be used as a secondary school.
(g) The addition of a gymnasium-auditorium lunch-room to each of four
elementary schools to assist modernization.
(h)  First unit of a vocational school (centrally located).
(i) An addition to John Oliver High School (Forty-third Avenue East and
Draper Street).
Since the above projects were authorized (some of them two years ago), the distribution of population within the city has altered their priority.
The Boards' ten-year building programme for $9,000,000, endorsed by the ratepayers March 5th, 1947, should look after any emergency accommodation.
Building Maintenance.
When deterioration is first noticed in any building or equipment, that is the time
to do repairs.    "A stitch in time saves nine."
Our building superintendent, Mr. F. J. Beechey, and his staff endeavour to do
that very thing, but a maintenance budget of slightly more than 1 per cent, of the
replaceable value of our school plant and its equipment makes such action impossible.
The difficulty of procuring skilled labour and supplies has handicapped considerably our maintenance programme. For example, very few of our buildings have been
painted externally since 1940. This delay has caused accelerated depreciation. One
should not lose sight of the fact that it is in the best interests of the city to maintain
its capital assets at their maximum value. Hence the budget for 1947 in this department was increased approximately $59,000 above the one for 1946.
I am personally very grateful, not only for the excellent maintenance programme
which has been done by Mr. Beechey and his staff, but also for the many fine improvements and alterations made to our health units, lunch-rooms, and school offices. I should
also commend this department for supplying much fine equipment to Science, Home
Economics, Art, Music, Industrial Arts, Primary, and Kindergarten class-rooms.
BUREAU OF MEASUREMENTS.
Testing.
Number of individual intelligence tests given, 775.
Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 9,262. (This applies to the tests
actually administered by the personnel of the Bureau of Measurements.) Y 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Intelligence tests were given to 180 prospective Grade Ib pupils who were under
6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1946. (Pupils who were 6 years of age in
December, 1946, were tested.) Sixty-seven of the 180 were admitted on trial to Grade
Ib, and the remainder, 113, were rejected as being unlikely to succeed in the work of
the first grade. In September the Detroit Beginning First-grade Intelligence Test
(Revised) was administered to all pupils of Grade IB.
For June, 1947, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given to
approximately 3,150 pupils of Grades VI and VIII: the Grade VI pupils in junior high
school areas for promotion to junior high school, and the Grade VIII pupils in senior
high school areas for promotion to senior high school. These standardized tests assist
the principals and the Inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement.
As in former years, probationary classes in nursing of the Vancouver General
Hospital were given intelligence tests—one class each in October and March.
Fifty pupils of the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind were
given the Pintner-Paterson performance test.
In May and June the Vancouver pupils taking final Junior Matriculation courses in
English, French, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Latin, and Mathematics were given certain tests.    Scores on these tests will be reported later.
To Inspector R. Straight and the other members of this Bureau, I extend my
thanks for their generous assistance and co-operation.
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
Centres.
Evening classes were conducted in many different parts of the city during the
year, the following centres having been operated:—
King Edward High School, Twelfth Avenue and Oak Street.
Vancouver Technical School, East Broadway and Clinton Street.
Fairview High School of Commerce, Broadway and Granville Street.
Grandview High School of Commerce, First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
John Oliver High School, Forty-third Avenue and Draper Street.
Point Grey Junior High School, Thirty-seventh Avenue and East Boulevard.
King George High School, Nelson and Burrard Streets.
Dawson, School, Helmcken and Burrard Streets.
Dawson School Annex, Barclay and Burrard Streets.
Tennyson School, Tenth Avenue and Cypress Street.
Language School for New Canadians, top floor, 337 Carrall Street.
Music Studio, 321, 445 Granville Street.
Colour and Sound Photography Studio, 3009 West Broadway.
Gordon House, Nelson and Jervis Streets.
Special reference should be made to the Point Grey Junior High School and Gordon
House centres. September, 1946, saw the first attempt to organize classes in the southwestern section of the city, and the Night School Department was gratified to have
approximately 600 registrations for courses offered at the Point Grey Junior High
School.
Classes in Dressmaking and Tailoring were organized at Gordon House, in the
West End, as of April 1st, 1947, immediately after the Dominion Government withdrew
its support to the Remake programme that had been so successful during the war years.
Here the night-school department was greatly assisted by the Director and the board of
management of Gordon House, who so kindly made space available, and by the Canadian
vocational training department, whose equipment was used. Ten classes, comprising
approximately 170 students, took advantage of the training offered, some of the classes
meeting during morning hours, some in the afternoon, and still others in the evening. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 57
Courses.
During the school-year classes were organized to carry on studies in eighty-six
different subjects, with groups working at as many as four or five different levels in
some.    In all, 188 classes were conducted.
Seventeen of the courses are worthy of special note because they were entirely new
to the night-school programme. They are Colour Photography and Sound Recording
in Motion Pictures, Co-operative Play Group Management, Design in the Modern Home
and Community, Electricity for Elevator Constructors, Electronics, Films and Education, Glove-making, Industrial Accident Prevention, Interior Decoration, Leatherwork,
Motor-bus Maintenance, Occupational Opportunities in British Columbia's Basic Industries, Orchestral Training, Servicing of Electrical Appliances, Toy-making, Weaving,
and Wood-carving.
Several of these new courses were the outcome of conferences with particular
organizations—associations, boards, unions, and business concerns. For example, the
course in Industrial Accident Prevention grew out of discussions with representatives
of the Industrial Safety Council of British Columbia and the Workmen's Compensation
Board; the course in Electricity for Elevator Constructors from meetings with a
representative of the International Elevator Constructors' Union; the course in Occupational Opportunities in British Columbia's Basic Industries through the planning of
a sub-committee of the Junior Employment Advisory Council; and the course in Motor-
bus Maintenance from conferences with the Maintenance Directors of the British
Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited. An interesting feature about the last
of these courses, given during late afternoons, is that the company is meeting all costs
of operating the class—membership at present being limited to company employees—
and is paying class members their regular wages for the time in attendance. Present
indications are that further training in all these special fields will again be included in
the 1947-48 night-school programme, and that, if satisfactory arrangements can be
made, additional courses will be provided for British Columbia Electric Railway
Company employees.
In-service Teacher-training courses offered during the year included Advanced
Music Literature and History, Fine and Industrial Arts and Play Materials, English,
and Canadian History. The last two of these courses were specially planned by the
British Columbia Summer School of Education to give holders of Second-class and
Third-class Teaching certificates an opportunity to earn credits toward First-class
certification. Numbers of teachers recommended for credits because of successful
completion of their courses were as follows:—
Number of Teachers
Course. recommended for Credits.
Advanced Music Literature and History  11
Fine and Industrial Arts and Play Materials  45
English   37
Canadian History  61
Under the financial sponsorship of the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, Youth Leadership courses were again included in the night-school programme. Valuable training
was given in group organization and teaching techniques; handicrafts; Cub, Scout,
and Guide leadership; and camp leadership.
In a general way the scope of the night-school programme is being widened from
year to year, added courses being offered in the academic, vocational, and general-
knowledge fields. Avocational courses have taken an important place in the broader
programme, and there is every indication of a need for further offering of this type. Y 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Attendance.
Night-school attendance, which had shown a marked decrease during the latter
war years, has grown considerably during the past two years. Class membership for
February and November from 1942 to 1947 gives some picture of the growth:—
February
Class Membership.
._-__ 2,013
Year.
1942	
1943  ._ 1,876
1944  1,655
1945  2,140
1946  3,176
1947  4,222
November
Class Membership.
2,141
2,392
2,753
3,317
4,555
Class membership for any one month does not indicate the actual registration for
evening classes for the year, primarily because certain short-term courses may finish
and new courses may start during any month of the year.
Attendance at the classes in high school and senior matriculation subjects has been
well maintained, and the number of applicants for Department of Education examinations has shown a decided increase over the past few years. Following are the numbers
of candidates and the numbers of individual examinations applied for by the candidates
for the past four years:—
University Entrance.
Senior Matriculation.
Year.
Number of
Candidates.
Number of
Papers
applied for.
Number of
Candidates.
Number of
Papers
applied for.
1944	
26
46
80
120
40
95
143
223
15
16
68
87
1945	
1946	
1947	
In part, the increase in night-school attendance for the past year has been due to
the increase in the number of centres operated and the wider range of courses offered,
and in part to the fact that many of the academic and avocational courses have been
planned on a one-night-a-week basis.
Staff.
The total night-school staff for the year, inclusive of principals, teachers, and
assistants, numbered 159, a few of whom were engaged to give one or more special
lectures, but most to meet classes regularly throughout the entire session. Of the
group, many were members of the day-school teaching staffs of Vancouver or adjoining
municipalities, but some seventy were recruited from other sources.
Finances.
During the past few years operating costs in the night-schools have become progressively higher, salary and service rates, as well as prices of supplies, having
increased materially. Greater revenue growing out of somewhat larger grants toward
teachers' salaries from the British Columbia Department of Education, special grants
toward vocational training from the Dominion Government under the Vocational
Schools' Assistance Agreement, and higher student fees have met the rising costs
adequately. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 59
Looking ahead.
In keeping with the growing interest in adult education, the Night School Department plans on additional centres and more courses for 1947-48.
Lord Byng High School has been selected as one of the trial centres for the coming
year, and the Parent-Teacher Association of the school is giving its co-operation in
connection with the proposed programme. Likewise, classes will be offered for the
first time at the Kitsilano High School.
As for the scope of the programme, more subjects in the academic field will be
included, as well as several new courses along vocational and avocational lines.
I am most grateful to Mr. Graham Bruce, our Night School Director, for the
magnificent job he has done through the years. He has spared no effort to institute
the courses requested by the citizens of our community and to procure the best possible
instructors available.
VISUAL EDUCATION.
In addition to the regular photographic assignments undertaken, the Visual Education Department prepared 5,230 reflex photo copies of school transfer cards for the
Bureau of Measurements. The Department also prepared 498 slides for Miss Hall,
supervisor of art. In co-operation with Mr. Graham Bruce, Director of Night Schools,
the Department has in production a 16-mm. film on the activities of the night-schools.
This film will be used in acquainting the public with the many courses given in the
Vancouver night-schools. The Department continued to co-operate with the B.C. Products Bureau of the Board of Trade and the Department of Education, and prepared
13 new film-strips on British Columbia industries to be used in the schools for
vocational-guidance work.
In September, 1946, the Board of School Trustees approved a visual education
delivery plan for the Vancouver city schools, which extended the former system of
circulating projectors to include the delivery of films on three afternoons once each
week. Under this system, each school receives a delivery once each week. This system
has been of great benefit both to the schools and to the Department.
In concluding this part of my report on visual education I should like to state that
the Department of Education has agreed with the Vancouver School Board to take over
the entire stock of visual aids to form part of their own central depot of visual education to be established in Vancouver. Such an amalgamation of services will eliminate
any duplication which otherwise would be difficult to avoid. Needless to say, the new
department, under the able supervision of Mr. J. R. Pollock, Provincial Director of
Visual Education for the Province of British Columbia, will continue to give the same
excellent service to all schools.
Mr. G. D. Kilpatrick, our own director, will continue with the Vancouver School
Board in order to assist in co-ordinating the visual-aid work of our schools with that
of the Department of Education. He will also be in charge of the photographic
department of our school system.
HEALTH SERVICES.
On reflection, the past year seems to have been one of constant struggle to keep
abreast of the routine school-work while attempting also to fit in the special procedures
which have been necessary to combat the threats of epidemics. Vacancies on the staff
have made the burden greater than ever this year.
STAFF.
Staff changes were numerous throughout the year. To our regret, Dr. White was
unable to continue his work with us due to ill-health.    His unflagging interest in the Y 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
school health programme and his advice, based on years of experience, have made him
a valued member of the staff.    We wish him enjoyment during his retirement.
During September it was necessary to carry on an extended high school programme, and special arrangements were made to have the nurses screen the students
taking part in major athletics, referring doubtful cases to the school medical officer.
