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FORTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1945

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 FORTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1st, 1943, TO MARCH 31ST, 1944
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Ciiakles P. Baneield, Printer to the King's Must Excellent Majesty.
1945.  To His Honour William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Fortieth Annual Eeport of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1944.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1943, to March 31st, 1944.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. S. PEARSON, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal. Christie, Hugh G., Acting Vice-Principal.
McLean, Miss W. P., Nurse-Matron. Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Goodlad, John I., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit herewith the fortieth annual report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys.
During the year ninety-seven boys were admitted, the average age being 14%
years. Thirty-five Juvenile Courts were represented; 50.5 per cent, of admissions
came from the lower mainland and coastal areas, 24.7 per cent, came from Vancouver
Island, and 23.7 per cent, came from the Interior.
The increased population has taxed our facilities to the limit and necessitated the
use of the auditorium for sleeping purposes. Plans for a temporary dormitory and
day-room are under way and when completed this will ease the overcrowding considerably.
From the annual report of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics covering the year
1943 it is noted that British Columbia is one of three Provinces showing an increase
in the number of juvenile delinquents brought before the Courts, there being a
3.6-per-cent. increase recorded. Figures for the Dominion, however, show a decrease
of 11.4 per cent, during 1943 as compared to the previous year.
From our records it is obvious that the large majority of our boys were victims
of neglect and broken homes. Not only were delinquent tendencies prevalent but the
general health of the lads sent to us was below par. The medical and dental reports
contained herein will be of interest in this regard.
The continued increase in numbers and the interest shown by the boys in the
academic and vocational classes have been most encouraging. This, together with the
recreational and group-work activity, has provided a well-balanced programme.
As in past years, we have enjoyed the utmost co-operation from the various
Government and private services and would take this opportunity of expressing our
thanks to all who have helped us in our work.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal. U 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1943, TO
MARCH 31st, 1944.
Number in school, April 1st, 1943     62
Number on parole, April 1st, 1943     89
Number on extended leave, April 1st, 1943       6
•   Number away without leave, April 1st, 1943       1
Number of new commitments during year     97
  255
Number of boys released      67
Number on parole, March 31st, 1944  110
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1944       1
  178
Number in school, March 31st, 1944     77
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1943, TO MARCH 31st, 1944.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
previous to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Edmonton, Alta  	
Years.
1
Life.
Life.
1
Life.
Life.
1
Life.
2 wks.
2 wks.
Life.
Life.
10 mos.
1
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
Life.
8
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1 mo.
Life.
Life.
8
15
8
9
Life.
Life.
1
Years.
Life.
1984
Life.
1985
Life.
1986
Scottish (both)   ..   _ 	
Canadian-American.— ■, .	
Canadian-Indian  	
Life.
1987
Life.
Life.
1989
Life.
Life.
Canadian German  	
Italian (both)	
Scottish-American  ..	
