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Enderby Press and Walker's Weekly Jun 27, 1912

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Enderby, B.^C,  June 27, 1912
AND       WALKER'S       WEEKLY
���������Vol. 5; No. .17; Whole No. 226 v.
Town and District News in Brief .
"   of People and Things Heard About
Mr. H. Greyell has i,aken over the
dairy business of Ij. Long.
Mr. and Mrs. Congreve of Sicamous
spent the week end in -Enderby.
Mrs. "A. Reeves is entertaining her
friend, Miss' C. Ireland, of Chicago.
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Harvey and
children are leaving for Victoria next
week, on a short visit.
J, S. Johnstone is building a 30x40
cement    block    residence   for Robert
- Matthews,  Salmon Arm.
>.> i
Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Richardson of
London, Eng., are the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. A. P. Crossman.
John H7 James, late -J Greenwood,
-is opening a photo studio in the old
' studio-building near the,bridge.-
- Mr. Williams is taking the place of-,
_ G.  G. 'Campbell    during ��������� the latters
- absence "on his ��������� honeymoon trip.
._-7;Mr.__and Mrs.-T-Sholtaz "are looking
over properties   in -.the Enderby dis-
- trict from the Southern Okanagan.
,.G. Maundrell is making delivery of
milk, left-_with him   by the.Glen Ger-
"Vgerrack dairy,""/~sincc'-" Mr.. McQuarrie >
discontinued    the    regular service in
Enderby..     ..' '.,
-Capt.".-Edwards -," lias sold his-:-Mara
property to Mr. Blurton, tht* original
' owner, and will-leave -or England in
July. .- * - - 7 * ;
/' Under the new Tax By-law, all city
taxes not paid on or before Dec. 31st
will, bear interest from that date until paid.    "       ' .
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. E. - Strickland
returned ".from their eastern trip on
.Tuesday.- Mrs.   Strickland  was much
- benefitted by the trip.
Dr. E." H.' Crawford 'will be at his
Enderby office on "Saturday, June 29,
for the day, and. again on Monday,
July 8th for a month or two.
=^Miss^Rho_des,___o_^W_enatchie,_7Wash.,;
is investigating land values in this
district: She was very much pleased
with the possibilities of Deer Park.
Mara citizens are giving $100 in
prizes for the racing events to be
held in Kelvin * Grove, to-morrow
afternoon,  June   28th.     A dance will
be given in the evening.
 Allan _ Marwood _arr]ycd_ from_ the
capitol city Tuesday morning, to
spend the summer in Enderby. Mr.
and Mrs. Geo. Bell and children will
come in Saturday morning.
Miss Hazel Stevens is spending her
vacation at home. Miss lone Holmes
who has been attending thc Seattle
University with Miss Stevens, accompanied her to Enderby to spend the
holidays.
Mr. Taylor and Mr. Fulton, of thc
School Board, left for Victoria on
Sunday to take up with the government the matter, of additional grant
for the proposed Enderby public
school building.
Dr. Margaret McKellar who has
been engaged in mission work in India for the past twenty-one years,
is expected to address the congregation in the Presbyterian church next
Sunday morning.
A. A. Faulkner, A. Mutcliffe and N.
H. Kenney attended the Grand Council meeting of the   Masonic order at
""the coast   last   week,   and   returned
from the meeting on Tuesday.
Yesterday was a big day. A June
wedding and a league baseball game
all in one afternoon. There w&f a
martial stride about it all. Our devil
says it was just as if the band was
playing "The Campbells are Coming"
Armstrong's celebration committee
are working hard to make the Dominion Day festivities the big event in
the history of Armstrong celebrations
and promise a splendid day of sports.
The lawn social to be given at the
Ruttan home by the Girl's Guild of
the Presbyterian church Friday evening promises to be' most enjoyable.
The Enderby band will be in attendance, i, '
' Mr. and Mrs. Frank, Prince are enjoying a visit from their parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Geo. H. Prince, of St.Paul,
accompanied by Miss Prince arid Miss
Bogart. Miss Prince will remain in
Enderby for* the summer.
���������V. Heber Brown and child, manager,,
of the Westminster^ . Trust Company;
spent the, week end. with-Mr. and Mrs.
Geo.    Brown.     Mr. , Brown",  was de-'
lighted .with "the district," particularly'
the beauty of. the river. -- ���������-/.  ,      . s-
Z, With this issue that excellent story
"One Way Out,"'will end. .Next week-'
a new story, will start,.,entitled ."The
���������Key to Yesterday."- Our;readers will
find^ - it . quite,*: ,as\-interesting .-as ��������� the
concluding story, has-been.'" '["   '-'"���������'"���������
'Mr. A. L. Fortune was .the ^ first/to
experiment with 'the growing of alfalfa in this district,' and* he. feels,, a
just pride in the splendid.acreage-of
this leguminous plant" now showing
on the Fortune meadows.-"The .fields'
never looked better, "and are cutting
three tons to the acre.   *  \"
The, Enderby. fo,otball " team will
play the Si wash team "on the recreation ground this (Thursday) evening.
The boys'are endeavoring to get together a winning team oi footballers,
and wish to see the general public
in attendance - at these games to encourage them in the sport.
It is not a difficult task to get rid
of cut-worms. This_7_remedy*-.is..sug_
open continuously from 9 a.m. till 6
p.m., and again in the evening from
7 till 9.
Notice has been sent to all property'
owners "by the City Clerk setting
forth the important features of the
new water rate' by-law. , They are
these: Any arrearage now standing
against- any service v-i now due and
payable, and should he paid on or
before 'the end of June. All rates
after July lst are'to be- charged up
to the owner of'the-property and are
payable every   six months.   The" ten-
���������y
ant will not hereafter be looked to
for any water rate, except that now
due. 7 Monthly payments will cease
from the. 1st of July.
Pretty June Wedding,Celebrated
Grey ell-Campbell. Nuptials
ENDERBY WINS AGAIN
"
1
2
3
4-
-5
6
7
8
9
Enderby:
Kelowna:
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
"1'
0
0
0
1
��������� 5
0
',0
2
2
7
'-6
gestcd by experts: Bran, 100 pounds,
Paris green, dry, 1 pound; sugar, 2
or three pounds. Mix thoroughly
and dampen slightly with water.
Scatter lightly over the ground where
the worms appear, but .where the
chickens cannot get it.
The Okanagan Saw Mills Company
was most fortunate this season in
getting "thc" annual"log"~driv'e���������down.
The sudden rise in the river ten days
or more ago cleaned the channels of
thc stream of all drift piles. As a
result Manager Stevens reports the
wills have twenty-seven million feet
of logs in the herding channels for
thc season's run.
An electrical storm of unusual
severity swept up the Valley Tuesday
night. Thc illumination was the
grandest ever seen here, great forks
of lightning striking tne hills on all
sides and standing zig-zag in the
darkness for several seconds. No
damage is reported from any quarter
as a result of the storm, but here
and there on the mountain tops were
noticed trees burning which had been
struck,
Don't forget to pay ycur city taxes
in time to obtain the discount. June
30th is the day officially named as
the last on which discount lean be allowed, but as that day falls this year
on a Sunday, and the next is a public holiday, you actually have until
July 2nd���������Tuesday next. On that
day, for the convenience of thc public
and in order that as many as possible may take advantage of the discount, the   City   Hall   will   be kept
'Enderby   and   Kelowna    came- to
gether again on the������diamond* yesterday "afternoon,  ,this"time on the -En'derby? field,,- and-" the /Enderby/boys
again came'out, on top, though in all
fairness to the. Kelowna _team it may
be 'confessed, it   was not -due to their
superior playing.    I The. Kelowna pitcher 7* Derr,-. is*-.one-"., of,-tlie?best-'all-,
round -players .in, the Valley, and-he
was,given better- support than Webb
of the home .team received.--Hoy, behind the'bat for'Kelowna, went up'in,
a balloon in. the 7th and'was responsible for fouriruns being, recorded by
Enderby. "He allowed Alack,and_-Webb
to score -on   pass    balls,-and threw
wide to -1st   after   dropping the ball
on   LaForge's   third   elrike.   In this'
inning Enderby scored f> of the 7 runs
made, and was shut out in six of the
eight ��������� innings   played.   From this it
will be seen   that   the Kelowna boys
are there with   the goods. \ And they
played a clean, gentlemanly game. It
just happened   that" chey  could not
handle the ball   in   the- passing rain
shower,    and   the   home team scored
on the errors of the visitors. ..In.the.
eighth for Kelowna, fhe Enderby
boys went up against the same conditions as to weather and allowed two
runs on errors. Otherwise, the game
was first-class. The earned runs were
really 3 for Enderby and 4 for the
visitors. Enderby was strongest at
bat, although Derr struck out 13 to
Webb's 10. The hits made off Derr
were 12, while off Webb only 10. ^In
the 1st inning Webb ritched only 5
balls. Three of these were hit and
fielded by. Webb and .he runners put
out at lst. But for tne passing rain
storm, this would have been a game
of the intensest interest. The teams
started out to play the game of the
season,  and the   weather looked fav-
Wednesday   afternoon'   in   the   St.
George's church, by the'Rev. Mr. Hilton,  Miss Gladys   Mary Greyell, the
only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Greyell, was   united   in marriage. (to
Mr. George Gordon Campbell,   of the
C.    P.    R.    station   staff,"   Enderby.
Shortly before 1.30, the hour for the
weeding, the church  .vas comfortably
filled by the'many friends of the popular' young couple." Aiter the simple,
but impressive, ceremony of the Episcopal church,   the   bridal   party repaired   to    the   home of .the bride's
parents,   and' there   in-the shade of
a canvass    bower   beneath the trees
a    bridal   dinner ��������� was   served. ' The
table was   daintily   laid amid richly
fruiting   cherry    trees  and profusely
flowering-rose -bushes^and" honey-suckle vines. -   -       7'   " ' 7  ' - "7
���������The   'bride - looked   most charmingT
seated at-the ,Ji'ead.of the long, table.
and "her bright --countenance "crowned,
.with; the brid'alv wreath" and" veil, sil-'
houetted-against "tlie ach foliage "of
the'flowering    vines surrounding'the
bridal table'.   -. .*.           -.,-'- /&\--J*-
"-VAfter' the bridal','dinner tlie friends
gathered   in   the'   home to view* the
many   handsome    gifts'* to .the~bride
and groom,    arid spent'-ythe afternoon
until train time in social intercourse.
"On" arriving   ;at v-the .'station" 'the
bridal-party found, the local band on
the ground to   play- them happily" on
their wedding trip.'* .They will spend
a week of two at Vancouver and Victoria,    and    upon   their    return will
take up their  .residence in the brick
cottage    recently-" purchased   by the
groom from "Mr. R. R. Gibbs, on the'
Salmon  Arm road.
Miss Greyell. had the honor to be
the first girl born * ancl feared in Enderby to be married here. Twenty
years ago Mr. and Mrs. Greyell drove
into Enderby   over   a very bad road
tea-spoons; Miss Sybil Salt, cut glass    ."
preserve jar; Miss Pearl Murray, ,silr7
ver_ sugar tongs; Miss Joyce Morkill,   , -
cut" glass    salt   shakers; Aunt' Alice',.   "
silver, berry   spoon;   '.'���������'Iiss Madeleine 7 *
George, - afternoon   embroidered    tea __ '
cloth;. Miss   Kate    'Stroulger;' glass , 7 -
berry- bowl and cake, dish; Miss Hazel   .-, ,
and Milton Stevens,' bronze repoussee   _
waiter;   *Miss   Cobb,' cut. glass _bowl;   "v
Miss Hope Aldih, Japanese cake'disb;   .' -
the Misses Mowat", eyelet embroidered .". /_
centrepiece; Ruby-Neve, napkin rings ]}/"���������
Mr. G.'Schmidt, cut glass berry bowl'  V'
Mr.*,. Hogg,      silver   salts;.'   Mr. -R.- 7 '���������;
Wheeler,     meat    carvers;  'Mr.*,' Fred 7'..
Moore,--Mission,  oak umbrella 'stand;'-'7
Mr.  Maurice'* Salt,  silver- egg. timer; //.-'--
Mr.- Rob't. "^Salt, -.���������silver-  batter dish 7. "-J-
'and' knife; ���������'Mr.   Gerald - Chubb, '.brass''/Z~.
fern bowl,-MrrR. Hadow,'gun metal*.::,'. Y
ink*.; stand; - Mr.' Leo - V'arley.^silver" ZJ"V
batter dish;,-- Mr... D'. Christie, silver ^
card',tra'y;*. Mrr "and Miss,Gibbs,3 meat -,* -ST^TS-j
carvers. ':-"������������������- -.   -'     --. -"'--'���������', '���������'"- ,-'^./^/-/fJyy\
CITY. OF ENDERBY. -"".'J^
it:../*- '.   "������������������-"/.'���������-.-t-    r/Zr
ife}y$
p'_.~"-i-rL<_-|
-- /.Tenders-for~Excavating���������;and^^-i,Z,y7vIMl
\ * -    ~-;-y.- - Backfilling.-' --,~rv -- -/ ~*-t r?
-."Tenders, are . hereby,:,invited.--for ;the:
*- :-. i
"from 7Sicamous. A year later a
daughter was born to 'hem, and this
daughter is now Mrs. 1   O. Campbell
Mr. Campbell Avas stationed at Enderby a year or two ago. He has
ever taken an active interest in all
movements and enterprises looking
to the advancement of Enderby. He
has won the confidence and esteem of
his .fellow__workersI- all-of- whom-will
be glad to wish him ancl his the richest blessings of a life full of service.
Following is a list of the ornamental and useful articles presented to
the bride: Bridegroom's gift, gold
watch; parents of bride, house linen;
Mr. L. Long, lounge; Mr. and Mrs.
Sutcliffe, Eiderdown quilt; Mr. and
Mrs. Aldin, drawing room lamp;
_.  ... Mr
orable to assist in making it,so, but j and Mrs. Taylor, landscape paintings
an  electrical  storm  broke  in uponit  "
streets:,- Plans and _ specifications, can *
be seen' at" the" City, Hall
-All   tenders'" must'^f be\enclosed;-,'in.
sealed    envelopes   marked ."-Tender,'_' -y
and must reach   the undersigned-not"y
later than "noon on .Thursday, thej4tti","._'
day of. July,71912. 'X -7 7::7 X7fXr
' .The ��������� lowest or any tender willTnbt"-, "-
necessarily be accepted.        -     " ,,.''-& *i
'-By order of the Council."    -"' -. '-���������> "i
I        GRAHAM ROSOMAN,  --' _*V_.,--'
../'-... City' Olerk.V." ���������:
City Hall,- June" 27th, 1912.
-'���������-?.���������.���������
'.- i.i'-'
LEAGUE   UMPIRES.
-j, Vernon, "June 15.���������Upon advice from'""
Mr. F.  T.  Jackson,   president ,of the'
Okanagan -Valley Baseball 'League, ,E-
iLa_v_e^appi_.int_xd__^the^ioUo_wing^officiaL:
staff of umpires:
1 Mr. F. T. Jackson, Armstrong. '    ���������
Mr. R. E. Berry, Vernon.
Mr. Fravel, sr., Enderby   .
Mr. James Pettigrew, Kelowna.
They have been instructed to rigid-
enforce all   rules,   and, good clean
lisp or t is
Eastman,
assured.
Secretary.
Yours truly, M.
ENDERBY TENNIS
���������UB NOTICE
Will members kindly note that Mr.
Christie has consented to attend to
any matters of importance during my
absence from town next month.
LEO  VARLEY,  Hon.   Sec.
ancl   8th innings    were
most unfavorable con-
and.the 7th
played under
ditions.
The winning of yesterday's game
puts Enderby 5 up and 0-down, while
all of the other Valley teams are
more than half down.
Yesterday's line-up:
Kelowna Enderby
Derr Pitcher Webb
Hoy Catcher Murphy
V. Fuller        lst Base Schmidt
Threadgiold     2nd Base Evans
Ives 3rd   Base        La Forge
Teskay Short Dill
W. Fuller Left Field      C. Fravel
Colvin Centre Field       D. Fravel
Kincaid Right Field Mack
Enderby turned, out well to seethe
game, and the 'baseball team had the
band engaged to enliven the proceedings'.
Rev. and Mrs. Hilton, mahiogony
work-table; Mr. and Mrs. G. Salt, silver fish servers; Mr. ancl Mrs. I-I. M.
Walker, crystal cream and sugar set;
Mr.  and   Mrs.    J.    Burnham,  wicker (Spallumcheen,
Mr.  Geo.   Brown   was a prominent-
bank president   in   the early days of
Winnipeg.   He now enjoys a home on
thc banks of   the   sleepy soft-flowing
having   ictirod   from
arm   chair;    Mr.    ancl   Mrs.    Nichol,   active  business.   Mr.   Rrown,   though
(England) afternoon tea spoons and
sugar tongs; Mr. ancl Mrs. G. Neve,
present to, come; Mr. ancl Mrs. Marris
cut glass stand; Mr. and Mrs. Hardy,
hammered brass jardiniere; Mr_ and
Mrs. C. Little, China sugar and
cream set; Mr. ancl Mrs. Harvey,
China tea cups and 'saucers; Mr. and
Mrs. Stroulger, cushion; Mr. and Mrs
Moffet, flour and cereals; Mr. and
Mrs. Pyman, silver souvenir tea
,spoons; Mr. and Mrs. G. Rosoman,
pearl-handled fish servers; Rev. and
Mrs. Baugh-Allan, cut glass trinket
jar; Mr. and Mrs. Lawson Stroulger,
glass set and cushion rover; Mr. and
Mrs. F. R. Prince, silver cold meat
fork; Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Lawes, Japanese inlaid tea tray; Mr. and Mrs.
W. George, feather pillows and "pillow
slips; Miss Hesther Moffet, sideboard
cloth and celery dish; Miss Lang,
vase;  Miss K.    Costerton,  afternoon
retired, often has some nice opportunities for investment offered. He
wanted to sell the editor of the Press
a timber concession for one hundred
and fifty thousand cash this week.
But the editor hasn't learned even to
roll a log yet, and had to turn his
back on the temptation. If wc could
have negotiated the deal with one
buck an'd a half we might have taken
a flyer, though we are not much of a
bird-man.
The league game played yesterday
between Vernon and-.Armstrong was
won by Vernon    by   a tcore of 12-G.
