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Public Archives of Canada Report 1972/1973 Public Archives of Canada 1974

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  THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA PUBLIC
ARCHIVES
OF
CANADA
REPORT
1972/1973 Cat. No.: SA1/1972-73 CONTENTS
Introduction
Page
Records Management Branch
Ottawa Headquarters Records Centres Division
Regional Records Centres Division
Office of Records Management Services Division
Historical Branch
Manuscript Division
15
PubUc Archives Library
39
National Map CoUection
43
Picture Division
50
National Film Archives Division
59
Administration and Technical Services Branch
Technical Division
Administrative Services Division
Management Services Division
Personnel Division
Office of the Adviser on Bilingualism and Biculturalism
Displays and PubUcity Division
PubUcations Division
Celebrations on the Centenary of the Public Archives of Canada      75  INTRODUCTION
The year's most important event was
the celebration of the Centennial of
the Public Archives, whose origin
dates from the appointment of William Brymner as the first federal archivist on June 20,
1872. At the same time, 1972 marked the 60th anniversary of the Public Archives Act which
gave the institution its name, its autonomy and the definition of its rôle.
The Centennial provided an opportunity to review our progress and goals in the perspective of our fbst century and to contemplate plans, goals and directions for the next
century. The general goal throughout the last century was to develop a national archives
that would acquire and preserve archival material of every nature and description that would
record all aspects of the history of the country. That goal was achieved to a remarkable
extent.
I have already given a brief account of the development of the Public Archives m my
introduction to the centennial exhibition catalogue, Archives: Mirror of Canada Past, and
I would like to refer the reader to it.
Development took place at an uneven pace. For most of the century progress was slow
because of limited staff, resources and space. In the last two decades there has been remarkable expansion marked by rapid increases in the volume and range of acquisitions, the
services provided to researchers, the development of records management, and technical
advances, particularly with regard to microfilm.
Throughout the century emphasis was placed on service to the public. The quality of
this service has been recognized and appreciated by researchers who continue to write hundreds of letters expressing gratitude for exceptional service by the staff. Several unusual
features were introduced, notably the 24-hour-a-day use of the search room and the interUbrary loan of microfilm.
But as we commence a second century, there are many opportunities and challenges in
the continual quest to preserve a more complete record of Canadian life and to be more
responsive to the needs of the entire community. AU areas are subject to improvement: the
competence of the staff; the comprehensiveness of the coverage, including the newer media,
film and machine-readable records; the size and quality of our conservation program; and
above all, expansion of the program of diffusion of the material held for the benefit and
enrichment of researchers and the general pubUc.
The last preoccupation provided the theme for the Centennial celebrations, which are
described in some detail elsewhere in this Report. It was the subject of discussion with
Canadian and foreign archivists, with professors and teachers of history. It was also the goal
of the Centennial exhibition and the catalogue which accompanied it, which highUghted the
celebrations. These discussions and consultations led to the preparation of specific projects
which wtil be developed over the next few years, and on which I will report next year.
Meanwhile, the Public Archives showed continued general growth in aU its activities,
necessitating the use of office and storage space outside the present building, on a short term
basis, and the preparation of plans for a new building to solve that problem more satisfactorily for the future.
Notable among new developments resulting from growth are the establishment of
PubUc Records as a division separate from the Manuscript Division, and of the National
Film Archives as a division separate from the Picture Division; a special section was also
created for archives of cultural communities other than French and English. Plans were
also made for the opening of two regional records centres to be located at Winnipeg and
Halifax. 2 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
A departmental committee was appointed to look into and report on machine readable
records, their short and long term preservation for administrative and eventually historical
value. A special study was commissioned on conservation of documents and artistic materials
by a recognized authority in the field, Mrs. Caroline K. Keck, professor and adrninistratorl
of the Cooperstown Graduate Program on Conservation of History and Artistic Works.
Her exceUent report wtil be most valuable for the development of our poUcies and practices
hi this essential aspect of our work which, for various reasons, has not been given the attention
it merited in the past.
In all the year's activities, the Public Archives received assistance and co-operation from
many people, and I would like to extend thanks to the individuals and institutions, government departments and officials, and the generous donors of archival materials. I am specially
grateful to all those distinguished guests who participated hi our Centennial celebrations.
Wilfred I. Smith
Dominion Archivist.
31 March 1973. RECORDS
MANAGEMENT
BRANCH
Under the terms of the Public Records
Order (P.C. 1966-1749, 9 September
1966) the Records Management Branch
of the PubUc Archives of Canada is
authorized to provide a comprehensive
service to federal government departments and agencies in Ottawa and other
large metropolitan centres across
Canada. This service includes: the use of records centre storage and reference facilities;
advice and assistance hi records scheduling and disposal; the provision of training courses,
printed standards and guides on records management, records surveys, audit and evaluations; and assistance in other related aspects of records management.
Intensive reorganization and major reclassification occurred throughout the Branch
during 1972-73. Changes involved staff transfers, realignment of duties and responsibilities,
and the development of new operational units in Ottawa and the region. This year, too,
marked the fbst fuU year of operation of the Vancouver Records Centre.
The Branch is divided into three Divisions: Ottawa Headquarters Records Centres
Division; Regional Records Centres Division; Office of Records Management Services
Division. Table I gives a breakdown of the total records centres holdings of the Branch.
TABLE I
Total holdings of the Records Management Branch as of 31 March 1973
Records Centre
Cu.
Ft. of Records
Shelving Occupied
(approx. utiles)
Ottawa complex
528,648
100
Toronto
121,137
23
Montreal
102,099
19
Vancouver
30,853
6
Totals
782,737
148
OTTAWA   HEADQUARTERS Durmg me year tms Division acces-
RECORDS CENTRES DIVISION reference reached a high of 187,281
requests: an average of more than 15,600 requests a month. In the personnel files activity,
another record was achieved; the files of 282,866 persons in both the civUian and armed
services categories were processed.
Effective 1 April 1972, the Division was reorganized and divided into three Sections,
two of which are designated as records centres: the General Records Centre (GRÇ), the
Canadian Forces Records Centre (CFRC), and the Personnel Records Systems Services
Section (PRSSS). Reporting procedures were worked out by sections, and stiU require
considerable reaUgnment. During the coming year we wtil be working on Performance
Indicators for the Canadian Forces Records Centre, and we hope to set up relevant standards.
A summary of statistics for the Division appears in Table H. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
3    I
S ?■ 5 ! ! 11 !•
j, s i ; i | a s
111 11 !! 11 !
HI 11II111
lïilllllli
||| s s s s g s §
ijî !• ! 11111
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illilllï
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H ...:.,„
Hiiiiïi RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 5
GENERAL RECORDS CENTRE (GRC)—Accessions—Because of reorganization, little
could be done to promote the use of GRC facilities. We were kept busy responding to demands
for services and were unable to solicit new accessions. As a result, the normal accession total
increased by only 1,100 cubic feet (excluding absorption by the War Service Records Division).
Also accessioned were 914 cubic feet of Emergency Measures Organization material for the
security site, and 3,773 cubic feet of mUitary and civilian personnel records. Arrangements
were also made to transfer to the Records Centre, from the Post Office and National Defence
Department aU personnel files recorded on microfilm. For the first time records were received from the Science Council of Canada and the Office of the Auditor General.
Reference—Our constantly improving techniques reduced research by 136 hours this year.
Our biggest customers were: National Revenue Department, with 27,991 reference requests;
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), with 25,300, and the Department
of Supply and Services (DSS), with 15,299.
An increase of 17,945 requests on general files came largely from two sources: National
Revenue Tax Division, where activity on T2 Corporation Tax records caused requests to
rise by 12,000; CMHC, where calls for mostly paid-up loan files increased requests by 10,000.
A decrease in interfiles of 14,899 was principally caused by CMHC's procedural changes,
which constituted 12,638 of the above total.
Physical disposals—Ordinary wastepaper is completely up-to-date, with no backlog, but
difficulties were encountered in the disposal of classified wastepaper. Efforts are being made
to solve that problem.
Transfers—Some 1,113 cubic feet of files were returned to owner departments for retention
or review; 4,610 cubic feet of files were passed to the Public Records Section of the Historical
Branch.
Relocations—The records formerly held in the Data Centre basement storage area which
we had to vacate, were relocated in the Records Centre Annex. This led to several transfers
and reshelvings.
Inventory—Much time was spent making a complete inventory of the records held by the
General Records Centre. As a result of this inventory, true figures of holdings on subject
accessions by departments are Usted, and wtil be updated on a yearly basis using the figures
provided by monthly reports from the Office of Records Management Services (ORMS).