In October we were fortunate in acquiring the services of Dr. E. H. Cooke, and temporary full-time services were re-established. However, an increase in health-service
requirements of the University made the appointment of a full-time doctor there
necessary.
At the beginning of the year Dr. Gordon Baker returned from duty in the Navy
and took over the directorship of Health Unit 4, and Dr. Cooke was transferred to the
University Health Service, giving some time to the high schools in the city. Thus the
high school time schedule was practically complete. At this time the schedule was
arranged so that in as many high schools as possible physical examinations of the girls
was undertaken by the women physicians on the staff.
Early in the year we were pleased to welcome back Dr. C. H. Gundry, who then
assumed the directorship of the School Health Service and the Division of Mental
Hygiene. The latter service had suffered due to his absence, and since his return he
has been fully occupied with the problems of the Division.
I was extremely sorry to have to accept the resignation of Dr. G. A. Lamont, who
left our service to enter private practice. He diligently served the Vancouver city
schools on a part-time basis for a period of over twenty-six years.
Examination for Athletics.
Because of the necessity of making the best use of the available doctors' time in
high schools, it was necessary to revise the method of examining students participating
in major athletics. The first step was to make sure that all of these students who were
new to the school—that is, coming up from an elementary or junior high school or new
to the area—were screened by the nurse and physical education teacher. Those who
had never had a physical examination or who had previously been excluded from
physical education were then referred to the school medical officer.
Those students who were in the high school the previous year but excluded from
athletics and who wished to participate in major athletics were also referred to the
school medical officer. The health records of the remaining students desirous of taking
part in major athletics were then checked and the students screened. Any giving a
history of illness or showing a defect since the last physical examination were then
referred to the school medical officer.
It would seem that this method of handling the situation has been satisfactory.
Goitre-prevention.
In the past it has been the practice to have all children eligible to take iodine
tablets screened by the school doctor. It was decided that in future the nurse would
do the screening and refer any doubtful cases to the school medical officer. This policy
also has proved to be satisfactory. This year approximately 11,912 children within
the city are taking natrodin tablets for the prevention of goitre.
Physical Inspections.
Previously the weighing, measuring, vision, and hearing testing of the students
was done at the beginning of the term and physical inspections were done later. This
did not seem to be a satisfactory procedure, as it did not make the best use of the school
time and did not furnish the nurse with as complete a picture of each child. Therefore,
after discussion, it was decided that the whole procedure would take place at one time.
J VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 61
In other words, each student would in future be weighed, measured, given a vision test,
hearing test, and physical inspection during one procedure. This has proved to be
very satisfactory, as students were ready for referral to the school doctor much earlier
in the term.
Referral of Absentees.
The Vancouver Schools Health Committee drew up a definite policy with regard
to the referral to the nurse of students who have been absent on account of illness.
This was put into effect and is as follows:—
If a pupil's absence of more than two school-days is known to be due to or contact
with a communicable disease, readmission may be granted only after reference to the
school nurse or medical officer.
Pupils who have been specifically excluded by the school nurse may be readmitted
only after reference to the nurse, even if there is a certificate from a private doctor.
If there is no reason to suspect a communicable disease, the principal may readmit
the pupil in the nurse's absence and refer it to her on her next day in school.
Ambulance Service.
The School Board reviewed the policy regarding the use of the ambulance. In the
case of accident or illness occurring at school, if the doctor, nurse, or principal considers
the use of an ambulance necessary, the School Board will assume the cost, and this
amount would be the total amount collected on such calls.
Physical Examinations.
The number of routine physical examinations done by the school doctors is considerably less than last year, but the number of students examined on the referral basis
has increased. This was not enough, however, to bring the total physical examinations
done equal to that of last year. Medical officers' examinations covered approximately
50 per cent, of the total school population, and this term only 41 per cent, was covered
and the remainder were given physical inspections by the nurse.
There is a very noticeable decrease in the percentage of Grade IV children given
routine physical examinations, with a corresponding increase in the number examined
on a referral basis, and this is true for all the elementary grades.
The number of doctors' examinations done for athletics this year is much lower
than in previous years, due to the method of screening used. Each student's case was
reviewed before he was given permission to participate, but only 140 were examined
by the doctor.
In high schools only 39 per cent, of the students were examined by the doctor.
This is unfortunate, as this age-group is one in which time spent on health education
brings best results. With resumption of the full-time programme next year, it is to be
hoped that the usual 50 to 55 per cent, may again be seen by the school medical officer.
Communicable Disease.
Communicable disease in the schools this year has not been of a serious nature.
A mild epidemic of mumps and chicken-pox was experienced. This reached the climax
in the late spring months.
There has been an increase in the number of tuberculosis cases occurring amongst
school children this year, and almost half of them are in an age-group below the grades
which receive yearly X-rays. Fifteen cases were found, including the one picked up
at the time of the survey in the schools and the two following the survey who were
among those sent in to survey clinic because of absence when the mobile unit visited
the school.    Four of these cases are in the 6-10-year age-group, and in each case the Y 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
source was within the family. Six cases occurred in the 11-15-year group. In three
of these the source is known to have been within the home. The remaining five cases
occurred in the 16-20 group, and two of these are home contacts. Of the remaining
three, one is a recent evacuee from Greece and so had ample opportunity to pick up the
infection. In the other two cases the source is unknown. The problem of getting
active cases into sanatorium remains the same, and it would seem that until such time
as this situation is relieved, young contacts within the home will continue to develop
tuberculosis.
The following is a summary of communicable disease in the schools for the year:—
Scarlet fever      105 Typhoid fever          1
Chicken-pox      902 Salmonelloses          5
Mumps  1,400 Poliomyelitis           1
Measles        68 Impetigo      420
Rubella        19 Pediculosis      143
Whooping-cough        21 Ringworm      195
Infectious jaundice          3 Scabies      441
Influenza          6 Contagious conjunctivitis    161
Meningitis          3 Vincents angina         1
Smallpox Vaccination.
During the year 4,386 students received primary vaccinations and 8,425 were
revaccinated. This marked increase has raised the percentage of students vaccinated
from 65 to 68 per cent. In the clinics within the city during the intensive spring
campaign, 12,744 school-children were vaccinated.
Diphtheria Immunization.
This aspect of our special services in school health work received a great deal of
attention this year. An increase in the number of cases of diphtheria during the fall
of 1945 made us very conscious of the fact that regular toxoid clinics had never been
undertaken in the secondary schools. It was estimated from our figures that only 50
per cent, of the high school students had ever received toxoid, and the number who had
been given reinforcing doses was negligible. Therefore, the possibility of a greater
increase in the incidence was real, and plans were made to remedy the situation.
It was decided to hold toxoid immunization clinics in all the secondary schools.
Every principal of the schools involved was visited, and the response from them was
very gratifying. In every case the organization of the clinics within the school was
splendid and did much to make the whole campaign run smoothly.
As a result of this campaign in the secondary schools, the number of students who
received toxoid had risen sharply over last year. In 1945 only 92 students in Grades
VII to XII, inclusive, received the series, while this year's figure is 1,494. In 1945 only
426 in the same grades received reinforcing doses, and the figure for this year is 4,016.
However, in spite of this, only 64 per cent, of the present total school population has
received diphtheria toxoid.
Nursing.
Changes in nursing personnel have been more frequent this year than usual.
Some fourteen nurses have withdrawn from the health services—seven for reasons of
marriage and seven married nurses returning to their home duties. We were extremely
sorry to lose their services, but were most grateful for the magnificent contribution
and assistance given during such trying times. As successors we have been very
fortunate in being able to procure very successful nurses. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 63
During the year approximately 7,600 visits were made to homes in the interests
of the health of children. Approximately 4,800 conferences were held during the year
with parents at the health units in the schools. The results of these conferences held
in the homes and at the school health units are having a most beneficial effect upon the
attitude of parents toward the whole subject of health, and also upon the health of the
children themselves. More clerical help and better transportation would enable our
present nursing staff to do more home-visiting.
Dental.
There are five dental clinics at the present time, operating on a full-time basis in
the city, situated at the following schools: Cecil Rhodes, Aberdeen (Dawson Annex),
Laura Secord, Tecumseh, and Florence Nightingale. Due to the demand for emergency
and extraction service, the Nightingale clinic has developed into a clinic for that work
entirely.
All children in Grades VII and VIII were examined. In Grade VII 2,784 were
given an examination and, of this number, 1,302 children were found to be dentally fit,
while 1,482 had dental defects.
In Grade VIII 2,597 children were examined, 1,099 of whom were found to be
dentally fit and 1,498 had dental defects which required immediate attention.
I wish to thank the Metropolitan Health Committee; Dr. Stewart Murray, Senior
Medical Health Officer; Dr. C. H. Gundry, Director of School Health Services; Dr.
Reba Willits, School Medical Health Officer; Dr. R. L. Pallen, Director of School Dental
Services; Miss T. G. Hunter, Director of Public Health Nursing, together with a fine
staff of doctors and nurses, who have responded so ably to extra tasks assigned. It is
to be hoped that by next year a more normal routine can be assumed so that more
attention can be given to the implementing of improvements which have been planned.
First Aid and Home-nursing.
All students received instruction in elementary first aid, safety education, and
home-nursing. More could and should be done to raise the standard of proficiency in
these subjects, and it is hoped the revised course of study in Health Education will
provide for this.
During the school-year under review the following numbers of students were prepared for the certificates of the St. John Ambulance Association:—
Number Number
Type of Certificate. examined. passed.
Senior First Aid   360 325
Junior First Aid   158 155
Junior Home-nursing        3 3
Junior Red Cross.
Junior Red Cross members in elementary schools amounted to 10,800, representing
347 divisions, and in secondary schools amounted to 5,192, representing 175 divisions,
making a total membership for 1946-47 of 15,992, representing 522 divisions.
There were 298 teachers sponsoring Junior Red Cross in elementary schools and
34 (plus) in secondary schools
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Enrolment.
The total enrolment is 5,319, made up as follows: Senior high school students,
1,610 with fifteen teachers; junior high school students, 1,884 with seventeen teachers;
Grades. VII and VIII centres, 1,645 students with twelve teachers. Y 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Expansion of Work.
At the Lord Byng High School there was an increased demand for more Industrial
Arts work. The accommodation was found by transferring the electrical equipment
from the general shop to a class-room, and the general shop furnished with more metal
shop equipment. This centre has progressed very favourably. At the King Edward
High School an extra shop was added in the way of a new draughting-room and an
additional teacher of Industrial Arts was appointed. A new draughting-room was also
provided at the Templeton Junior High School to replace the old one located in a classroom. Both the draughting-rooms at King Edward and Templeton were furnished
with new draughting-desks made in our own workshops.
When the Moberly Elementary School burned more than a year ago, it was necessary to close the old Manual Training centre at Moberly Annex, and also to curtail the
space given to the Manual Training room at Fleming. The crowded condition of all the
schools in this area will necessitate better arrangements being made for the opening
of school in September. There has been a distinct shortage of qualified Industrial Arts
teachers. During the year we had to apply to the Department of Education officials in
charge of Veterans' Affairs training centres for Industrial Arts teachers. Two of
these have applied as substitutes on different occasions from their training class. They
have done very satisfactory work.
Mr. A. S. Hamilton, supervisor of industrial arts, is to be commended for the way
in which he has dealt with the problem of adjustment during these trying times.
HOME ECONOMICS.
Organization and September Enrolment.
Teachers. Students.
Senior high  (9)  16 1,652
Girls' technical school (1)     4 312
Junior high schools  (4)  11 1,627
Elementary schools (14)     9 1,715
Totals    40 5,306
There were also four part-time teachers.
Maintenance of Centres.
The Building Department, as well as the Purchasing Department, is to be commended for the splendid co-operation given Miss Allen of this Department. A new
foods laboratory and a new cooking laboratory were equipped at the Technical School.
Although neither of these rooms were really large enough for Home Economics centres,
they were the only ones available. For the vocational type of work offered, if the class
is kept to twenty pupils or less, fine work can be done in each of these centres.
In conclusion I wish to thank Miss Allen for the very competent work which she is
doing in this Department.
MANUAL ARTS.