Life.
1992
Calgary, Alta -	
Life.
Life.
New Westminster, B.C  	
Life.
Life.
1996
Life.
Scottish (both)	
Life.
American (both)	
Life.
Scottish (both)	
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
2003
Scottish (both)	
Life.
Life
2005
2006
Sooke, B.C.   ,  - 	
Halfbreed-Unknown	
Halfbreed-Unknown	
Life.
12
Life.
2008
Hedley, B.C.                  	
Australian-Halfbreed	
Life.
Life.
2010
2011
Kelowna, B.C	
Ukrainian-Rumanian  _ _	
Scottish (both)	
Life.
Life.
2012
Life.
2013
Life.
2014
Vancouver, B.C. -	
Life.
Life
Calgary, Alta  	
Life
2018
Caderre, Sask	
Life.
Life
2020
Life.
2021
Swedish-French	
Life REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44.
U 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1943, TO MARCH 31ST,
Continued.
1944-
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
previous to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
2022
2023
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1
8
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
iy„
8   .
l
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
3
10
5
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
2
2
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
2
Life.
4
7
10
13
Life.
1
7
Life.
Years.
Life.
Chilliwack, B.C.
Life.
2024
Chilliwack, B.C           	
Life.
2025
Scottish (both)   	
Life.
2026
Life.
2027
2028
2029
2030
Fernie, B.C.             	
Life.
Scottish (both) _..	
12
Trail, B.C.          	
Italian (both)    	
Life.
Life.
2031    I Kino-come Tnlet. B.C.
Life.
2032
2033
2034
2035
2036
2037
2038
2039
2040
2041
2042
2043
2044
2045
2046
2047
2048
2049
2050
2051
2052
Burnaby, B.C.                                    	
Life.
Life.
Ocean Falls, B.C.
Irish (both)	
Life.
English (both) 	
Life.
English (both)	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Prince George, B.C  +	
Grand Forks, B.C  ,   ,	
Life.
Doukhobor (both) —  	
Life.
Life.
Scottish (both)	
Life.
Life.
Irish (both)	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Old Masset B.C.
Scottish (both)	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Regina, Sask   —	
Life.
Life.
Calgary, Alta	
Life.
Irish-Norwegian  	
Polish (both)   	
Life.
2056
2057
2058
2059
2060
2061
2062
2063
2064
2065
2066
2067
Life.
Trail, B.C.            -	
Welsh-Canadian   	
Life.
"Victoria, B.C    - 	
Life.
Ukrainian (both)  	
English (both)  	
Life.
Life.
English (both)	
Life.
English (both).....	
Life.
Polish (both)  .._ 	
Life.
Moose Jaw, Sask —  _	
English (both)   	
.Life.
15
Belgian-Canadian  	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
2070
2071
2072
2073
Polish (both)  	
16
Life.
Life.
Life.
English (both)	
10
13
2076
2077
2078
2079
Victoria, B.C    	
Life.
English (both) •.	
Life.
Victoria, B.C - -- -	
English (both)	
Life.
Life. U 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)       1
American-Irish      2
American-Scottish _..
American-Swedish ._..
Australian-Half breed
Belgian  (both)  	
Belgian-Canadian 	
___ 1
.._ 1
... 1
... 1
___ 1
Canadian  (both)    5
Canadian-American   3
_ 1
___ 1
... 1
___ 1
... 1
_. 1
.__ 1
Canadian-English  	
Canadian-German 	
Canadian-Indian 	
Chilian-Indian 	
Chinese  (both) 	
Danish-Swedish 	
Doukhobor (both) 	
English  (both)      9
English-Canadian      4
English-Irish      3
English-Scottish      2
German (both)      2
Halfbreed-Unknown      2
Indian  (both)       9
Irish (both) .
Irish-English
Irish-Norwegian      2
Irish-Scottish      1
Italian (both)   2
Jugoslavian (both)   1
Polish (both)   3
Russian (both)   1
Russian-English    1
Russian-Polish   1
Scottish   (both)    10
Scottish-American    1
Scottish-English   3
Scottish-Irish   3
Swedish-English   1
Swedish-French   2
Ukrainian (both)   1
Ukrainian-Rumanian   1
Welsh-Canadian   1
Unknown   5
Total.
97
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1941-42, 1942-43,  1943-44.
Birthplaces.             1941-42.
Alberta _ __          __      ____      4
1942-43.
9
44
1
1
3
3