Several meetings were held with the Department of Supply and Services concerning
cheques. Satisfactory solutions were found on frequency of transfers, size of boxes and
recycling of paper. A study was conducted into the record keeping practices of the departmental service offices at the request of the same department. Recommendations were made
to improve their management. Discussions were held with the Department of Health and
Welfare, and agreement reached to have specially designed boxes for the miniature files of
the Radiation Protection Bureau.
Other duties performed include trucking services for the Administration Branch and
the Office of Records Management Division, and the fumigation of some 200 feet of records.
CANADIAN FORCES RECORDS CENTRE (CFRC)—This Centre was created in 1971
when the War Services Records were transferred from the Department of Veterans Affairs
to the Records Management Branch of the PubUc Archives. The reorganization initiated PUBUC ARCHTVES REPORT 1972-1973HJ
at the time was completed without interruption of service. A number of form letters were»
designed to improve service, and turn-around time on correspondence has been reduced
from one month to a maximum of three days. Problem areas relating to access and invasion
of privacy are being identified and wtil be cleared with the creating departments and the
users at a later date. A number of meetings have been held with National Defence records
personnel on immediate problems. They have resulted in a notable reduction in interfiles and
the elimination of much useless work for all concerned.
PERSONNEL RECORDS SYSTEMS SECTION—This section processes both civiUan
and mUitary files. In 1972-73 the total number of files processed was 282,866, an increase of
139,960 over the preceeding year. They consisted of 182,693 files of wartime and regular
forces (automated method), 59,153 files of reserve forces, and 41,020 files of civUian personnel.
The reference on civUian personnel files was as follows:
CivUian Personnel FUes
1972-73
1971-72
Increase or
Decrease
Requests
10,913
8,919
+1,994
Interfiles
12,414
45,452
-33,038
Research hours
1,622
2,278
-656
Persons processed (files
of)
41,020
50,177
-9,157
Automated services—On 1 September 1972, work started on the 1971 Regular Force releases,
and was foUowed by work on World War H and RCAF releases. Since then, we have processed 21,526 Regular and 161,167 World War H and RCAF files.
FUe pockets—Some trouble was experienced in acquiring file pockets so processing had to
be suspended for a time. To prevent waste, our machine operators used the time to convert
35,220 pre-1971 Regular Force index cards from Soundex to keypunch. EventuaUy, we hope
to convert the entire Regular Force Index to keypunch. A new type of pocket was devised,
costing 13.5 cents each, as compared with the former price of 26.9 cents each. This represents
a saving of $48,000.00 for the fiscal year of 1972 alone.
Economy envelope—An economy envelope was designed to store Reserve Forces Records.
The new envelope will effect considerable savings in production cost and manpower.
Microfilmed records—We have entered the field of microfilmed records and have accessioned
1,500 reels from the Post Office and National Defence Departments this year.
Integration and Support Services Unit—This unit has integrated 33,624 cubic feet of files and
has given 8,125 hours of support to other units. Over and above its normal activities, the
unit has: 1) sorted, arranged and interfiled 138,129 pay sheets received from 28 military pay
bases across the country; 2) screened and sorted 2,385 cubic feet of records, and separated
these by type of service; 3) forwarded to PubUc Records Section of the PubUc Archives, afl
Fenian Raid and North West RebeUion records; 4) dismantled and reassembled 2,500 linear
feet of shelving to house medical library records.
Training—A total of 20 man-weeks were aUotted to training senior personnel, and 16 weeks
to training intermediate staff members of the Division. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 7
REGIONAL RECORDS The Division ûas three main activities, aU of which
r,17lVTPïrÇ nTVICIfiW correspond roughly to those activities described by
IsiLlX 1KIL& Ul V lMUIN the Ottawa Headquarters Records Centres Division.
Differences arise only from geographic location and the types of records held and serviced.
Storage facUiues—Provision of economical storage factiities for departmental dormant
records of the general or subject category (no personnel records) m regions where the Federal
Government has its main activities.
Reference service—Provision to the departments of a complete reference service on the local
records (no headquarters records) stored hi the regional records centres.
Disposal—Provision of a service for the physical destruction of obsolete or useless records
by theb shredding, baling, incineration, or despatch to waste paper contractors, in order to
vacate Centre space for further storage use.
General—Whtie the 1972-73 fiscal year has seen the rapid development of the infant Vancouver Centre, plans were going steadily ahead on the proposed Winnipeg and Halifax Centres.
We now expect that the two proposed centres, Winnipeg and Halifax, wtil open theb doors
sometime within the 1973-74 fiscal year.
Departments have begun to request more and better service for theb offices, even in
areas where no records centre yet exists. This is a most encouraging indication for the estabUshment of future records centres. We have been required to give active consideration to a
proposal that a regional centre be estabUshed in Edmonton. It would serve aU Alberta where
an earlier survey strongly indicated that a records centre operation would be viable. Statistical
information relating to the several Regional Records Centres is given in Table III.
TORONTO RECORDS CENTRE—Accessions this year total 33,731 cubic feet, the highest
figure for accessions in Toronto hi any one year to date. This amount represents a 61 per cent
increase over the 1971-72 total.
Reference on requests reached a new high of 151,061, an increase of 59,368 over the
Î&71-72 total. Records disposal was increased from 13,067 cubic feet to 28,990 cubic feet, or
by 100 per cent. Some 223 tons of paper were shredded, baled and sold for $31.00 a ton compared with $20.00 a ton in 1971-72. Despite the volume of records destroyed the 1972-73
holdings reached 121,137 cubic feet. The number of departments, agencies and crown corporations serviced rose from 17 to 19.
The Centre was visited by Nigerian and Canadian officials who were interested in
Records Management. Visits to many user-departments resulted in the servicing of two new
customers, Ab Canada and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
With the continued rate of growth and range of demands it is estimated that we could
exhaust our present storage faculties during 1974-75.
MONTREAL RECORDS CENTRE—During the 1972-73 fiscal year the Montreal Centre
accessioned 24,197 cubic feet of records, serviced a new high of 187,018 requests, and disposed of 29,542 cubic feet of records. The volume of records held at year's end stood at
102,099 cubic feet, with a fuU-time staff of 13 employees. At the end of the 1972-73 fiscal year
Montreal had 12,000 cubic feet left of available storage space. The 1973-74 intake of 25,000
cubic feet wtil leave the Centre with approximately 7,000 cubic feet of avaUable storage
space before the end of the 1973-74 fiscal year. It is therefore necessary to keep a close check
on the Montreal situation. Further it is hoped that the Montreal Centre operations wtil be PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT l912-l9Ti
«g g
lu
t 2 _ -g "g
O.S I fi £ RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
brought under one roof. By doing so, we could provide a better distribution of space, utilize
ati available areas to their fullest extent, and bring the overaU operations closer together.
The Head of the Centre was involved in other areas of activity including holding seminars,
lecturing at outside mstitutions, and advising officials from Montreal University on the
feasability of setting up a course in records management for the Provincial Department of
Education. He also visited a number of departments which resulted in the servicing of two new
departments, thus raising the total to 24 departments or agencies serviced.
VANCOUVER RECORDS CENTRE—By the beginning of the 1972-73 fiscal year the
Vancouver Centre was fuUy operative. Despite inconveniences occasioned by various factors,
the Vancouver Centre accessioned a total of 30,853 cubic feet of records, serviced 38,300 requests, and put away 4,943 interfiles. The Head of the Centre also attended meetings with
officials of the Provincial Archives of British Columbia, the City Archives of Vancouver,
and the National Archives of the United States.
OFFICE OF RECORDS
MANAGEMENT
SERVICES DIVISION
The Office of Records Management Services
(ORMS) Division formerly the Advisory Services Division, emerged from the major reorganization of the Records Management
Branch which took place in 1972-73. Within
the Division there are two sections : the Audit, Training and Inventory Section, and the Audit,
Standards and Issuance Section.
The Office of Records Management Services Division is requbed to promote the use of
records centres by government departments and agencies in the interest of efficiency and
economy, and to identify the need for additional records centres across Canada as a result of
its inventory and survey functions.
The Office of Records Management Services Division has basic responsibility for:
Records Schedules—To assist government departments in the development of records schedules; to process and apply these schedules; to make recommendations to the Dominion
Archivist in regard to the disposal of records.
Inventory and Survey—To maintain an inventory of records holdings, equipment and staff;
to survey and audit the performance in records management of departments; to prepare
reports for departments, the Dominion Archivist and the Treasury Board.
Advisory Services—To provide an advisory service in records management for government
departments and to assist them in projects that improve efficiency in records management.
Training Courses—To conduct regular training courses in records management for the staff
of government departments and agencies, and in other ways to provide formal instruction hi
records management.