In September, 1946, there were 348 Manual Arts classes in Grades IV, V, and VI.
Owing to the scarcity of qualified teachers to teach Manual Arts and craft-work, it was
decided to select a group of teachers for special training. This group of teachers was
later used as instructors to train others attending night-school classes. The instruction
was given by Miss Jessie Parkes, supervisor of manual arts. The following classes
were in operation during the year: Leathercraft, eleven, and weaving, three. Besides
these special craft classes, more elementary work was taken with two classes of forty- VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS. Y 65
seven teachers in Manual Arts covering paper-folding, light cardboard modelling, book-
making, needlecraft, and plasticine modelling.
Service to the Schools.
During the year the following articles were made for use in our system: 1,000
large kraft paper envelopes for use in the Primary libraries; 150 film-slide boxes for
the Art Department; 50 film-slide boxes for the Visual Education Department; 75
khaki aprons for Kindergarten classes; 75 rulers for the Manual Arts centres; 2,250
articles for Junior Red Cross.
There is no type of work in our curriculum that gives more genuine satisfaction to
the younger children attending our schools than does the Manual Arts course.
Miss Parkes and her staff of well-qualified teachers are to be commended on the
excellent creative work they are doing.
MUSIC.
Good general progress is being made with the teaching of music in our schools.
Sight-singing, music appreciation, the artistic rendering of songs, percussion-band
playing in the Primary grades, study of the lives of composers, acquaintance with the
instruments of the orchestra—these are all being emphasized in the elementary schools
as foundational in the child's understanding and enjoyment of music.
In the high schools considerable progress has been made in the development of
orchestras. The King Edward High School is rapidly building up a fine body of
players. The string orchestra of the John Oliver High School has added woodwind
and brass players. Templeton Junior High School has been able to increase its
orchestra considerably during the past year. Kitsilano and Lord Byng High Schools
continue to be our outstanding orchestras.
Some very fine work is being done by the teachers of music in the elementary
schools. A series of school concerts was held during June to commemorate Vancouver's
diamond jubilee. These community nights of music were excellently done. The
teachers are all to be commended on the fine performances given at every one of these
school programmes. Exceptional work is being done by Mr. Burton Kurth, supervisor
of music, and Mr. Ifor Roberts, his assistant.
ART.
Organization.
There are 10 senior high schools with 10 Art teachers, 4 junior high schools with 7
Art teachers, and 48 elementary schools with 224 Art teachers.
The problems of this Department are made much easier by having good in-service
Art classes so that the teachers attending such classes are being given an opportunity
for growth in Art and Art Appreciation.
A series of lectures was commenced early in the year. The number of teachers
involved meant dividing the group into two sections. The approach to Art in these
classes stressed the expressive and functional aspects, and also provided some needed
drawing practice for everyone. Mimeographed drawing-sheets served as reference
material for teachers and reduced note-taking to a minimum. There were also excellent
illustrations by slides, giving examples of children's drawings from our own schools.
Further classes were given to other groups of our teachers of the elementary school
in design.    This second group emphasized crayon techniques in Grades V and VI.
The assembling of suitable illustrative material for Art classes has always been a
major problem for our Art supervisor. To meet this need, sets of Art slides have been
prepared by the supervisor in co-operation with the Visual Education Department.
s Y 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
These slides consist of photographs from nature, instructional diagrams, samples of
children's work, and some techniques of Art masterpieces in relation to the proper
topic. Forty of such sets are now available for use. Boxes for these sets were made
by the Grade VI Manual Arts classes under the direction of Miss Parkes.
SAFETY.
Our school-boy patrols now operate at thirty-two crossings, involving twenty-seven
of our elementary schools. A volunteer group of over 800 boys do patrol-work at four
different periods of the school-day, approximately at the following times: Morning
assembly just prior to the opening of school, 8.45 to 9 a.m.; noon dismissal, from 11.55
a.m. to 12.10 p.m.; noon assembly, from 12.50 to 1 p.m.; school dismissal, from 3 to
3.15 p.m.
The boys on duty from these safety patrols stand on the curb. They do not
attempt to control the motor or street traffic, but they do endeavour to control the pupils
assembled at the curb, so that advantage may be taken of lulls in street traffic. While
the crossing is occupied by the school-children, the patrol boys on duty expose a stop
signal to the street traffic. No accident has occurred in our system while and where
patrols have operated.
The " Stop When Occupied " school crossings were introduced by our City Police
Traffic Department for the first time in September of 1946. Radio and newspaper
publicity was given to the proper operation of these crossings. In order to avoid
accidents, motorists were warned of the danger to school-children if traffic did not stop
when the crossings were occupied. In spite of all the publicity given to the proper
operation of these crossings, a little girl, age 7 years, was killed on the way from
school at Twenty-seventh Avenue and Granville Street. It should be explained that
this school crossing at Twenty-seventh Avenue was rather far from the school to make
it practical for a school patrol to operate. This crossing was usually patrolled by a
police officer. Your School Safety Patrol Committee has taken every opportunity,
through the principals and teachers, to again warn every school-child of the necessity
of taking the greatest care at all times when crossing any street.
Many other topics of Safety Education were continuously brought to the attention
of the children through the content of the school curiculum, such as safety at home,
safety on the school-grounds, safety in the school building, safety while playing different
games, safety while skating, hiking, swimming, ski-ing, etc., safety from the point of
view of health in order to avoid contagious and communicable diseases. These topics
on Safety Education were taught in conjunction with instruction in Health, Science,
and Home Economics.
Our principals and teachers have made a conscientious effort to give the best
instruction in Safety Education. VANCOUVER CITY SCHOOLS.
Y 67
RETIREMENTS.
The following members of the staff were granted superannuation.    These teachers
are to be commended for their many years of loyal and efficient service:—
Name.
School.
Date of Appointment.
C. G. Allin    .       ...               	
September, 1921.
Miss P. C. Becker	
Lord Selkirk (special class)	
Britannia Senior High	
Social Service Worker, Bureau of Measurements.
August, 1905.
Miss L. B. W. Browne	
August, 1914.
November, 1907.
A. M. Cronkhite	
October, 1911.
Miss M. D. Dewar	
Relieving teacher, Laura Secord and Woodland...
Dawson	
Cecil Rhodes	
August, 1911.
February, 1927.
Miss E. A. Faunt	
August, 1913.
June, 1920.
Miss F. I. Grant    ..
January, 1907.
F. H. Halstead    ,                    .  ...
September, 1918.
Miss E. S. Hathaway	
Henry Hill	
Britannia Senior High	
October, 1927.
September, 1925.
September, 1909.
A. F. Reid    	
September, 1928.
E. W. Reid        	
August, 1913.
Alfred Rines	
A. W. Ross                                                 ..    .
Lord Roberts	
August, 1908.
January, 1909.
King Edward High	
August, 1913.
August, 1916.
Miss L. E. Underhill.            	
September, 1922.
IN MEMORIAM.
I report with deep regret the death of the following teachers who have served our
school system so faithfully:—
Name.
School.
Appointed to Staff.
Date of Death.
Strathcona	
On leave of absence
Lord Byng High	
Templeton Junior
August, 1911	
February 20, 1947.
April, 1919	
September, 1921	
April, 1947.
May 10, 1947.
July 8, 1947.
CONCLUSION.
I should like at this time to express my thanks for the co-operative help which I
have received from the Mayor, City Council, Library Board, Parks Board, Fire Department, Police Department, and all the officials of these organizations of our city.
To the principals, staff, and officials of my own Board, I am most grateful for much
competent help and advice. By working together, many difficult jobs have been done
with comparative ease.
To the press I extend my thanks for their fair presentation to the public of our
many intricate school problems.
Needless to say, I am most indebted to my own Board of School Trustees for their
untiring efforts and sympathetic assistance given to me in the administration of our
school system.
To you, sir, and other members of your Department of Education, I am. more than
grateful for the guidance, patience, and excellent help so generously given at all times.
By such a spirit of mutual understanding and co-operation we can successfully solve the
many difficult problems that must lie ahead. Y 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA.
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH; M.A., B.PAED., AND JOHN GOUGH, M.A.,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS.
The year just closed as at June 30th, 1947, has been a memorable one in many
respects. Although the Greater Victoria School District No. 61 was organized in
April, 1946, it Was only after school opening in September that many problems of an
administrative and supervisory nature presented themselves. Consequently this year
has been largely confined to finding solutions to many difficult situations. Four standing committees of the Greater Victoria School Board were set up: Finance, Education,
Buildings and Grounds, and Public Relations. These committees have worked out new
policies and have aimed at developing some degree of uniformity in practices which had
prevailed for many years in the various units now included in the Greater Victoria
School District.
The following is a brief summary of what has been accomplished during the year
in so far as school organization is concerned:—
(1) Extension of the work of the present supervisory staff to cover all of the
schools of Greater Victoria.
(2) Setting up a Purchasing Agent's Department to care for the needs of all
the schools, teachers, and pupils of Greater Victoria.
(3) Extension of pre-primary education.
(4) Expansion of night classes and adult education.
(5) Establishing a speech clinic.
(6) Reorganization of cafeteria services in the high schools.
(7) Appointment of a physical education supervisor for all the elementary
schools in the Greater Victoria area.
(8) Carrying out a census of all children—pre-school as well as school—in
Greater Victoria.
(9) Publication by the School Board of a bulletin called " Education News."
(10) Bringing about a greater uniformity of policy within the teaching staff
relating to such matters as teaching.
(11) Undertaking a vocational survey in order to ascertain the needs of the
Greater Victoria system.
(12) Setting up new salary scales for all of the teachers of the Greater Victoria
school system, as well as for all other employees of the Board.
A great deal of time and effort has been spent this year on the building programme
presently proposed for the Greater Victoria School District. Numerous committees
worked on various angles of the programme. In April, 1947, the details of our extraordinary estimates were placed in the hands of the four Municipal Councils and the
Department of Education, but it was not until June that the by-law for new school
buildings was ready for presentation to the ratepayers of the Greater Victoria School
District. On June 19th in Victoria and June 26th in Oak Bay, Esquimalt, and View
Royal, and finally on the 28th of June in Saanich, the ratepayers were called to the
polls. The voters supported the programme with an overwhelming majority, indicating
that the need for new schools and additions was realized by the people of this district.
The administrative and clerical staffs of the Greater Victoria School Board have
functioned throughout the year with remarkable smoothness.    In January the School REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
Board offices were moved to Craigdarroch, where ample office space and facilities were
available. This is an excellent centre and one of which any school system might well
be proud. It affords a fine opportunity for expansion and development in the years
to come.
Victoria College.
(Dr. John M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed., Principal.)
The 1946-47 session of the College opened on September 19th at Craigdarroch, with
a registration of some 600 students. Congestion was so great and the fire-hazard so
serious that the situation became desperate, and on November 15th the College was
moved to the Normal School building.
Besides the regular sessions, a winter session and a spring session for veteran
students were held as in the previous year.
New courses added in 1946-47 were Chemistry 225 and Home Economics 100 and
101.
There were several important additions to College facilities during the year, and
these may be listed briefly as follows:—
(a) Two army huts were purchased and set up on the Normal School site to
serve as a chemistry laboratory.
(b) The biology laboratory was moved from  Craigdarroch to the  Normal
School site.
(c) Two buildings, erected and used as stores by the Dominion Government,
were converted to use as a College cafeteria.
(d) A great deal of office and other equipment was secured for the main
building.
Secondary Schools.
(Mr. J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., Senior Municipal Inspector of Schools.)
The formation of a Greater Victoria School District has resulted in five high
schools and one junior high school being included in the new area, as follows: Victoria,
Oak Bay, Mount View, Esquimalt, Mount Douglas, and the Central Junior High School.
In recent years the tremendous influx of pupils into our high schools has created
problems which have risen with the changing times. Our elementary school population
is likewise rapidly growing, and when these pupils arrive at the high school level, we
may expect the already large numbers to be augmented beyond present facilities.
In our high schools to-day the problem of taking care of the wide variations in
abilities and interests among such large numbers of pupils is of increasing importance.