1
7
1
1
1
1943-44
14
British Columbia
40
62
France            	
India   	
Manitoba   	
       1
3
North-west Territories	
Ontario 	
       1
    ...      1
Poland 	
1
Quebec 	
       1
2
Rumania 	
       1
Russia    -
1
Saskatchewan	
      7
10
Scotland      	
1
United States of America	
Unknown 	
       2
3
Totals
58
72
97 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44.
U 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Charges resulting in Commitment.
1941-42.
Theft     29
Breaking and entering        2
Breaking and entering and stealing      13
Retaining stolen property _
Wilful damage of property _
Arson 	
Assault 	
Indecent assault 	
Armed assault 	
Gross indecency	
Rape 	
Inflicting bodily harm	
Violation of probation	
Being unsatisfactory ward ..
Being a juvenile delinquent
Incorrigibility 	
2
1
1
1
Unlawfully carrying firearms i     _
Unlawfully stopping train        2
Infraction of " Railway Act "      __
Forgery 	
Attempted theft L
1942-43.
34
3
13
2
1
1
2
1
1943-44.
34
2
32
4
7
2
1
3
2
1
3
Unlawfully wearing Air Force uniform
Totals      58
72
97
Ages of Boys.
1941-42.      1942-43.      1943-44.
10 years     	
11 years  1
12 years  1
13 years  8
14 years .  7
15 years  14
16 years  15
17 years  12
18 years	
7
11
13
20
12
5
3
2
2
9
19
15
22
16
11
1
Totals
58
72
97
Length of Sentence.
Indefinite 	
" Juvenile Delinquents Act"
45 days 	
2 years 	
1941-42.     1942-43.     1943-44.
_ 44          72          96
. 13
- --          _.            1
. 1
Totals    . 58
72
97 U 10 - BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE
Abbotsford -      ...
STATISTICAL INFORMATION-
Places of Apprehension.
1941-42.
               1
-Continn
1942-43.
1
1
2
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
5
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
ed.
1943-44.
Alberni 	
Alert Bay .       	
2
2
Alexis Creek .   	
          1
Armstrong 	
Ashcroft
1
Bella Coola -
          1
Burnahy 	
Castlegar	
          1
10
1
Chase 	
Chilliwack 	
Clinton ._    -  . 	
       4
6
2
Cloverdale 	
Courtenay .
       2
2
Creston 	
Duncan    	
Enderby       -	
       1
       1
1
Fernie 	
Fort Fraser   „
     .—
2
1
Grand Forks
3
Haney 	
Hope 	
Kamloops   ..      	
.             ..      ...      ._        1
3
4
Kelowna 	
Kimberley 	
       2
2
Langley .    	
2
Lumby   	
1
Lytton  	
Masset 	
Mission 	
       2
1
Nakusp 	
Nanaimo 	
Nelson   	
          2
1
1
New Westminster
     ....      6
8
North Vancouver ..
     ... .   ....      2
1
Penticton 	
  __      2
1
Port Alberni  	
2
Pouce Coupe 	
Powell River	
    .....    ...               1
1
Prince George 	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton  	
Quesnel 	
       1
       1
1
1
Sechelt   	
Sidney 	
     ....
1
Sooke 	
2
Squamish 	
Smithers 	
       1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44. U 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1941-42.      1942-43.      1943-44.
Stuart Island   _ __ 2
Trail       12 2
Vancouver   13 19 11
Vanderhoof     1
Vernon        4 3 1
Victoria        6 5 13
West Summerland        1 1
Williams Lake     1
Yale   ____ 1 2
Totals  .  58 72 97
Religion. 1941-42.   1942-43.   1943-44.
Baptist       2 3
Buddhist        1
Christian Science 	
Church of England   14
Doukhobor   	
Evangelical   ....
Greek Catholic       1
Jewish   	
Lutheran        1
Mennonite   _..
Moravian   	
Plymouth Brethren 	
Presbyterian       5
Roman Catholic  21
Salvation Army   	
Seventh-day Adventist   	
Sikh   _
United       7
Non-denominational        6
Totals  58 72 97
Parental Relationships.
1941-42.
With both parents living  32
With both parents dead       2
With father living and mother dead       4
With mother living and father dead       3
With both parents living but separated       9
With foster parents  .—
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown.— 	
With father living and stepmother       4
With mother living and stepfather       4
Totals    58 72 97
	