Publications—To prepare and pubUsh manuals and guides for the use of government departments in estabtishing and maintaining uniform procedures and standards in records
management. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197M
Essential Records—To service the government's Essential Records Program to ensure prorl
tection of records against nuclear or natural disaster.
Records Disposal—To provide for the ultimate disposal of all records held at the Ottawa
Records Centre.
îportance, are the major
Described below topically, but not necessarily hi order of ii
activities of the Division.
Submissions Examination—The Public Archives assumed responsibility in 1961 for examining
submissions received concerning records schedules, records destruction proposals, and microfilm.
Although there was an almost 50 per cent increase in microfilm submissions during the
year, the number of records scheduling submissions declined. This reflects the near-completion of the scheduling task imposed upon departments by the terms of the Public Records
Order.
More than 90 per cent of the departments and other organizations included in the
Financial Administration Act (Schedules A and B, or equivalent), have completed the
scheduling of theb existing operational records. Only approximately 35 per cent of them had
completed their schedules on 1 May 1969. By volume of records in cubic feet, we estimate that
more than 85 per cent of the total records holdings of the same departments have been
scheduled.
The number of submisssions received over a 12-year period is indicated in Table IV.     j
TABLE D7
Number of
records schedules
or destruction
proposals
Number of      Cumulative
microfilm*        number of
Period
submitted
submissions
submissions
1961-71 (March)
567
110
677
1971-72
50
28
755
1972-73
40
41
836
12-Year Totals
657
179
836
*Also includes proposals for microfilm equipment from 1961 to 1966 inclusive.
Dormant Records—The Office of Records Management Services is responsible for the
appUcation of approved records schedules to the PubUc Archives holdings of dormant departmental records. Table V Ulustrates the total volume of records disposed of at the Ottawa
Records Centre (both general and personnel files), for the years indicated. Between 1956 and
31 March 1973, a total volume of 401,094 cubic feet of records was disposed of. This is more
than the capacity of the main Ottawa Records Centre building, and enough records to fill
almost 76 miles of shelving. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
TABLE V
Ottawa Records Centre
Cubic feet disposed of from 1956 to 31 March 1973*
Period
General
Files
Personnel
Files
Annual
Total
Five-Year
Total
Cumulative
Total
1956-60
21,091
153
-
21,244
21,244
1961-65
92,401
1,617
—
94,018
115,262
1966-
March 1972*
207,316
2,707
_
210,023
325,285
1971-72
37,001
465
37,466
—
362,751
1972-73
38,274
69
38,343
-
401,094
17-Year totals
396,083
5,011
-
-
401,094
Records Management PubUcations—The Office of Records Management Services is now
investigating the possibility of producing a companion volume to the General Records
Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada, which covers housekeeping records only.
The second scheduling authority would cover operational records and would offer a ready-
made records schedule for immediate use by new or reorganized departments.
During the year, the Division revised and translated several pubUcations, as shown hi
Table VI.
TABLE VI
Records Management PubUcations
Comments
Revised reprint produced by the Office of Records
Management Services. French edition expected
within the 1973-74 fiscal year.
Revised, and translated into French. EngUsh and
French editions expected in the current fiscal year.
Translated into French. PubUcation of French
edition expected by next fiscal year.
Being translated into French.
Originally prepared by the Office of Records
Management Services Division for pubUcation by
the Department of Defence Production in 1964.
Revised and updated by the Division for the Industrial Preparedness and Emergency Planning
Division of the Department of Supply and Services. DSS wiU presumably publish the manual in
both EngUsh and French in 1973.
A booklet in French, based on Appendix B of
the pubUcation Records Organization and Operations, was produced as a joint effort by the Records
Management Institute, the Advisory CouncU on
PubUc Records, and the PubUc Archives of Canada.
The booklet has proved most useful in the translation of other pubUcations on records management.
Name of Publication
General Records Disposal Schedules of the
Government of Canada
Mail Management in Government
Departments and Agencies
Records Scheduling and Disposal
Records Organization and Operations
Essential Records for Industry
Traduction et definition des term
dans la gestion des documents
p employés 12 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1971
Records Management Forms—The Division provided the Secretariat for the Advisory Council
on PubUc Records. A subcommittee of the CouncU worked closely with the Canadian Government Specifications Board on the development of standard forms used in departmental
records offices. As a result, some 16 forms have been approved by the working group, with
others yet to be considered. Considerable savings are expected to result from the use of
standard forms.
Training—The Division conducted two full four-week Records Management Courses,
Numbers 18 and 19. There was an emoUment of 59 students, 41 from departmental headquarters, 12 from departmental field offices, 3 from provincial governments, and 3 sponsored
by the Canadian International Development Agency ifrom foreign countries. In addition, the
Division contributed resource people to smaU courses in Records Management offered by
departments, and operated several smaU seminars at the request of individual departments.
Essential Records—The total holdings of those records essential to the continuity of government in the event of a nuclear or natural disaster now are approximately 8,400 cubic feet. This
represents a drop of 2,000 cubic feet because of some major disposal activities. Storage facU-
ities have been improved to provide adequate humidity and temperature controls for the
housing of dormant microfilm and magnetic tape records.
Departmental and Other Projects—The PubUc Archives, under the Public Records Order,
ensures that departments properly document theb poUcies and programs. In addition,
departments refer many of their records management problems to the Public Archives fqr
advice and assistance. Consequently the Office of Records Management Services, was deeply
involved with various departmental projects. They included: conducting surveys and preparing reports; developing new, or revising old, classification systems; developing procedural
manuals; conducting mail management surveys; and giving assistance and advice in records
office organization, staffing matters, equipment, lay-out and space.
Assistance was also provided to the Government of the Province of Prince Edward Island
to develop an information retrieval system for. the Provincial Executive Council.
FinaUy, considerable time and effort were devoted to the Public Archives Computer
Records Committee dealing with the role of the Public Archives in the area of automated
records, as well as dealings with the Treasury Board hi the Board's efforts to develop various
EDP guidelines. Table VII indicates the technical assistance provided to departments ova
the period of six fiscal years.
TABLE VH
Technical Assistance Provided to Departments and Agencies
1
1967-68
1968-69
1969-70
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73
Totals
Small projects
9
11
11
9
9
9
58
Medium projects
1
2
2
3
6
8
22
Large projects
-
-
2
1
1
1
5
Total number of
projects
10
13
15
13
16
18
85
Legend: Small project—up to 30 days
Medium project—31 to 100 days
Large project—over 100 days.
General Comments—Major challenges facing the Division in the coming year include:
management of computer generated records; translation into French of the various pubUcations, directives etc. in records management; development and presentation of a Records
Management Course in the French language; and development, where feasible, of additional
manuals in the areas of operational records classification and scheduling. HISTORICAL
BRANCH
This has been a Janus year for the Historical
Branch. We have looked backward over 100
years of steady growth celebrated in part by
the exhibition and catalogue Archives: Mirror
of Canada Past; we are looking forward to a
bright future for the National Film Archives Division and the Public Records Division, to
the proper control of EDP as an archival medium, and to the diffusion program which wtil
bring our resources to far more people in a more attractive way.
The Diffusion Program—This program is the response of the Branch to the declared policy
of the Secretary of State to disseminate, where possible, the cultural resources of the nation.
There is, of course, nothing new about diffusion. Publications, exhibitions and inter-library
loan of microfilm have been part of the service for several years. The new program is really
an extension which can be described under four headings:
1) Exhibitions of limited size sufficiently mobile to travel across Canada. Display of
original material will be restricted to the major museums and galleries. Duplicates
and facsimiles wtil enter a more general display network.
2) Deposit of microfibn in the ten Provincial Archives which witi consist of the earlier
Prime Ministers' papers and finding aids, together with newly-filmed public records
and finding aids of particular interest to the various regions of Canada. For example,
immigration records for the Prairie Provinces, Upper Canada sundries for Ontario,
seigneurial documents for Quebec. The new microfilm wtil be 16mm and a microfilm
reader has been dispatched to each of the Provinces to supplement local resources.
3) Publication of a series of volumes (some of which are in conjunction with exhibitions)
prefaced by short introductions which wtil present primary text complemented by
pictorial record in an exciting mix designed to appeal to the reader who is interested
in appreciating history and the historical record without too much of the historian's
gloss.
4) The pubUcation of various inventories and Ustings of maps on selected themes such
as township surveys, county maps and bird's-eye views with supporting illustrations
and microfibn.
The involvement of the Divisions i
year to year.