The situation can best be met by a composite high school offering varied courses to
meet individual needs. It is proposed, therefore, that this will become more and more
a characteristic of the Greater Victoria school system.
During the past year we conducted a fairly comprehensive vocational survey into
the trades and industries of the district. The result of this survey shows that there
are many openings for students trained in the various trade skills and that there is
a corresponding need for courses in vocational training to meet this situation. The
new vocational-technical unit planned as an adjunct to the Victoria High School will
serve to meet the needs of a district which is not highly industrialized, but which
nevertheless shows certain tendencies in that direction. It is proposed that certain
numbers of students from all of our high schools will be trained at this centre to take
advantage of the courses given. It is also to be anticipated that in the senior Commercial branches the highly developed facilities and staff of the Victoria High School will
be made available to students throughout the area. It is therefore advised that, for the
present, vocational courses will be given in so far as our facilities permit at the Victoria
High School centre and that non-vocational courses will be maintained at the other four Y 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
schools.    All of our high schools will continue to provide non-vocational courses in
Commercial subjects, Industrial Arts, Food, Clothing, Art, and Music.
Kindergarten and Primary Education.
(Miss Marian James, Director.)
During the year 1946-47 the primary department was comprised as follows:
eighty-seven primary classes (Grades I to III), four craft classes (primary, junior,
intermediate, and senior), and eight kindergarten (pre-primary classes).
The primary classes were smaller on the whole this year, but in some cases the
number of children enrolled in a district where the accommodation was very limited
necessitated too large a class. It is hoped that as new buildings become available this
condition can be remedied.
The circulating library of Supplementary Readers, Social Studies books, pictures,
and recordings was a great help to all classes. Teachers are making good use of the
materials provided.
A Primary Bulletin was issued, which contained helpful material. This will be
added to during the coming year.
The kindergarten (pre-primary) classes have now become an integral part of the
school system of Greater Victoria. The three classes previously organized at Oaklands,
Sir James Douglas, and Spring Ridge have proved very successful. ■
In September, 1946, the Greater Victoria School Board opened four new classes at
the old Oak Bay High School, Margaret Jenkins, Victoria West, and North Ward.
These divisions have good enrolments. Both parents and teachers are enthusiastically
supporting these new centres. The need for a kindergarten (pre-primary) class in
James Bay became so apparent that the School Board opened an additional room there
in March, 1947.
The class-rooms used for these children are all attractively decorated and suited
to the needs of young children. The equipment is excellent. Teachers, janitors, and
pupils take great pride in these rooms and make every effort to care for the things
they use.
Several study-groups have been formed for the parents of these children. The
teachers have encouraged the parents to come to these study-groups and have planned
meetings that have helped to form a closer link between the home and the school. An
open day was held in all centres to give the public an opportunity of observing the
children at work and of becoming more familiar with the kindergarten programme.
Child Study Department.
(Miss Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
In a measurement and research bureau such as the Greater Victoria Child Study
Department, it is important to have some major unifying objectives. Briefly, the
major objectives of this department continue to be the following:—
(1) The identification of remedial cases in the school system early enough in
the school-year to do something for them;   and
(2) The improvement of instruction by making full use of standardized test
results to highlight topics which appear to need greater teaching
emphasis.
The results of testing were made available to the teachers by means of class record
sheets and bulletins. Several additions in the way of error studies and city summaries
were made to the Green Staff Bulletin Book, Vol. II, a publication of this Department.
A " remedial workbooks " branch of this Department was started in a small way
this year.    This branch will help to supply remedial reading materials for genuine REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. Y 71
remedial reading cases in the upper grades of the elementary schools and in the high
schools.
Primary-Junior-Intermediate-Senior Crafts Department.
(Miss Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
Between fifteen and twenty pupils attended each of four crafts classes this year.
The age-groups represented were: Primary, 6-8 years; junior, 8-10 years; intermediate, 10-12 years; senior, 13-17 years. In all four classes handicrafts played an
important part in instruction, and the three R's were related to activities wherever
possible.
Industrial Arts and Technical Training.
(Mr. George Anstey, Director.)
Since my last report, submitted April 30th, 1946, the school district has been
enlarged. This has brought three more shops and four additional instructors under
my supervision. With two new instructors appointed in September, the total number
of instructors in the system, including the supervisor, is as follows: Full-time instructors, 15;  part-time instructor, 1.
There are at present fourteen shops, situated as follows:—
For elementary schools,  at  Quadra,  South  Park,  Sir James  Douglas,  and
Victoria West.
For elementary and high schools, at Mount View  (three shops), Lampson
Street, and old Oak Bay High (two shops).
For Grades VII and VIII junior high students, at Central School.
For Grade IX junior high and all senior high students, at Central Junior (two
shops) and Victoria High School.
The total number of boys taking shop-work during 1946-47 was as follows:—
Grade VII     426 Grade XI      92
Grade VIII     437 Grade XII      38
Grade IX     292 Special        56
Grade X     200 	
Total  1,541
All Grade VII and VIII students receive one-half day or four periods of shop-work
per week.
Speech Clinic.
(Miss M. Crickmay, Director.)
The principal event of the school-year, September, 1946, to June, 1947, has been
the establishment of a Speech Clinic at the vacated Health Centre, Central Junior High
School. This clinic was started on an experimental basis, but the results obtained
during the first year have more than justified the experiment. During the previous
year fifty-four children with defective speech were treated, while this term, under the
new arrangement, eighty children have been treated. This increase is chiefly due to
the fact that it is now possible to treat the children in small groups, whereas previously,
due to the disparity in age and type of defect found in each school, the majority of them
had to be treated individually.
During the school-year 240 children with speech defects, varying from very slight
to very severe, were examined in the schools of Victoria, Saanich, Oak Bay, and
Esquimalt, the latter being included in January, 1947. The majority of these children
were examined in September, when a careful check-up of cases was made. In the less
severe cases the teachers were advised as to the best way of helping the children in
class, and the children were seen again at intervals during the year and their progress
checked. Y 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Physical Education.
(Mr. George Grant, B.A., Director.)
This department was established in September, 1946, only five months after the
amalgamation. There was much new ground to be broken and a lot of time spent in
visiting schools to meet and become known to principals and staff members. At the
same time there was the need, and on occasion the demand, to meet and take part in
the activities of other organizations related to school physical education, such as the
Recreation Council, Red Cross, playgrounds, National Film Board, and others.
The work of this Department for the year may be summarized as follows: Visits
to schools to give demonstrations and suggestions to teaching staffs; administration of
equipment; extra-curricular activities associated with the Greater Victoria High and
Elementary School Sports Associations; organization and supervision of swim programme instituted to teach every child to swim at the Grade V level (750 children
participated during the year) ; in-service training programme for teachers; participation in the work of revising the health and physical education curricula for primary
grades.
Music.
(Mr. A. Prescott and Mr. H. J. Bigsby.)
The work both in band instruction and vocal music was expanded during the year,
but the music programme in Greater Victoria is still in its infancy. During the
present year we have had visits from two outstanding high school bands, one from
Trail, B.C., and the other from Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Anyone in Greater Victoria
who had an opportunity to hear these bands will realize the possibilities in an area as
large as we have here.
The work in vocal music may be divided into a general class-room programme and
extra-curricular choral groups. Some attempt was made during the year at the
standardization of time allotments, objectives, and materials throughout the system.
Prescribed standard texts were used to promote further a similarity of work between
the schools and to guide the sight-reading programme.
At the primary level, with the co-operation of the Primary Department, rhythmic-
work bands and natural rhythmic responses were encouraged. Concerning extracurricular choral groups, there was an attempt to provide advanced specialized outlets
for those students who desired more than the general class programme. Many schools
were particularly successful in obtaining high standards in this phase of the work.
The vocal music programme for the year culminated in the case of the Saanich
schools, in what was called " The Saanich Schools Music Meet and Festival of Song."
For two days all classes from all schools met at a central point and demonstrated the
result of the year's class-room work. This project was non-competitive, with constructive comments being offered by two of Victoria's well-known men of music. Evening
concerts for the enjoyment and education of the general public were presented.
Night-school Classes.
(Mr. George Anstey, Director.)
For purposes of classification, our night-school programme covered three main
fields: Apprenticeship, vocational, and avocational. Altogether forty-one courses or
subjects were given by some fifty-two instructors. The average enrolment for the
night-school session was approximately 1,000.
On the whole, the programme was very successful, and it was expanded to cover
certain parts of the Greater Victoria School District which had not in previous years
maintained night-school classes. Keen interest was shown in the work, and attendance
was good throughout the session. We were very fortunate in securing an excellent
staff of instructors. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. Y 73
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER.
REPORT OF R. S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in the city schools the past year showed a small but steady increase;
this is noteworthy in that during years past we have lost groups of pupils in large
numbers due to many reasons, namely: Burnaby Senior High students on the opening
of their new senior high school; Surrey pupils due to the inauguration of the double-
shift system; Coquitlam students due to the completion of their building programme;
also all the Japanese students. The number of teachers remains approximately the
same.
Satisfactory progress is being made in the lessening of the average number of
pupils per class-room teacher, especially in the elementary grades, and a noted result
in class-room efficiency is evident. Continual efforts are being made to maintain the
average daily attendance at a maximum, and absenteeism is not countenanced without
adequate reasons. As a result of the Provincial Health Department's psychiatric clinic,
it is hoped that special classes for pupils requiring extra help will be instituted, relieving to a commendable degree delinquent problems.
It is a pleasure to comment most favourably on the very efficient work of our school
health services. The Medical Department, with Dr. D. A. Clarke in charge, Miss Doris
Bews, R.N., and Miss E. Young, R.N., assistants, has kept the health of our pupils at
a very high level; about 7,000 pupil examinations were made, exclusive of all the
necessary work involved in any first-class clinic.
The Dental Department, with Dr. G. T. Lawrence and Miss A. Engelstad, R.N.,
assisting, again played a most important part in the health of our pupils. It is with
sincere regret we report the resignation of Dr. Lawrence, who for five years has given
of his best to the welfare of our school system.
Early in 1946 the Board of School Trustees, under the chairmanship of Mr. A. W. E.
Mercer, launched the greatest school-development project in the city's history, involving
close to $2,500,000. The plan, spread over five years, provides for a new junior high
school, new senior composite vocational high school, administration buildings, auditorium and stadium at Eighth Avenue on 30 acres of land set aside for school purposes
by the City Council, also an addition to Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary School consisting
of four class-rooms, activity-room, and cafeteria.
On December 13th, 1947, a by-law for the first unit of the programme, $700,000,
was placed before the people and passed with an overwhelming majority. The Department of Education has given assurance of a Government contribution of 50 per cent,
toward the above programme. I think it is not necessary to report the anticipated
results of this school-construction project and what it means to this city, nor the extent
of appreciation due to those citizens whose efforts have been crowned with success.
The addition to Lord Tweedsmuir is under way and is expected to be ready for
occupancy about December 1st. Plans for the new junior high have been drawn up
and passed on to the Department of Education for approval. George Evans & Son are
the architects.
Slowly but surely our school libraries are becoming more able to contribute to
fulfilment of the educational aims of the schools. Plans have been approved by the
Board of School Trustees for an elementary circulating pool library, with headquarters
at Lord Tweedsmuir School, and Miss Hilda Smith, a trained librarian from our teaching staff, in charge. Books will be interchanged amongst the schools on a quarterly
basis, thus giving all elementary pupils a maximum chance of reading a wide variety
of the best fiction recommended by the Library Committee and the Department of Y 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Education. Much of the credit for this progressive step is due to the initiative of
Mrs. Jack Wood, head of the Library Committee on the Board. Sincere appreciation
is due to Mr. Owen Thomas, of the Vancouver schools system; to Miss Ruth Cameron,
city librarian, and her associates; and to the Parent-Teacher Associations for their
close co-operation.
Royal City high school students may soon lead Canada in being the only pupils
receiving driving lessons as part of their extra-curricular study. The plan would give
Grade XI students eight hours' instruction in a dual-controlled car with a qualified
instructor, probably a Provincial Police officer. Four hours would be in observation
and four behind the wheel, with the instructor looking on; the course would run one
complete year.