You    cannot   measure the proclivities of the ptg by the size of the poke ENDERBY PRESS AND  WALKER'S WEEKLY  ONE WA Y OUT  Bg WILLIAM CARLETON  Copyright, 1911 ���������������������������  [By Small, Maynard & Co., Inc.  CHAPTER  XVI1L���������������������������(Continued)  Maturing Plans  It was Rafferty who helped me turn  this   over   in   a   real   estate   deal   in  which he was interested.     I made six  hundred dollars by that.     Everything  Rafferty touched  now seemed  to turn  to  money.      One  reason  was  that  he  was   thrown   in   contact  with   moneymakers all  of whom were anxious  to  help him.     He received any number of  tips from those eager to win his favor.  Among the tips were many that were  legitimate   enough,   like   the   one   he  shared -with  me,  but there  were also  many  that were   not ���������������������������.quite so above-  board.      But  to  Dan   all   was   fair  in  business   and   politics.       Yet   1   don't  know a man I'd sooner trust upon his  honor   in   a   purely   personal   matter.  He   wouldn't   graft   from   his   friends,  however much he might from.the city.  In  fact,   his  whole  code  as  far  as   L  could   see  was   based   upon   this   unswerving   loyalty   to   his   friends   and  scrupulous   honesty     in   dealing   wilh  them.     lt was only when honesty became abstract that he couldn't see it.  You  could  put a  thousand  dollars  in  gold   in   his  keeping without  security  and come back twenty years later and  find it safe.     But he'd scheme a week  to frame up a deal to cheat the city  out of a hundred  dollars.      And he'd  do it with his  head in the air and a  grin  on his face.   J've seen  the same  thing done by educated men who knew  better.      I   wouldn't   trust   the   latter  with   a   ten   cent   piece   without   first  consulting a lawyer.  The money 1 had saved didn't represent all my capital. I had as my  chief asset the gang of men 1 had  drilled. Everything else being equal  .they stood ready to work for me in  preference to any other man in the  city. In fact their value as a machine depended on mc. If 1 had been  discharged and another man put in  my place the gang would have resolved itself again into merely one  hundred day laborers. Nor was this  my only other asset. I had established myself as a reliable man in the  eyes of a large group of business men.  cut loose ������������������with my men and leave  out Dan and his influence. He stood  ready "to back me not only financially  but personally. And he knew me well  enough to know this would not involve  anything but; a business obligation on  my" part.   - - "   _ -" .    ' '  -With these things in mind,- then, I  felt ready to take a radical departure  , from the routine of my life when the  opportunity came. But I made up my  mind I would wait for the opportunity.  I must have a chance which would-not  involve too much capital and in which  my chief asset would be the gang.  Furthermore, it must be a chance that  1 could use without resorting to pull.  Not only that but it must be something  on which I could prove myself to such  good advantage that other business  .would be sure to follow. I couldn't  cut loose with any men 'and leave  them stranded at tne end of a single  job. J  I watched every public proposal and  analyzed them all. _ I found that they  very quickly resolved themselves into  Dan's crowd. I kept my ears wfde  "open for private contracts, but by Lhe  time I heard of any 1 was too late.  So I waited for perhaps three months.  Then 1 saw in the daily paper what  seemed to me my opportunity. it  was an open bid for some park construction which was under the guard-  ���������������������������i pnehip���������������������������nf���������������������������n _ commission It���������������������������was_a.  grading job and so would require nothing but the simplest equipment, r  looked over Lhe ground and figured out  the gang's part in it first. Then I  wont to Raff erty and told him what  I wanted in the way of terms. J  wanted only the carts and horses���������������������������1  would put my own men to work with  them. 1 asked him tn Lake my note  for the cost.  ..."I'll. _tako..ypur .wnrd, _P -i r-J * 'j. on/"   M ??  said.      Thot's  enough."  But I insisted on the note. Me finally agreed and offered to secure for  me anything I wanted for the work.  I wont back to Ruth and we sat  down and liguiv-d the matter all over  oiu-e again. Wo stripped it down to  a figure so low that my chief profit  would came on tho time 1 could save  with my machine. 1 allowed for Lhc  scantiest profit on dirt and rock though  I had secured a gnod option on what  I needed of this. I was lucky in finding a short haul though 1 had had my  eye on this for some time. Of one  thing I was extremely careful���������������������������-to make  my estimate large onoimh so that 1  couldn't possibly lose anything but my  profit. Even ir I wasn't able to carry  out my hope of boing able to speed  up the gang I should be able lo pay  my bills and come out of the venture  "Von.  Ruth  and   I  worked  for a week  on  it and  when  I saw the grand total it  look away my breath.      I wasn't used  to dealing in big figures.     They frightened me.     I've learned since then that  it's a good  deal  easier  in some ways  to deal in thousands than it is in ones.  Vou    have   wider    margins,    for   one  thing.      But I must confess that now  1  was seared.      I  was ready  to  back  out.      When 1  turned to Ruth for the  final decision, she looked into my oyes  a second just as she did when I asked  her to marry me and said:  "Go after it,  Billy.    You  can do it."  That night I sent in my estimate endorsed   by   Dan   and   a   friend   of   his  and  for  a  month  I  waited.      1  didn't  sleep as well as usual, but Ruth didn't .seem to be bothered. Then one  night when I came home I found Ruth  at the outside door waiting for me. I  knew the-thing had been decided. She  came? up to me and put her hand on  my shoulder and patted me.  "It's  yours, Billy,"  she said.  My heart stopped beating for a moment and then it went on again beating a dozen ticks to the second.  The next day I closed up my options. I went to Corkery, gave my  notice and told him what I was going  to do. He was madder than a hornet. 1 listened to what he had to say  and went off without a word in reply.  He was so unreasonable that it didn't  seem worth it. That noon I rounded  up the men and told them frankly  that I was going to start in business for myself and needed a hundred men. I told them also that this  first job might last only four or five  weeks and that while 1 had nothing  definite in mind after that J was in  hopes to secure in the meanwhile  other contracts. 1 said this would  be largely up to them. I told them  that 1 didn't want a man to come who  wasn't willing to take the chance. Of  course it was something of a chance  because Corkery had been giving them  steady employment. - Still it wasn't  a very big chance, because there was  always work for such men.  I watched anxiously to see how they  would take it. I felt that the truth  of my theories were having their hardest tesL. When they let out a. cheer  and started towards me in a mass I  saw blurry.  1*11 never forget the' feeling 1 had  when I started out in the morning that  first day as an independent contractor;  I'll never forget my feeling as I reached Lhe work an hour ahead of my men  and waited for them to come straggling  up. I seemed closer than ever to my  ancestors. 1 felt as my great-greatgrandfather must have felt when he  cut loose from the '-Massachusetts col-  only and went off down into the unknown Connecticut. J was full enough  of confidence, but f knew that a month  might drive me back again. Deeper  than this trivial fear, however, there  was " something bigger���������������������������something  finer. 1 was a free man in a larger  way than I had ever been before. It  made me feel an American to.the very-  core of my marrow.  - The work was all staked out, but  before the men began" 1 called them  all together. 1 didn't make a. speech;  J just said:  "Men���������������������������I've  estimated   that- this  can  be done by an ordinary bunch of men  in , forty   days:   I've  banked   that  you  can do it in  thirty.      if you  succeed,  it gives me profit enough to take another contract.     Do the best you can."  There wasn't a mothers son among  them  who  didn't appreciate my position.      There were a good many who  knew Ruth and knew her through, what  she  had  done for  their  families,  and  I these  understood  it even better.    The  dirt began  to fly and it was a pretty  sight to watch.      I never spoke again  to  the men.  _  I  simply  directed  their  efforts.      I spent about half the time  with   a  shovel   in   my   hands   myself.  There was .scarcely a day when Ruth  didnt   come 'out   to   watch   the   work  with   an   anxious   eye,   but   after   the  first  week   there  was   little   need   for  anxiety.     I think she would have liked  to take a shovel herself.      One Saturday  Dick  came   out  and  actually  iu-  =sisted-=upon���������������������������being^a-llowed=to���������������������������do=this^  The men knew him  and  liked  to  see.  such spirit.  Woll, we clipped ten days from my  estimate, which left me with all my  bills paid and with a handsome profit.  Better still, I hud secured on the  strength of Carleton's gang another  contract.  Thc night I deposited my profit in  Lhe bank, Ruth quite unconsciously  took-her-pad and pencil and sat-down  by my side as usual to figure up the  household expenses for the week. We  had been a bit extravagant that week  because she had boon away from the  house a good deal. The total came  lo four dollars and sixty-seven cenLs.  When Ruth had finished 1 took the  pad -and pencil away from her and  put  it  in  my  pocket.  "There's no use bothering yonr head  any more over these details," I said.  .She looked at. me almost sadly.  Billy,"   she  said,   with   a   sigh,  isn'1, is there?"  off to Australia or somewhere,  didn't  you, Carleton?"  "I emigrated," I answered.  He,looked up eagerly.  "I remember now.     It seems to have  agreed with you."  "You're still with the leather firm?"  I inquired.  I-Ie almost started at this unexpected question.  "Yes," he answered.  His   eyes  turned  back   to   his   trim  little house, then to me as though he  feared I was bringing him bad news.  "But I've been laid up for six weeks,"  he faltered.  I knew what was troubling him. He  was wondering whether he would find  his job when he got back. Poor  devil! If he didn't, what would become of his trim little house? Grover  was older by five years than I had  been when the axe fell.  ��������������������������� I talked with him a few minutes.  There had been a death or two in the  neighborhood and fhe children had  grown up. That was the only change.  The sight of Grover made me uncomfortable, so I hurried about my business, eager to get home again.  God pity ihe poor? Bah! The poor  are all right if by poor you mean the  tenement dwellers. When you pray  "again pray God to pity Lhe middle-  class American on a salary. Pray that  be may riot lose his job; pray that if  he does it shall be when he is very  young; pray that he may find the  route to America. The tenement  dwellers are safe enough. Pray���������������������������and  pray hard���������������������������for the dwellers in the  trim  little houses of the suburbs.  I've had my ups and downs, and  profits ancl losses since 1 entered business for myself, but I've come out at  the end of each year well ahead of the  game. 1 never made again as much'-1  in so. short a time as 1 made on that  first job. One reason is that as soon  as I was solidly on my 'feet I started  a profit sharing scheme, dividing with  the men what was made on every job  over a certain per cent. Many of  the original gang have left and gone  into business for themselves of one  STt and another, but each one when  he went, picked a good man to take  his place and handed down to him the  spirit of the gang.  - Dick went through college and is  now in my office.- He's a hustler and  is.going to make a good business-man.  But thank God he has a heart in him  as well as brains. I-Ie hopes to make  "Carleton and Son" -a big firm some"  day, and���������������������������he will. If he does, every  man who faithfully and honestly  handles his shovel will be parf'Of thc  big firm. -His idea isn't to make  things easy for the men; it's to preserve the spirit they come over with  and give them a share of the success  due to that spirit.  We didn't move away from our dear,  true friends until the other boy came.  Then 1 bought two or three deserted  farms outside the city.���������������������������fifty-acres in  all. 1 bought them on time and at' a  bargain. I'm trying another, experiment here. I want to see if the pioneer spirit won't bring even these worn-  out acres to life. 1 find that some of  my foreign neighbors have made their  old farms pay even though, the good  Americans who left them nearly starved to death. J have some cows and  chickens and pigs and am using every  square foot of the soil for one purpose or another. We pretty nearly  get our living from  the farm now.  "Xo,  'there  CHAPTER  XIX.  Once  Again  a  New   Englander  During all those years we had never  seen or heard of any of our old neighbors.      They had  hardly  ever entered  our   thoughts   except   as    very   occasionally tho boy ran across one of his  former playmates.      Shortly after this,  however, business took rne out into the  old   neighborhood   and   I  was   curious  enough to make a few inquiries.   There  was no change.     My trim little house  stood just as it then stood and around  it   were   the  other  trim   little  houses.  There  were a  few  new  houses and a  few newcomers, but all the old-timers  wore still  there.      I met  Grover, .who  was just recovering from a long sickness.     He didn't recognize me at first.  I   was   tanned   and   had   filled   out   a  good deal.  "Why, yes." he said, after I had told  my   name.       "Let   me   see,   you   went  ==Avle^entenLain=JL=good^deal,=but==w.e-  dont entertain our new neighbors.  There isnt a week, summer or winter,  that 1 dont have one or more families  of Carlctons gang, out here for a half  holiday. It's the only way I can reconcile myself to having moved from  among them. Ruth keeps very closely  in touch with them all and has any  number of schemes to help them. Her  pel one just now is for us to raise  ' enough cows so that we can sell fresh  milk at cost to those families which  have  kiddies.  Dan comes out to sec us every now  and then. He's making ten dollars  to my one. He says he's going to be  mayor of the city some day. 1 told  him I'd do my best to prevent it.  That didn't seem to worry him.  "If ye was an Irishmon, now," he  said, "I'd be after sittin'- up nights in  foar of ye.      But ye ain't."  I'm almost done. This has been a  bard job for me. Ancl yot it's been  a pleasant, job. It's always pleasant  to talk about. Ruth. I found that  even by taking away her pad and  pencil 1 didn't accomplish much in the  way of making her less busy. Even  with three children to look after instead of one she does just as much  planning about the housework. And  wo dont have sirloin steaks even now.  We don't want them. Our daily fare  doesn't vary much from what it was  in the tenement.  .Ruth just came in.with Billy, Jr., in  her arms and read over these last few  paragraphs. She says she's glad I'm  getting through with this because she  doesn't know what I might tell about  next. But there's nothing moie to  tell about except that today, as at the  beginning. Ruth is the biggest thing  in my life. I can't wish any better  luck for those trying to fight their way  out: than they may find for a partner  half a.s good a wifo as Ruth. I wouldn't be afraid to start all over again  today  with  her by my side.  PARSON TURNED  PUBLICAN  An extraordinary career is ended by  the death of Rev. Samuel Thackeray,  M.A., LL.D., a clerk in holy orders,  who about six years ago shocked the  ecclesiastics by becoming "mine host  of the Fish and Eels," at_Hoddesdon,  Hertfordshire. "~^~1~  Before that time people had heard  of fighting parsons and walking parsons, but they had never heard of one  who stood behind a bar and served  out beer. *'  As a youth Mr. Thackeray went to  Cambridge, and became a wrangler, ln  1S72 he was headmaster of Dartford  Grammar School and curate of Bexley  Heath. Subsequently he was assistant chaplain at Tilbury Fort and held  curacies at St. Luke's, Victoria Docks,  All Saints, Newington, Christ Church,  Greenwich,  etc.  From 1S9S to 190G he was chaplain  of the Gordon Road Workhouse, Cam-  bcrwell, and it was while he occupied  that .-position that his application for  the license of the Fish and Eels Hotel  at Hoddcsdon brought him into notoriety. Thc inn adjoins the River Stort,  and in the summer large numbers of  "anglers go into the vicinity to fish���������������������������  and naturally adjourn to thc Fish and  Eels.  "1 can't provide1divine service there  ���������������������������my duties al the Workhouse will  prevent that, but I shall probably try a  few family prayers in the hotel," said  the clerical landlord after getting the  license. He seldom visited the workhouse, except on Sundays (though he  drew -$550 a year), and his idea was,to  leave a manager in charge' of the public-house on that day.  Bui though the magistrates raised  no objection to having a clergyman  as a, publican, the bishop of South-  wark and the Camberwell Guardians  objected strongly. When requested  by the guardians' to resign his chaplaincy, Mr. Thackeray declined, and at  tho guardians' desire the local government board issued an order removing  him from his office.  "I shall now," he said, "hold services in the inn on Sundays. I shall  be thc publican behind the bar, the  sinners will bc in.front of me, and  Christ. I hope, will .be in the midst  of us." _ He certainly did hold services, and sometimes on weekdays he  conducted prayer meetings.  Not only was Mr. Thackeray a brilliant mathematician, but an accomplished musician, being an associate,  of Trinity College, London. Pie claimed to have invented a new system of  music, and so certain was hc that it  would become popular that he-patented  it. Tt was called the Uniclef system,  from the fact that it reducel all music  into one key���������������������������C natural.  .Some time after becoming a publican  he obtained amusicand dancing-license, informing the magistrates when  he made the application that the students of his -new system of music  would " probably 'want <io give impromptu concerts. When asked if he  thought dancing was a proper recrea"-  tion, he replied he did, and pointed  out that it had biblical sanction.  A Christian Socialist, he was a member of the independent Labor party,  and a book of his. "The Land and the  Community," in which land nationalization was urged, ran into several editions.  Owing to ill-health, he resigned the  tenancy of the Fish and Eels in Juliet  1907, and afterwards held a curacy at  East Peckham, near Paddock Wood,  Kent.  legume to be sown has been grown  successfully and spreading it on the  land to be seeded, or, the seed may be  treated with artificially grown cultures  of the bacteria originally secured from  nodules on the roots of the same species  of .plant as is to be sown. These  cultures, with full directions for using them, may be obtained from Prof.  S. F. Edwards, Bacteriological Department, Ontario Agricultural College,  Guelph, and from other colleges as  well. In many cases inoculation of  the soil with the proper ��������������������������� bacteria has  given .very interesting and practical  results.  OIL MOTOR-DRIVE SHIPPING  Now upon her first voyage, the large  motor-driven ship, Selandia, bound  from London for Bangkok, Siam, is an  object of world-wide interest, especially to shipbuilders and mechanical engineers. She has a gross tonnage of  about 5,000, and is propelled by oil engines of the Diesel type, for which complete success has long been predicted  and now seems to be attained. In fact,  Dr. Rudolph Diesel,- of Munich, Germany, the inventor of'the oil engine,  said in a recent lecture before the Institute of Mechanical Engineers in  London, that ,the problem of using  liquid fuel in its simplest form  for power production had been  solved; that the oil engines were  simpler and more economical than  those using either steam ,or gas; that  -there is probably as much liquid fuel  as coal in the world, and that 40 per  cent, of the present output of mineral  oil was sufficient to operate engines  for all the naval and mercantile ships  now existing.  The great advantages claimed for  fuel oil in 'driving ships are cleanliness,  portability and economy, the latter  both in space and in methods of operation. Much loss room is required to  be reserved for fuel and fewer men are  needed to run the engines, it is assorted that thc Selandia' can be run  at the rate of 12 knots per hour using  10 tons of oil per day, but that a steamship of her size would burn 45 tons  of coal per day to do the-same work.  The oil is stored in tanks having a  total capacity of 1,000 tons, or ample'  for a long voyage.  Concerning the operation of this novel ship,- it is said in an engineering  publication that the engineroom is  spacious, cool and comfortable, ��������������������������� the ���������������������������  temperature being agreeable even when  the motors are going at full speed. The  only place where heat-is especially noticeable, is in the chamber through  which all the exhaust from the engines  passes, to be finally discharged through  the mizzenmast, which is hollow and  acts as an exhaust pipe. There is an -  almost complete absence of odor.-    '- ��������������������������� .  .The.--Selandia, was   built  at .Copenhagen, Denmark,  by Burgmeister-and "  Wain,   who  also-constructed   her  en-"  giiies.    She'is 370 feet long,and 53 feel  WOMEN AVIATORS. -  The first woman to fly in a heavier  than air machine was Madame Cherch  Peltier, a French sculptress. The flight  was accomplished in 190S, and she was  a passenger in a Voisin type "machine,  M. Delagrange acting as pilot. This  was in Turin, Italy. In 1909 Henry  Earnham.-carricd-.a.._woman..nassenaer.  aloft, and the occurrence was considered of sufficient importance to cable  around the world. Now seven countries are'able to boast at least one  licensed woman aviator. France has  three or four; America has but two.  Madame de la Roche, erroneously termed "Baroness," is entitled to thc distinction of being thc pioneer of Lhe  women flyers of the world. Madame  do la Roche began learning at the  lime when-it-wns most-extraordinary  for a woman to go aloft at all.  (The End)  ABSORPTION   OF   ATMOSPHERIC  NITROGEN  Thero i.s an important group of organisms in the soil wliich apparently have nothing to do with lhe breaking  down of organic matter. They have  the power of absorbing the nitrogen  of! Lhe atmosphere. Some of Lhese  can use the free nitrogen, provided  there is an ample supply of organic  matter of the right kind, and these  probably add sonic nitrogen to the arable land laid down to grass. But  the group we are most familiar with  are those which penetrate the rootlets of the young plants of Ihe leguminous family, peas, clover, alfalfa,  etc., and multiply there and form nodules on thc roots, when they become  active in taking nitrogen from the air  and storing it in the plant. The  legume plant cannot use the free gaseous nitrogen of the atmosphere unless its roots are infected with the nitrogen-accumulating bacteria, and obviously the roots cannot become-infested unless the proper bacteria are present in the soil. On old soils, or  where clovers or other legumes are  successfully grown in crop rotation,  these bacteria are usually present'. In  new soils, however, or where new  legume crops, as alfalfa, are grown on  old soils, the appropriate bacteria may  not be present, and some method of  inoculation should be adopted to supply  tbe bacteria. This may be clone by  taking  soil      from   a   field   where  the  -wide .and   has" a" capacity  about  four  times as  great as  the Vulcanus." anther motor ship that has been operated ���������������������������  about a year.   Her machinery consists  of two  sets  of  four-cycle Diesel  mo- '  tors,  each, with  eight cylinders 20.8x-  2S.7  inches,  affording a total of 2,506  indicated   horsepower   at   140   revolutions  per  minute.5  Their  general  appearance is that of marine steam engines.   While   she   is   mainly   a.  cargo  vessel,   the   Selandia   has   cabins, for'  about   twenty   passengers,   the   rooms  being arranged in suites with baths.  This unique ocean-going ship,' which  may be the pioneer of a large fleet of .  oil-motor driven craft, is. owned by the  East Asiatic Company that is having  tho Jutlandia,  a  sister  ship,   built  at  .the yards  of Barclay,  Curie, and  Co..  on the Clyde in Scotland, and another,  the Flonia, at Copenhagen.   Burmeis- -  ter  and  Wain  are also  said  to  have  orders from the same company .for two'  ..ore vessels  like the Selandia,  but a  little larger, besides two strictly freight  boats,  all  to  be equipped with Diesel  ~ongiriesf=Th"c'se~libera^  motor  ships   would   seem   to   indicate  that their utility is adequately demonstrated, certainly to the satisfaction of*  the East Asiatic Company.   It may not  be   risking  too   much   to   venture   an  opinion  that   more  and   more   motor  ships  will   be  constructed   for  use  in  waters at whose ports fuel oil is easily  and   cheaply   obtainable,   just   aa   oil-  burning   locomotives   are   freely   built  for._use in_.ccrtain_parls of .this .country...  where pelroleum is plentiful.  if* I  t  m  I  - HI  71  RED  KID  BOOTS WITH  WHITE  SUITS  A new fashion note, apropos of the  popularity of white goods this spring  and summer, was noted in the factory  of a maker of women's high grade  shoes, where we saw a large number  of red kid button boots being prepared  for shipment.  Upon inquiry we learned that these  red kid boots were intended for wear  with white suits and gowns at fashionable country and seashore resorts  as a change from white footwear, it  being evident to milady of fashion that  she must have footwear that will take  her out of the ordinary humdrum of  fashion. Her white suit or gown will  havo a touch of red trimming to complete the combination of a. white dress  and red boots.  Red is, by the way, a very important  item among relieving colors and in  bright shades such as geranium and  cardinal flashes in discreet touches  upon even  the conservative frocks.  Rice paper is not made from rice,  but is derived from the white pith of  a tree of a genus represented in this  country by the spikenard.  Mother���������������������������That's some of my son's  work.     He's quite wedded to art.  Jones (thinking aloud)--Ah, another  of those unsuitable marriages!  138 ������������������������������������������������������if-"WW .������������������.������������������*<*' **W  ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S WEEKLY  /#  PILES CURED!  I  I  Writing from Poplar, B.C., Mrs. 0.  Hanson, proprietress of the Commercial Hotel, Bays: ���������������������������' I suffered for years  with bleeding piles. Tlie pain w.'ia so  bad at times that I could hardly wall:,  and ordinary remedies seemed utterly  unablo to give mo any ease. "Finally  I decided to undergo nn operation,  and wciifc to the Saci ed Heart Hospital  in Spokane. There they performed an  operation. For a time I was certainly  better, but within twelve months the  piles became as painful as ever. I  tried liniments, hot poultices, various  'pil-j cures,'and indeed everything I  could think would be likely to do any  good, but still I continued to Buffer,  and the shooting, burning, stinging  pains, tho clull, aching, 'worn-out'  feeling that the disease causes continued as bad as ever.  , "One-day'I read about Zam-Buk  and thought I would try it. The first  one or two boxes gave me mora ease  than anything elso J had tried, so I  went on with the treatment. In a  short time I began to feel altogether  different and better. Well, I went on  using Zam-Buk, and by the time I had  u^ed six bbies I waa delighted to find  myself entirely cured. That was three  years ago, and there has'been no  return of the trouble."  , Zam-Buk is a sura curs for piles,  eczema, ulcers, abscesses, eruptions,  chapped bands, varicose sores, burns,  scalds, Jbruiaes, inflamed patches., and  all skin injuries and diseases... .Druggists and stores everywhere, 50c. box,  or Zam-Buk Co., Toronto, for prica.  Father (at end of lecture to son who  has {been "sent down")���������������������������Nothing, ab-'  solutely. nothing to show,for all the  money I've, spent!     ���������������������������-,     .    ,  - .'Daughter���������������������������How- can "you,   "father,  when you know they- say that all. the  bloods copy his socks and waistcoats!���������������������������  -���������������������������'���������������������������-.*.**-  -.-.Ethel���������������������������Jack   says   I. grow   prettier  every.- day._ \ -  \ Kate���������������������������What ra" fright "you must." have  been at-the start.      -. -   ���������������������������- "  . , ,,      . '     *    *    *        -     '   -  "Sorry youcouldn't attend our ban-  t.uet last'night, doctor. If would have  done you good."  "Thank you! it has done me good. I  have just prescribed for three of, the  guests." . .   '  When Your Eyes Need Care  Try Murine Eye Remedy. No Smarting���������������������������Feels  Fine���������������������������Acts Quickly. Try it for Red, Weak,  Watery Eyes and Granulated Eyelids. Illustrated . Book in each Package. Murine is  compounded by our Oculists���������������������������not a "Patent Medicine"��������������������������� but used in successful Physicians' I'rac-  lico for many yean. Now dedicated to tho Public nnd sold by Druggists at 25c and 60c per Bottle.  Murine Kyo Salve in Aseptic Tubes, 2nc and 60c.  Murine Eye Remedy Co., Chicago  The Worth of a Good  Chauffeur  Well, Well!  THIS isa HOME DYE  that ANYONE  can use  This is the time of year when calls  for chauffeurs are beginning to appear in the "help wanted���������������������������male" columns of the newspapers, the approach  of spring bringing to mind the unsurpassed pleasure of touring in a good  automobile in charge of a competent  driver. As the chauffeur looking for a  place scans these columns, however,  he frequently utters expressions of  disgust, especially if he is a good one,  and generally you will find that his ire  has been aroused by an "ad." calling  for a man to drive and make repairs  on a car, wash windows, keep the.lawn  trimmed, and do a dozen or more odd  jobs, all for fifteen dollars a week.  it is a strange idea of economy,that  prompts a man who has bought a high-  priced car to hire a cheap man to run  it, but such men are not rare, and they  never learn until too late that their  economy has been of the false variety.  However, if you study garage bills  and scan the daily papers in which are  recounted, with all the terrible details,  the accidents that are,, due to irresponsible, ."joy-riding" chauffeurs, you  will readily see that there can be no  saving by employing a cheap man. Of  course it is not impossible to get a  man for fifteen dollars a week who will  drive a car and perhaps do the housework if he is willing, and he may be  able to operate the car satisfactorily  under ordinary conditions and get  along without any serious trouble in  the way of accidents or breakdowns.  So far-as the owner of the car is able  to discover, his cheap man has done  as well as could be expected; but let  "an export examine the car at the end  of the season and he will soon point  out - that the cheap man' has been a  vf3ry expensive man, after all. He will  show that the motor is badly racked  on account of the ignorance of the  driver in motor construction and operation, one of the most common faults  of such chauffeurs being that of racing the engine. .. .  In' the matter of tire -expense the  cheap chauffeur again shines, for no"  doubt he thinks he is a clever driver  if he'can race up to the stopping-place,  jam' the brakes on, and bring up with  a jerk where his passenger wishes to  alight. He has.not the least idea that  he- is shortening the life of the tires  every .time he does "this, and probably  his employer- cannot understand why  his tire bill so largo, but' blamua 'the  manufacturer for turning out ah inferior product. "7'   ,."        "    ;'   " ' *���������������������������   ._  Then, Jf-the cheap man encounters  a breakdown, the car must-go to the  repair.shop, .and its .charges are not  light..- If-'he~knew his''business the  chances are that he could .prevent the  trouble and in most'cases make the repairs without" sending, the car to the  shop. -The engineer t can , detect an  '.'out" in his engine by simply listening  to<,the-working* of the-machinery; in  the same,way the chauffeur who knows  his machine can do the same, and by  going liver the mechanism at frequent  intervals he will pick out'and remedy,  a" fault before it.attains serious, proportions. He will not be careless about  the ('poling system and burn out a  cylinder as a result, neither will he  neglect the lubrication.-   '-'     -'  Here is a little'example of the value  of a good chauffeur from the experience of an automobile owner who has  two cars���������������������������a touring car for summer  and a limousine "for cold weather. He  pays his chauffeur, who.,is of' course  a skilled chauffeur, considerably more  than twice fifteen dollars a week and  finds' that he is really saving money.  He has had both cars three years, and  in all that time they have never been  sent away for repairs, his chauffeur  making all'of them. Just before each  season in which the cars are to be used  _the.__jc.ha uffeur��������������������������� overhauls them_.com-  est repairs made at the garage, is at  an expense of about fifteen cents a  mile for maintenance. A man with a  mechanical bent, who can make ordinary repairs and keep his car in his own  garage, gets out of it for about ten  cents a mile. The skilled chauffeur,  who not only drives his car with care  but also makes all repairs, operates it  for' about five cents a mile. By putting the -chauffeur into one of these  classes you can see what he is costing  and that in the end the high-priced  chauffeur is  the better economy.  Besides the ability of the chauffeur  to keep his car in repair, there is another thing even more important���������������������������reliability. At the present time, when  so many young men, some of them  mere boys, are drawn to automobile  driving by the attractiveness of the  work and the comparative ease with  which automobile driving is learned,  all sorts are taking up the work. Many  of them are irresponsible fellows who  have had little or no opportunity of  acquiring mental balance; as a result  we frequently read of, the chauffeur  who races the train to the railroad-  crossing with fatal results. His mental unfitness usually appears when he  is thrown upon'his own judgment," as  is frequently the "case if he is driving a  party of women. Can anything be  more shocking than the repeated failures to beat the train?  The high-priced chauffeur is usually  a man of more mature years and judgment, so the employer feels perfectly  confident that -his women folks can  venture out safely in the car even if  'he is "'not along.- This chauffeur does  not take a chance anywhere, nor does  he entertain his friends with "Joy  rides" when the''car is supposed to be  in the garage. He is getting a good  wage and appreciates it. It is so good  that he is willing to perform his work  to,the best of his ability, that he may  continue to hold his place. _   -  ir// I dyed ALL these  ^DIFFERENT KINDS  of Goods  with the SAME Dye.  I used  DYOLA  INE DYE'  CLEAN and SIMPLE to Use.  NO chance of using thc WRONG Dye forthc Goods  one has to color. Al I colors from yonr Druggist or  Dealer. FREE Color Card and STORY Booklet lt,  The Johnson-Richardson Co,, Limited, Montreal,  ^mmmjRSsW.  PainfrJ.Ki., ed,Swollen Velns.MHk  Iieg,niuiui������������������i- *, OldSores, Ulcers.   It  is healing, sod:I ng, strengthening and in-  viRorafclng ��������������������������� uilii 's pain and Intlammatiou  promptly. Goiiii ciaound antiseptic.  Mrs. K. M. Hon lcr, It. D. No. 1, Fedora!,  Kan., had cnlaruiil veins that finally broko  causing considerable) loss of blood.  Used ABSORBING, JR. and reported  Nov. 6, 11)10. veins entirely healed,  _ 'swelling and discoloration gono and  has bad no troublo with them slnco July 1U09.  AUSOUlilNH.JB. Is invaluable as a general household liniment, ior the cutij and bruises that tho children eot__croup, dcop-scatcd colds, stiff-neck, soro-  throat. jBcmoves tatty bunches, Koltre, enlarged  glands, wens, cysts, weeping sinows, etc. 11.00 and  |2.00porbottloat(lruggistBordcHvcred. Book8Gfree.  W. r. YOVNG. P.D.F���������������������������!10 LyinansBtdg., Montreal. Can.  Also furnished bT Martin, Bole k Wynne  Go., Winnipeg; the National Drag k Ohwnieal  Co., Winnipeg and Calgary, and Hendaraan  Brog. Oo., Ltd., Vaneewfer.  pletely, thus keeping- them-in the best  ,possible condition. Before hc undertook this work he went to a public  garage and inquired how much they  would charge to overhaul ihe limousine. The price was $3 95. Hc then  went to the factory where thc car was  made to learn the price for the same  work and was informed that it would  cost $225. The chauffeur thought both  prices excessive, so hc does the work  himsell'-now.    This is where thc saving comes in  for the man who pays his chauffeur  what is considered high wages. If  he kept the cars in a public garage, thc  amount he pays his chauffeur weekly  would not go very far. The average  charge at a public garage for housing,  washing, and thc other care is thirty-  iiv<_ ddii'is a month for .i limousiiT.-,  twenty-five dollars a month for a touring car, and twenty dollars a month for  a runabout. Then there must be added  to this the repair bills, which arc frequent if the owner drives his own. car  or has a cheap chauffeur.  Wil'-iout thc slighturc d**,ubt these  two cars would not-be in as good condition at the end of three years if a  cheap man was caring' i'or them, so  so that it would be necessary to replace them with new ones; and the  higher the price of the car when new  the greater the loss when it is turned  in or sold at second-hand. This high-  priced chauffeur knew his business  from start to finish, as be had learned  it in an automobile factory where he  made good wages. He cou.d not have  been secured as a chauffeur unless the  wage was at least equal to what he  was getting in the factory.  Another way of getting at thc saving of expenses by tho high-priced  chauffeur as compared with the cheap  ono is this: Men experienced in the  automobile business figure it out that  a man who drives his own car, keeps  it in a public garage, and knows nothing about the machine, so that it is  necessary for him to have the slight-  RATE  FOR  RADIUM  An- international commission composed of scientific men to whose work  the most important discoveries in  radioactivity are due, met "recently in  Mme. Curie's laboratory to confer on  the definite adoption of an alternation:  al standard ot"radium. '"  - The creation of this standard was  determined upon by the Radiological  and Electrical.Congress at Brussels"in  1910, when the following commission  was' named to "consider the question:  Germany, Profs. , I-Iahn J and Geitel;  Eng]and,-Profs.-;Rutherford_andTSoddy;  Austria-Hungary, .vProfs. -Meyer'.and  Sweidler; - United States and Canada,'  Profs. Boltwood" and.'Eve;- JFrance,  Mme. Curie and Prof."Debierne.   "���������������������������.   ���������������������������  The' commission ���������������������������' requested", 'MmeT  Curie - to'undertake, the7task of pref  paring*���������������������������;' the* infernationaf' standard,  which she completed'in. August'last,  using chloride .of pure radium, .prepared and specially purified by-.herself.  Thc standard isr established.by"'a small  tube of thin glass about three millimeters���������������������������a little , more than one-t8ntb  of an inch���������������������������in diameter and three centimeters���������������������������over.- one .inch���������������������������in length  which contains - a carefully weigher  amount of chloride of "pure radium���������������������������  about two centigrams, or seven-tenths  of an ounce. The tube is, sealed and  a small platinum wire runs into tht  glass to give electric communication  between the interior of the tube-and  the exterior to carry off any electric  sparks which the radium rays might  produce and which might possibly  break the tube. ._  This little tube of radium, which will  bc used as the international standard,  will probably be* placed in the International Bureau of Weights and Meas-  uWsf^^SCToTTdffry^stalndM-'ds^^vjll^he"  prepared in various scientific or official  laboratories and their amount of radium will be established by comparison  with the international standard, by  determining thc intensity of the rays  which   have   traversed   several   milli-  WIFE OF THE P.M.  TALKS TO WOMEN  TELLS    WHAT    DODD'S-   KIDNEY  PILLS DID FOR  HER  She Suffered for Two Years and Found  a   Cure   for   all   Her   Troubles   in   a  Single Box.  Lower Caraquet, Gloucester, N. 13.  (Special).���������������������������Mrs. Jos. O. Chiasson, wife  of the police magistrate here, who for  two years has been practically an invalid, is again in the best of health,  and she is telling her friends how  quick and complete was her cure when  she took Dodd's Kidney Pills.  "My illness," Mrs. Chiasson says,  "was caused by a strain, and for two  years 1 was a sufferer. My back ached, I was always tired and nervous,  there were dark circles under my eyes  and after sleeping I had a bitter taste  in my mouth.  "I had a pressure and sharp pain on  the top of my head, I was always  thirsty and my skin had a harsh, dry  feeling. I was often dizzy, I perspired  easily and my perspiration had an unpleasant odor.  "Almost from the first dose Dodd's  Kidney Pills helped ine and by the time  I had finished the first box I was a  well woman."  Mrs. Chiasson's symptoms showed  that the trouble was her kidneys.  That's why Dodd's Kidney Pills cured  her so quickly.  meters of lead, the rays so used being, the gamma rays. Various secondary standards will be measured by  the members of the commission ,at  their approaching meeting.  The radium salts used for preparing  the international standard have been  taken from a small supply of radium  which belongs to Mme. Curie, and is  not only used by her in her personal  researches, but is also placed at the  service of those who work in her laboratory. The members of the commission have decided to ask their governments to reimburse Mme. Curie for  thc value of the radium employed in  preparing the standard.  The need for a radium standard has  been felt for some time by scientific  workers in radioactivity. Owing to  the difficulties of purifying radium important differences, exist between the  tubes which are used in different laboratories as standards. In addition to  this purely scientific interest, there is  a commercial and industrial demand  for a standard.  Radium is the most costly matter  sold commercially. Its present price is  400,000 francs for a gramme of bromide, or over $2,250,000 an ounce avoirdupois, and fhe price is'likely to increase. Up to^the present time it has  been difficult for buyers and manufacturers to agree on the real quantity  of radium contained in the article sold.  When the international standard is officially adopted commercial products  will naturally be compared with this  standard. "   .   .  Most of the radium manufactured is  employed'by doctors and they naturally will'be glad of a'means to compare the quantity of radium they use  with a fixed standard.  Among other decisions taken by the  International Commission on,Radium  was the adoption of a particular unit  for measuring the amount of radium  emanation, the radioactive gas, the.life  of which is essentially ephemeral and  which is continually being produced by  radium. It is to this emanation that  the curative properties of c_ertain mineral waters are attributed.  The unit adopted was the quantity  of emanation in equilibrium with a  gramme of radium. This unit received  the name of a curie. A secondary  unit, a thousand times smaller, corresponding to a milligram of radium,  was named a millicurie.    ���������������������������  Expected Death  From Day to Day  ANOTHER     CASE     WHERE      LIFE  WAS SAVED AND HEALTH  RESTORED BY NERVILINE  SJiihh'sGuiv  QTAAC AAiinUC HEALS THE LUNGS  3TOP6 GOUGHS _>XIC������������������. 25 CfiNTS  We have all read and heard of the  agonies of sciatica, but only those who  have been tortured by this dread malady can fully appreciate what it must  mean to be cured after years of suffering.  It is because he feels it his solemn  duty to tell to the world his faith in  Nerviline that Victor P. Hires makes  the following declaration. "For three  years I was in the Royal Mail service,  and in all kinds of weather had to  meet the night trains. Dampness, cold,  and exposure brought on sciatica that  affected my left side. Sometimes an  attack would come on that made me  powerless to work. I was so nearly  a complete cripple that I had to give  up my job. I was in despair, completely cast down, because the money  I had spent on trying to get well was  wasted. <-! was speaking to my chemist one day, and he recommended 'Nerviline.' ' I had this good liniment rubbed on several times a day, and got  relief: I continued this treatment four"  months, and was cured. I have used .  