The diffusion program is designed to appeal to the scholar through microfilm and
finding aid pubUcation, the responsive reader through the text and pictorial record publication, and the general pubUc through the exhibitions. It is hoped that with the build-up
of PAC microfibns in the Provincial Archives, scholars wtil be able to study PAC resources
in the context of provincial sources, without having to visit Ottawa in the fbst instance. An
extension of this concept would also see copies of provincial finding aids increasingly avaUable
in the PAC to support the specialized interests of staff and scholars alike.
EDP Archives—For some time now it has been apparent that the latest newcomer to the
family of archival media is record produced by electronic data processing (EDP) and that
it has been somewhat neglected, to say the least.
This year the Historical Branch undertook the reconstitotion of data sets and code
books from the raw data on punch cards that was produced for the Royal Commission on
Bilingualism and Biculturalism. It soon became clear that, quite apart from missing elements,
i this program wtil be flexible and wtil vary from
13 14
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197»
here was a vast field of information that was suffering severe physical damage not clear to
the naked eye (a punch card slightly distorted by poor storage will be rejected by the computer). Yet this was unique information, invaluable for comparative study, which could
not be obtained again.
Michael CarroU was seconded from the old PubUc Records Section to the office of the
Branch Director to supervise this project and also to represent the Branch on the EDP
Records Management Guideline study team which has abeady produced several draft
reports with profound impUcations. It is probable that EDP records of permanent value
wtil, m time, be transferred to a Data Archives Division. The Branch wtil then encompass
all archival media presently in use and wtil look forward to a practical application of holography as the next world to conquer!
The 1972 Archives Course—Thirteen students were accepted and all completed the course
jointly sponsored by the PAC and the Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association
which was held from 5 September to 6 October. The course was designed to assist those
with at least one year's experience in the archival profession to obtain a broad framing in
archival principles and administrative practices.
The seminar approach was continued as before and the first she days were given over to
archival media "immersion" in the various divisions of the PubUc Archives. In this way the
students were exposed to the contrasts and similarities in techniques and became aware of
the inter-relatedness of the various media when seen in terms of information. The course
terminated with an examination. Michael CarroU was the co-ordinator.
The Future—A brief glance at the Divisional reports wtil reveal that the Branch is deeply
involved m a network of programs both familiar and new. Some reports are relatively short
but this is not for lack of output. The programs may be too famtiiar to need description or
too new to be properly articulated.
The Picture Division receives special prominence this year because a great deal that has
gestated over a long period has now come to fruition in a wide range of activity. As a result
the Division is now better poised to respond to an escalating public demand—always provided that conservation and reprography can keep pace.
Fears have been expressed that the Branch is moving too far, too fast, in too many
directions, but the fact is we are being gathered up in a natural impetus which moved slowly
during the first ninety-five years of the Public Archives' history and much more rapidly
over the last five.
It is no longer possible for Divisions to travel along theb traditionaUy separate orbits
of responsibtiity. New programs, such as the Systematic National Acquisition Programme
of the Manuscript Division, have meant that archivists frequently encounter media With
which they are unfamiliar. This has produced an increased awareness of the work of other
Divisions. At the same time the clientele of the PubUc Archives of Canada has begun to
change and increasingly its demands are crossing all Divisional bounds. Divisions can no
longer remain self-sufficient. We are aU learning to respond to multiple situations as the
PubUc Archives becomes totaUy involved in the information and conservation business.
Our final aim should be nothing less than the identification and availability for research
of the entire Canadian documentary record wherever it may be. In this the recognized repositories wtil be our partners as we share the physical custody and control, but we should
take the lead in articulating finding aids, miniaturizing and distributing copies of our holdings
and giving aid to small repositories lacking professional staff so that theb collections can be
examined and evaluated. We wtil have an increasing obligation to diffuse information
through pubUcations and exhibitions, video-tape and televisual display, the cassette and the
on-line terminal, to put at the disposai of research all the retrievable past. HISTORICAL BRANCH 15
MANUSCRIPT DIVISION The work of the Division increased again in
1972 reflecting expanded responsibilities. The
number of inquiries, requests for reference service, microfilm loans, and accessions have all
shown sizeable growth over the 1971 figures.
The Systematic National Acquisition Programme was particularly successful. Large
collections of private papers and corporate records were accessioned to our Arts Archives,
Business Archives, Ethnic Archives, Labour Archives, Judicial Archives, Medical and
Scientific Archives, Military Archives, Public Affairs, and Sports Archives.
The Division published two more volumes of the General Inventory: Volume 4 (MG 22
to 25) and Volume 5 (MG 26 and MG 27).
The end of the fiscal year also marked a major reorganization of the Division. The
Public Records Section has been given the status of a separate division, and the Post-Confederation Section is being restructured to reflect its manifold functions and responsibilities.
PRE-CONFEDERATION SECTION—Much of the year 1972-1973 was again devoted to
the revision of inventories. MGs 22-25 were edited and published in the winter of 1972, as
volume 4 of the General Inventory. Volume 3, comprising MGs 17-21, is slated for publication
in the summer of 1973, and volume 2, comprising MGs 11-16, for autumn 1973. The final
portion of the project, RGs 1,4 and 5, is also expected to be completed for the winter of 1973.
Finding aids were prepared for a large number of collections, both new and old, in our
holdings.
During the course of inventory revision, finding aids were revised for the Askin Papers
(MG 19, A 3), The Ermatinger CoUection (MG 19, A 2), the Hargrave Papers (MG 19, A 21),
the Claus Papers (MG 19, F 1 ), t he Selkirk Papers (MG 19, E1), the American Fur Company
(MG 19, B 2), and the British Headquarters Papers (MG 23, B 1). These improvements
have led to considerably greater utilization of several collections, notably the British Headquarters Papers. Additions to a number of coUections were noted in the appropriate finding
aids, specifically for the records of the Moravian Brethren (MG 19, D 1), the Séminaire de
Saint-Sulpice (MG 17, A 7-2), and the Oblats de Marie-Immaculée (MG 17, A 17), Sources
on the Jesuit Estates (F. A. 429), the Kupp Collection (MG 18,0 12), the papers of Abraham
Joseph (MG 24,1 61), and Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine (MG 24, B 14).
New finding aids for old holdings include those for the Joshua Sharpe Papers (MG 23,
113), the James Anderson Papers (MG 19, A 29), the Edward Walsh Papers (MG 19, F 10),
the Masson CoUection (MG 19, C 1), the papers of Ludger Duvernay (MG 24, C 3), and
of the Amherst family (MG 18, L 4). A card index for the records of applications for notaries'
and lawyers' commissions in Lower Canada, 1760-1841 (RG 4, B 8) has also been prepared.
Finding aids prepared for new acquisitions included descriptive lists for the papers of
Sb James William Montgomery (MG 23, E 6), and John Forrest (MG 24,1158); financial
records of the Nova Scotiâ Command (MG 9, B 12); parish registers of Sainte-Famille de
Boucherville (MG 8, G 4); seigniorial records in the Mackay-Papineau CoUection (MG 24,
I 160); papers of Nicholas Sparks (MG 24, I 40), Henry Dives Townshend (MG 24, F 87),
Henry Elliott, Sr. and Jr. (MG 28, III 41), William Loch (MG 24, D 82), and Dr. Johann
Ludwig Tiarks (MG 24, H 64).
Detailed guides were also prepared for série C 13 B, Louisiana, of the Archives des
Colonies (MG 1), the collections Arnoul and Mélanges de Colbert of the Bibliothèque
nationale (MG 7), série B 1, Décisions, of the Archives de la Marine (MG 2), and série
C11C, vol. 7b, Possessions Britanniques—Terre-Neuve of Archives des Colonies. A file
Hst is now available for the Admiralty Pacific Station records (RG 8, HI, series B) and flat
copies of the indexes to volumes 11-21 of CO 189, New Brunswick entry books (RG 11),
have been prepared. Shelf-lists for the correspondence files of the Provincial Secretaries for PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
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Canada East and Canada West, 1841-1867, (RGs 4 and 5, series C 1) have been prepared as
appendices to the inventories of those groups.
Accessions—The year 1972 saw the arrival of several interesting and significant accessions,
although very little came for the British and French units.
BRITISH RECORDS
MG 11 Colonial Office 5: Colonial Papers, General Series, 1679-1778 (microfilm, reels
B-3775 to B-3799); selections from volumes 536-1053, relating to New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.
MG 11 Colonial Office 323: Correspondence of the Secretary of State, 1922-1924 (microfilm,
reels B-3751 to B-3755 and B-3763 to B-3774); copied from volumes 886-933.
MG 13 Foreign Office 802: Indexes for Foreign Office 5 and 27 (microfilm, reels B-3756
to B-3762).
MG 13   Foreign Office 804: Indexes for Foreign Office 27 (microfilm, reel B-3762).