The past school-year has been highly satisfactory and great credit is due to the
co-operative efficient work of capable principals and able teachers. We acknowledge
the years of splendid service and keen leadership of Mr. Reginald Ashworth, B.A.,
principal of Sir Richard McBride Junior High-Elementary Schools, and, on his retirement, wish for him and Mrs. Ashworth many happy profitable years of continued
service.
We are indebted to many organizations for scholarships awarded this past year on
the senior high schools level, namely: The Kiwanis scholarship, the Hamber bursaries,
the Victoria Cross Fund awards, the University Women's scholarship, Department of
Education awards, fire-prevention awards, and other prizes. Our pupils are taking
full advantage of these incentives to more intensive studies.
I wish herewith to pay tribute to the New Westminster School Board and officials,
to parent-teacher organizations, to teachers and principals, and to those many agencies
which have combined to make the educational field in this city more efficient than it
has ever been.
SCHOOLS OF NORTH VANCOUVER AND WEST VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
During the school-year 1946-47, in this area, 4,697 pupils attended the schools and
153 teachers were employed. The enrolment in School District No. 44 (North Vancouver) was 3,370, with a staff of 107 teachers, and in School District No. 45 (West
Vancouver) the number of pupils was 1,327, with a staff of 46 teachers.
North Vancouver.
The most difficult problem faced by the School Board is the need of additional
class-rooms for the increase in enrolment. During the past year a partial solution
was found for the congestion in two areas. An army hut was moved to the Capilano
School site and converted into a class-room. It is the intention of the Board, however,
to add two other rooms to the main building in order to provide for the increase in
enrolment expected next year.
The congestion in the high school was relieved to some extent by the construction
of a vocational-technical unit on adjacent grounds. Three large army huts were
purchased, moved to the site, and converted into an excellent vocational school. The
building contains a woodworking-shop, metal-work shop, and large draughting-room,
together with other necessary facilities. This school will operate under the Dominion-
Provincial Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.    Invaluable help was given by REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. Y 75
the Provincial Director of Technical Education in meeting the requirements necessary
to obtain this assistance. Vocational classes will be organized at the opening of school
in September in machine-shop practice, carpentry and cabinetmaking. Prior to this
decision a vocational survey of the district was undertaken and an advisory committee
set up, including representatives from the two large ship-building plants in North
Vancouver. The fullest co-operation from the executive heads of these plants has been
promised, and certain of their facilities have been placed at the disposal of the school.
The School Board expects that the technical training which will be offered in this school
will meet a long-felt need among the boys of high school age in this community.
A further easing of the congestion existing in the high school was accomplished by
the establishment of another foods laboratory for the girls of the Home Economics
classes in Queen Mary School.
The main problem of school accommodation is still, in the opinion of the Board,
the provision of a junior high school. Difficulties in financing such a construction have
been mentioned in a previous report, this school district being handicapped by the
controls placed on borrowing in the two municipalities of North Vancouver. Certain
recommendations have been made by the Town Planning Commission relative to junior
high schools, and the Board is hopeful that something definite will result.
Further progress has been made by the School Board in its lunch-room programme
by providing additional schools with lunch-room facilities.
Progress likewise has been made in the pool library plan. The librarian has an
excellent knowledge of library procedure and is building up the pool on sound principles.
Three teachers who had given many years of valuable service to the schools were
superannuated in June. They are Miss J. Angus, Miss C. Thornton, and Mr. C.
Darwin.
West Vancouver.
As in North Vancouver, the need for additional class-rooms for the increasing
number of school-children is the main problem facing the School Board of West
Vancouver. The three schools, Hollyburn, Pauline Johnson, and West Vancouver High
School, have no vacant class-rooms, and classes are being accommodated in annex
buildings, which in normal times would probably be used for other purposes.
Plans had been under way for the construction of a new senior high school, but,
owing to the high cost of building and the somewhat unexpected increase in elementary
enrolment, this project has been temporarily shelved, and efforts are now being
concentrated on providing additional elementary class-rooms.
To ease the congestion at the high school, a building was constructed during the
year adjacent to the main building from army huts. From these a very attractive
unit of four class-rooms has been obtained. It has a central heating system, is well
lighted and tastefully decorated, and has an attractive exterior. It will provide
accommodation until a larger building is possible.
In planning for future buildings, the School Board has endeavoured to predict
requirements for the next five years. In conferences held with the Council of the
municipality this policy has been heartily endorsed by that body, and relations between
it and the Board have been very satisfactory. Cognizance of the recommendations of
the Town Planning Commission has also been taken in relation to school planning, so
that the School Board feels satisfied that it is following a sound policy.
The importance of maintenance of buildings is fully recognized by the Board, and
its efforts have been directed toward improving the physical condition of existing
school buildings.
General.
The teachers and principals of both school districts are doing very satisfactory
work.    The School Boards rely on the principals to a very large extent to direct their Y 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
individual schools and to assume the responsibility of keeping them up to a high
standard of performance. The principals have reacted well and by means of monthly
meetings discuss the various problems relating to their work.
Again I express my appreciation for support received from both School Boards
and from officials of the Department of Education.
SCHOOLS OF THE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY OF BURNABY.
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
School Enrolment and Accommodation.
The new term began with an enrolment of 6,191 pupils in the following classifications: Elementary, 3,658; junior high, 1,574; senior high, 959. An active building
programme is under way throughout the municipality, and each year an increasing
number of pupils offer themselves for instruction. During the year of this report 1,200
new homes were being built. The following year indicates that this number will be
increased by 25 per cent. To meet the influx of new pupils, a number of schools will
be obliged to go on double shift. The School Board has been aware of this development
and has caused to be prepared a building programme covering a seven-year period,
which, if it can be carried out, will cope with the situation. In the meantime the
various activity-rooms, laboratories, and libraries have had to be again occupied as
regular class-rooms. A very determined effort will be made to get the building programme under way the ensuing year.
Supervision of Instruction.
Throughout the year, tests and test results were made available to teachers to
assist them with the diagnosis and classification of their pupils. Steps were taken to
provide more time for the principals to supervise their schools. Relieving teachers
were assigned to the staff and a supervisory plan was initiated whereby the learning
situation was studied in each class-room. To assist in the work of pupil and teacher
adjustment, a primary supervisor, Miss Kathleen E. Collins, was appointed to act as
curriculum consultant, with particular reference to the primary grades. Under Miss
Collins' direction a programme of in-service training was developed and is continuing.
A thorough study and analysis were made of Supplementary Readers and reference
materials, and selected lists were prepared for the guidance of the teachers in purchasing books and in allocating them for instructional purposes.
Metropolitan Health Unit No. 5.
The school health services were administered by Dr. E. B. Roach and a staff of six
public health nurses. Pupils in Grades I, VII, and X were examined by the school
medical officer, and the pupils in all other grades were inspected by the school nurses.
All pupils participating in major sports were given a special examination in September.
During the months of May and June special attention was given to the examination of
pre-school children.
As a result of an outbreak of smallpox in the State of Washington during 1946,
particular precautions were taken and a continuing interest in vaccination was maintained. The following table shows the number of children immunized against smallpox,
diphtheria, whooping-cough, and scarlet fever:— REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. Y 77
1946-47.
Diphtheria toxoid   4,831
Smallpox vaccination   4,644
Scarlet fever  3
Whooping-cough (pre-school)       502
In October, 1946, the mobile survey unit conducted an investigation for cases of
tuberculosis and X-rayed 1,202 students in Grades IX, X, XI, XII, and XIII in this
survey.
Clinical Services.
The eye clinic, under the direction of Dr. H. Mallek, is held twice monthly at the
Health Centre, and about fifteen pupils are examined each session.
Two dental clinics have operated throughout the year and have rendered services
to all pupils in Grades I, II, III, and IV, together with emergency cases. The public
demand for these services is growing and is in excess of our present facilities.
In addition to the activities described above, the School Health Department also
conducts a mental hygiene clinic and an orthopaedic service to which children are
referred. A nutritionist is also available as a consultant in all problems dealing with
nutrition.
General.
The School Board concentrated its efforts during the year at improving the school
environment through the redecoration of the various schools. The work was done
largely by the maintenance staff. New and modern equipment was installed, the lighting was improved, and the rooms and basements of a large number of schools were
made attractive by the use of clean, bright colour effects.
The benefits from the increased Government grants toward education have been
reflected by better salaries for the teachers and other staff employees, by greatly
improved facilities in the schools, and, as has been referred to, by the programme of
improvement in the school building and grounds.
In concluding this report, I would like to record my appreciation and recognition
of the vigorous leadership and co-operation given by Lieut.-Col. F. T. Fairey, Superintendent of Education, and his Departmental staff. At all times he has been quick to
understand the problems presented to him and prompt in his action in effecting a
solution.
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Paed., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS (SURREY).
In School District No. 36 during the school-year 1946-47 there were in operation
twenty-eight elementary schools and three junior-senior high schools, enrolling in all
some 4,400 pupils. Overcrowding continued to cause difficulty, but the worst of this
was overcome by transporting pupils to other schools, by renting halls, and by organizing classes on the shift system where no other accommodation could be arranged. By
these means it was possible to keep the size of the classes within reasonable limits, so
as not to work hardships on pupils and teachers.
Grades VII, VIII, and IX in Lord Tweedsmuir and Queen Elizabeth High Schools,
twenty-eight classes in all, operated on the double-shift system. The morning group
were in session from 8 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. and the afternoon from 12.45 to 5.15. In each
school there were three distinct groups of pupils—junior high morning shift, junior
high afternoon shift, and the senior high grades operating on the regular school-day.
This has made extra-curricular activities almost impossible in these schools, but in
many ways has not been as bad as was expected and from a purely academic standpoint Y 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, i946-47.
has proven fairly satisfactory. One of the main difficulties has been in homes where
the children happen to be on different shifts.
In December a by-law to raise $282,000, the district's share in a building programme, was passed by a large majority. It was planned to build a junior-senior high
school, two elementary schools of four class-rooms and one of two class-rooms, and also
to modernize and add five class-rooms to three existing buildings. Unfortunately
various difficulties have arisen to hold up this project, and the only work begun so far
is on the three additions. It is now realized that this programme is not adequate. If
the accommodation planned were ready for September next it would be filled to capacity.
Another building programme should be planned in the very near future.
Turnover of staff continued to be a major problem. Sixty-eight new teachers
came to Surrey during the year. It is impossible for the schools to do first-class work
when almost half of the staff takes a considerable part of the year in getting to know
the pupils and the particular problems of the school and district.
In September a diagnostic testing programme in the skills was carried out in
Grades IV, V, and VI, and in June the achievement in the same skills was measured in
Grades V and VI.    Some schools showed gratifying progress.
The tests, administered under the guidance of the Bureau of Tests and Standards,
were very helpful to the teachers.
Strathcona Trust prizes for excellence in physical education were awarded to
Cloverdale Elementary School (Miss Kathleen Crook, principal) and White Rock
Elementary School (Mr. Wm. F. Davidson, principal).
The job-study competition sponsored by the B.C. Products and Industrial Bureau
of the Vancouver Board of Trade was won by Janet Rankine, of Semiahmoo High
School. Her study was entitled " Forests and Related Industries." Second prize went
to Kenneth Estensen, of Queen Elizabeth, who wrote on " Gill-net Fishing," and the
third to Vernon Swank, also of Queen Elizabeth, for a study on " The Trade of
Automobile Mechanic."
In a Dominion-wide art competition sponsored by the Robin Hood Flour Mills,
Wendy Middleton, of Semiahmoo, won first prize of $150.
I should like to express my appreciation of the help and co-operation so generously
given throughout the year by the officials of the Department of Education, by the Board
of School Trustees, and by the principals and teachers of School District No. 36. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 79
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 62  (SOOKE), No. 63  (SAANICH),
NO. 64 (SALTSPRING), AND No. 65 (COWICHAN).