all kinds of liniments, and can-truth--  fully say that Nerviline is far stronger, more penetrating and infinitely bet-'  ter than anything else 'for relieving  pain. r I -urge everyone with lumbago,  neuralgia, rheumatism, or sciatica, to  use Nerviline. I know it-will cure  them." " . /'  Get   Nerviline   to-day,   large   family;  size, 50c;-trial size, 25c; all dealers or  The   Catarrhozone   Co.,   Buffalo,   N.Y\  and Kingston, Canada.  The. Oracle  of the  Sergeants'  Mess,  (after   much   heated    discussion)���������������������������Ah  donn't  caer. whutt  ye  say .it's  no''-a'  gentlemanly   thing   furr   a   gentleman  tae pit strobbery jaam on anither gen-  ri-  tleman's haer!        '- - '* . . -V  -*'.**. -,.' ?��������������������������� ���������������������������  ��������������������������� '. -,  "I've spent all my money,-my .race-. J  horse is lame, my wife has !elop'ed "with    \  my-jockey. .'What more can-happen,'  I wonder?;'     '     ���������������������������'     ',-,     .,-���������������������������.,.   -7'.���������������������������.  - "Your wife can come back." ��������������������������� _. ... '���������������������������'��������������������������� ,,  7. *    V * .    -r .'."'.. -,;.  J Gibbs���������������������������And" so-your wife gets along.  onccomparatively little, does.,she?- , ,7t\. .  , Dibbs���������������������������Yes���������������������������that  is,   on*, little, com]-' ,7:  pared with what *she* thinks she' ought, y  to have. ������������������T      ' *-., ",i~,   '  '"i'/'y  z'*y,  ^ - .^ i  Far.  \ s--y"Z  -.: . ��������������������������� ^ J; ���������������������������  r-'rvp.-  r\ IQTC Hil DC D Pi>kE?������������������, Epbiotic, shippiij  UIO I CilVir^tl\ Fevtr ind CaUrrkil F������������������T������������������v  _- Siirc _curo,and positive rpreventive,"; no niatter' how 'horses~������������������.ai '/'y Z/y-^X  any.,age are infected, or "..'exposed." Liquid,-giyea on'tlie tongue;.,'.* Z~/i'fZ,fk"iI  acts on .the Blood and .Glands,_ expels" the ^poisonous 'geriiis;.from'7_45i*t'''t>Sg|  the -body.    , Cures Distemper'- iifDogs" -and Sheep and .Cholera*- in i/igjyZr'&iil  Poultry. '. Largest gelling, live-stock '.remedy. *? Cures  La-'Gripp;  among human beings, and'is a-'fine Kidney remedy.._50c .and, $1  bottle; $C"and $11 a "dozen.-.Cut'this out. Keep it.-'Show to'your_s\j-_,-r^r^|  druggist, who will get"'if for you"--Free .Booklet," "Distemper,-;,",-' .'.J."i'r������������������^l  Causes.and*Cures." .  ���������������������������  /  ���������������������������'Z  , -���������������������������',   x>. -���������������������������:'"' ������������������������������������������������������ a ��������������������������� -, * .*-������������������ _ -���������������������������*-���������������������������,--" ~.^:-:"'J>?^"i_l  DISTRIBUTORS���������������������������ALL-WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.,       ,���������������������������,.-,__  . SPOHN:MED|CAL;C0., Chemists and;Bacteriologists,'GOSHEN. IND/; }i.���������������������������*���������������������������?*������������������':$%! ,f?  'J',.;--/.!  ,y. -yr y;i\t  HIDES, PELTS & TAUtOW  Highest market ,prices paid.  ��������������������������� ...  Present Prices���������������������������10 cents and 11 cents for salted hides.-  382  Nairn   Avenue  Winnipeg Tanning Co.  w  -     T  f. ,#wv r:?.  "-T- _.J~  v i<x f; ������������������������������������  .Winnipeg,. Mari.^  01 L S  OF ALL KINDS AT  WHOLESALE PRICES  '   *  -Write for .Catalogue and Prices' To-day '-.  DIAMOND  OIL COMPANY,   Fortune  Block, 23������������������ Main St.  .      WINNIPEG",   MAN.   ' "   " Reference:  Dominion Bank   -  WHEAT, BARLEY  OATS, FLAX  ' Owing to so much unfavorable weather,.many farmers over Western  Canada have gathered at least part of their crop touched by frost or  otherwise water damaged. HoweVer, through the large shortage in  corn, oats, barley, fodder, potatoes and vegetables, by the unusual heat  and drought of last summer in the United States, Eastern Canada and  Western Europe, there is going to be a steady demand at good prices  for all the grain Western Canada has raised, no matter what its quality  may be. "���������������������������  So much variety in Quality makes it impossible for those lees experienced to judge the full value that should be obtained for such praln,  therefore the farmer never stood more in meed of the services of the  experienced and reliable grain commission man to act for him. In the  looking  after  selling  of  his   grain,   than he does thi sseason.  Farmers, you will therefore do well for yourselves not to accept  street or track prices, but to ship your grain by carload direct to Fort  William or Port Arthur, to be handled by us in a way that will get  for you all there is in it. We make liberal advances when desired, on  receipt of shipping bills for cars shipped. We never buy your grain on  our own account, but act as your agents in selling it to the best advantage for your account, and we do so on a fixed commission of lc. per  bushel. ��������������������������� "^  We have made a specialty of this work for many years, and are  well known over Western Canada for our experience in the grain trade,  reliability, careful attention to our customers' interests, and promptness  in makng settlements.  We invite farmers who have not yet employed us to write to us for  shipping instructions and market information, and In regard to our  standing in the Winnipeg Grain Trade, and our financial position, we  beg to refer you to the Union Bank of Canada, and any of ita branches,  also   to   the  commercial  agencies   of Bradstreets and R. G. Dun K- Co.  THOMPSON SONS & CO.  GRAIN COMMISSION MERCHANTS  703 Y Grain Exchange Winnipeg  138 THE ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S WEEKLY  Thursday, June 27, 1912  The warm weather will be  little felt if you keep even-  tempered and think right.  Talcum Powder  on the toilet table along  with a packet of  Ease 5Em   .  for the feet will be wonderfully conducive to cool  feelings when the weather  in hottest.     Keep Sweet.  A. REEVES  Drug-gist & Stationer  Cliff St. . Eidcrby  SECRET SOCIETIES  ENDERBY PRESS  Published  every   Thursday at  Ender.by, B.C. at  $2 per year, by the Walker Press.  Advertising Rates; Transient, 50c an inch firBt  insertion, 25c each subsequent insertion. Contract advertising.. $1 an inoh per month.  Lcnnl Notices: 12i_ a line first insertion; Sc a line  each subsequent insertion.  Reading Notices and Locals: 15c a lin*.  JUNE 27.  1912  A. SUTCLIFFE  W. US,  A.F.&A.M.  Enderby Lodsre No. iO  Regular meetings first  Thursday o*i or after the  full moon at S p. m. ha Oddfellows HaU. Visiting  brethren cordially invited.  F. H.  BARNES  Secretary  I. 0.0. F.  ������������������/  Eureka Lodge, No. SO  Meets every Tuesday  evening at 8 o'clock, in I. O.  0. F. hall. Metcalf blcc't.    Visiting brothers always    welcome. J. C. METCALF. N. G.  R.E.WHEELER. Sec'y.  .1. K. GAYLORD. Treas.  ENDERBY   LODGE  No. 35. K. of P.  ���������������������������w.f^a *������������������   ^-^    Meets every Monday evening  <!&&'&������������������&      in K- of V- IInl1-   Visitors cor-  xS^J-135*-*'      dially invited to attend.  FRED. F. MOORE. C.C.  C.E.STRICKLAND. K.R.S.  R. J. COLTART. U.F. ���������������������������  Hall suitable fo Concerts, Dances and all public  . ontortaininLnts. . For rates, etc., address,  JAS. MOWAT. Bell Blk. Enderby '  PROFESSIONAL  v  DW. CHAPMAN  "****   *        [Organist at St. George's Church]  Visits or receives pupils for Piano, Organ, Violin,  Singing and Theory of Music, Etc. ���������������������������  Address, P. O. Box 2A, Enderby.  .-T-RUIT  CROP  If we read the   signs correctly,  we  are to    see   the   strongest fight ever  put up by the fruit growers of B. C.  to break the fruit   combine that has  been  operating in  the Northwest for  the past    two   or   three- : ears.   The  markets have    been in control of the  American   shippers    union,    ancl   the  fruit growers of   B. 0. have been at  the mercy of the combine.   This year  every" promise is given that the fruit  men of British Columbia will clo more  than play second-fiddle to the American   shippers'    union.   The  C.  P.  R.  has made a ve.y   material reduction  in- all freight rates on fruit, and this  ' railroad    is    making    every effort -to  'expeditiously   handle the crop,  which  j is certain to be a record-breaker. The  :B.0C.  fruit Union   is   determined to  ;get into the   Northwest   on a better  | basis than that of a year ago.     If it  | is found to be   necessary,  the B.  C.  ' shippers' union will open retail stores  in all of   the   cities   where the fruit  market is con trolled, by the American  fruit    combine,   and   will   put B.  C.  fruit into the hands of the buyers at  a price which will break the combine.  This can.be   doneo this season.   It  would-have been impossible last year.  Never have we had'..uch a fruit-crop  as is now promised, ..nd certainly tho  'facilities for handling have never been  so .well organized.   ���������������������������  apple crop. Since there is no one  now acting, The Walker Press will  take upon itself the collecting of estimates from the producers of the district with the object of interesting  one or more of the; Armstrong exchanges in putting a man in Enderby to attend to that end of the business for them. A letter containing  this information from any farmer in  thc district will be appreciated���������������������������if  the writer is prepared to deliver the  goods when called upon.  Attention is called to the probable  surplus of fruit in this neighborhood.  Other sections are now making arrangements for thc packing and sale  of their fruits. Anyone intending to  take advantage of the movement now  in progress will find it to their advantage to act promptly. Write the  name and give the probable quantity  of summer ancl winter Iruit they will  have for sale, so .-that arrangements  may be made for the obtaining of  boxes and the services of a competent  packer. Applications must be in by  the 11th of July to be of service.  Bank of Montreal  ��������������������������� Established   817  CAPITAL   all   paid ' up, . $15,413,000.   REST, $15,000,330.89  Hou. President, Rt. Hon. Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal Gr. C. M-. Q.  President, R. B. Angus, Esq.   Vice-President, Sir Edward Clouston, Bart.  General Manager, H.V.Meredith  BRANCHES IN LONDON, ENG., NEW YORK an'd CHICAGO.  SAVINGS   BANK   DEPARTMENT  Deposits received from $1 upwards, and interest allowed at current rates.  Interest credited 30th  June and 31st December.  ENDERBY BRANCH A.  E.  Taylor,  Manager  MINING IN THE SLOCAN  COMBINATION WORK  W  ALTER ROBINSON  NOTARY public  CONVEYANCER  Agreements of Sale.   Deeds & Mortgages.   Documents Witnessed.    LoariH Negotiated  Oflioe: Poison & Robinson,  next  door Fulton's  west, Enderby, B. C.  TjINDERBY . COTTAGE .HOSPITAL  MISS WARWICK, Proprietress  Maternity Fees, $20 per week  Fees covering ordinary illncBs, $2 per day.  Hospital Tickets, half yearly and  yearly,  SI per  month. ENDERBY. IS. C.  &r  L. WILLIAMS  Dominion and  Provincial Land Surveyor  Bell Block       Enderby, B.C.  D  R. H. W. KEITH,  Oflice hours:   Forenoon,  f) to 10:30  Afternoon, 3 to A  Evening, G:30 to 7:30  Sunday, by appointment  .Office: Cor. Cliff and Ouw-KtiSts  ENDEUHY  POLITICAL  XPNDERBY   CONSERVATIVE  -^ ASSOCIATION  J. L. RUTTAN,       A. F. CROSSMAN  President. Secretary.  BLANCHARD & ENGLISH  Enderby, B.C.  Contractors & Builders  First-cla'is Cabinet Work and   Picture Framing.  Undertaking Parlors in connection.  Next to City Hall.  . In a visit to Armstrong last week  we could not fail to notice the great  preparations   being   made    there   to  j handle this season's crop of fruit and  field produce.   The    McNair exchange  building has been    enlarged  to  more  than double the   size of last season,  and   is   substantially   constnu-ted   of  brick.     A new   building, as large as  the McNair building is being erected  by Mr.   Jackson's   excn.inge, a:i :  another warehouse,   as large as ei'.rcr,  is underway by the Kelowna Farmers  Exchange.      There   will    not-be ?.ny  d fficulty    for    the   farmers oi  A nr-  strong to    dispose    of "|,-ieir produce.  These firms of   shippers are well and  TaToWiflF^kTnrwTi", uncHirav^r^oiTt^cT  Never since the first location was  made have mining prospects looked  so bright in the Slocan as at the  present time. This is due to the  deep-level developments of the past  three years. It is believed that the  tunnels now being run on the Star,  the Payne and the Idaho will prove  as satisfactory as the development on  the Whitewater, the Bambler-Carri-  boo, the Lucky Jim, the Van-Roi and  the Standard. It is not alone in  this belt that claims are showing up  well, but throughout the whole Slocan district. .At Ten Mile and in the  vicinity of Slocan results from recent development nave been more  than satisfactory.���������������������������Slogan Record.  up  1 -1 ���������������������������      Victor Gramophones and Victrolas  Disc Records  Perforated Music Rolls, from 15c  For all Player' Pianos V  Always in stock  Leave your order with us for Edison or Disc Records, if we haven't  what you want in stock.       See and hear the -Gourlay-Angelus  Piano.  Ai.ent also for Church and Parlor Organs  Also Fire and Life Insurance  Office in brick block opp. The Walker Press.  J. E. CRANE,  Enderby Agent  SCOUT ORDERS  The lst Enderby Troop of Boy  Scouts. A Church' Parade, will be  held on . Sunday, July 14th, at St.  George's church. The Beaver, Buffalo ancl Tiger Patrols' will "assemble  at the school house at 10:30 a. m.  punctually, without staves or water  bottles.     By order, '     ��������������������������� ,, - .  M. F. HILTON, Scoutmaster  tions in the Northwest that will take  care of the entire output of the c.is-  trict, at good prices.  We could not fail to contrast the  conditions prevailing ui Ai-instn.nj;  on this particular point with ilm conditions prevailing at Un "ic/by. Ihe  producers of Armstrong _...vc ;.l;iee  extensive - exchanges -- to - handle ihe  output of that district, whereas the  farmers of Enderby have not one.  We do not wish to anlarjcc '. *���������������������������.���������������������������,) on ilns  fact. It is not to the credit either  of Enderby or thc farm-..\s uf thc district. Our lands are is 'f.-rtile arc!  the climatic conditions are twZite as  favorable here as at -Vrmstroug, Li.t  the fact remains that wc haven't, 'he  produce to warrant any private individual establishing a produce exchange here. When we have produce  it will not be a difficult thing to find  a market for it, and there will be exchanges established here to handle .t.  With the developments of the past  year or two, it will not be long until  such a state of affairs ,vill exist here.  In thc meantime, it .vill be necessary  for our people who have fruit and  farm produce for sale, to get in  touch with one of these Armstrong  exchanges and thus find a ready market for their output, provided, of  course, they have not made other arrangements. We understand such an  arrangement can be made, and there  will probably be an expert packer  stationed here    to   handle all of the  HAS RECORD FOR GROWING HAIR  Machela, Nature's Scalp Tonic, will  do it in 95 cases out of 100. It is the  only remedy ever discovered that is  similar to the natural ��������������������������� hair foods or  liquids of the scalp. Removes dandruff, "prevents falling4 of the hair and  all other diseases of the scalp. Each  package contains a packet of Machela  Dry Shampoo Powder. Price for complete home treatment, $1.00. Sold  and guaranteed by A. Reeves.  Are YOU going to do any  building this Spring ?  WE HAyE A FEW SPECIALTIES  WHILE THEY LAST-  Cull boards, $5.00 per thousand.  No. 2 Dimension, $12.00 per thousand.  Some cheap Flooring, Ceiling and Drop Siding, $10.00 thousand  No. 3 Cedar Bevel Siding, $10.00 thousand.  Also some short Moulding* at a reduced price.  Get in early on some of the above bargains.  OKANAGAN SAW MILLS, Ltd. Enderby  ' 'Enderby is a charming villiage with eity. airs.  When Paddy Murphy shqok "the snow of Sandon  off his feet he came here, and now owns one of  finest brick hotels in the country. . Although  Paddy is an Irishman from Michigan, he calls nis  hotel the King Edward. In addition to the excellence of the meals, breakfast is served up to 10  o'clock, which is an added attraction for tourists.;"  (Extract from Lowery's Ledpe.)  Me of  le  The Champion Clydesdale Stallion  WILL TRAVEL  AS  FOLLOWS:  ==Monday"=imorning=^eave=:=home^for  Salmon- Arm, arriving same night,  and stopping till vVednesday noon.  Wednesday night at Baylor's Ranch,  Deep Creek, till Thursday noon, and  returning home Thursday night-  Terms: $25 to insure; season, $15.  Special terms on two or more  mares.  -SPECIAL-NOTICE���������������������������Pasture-your  mares at Hazelmere Ranch. Mares  sent for breeding will be pastured free  during the season, and receive every  reasonable care.  R.   WADDELL,  Hazelmere Ranch,  Grindrod, B.C.  B. BRUNDISH  Enderby, B. C.  I have purchased the old Farmers' Exchange building, on the  railway, and am placing in  stock a full line of  Bricks, Lime, Hard Wall  Plaster and Cement  Estimates furnished on all kinds  of Cement, Brick and Plaster  Work.  Enderby  Poo! and  r  THREE regular Pool Tables  ONE full-sized Billiard Table  Opp. Walker Press Office  King Edward Hotel,  P. H. MURPHY  Proprietor  Enderby  Deer Park Fruit Land  ENDERBY  NoJrrigation^Required.  These lands are situated on the benches near Enderby and are especially suited for Fruit and Vegetables, and, having been in crop, are ln splendid condition for planting.  An experienced fruit grower is in charge and will give instruction to  purchasers free of charge, or orchar. will be planted and cared for at a  moderate charge.  160 acres, sub-divided into 20-acre lots ..<��������������������������� now on the market at ������������������175  per acre.  Get in on the first block and make money on the advance.  Apply to���������������������������  GEORGE PACKHAM,   Deer Park Land Oflice, Enderby.  JAMES MOWAT  Fire, Life, Accident Insurance  Agencies  REAL ESTATE  Fru it Land Hay Land  Town Loti  The Liverpool & London & Globe Ins. Co.  The Phoenix Insurance Co. of London.  Lindon-Lancaihire Fire Insurance Co.  Royal InsuranceCo.,of Liverpool (Lifedept  The London & Lancashire Su ir.ia l j;  Accident Co., of Canada.  BELL BLOCK,   ENDERBY  Fred. H. Barnes  BUILDER &  CONTRACTOR  .  Plans and estimates  furnished  Dealer in Windows, Doors, Turnings and all factory work.  Rubberoid Roofiing, Screen  Doors and Windows. Glass cut  to any size.  We represent S. C. Smith Co,, of  Vernon. Enderby.  IF YOU WANT TO OWN  Pocket  Knife  BUY A CARBO MAGNETIC KNIFE  For Sale by  THE ENDERBY TRADING CO /.  Thursday, June 27, 1912  THE ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S WEEKLY  B. C. Fruit Men Believe They Can  Knock the American Fruit Combine  "We will have a three million dollar apple crop this year, and we will  give the people of Calgary this product at half the price they paid for  their apples last year.  This statement was made to the  Calgary Herald a few days ago by  Joseph Harwood, a shareholder in  the Vernon Fruit Company. Mr  Harwood had no hesitancy in stating  that the consumers of Calgary were  at the mercy of a combine so far as  fruit was concerned. "Why, our  fruit was rotting in the Okanagan  Valley when you people were paying  an-exorbitant price for all you consumed," he declared. . But now we  have a fair freight rate we can ship  in our stuff in refrigerator cars, and  give'the prairise- the finest fruit in  the world at a reasonable price. All"  we want is a fair price and we can  get that and sell the fruit in Calgary  at undreamt ,of prices. In the Okanagan this year there will be a five-  million dollar fruit crop.  "Last year B. C. fruit did not get  25 per cent, of the Calgary market.  This year we intend to secure our legitimate proportion of the trade, if  we have to create our own retail  stores here to handle fruit and vegetables. The reduced freight rates  which are now in effect are almost 70  per cent under the rates of last year.  Then we paid $3.50 per 100 pounds  from Okanagan points to Calgary.  This year the rate i.s $1.32 per 100  pounds. Express companies have  made reductions corresponding with  those of -the railroads. These rates  place our fruits in reach of this market, and it will be delivered and sold  here at, prices never before approached. All our growers need is a  square deal against the American  combine that now controls the Calgary market. We expect to get it,  and if we don't you can look to the  establishment of our own stores here.  This great reduction 'n rates should  certainly result in breaking the backbone of the combine, and in giving  to consumers good fruit at a reasonable rate."     ^  1  i  CANCER AND THE KNIFE  Dr. Bell, of   Mayfair,-Eng.,  is uri-  . orthodox   in,  his   belief and practice  regarding   the   treatment    of cancer.  ' He believes cancer is the result of too  much meat eating.and that the'pro-  _  per treatment   of _ the    disease is "by  diet and , medicine..  The  "orthodox"  y      -   treatment of   cancer is by the knife.  Dr. E. F.    Bassford',   of   the British  Medical Association,    believes ia the  ti_ ,    .efficacy of the knife,   and disbelieves  ,   in all other forms of treatment.   He  .has even gone   so   far as, to  charge  "   ' - Dr.^Bell.bf quackery,'because Dr. Bell  .. -     refused to'confine his practice to the  ~-'.' accepted methods" of theJBritish Medi-  . -  '   cal Association. 4 Dr. >-3ell believes* in  '-"   -~    .abstaining'   entirely   :rom meat, and  F-7-&.. r .eating* fruit; and  vegetables together  '���������������������������'..;   *  with cheese," eggs_ and" niilk.   This .he  *f -   - believes,-   should* constitute thei'prin-  f ;  "     cipal diet *of -  the   man   and woman'  "wishing to'"live long.;;   Investigators  ' '- .;  for the -British,--Medical Assbciation-  ,   ' -/denounced' Dr.''Beir as "'a'quack:'."'He  was too unorthodox,   and, Dr*. Bass-'  - _ --.   ford, of the Medical.association, pub-  - .       lished   serious    charges .against Dr.  '. _Bell.    >_ .       -' . '   ���������������������������    '-/-''._  -Dr. Bell brought action against Dr.  Bassford, and a London jury ..warded  $10,000,. to- the-'plaintiff. When-the  jury  announced   their'   verdict,  there  '   -was "a great burst   of applause from  the-crowded courtroom.  "-"Summing   up,   Lord   Justice Alver.  stone-said: 7 "It would be a lament-  - "able thing "if - any, attempt to find a  ease-by diet and meii.-.vie.  point of the case' 's this: !)���������������������������������������������.  cure for the cancer scourge should be  checked by the unjust criticisms r.'id  comment, and the denunciation nf investigators as quacks. It, is plain  that persons are eager to avoid cancer operations. Sevir-.il I.o.idi'U h.