MG 21 Egerton MSS. 259-262: Debates of the House of Commons, 1774 (microfilm, reels
A-873 and A-874); debates, petitions, examinations of witnesses and related records
of the second and thbd reading of the Quebec Act, with an index of speakers.
FRENCH RECORDS
MG 1, 15 Archives des Colonies, série E: dossiers personnels (microfilm, bobines F-822 à
F-827); cartons 82 à 146, Ciraud à Dufossat, 1626-1817.
CANADIAN RECORDS
Early Colonial Period
MG 18, 0 12 Kupp Collection, volumes 5-8 (photocopies, 8 inches): a further selection of
documents relating to Dutch participation in and influence on the fur trade and cod
fisheries of North America, 1595-1743, copied from notarial records in Holland, chiefly
the Gemeente Archief, Amsterdam, by Dr. Jan Kupp of Victoria. Transcriptions and
English translations are interleaved, a detailed finding aid (no. 740) is available.
MG 23, C 25 Anthony Wayne (1745-1796, soldier, promoter of settlement), 1764-1771
(originals, 26 pages; photocopies, 29 pages): correspondence, accounts, contracts and
memoranda concerning the efforts of Anthony Wayne, John Hughes, and a number
of Philadelphia backers to promote settlement in Nova Scotia. To complement the
acquisition of original material, photocopies of related documents in the collections of
the Historical Society of Philadelphia were prepared.
MG 18, N49 Henry Fox, first Baron Holland(1705-177r4), 1755-1762 (originals, 118 pages):
correspondence, petitions, reports and related papers, apparently from the files of Henry
Fox, concerning the affairs of Virginia under Robert Dinwiddie, military strategy, the
state of fortifications in British North America, and related matters during the French
and Indian War.
Fur Trade
MG 19, D 8 Fort Kilmaurs, 1826, (original, 55 pages): journal kept by William Brown at
Fort Kilmaurs on Babine Lake, March-June 1826. 18 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-19731
Surveys
MG 24, H 64 Johann Ludwig Tiarks (1789-1837, astronomer and mathematician), 1808-1838
(originals, 1 foot 8 inches): journals and correspondence of Dr. Johann Ludwig Tiarks,
together with reports, memoranda, notes and misceUaneous papers relating chiefly to
his work with the Boundary Commission estabUshed under terms of the Treaty of Ghent
(Maine-New Brunswick, New York-Quebec and Ontario-Lake of the Woods). Of note
are his interests in Indian languages and local customs. A series of maps was transferred^
to the Map Division. Presented by Mr. Henry F. Tiarks of Foxbury, England, the
coUection is among the most significant accessions of 1972. A finding aid (no. 829)
provides a detatied description of the papers.
MG 24,1157   Fortune Family, 1793-1844 (originals, 3 biches): correspondence of WUliamJ
Fortune (fl. 1747-1821) and his son Joseph Fortune (fl. 1788-1844), accounts of the
Surveying Department of Upper Canada, 1793 ; survey notebook of Hawkesbury Town-«
ship, 1798; and miscellaneous accounts, warrants, commissions and petitions accumulated by the Fortunes m the course of theb careers as surveyors, chiefly in Eastern
Ontario. Presented by Mrs. O'NeU of Ottawa.
RaUways and Canals
MG 24,1106   Keefer Collection (original, \ inch): engineer's log-book for locks and canals
on the St. Lawrence from Long Sault to Cornwall, with a schedule of contract prices
for work hi 1834-1838.
MG 24, E 21    William Hazen (fl. 1853-1860, railway engineer), 1853 (original, 113 pages):
handbook of engineering and buUding rules for railway construction, compiled by
William Hazen.
Business
MG 24, D 81 Joseph Masson (1791-1847, businessman) 1830-1847 (originals, 34 pages):
business letters and related papers concerning the activities of firms with which Joseph
Masson was involved.
MG 24, I 40 Nicholas Sparks (1792-1862, businessman), 1808-1880 (originals, 1 foot):
leases, bonds, mortgages, agreements and deeds of sale; wtils, marriage and baptismal
certificates; misceUaneous related papers of Nicholas Sparks, Sr. and his family. A
detailed description of the coUection is available as a finding aid (no. 804). The collection
is an exceUent source of information on the land transactions in which Nicholas Sparks
engaged during the early years of Ottawa settlement. Presented by Mr. J. B. L. Heney
of Ottawa.
MG 24, D 82 William Loch (1786-1856, merchant), 1808-1907 (originals, 8 mches): correspondence, accounts, deeds, bonds and related papers of Wtiliam Loch accumulated
during his career as a merchant at Newcastle, N.B. in partnership with Archibaldjl
Duncan, and correspondence, accounts and related papers of Wtitiam Loch Stuart
concerning the settlement of his uncle's estate. A descriptive list is avaUable as a finding
aid (no. 838). Presented in 1972 by the estate of Wilbam Loch Kidston, through the
courtesy of Mr. M. L. Wells of Weybridge, England.
MG 28, III 41 Henry Elliott, Sr. and Jr. (originals, 4feet 8 inches) : correspondence, accounts,
journals and related records of Henry ElUott,Sr.(1809-1905)andhis son Henry Elliott, Jr.
(1835-1915), accumulated in the course of theb business as merchants and postmasters
at Hampton, Ontario; included are private correspondence and some records of the Independent Order of Templars and the Sons of Temperance. A finding aid (no. 817)
provides a detatied description of the collection. HISTORICAL BRANCH
19
Settlement
MG 24,1160   Collection MacKay-Papineau (photocopies, 1 \ pied) : papiers légaux, comptes»
A> rentes seigneuriales, etc. Copiés en 1970 des originaux en possession du Centre de
Recherche en Histoire du Canada français à Montréal. L'inventaire (instrument de
recherche no. 839) a été préparé sous la direction de Cameron Nish.
>JIG29,E23 Trover Van Vliet(1800-1890, postmaster), 1863-1890(microfilm, reel M-2302):
diary of Traver Van Vliet, postmaster of Lacolle, Quebec. Copied in 1972 from the
typescript copy held by William H. Van Vliet of Granada Htils, California.
MG 24, I 158 John Forrest (fl. 1798-1877, weaver), 1798-1878 (originals, 132 pages):
correspondence and misceUaneous papers of John Forrest, a settler in McNab Township,
Ontario. Several of the letters contain highly entertaining accounts of immigrant life.
MG 23, E 6 Sir James William Montgomery (1721-1803, jurist), 1767-1803 (microfilm,
reel A-865): correspondence with John Spottiswood concerning his estates in Prince
Edward Island and other business affairs, with a few items relating to Quebec, 1765-1775.
Copied in 1972 from the originals in the Scottish Record Office, Edinburgh. A finding
aid (no. 765) provides a descriptive Ust of the items.
Legislative Affairs
MG 24, B 147 Robert Hoyle (1782-1857, MLA), 1826-1844 (originals, 2± inches): correspondence of Robert Hoyle with his wife, with comments upon poUtical and social
affairs of the time, as well as his personal and business affabs. Presented in 1972 by
W. H. Van Vliet of Granada Hills, California.
MG 24, B 14 Sir Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine (1807-1864, juriste), 1859-1861 (originaux, 8
pouces): factums en appel pom les districts de Montréal et Québec. Reçu en 1972 de
la bibliothèque des Archives. L'instrument de recherche no 283 constitue un inventaire
descriptif des factums.
MG 24 B 2 £om-/oje/>ÂP^/Kea«(1752-1841,stetesman),andfantily(originals,ca.3ifeet):
family correspondence of Louis-Joseph Papineau, reflecting all aspects of his long
career in the Legislative Assembly, as leader of the Patriotes, and as an exile. Many
important individuals of the period appear as correspondents: William Lyon Mac-
Kenzie, Edmund O'Callaghan, Robert Nelson, Robert Christie, etc.
MG 9, D 3 Upper Canada: Legislative Assembly (original, 348 pages): journal of the
Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada, November 1823—January 1824.
Financial Affairs
MG 9, D 10 Upper Canada: Inspector General of Public Accounts (originals, 81 pages):
warrants for the payment of civil and military salaries and pensions, 1813-1815, with
a few accounts and receipts.
MG 8, A 20 Lower Canada: Inspector General of Public Accounts (originals, 38 pages):
warrants for the payment of civil and military salaries, 1812-1815.
MG 9, B 12 Great Britain: Army, Nova Scotia Command (originals, 115 pages): correspondence, statements, receipts and related records concerning accounts paid by the
Paymaster General under the authorization of the Commander of the Forces, Nova
Scotia Command, 1777-1822. A finding aid (no. 790) is available.