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Since the reorganization of districts in April, 1946, the number of teachers in
these schools has increased from 126 to 141. Pupil enrolment in the same period has
increased from 3,113 to 3,713. All four districts shared in the increase. The chief
problems facing the Boards have been the providing of more suitable accommodation,
the organization of junior-senior high schools, difficulties experienced in transportation,
and the rising cost of education. Districts which expected lower mill rates or at least
an equalization of costs have been somewhat disappointed. The new system of grants
has been well received, and criticism with respect to assessment has abated with the
appointment of a School Taxation Commission. Public interest has not been entirely
limited to matters of finance, however. There is evidence of a growing appreciation of
the significance of the broader social aspects of education. I wish to pay tribute to the
Boards, the secretaries, and the teaching personnel for their earnestness of purpose
and for the harmonious relations which have prevailed.
School District No. 62 (Sooke).
Upon the organization of this district, the Board was compelled to give immediate
attention to providing accommodation for its high school pupils who had previously
attended the Victoria city schools. By making use of army huts, the district was
enabled to open its first high school at Milnes Landing in September, 1946. A year
later the Belmont High School was opened. Each high school has four teachers, with
every prospect of requiring several more teachers for the next school-year. New
elementary schools have been built at East Sooke and at Leechtown. An additional
class-room has been added to the Happy Valley School, and several older schools have
been remodelled and improved. The Board is at present preparing a by-law for
presentation to the ratepayers in November. If the by-law passes, the Board's building
and improvement programme will be completed.
Total enrolment 1945-46, 583;  enrolment September, 1947, 739.
School District No. 63 (Saanich).
This district includes Wards 5 and 6 of the Saanich Municipality and the rural
sections of James Island and North Saanich. Prior to reorganization, North Saanich
already had a modern consolidated junior-senior high school and the new school at
Cordova Bay was approaching completion. Mount Newton has been reorganized into a
junior-senior high school and provided with modern shops. The programmes of both
high schools have been enriched with Commercial courses, and the district maintains a
physical education supervisor. Additional class-rooms have also been provided at
Sidney, West Saanich, and Deep Cove. Transportation problems have arisen from time
to time, but, on the whole, the schools are operating smoothly and efficiently. The
number of teachers has increased from thirty-six to forty-one. Enrolment has
increased from 920 to 1,088.
School District No. 64 (Saltspring).
This district is composed of Saltspring Island, with a modern junior-senior high
school, and neighbouring islands, each with one or two one-room elementary schools. Y 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Lack of regular communication between these islands makes it impossible for pupils to
commute daily to attend the high school at Ganges. A few pupils are living in a
boarding-house. A number of secondary pupils are staying with friends and attending
schools in Vancouver or Victoria, the Board paying their tuition. School attendance at
Ganges is increasing rapidly, and the Board will soon be faced with the necessity of
providing additional accommodation.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan).
A few days before the districts were consolidated, a disastrous fire destroyed the
high school at Duncan. Temporary quarters were found for a number of classes at
Fairbridge Farm School and in a number of unused buildings in the neighbourhood.
Plans have been completed for a new junior-senior high school which will accommodate
700 pupils, a new four-room school at Shawnigan, two-room schools at the Bench and
Mill Bay, and a one-room school at Crofton. Sites have been approved and a by-law
will be submitted to the ratepayers in November. The Board has organized the district
under a number of supervising principals—small rural schools being grouped under one
principal. Col. R. N. Lendrum has been named senior principal and is rendering valuable service to the Board as an adviser on administrative problems. The completion of
the building programme will enable the Board to close several of the smaller schools.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 14  (SOUTHERN OKANAGAN), No. 15
(PENTICTON), AND No. 16   (KEREMEOS).
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., E.D., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The outstanding feature of the year 1946-47 was the effort of the District Boards
to provide adequate accommodation for the increased pupil population.
In the Southern Okanagan District a by-law in the amount of $550,000 received
the assent of the ratepayers to provide the district share of (a) a completely new
junior-senior high school at Oliver, and (b) the initial elementary unit of a projected
elementary-junior high school at Osoyoos. Construction on the Oliver school was commenced in January, 1947, and completion is expected for September, 1948. Should
favourable bids be received, the Osoyoos unit will be started in the summer of 1947.
The Penticton School District, because of the greatly increased building costs,
postponed the building of its $450,000 new high school addition, which had been
approved by the ratepayers in 1945. To meet the emergency, plans have been drawn
to (a) provide twelve additional class-rooms in Penticton by use of two H-type army
hutments, and (b) reconstruct and add four class-rooms and a modern play-shed to the
Summerland Elementary School. The total anticipated cost of these projects is
$177,000.
The Keremeos School District has also been forced to find new accommodation at
Keremeos. The elementary school at this centre will be reconstructed, and an addition
by way of a rebuilt single army hut will provide three additional class-rooms. The
by-law for the district share of this expenditure in the amount of $19,000 is now
pending.
Throughout the whole inspectorate all school accommodation, including basements
and auditoriums, is being used to capacity. In Penticton, Keremeos and Osoyoos,
class-rooms are also being conducted in churches and (or) community halls. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 81
Plans for consolidation have been proceeded with cautiously. Where the financial
outlay has been moderate, commensurate with high educational advantages to the
pupils, and public opinion generally favourable, plans have been implemented. These
have been:—
(a) Bringing of Summerland Grade XIII pupils by bus to Penticton.    No
Grade XIII class has ever been possible at Summerland, and pupils formerly had to either attend the University of British Columbia in Vancouver or come to Penticton and board while attending school.
(6) Providing secondary education for the Grade IX to XII pupils of Cawston
and Grade VII to XII pupils of Olalla in the Keremeos School District.
These  students  are carried by bus to the  Keremeos High  School at
Keremeos.
Teacher-Trustee Board relations continue to be very satisfactory.    All District
Boards negotiated new salary schedules with their teachers, which are appreciably
higher, both as to minimum and maximum, than former scales.
The new organization has placed a greater administrative responsibility on School
Boards than heretofore and demands on the time of the Trustees have been much
increased. They deserve credit for the manner in which they have made possible the
carrying out of the educational reorganization. On the whole, and considering the
many difficulties to be surmounted, good progress has been made this school-year.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 69 (QUALICUM), No. 70 (ALBERNI), AND
UNATTACHED SCHOOL DISTRICTS BAMFIELD, CLO-OSE, ESPE-
RANZA, KILDONAN, PORT RENFREW, SYDNEY INLET, TAHSIS
RIVER, TOFINO, UCLUELET, AND ZEBALLOS.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
This inspectorate consists of School District No. 69 (Qualicum), School District
No. 70 (Alberni), and nine unattached schools on the west coast of Vancouver Island,
namely, Port Renfrew, Kildonan, Bamfield, Ucluelet, Tofino, Sydney Inlet, Tahsis
River, Esperanza, and Zeballos. Also included in the inspectorate are unattached
schools at Clayoquot and Kyuquot, but these have been closed for several years. The
schools at Tahsis River and Sydney Inlet were opened for the first time in the autumn
of 1946.
In both large districts the school population has increased greatly during the last
year or two, and building construction has lagged far behind needs. Temporary classrooms in basements, community halls, churches, and converted army huts have had to
be used. A building programme is under way, however, in each district, and it is to
be hoped that better accommodation will soon be available.
The same situation existed in several of the unattached districts, and the way in
which the Bamfield community met its problem is worthy of recording in some detail.
This district possessed a very old and dilapidated one-room school to which a small
lean-to had been added. Here three teachers were trying to carry on their work with
over sixty pupils. A ratepayers' meeting was held, at which it was decided to build,
with the assistance of the Department of Education, a three-room modern school to
cost in the neighbourhood of $28,000. Plans were prepared and approved, but when
the tenders were called for, the Board was dumbfounded to find that the lowest tender
was almost double the amount which the district felt it could afford. Y 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
The School Board and the community were determined not to give up the project
nor to compromise on a less satisfactory school. A Building Committee of able citizens was co-opted by the Board and set to work on ways and means. Since the majority
of the parents were fishermen, who had a slack season during the winter months, it
was decided to build the school largely with local labour. A head carpenter was
brought in to supervise the job. All physical labour was paid for at prevailing rates,
but the mental work, the searching for material, the driving force, and almost superhuman exertions of all concerned could never be paid for in money. A railway had to
be constructed up a 45-per-cent. grade to get materials to the site where no road
existed. Bulldozer, equipment, and materials had to be towed 40 miles, on a borrowed
barge, by the fishermen in their own boats.
Finally the school was opened on September 1st by the Superintendent of Education, who described it as probably the most modern rural school in British Columbia.
It is heated by hot water and an oil furnace. An automatic lighting plant starts at
the turning of any switch and floods the rooms with fluorescent light while germicidal
lamps purify the air. In addition to three large and airy class-rooms, it possesses
modern indoor lavatories, principal's office and teachers' room, a fully equipped kitchen
with oil-burning range, and a large basement suitable for play-rooms and shops. All
this has been done within the original vote of $28,000.
This is a shining example of what can be done by people who are willing to work
together and are determined to give their children the best possible opportunities. The
children of Bamfield are not the only ones who will reap a benefit from this school.
All who took part have had a valuable and wonderful experience.
Better salaries have been offered in practically all districts, but still it has been
difficult to procure teachers for the more remote schools. Though none has had to
close for lack of an instructor, several Temporary certificates have had to be requested
for unqualified teachers.
In the two larger districts the amalgamation under the recommendations of the
Cameron Report has resulted in the almost total elimination of the ungraded school,
with a considerable increase in the efficiency of instruction in rural areas. Only
experienced teachers have been assigned to one-room rural schools, and if present plans
are carried out, even greater benefits will accrue to children in the outlying districts.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 35  (LANGLEY), No. 47  (POWELL
RIVER), AND UNIVERSITY HILL SCHOOL DISTRICT.
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
My inspectorate includes the districts of Langley, Powell River, and University
Hill, and the School for the Deaf and the Blind.
School District No. 35 (Langley).
The school enrolment of Langley Municipality increased more than 10 per cent,
during the year to a total of 1,950 pupils, requiring twelve additional teachers. New
accommodation was provided through the expedient of basement class-rooms. Despite
the passing of a comprehensive building by-law in May, 1946, no new construction was
undertaken owing to the shortage of materials and the steadily rising costs.
An area of 30 acres was purchased as a site for a new secondary school. As the
population to be served by this school is for the most part engaged in agriculture, it is REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 83
intended that the curriculum in effect will provide generously for local needs. With
this purpose in view a Vocational Committee was selected to assist the School Board in
an advisory capacity.
School District No. 47 (Powell River;.
In the immediate vicinity of Powell River the schools are overcrowded to the extent
that considerable temporary accommodation is in use. Most of the schools in the
outlying parts of the district are in urgent need of replacement. The School Board
wishes to institute a programme that will correct the deficiencies it has found, but its
plans have been delayed through the difficulties encountered in securing suitable sites.
Meanwhile a programme of improvement to the existing class-rooms is being pushed
forward steadily.
University Hill School District.
This, the most populous of the unattached districts, continued under the control of
an Official Trustee until the end of December, when the newly elected School Board of
three members assumed office.
The School for the Deaf and the Blind.
During the war the buildings belonging to this school were turned over to the
Royal Canadian Air Force. In March all classes were returned from their temporary
quarters and once again consolidated.
Conclusion.
I wish to commend the co-operation and loyalty of the teachers of my area. Much
might be said also in recognition of the work of the School Boards in their earnest
efforts to correct the legacy resulting from the " depression " period followed by the
years while we were at war. All are confronted with common problems of antiquated
and overcrowded school buildings, indifferently equipped and poorly lighted class-rooms,
and school-grounds that are now recognized as far too meagre for the purposes they
should serve. The members have devoted long hours to the study of their districts'
needs, and gradually they are developing plans that give promise of eventually providing
school facilities that will enable teachers to perform the quality of work required of
them in our rapidly progressing society.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 9  (CASTLEGAR), No. 12  (GRAND
FORKS), AND No. 13  (KETTLE VALLEY).
REPORT OF C E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the first part of the term much time had to be devoted to organizing the
first regular election and holding ratepayers' meetings. Twenty-two meetings were
held during the month of October to elect representatives.