-,&  pitals are now treating the dretid dis-:  T!:e whole  Bell was  justified in, saying hit. method w.as  successful. It is ail ~erv well _c,r  great physicians,to -iay ������������������.'ie nev veat-  ment is quackery, but many if.culern  treatments are simply a .'ecival of  old ones .with" modern' imj-rovi.h.ents.  -"Hisj contention- that cancer, c.-.uld  be cured'without .the "knife; has.l.etn  supported-by the-testimony'1"*)' eminent; witnesses ...who have ha-i exp������������������'*ii-  encein cancer- cases/'- / I--. ~-T-.7'-- t .  : ,Dr. -Bell,-'the .physician decuied'to  be ���������������������������"unprofessional"-,or '; unorthodox*'  by "thei,British" Medical Association",'  is a "Fellow of thei "Koyal -Faculty' of  Physicians and- Surgeon's sines 1S72,  advocated* in-1870 an .improved" method, of treating- diphther'a.T/which was  approved by-the profession! -He' also  originated "a "method of treating small  pox, which helped to,.io'away with  the secondary .fever. ~ He was among  the. first to advocate the open-air  treatment.of consumprion."    '_ "  1  if  I  I  i  'A  ���������������������������'���������������������������?,  f  4  3  #  I  -I  *  '&4  #  w.  -���������������������������%  n  COUPON  CANADA CEMENT COMPANY  LIMITED  Herald Building, Montreal  Please send 'me full particulars of  tlie 1912 Farmers' Prize Contest, and  a free copy of your book. "What the  Farmer Can Do With Concrete."  Name  Address.  Willj*)u Le one o������������������ ine 108  farmers who will receive  our Prize Contest checks?  THERE will be twelve cash prizes in  each of the nine provinces (108 in all)  in the 1912 Prize,Contest fon Canadian  Farmers. Thc 1911 Contest was so successful in awak- ������������������  ening interest in the use of Concrete on the farm, that a  second contest, in which three times as many prizes are  offered, was decided upon for this year.  The Contest this year is divided into three classes, "A,"  "B" and "C," and there will be four prizes in each class.  (First'  prize, $50; Second prize, $2 5; Third .prize, $15; Fourth prize, $10.) ���������������������������  Thus there are three $50 Prizes, three $25 Prizes, "three $15  prizes, and three $10 Prizes, for each piovince. ���������������������������  DESCRIPTION- OF CLASSES r. /     /y  In Each Class there will be First, Second, Third and Fourth Prizes  ($50, $25, $15, and S10) for. Each Province.  CLASS "A"���������������������������Prizes to bc awarded to the four fanners in each prorince who use most  ,   "Canada" Cement on tlicir farms in the year._'H2. ,  CLASS "B"���������������������������Prizes to be awarded to the four farmers in each province who send pboto- ^  eraphs.of the best'eoncrete work done with "Canada" Cement on their ..  farms in 1912. , .    - *    .  CLASS "C"���������������������������Prizes to be awarded to the four farmers in eich province who send in  the best description, telling how any'piece of concrete work was done with  "Canada" Cement. (Entries for this prize must be accompanied by photographs of the work.) ��������������������������� ,' .  Don't think that you must use a large quantity of cement iii order to  win a prize. Thc quantity of cement used does not count in Classes "B' *  and "C"    Many of last year's prize-winners used very little cement".  When you enter the Contest, you have ,a chanee to win a cash -  prize of $50 as well as the certainty that'you will add a''/ '���������������������������'manent *'  improvement to your farm.    If you haven't a copy, be sure and ask for  our book, "What the Farmer Can Do*With'Concrete."   "It,will not"  only suggest many improvements that you can use in entering the Contest,-  but will tell you.;-,{! about the use ol concrete on the farm.    -��������������������������� .  Just write your name and address on the attached coupon, or nje a   _    _    .  postal card, and uc will bend full particulars of thr Prize Cuntest  and a copy of '.'What the Farmer Can, Do With Concrete" tc you  absolutely free,     -fi  .    ' ".-.-.'  A.       Address Publicity"Manager  Canada Cement  Company  Limited ^ ��������������������������� -   "*'-������������������������������������������������������  501 Herald Bldg.    -   ..-     Montreal  T  4  I  -t  I  ������������������  r  i  *  i  i  I  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i ,  ���������������������������  i  i  I  i  C. B. Richardson, hydrographer for  the Dominion government, is keeping  close touch. on the condition of the  Spallumcheen river at all seasons of  the year. He is taking measurements  every "week or two with a view of  recording the volume of water and its  current for "power, purposes. "'  It Outshines  GAS OR ELECTRICITY  The Aladdin Lamp  This is an oil-burning lamp which produces a flood of pure, waite light  ������������������������������������������������������more=brilliant--than-gas-or-c!et.lricity.���������������������������yet=wonderfully���������������������������������������������nellow^jind=-easy=  on the eyes.   It is simple and safe, clean -and   noiseless,   does not fill the  room with obnoxious, unhealthful odors.     To have a better lighted home,  with an���������������������������  ALADDIN Mantle Lamp  will actually cost you retiring. It will pay for itself in the oil it saves.  I am the agent for the Mantle Lamp Company of America and am telling you what I know to be abso'ite facts. Professor Rogers, of Lev/is Institute, Chicago, "made a comparative test of all the leading oil-burning  - lamps-.on-thelmarket���������������������������and-the: Alad-din_was_ foun'd to. %ive. the BEST  LIGHT and the MOST ECONOMICAL to use. But you don't need to ac-'  cept these strong statements on my word only. All I ask is the opportunity to PROVE THEM at my own risk. ,   I will be glad to let you  Try an Aladdin Lamp in your Home Before You Buy  I furnish Table, Hanging, Bracket, Wall and Chandelier types of lamps���������������������������  .  in fact Aladdin Lamps for/every pmpose.     Just drop me a post card and  simply say you are interested.     I'll be glad to bring an Aladdin Lamp to  show you and leave in your home to use a night or two, entirely without  obligation.     Mail the card to-day.   BERNARD ROSOMAN, Agent,  Grindrod, Okanagan Valley, B.C.  Orchardists:  The Fraser Valey Nurseries, Ltd.  ALDERGROVE,   B.   C.  Have the Finest  Home-Grown Nursery Stock  Including���������������������������  APPLES, PEARS, PLUMS, CHERRIES,  SMALL   FRUITS AND ORNAMENTAL SHRUBBB.RY. For full particulars, write-  RICHARD McCOMB,  General Manager,  LIVE DISTRICT AGHNT WANTED. Aldergrove, B.O  BOY SCOUTS IN ACTION       7,  ,;.There is still room* for a few more  boys in the lst:. Enderby; Troop _of  Boy Scouts.���������������������������7*Another .-. patrpll -is to  organized,.and applications should be  made'"a't"'once."7.-i There are "many interesting "incidents --.in -the" every-day  operations of the' scouts : which illus-.  trate. how -successfully the - organiza-  tion^'gets _upon"��������������������������� .the^-ingenuity of  the" boys' and operates ������������������in their development." ,One of_* the .boys was de-.  detailed to1 carry a"' message" to a  rancher's . house" two or three miles  from town. When,he reached there,  the rancher was absent. , The ^boy,  did; not have paper . or pencil', - nor j  could he" find "anything, with which to \  write in his search of the- house.   He |the hcaring. of evidence. -,      ,  found some flour,* however, and with! -Mr. C. H.'Dunbar; a.barrister,.has  a'little    water   made a paste.   With , been, appointed    by   the. Minister of  his finger "for a. brush'and'the "paste *ILandsto assist the aolders of Water  . ��������������������������� .���������������������������,, , ' ,... a - ~ i i *u * i rights in. the preparation of their  for ink he   briefly   scrawled- the mes-.j st6atements   6f   cTaim and-will^be at  sage on the door of the cabin and. re- | the,different   places 'mentioned below  WATER ACT  -All -persons _ who. have any;' water  rights. within'7the'- 'Kamloops-'Water  District' "are required-'/to-:fil<>_claims'  with the Comptroller of Water'Rights  at the Parliament .Buildings on or before the-15t'h'day~6f July ne'xL. -Par-  tie's who have already filed claims  will be notified in a few-days whether  further'information is required, ..The  Board desires to have all claims examined and -compared with"' the departmental" * maps   and "books - before  turned to" report. ** It brought the required results. .        -  - In one   of   their   recent drills, the  on the dates fixed. Hc. will'be provided with the necessary forms, 'but  the claimants', should bring a sketch  showing their    land and the streams  bicycle patroll were detailed to cap- I with the pointy   of diversion .shown ;  ture   the   Buffalos' in   hiding in the   this sketch  may   be 'drawn roughly.  woods.       Two   of    the   patroll sue-' Tney should also bring all the papers   ~ "7^1'i''""* 7~JZ/ ,      ���������������������������' they-may-=have^in^the~way=of=deedSr  capturing one of the boys!recJrds *nd entHes_ Ulat ^ Dunbar  They brought their pris- i raay see them.   ��������������������������� Mr. Dunbar will also  ceeded in  in hidings  oner into town   astride the staffs of' prepare any objections which may be  the captors, hung from bike to bike. !macle-    i    When   the   claims    are   all in the  The egg-laying contest promoted by ' BoPrd. wiU famine the claims and  the poultry branch of the Provincial' objections, and a list will be sent to  Department of Agriculture, at New  Westminster, is attracting much interest among poultry raisers. In  class_A,.:ofl 23.-contesting- birds-the  highest ten are all white leghorns.  Then comes a buff leghorn for 11th  place, followed by four more white  leghorns for the following four places  while a brown leghorn holds 16th  place, and white leghorns 17th, 18th,  19th and 20th places.  One  rule  of  etiquette  covers  all  emergencies;    when   you   are   alone  presence  with Self act as in the  royalty and the habit will  second Self.  of  become a  E. J. Mack  Livery, Feed & Sale Stables  ENDERBY, B. C.  Good Rigs;  Careful Drivers; Draying of all kinds.  Comfortable and Commodious Stabling for teams.  Prompt attention to all customers  Land-seekers  and Tourists in  vited to give us a trial.  the Government Agent at Kamloops  who will show it' to any person who  applies. "  -   Mr. Dunbar will be at��������������������������� . .  " Kamloops"Juhe~25"aud~26;~ "~  Armstrong,' June 27,  Enderby, June 28,  Glenema,  June 29,  Salmon Arm,  July 2,  Ducks,  July 3,  Savona, July 4,  Ashcroft, July 5,  Kamloops, July 6.  Victoria, 19th June, 1912.  J. F.  ARMSTRONG,  Acting Comptroller of Water Rights.  If you  have land  to sell  List it with me.  If you want to  buy land, see me.  Chas. W. Little  Eldernell Orchard, Mara, B. C.  ���������������������������yyil  p-V;/*!  M-'tXl  in'; Manitoba;',' "Saskatchewan" and ^Al^ffi^f).  berta,', the 7 Yukon.,-- -.Territory,^the"' -'-' ~"J  Northweat \Territbrics7-; and.,W' portion  ,6t the' province"- oj/Britishj.Columbi-af  -may be leasedJ6r:a.;.termTiof%twentyT^S|*^.^  dneryears ��������������������������� at an7 annual'rental-Jolz^^iV/'/"'^  an acre."   '.'Not more than^,560.acres"-"''" '*"*'  will be l������������������Mtd-to one:1 applicant..f-'y-'Tf/..  _.,  - ' Application" v; lor '* a"., ;iease'jmust, be izAr  made by the   applicant' in'**"person'.to"7'-'  the Agent' or -sub-Agent of the-dis1 f 7  trict in which rights applied .for,Jareyj'7  situated. ,.-   , ;,.- .  ' '-   ;-  J'}-.: i-z-'^'iiy.  ' In surveyed territory the land must  be described   by" sections,, or7legal  sub-divisions of; .sections,*'and m'.un-i'V ;-*'  surveyed   territory- .the tract'applied .>'\  for.shall-be staked out by the-appli-7 J''  cant himself.     :        : ~.   _r,.    * -y ���������������������������-. \>: -��������������������������� - v*.  ,  Each " application" must.be'"accomr- -T.Z'  panied by a fee -for $5i which will be "  '-"  refunded if the rights applied for are. J- -  riot available, .but not, otherwise.- \A.'\~-  royalty   shall - be paid", on - the "mer-7'. -.  chantable output of the mine at the 7 " ���������������������������  rate of five cents per ton. '  ./" "���������������������������  The person operating the mine shall 7 '7J<  furnish the Agent with sw.orn returns./-,  accounting for ' the full quantity ot -'. '  merchantable=coal=mined--and-pay^the=���������������������������=^  royalty thereon. If the coal mining *..  rights are not being operated, such . '  returns should be furnished at least "' .  once a year. *  The lease will include the coal min- ���������������������������  ing rights only, but the lessee may be  permitted to purchase whatever  available surface rights may be conL  sidered necessary for the working of  the mine at the rate of- $10.00 an acre  For   full     information   application ----..  slfould~bc "made   to"the" Secretary'"of      "  the Department   of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent  of Dominion Lands.  W. W_ CORY,  Deputy Minister of the Interior.  N.B.���������������������������Unauthorized publication of  this advertisement will not be paid  for. sp2  SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH  Daily trains both ways from Sicamous Junction to Okanagan Landing:  South  bound  read down  10.15   (Lv)  STATIONS  Jet  10.48  11.03  11.18  11.45  12.03  12.30  12.45 (Ar)  H. W. BRODIE  Gen. Pas. Agt.  Vancouver  sicamous  Mara  Grindrod  Enderby  Armstrong  Larkin  Vernon  Ok. Landing  North  bound  read up  (Ar)  17.30  16.45  16.29  16.14  15.45  15.25  15.00  (Lv) 14.45  JNO. BURNHAM  Agent  Enderby  R. Chadwick  REGISTERED PLUMBER  (certificate.)    Painter and Decorator,  Box 74, Enderby. ENDERBY PRESS AND  WALKER'S WEEKLY  ���������������������������'M  I PILES CURED!  Writing from Poplar, B.C., lira. 0. j]  j Hanson, proprietress of the Commar-2  Icial Hotel, says: " I Buffered for years y  I with bleeding piles. The p.-iin w.-.s sog  j. bftfl at times that I could hardly walk, |  Sand ordinary remedies neuiueu. utterly $  ^unable fco give mc any ease. Finally n  .������������������ decided to undergo an operation, $  Jand went to tho Sac.ed Heart Hospital  gin Spokane. There thoy performed an  $ operation.   For a time I was certain lyj  ��������������������������� better, bub within twelve months tho"  Spiles became as painful as ever. I  B tried liniments, hot poulticas,.various  p'pilo cures,'and indeed everything I  jjcould think would be likely to do any  If good, but still I continued to suffer, _  ��������������������������� and the shooting,   burning, stinging fl  | pains,  the dull,  aching,   ' worn-out'fi  ��������������������������� feeling thafc the disease  causes con-fl  Hinued aa bad as ever. |  "Ono day I read about Zam-Buk $  and thought I would try it.    Tho Srst^  | ono or two boxes gave mc moro ease if}  'than anything else  I had fcriod, so 1%  went on with the treatment.    In r.a  short time I began  to feel altogether1  different and better.    Well, I went on  usiu^ Zam-Buk, and by tho time I had  used six boxes I waa delighted to find  myself entirely cured.   That was three  years ago, and  thers   has   been no  return of tho trouble." ���������������������������������������������  Zam-Buk is a sure cur������������������ for piles, jr  eczema, ulcers, abaceaies, eruptions, |  chapped bands, varicoie sores, burns, |  ���������������������������j scalds, bruises, inflamed patches, andS  all skin injuries and diseases. Drug-jj  jgists and stores everywhere, 50c. bos, ������������������  | or Zam-link Co., Toronto, for price. ' u  &m-Bii  ' - Father (at end of-lecture to son who  has been "sent down")���������������������������Nothing, absolutely nothing to." show for all the  money.I've-spent!  'Daughter���������������������������How' can ' you, father,  when you know they say that all the  bloods copy his socks and waistcoats:  r      Hj      n-  l-lihel���������������������������Jack says I grow prettier  every day.  ' Kate���������������������������What a fright you" nuist have  been at-, the start.  *        *        x  "Sorry you couldn't attend our banquet last night, doctor.' It would have  done you good."  "Thank you! it has done me good, r  have just prescribed for three of the  guests."  When Your Eyes Need Care  frj- Murine Eye Remedy. Xo Smarting���������������������������Feels  Fine���������������������������Acts Quickly. Try it Ior Red, Weak,  Watery  Eyes and Granulated Eyelids.   Illus-  ���������������������������-������������������������������������������������������--������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������    "   -���������������������������       Murine   is  Patent Mcd-  irated   Book  in  each   Package.  compounded by our Oculists���������������������������not a "Pa   icine"' ���������������������������but used in successful Physicians' Practice, for many vear\. Now dedicated to tho Public and sold bv Druufcihts at 25c and &0c per Bottlo.  Murine   Kyo Salve In Aseptic Tubes, 2;>e and 6Uc.  Murine Eyo Remedy Co., Chicago  Well, WeU!  THIS is a HOME DYE  ihat ANYONE  can use  fr  ''&������������������&$  I dyed ALL these  ;> DIFFERENT KINDS  of Goods  = with the SAME Dye.  I used  DYOLA  CLEAN and SIMPLE to Use.  NO chance of using lhc WRONG Dye for (lie Goods  one has to color. All colors from yonr Drticfrist or  Denier. .������������������������������������������������������|il.l. Color Curd and STORY Booklet 10,  Thc Johnbon-Rlcluirdson  Co.,  Limited, Montreal,  The Worth of a Good  Chauffeur  ' "ABSnmillBJKBRF  Pnhifr _,K!>      oil,Swollen Veins, MIIIc  _������������������=,.   ,,,   .Log, JVssiuiuu    i, Oltl Soros, Ulcer.H.   ID  V3;   ;)   is hoallii;.', sou1:  hr, .strenutlicnlnu and In-  i!*i '.(   vlgoratlnis ���������������������������nlir-'s pain and inllainuialion  promptly.  (Ji'iu. 'jidound antlsemic.  Jlrs. It. M. Kotifer, H. D. No. 1, Federal,  Kan., bad onlarctu veins that finally broko  causing eoiisidor.iblo loss of blood.  Used AUSOKUIN'K, JK. and reported  Nov. 8,  1'JlO. veins   entirely healed.   ~������������������j���������������������������Jswelling and discoloration tone and  tiais had no trouhlo with them slnco duly l'.W.  A1JS0H13INB,.III. Is Invaluabloas a Ronoral household liniment, for tho cuts and bruises that tho children got. croup, denp-seared colds, stlir-neck, sore-  throat. Itcmovcs fatty bunches, goitre, cnlarRcd  elands, wens, cysts, weoplnu sinews, etc. 11.00 and  (2.00 per bottlo at druggists or delivered. UooU 3 o free.  W. F. YOUNG. P.D.F..210 LymansBIdg., Montreal, Can.  Also furnished by Martin, Bole A Wynne  Oo., "Winnipof; the National Droit * Ohemical  Co., Winniper and Calgary, and Hendaraon  *ro������������������. Co., Ltd., Vanaanvar.  This is Lhe time of year when calls  for chauffeurs are beginning- fo appear in the "help wanted���������������������������male" columns of Lhe newspapers, the approach  of spring bringing to mind tite unsurpassed pleasure of louring in a good  automobile in charge of a competent  driver. As Lhe chauffeur looking for a  place scans these columns, however,  he frequently utters expressions of  disgust, especially if he is a good one,  ancl generally you will find that bi.s ire  has been aroused by an "ad." calling  for a man to drive ancl make repairs  on a car, wash windows, keep thc lawn  trimmed, and do a dozen or more odd  jobs,.all for fifteen dollars a week.  JL is a strange idea of economy that  prompts a man who has bought a high-  priced car to hire a cheap man to run  iL, but such men are not rare, and they  never   learn   until   too   late   that  their  economy has been of the false variety.  However,   if you  study garage  bills  and scan the daily papers in which are  recounted, with all the terrible details,  the   accidents   that   are   due   to   irresponsible,  "joy-riding" chauffeurs, you  will readily see  that there can  be no  saving by employing a cheap man.    Of  course   it   is   not   impossible   to   get  a  man for fifteen dollars a week who will  drive a car and perhaps do the housework' if he is willing, ancl  he may be  able  to  operate  the  car satisfactorily  under    ordinary    conditions    and    get  along  without  any  serious   trouble  in  the  way  of  accidents  or  breakdowns.  So far as the owner of Lhc car is able  to  discover,  his   cheap   man has  done  as  well as could  be expected;   but let  an expert examine thc car at the end  of  thc season and  he  will  soon  point  out  that  the  cheap  man  has  been  a  very expensive man. after all.   He will  show  that  the motor  i.s  badly  racked  on   account  of   the   ignorance   of   the  driver in motor construction and operation, one of Lhe most common faults  of such  chauffeurs being that of racing the engine.  Tn the matter of tire expense tlie  cheap chauffeur again shines, i'or no  doubt he thinks he is a clever driver  if he can race up to Lhe stopping-place,  jam the brakes on, and bring up with  a jerk where his passenger wishes to  alight. He has not the least idea that  lie is shortening the life of-the tires  every time he,does this, and probably  his employer cannot understand why  his tire bill so large, but blamoa the  manufacturer for turning out an inferior product. - -     -. "���������������������������--���������������������������"  Then, .if .the cheap man encounters  a breakdown, the car must go to the  repair shop, and its charges are not  light. ' If he knew his business thc  chances are .that he could prevent the  trouble ancl .in most cases make the repairs without sending Lhe car to the  shop. Thc engineer can detect an  "out" in his engine by simply listening  to the working of the machinery: in  the same way thechauffeur who knows  his machine can clo the same, and by  going over the mechanism at frequent  intervals he will pick ouL ancl remedy  a fault before it attains serious proportions. I-Ie will not be careless about  Lhe cooling system and burn out a  cylinder as a result, neither will he'  neglect the lubrication.  Here is a little example of the value  of a good chauffeur from the experience of an automobile owner who has  two cars���������������������������a touring car for summer  and a limousine for cold weather. He  pays his chauffeur, who is of course  ii skilled chauffeur, considerably more  than Lwice fifteen dollars a week and  finds that hc is really saving money.  He has had both cars three years, and  -i i _=___i i=u. n.l=ti m e=th r-v���������������������������hn ve~naver- been.  sent away for repairs, his chauffeur  making all of them. .Just before each  season in which the cars arc to be used  the chauffeur overhauls them completely, thus keeping them in the best  possible condition. Before he undertook this work ho went Lo a public  S garage ancl inquired how much Ihey  ; woii-.l th.ir.'i- Ln overiv.nl the limousine. The price was $l!lf>. He Lh'en  wont Lo Lhe factory wlu-re Lhc car was  niadi- to "learn-the price for thc same  work and was Informed that iL would,  Cost $l!L'r". The chauffeur thought both  prices excessive, so he does the work  himself now.  