MUitary life
MG 23, K 4 John Fife (fl. 1780-1820, soldier and musician), c. 1782-1804 (microfilm,
reel M-2233): music book of John Fife, containing some 800 airs, with an index of 20
PUBUC ARCHTVES REPORT 1972-1973
titles. Color negatives of some illustrations are held by Picture Division; the book
contains watercolors of the French and British fleets off St. Kitts, 1782, flags and uniforms, and the French fleet at the Nile mouth, c. 1797. Copied in 1972 from the original
in the possession of Miss Claudia Cameron of Kanata, Ontario.
MG 24, F 87 Henry Dives Townshend (1795-1882, soldier), 1654-1920 (originals, 2 feet):
correspondence of General Henry Dives Townshend, 1836-1877, including the records
of his service in Canada during the Rebellion of 1837, and various family and estate
records. A significant series is devoted to correspondence concerning settlement of the-
estate of Major-General Charles Lee, an American Revolutionary War veteran. A
finding aid (no. 809) is available to provide a more detailed description.
Local History
MG 24, K 2 George Coventry (fl. 1816-1866, collector and historian), 1839-1884 (originals,
6 inches) : correspondence relating to historical work, life in Cobourg, Ontario, and his
business affabs, as well as notes on the history of Upper Canada and draft poems,
1783-1866. Presented in 1972 by the Ontario Historical Society.
MG 9, D 8-54 Simcoe County n.d. (typescript, 159 pages): anonymous, incomplete manuscript of a history of Simcoe County, Ontario. Presented in 1972 by Miss Marion
Wilson of Belleville, Ontario.
MG 9, D 8-55 Prescott and Russell Counties, 1882-1912 (originals, 6 inches): procedure
books of the 9th Division Court of Prescott and RusseU. Presented in 1972 by r.p.
Paul Drouin of the Library of the University of Ottawa.
Religious Life
MG 24,  J 42   Nicolas Burtin (1828-1902, missionnaire),  1851-1878 (microfilm, bobine
M-2216): lettres de Nicolas Burtin à sa famille résidant en France. Microfilm des copies
dactylographiées en possession des archives historiques oblates à Ottawa, réalisé en 1972.
Une table des matières servant d'instrument de recherche se trouve à la fin de la bobine.
MG 24, J 43   EugSne-Bruno Guigues (1805-1874, évêque), 1848-1880 (45 pages:) mandements, lettres pastorales et autres documents concernant l'œuvre d'Eugène-Bruno
Guigues.
MG 17, A 7-2   Archives du SSminaire de Saint-Sulpice, Montréal (microfilm, bobines
M-2234 à M-2242): documents relatifs aux terres de l'île de Montréal, 1672-1802;
contrats de concessions, de rétrocession, de vente, de constitution de rente; procès
verbaux d'arpentage et de bornage, etc.
MG 17, D 1    Moravian Brethren (originals, 3 inches): misceUaneous papers in Eskimo from
the Hebron Mission, 1827-1955, including biblical commentaries, accounts, receipts,
bills, and registrations of marriages, 1904-1918.
Parish Registers
MG 8, G 49 Quyon United Church (microfilm, reel M-2212): registers of Onslow Mission
of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and its successors the Quyon Circuit and Quyon
Pastoral Charge, Quebec 1859-1923. Copied in 1972 from the originals loaned by
S. Wyman MacKechnie of Quyon Pastoral Charge.
MG 8, G 51 Quyon: St. John the Evangelist (Anglican) Church (microfilm, reel M-2226):
registers of St. John's, Quyon, and St. Luke's, Eardley, 1857-1909, which began as
Onslow Mission. Copied in 1972 from the originals in the custody of Rev. E. N. McCol}
of Quyon. HISTORICAL BRANCH 21
MG 8, G 52 Côte St. George (Presbyterian) Church (microfilm, reel M-2228): registers of
Côte St. George Presbyterian Church, Quebec, 1862-1871, and minute book of Kbk
Sessions, 1861-1867. Copied in 1972 from the originals loaned by Rev. Kenneth McDonald of Martintown, Ontario.
MG 8, G 53 ShawvUk Vnited Church (microfilm, reel M-2243): registers of Lichfield
Presbyterian Congregation, 1854-1904, Clarendon Wesleyan Circuit, 1851-1898, and
Portage du Fort Methodist Mission, 1860-1879, all of which were succeeded by Shaw-
j, vibe United Church. Copied in 1972 from the originals loaned by Rev. Alistair J.
Macintosh of Shawville, Quebec.
MG 8, G 4 Boucherville: Sainte-Famille (église catholique) (microfilm, bobines M-2369
à M-2371): registres de Sainte-Famille, 1669-1790. L'instrument de recherche (no 831)
est une liste des dates et du contenu. Copies reçues en 1972 du Département de démographie de l'université de Montréal, Québec.
MG 8, G 54 Quebec Tombstone Inscriptions: LotbiniSre and Megantic Counties (transcripts,
46 pages): inscriptions from 14 cemeteries of the region. Presented in 1972 by Mr.
W. T. L. Harper of Willowdale, Ontario.
MG 9, D 7-26 Almonte United Church (microfilm, reels M-2217 and M-2229): registers
of Ramsay 'Auld Kbk', St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church of Ramsay Township,
Carleton Place Wesleyan Methodist Circuit, Almonte Methodist Circuit, St. John's
Presbyterian Church of Almonte, Bethany United Church, 1833-1962; and of Ashton
Presbyterian Church, 1896-1926; minutes of the Kirk Sessions of Appleton Presbyterian
Church, 1889-1962, with the communion roll, ca. 1889-1917. Copied in 1972 from the
originals hi the custody of Almonte United Church and Mr. Cecil Turner of Almonte,
Ontario.
MG 9, D 7-32 Perth: St. Paul's (United) Church (microfilm, reel M-2232): registers of
St. Paul's United Church, Perth, and its Presbyterian and Methodist predecessors,
1858-1968; Perth Free Church Presbyterian Congregation, Knox Presbyterian Church,
Calvin Presbyterian Church of Bathurst, Ashbury Methodist Church. Copied in 1972
from the originals in the possession of St. Paul's United Church, Perth, Ontario.
MG 9, D 7-33 Lochwinnoch (Presbyterian) Church (microfilm, reel M-2368): register of
Lochwinnoch Presbyterian Congregation, 1877-1919, and minute book of the Kbk
Sessions, 1875-1971. Copied in 1972 from the original loaned by Mr. Robert MacGregor,
Clerk of Sessions, Lochwinnoch, Ontario.
MG 9, D-34 Lochiel (Church of Scotland) Congregation (microfilm, reel M-2246): register
of the Church of Scotland congregation at Lochiel, Ontario, 1820-1911, later known as
St. Columba, Kirkill. Copy presented in 1972 by Mrs. Mary Beaton of Ottawa, Ontario.
Genealogies—Genealogical notes and charts, correspondence and related papers concerning
a large number of families have been added to MG 25. Among them were the following:
Cole family, No. 148 (photocopies, i inch), presented by Lloyd B. Rochester of Ottawa,
Ontario.
Clarke family, No. 139 (photocopies, 38 pages), presented by Mrs. Arthur Field of Strathroy
Ontario.
Desautels famille, No. 32 (photocopies, 36 pages), présentées par Sœur Marie-Jeanne Des-
autels de Gravelbourg, Saskatchewan.
EUiot family, No. 140 (transcripts, 118 pages), compiled and presented by Mr. R. Edwin
Elliot of St. Jean, Quebec.
Gunsolus family, No. 142 (photocopies, 1 inch), compiled and presented by Mrs. Clarabell
Morris of Surrey, British Columbia. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
Kidd family, No. 147 (photocopies, 34 pages), presented by Mr. Kenneth E. Kidd of Peterborough, Ontario.
Morris family, No. 143 (photocopies, i inch), presented by Mr. C. D. Morris of Surrey,
British Columbia.
Moxley family, No. 92 (transcripts, 95 pages), presented by Mr. George P. DeKay of Hyde
Park, Ontario.
Genealogical notes and some family correspondence of Gother Mann, (microfUm, reel A-852)
were added to the collection under his name (MG 23, J10). Copied in 1971 from originals
held by Miss Julia de Lacy Mann through the London Office.
POST-CONFEDERATION SECTION—As of 31 March 1973, the Section was composed
of sixteen archivists, two support staff, and one typist-receptionist. Mr. D. L. McDonald was
appointed Section Head in July 1972.
The organization of the section remained very similar to that of the previous year.
There were six areas of specialization: Prime Ministers, Public Affabs, Arts, Labour, Medical
and Scientific and Sports. Work on the Union List of Manuscripts was also handled by the
staff of the Post-Confederation Section.