In District No. 9 (Castlegar) all schools were staffed. Of the thirty teachers, only
two were untrained. In District No. 12 (Grand Forks) all members of the teaching
staff were trained. District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) did not fare quite as well, as it was
necessary to use four untrained people to staff some of the more remote schools.
By uniting Carmi and Beaverdell, it was possible to create a superior school at the
latter place. This has been of great benefit to the district, as high school pupils in this
area previously had to leave home for all their high school work. Now they can attend
Grades IX and X in their home district. Y 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
Each district is giving financial assistance to pupils in attendance areas where
there are no high schools or where daily transportation is not available. The response
to this has been very gratifying, particularly in District No. 13 (Kettle Valley), where
pupils from Midway, Westbridge, Bridesville, and Rock Creek are carrying on with
their education. Grades XI and XII pupils from Carmi and Beaverdell are also taking
advantage of this opportunity.
As well as the tests administered for the Department of Tests and Standards the
Otis Self Administering Tests of Mental Ability were given to all pupils above Grade
IV. In May and June Progressive Achievement Tests were administered to all pupils
in Grades IV to VIII, inclusive.
In each of the districts the housing problem is acute. District No. 9 (Castlegar)
is using two community halls and one church hall in the Castlegar-Robson area. It is
hoped a by-law will be submitted there soon to provide adequate accommodation for the
pupils in this district. District No. 12 (Grand Forks) was successful when it submitted
a by-law for $239,000 for the building of a new junior-senior high school. The needs of
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) are being studied and will be dealt with early in the
next term.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 42   (MAPLE RIDGE), No. 43
(COQUITLAM), AND No. 48  (HOWE SOUND).
REPORT OF E. G. DANIELS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The above districts employed 143 teachers during the past year: in senior high, 31;
in junior high, 28; in elementary, 84. Districts No. 42 and No. 48 have five-member
Boards, while District No. 43 elects nine members.
The December elections resulted in only four changes in Board personnel for 1947,
and in only one case was a member of the 1946 Boards defeated. This would seem to
indicate public confidence in the members of the temporary Boards which held office
from April 1st to December 31st, 1946. These temporary Boards were comprised of the
best material from the former small Boards. The new members are of unusually high
calibre, and the planning and organization of all Boards in my inspectorate is increasing
in effectiveness.    I have found them very friendly and co-operative.
No new building programme had been undertaken for some years, except in
Coquitlam Municipality, where twenty-one class-rooms had been added, before the
changes resulting from the Cameron Report. The influx of pupils, especially during
the last three years, has necessitated the use of basements and other temporary
accommodation.    In a few cases double shifts have been the only solution.
Maple Ridge Board is now developing a long-range building plan. Coquitlam
Board has had blue-prints prepared which will involve an estimated expenditure of
$856,000, with an additional cost of more than $100,000 for equipment and grounds.
Many of the most pressing accommodation problems have been solved by an increase
in bus transportation. This has involved heavy expense both to the districts and to the
Provincial Government.    In one district the cost has trebled.
In Coquitlam School District, loco High School was closed and incorporated into
Port Moody High School, the rooms formerly occupied by high school students in loco
being filled with the overflow from Port Moody elementary grades. Home Economics
and Industrial Arts programmes were made available to part of Port Coquitlam
students by transportation to Port Moody centre. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 85
Health units under the Provincial Board of Health have been organized in Districts
No. 42 and No. 43. There are many evidences that this is most effective in promoting
public health.
Since the new Boards took over the responsibility of staffing, caring for, and
equipping the schools, there has been a very creditable improvement in the comfort and
appearance of the school buildings in all areas. School supplies are provided in more
satisfactory amount and quality than formerly, especially in the matter of library
material.
The problem of a hot dish at noon is being solved, in a considerable number of
schools, through the very praiseworthy co-operation of Parent-Teacher Associations.
All three Boards in this inspectorate have adopted the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation salary schedule. During the past year a large number of teachers in these
districts have improved their professional standing.
Miss Jean McLean, of Port Moody High School, was successful in winning a Royal
Institution scholarship of $175, awarded for the highest rank in University Entrance
in her district.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 1   (FERNIE), No. 2  (CRANBROOK),
AND No. 5  (CRESTON).
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The Cranbrook inspectorate is comprised of School District No. 1 (Fernie), School
District No. 2 (Cranbrook), and School District No. 5 (Creston).
Any report on development in this inspectorate must be prefaced by a tribute to
the three Boards of School Trustees. The reorganization effected in April, 1946,
greatly increased the work and interests of the Boards. Subsequent development
could not have been carried out so rapidly and efficiently had it not been for those
citizens who have so unselfishly sacrificed their time and energy in the cause of
education. Our democratic way of life is in safe hands so long as we have men and
women who are prepared and willing to render unrewarded public service. There is a
danger, however, that the greatly increased burden placed upon the Boards may prove
too heavy to attract men who, in most cases, have little but their leisure time to offer.
No tribute to the Boards would be complete without suitable acknowledgment and
appreciation of the excellent service rendered by the secretary-treasurers.
The reorganization of the school districts resulted in marked and immediate
improvement of the school buildings and properties. Rural schools, hitherto somewhat
neglected, were renovated, repaired, and repainted. In all of the larger schools,
programmes for the improvement of lighting and for redecoration were energetically
developed and carried out. I am deeply impressed by the very important parts played
by the various school principals in this programme. Without their knowledge and
ability, little could have been accomplished.
Increased enrolments, the need for additional and improved accommodation, and
the high cost of building have been and will continue to be burdensome problems for
some years to come. One of the most irksome problems has been that which has arisen
from the urgent need to provide greatly increased transportation facilities. The
widespread demand to provide secondary education for all pupils, the even spread of
taxes, and the shortage of qualified teachers have forced Boards to recognize transportation as the only apparent solution. While the closing of the small rural schools
is not necessarily a good or wholesome development, these factors have caused the Y 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
closing of five small schools in the past year and will cause the closing of five more in
the coming year.
True progress cannot be measured, however, in terms of material or physical
improvement or in organization. Unless there is an increase in learning and an
improvement of instruction, it is difficult to evaluate progress. This, of necessity,
implies that there must be a reasonable degree of stability in the teaching staffs.
No such stability has been evident for many years. Of the 135 teachers and principals
in this inspectorate, 24 were here six years ago, 53 have been here two years or more,
and 56 are new to the districts this year. If it were not for the pool of teachers in the
other Provinces, which we have so willingly and somewhat unfeelingly drained, the
adequate staffing of the schools would have been impossible. No greater problem exists
than that of assuring formal education an adequate supply of well-trained teachers.
It is to be hoped that we do not have to await another depression to drive our young
people into the teaching profession, although we must admit that increased remuneration is not, in itself, the only solution. If trends in education are to find roots in the
class-room, much remains to be done to weave the teaching profession into the fabric
of community life.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 59 (PEACE RIVER NORTH), No. 60 (PEACE
RIVER SOUTH), AND UNATTACHED SCHOOL DISTRICTS ATLIN,
CAMP MILE 163, CAMP 300, AND FORT NELSON.
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The Peace River inspectorate includes two large rural school districts—Peace
River South, centred at Dawson Creek and covering the area south of the Peace River,
and Peace River North, centred at Fort St. John—and five unattached schools in army
camps along the Alaska Highway. There are 100 teachers employed in the sixty-seven
schools, which enrol a total of 2,351 pupils. In addition, the local districts employ a
correspondence teacher for sixty-five pupils in isolated districts.
For the most part, this part of the Province is in a stage of pioneer development,
with land rapidly being opened for settlement. However, the centres of Dawson Creek
and Fort St. John, with their surrounding farming areas, have established a permanent and prosperous economy. In these two centres the Trustees are in the process
of establishing modern educational facilities. Quite rightly, the Trustees are endeavouring to extend the facilities to be provided at Dawson Creek and Fort St. John to
the rural areas.
In June, 1945, the South District passed a by-law for $200,000 to provide a modern
central high school in Dawson Creek. The first unit of this school is under construction, and when the building is completed and staffed, the residents of the South
District will have a school the equal of the best in the Province. Over 400 high school
students will be enrolled, with over half coming from the rural area, where high school
education cannot now be given. To provide for these latter students, the first unit of
a fleet of buses has been purchased, and suitable army buildings for use as dormitories
have been secured.
In Peace River North a four-room school in Fort St. John, built in 1945, has had
to have five temporary rooms added. At present the North District has a two-room
high school in Fort St. John, while there are sufficient students of high school age to
warrant at least five divisions.    A dormitory in Fort St. John is the only means by REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 87
which secondary-school education can be extended to the rural pupils. The Trustees
have prepared a by-law to cover the immediate needs of this area.
An extensive programme of repairs has been undertaken to the rural schools in the
area. However, many schools will have to be replaced. This district was populated
during the depression era and school buildings were built accordingly. With the
development accompanying the building of the Alaska Highway, and with the promise
of future expansion following the completion of the John Hart Highway and the
extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, it is evident that the rural schools
need immediate attention.
The teacher-supply has been inadequate in this area. High school graduates have
had to be employed without teacher-training. The Trustees are now paying above the
British Columbia Teachers' Federation salary scale and are providing suitable residences in the rural area. These measures have brought about some improvement, and
there are now only twenty-two untrained student-teachers in the area. However, a
large number of temporary teachers are still employed.
The administration of the large rural school districts in the Peace River is a
trying task. Too much tribute cannot be paid to the members of the School Boards,
who give more than generously of their time' in their efforts to provide an adequate
standard of education to the families who are establishing a new empire in the most
northern section of our Province.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 19,   (REVELSTOKE), AND No. 20
(SALMON ARM).
REPORT OF W. H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The impletion of the Cameron Report has been followed by certain definite
trends:—
(1) The introduction and refinement of systematic methods of handling
school business on the part of School Boards and secretary-treasurers:
Boards were more and more concerned with matters of policy-making,
and delegated more of the execution of routine matters to secretary-
treasurers.
(2) A realization by School Boards, especially where a number of small outlying schools were operated, of the importance of school representatives
as a link between the Board and the public: Copies of the minutes of
Board meetings have been regularly supplied to school representatives.
(3) A realization of their new borrowing-powers, as well as the more generous
assistance afforded by the Department of Education, has enabled Boards
to deal more effectively with urgently needed alterations and additions
to meet the needs of growing communities.
(4) The tacit acceptance on the part of School Boards of their duty to
endeavour to provide equal educational opportunity to all children within
their own districts.
In School District No. 19 (Revelstoke) the entire educational set-up has been
reviewed, and plans formulated to meet the present and future needs of the district.
In the two centres where the need was urgent—Arrowhead and Glacier—work was
started on additions and alterations to the school buildings to make them more suitable
for a modern educational system;   this work is expected to be completed before the PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
end of 1947. The organization of the school system in the City of Revelstoke along
a 6-3-3 plan with the erection of an auditorium-gymnasium and the building of a new
school at Beaton are projects outlined for the future.
In School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm) the School Board has struggled with
making the very much debilitated school system serve the increasing needs of a growing
school population, and, at the same time, with formulating plans for the rehabilitation
of the entire system. These plans involve the development of a central plant meeting
the needs of most of those requiring secondary education and of the development of a
number of smaller consolidations throughout the district, which, when the plan comes
to fruition, will replace a number of worn-out buildings and, at the same time, offer
the advantages of graded schools to a number of communities at reasonable transportation costs.
The acceptance by School Boards of salary scales comparable with the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation model has enabled the Board to keep schools open,
although the number of Temporary certificated teachers employed is disturbing.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 49 (OCEAN FALLS), No. 50 (QUEEN CHARLOTTE), No. 51 (PORTLAND CANAL), AND No. 52 (PRINCE
RUPERT).
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In the school-year 1946-47 there were seventy-three teachers employed by the
School Boards in Districts No. 49, No. 50, No. 51, and No. 52. Schools were established
at Namu and Alice Arm. The school at Inverness Cannery was closed. Except for
brief intervals, none of the schools or divisions was closed because of the lack of a
teacher.