This is when' the saving comes in  for tin- man who pays his chauffeur  what is considered high wages. If  he kept the ears in a public garage, tho  amount he pays his chauffeur weekly  would nut go very far. The average  charge: at a public garage for housing,  washing, and the other care is thirty-  i:vi��������������������������� 'lciii'is a month for .i limousine,  twenty-live dollars a month for a touring ear, and twenty dollars a month for  a runabout. Then there must be added  lo this the repair bills, which are frequent if the owner drives his own car  or has a cheap chauffeur.    ,  '.Vit'ioul the slighte:-. i! lubt these  two cars would not be in as good condition al Lho end of three years if a  cheap man was caring for them, so  so thai it wonld be necessary to replace them wilh new ones; and the  higher the price of the car when new  Lho greater the loss when it is turned  in or sold at second-hand. This high-  priced chauffeur knew his business  from start to finish, as ho had learned  it in an automobile factory where he  made good wages. He cou d not have,  been secured as a.chauffeur unless the  wage was at least equal to what he  was getting  in   the  factory.  Another way of getting at the saving of expenses by the high-priced  chauffeur as compared with the cheap  one is this; Men experienced in the  automobile business figure it out that  a man who drives his own car, keeps  it in a public garage, and knows nothing about the machine, so that it is  necessary for him  to have the slight  est repairs mado at the garage, is af  an expense of about fifteen cents a  mile for maintenance. A man with a  mechanical bent, who can make ordinary repairs and keep his car in his own  garage, gets out of it for about ten  cents a mile. The skilled chauffeur,  who not only drives his car with care  but also makes all repairs, operates it  fo'r about five cents a mile. 13y putting the chauffeur into one of these  classes you can seo what he is costing  and that in thc end .the high-priced  chauffeur is the better economy.  Besides the ability of the chauffeur  to keep his car in repair, there is another thing even more important���������������������������reliability. At the present time, when  so many young men, some of them  mere boys, are drawn to automobilo  driving by the attractiveness of the  work and the comparative ease with  which automobile driving is learned,  all sorts are taking up Lhe work. Many  of them are irresponsible fellows who  have had little or no opportunity of  acquiring mental balance; as a result  wc frequently read of the chauffeur  who races the train Lo the railroad-  crossing with fa Lai results.. His mental unfitness usually appears ,when>"-lie  is thrown upon his own judgment, as  is frequently the case if he is driving a  party of women. Can anything be  more shocking than Lhc repeated failures to, beat the train?  The high-priced chauffeur is usually  a man of more mature years and judgment, so the employer feels perfectly  confident Lhat his women folks can  venture out safely in the car even if  he is not along. This chauffeur^ does  not take a chance anywhere, ndr does  he entertain his" friends with "joy  rides" when the. car is supposed to bo  in the garage. He is getting a good  wage and appreciates it. It is so good  that he is willing Lo perform his work  to the best of his ability, that he may  continue to hold his place.  RATE   FOR   RADIUM  An international commission composed of scientific men to whose work  the mosL important discoveries in  radioactivity are due, met recently in  Mme. Curie's laboratory Lo confer on  Lhe clefinile adoption of an international standard of radium. ���������������������������   ���������������������������  The creation of this standard was  determined upon by the Radiological  ancl -Electrical Congress-tit Brussels, in  1910,' when"' the following .commission  was named Lo consider -the question:  Germany, Profs.' J-lahn .and Geitel:  England, Profs. .lUiiherford and Soddy;  Austria-Hungary," 'Profs. Meyer and  Sweidler; United States and Canada,  Profs. BolLwood ' and Eve; Prance.  Mme. Curie and Prof. D.ebierne.  The commission- requested Mme.  Curie to undertake the task of preparing the .international standard,  which she completed in August last,  .using chloride of pure radium, prepared and specially purified by herself.  The standard is established by a small  tube of thin glass a'bout three millimeters���������������������������a little more than one-tenth  of an inch���������������������������in diameter and .three centimeters���������������������������over one inch���������������������������in length  which contains a carefully weighed  amount of chloride of pure radium���������������������������  about two centigrams, or seven-tenths  of an ounce. The tube is sealed and  a small platinum wire "runs into the  glass to give electric communication  between the interior of thc tube and  thc exterior to carry off any electric  sparks which the radium rays might  produce ancl which might possibly  break thc tube.  ���������������������������Tfiiirl i ttl e^tn bcTo f-r a cl i u nif^wh i c h-w ill-  bo used ns the international standard,  will probably be placed in the International Bureau nf Weights and Measures. Secondary standards will be  prepared in various scientific or oflicial  laboratories and their amount of radium will be established by comparison  with thc international standard, by  determining the intensity of the rays  which   have   traversed   Severn I   milli-  WIFE OF THE P. M.  TALKS TO WOMEN  TELLS     WHAT     DODD'S     KIDNEY  PILLS DID FOR HER  She Suffered for Two Years and Found  a   Cure   for   all   Her   Troubles   in   a  Single Box.  Lower Caraquct, Gloucester, N. 13.  (Special).���������������������������Mrs, Jos. O. Chiasson, wife  of the police magistrate here, who for  two years has been practically an invalid, is again in the best of health,  ancl she is telling her friends how  quick and complete was her cur.e when  she took Dodd's Kidney Pills.  "My illness," Mrs. Chiasson says,  was caused by a strain, and for two  years I was a. sufferer. My back ached, 1 was always tired and nervous,  there were dark circles under my eyes  and after sleeping 1 had a bitter taste  in my mouth.  "I had a pressure ancl sharp pain on  the top of my head, 1 was always  thirsty ancl my skin had a harsh, dry  feeling. I was often dizzy, I perspired  easily and my perspiration had an unpleasant odor.  "Almost from the first dose Dodd's  Kidney Pills helped me ancl by the time  I had finished the first box 1 was a  well woman."  Mrs.   Chiasson's  that    the   trouble  That's why Dodd's  her so quickly. '  showed  vidneys.  Kidney Pills cured  symptoms  was   her  meters of lead, the rays so used being the gamma rays. Various secondary standards will be measured by  tho members of the commission at  their approaching meeting.    *  The radium salts used for preparing  the international standard have been  taken from a small supply of radium  wliich belongs to Mme. Curie, and is  not only used by her in her "personal  researches, but is also placed at the  service of those who work in her laboratory. The members of the commission have decided to ask their governments to reimburse Mme. Curie for  the value of the radium employed in  preparing the standard.  The need for a radium standard has  been felt for some Lime by scienLilic  workers in radioactivity. Owing Lo  Lhe difficulties of purifying radium important differences exist between the  tubes which are used in different laboratories as standards, ln addition to*  this purely scientific interest, there is  a commercial ancl industrial demand  for a standard.  Radium is the most costly matter  sold commercially. Its present price is  400,000 francs for a gramme of bromide, or over $2,250,000 an ounce avoirdupois, and the price is likely to increase. Up to the present time it has  been difficult for buyers and manufacturers to agree on the real quantity  of radium contained in the article'sold.  When the international standard is officially adopted commercial* products  will naturally be compared with this  standard.  Most of the radium manufactured is  employed by doctors and they naturally will be glad of a means to compare thc quantity of radium they use  with a fixed standard.  Among other decisions taken by the  lnlernation.il Commission on Radium  was the adoption of a particular unit  for measuring the amount of radium  emanation, thc radioactive gas, the life  of which is essentially ephemeral and  which is continually being produced by  radium. t It is to this emanation that  the curative properties of certain mineral waters arc attributed?       '   .  The. unit adopted Vas the quantity  o'f' emanation in equilibrium with a  gramme of radium. This uniL received  Lhe name of a curie. A secondary  unit, a thousand Limes smaller, corresponding Lo a milligram of radium,  was named a millicurie.  Expected Death  From Day to Day  ANOTHER     CASE     WHERE     LIFE  WAS SAVED AND HEALTH  RESTORED  BY NERVILINE  SMhaVsGim  MMPAfl* HEALS THE LUNGS  VWHJM������������������ ?*_tICE, 25 CKNTS  We have all read and heard of tlie  agonies of sciaLica, buL only Lhose who  have been tortured by this dread malady can fully appreciate what it must  mean to be cured after years of suffering.  It is because ho feels it his solemn  duty to tell lo the world his faith in  Nerviline that Victor P. Hires makes  the following declaration. "For three  years 1 was in the Royal Mail service,  and in all kinds of weather had to  meet the night trains. Dampness, cold,  and exposure brought on sciatica that  affected my left side. Sometimes an  attack would come on that made me  powerless to work. I was so nearly  a complete cripple that I had to give  up my job. I was in despair, completely cast down, because the money  I had spent on trying to get well was  wasted. 1 was speaking to my chemist' one day, and he recommended 'Nerviline.' 1 had this good liniment rubbed on several times a day, and got  relief. I continued this treatment four  months, and was cured. I have used  all kinds of liniments, .and can truthfully say that Nerviline is far stronger, more penetrating and infinitely better than anything else for relieving  pain. I urge everyone with lumbago,  neuralgia, rheumatism, or sciatica, to  use Nerviline. I know it will cure  them."  Get Nerviline to-day, large family  size, 50c; trial size, 25c; all dealers or  Thc Catarrhozone Co., Buffalo, N.Y".  and Kingston, Canada.  The Oracle of the Sergeants'- Mess  (after much heated . discussion)���������������������������Ah  donn't caer whutt ye say it's no' a  gentlemanly thing furr a gentleman  fae pit strobbcry jaam on anither gen-'  tleman's haeri ��������������������������� .  ���������������������������' *    *    * ...  "I've spent all my money, my racehorse is lame, my wife has elopeel with  my jockey. "What more can happen,  I wonder?"  "Your wife can come-back."  *    *    *  Gibbs���������������������������And so your wife gets along  on comparatively little, does she?  Dibbs���������������������������Yes���������������������������that is, on little compared with uwhat she thinks she ought  to have. -_  Far W\\CTETM DCD Pln!i������������������r<.Abiotic,Shipplaj  Uf IO I EHwl r&IY Fevtr ud Catarrhal Fevtr7  "Siirc cure'and ])ositivc preventive, no matter-, how horses at-  ,any figo are infected oi' '"exposed."'liquid, given on the tongue;  ���������������������������acts on the lilood nnd-Glands, expels the poisonous sevms from-  the body. 'Cures.Distemper in Dogs and Sheep and Choleni.iu  Poultry. "Largest selling live stock romedy. Cures La Grippe  among human beings, and. is a fine Kidney remedy. 50c and $1 a  Lottie; $6 and $11 a dozen. Cut this out. Keep it."' Show to'your  druggist, who will get it for you. , Free Booklet,, "Distemper,  Causes and Cures."  DISTEIBUTORS���������������������������ALL WHOLESALE DEUGGISTS  SPOHN MEOtCAL CO., Chemists and. Bacteriologists, GOSHEN, IHO., U. S. A.  HIDES, PELTS & TALLOW  Highest market prices paid.  Present Prices���������������������������10 cents and  Ll cents for salted hides.  Winnipeg Tanning Co.  382   Nairn   Avenue  Winnipeg,   Man.  OIIO OF ALL KINDS AT  I   L Q      WHOLESALE PRICES  ���������������������������IAMOND  OIL  COMPANY,  ���������������������������WINN I REG,=MAN.  Write for Catalogue and  Prices To-day  Fortune  Block, 23t Main St.  ������������������������������������������������������. -���������������������������R eier_an.ec_;^JQ.Qm in ion-Bank.  WHEAT. BARLEY  Owing to so much unfavorable weather, many farmers over Western  Canada have gathered at least part of their crop touched by frost or  othorwise water damaged. However, through the large shortage in  corn, oats, barley, fodder, potatoes and vegetables, by the unusual heat  and drought of last summer in the United States, Eastern Canada and  Western Europe, there is going to be a steady demand at good prices  for all the grain Western Canada has raised, no matter what its quality  may be.  So much variety in quality makes it impossible (or those leas experienced to judge the full value that should be obtained (or such grain,  therefore the farmer nevor stood more in need of the services of the  experienced and reliable grain commission man to act (or him. in th*  looking  after  selling  of  his   grain,   than he does thi ssoaaon.  Farmers, you will therefore do well for yourselves not "to accept  street or track prices, but to ship your grain by carload direct to Fori  William or Port Arthur, to bev handled by us in a way that will get  for you all there is in it. We make liberal advances when desired, on  receipt of shipping bills for cars shipped. We never buy your grain on  our own account, but act as your agents in selling it to the best advantage for your account, and we do so on a fixed commission of le. per  bushel.  We have made a specialty of this work for many years, and are  well known over Western Canada for our experience in the grain trade,  reliability, careful attention to our customers' interests, and promptness  in makng settlements.  We invite farmers who have not yet employed us to write to us for  shipping instructions and market information, and in regard to our  standing in the Winnipeg Grain Trade, and our financial position, we  beg to refer you to the Union Bank of Canada, and any of its branches,  also   to  the  commercial  agencies   of Bradstreets and R. G. Dun & Co.  THOMPSON SONS & CO.  GRAIN COMMISSION MERCHANTS  703 Y Grain Exchange Winnipeg  138  \ ��������������������������� (���������������������������  tf  Thursday, June 27, 1912  THE ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S WEEKLY  ���������������������������x  BASEBALL  AS IS  By our Bum Artist  Our cartoonist here pictures the  game played at Vernon last week, as  lie saw it-r  Oaptain Murphy assumes an inspiring  attitude when he wants the Enderby  team to "ginger up." This is the  way he signals the boys to "get a  hump on" from his position behind  the bat.   It is very effective.  The way it looked before the Vernon  team took the toboggan  The, way. itZ looked   after the' Vernon"  -1-7" - ,\.-team -took the toboggan -'��������������������������� "-'-���������������������������  Webb's curves as Eastman, saw them  (?������������������������������������' TW5~������������������5]  Vaaa.ma9m  'Bean" Fravel likes, to beat the -ball  ���������������������������V>B lien-.  Schmidt .doesn't miss any of the'igh  -   ones at first bag  Evans   makes   sensational   catch   off  v second base ���������������������������   ,  Clarence Fravel gets  dome  Vernon's -pitcher has a very ."graceful  ' \ - 'delivery .when he unwinds* * -  Dill gets off the moment Larson begins to unwind, 'and steals second  and . third ' bn . Wilson's bunt, and  scores while "Wilson was beating the  ball to -first���������������������������two-bases'.and hlome  on a" 'bunt: is not so slow for a; hot  ���������������������������day ,on' a diet of Dill7pickles.    '   ��������������������������� -  HMcCONNEL  Tailoring/ Repairing,  t J- '-'��������������������������� 7/C\eAhin'gX^^7fyyX  ���������������������������-"Men'sSuits cleaned,.pressed and repaired un  "short notice. "Enderby.Hotel Block."';- ;-*"V.. \~\  Fresh Meats  "_If you want' prime7fresh > meats, \we/y/l/������������������;\.\  have them.;  Our cattle are^ grain-fed":"'"^  "and selected, by our own buyers, fromv  the~ richest feedings grounds _iri''.Albeb/r-7;_*������������������7������������������|  ta,' and   are   killed sand cut; strictly V.':-'4?*~%l  PDuaw - - -, -        *--   -    ".'V-1    -    ' "-'V-'. .'-'.-���������������������������--*'-���������������������������" .-'-j*"*!  r KEiOti.jr -;_.. -   ��������������������������� -*.._' --.>,; ;   v. -_���������������������������**.���������������������������������������������- z^-Sr.yt&T  fTTWe(buy '��������������������������� firsthand ;f or/spot -icasii"> sov~.rV7S%  can, givet you - the best" price possible.'���������������������������^'-"^.311  j*iV "���������������������������__,* .-. ^ -.al'-'-' :���������������������������"-.'" , -_- }���������������������������-;-...��������������������������� - V.;Qjiv.sji--V:->'}3*������������������3l  Gyw* /QlX72.^iiX^ *-y ^/Xj'Wi  a i\. onarpe, j^?^^%mm  ;/J>- ~    '       _        ���������������������������������������������"  > F- -    ,/"*  f   -   *-,     v-iV*--*  '-   jc   *JJ*T^1V*n,^|  yy:y./J.^:y/.^ ENDERBY, '3* Gig������������������Sl!  *M**i^MM^BMiMnM^H^HHMM^M^H^HMMMi^H^^BH^^_B r  *-     -."��������������������������������������������� --     -'    -"   .   ���������������������������-;-;������������������    1   ������������������������������������������������������ -   - i  "-"^Vrt-ijrf'-.?^  ^A * ..   *-Vr.__'  ������������������".    w.>      . .Vi.nl '*���������������������������   -- i  rtay(^���������������������������^7-5Q to jpffi  Sytties} $1.25 each    Snaths, $1.00  Every  Good  Carpenter ������������������������������������.������������������  Good Saw and tbe Maple Leaf *  1900  SAW  A  is the one that will suit  you. -Being a true Taper  Ground Saw it runs with  very little set.    Made of  "Razor Steel"  and tempered  by the " Secret  Process "  EVERY SAW  GUARANTEED  Reaping" Hooks, 35c  HayForKs775c~c9=8Sc=  Blocks, Rope, Wire Cable and   .__ ���������������������������Haying"���������������������������Tools^ :    ;___  Frost & Wood Mowers, $54.0013  "      10-ft. Rakes, $34.00 o  Horse Forks, $5 to $6  Our stock of Builders' Hardware, Mechanics'  Tools, Paints, Oils & Varnishes is complete  Let us quote you prices for your new home.   We install Furnaces  and Plumbing systems.  V"    c  J*>__   ���������������������������������������������. I  *"$$& I  -yiJAJ-**  7//^:.^  jXWM  $?y7~y7-,\  VS:  FOR  SALE  BY  .  Fulton Hardware Company, I  Enderby,  B. C. ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S, AVEEKLY  60 MEN WANTED  At   Once   to  Learn  Barber  Trade  Only eight weeks required to learn, tools  free and pay wages while ieavning. Positions secured on completion at from ������������������15  to S20 per, week. We have hundreds of  locations where you can start business  for vourself. Tremendous demand for  barbers. Write for Free Catalogue; better still, call. If you would become an  expert you must be an International  graduate. <���������������������������  INTERNATIONAL    BARBER    COLLEGE  Alexander Ave.,   First  Door  West  of Main St., Winnipeg.  CANADA BEATS  THE UNITED STATES  MORE HONORS FOR  GIN  PILLS  "JlolyoK-e, Mass., U.S.A.  "Having taken two boxes of-your excellent GJiV I'ILLS. they relieved me  so much that I run ciuiLe satisfied with  the results. I gave an order to my  druggist about three weeks ago to send  me some more. Nothing has come yet  and I had to borrow a box from a lady  friend who is also usin.. GIN" I'ILLS.  I have none left and am* sending you  $1.50 for three boxes, which J would ask  you to send at once as T am not quite  so well when 1- am without GIN  PILLS.  "AGATHE VANESSE."  Gin Pills must he good when people  in Massachusetts send all Ihe way to  Toronto to get them. There is nothing  like Gin Pills���������������������������nothing just the same  or just as good. Don't accept substitutes if you value your health and want  to be cured of Kidney and Bladder  Trouble,   or   Rheumatism.      Insist   on  That Reminds Me  The Lady-  the  striking*  The Leofer  call one  o  -So  you're  miners?  -Yus, lidy.  the pioneers  really  one  of  I'm -\vhot they  o'  the move-  on strike twenty-three  and I ain't never give  ment.      1 went  years ago,  lidy,  in. yet.  it    *    *-  Waiter���������������������������Thank you very much, sir.  Old Gent-What the deuce do you  mean? I haven't given you anything.  Waiter���������������������������No, sir:'"but. I bet No. 10  half-a-orown you wouldn't tip me!  * *    *  Wife���������������������������Hilly, dear, 1 stitched up the  hole in your, trousers' pocket last  night after you had gono to bed. Now  am  I not a thoughtful little wife?  Husband���������������������������-H'm! How did you know  there was a hole in niy pocket?  * *���������������������������    i  Hill���������������������������"How's  his  factory  going?"  Jill���������������������������"Like clockwork."  Hill���������������������������"Why, I heard  he'd  failed." '  Jill���������������������������;"So he has.   They've just wound  up  his business."  +    *    ������������������ ������������������  Lady Customer (in department store.  ���������������������������"Have you anything to keep hair  from falling?"  Clerk���������������������������"Hairpins, two counters to the  right, madam."  Couldn't Get Strong  Seemed To Have Lost All Ambition, Was Pale and Anaemic  Made Wonderful Recovery When  Dr. Hamilton's Pills Were Used  ]Mrs.   Cumrox.   who  musical  programme.  having Gin   Pills.  50c.  a  box.   G  for  $2.50. Sample free if you write National  Drug and Chemical Co. of Canada,  Limited, Dept. R.P., Toronto. 02  FITS   CURED  ry  Send for Free Book giving full particulars   Of   TRES'CU'S   REMEDY,   the  World-famous   Cure   for   Epilepsy -and  home    treatment.      25  Pits.      Simple  years'  success.  Testimonials  avorld.    Over 1  of   the  from   all   parts  000 in one year.  TRENCH'S REMEDIES,  LIMITED  107 St. Jiiiiicn' ClimiiberN, Toronto.  9t_M&&������������������Mi  Constipation  Vanishes Forever  Prompt Relief���������������������������Permanent Curt  CARTER'S LITTLE  LIVER PILLS  , fail.    Purely veget.  ���������������������������ble���������������������������act lively fc  but gently oi  the liver.  Stop ahi  . dinner  distrew���������������������������  cure indi-  gejtion��������������������������� improvs l-s complain ��������������������������� brightw  tbeeyet.   Sadl Pill, Small Dasa, Smlftko  Genuine must bear Signature  belong    to   no  Rasberry,   "but  to  ary  one  of  BUNIONS   NO  JOKE  Hard to.get rid of them, too. Two or  three applications of Putnam's Painless  Corn Extractor softens the thickest tissue, and removes it painlessly. Putnam's Painless Corn Extractor removes  corns, warts, and callouses quickly and  painlessly. Sold by all druggists,  price 25c.  IN   AEROPLANE_ INDUSTRY^   ���������������������������= "���������������������������FRANCE = ===  As an illustration of tin: activity  now reigning in the aeroplane industry  in "France, a few figures of fact are  worth a ton of theory. Thero are in  France some thirty linns engaged in  manufacturing aeroplanes. Inquiry  has elicited that seventeen among  these thirty firms turned out last year  over 1300 aeroplanes between them.  