PROJECTS
Union List of Manuscripts—During 1972-73 the liaison visits to contributing repositories were
completed. A large number of return forms were received, and some editing was done.
Discussions were held with representatives of Alphatext Limited with a view to having the
ULM processed by them.
Pretiminary Inventories—Mme Françoise Houle supervised the preparation of Volume 4
of the General Inventory.
ARTS ARCHIVES
Bierstadt, Albert, artist: xerox copies of correspondence from the Marquis of Lome, 1882-
1889, and Lord Dufferin, 1874-1884, to Albert Bierstadt. Presented by the Amoft
Carter Museum of Western Art through the Picture Division of the Public Archives.
(i inch)
116 Bomber Reconnaissance Squadron R.C.A.F.: song sheet—including perhaps the earliest
known version of "The North Atlantic Squadron", 1943. Presented by a former squadron
member. (13 pages)
Canadian Theatre Centre: records including minutes, correspondence and printed material.
Acqubed from the Canadian Theatre Centre, Toronto, (approx. 200 feet)
Carman, Bliss, CoUection, (1861-1929) poet and author: letter, 1916, from Bliss Carman to
the publishers of a book of poetry entitled Canadian Poets giving them permission to
include some of his verse. (2 pages, additional)
Chadwick, Ethel: diaries, scrap-books relating to theatre and social events in Ottawa, 1890's
to 1970. Obtained through the National Arts Centre, (approx. 3 feet)
Coffin, Mrs. E., Collection: programmes, 1912-1960, of professional and amateur Ottawa
theatre productions including the Canadian Repertory Theatre, 1950-1953, and several
RusseU Theatre programmes, 1912, 1920-1928. Presented by Mrs. Christopher Young,
Ottawa. (4 mches) Sheet music "Beyond the Htils of Dream", 1910. Presented by Mrs.
G. M. Coffin, Ottawa. (3 pages)
Cohen, Nathan, (1923-1971) theatre critic: xerox copies of Nathan Cohen's writings, 1941-
1942, as Editor-in-Chief of The Argosy Weekly, Mount Allison University, copied from HISTORICAL BRANCH 23
originals in Mount AUison University. (19 pages) Microfibn copies of correspondence
relating to the Toronto Star and "Fighting Words", 1970-1971 ; manuscripts of lectures
andradio scripts, 1948-1971 ; scrap-books of dippings and playbtils, 1947-1971. Copied
from originals in the possession of Mrs. Nathan Cohen, 169 Glencedar Road, Toronto
10, Ontario. (8 reels)
Commercial and Press Photographers' Association of Canada, (est. 1847): records including
financial papers, minutes, membership lists, correspondence and printed matter, 1947-
1962. Acqubed from Miss Edna Boyd, Toronto, through the Picture Division of the
PubUc Archives, (approx. 7 feet, 8 mches)
Cooke, James E. CoUection, dvti servant: programmes of professional and amateur Ontario
Theatre productions, 1957-1972. Presented by James E. Cooke, Toronto. (2 inches)
Crowder, (Mrs.) N. K., CoUection: sheet music and song sheets from Canada and the United
fa States, 1897-1927. Presented by Mrs. N. K. Crowder, Ottawa, through the Picture
Division of the PubUc Archives. (1 inch)
de la Roche, Maso, CoUection, (1885-1961) author: letter 1955, from Mazo de la Roche to a
Mrs. Watson commenting upon OakvUle and the suggestion of a connection between
» the Whiteoak and Chisholm families. Acqubed from Mrs. Joan Enders, Albuquerque,
New Mexico, U.S.A. (1 page)
Dominion Drama Festival, (est. 1932): microfUm copy of "Eastern Ontario Drama League"
scrap-book, 1933-1971. Copied from originals in the possession of Dr. J. L. Caroll,
Brockville, Ontario. (1 reel, additional)
Fraser, Donald A., (1875-1948) author, teacher: typescript of "The Maiden Months", a
poetic pageant by Donald A. Fraser with a covering letter submitting the manuscript
to B. J. Brimmer Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass., 1928. (29 pages)
Gardner, David, (1928) actor and dbector: microfilm copies of scrap-books, 1935-1955,
containing cUppings, letters, photos, programmes and assorted memorabilia relating
to Gardner's career. Copied from originals in the. possession of Mr. David Gardner,
Toronto. (2 reels)
Gauthier, Eva, (b. 1885) chanteuse: programme of a song recital by Eva Gauthier at the
Greenwich Vtilage Theatre, New York City, on 11 January 1920. Presented by Mrs.
Mary Gauthier, Mundelein, Illinois. (1 page)
Gauthier, Juliette, concert singer and folklorist: programmes, publicity material, clippings
and a manuscript, "Juliette Gauthier de la Verendrye" by LiUa M. Kerr. n.d., 1929,
1932, 1934. Presented by Miss Kerr, Ottawa. (± inch, additional)
Johnston, Clifford M., (1897-1951) amateur photographer, correspondence and printed
material relating mainly to Clifford Johnston's activities as an amateur salon photographer, including material documenting the estabUshment of the annual Canadian
International Salons of Photographic Art in 1934, n.d., 1888, 1911-1940. Transferred
- from the Picture Division from the Clifford M. Johnston coUection of photographs.
(8 inches)
Laberge, Albert, (1871-1960) auteur: lettre d'Arsène Bessette au sujet du don du manuscrit
de son roman Le débutant à Albert Laberge, 1918. Acquise d'Amtmann. (1 page)
Lampman, Archibald, (1861-1899) poet: microfilm copy of the original manuscript material,
1893-1894, in the possession of the Public Archives (Archibald Lampman Papers,
MG 29, G 40). (2 reels, additional)
Le Moine, Sir James MacPherson, (1825-1912) author and barrister: papers, 1785-1905,
consisting of correspondence, an autographed book, medals, newspaper clippings, a
genealogical chart and a family bible relating to the Le Moine Family. Presented by 24
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973§
his granddaughter, Miss Lily B. Rhodes. (4 inches, additional) Thank you note, 1893,:
written by Miss Marjorie A. Hamilton-Gordon (Lord and Lady Aberdeen's daughter)
to Sir James M. Le Moine for the gift of his book Picturesque Quebec. Presented
by Miss Rhodes, Quebec, Que. (2 pages, additional)
Macdonald, J. E. H., (1873-1932) artist: poetry manuscripts, typescripts and lecture notes,
1918-1931. Donated by Mr. Thoreau Macdonald, ThornhiU, Ontario. (1 foot, 4 hs|
ches, additional)
Nakash, George, (b. 1892) photographer: xerox copy of a speech on portrait photography
which includes autobiographical reflections, delivered at the Rotary Club of Montreal,
14 December 1971. Copied from originals in the possession of Mr. George Nakash».
Montreal, Quebec. (18 pages)
Ottawa Little Theatre, (est. 1913): adjudication comments and manuscripts of ranking plays
submitted to the Annual Canadian Playwriting Competition sponsored by the Ottawa
Little Theatre, 1944-1971. Presented by the Ottawa Little Theatre, through Mrs. Roy
MacGregor Watt, 244 Powell Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario. (2 feet, 11 inches, additional)
Packard, Frank L., (1877-1942) author: correspondence, scrap-books and printed material
relating to the career of Frank L. Packard, 1906-1937. Also a diary and unpublished
manuscript by Mrs. Frank L. Packard recording their South Seas trip, 1912-1913.
Donated by Mr. Robert Packard, New York, N.Y., U.S.A. (5 inches, additional)
Peene, Vida, Papers, patron of the arts: minutes, correspondence, clippings documenting
various committees relating to the arts of which Miss Vida Peene has been a member.
Donated by Miss Vida Peene, Toronto, Ontario. (10 feet, additional)
Performing Arts Playbill, CoUection: coUection of Canadian and foreign playbills, 1872-1973,
relating to amateur and professional performing arts, compiled by the National Arts
Archives. (5 feet)
Professional and Press Photographers' Association of Canada, (est. 1963): records mcluding
correspondence, membership lists and printed matter, 1963-1968. Acqubed from Miss
Edna Boyd, Toronto, through the Picture Division of the Public Archives, (approx.
1 foot)
Roy, Marie-Anna-Adèle, (1894): manuscrits (quelques versions) de "Journal Intime d'une
Ame Solitaire: Reflet des Âmes dans le Miroir du Passé", 1972, de Marie-Anna-Adèle
Roy, sœur de Gabrielle Roy. Acquis de Marie-Anna-Adèle Roy. (8 pouces, additionnel)
Royal Lyceum Theatre, Toronto, (MG 55/24. No. 425): theatre programme, 1855. (1 page)
Sadler, Mr. and Mrs. Filmore, theatre owners and producers: nine scrap-books documenting
the history of the Brae Manor Theatre and School, Knowlton, Quebec, and clippings
relating to the Montreal Repertory Theatre, n.d. 1934, 1936-1956. Presented by Mrs.