1
16
18
	
1
	
1
2
	
1
	
1
1
....
1
1
	
1
1
6
3
24
28
1
1
	
2
1
6
17
9
22
42-43.
1943-44
40
46
4
7
3
5
5
7
13
23
	
1
	
1
2
3
5
4 U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1944, the teeth of all the boys were
carefully examined and record charts made. Very few of the boys had evidence of
regular dental care and most of them had very unhealthy mouths. The following
work was completed:—
Examinations   137
Hopelessly diseased teeth extracted     66
Local anaesthetic for relief of pain     53
Fillings inserted   217
Minor treatments for relief of pain       7
Prophylaxis     24
Treatment of gingivitis and pyorrhoea       9
Silver nitrate treatment to prevent decay     17
Devitalizing fractured tooth and filling       1
" As far as time would permit the most urgent cases were selected and the mouths
placed in healthy condition.
" I believe the services rendered will be of great benefit in assisting these boys to
become useful citizens. „ Emery j0NES) d.D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—In the last year there has been a noticeable increase in the amount of
medical care needed. The increase as shown by the following figures was no more
than could be expected with such a large increase in the school population.
No. of Cases.      No. of Days.
Tonsillectomy   15 53
Mastoidectomy   1 25
Pneumonia   3 18
Circumcision   1 7
Mild meningial infection   2 13
Herniotomy  .-. 2 47
Appendectomy   3 36
Diagnostic X-ray   2 2
Myringotomy   1 3
Otitis media   2 11
Possible appendix  1 2
Totals   33 217
" Besides those boys needing hospitalization the following cases were treated in
OUr OWn sick-rOOm :  No. of Cases.
Infectious jaundice  4
Stomach influenza   23
Measles  _.  6
Septic throat  9
Scabies   7
Lacerated scalp   4
Middle ear infection   11
Ringworm   10
Impetigo  4
Boils    10 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44. U 13
" Improved isolation facilities have greatly aided us in keeping these diseases from
reaching epidemic proportions. The use of the auditorium as an extra dormitory to
relieve the overcrowded sleeping accommodation will also be a help in controlling the
spread of infections.
" The amount of dental work necessary for the increased number of boys has
meant that a routine examination on admission is no longer possible. Emergency
work has become such a large factor that it is often six months before the boys can
have the initial examination. It is to be hoped that some day we will be able to get
back to more complete dental care. We realize, of course, that present-day conditions
make this an impossibility.
" Our doctor also finds it increasingly difficult to spend the amount of time attending the boys that he would consider desirable in normal times. His work is greatly
assisted by the co-operation received from the laboratory and X-ray departments of the
Provincial Mental Hospital.
" In spite of the difficulty in getting a variety and a sufficient quantity of fruits
and vegetables, a well-balanced diet has been maintained.
" The chest X-rays, taken of all the boys, have detected six old infections but no
active tuberculosis was reported. Blood Kahn reports have been negative except for
one positive report, which was diagnosed as congenital syphilis. This boy was given
regular weekly treatments at the Venereal Disease Clinic.
" During the course of the year specialists were called in for two cases of middle
ear infections and one mastoidectomy. Five boys had their eyes examined and the
prescribed glasses were supplied.
" Getting the boys to apply hygenic principles is definitely a problem and teaching
cleanliness is one of the main difficulties. Home training in a large number of cases is
lacking. As they are boys, it is even more difficult to educate them to the advantages
of soap and water. However, some progress can be seen after two or three months
and washing is done with less reluctance. Diet is the other main problem. A considerable amount of explaining is necessary to get the boys to eat all the foods that
are prepared for them. In spite of these problems, it is interesting to note that during
the boys' first month in the school the average gain in weight is 5 lb. This can
be attributed to sufficient sleep, adequate diet, well organized work and exercise programme, and a pleasant, healthful environment.
" Winifred McLean, R.N.,
Nurse-Matron." U 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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M   Ph   Q REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44. U 15
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—Altogether, during the year 1943-44, eighty-four boys attended regular
classes, an increase of eighteen over the previous year. Those on the roll as at
March 31st, 1944, were graded as follows:—
Special class  10
Grade II.      2
Grade III     2
Grade IV.      3
Grade V     7
Grade VI.     2
Grade VII.   10
Grade VIII 1 ,     9
Grade IX. (Correspondence)      1
Total   46
" It is gratifying to note that twelve of these forty-six boys were over fifteen,
the age when school attendance is no longer compulsory. The special class group of
only ten pupils does not represent the true picture. Since the average intelligence
quotient for those attending school was only 86 (a drop of two points from the previous
year), it is evident that most of the boys would ordinarily constitute special class