JSxact figures are available in tho case  -tiC_livu .constructors-- Uleriot.. J'arman  (Hf-nry). Fsnault - I'elterio, Hrnguet  and Train-- which produced a total of  SK. machines; of these 100 were sold to  the French and other Governments,  :.(',; were used for tuition and  exhibition Mights, while forty-six wore  sold to private purchasers. During the  present year this output .should be  easily doubled. And* in considering  these figures It should be borne in  mind that some of the largest concerns, such a.s Nf ion port and Ooper-  dussin, are not included. On analysis  the figures afford an extremely interesting insight Into the channels available at present fur the aviation industry. So far as can be gauged. 'IOO, 3G7,  and 'IG probably represent wilh fair accuracy the present demand of thc  military authorities, the schools, and  the private purchaser respectively.  '"[ think," said  was^ arranging a  "that we will  have a mezzo-soprano."  "All right," replied her husband.  "Don't bother me about if. Go ahead  and see an architect."  Gibbs���������������������������Aly wife explored my pockets  last night.  Dibbs���������������������������How did she come out?  Gibbs���������������������������As an explorer should. She  acquired enough material for a lecture.  * *    *  Dodds���������������������������As one grows older there are  certain things in which it is difficult  to keep up one's interest. Don't you  find it so?  I-Iobbs���������������������������Er���������������������������yes���������������������������there's the mortgage on my house, for example. *���������������������������'���������������������������  * *    *  "Which political party do you belong-  to?"  "I doesn't actually  party," replied Uncle  'casionall.v  T  hires ou  ���������������������������em."  * v   *  Citizens Jones and Brown disagreed  as to thc eloquence of ex-Senator Bcv-  eridge. Said Jones: "He was one of  the most eloquent men in Congress.  You shoulduhave heard him speak."  "I did hear-him;' I listened to him  two  hours one afternoon."  "What.was he talking.about?"  * "I "don't know; he didn'tsay."  He came creeping in at the usual  hour when a man finds it convenient  to enter his house with as little commotion as possible. He replied, in  response to the usual wifely-query put  to gentlemen who arrive home at that  hour of the night, that he had been  sitting up  with a sick friend. .  ���������������������������  "A sick friend, indeed! And what  ailed him?"  "W-why, he lost ?S7."  * *    *  . An   actor   at   The   Players,   in   New  Vork. praised David  Belasco ardently.  "You can't make a silk purse out of  a sow's ear," he said, "but Mr. Belasco, time and again, has made a skilful and fiery artiste out of a cold and  awkward amateur.  "Mr. Belasco has a happy way, at  rehearsals, of driving home his points.  Thus, one clay, he wasn't satisfied with  the contempt that a leading lady was  putting into a certain speech.  "'More contempt!' he said. 'More  spite!    More  venom.'  " 'Oh,   r  can't do  any  better  than  a,n.,'_sai_d_the.J_ady  '���������������������������I   w  Mrs.   I.  as   never  a Pierre,  sick," writes  a well-known  "yet   1   never  .dually  wife of  resident of Labeniene,  could get strong like other women. 1  ate well enough, but somehow blood  rich and red 1 could never make. When  I married 1 took <a great pride in my  housekeeping, but it kept me tired all  the time. Mrs. Lechanco, my neighbor,  looked well���������������������������she~ told me her health  had been made by Dr. Hamilton's Pills.  I only thought of pills as a physic, but  now r know that Dr. Hamilton's Pills  are more, for they quickened' my  stomach,  lover  and   bowels���������������������������made  me  ^stouter   and   stronger;   gave   me   such  1 color in my cheeks as J never had before. They do good to parts in ways  1 need not mention in this letter, but  ! sincerely believe Dr. Hamilton's Pills  should be used at regular intervals by  every woman���������������������������that's why  I  write this  letter."  No   medicine   invigorates   a   woman  like Dr. Hamilton's I'ills.    25c. per box.  all   dealers   or   the   Catarrhozone   Co..  Kingston.- Canada.  I  " 'Rubbish!  Mr. Belasco.  hiss the word  a   lady   friend  Of course you can,' cried"  'Hiss the lines as you'd  "musquash" if you saw-  in   a   great,   long,   imi  tation sealskin coat."  Richard Croker, at a dinner in New  Vork. praised,the young American millionaire Avho works.  "lt is better to work," hc said, "than  to spend one's days, in idleness, like  young Lord Rocksavage. Lord Portar-  lington and so forth.  "But when 1 say work 1 mean work.  1 know a young millionaire who claims  to work, but t-he other morning at  about eleven o'clock a friend saw him  run down the steps of hi.s Fifth Avenue  house ancl prepare to enter his waiting  motor car.  "What's your hurry?' .said his  friend.  " 'Oh;': the young man replied, as  he looked at his wrist watch, 'I've got  to get clown to the-office right away  or 1 won't be there in time to go out  to   luncheon.' "  With the Horses  A report in Rider and Driver, from  the New Vork Sun, cites a case where,  with equal distances to travel, a fire  engine drawn by three horses, in New  Vork City, beat a new automobile engine to a fire by a block and a half,  while the automobile tender was still  a block behind.' Both companies knew  they had a race, and the winning of  the horses is significant.-> The horse is  generally considered the most reliable,  find, wilh such speed demonstrations,  should have little trouble in retaining  a place on the fire brigades of the  large cities.  The horse at work requires a diet  richer in protein than the animal on  a maintenance ration, and thus a narrower nutritive ratio in the ration is  necessary,, which is accomplished by  adding more grain and lessening the  roughage in the daily feed. The working horse must' also get more, non-  nitrogenous material than when he was  at rest, in order to prevent the using,  of too much of the body fat to provide the necessary energy, which, if  continued, cannot .but emaciate the  animal. : Work means an'increase.'.in  feed given, and, in proportion to the  amount of labor accomplished,' so  should the ration be increased; and the  time to commence the increase is not  the day seeding* commences, but some  weeks before, making it gradual, so  as to*> accustom the horse's digestive  organs to  the change.  It   is   impossible   to  avoid   a  certain  amount of work being required of the  digestive   organs,   but   the   more  concentrated  the ration,   the  less will  be  the   work   required   of   the   digestive  tract to prepare the fuod for assimilation.      Here is a good  reason  for  increasing the grain ration to fhe horses  during heavy spring work.   ' All their  energy is required for work outside the  body, and  as   little as  possible should  be used in the work of digestion.  Eliminate,   as   far  as   possible,   th<5   indigestible, coarse, fibrous materials from  the ration.      The smaller the quantity  of  this  material   in  the  feed,   fhe less  the work of digestion.      This must be  considered   at  this  season.       We  cannot, -however, be governed in our feeding by this fact exclusively, because, as  a   general   rule,   a   stated   amount   of  digestible  matter  can   bc  obtained,  at  less expense, from the coarser fodders,  like hay;   but,  during strenuous work,  when   the  horse  has  scarcely   time  to  properly masticate ancl digest his feed  before being rushed  back to the field,  increasing   the   grain   ration   and   decreasing the roughage feci, seems to be  tlie logical proceeding.  The pacer' Bradmont, 2:24i, recently purchased by R. J. McKenzie of  Winnipeg, Man., will be raced the coming season by Charley Dean of Palan-  tine, 111. Bradmont is������������������by Alto Ley-  burn, the sire of Jack Hey burn,  2:04;}.       - '     . .  .       IH   ,       * pr  The former champion trotting gelding, Major Delmar, 1:593, was not sold  with thc othor members of the Ard-  maer Farm, which were purchased by  Mr. Look, proprietor of the Castle-  ton Farm, Lexington, Ky. The famous old gelding has been blind for a  number of' years, and will spend the  declining clays of his life in comfort,  the " property  of  William   Bradley.  Ideal Protection Against  Inroads of Catarrh  3y   Breathing  the   Rich,   Balsamic  Vapor  of  Catarrhozone  You   Prevent  and  Cure All  Head,  Nose, and  Throat Disease.  Remember this: You don't lake  drugs when using Catarrhozone; you  simply inhale a healing vapor that  cures every type of catarrh, bronchitis, asthma, throat and nose soreness  and irritation.  No medicine brings such prompt relief, exerts such an invigorating influence, or so thoroughly and speedily  cures throat troubles as "Catarrhozone." Doctors, hospitals, sanitariums, all say that for those who suffer  from changeable weather, for those  who are predisposed to catarrh, lung  trouble, deafness, or bronchitis, no  treatment is so indispensable as "Catarrhozone."  Victim   of  Chronic  Catarrh   Cured  I contracted a severe cold while following my occupation of furniture travelling, and eventually it developed  into Catarrh. The desultory mode of  life I was following gave me very little chance to attend to the Catarrh  condition, and at last I became a victim of Chronic Catarrh. I bought a  large package of Catarrhozone, used it  as per directions, and have never been  bothered since. I will only be too glad  to give any information I possess to  any person suffering from the disease  that was the bane pf my life two  years.  A.   H.   SWARTZ,   Brockville,   Ont.  For certain cure, for .relief in an  hour, use Catarrhozone, the only direct, breathable medicine. Two months'  treatment guaranteed, price $1.00,  smaller size 50c; at all druggists, or  the Catarrhozone Company, Kingston,  Ont., and Buffalo, N.Y.,  U.S.A."  The following trotting stallions have  gained 2.-05 honor:  Thc'Harvester, 2:01; Cresceus, 2:02:1.;  Billy Burk,' 2:03:1; John A. McKerron,  2:0-1?.; Bob Douglas, -2:041; General  li, 2:04:!; Colorado E, 2:0-1:!; and Ad-,  miral Dewey, 2:04:!. The Harvester  is in the Billings stable. Cresceus is  in Russia. Billy Burk is in training  in Lon McDonald's stable. Jno. A..  McKerron is in the stud. Bob Douglas and General H are racing in Russia. Colorado E will be .trained . for  an attempt against the stallion record. Admiral' Dewey -,died. several  years ago. * .        ' - ".  .  Headaches' ��������������������������� nausea"-.-- iridigestionT-muddy complexion���������������������������"pimples-*^  bad breath���������������������������these are "some of the effects of constipation.   -The mild, sensible,  reliable remedy ^^m^^^^^s\\\\\\\\W^m\W.m\\,'wMk^  They contain tHe latest  discovered am! best evacuant known, which;  empties the bowels Without the'slightest discomfort and without disturbing the rest of the system. .Constantly increased doses are not necessaryv-  25c. ��������������������������� Won.   If row tfructtst has not yet stocked them, sand 25c. and we will mail them. 25 |  National Drug: .-nd Chemical Company of Canada, Limited, -- -   ���������������������������     Montreal.  Gure  OWHIM* aaieauo HEALS THE LUNGS  STOPS COUGHS PRICE. 25 CENTS  WALL PLASTER  The "Empire"' Brands of Wood Fiber, Cement Wall  and Finish Plasters should interest you if you  are looking for the best plaster board.  Write today for our specification booklet.  WINNIPEG, MAN  AN ACADEMY FOR DOGS  An enterprising person in Paris has  opened an academy for dogs. The  duration of the curriculum is a minimum four months, when presumably a  pass decree is obtained. For honors,  the time spent at the academy is longer. The cost of living with class fees  Is somewhat heavy.  The animals received at. the school,  which has above its portals in letters of gold the words, "Academic pour  Chiens," are taught a thousand and  one graceful tricks, and on leaving  they fake with them their diploma  signed and sealed. Some of the alumni, v>-c read, have nlrendy attained a  deserved reputation.  Is theBest Buy in  Western  Canada  and INDUSTRIAL VIEW is the Best Buy In EDMONTON  Why Edmonton ?  Is Lhe centre of the greatest railroad activity in the West.  Is tlie gateway of the great Peace River country now being  opened up. Is growing more rapidly than any other city in  Alberta. Ts East becoming the greatest manufacturing city  ���������������������������west of Toronto.  Why Industrial  Is a close-in subdivision and will be the scene of considerable more building operations this summer. Adjoins the million-dollar packing plant owned by Swift & Co. Is half mile  from Burns' plant and alongside Edmonton Carpet and Box  factory. Five thousand men employed in these factories.  Lies between two car-lines; consequently Industrial View will  be a big factor to all who invest today���������������������������Ideal Industrial View.  Lots Sell IHO fot $150 tO $250    *30 down, balance $ 15 monthly  LUIO  OCIfllli/   fVl    yy f ������������������/v   *-v y^w^ Write at once for Particulars  45 Scott Block  WINNIPEG  MacDowell & Parsons  45 Scott Block  WINNIPEG  ���������������������������Al ENDERBY PRESS AND  WALKER'S WEEKLY  /  P  Fires Made to Order  Barry  O'Neil,  managing director of, curls.    The  features  of  the  face  are  one of the Lubin stock companies, receives a scenario of a photoplay. It is  a melodramatic story which, to the  experienced director is perfectly easy,  except that he must make a fire scene,  with all the circumstance and excitement of the real thing. He approaches  the principals of t.he firm and tells  them that there is no fire reported in  town and he must have a fire that  afternoon, as the production is late.  "Well," replies Mr. Lubin, "make  one."  O'Neil explains that it will cost  much  money.  "No matter what it costs. Make the  fire!"  The stage manager goes out on a  hurried quest, and not far from the  plant he finds an empty house, in a row  of pretty cottages. The' landlord is  sent i'or and a deal i'or the rehearsal  is quickly made-with a guarantee that  the house shall not be burned down  and all damages shall be paid for. A  telephone 'is sent to the nearest fire  station and engine and crew of firemen are secured ancl quickly on the  spot, followed by the usual crowd,  which pretty soon numbers 400 or 500.  Here is the necessary mob. O'Neil  brings his players to the scene, ancl  standing in 'the middle of the road  directs the scene. A few preliminary  "��������������������������� instructions' and all hands go to work.  Smoke  is  seen   issuing  from  the  top  - story window. The engine dashes  around the corner and the firemen get  down to business. A half dozen axes  smash in the door ancl lower windows  '- and the firemen enter. Ladders are  placed at the upper windows, which  are quickly demolished.  A child is brought out of tho door,  then three or four men and women are  dragged through the upper windows  by the firemen ancl brought down tlTe  ladders to safety. ' The mob cheers lhe  rescuers. A property man of the  plant is one of the workers at the  scene;   a little  dog,  Trixie,  is  always  - at his heels, and as the man dashes  into the burning" building the dog fearlessly follows. Presently the clog is  seen to jump from one of the avindows and receives a round of applause.  There is still one woman in the burning house. The smoke is now dense  ��������������������������� and  the  flames  belch  forth  from  lho  from the.windows.    The rescuei ones  -urge the firemen  to save the heroine  of the playlet. - One daring manu*ushes  " up-,the ;������������������ ladder-��������������������������� to'the-'top uloor,   he  climbs   into Jthe   window,   the ..crowd  r'shriek and^ cover their eyes at the "fear-  ,- ful���������������������������*sight;   presently',tiro  fireman -ap-  _pears at 1the window, "one drm.ciasps  , May "_ Buckley' around -the- waist,   and  , "stepping out;upon*the la.l-5or .io dra^s  the.siTseless form'out and-carries her  ' hoadTirst tothe ground: -.The Vnobem-"  brace   the   rescued   woman,, and ' the  brave fireman.    Miss Buckley quickly  slips out; of the picture and  trots off  '- back  to  the  studio. -  The  flames  ancl  smoke clear away: ''the house,  cxcei-'t  for  tho  broken   windows. Mooks   none  the-worse for the rehearsal. " ' ".  Howi are    the    smoke   and   flames  made?    You must ask "the-chemist..'  lacking; perhaps some superstition  such as that which prevails among Mohammedans forbade their portrayal.  Some small ivory figures also recently discovered, and considered to be  of the same date do show features,  which arc those of the bush women or  Hottentots of South Africa.  The three bas-reliefs came from a  kind of subterranean museum'discovered at Laussel, in the Dordogne. Here  in front of a ravine stands a gigantic  ruin the donjon of Commarpue, which  faces Laussel.  Under the shadow of this fortress  was tho site chosen by the palaeolithic  men for their primeval village, a site  chosen no doubt for the same strategic reasons that appealed to the builders of the donjon. Bones of lions, stags,  monkeys, wolves and reindeer, chiefly  reindeer, are to be found under the  soil, as well as quantities "of weapons  polishers and pierced shells, which  evidently made part of, palaeolithic  woman's adornment.  In a cave in the surrounding cliffs  has been discovered a frieze beautifully done, representing bison, horses,  etc. These belong to .the Aurignacian  epoch.  ART OF 30,000 YEARS  AGO    .  . ' Three statuettes, or bas-reliefs as  they might almost be called, the work  of men-who "lived-about'30,000 B.C.,  were exhibited recently before, the  French Academy of Inscriptions. " The  man represented in these bas-reliefs is  strongly but neatly made, thin, without  any sign of superfluous flesh, and his  figure betokens great suppleness. He  seems to be on the point of throwing  a lance.  The   women    are    rather  heavy   in  ^build.^-v-The^Jiair.-is���������������������������welWdressed^and.  falls down over the neck in long, close  NEW ONTARIO  It is easier to give ?5,000,000 for the  development of New Ontario, if one  has the means, than to decide upon  ways and means for expending it to  thc best advantage. The Government  of Ontario is receiving much gratuitous advice on this score just now.  Whatever may be said in behalf of the  forest and mining interests of that  part of the country, there is one thing  certain, that permanent progress need  not bc hoped for unless the agricultural resources of the country receive  first attention. But the big question is how best to bring.the big farming area of that part of Ontario to'  the attention of the* settler and. how  best to help the settler when he is  secured to make thc most of his opportunity. A system of ready made  farms has been suggested as the plan  that" should^ be adopted. , * While there  is much, to be said in -favor _of a  scheme of this kind, it is just a question whether this is the plan to adopt  or a scheme'by which the settler might  do his own getting ready, so to"speak,  the government loaning him sufficient  funds at a',l6w rate of interest to enable him'tov'rnake good."- This latter  plan would.-have; this -advantage,^ at  any rate, ������������������it. would test"the ability of  the settler to make good in a new  country^ - But whether the ready made  farm or some other -plan is. adopted,  the 'success of the .venture, will depend, large.ly.-uponLthe kind, of, settler.  The ready-made farm idea * might be  taken advantage-.of by people, with no  other desire-than to acquire the.title  deeds to a piece of Ontario's heritage.  This,' however, -could be safeguarded  against by making the period of residence before a clear title could be secured long enough-to prevent it.- Along'  with any scheme for,settling thejeoun-'  try' must go some plan for providing  good roads for'the districts-settled.  Without this few'Would care to venture in.   - ������������������  DURO  TRADE MARK REG.  Sheathing Paper  ���������������������������a high-grade paper, odoriess,  tasteless, free from tar,  waterproof, exceptionally strong  --will not tear. A durable  and effective interlining for  walls, floors and ceilings.  Examine DURO carefully at  your dealer's, or write for sample  and Booklet to the 85  Sole Canadian Manufacturers  THE STANDARD PAINT CO.  of Canada, Limited,  Montreal, Winnipeg, Calgary, Vancouver.  THE  BLOODHOUND ON  THE  TRAIL  The bloodhound, or what*-is known  as the bloodhound, has figured prominently in many important cases in  criminology, and the work, of the dogs  has often resulted in conviction." Last  year in Omaha, Neb., Herman Cohn, a  business man, was killed within fifty  feet _of_ his^ home. There was _a_ dog  llTow^b^iW=lrefd=iir"Ornal1arat_th"e_fime  and two hounds were secured from the  show and put on the trail within an  hour of the murder. One of the assassins had dropped his revolver and  did not stop to recover it. This revolver was used as the scent.  Without a halt or falter the hounds  led their trainer through the outskirts  of Omaha clown through a park and  out upon the railroad track, which was  followed for'mlles^..'Once _thc_.hounds  stopped at a barn, 'but only for a moment, when thoy again took up the  trail. At La Plate, fifteen miles south  of Omaha, the hounds made a circuit  of the railroad watering tank, went  onco around the depot, and thon to  the door of the station. When the door  was opened they rushed to ono corner  in which two young men were sitting  and bayed at them. They admitted  having been in Omaha, having walked  the track, and were identified by  young Cohn as the men who killed his  father.  better  still,  embroidered  with  colored  worsted.  Below where you have tied the skein  separate it into three parts, the two  at the sides being smaller than the  central portion. These side strands  should be braided to form the arms  of the doll; tie the braids at thc points  you intend %r the wrists; the parts  below will serve as hands.  At waist length tie the skein again,  and if your doll is to be a girl she  will now be finished, unless you wish  to give her feet below the line of her  skirt. If so, braid strands from the  central part of the skein and tie these  to form feet. The straight hanging  strands may be clipped a little to show  the feet, if you' wish. If you prefer  a' boy ������������������doll, divide the entire skein  below the waist line and braid to form  legs, tying above the feet. '  Dolls may be made in this way from  black worsted. A 'gift for Easter to  your schoolgirl chum may be two of  these tiny 'dolls, a boy and a girl, fastened at either end of a strip of ribbon. The eyes, nose and mouth may  be marked with red silk, which turns  the dolls into little pickaninnies.  