School District No. 49 (Ocean Falls) has made a thorough study and drawn plans
to meet the educational needs of the area for the next several years. A new two-
teacher school at Namu, a four-teacher central school for the Bella Coola Valley, a
reconstruction of the Ocean Falls High School and an extension of the school plant to
provide space for kindergarten are among the items planned for the immediate future
in this area.
A major problem in School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte) and No. 51 (Portland Canal) has been to provide even the minimum needs of secondary education within
the area. The School Boards in each case have agreed to pay a portion of the board
costs for pupils attending superior or high schools within the school districts. The
result of this offer was shown in the increased enrolment in the superior schools at
Masset and Stewart, and made possible an additional member on each staff for the
following school-year.
The co-operation of the School Boards in Districts No. 49, No. 50, No. 51, and
No. 52 in establishing programmes that will develop adequate class-room libraries and
Supplementary Readers is much appreciated. In these districts, too, the willingness
of the Board members to give freely of their time and effort to improve educational
facilities is to be commended.
In the two regularly organized junior high schools in this area at Prince Rupert
and Ocean Falls the principals concerned were successful in effectively reducing the
amount of departmentalization in these grades. It was pleasing, indeed, to hear the
favourable  comment  of the  teachers  concerned,  who  recognized  the  advantage  in REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 89
knowing the pupils more thoroughly and in having a more definite responsibility in
the progress of their home-room pupils.
The establishment of the larger administrative units in these areas, which are
separated by formidable water barriers, has required a sympathetic understanding on
the part of the Board members to be effective. In some seasons of the year, because
of weather conditions, it is not possible to hold meetings, and in many instances it
requires two weeks to receive a letter by regular mail service. Nevertheless, by the
delegation of authority and the development of a mutual understanding of local
problems a satisfactory administration has been organized.
In conclusion may I express my thanks for the assistance given and the courtesies
shown to me by the members of the teaching staffs, the School Boards, and the
secretary-treasurers in Districts No. 49, No. 50, No. 51, and No. 52.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 6  (KOOTENAY LAKE), No. 7
(NELSON), AND No. 8  (SLOCAN).
REPORT OF F. A. JEWETT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
A beginning has been made in these districts to assist pupils in maintaining
themselves at high school centres. Much more in this direction can be done. The
school dormitory has an important place in making provision for those who live far out.
According to our school purposes, these children cannot be neglected.
The major need at the present time is the establishment of a high school at Salmo.
It is the one thing without which Salmo cannot prosper. It is essential to the stability
of the community. The Board in District No. 7 has been fully conscious of the need
and has acted accordingly. Let us trust in the sense of fairness of all concerned to
meet the need.
In these three districts, at the present time, opportunities are concentrated at
Nelson, Kaslo, and New Denver. To suppress or deny these opportunities to other
places in fair measure requires a policy of withholding, which is not in keeping with
the good and fair intent of the " Public Schools Act."
Following the reasonable requests in the interests of rural pupils for transportation
to high school centres, the three Boards have made commendable progress in extending
bus facilities. In the rural sections contiguous to Nelson, Salmo, Kaslo, and New
Denver contracts were made which brought high school opportunities to an increased
number of children. The shortage of available buses was a real handicap, but in spite
of that handicap the expressed needs of the people were met to the best of the Boards'
abilities.
Rightly, I believe, the Boards could see the impossibility of closing elementary
schools, and by means of the transportation of pupils, the establishment of consolidated
rural schools. Future possibilities along these lines are many, and pupil conveyance to
schools is an established part of the school services to be given.
This inspectorate comprises three school districts, namely, Kootenay Lake (No. 6),
Nelson (No. 7), and Slocan (No. 8).
The School Boards of these districts were, respectively, under the chairmanship
of Mr. William Tonquin, Mr. E. Hopwood, and Mrs. Emily Popoff. The succeeding
chairmen in 1947 were Mr. William Morton, Mr. E. Hopwood, and Mr. F. Broughton.
These chairmen have been ably assisted by the other members of the Boards, who
undertook their duties on the various committees with energy and dispatch. Y 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
In District No. 6 the secretary-treasurer appointed by the Board was Mr. R. D.
Gardner. In that capacity for Districts No. 7 and No. 8, Mr. N. S. Macleod was
appointed. The duties of these officials took on the nature of business managers, and
their work was distinguished by marked efficiency.
The Trustees of both urban and rural centres have shown a wide interest in school
affairs and have planned courageously. Their purpose was to bring full and fine
opportunities to all the children in the three districts.
In keeping with the ideas of Dr. Cameron, as set out in his report, equality in
opportunities was the desired goal. Against such a principle there can be nothing said.
It is right and democratic to a wide degree. It prepares for a better community in
which to live.
Improved opportunities are now needed for many sections of the country. The
present status is not good enough, and in the diversity of prevailing conditions the
privileges of the high school are too often lacking. Since responsibility in taxation is
gradually being levelled, any continuation of this state of affairs is greatly to be
deplored.   There is no place for unfairness in the planned control of education.
One of the weak spots in our school-life is the lack of training in Industrial Arts.
Too few places can meet the needs and interests of their boys and girls in this respect.
Nothing will go further than the introduction of industrial work in lifting school-life
to its proper level. It is a school subject that lightens the load in education and leads
on to industrial employment. It belongs now to all good schools and should be
introduced, I believe, as fast as teachers, shops, and equipment can be secured.
In taking leave of my work in this inspectorate I wish to speak of the teachers with
whom I have been associated. Their schools are more than buildings, grounds, and
equipment. In large part it is the teacher who turns the work, play, study, and
instruction to educative account.
The teacher is back of those mental and physical undertakings which culminate in
new knowledge, new undertakings, new powers, and new enjoyments. It is in the art
of the teacher to arouse ambitions, to effect co-operation, and to bring to light the
realities of good living.
It takes a teacher of quality to build up a school-life, at once physical, mental, and
spiritual. It is no ordinary person who can call out the very best in her pupils and can
put superiority into spontaneous action. These are the teachers who know hard work
but no drudgery, who deal in kindness but no ill will, who arouse or suppress but never
discourage nor embitter.
During these long years I have looked for such teachers and have found many.
I pay tribute to them. Their loyalty to their jobs and to their pupils has been excellent.
Their faith in the value of the subject-matter of their instruction has had a holding
power. Their outlook upon life has produced a brightness that has no part in dullness
and mediocrity.
I acknowledge with fraternal appreciation the assistance given me during part of
the year by Mr. J. Chell. It is a pleasure to know that he has now succeeded me as the
Inspector of Schools in that area. I wish him the greatest success in his work, and
I commend to him the whole school personnel.
I shall hold in grateful memory the people with whom I have been privileged to
work and shall continue to think in terms of good to all sections of that delightful
country. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 91
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 53  (TERRACE), No. 54  (SMITHERS),
No. 55  (BURNS LAKE), AND No. 56  (VANDERHOOF).
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Although the four large school districts of this inspectorate have been handicapped
by the current shortage of qualified teachers, the schools at Willowvale, Cheslatta,
Grassy Plains, Tatalrose, and Kitwanga were reopened during the year, and the schools
at Terrace, New Hazelton, Telkwa, and Fraser Lake were each increased by one teacher.
By December only one rural school remained closed for lack of a teacher.
A serious building problem exists in all four districts, and the Boards are taking
the necessary preliminary steps to solve this. The only by-law presented to the
ratepayers during the year was for the acquisition of three army buildings at Terrace,
and was ratified by a vote of 298 to 18. One of the buildings was put into use
immediately for two primary classes. The buildings will be completely remodelled for
school use.
There has been an extension of the practice of conveying children in order to
provide educational facilities over a greater area. In District No. 54 a bus was put into
operation to convey high school pupils from Telkwa to Smithers and to take certain
elementary pupils (not previously at school) to Smithers. The Evelyn School was
closed and pupils taken to Smithers. In District No. 55 children from Forestdale were
conveyed to the Omineca School, and children from the western part of the attendance
area were taken to Francois Lake. In District No. 56 pupils from the Tsinkut Creek
area, previously without school facilities, were taken to Vanderhoof.
An extensive testing programme was carried out. Intelligence tests were administered to all pupils in Grades II, IV, VI, VIII, and IX. A battery achievement test in
fundamentals was given in the fall to all pupils in Grades III, VI, VIII, and IX, and
a second form of the same test to the same grades in the spring. The results of these
tests were analysed for the use of teachers in developmental and remedial instruction.
Error studies were made and distributed.
Most of the schools in this inspectorate are of the small rural type. The Boards did
much to increase their equipment and to render them more attractive by redecorating
them.    Much remains to be done.
All four districts inaugurated new salary schedules during the year, substantially
increasing teachers' salaries. At Driftwood Creek and Barrett Lake, both in District
No. 54, new teacherages were constructed.
Health services were extended to include all of District No. 53, giving the same
nursing and medical inspection facilities to the outlying areas as were previously
enjoyed by Terrace alone.
The Boards of this pioneering region are coping with tremendous problems.
Among these the following loom large: The securing of qualified teachers; the
provision of new schools and the renovation of old ones; the provision of educational
facilities to small groups of children in isolated areas; the extension of opportunities
for secondary education to children who complete Grade VIII in the rural schools; the
broadening of the curriculum in their secondary schools to include subjects other than
those purely academic. These problems must be met within the practicable limits of
financial and geographic factors. Y 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1946-47.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 10  (ARROW LAKES)  AND No. 11   (TRAIL).
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
This inspectorate comprises School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) with fifteen
teachers and School District No. 11 (Trail) with 120 teachers. The former is defined
as a large rural school district and the latter as a large municipal school district.
The successful functioning of the larger school districts created by the implementation of the Cameron Report has in a very large measure been due to the fortunate choice
of School Trustees and secretary-treasurers. All have given willingly of their time to
ensure the success of the new educational set-up. Both Boards in this inspectorate
have given first consideration to increasing the educational opportunities of children
in the more isolated areas.
In an effort to provide the children of Inonoaklin Valley, Edgewood, Needles, and
Fauquier with facilities for education beyond Grade VIII, the Arrow Lakes School
Board purchased a school bus, making it possible to enrol a class of twelve Grade IX
students at Fauquier. As a result, permission has been obtained from the Department
of Education to have a superior school in the area, commencing September, 1947.
High school students of the Burton School Attendance Area have been transported to
the Arrow Park Superior School. Previous to this year there was no provision for
high school education in that area. The Mount Ingersoll School has been closed, and
its pupils are now transported to the Arrow Park School.
In the Trail School District all Fruitvale pupils in Grades VII to XIII, inclusive,
have been transported to the Trail Junior-Senior High School. This plan has not only
relieved the overcrowding in the Fruitvale School, but has provided those students with
the enriched educational programme possible in the Trail Junior-Senior High School.
The libraries of all schools in the inspectorate received special attention during the
year. Many valuable and greatly needed books were added for student reference in the
Social Studies, General Science, and Health. A good start has been made on a teachers'
professional library in each of the larger schools.
A testing programme was carried out in all schools for the purpose of diagnostic
and remedial work and for aiding the Guidance programme generally.
Mention should be made of the tour of Southern British Columbia by the Trail
High School Orchestra and Band. A total of eighty-five students, drawn from Grades
VII to XIII, embarked upon the trip. They played to over 20,000 people, including
student audiences of twelve school districts. Concerts given to schools were given free
of charge. It is felt that the trip did much to encourage the growth of music in the
Trail and other schools. It proved a gratifying experience to the students concerned,
in that they felt they were sharing with others of their own age an accomplishment
which had given them so much pleasure.
The greatly increased enrolment during the past five years has filled all available
class-room space and, in addition, necessitated finding temporary class-rooms in the
basements of existing schools, in church halls, and in community halls. The Trail
School Board and the Arrow Lakes School Board are making a careful study of their
building needs. By-laws for new schools are to be submitted during the next
school-year. A new one-room school at Big Sheep Creek was completed in October by
the Trail School Board. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. Y 93
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 37  (DELTA), No. 38  (RICHMOND),
AND No. 46  (SECHELT).
REPORT OF V. Z. MANNING, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
This inspectorate consists of the two municipal district