material. Pupils so classed above are only those whose wide range of ability in
individual subjects makes the placing of them in any one grade virtually impossible.
For example, one boy possessing only Grade V. ability in arithmetic works with the
Grade VIII. class in spelling. By means of this system, a boy who might ordinarily
struggle listlessly along year after year in a grade far below normal for the sake of
one or two fundamental weaknesses, experiences the satisfaction of working with boys
his own age at least a portion of the time while continuing to pursue his weaknesses at
the proper achievement level. Such a programme of individual instruction, while being
very beneficial to the pupil, places a heavy preparation and teaching burden upon
the teacher if class-rooms become at all crowded.
" The library continued in its popularity, books being available at almost any time
of the day so as to encourage constant usage. Although about fifty books were
received in the form of donations a great many more will be needed soon to replace
the many badly worn volumes.
" In June, 1943, the School Inspector approved the promotion of five of the
Grade VIII. boys to Grade IX. Some boys, committed late in the term, had missed so
much schooling that advancement was considered inadvisable.
" Following the commencement of the new term in September, the enrolment
increased so rapidly that the appointment of a second teacher became necessary.
In November Mrs. A. L. Arthur accepted the position on a temporary basis, teaching
mornings only. The fourteen boys in Grades I. to IV. were then shifted to the second
division. Nearly all of these were seriously retarded for their age, three of them,
although over thirteen years, being unable to read beyond the Grade I. primer.
" Early in 1944 conditions became so crowded that it was necessary for Mrs. Arthur
to teach the full day, half the time being spent with her original group and the
remainder with a remedial class made up of pupils from all other grades who needed
some form of special instruction and drill. By this means it was possible to coach
some boys up to a standard more closely approximating normal.
" The Inspector was well pleased with the attitude of the boys to their work,
their contributions to room decoration, the table model of Vancouver Harbour
assembled by the intermediate grades, the level of work achieved, and the high standard U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of penmanship evidenced by many.    He is anxious that a phonograph be provided for
use in the primary room.
" If really worth-while work is to be done with boys of this type, no teacher should
have charge of more than twenty pupils each day. Individualized instruction is
essential if the well-established attitude of antagonism is to be eliminated soon after
committal; if difficulties are to be discovered, diagnosed, and remedied during the short
period boys are with us; if a satisfactory standard of scholastic achievements is to be
attained; and if students are to be returned to normal school-life with a reasonable
assurance of satisfactory adjustment. Once interest has been aroused, the cornerstone to learning has been laid. Then, encouragement to break down the wall of
inertia built up through repeated failures, condemnations and lack of confidence, coupled
with a few words of praise for any task conscientiously performed, will transform
a potential truancy problem into a happy citizen of the school community.
" John I. Goodlad,
Teacher."
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—Work in the tailoring department during the year 1943-44 comprised
the following:—
Tailoring:  46 pairs tweed pants, 147 pairs denim pants, 179 pairs shorts.
Miscellaneous:  18 suits pressed, 92 pairs tweed pants pressed, 1 coat repaired.
Sewing:   70 pillow-covers, 73 sheets, 84 tea-towels, 112 bath-towels, 7 rubber
sheets, 23 aprons, 7 table-cloths.
" Shoe check was held regularly and repairs done to 241 pairs.
" In the classes this year six boys have  received instruction and training in
tailoring. "J. HENDERSON,
Tailor."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" SIR,—We continue to hold the interest of the boys enrolled in this department,
especially since a course of instruction in farm tractor operation has been added to
the training being given. As we have only one class period per week it is difficult to
accomplish as much theory and practical training as the boys could absorb.
" Automobile mechanics to-day hold a very important place, becoming a national
necessity due to lack of new cars being produced at the present time. Therefore,
I feel this course should continue as the present generation is more mechanically
inclined than ever. " j)  w. MUNRO,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Garden.
" Sir,—The results from this department have been very gratifying during the
past year. The purchase of a tractor has made our work much easier in working
the soil and weed-control, with the result that our production was greatly increased.
The tractor has been much appreciated and enjoyed by the boys and myself and has
stimulated interest in the work.
" It is very unfortunate that we were unable to procure any barnyard manure this
year, especially as it is an absolute necessity for our type of soil. We did manage to