WHEN   NAPOLEON   GREW   FAT  History as Told  in  the  Newly  Found  Account  Books  of  His Tailor  Paris, April 4,���������������������������The account books  of Chevalier, who was the tailor of  Napoleon I., have just been discovered  and reflect his history from July, 1805,  to June, 1809, when they close.  The first thing that strikes the reader of these leaves yellowed by time, is  that the Emperor was very hard on his  clothes and had many repairs made.  The bill for 1806 is significant. In addition to the usual repairs, linings, new  buttons, etc., come the suggestive  items:��������������������������� v  To enlarging" the Coronation coat,  to relining and six ells of satin  ; for relining at 15 francs  -  90  To    enlarging   six   old    pairs    of  white kerseymere trousers      18  Putting two backs into jackets to    -'  enlarge  them    10  Enlarging hunting coat in front...   30  Enlarging 24  kerseymere trousers  throughout        96  Enlarging a coat and trousers and  putting in a new back      .7  .All these items show that Napoleon  was beginning to put on.flesh in 1806.  He was then about 40 and was returning from the first campaign he. had  conducted as Emperor. He instructed  his tailor to prepare the Coronation  garments worn just a year before, but  now they had to be enlarged.  The -account books show that the  bills sent in were' made, out for greater, amounts than those endorsed in the  books.because the Emperor revised all  his bills and cut them, clown, ,so the  tailor increased^them beforehand. His  green coat cost him ?42, his epaulettes  ?28.80;--his. star,- $10;,-... his grenadier  uniform," $50. " */}>'���������������������������' ��������������������������� ��������������������������� .���������������������������'.'" ~  ' As' cloak. he - wore -almost 'exclusively  the famous grey coat, for which Chevalier charged him-$40, a price that  Chevalier's successor, Legeume,- reduced to $32, much to-Napoleon's pleasure. Hisrhats cost him $9.60and it  is calculated that from 1800 to 1815  he wore out 120. '   , . -  .With every coat he ordered an extra pair of epaulettes'and'a'star/The  epaulettes, of course, soon showed  signs, of wear from being-used, under  the grey cloak, but the, stars were of  solid "silver and their number is explained by the .Emperor's habit of  presenting them to his, marshals and  high dignitaries. .  THE  NEAL CURE  For Alcoholism  rpHE Neal Treatment releases the moderate,  -I. periodical or excessive drinker from an appetite  stronger than his will power, stronger than the tearful wife's pleadings. It takes all desire for liquor  away,   and   in  Three Days' Time  without hypodermic injections, leaving, thc patient  in the same perfect condition as he was before  he ever touched liquor. Write or call for full information.    Everything confidential.  The Drug  Habit perfectly cured also.  The NEAL INSTITUTE CO,, Ltd.  602 Seventeenth Ave. West  CALGARY  ' 405 Broadway. <  WINNIPEG  2244 Smith St.  REGINA  fl������������������  Standard  Gas Engine  gives theN best lubrication possible, alike in kerosene,'  gasoline and gas .engines.   Keeps -its body at'high.;  temperatures.   Equally good for external'beaniigs./,,  MI���������������������������A AXLE GREASE7 >  saves power and fuel in yoiif.^tractprB;'':^e^best'-;ir.  known, most liked.' axle. greasevmade.,: Never rubs, %  off.  Never gums.;- .,���������������������������-   /"   / XJ/\'%\77y\'7'y'Xy'7X'X  DOLLS OF CORD AND WORSTED  A doll which is just the thing for a  baby, because it is soft and cuddly  and has no hard edges to hurt ancl no  paint to come off when the baby puts  it info his mouth, can be made by the  baby's big sister or big brother from  a ball of cord or a skein of worsted.  Choose cord or worsted that is soft  and white in color; a ball of cord may  be purchased for not more than 10  cents at any hardware store. Now  take a stiff piece of cardboard about  nine or ten inches long and wind off  thc cord or worsted over this until  all  is   thus  rewound.  Slip the skein off the cardboard and  tie one end tightly about half an inch  from thc end, making a hard knot,  so that there is no clanger of the cord  pulling out. Then cut the loops of*  the other end, leaving only cut ends,  and reverse the skein, so that' the  knot you have made is inside. Just  below the knot tie the skein tightly  again; this forms a firm head for the  doll.     A face may be marked out or,  THE  REAL EUGENE ARAM  .A sale of relics of Eugene Aram reminds -.us that-Lord Lytton's Aram was  a very different personage from him  who was hanged at York, who, judging from the published-account of the  trial, was merely a felon of the baser  sort. He associated with low companions, married a low wife and practiced swindling with a miserable creature whom in his younger days he  was=assoeiated=*with=inrsstealing=flower  roots���������������������������for they were both gardeners  ���������������������������and finally murdered him to secure  a few pounds, the proceeds of a swindle. . :���������������������������  Aram possessed a vigorous intellect,  had mastered the learned languages,  had read every classic that came in  his way, ancl says a distinguished  writer, when the learned felon- came  to  make  his  defence  all  Britain   was  astonished by _a   piece . _nf __plcadjng  which, if given to the public among  the defences and under the namo of  Thomas Lord Erskine, so celebrated  for this species of composition, would  certainly ndt be deemed unworthy of  thc collection of its author.  BREED   CAREFULLY   NURTURED  This breed of clogs���������������������������the bloodhound  ���������������������������has been carefully nutured in  late years and the bloodhound today  is probably the most aristocratic of  all breeds of dogB and can trace his  ancestry back for hundreds of years.  There are many different types of  bloodhounds but these different strains  all lead back to one stock, but show  crosses at times with other breeds for  the purpose of fitting them for other  work. In India there is the Rampore  hound, a wild, ferocious beast used  for hunting. This animal stands about  three feet in height and not long ago  three of them started a tiger out of  its lair ancl literally .tore the tiger to  pieces. One man cannot hold one of  these hounds ancl they are beaten into  subjection by their owner, who will  uso a leather thonged whip on which  are small pieces of steel or nails.  There is -a Spanish bloodhound  which is said to, be the hound used in  the South ancl West. It went from  Spain to Cuba and then into this country, and slave owners used it during  slave days to track runaways. This  animal is ' not as ferocious as it is  supposed to be. It will not attack a  man unless it has been specially trained for that purpose. A slave owner  who had his money invested in slaves  did not want to injure his property but  Engine Kerosene Oil  Silver Stair  ,t  Gasoline  Engine^  ���������������������������-   -v,^"   1      Jii  7 -Zj-i  i GRANITE HARVESTER OIL-r-The'.short cutxoil ���������������������������'speci-" 7  ally prepared for use on reapers; .binders.and threshers.  Greatly" 7  reduces <friction?and wear.' Body not affected by1 moisture or --.-;  change of climate.    ���������������������������      :-'    "    -'   7       7    /.      . ."   -7-/J y 7  ���������������������������     . .- -        _r_'_.,      ' ' .    . v  *-  "    *-���������������������������--..-* -.   --'--  CAPITOL CYLINDER OD^-The very..best oil for'"steamX  plants on the farm.   Lasts longer and gets more power from v  the engine,-with less-'wear,-than1 any cheap, substitutes; costs -  ��������������������������� less in'the end. -  .-      ������������������������������������������������������"���������������������������-.        -'*���������������������������*     ;;    . - "   '-"  ���������������������������- "'" "-.-"  ATLANTIC RED. ENGINE OIL-^Strongly recommended .!  for slow, and medium speed engines and machinery. Bases .the -',  bearings and lightens the load. - "    J ���������������������������"-  Our experts ��������������������������� have made a special-study of    ���������������������������-.-" :  '   -    the requirements of farm machinery. , Bead  i our "Easier Fanning" booklet; _ free, post-'- "-��������������������������� *  paid.   Call or write,'any agency. -        ���������������������������"  The Imperial Oil Company, Limited  .-. -���������������������������'"'  T*r -.-.-- f>~cr���������������������������������������������  -* ���������������������������: -r���������������������������_ - -i ,������������������*-  J*&&r   -���������������������������    -    *Vk  t\.j~: .   '.   ���������������������������Jt f-i-\W  :���������������������������_.'.- c.jr-^l  -if/j/ygp-zm  Ts *>_ .^ri^fST'JfcalVlfr r  a&  ,;*m I  Z-Al  to discover it, and the hound would  track the runaway and when found  the slave would take to a tree while  the hound would lie underneath and it  is said quietly wag his tail at his prisoner. The slaves, however, lived in  fear of these dogs ancl were taught  that they would tear them to pieces  sliould  they be caught.  In slave days there were bloodhounds on nearly every plantation, and  since thoscrdays- these'dogs" have'been  kept and improved as far as possible  and are used for hunting purposes.  In the South ancl West, too, they aro  Btill kept for man-hunting purposes and  are really very savage. They are used  to track criminals and have been used  very successfully.  LIABILITY TO SICKNESS  The liability to sickness varies with  the  occupation.      In   Germany  out  of  every 100 workers between  15 and  GO  years of age, thero fall ill on the average, of storekeepers' assistants, 4; tailors, 5G;  shoemakers, turners, .saddlers,  and leather dealers, each, 59; butchers,  64;   gold nnd silver workers,  G5;   carpenters  and  wheelwrights,  GS;   glove-  makers (male), 71; bakers and confectioners, each 74; blacksmiths and locksmiths,   each,    70;    coachmen,    textile  workers     ancl      book-binders,      each,  SO; small printers, S4; glove manufacturers, SG;  glove-makers  (female), female   workers   in   cement   works,   92;  female  textile  workers,   93;   clay   ancl  porcelain workers, 94;  builders' workmen, 95;  female workers in small factories,  96;   brickmakers, male workers  in match factories, and cement works,  each,  102;   furnace  workers  In  match  factories, 103; large printers, 104;  leather  manufacturers,   105;   female  clay  and   porcelain    workers,    106;    female  workers in wooden ware factories, 10S;  obacco workers, 109; glassblowers, 112;  workers   in   sugar   refineries,   126;   in  paper mills, 130; on heating and lighting  apparatus,   132;   iron   and   metal  workers,   137;   brewers,   distillers,   and  railway   workmen,    142;    workers    Jn  chemical factories, 170; miners, 184. - ;  GROWING   DIAMONDS  ARTIFICIALLY  It has  been  found  by  W.  von  Bolton   that   certain   carbon   compounds,  such as illuminating gas, when exposed  to   the  action   of  mercury   vapor,  are  decomposed,,., Jiberating_a___portion7of__7f  their carbon     partly    in  the "form  of  amorphous  powder and  partly  in  the  form  of  microscopic  diamonds.      Mr.  Bolton has continued his experiments  with a view to causing the growth of  the small diamonds thus  formed.    He  took very fine diamond powder which,  even under the miscroscopc at a magnification of GS diameters, showed only  a  few    crystals.      This    powder Avas-  placed   on 'a  layer of sodium  silicate:  ancl  exposed   to  mercury  vapors   proceeding from   sodium  amalgflnT.    Tlie  materials were kept at 100 deg. Cent,  and a slow current of illuminating gas '  was passed  through.      At  the end  of  ono  month  a  very  small   quantity  of  black,carbon  had deposited, while the  original layer of dust showed, even to"  the  naked  eye,  some  brilliant  point.':,  indicating  the    presence    of diamond  crystals.    After cleaning with acids the  author  once  more  examined  the  material   under   thc   microscope  with   68  diameter magnification, and found that  lhe   original   dull   powder   had   been  transformed    into    brilliant    crystals,  which,   like   natural   diamond,   burned  in   oxygen   without   leaving  any   residue.  CASTORIA  Tor Infants and Children.  The Kind You Have Always Bought  Signature of ^a/^f7^c^X FT  THE ENDERBY PRESS AND WALKER'S WEEKLY  Thursday, June 27, 1912  Want Ads.  AU aria under this head. 3c a word first insertion; lc a word each subsequent insertion: 25c  minimum charpe.  MEN WANTED-For sawmill, yard &  camps: ������������������2.50 to S3.00 per day. Apply  either in person or by letter to Adams'  River Lumber Co., Chase, B.C.   jlStf  For Sale���������������������������Team of bay mares, 0 &  ',) years old, weight about 2500. Guaranteed sound. Price ������������������.500 cash. Apply  K. Waddell, Hazelmere Ranch.  T. P.'S MAGAZINE ON B. C.  For-Sale���������������������������One saddle mare,  to (!. .Murdock, Grindrod.  Apply  jGtf  OF  Under the caption "A Benevolent  Autocrat," T. P. O'Connor writes in  his magazine of' June,' a most interesting sketch of Sir Richard McBride,  in which he'gives a sidelight on what  the Old Country people think of this  rapidly developing province. After  reviewing the splendid work of Sir  ���������������������������Richard as premier of the province,  Mr. O'Connor adds:  "Thc future development of British  Columbia must go on at even a more  rapid rate than even its present enormous advance. In a couple of years  from now the   Panama canal will be  _���������������������������__ _ ��������������������������� open to the   commerce of thc world,  For Sale���������������������������A few Berkshire pigs;; and all the western coast on the Pa-  boars and sows; registered stock, cific must receive an -Immense impetus  Stepney Ranch, Enderby. jGtf j from this extraordinary new devclop-  ��������������������������� ���������������������������.���������������������������: ���������������������������    ment of ocean traffic.     Thc thoughts  ' of Mr. McBride have been devoted for  some years towards preparation for  this momentous revolution. He went  to the country a few months ago;  and the chief plank in his platform  was thc construction uf railways to  the enormous amount of twenty million sterling, and the result I have  already told���������������������������a ^legislature of forty  supporters and two opponents.  "But there are other developments  going on under this active and restless man. He is building one of the  greatest universities in the world for  his province, and he is searching all  Europe for men who are the foremost in educational work. It is his  ambition, as he says himself, not to  reach as high an educational position  as Oxford or Cambridge or Harvard,  but to start equal with them."  "Finally, a few statistics to show  what progress British Columbia has  made in the ten years of Mr. Mc-  Bride's rule: The net revenue has  grown from $2,044,00 in 3 902-3 to  $10,500,000 in 1910-11. Whereas the  province was heavily in debt in 1903,  the public accounts showed at the  close of the last fiscal year a balance  of $1,500,000 over all liabilities, and  by reason of thc surpluses which of  late years have been the invariable  result, thc estimated expenditures for  the present fiscal year are more than  "The    population,    too,  CANADA  $8,181,370  Tolal Assets (Over)    $58,0009000  CITY COUNCIL MEETING  Taid-up Capital. Rest  and Undivided ProliJs  A Growing Balance  in a Savings Bank Account is one  of the strongest incentives to  further saving. It is a source of  genuine satisfaction, and gives a  comfortable feeling of security  from financial troubles.  If 3-ou haven't a Savings Bank  Account already, now is the time  to start one.    Come iu and do it.  Enderby Branch,   W. D. o. CHRISTIE, Manager  LONDON  CH9  G.  , ENG., BRAN  51 Tiircudnecdlc St., E.C.  XV. ASHE, - - Map.nfjcr  M. C. HAKT SMITH.   Assistant M.jr  Attention    is    called  to the  Water  Department notice in this issue'of the  Press.   All holders of water rights in  .this district   will be particularly in- i.?16,000,000  vterested In ��������������������������� the   meetings advertised . has grown in ten years "-ore than 113  to take place. -   ; per cent., and is_now 400,000."  rvey  Real Estate, Insurance, Etc.  Post Office Block, Enderby  The City Council met in regular  session Monday evening;.--Acting Mayor Peel in the chair, ancl Aldermen  Blanchard, Barnesu Keith and Johnston around the table.  When the business growing out of  the minutes was cleaned up, A. Fi  Cr.ossman, solicitor for Wm. H. Hutchison, addressed the Council, stating that Mr. Hutchison wished to  protest against the -oroposed action  of S. Poison,who was about to move  the old shacks from their present position on Belvedere street to the back  of the lot, thus greatly adding to the  general risk of the neighborhood. Mr.  Crossman called attention to Sec. 5,  of By-law 55, known as thc Building  By-law, which reads "that every person or corporation who* has obtained  a permit for thc erection, alteration,  removal or structural repair of any  building, if called upon by the Board  of Works or by any inspector acting  under their authority so to clo, shall  submit to such Board or to such inspector plans and. specifications of  the building proposed to be erected."  Mr. Crossman asked the Council to  look into the matter before granting  the permission for the moving of the  buildings referred to. This was  promised by the Council, it being the  general opinion that the only permission that should be granted was  for the tearing down nf the buildings  in question.1  The report of thc -secretary of the  celebration committee, ^id over from  last meeting, was taken up, ancl the  amount <asked for by the committee  to allow the payment of suitable  sums to the baseball team and the  local- band, was granted, a reduction  of $10 being made toward the band,  in view of the action taken by-the  Council in allowing $25 per month  towards the up-keep of the .band.  The matter of poor.water service  was again brought to the attention  of the' Council. Constable Bailey reported more trouble at the head of  the system. It was ordered that the  intake be moved temporarily until  the river lowered,- when "permanent  repairs should be.made..        *   -  A discussion of the drain .question  again occupied the hours of the  Council. A tender was received from  Robt. Jones ' for .the digging and  backfilling, but .as the Council had'  not 'yet called for tenders, the matter  could not be considered.   -  See our window  for enquiries for all  kinds of Properties;  Perhaps yours will suit  IOUS  TO    MAKE    A  LEFT   BEFORE    WE  OUR  NEW-  LIST  [IS BEING   RAPIDLY    FILLED    UP  JBY OWNERS    ANXIOUS    TO MAKE  USE OF OUR BRANCH AGENCIES.  NEXT WEEK  WE WILL CLOSE THIS LIST. IF  YOU HAVE NOT SEEN US ABOUT  YOUR PROPERTY   AND ARE ANX-  GOOD   SALE,  YOU    HAVE    ONLY    A. FEW DAYS  GO   TO THE PRINTER.  TAFT IS NOMINATED  HARVEY & RODIE  Will be Celebrated in Grander Fashion  than ever before at  JULY FIRST  Two Flights by Aviator Stark in his Wright Biplane  75-h.p., 8-cylinder.  First Aeroplane Flight in tke Interior  BASEBALL���������������������������League Games  Vernon vs. Kelowna  Enderby vs. Armstrong  HORSE RACING  Vernon ancl Armstrong Bands.      u  LACROSSE-League Games  Kelowna vs. Armstrong  Grand Ball in the evening.  SEE BIG DISPLAY CARDS FOR FULL PARTICULARS .. S TO PROGRAMME AND EXCURSION RATES. Special train leaves Revelstoke,  ���������������������������5:30 a.m.; arrive Armstrong, 9.15 a. m.; leave Okanagan Landing 10.15 a.  m., arrive Armstrong 11.25. Returning, leave Armstrong (south) S.30 p.  m., arrive Okanagan Landing 9.30 p. m.; leave Armstrong ("north) 11.00 p.  m., arrive Revelstoke 2.00 a.m.  The national Republican convention  concluded its labors at Chicago Saturday evening last by the nomination of President Taft for a second  term. The "steam roller'.' program  was carried out to the last. Taft received 561 votes, Rosevelt 107, La  Follette 41, Cummins, 17, Hughes, 2,  six were absent, ancl the 344 instructed Roosevelt delegates were present  but refused to vote, owing to what  the Roosevelt leaders claimed was  fraud ancl corruption in the_organ_iza___  tion of the convention. At the conclusion of "the convention as he was  leaving the hall, one of the Taft delegates is reported as saying: "We  have spent a h���������������������������1 of a long time nominating a man who can never be  elected." This seems to express the  general opinion of all politicians who  have watched the contest between the  people's" choice and "the" machine.  Immediately following the nomination of Mr. Taft, the Roosevelt, or  Progressive Republicans, proceeded  with the initial organization of a  new party, and informally nominated  Theodore Roosevelt for the Presidency  explaining that this was necessary in  perfecting a temporary, organization.  "I accept the nomination," said  Colonel Roosevelt, "subject to but  one condition. I ask you to go to  your homes to fin'd out the sentiment  of the people at home, ancl then  again to come together. I suggest by  a mass convention to nominate for  the presidency a progressive candidate under a progressive platform, a  candidate ancl a platform that will  enable us to appeal to all sections in  the name of our common American  citizenship. If you wish me to  make the fight I will make it. The  only condition I impose is that you  shall be entirely free;when you come  together to substitute any other man  in my place if you deem it better for  the government, and in such case I  will give him my heartiest support."  JfWe boom our business  -s by givi ng our customers  Whenever you see people doing a  thriving business you may know there  is a good reason for lt. You may be  fooled vhen you try your goods "on."  but you can't be fooled long after \ou  try them "out."  Ve are in business to stay in business.  Ve would rather make a little profit and  be sure of a big business, than make a big  profit and take chances of having to quit.  Ve give our customers good stuff for  their money, but ve don't "stuff" prices.  Slater Shoes  Empress   "  for Men  Ladies  Enderby TradingCo^Ltd.  MOPPETS  COLUMBIA   FLOURING   MILLS   CO. Limited  Applications   received  for  Loans on improved Farming  and City property.  Apply to���������������������������  G. A. HANKEY & CO., Ltd.        VERNON, B.C.  LEAGUE   UMPIRES  Vernon, June 15.���������������������������Upon advice from  Mr. P. T. Jackson, president of the  Okanagan Valley Baseball League, E  have appointed the foLlowing official  staff of umpires:  Mr. F. T. Jackson,  Armstrong.  Mr. R. E. Berry, Vernon.  Mr. Fravel, sr., Enderby  Mr. James Pettigrew, Kelowna.  They have been, instructed to rigidly enforce all rules, and good clean  sport is assured. Yours truly, M.  Eastman, Secretary.  J. S. JOHNSTONE  Cement Building  Contractor  Is prepared to furnish straight blocks  veneer   blocks,    cement 'brick,  lawn  vases,  peer   blocks,   chimney blocks,-  ��������������������������� also lime and cement,  Leave orders early.  Enderby, B. O.  J'i  I

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