overcome the lack in a small way by the planting last fall of winter wheat to plough
under this spring.
" Our greenhouse continues to produce a profusion of flowers, bedding plants, and
also vegetable plants for setting out. " D W Munro
Gardener." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1943-44.       U 17
Industrial Arts Department.
" Sir,—An attempt has been made this year to organize the industrial arts classes
on a more efficient basis. There were many special problems to face that do not
confront the ordinary school classes. Boys were starting and leaving the classes at
all times. This has now been changed and classes are regrouped periodically four or
five times a year.
" Each boy is now given a little booklet in which he himself keeps a record of
demonstrations given and work accomplished. By this means the Instructor is able
to give more individual instruction and there is no need for the quicker boys to wait
for those who do not get on so fast.
" There has been a large increase in attendance which has taxed the capacity and
facilities of the shop to the utmost. However, the boys are learning to overcome
difficulties and to make do with the materials that are available.
" While interest has been maintained in the correspondence courses, a number of
the boys leave before they have finished many papers. They are encouraged to carry
on with the work at home, but there is a great need for supervision and follow-up work
and advice after they leave school. Twenty-three boys received courses this year and
eighty-five papers were sent in. One boy finished his course in Automotive Engineering and received a certificate with A rating. He is now taking the advanced course
with as much success and is expected to complete it by the summer.
" J. B. Pattern,
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—In summing up the year's activities I find that they have been quite satisfactory, progress having been made in some phases of the work and interest having
been maintained throughout.
" The Junior Leaders' Corps, which was formed two years ago, has certainly
proved very satisfactory both to the Instructors in charge and to the boys in the school.
" The recreational programme is divided into three sections. The first, a select
group of junior boys, forms the Hobby Club. Their main interests are centred around
their club activities. A one-half acre Victory Garden of potatoes and corn was planted
and new 8-foot boats were built and old ones repaired, painted, and used at their campsite on the Coquitlam River. The early part of the winter programme was spent in
building a wood lathe and a jig-saw, which were used in making toys. The rest of
the winter programme was spent in work on aeroplane models, sailboats, and other
projects. Open discussion meetings were held in the club on Saturday nights and the
week's problems discussed in a friendly fashion.
" The second group, composed of the better senior boys, forms the Boat Club.
Their summer was spent in repairing and making seaworthy their 30-foot sailboat,
which is their main interest. Their sailing activity was climaxed by an overnight trip
in their boat and a hike up Seymour Mountain. In addition, the group worked on other
projects such as club-house repairs, work on another one-half acre Victory Garden, and
building activity of various types at their camping spot on the Coquitlam River. An
old Model T Ford, which was purchased with the idea of turning it into a tractor, kept
the mechanically minded boys busy while others worked on hobby projects in the club.
Physical training standards were kept at a high level in the gymnasium and tank and
many games of lacrosse, Softball, and soccer helped to round out their physical
programme.
" The third group, known as the Industrial or Beginners' Club, contains the
remainder of the boys in the school. The boys in this group undergo a routine training in gymnasium work, swimming, and diving exercises, and a thorough training and U 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
coaching in sports; their rules and sportsmanship fill out their physical programme.
Each member is expected to work hard until he reaches a physical achievement and
behaviour standard high enough to allow his movement into a better club with a more
varied programme.
" Arrangements for Softball, lacrosse, and basketball games were made with a
number of outside teams. The boys who took part in the games deserve credit for the
sportsmanship which was shown.
" Records were kept both as a personal help to the leader in evaluating his work
and as a tool in the treatment of the individual. These records were only as good as
the leaders who were responsible for keeping them up to date, with the result that
although they are a step in the right direction a great deal of work and study will be
necessary before they can be considered, as they should be, a very valuable aid in the
individual treatment necessary. Leadership training for the counsellors in charge of
this phase of programme was conducted through the use of panel discussions held
after the work-day, in which individual problems and work methods were discussed.
" Walter Shogan,
Instructor."
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1945.
390-145-4528  

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