F. Sadler, Montreal, Quebec. (1 foot, 1 inch)
Showalter, H. A., first president of the Stratford Shakespearean Festival Foundation: xerox
copies of correspondence, memoranda and minutes relating to the founding and fbst
seasons of the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, 1951-1963. Copied from originals in
the possession of H. A. Showalter, 454 Briar Avenue, Ottawa. (6 inches)
Starke, Sally, CoUection: theatre prompt book, programmes, press releases, clippings, 1851,
1967-1973. Presented by Miss S. Starke, Montreal, Quebec. (1 foot, 6 mches)
Steams, Dawson, journalist: typescript of "Where Fog and Fish Fail Not", by Dawson
Stearns with original photographs and a covering letter submitting the manuscript to
Brimmer Co., Literary Agents, Boston, Mass. 1928. (14 pages)
Stone, Edgar, (b. 1897) radio and theatre dbector: programmes and clippings, 1921-1941.
Presented by Mr. Edgar Stone, Toronto, Ontario, (i inch, additional) HISTORICAL BRANCH 25
Traill Family, Collection: flower pressings, (ca. 1854-1899) mostly made by Catharine Parr
Traill, and printers proofs and plates for Canadian Wild Flowers written by C. P. Traill
and published in 1868-1869. Acquired from the estate of Miss Anne Atwood, Lakefield,
Ontario. (4 feet, additional) Manuscripts, notebooks, diaries, correspondence relating
to the Traill family, 1822-1970. Presented by the estate of Miss Anne Atwood, Lakefield,
Ontario. (9 feet, additional)
Tweed, Tommy, (1908-1971) actor, radio personality: correspondence, memoranda, notes,
scripts, financial papers, journals, clippings, 1928-1971. Presented by Mrs. T. W. Tweed,
Toronto, Ontario. (26 feet, 8 inches)
JUDICIAL ARCHIVES
Justice E. M. Hall, Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada: correspondence and memoranda,
1960-1973, relating to his career in the Supreme Court, the Royal Commission on
Health Services and the Committee on Aims and Objectives of Education in Ontario.
There are also papers relating to his social welfare activities concerning the University
of Botswana and Children's VUlages International. (4 feet)
Canadian Bar Association, Papers: correspondence, memoranda and pamphlets of past
presidents, 1912-1965, with very few papers for the 1920's and 1930's. (8 feet)
Justice AndrS Taschereau, Judge of the Quebec Superior Court and Past President of the
Canadian Bar Assodation: correspondence and memoranda relating to the Canadian
Bar Association, 1944-1972. (4 feet)
Justice Jacques Dumoulin, of the Federal Court of Canada: family papers, 1852-1900,
(cUppings, photographs and documents). (4 inches)
Gravel et AssociSs, Papers: history of the law firm in Quebec City, 1801-1972.
LABOUR ARCHIVES
Broten, L. J., (b. 1914) labour union official: transcripts of two interviews, conducted in
1969 and 1970, primarily concerned with the establishment of the United Transportation Union in 1968. Copied from the originals which are located at the Labor Management Documentation Center, New York State School of Industrial and Labour Relations,
Cornell University. (143 pages)
Canadian Labor Congress, (est. 1956): proceedings of the Constitutional Conventions,
1962 and 1964; misceUaneous subject files, 1945-1966; miscellaneous reports, briefs
and arbitration judgements; issues of the Socialist International Information, 1960-1963,
and the St. Johns Examiner, 1961, and loose newspaper dippings. Transferred from
the Canadian Labour Congress Library. (7 feet, additional)
Cohen, J. L., labour lawyer: papers. Presented by Mrs. PhyUis Clarke of Toronto, (approx.
60 feet)
Dupuis, Michael, (b. 1945) graduate student: correspondence compiled in connection with
the research for his M.A. thesis "The Toronto Daily Press and the Winnipeg General
Strike of 1919". Three tapes of interviews were transferred to the Historical Sound
Recordings Unit. (71 pages)
Forsey, Eugene, (b. 1904) political scientist: correspondence, subject files, letters to editors,
and newspaper clippings; copy of W. J. C. Cherwbishis' doctoral thesis, "Organized
Labour in Saskatchewan: The TLC Years, 1905-1945". Presented by Dr. Eugene
Forsey. (2 feet, additional) MisceUaneous correspondence, articles, speeches, notes,
newspaper dippings and a file entitled "Capital Region in Canada". Presented by
Dr. Eugene Forsey. (3£ inches, additional) 26 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
Gray, Charles F., (1879-1954) municipal poUtidan: exhibit items entered as evidence by
the Crown in the trials of the leaders of the Winnipeg General Strike, including cor|
respondence of the Winnipeg Trades and Labor Coundl, the Strike Committee, am|
the Mayor, Charles F. Gray, and some issues of the Western Labor News and the Soci- \
alist Bulletin; two scrap-books of newspaper clippings about Gray's municipal campaigns of 1916 and 1917; two photographs transferred to the Picture Division and two I
books to the Library. Presented by Mrs. Avis Walton of Victoria. (2 inches)
Kaplansky, Kalmen, (b. 1912) labour leader: correspondence, and subject files, 1935-1964;
speeches, articles and newspaper clippings; minutes and correspondence of the Labor j
Party of Canada (Quebec section), Montreal District Council, 1935-1938. Presented |
by Mr. Kalmen Kaplansky. (8 inches)
Kitchener-Waterloo District Labour Council: minute books, 1942-1971; constitutions, 1912,
1957-1966, and by-laws, 1969; tape of a speech by Claude Jodoin transferred to the
Historical Sound Recordings Unit. Received from the Kitchener-Waterloo Distrfct
Labour Council. (8 inches)
Ontario Labour Committee for Human Rights (est. 1947): correspondence, minutes, financial
statements, subject files, newspaper clippings and printed matter, 1946-1972. Received
from the Ontario Labour Committee for Human Rights. (35 feet)
Toronto District Labour Council (est. 1871): microfilm copy of the minutes, 1922-1926,
1939-1968; minutes of the Toronto National Labour Council (A.C.C.L.), 1934-1940,
the Toronto Labour Council and the Toronto and Lakeshore Labour Council (C.C.L.j|
1940-1943 and 1945-1956. Lent for copying by Mr. Louis Lenkinsky of the Labour
Council of Metropolitan Toronto. (2 reels)
United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America: papers, 1937-1956 (29 reels of
microfilm to be copied); printed matter, 1948-1972 (3 feet) U.E. Canadian News, 1956-
1971. Arranged through Mr. C. S. Jackson, President of the Union.
Winnipeg Independent Labor Party: minute book, 1920-1923. Copied from the original which
is located in the Manitoba Provincial Archives. (1 inch)
MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC ARCHIVES
Canadian Neurological Society, (est. 1948): correspondence and minutes, 1948-1971. (5 feet)  |
Canadian Psychiatric Association Collection, (est. 1951): minutes, correspondence, membership lists and printed matter, 1949-1971, directly relating to the activities of the
Association; a collection of manuscripts and printed matter, 1835-1971, concerning  I
the history of psychiatry with particular emphasis upon Canadian psychiatric development. (10 feet)
Canadian Psychological Association, (est. 1939): correspondence, memoranda and reports
relating to the Association's activities; minutes and agenda of executive, board of
directors and annual meetings; collected material relating to psychology in Canada
including regional associations' newsletters, pamphlets, booklets and reports; transcripts
of recorded interviews with senior Canadian psychologists. (24 feet)
Lochhead, Dr. Allan G.: correspondence, 1914-1972, a small diary, 1914 and 1930, reports,
manuscripts, printed matter and misceUaneous items which relate to Dr. Lochhead's
career as a bacteriologist with the Department of Agriculture and his internment as a
civUian prisoner of war at Camp Ruhlcken during World War I. (2 feet, 8 mches)
Macphail, Sir Andrew: correspondence, diaries, clippings, manuscripts and reprints, 1880-
1938, relating to his activities as author, soldier and physician; related papers, 1816-1905,
of his grandfather William MacphaU I and his father William Macphail n. (6 fe#- HISTORICAL BRANCH
27
Millman, Dr. Thomas: diary kept while serving as assistant surgeon with the British North
American Boundary Commission, 1872-1875. (Reel M-2231)
Royal Geographical Society CoUection: select material of interest to Canada from the collection of the Royal Geographical Society of London, England. Included are correspondence, diaries, log books and other records, 1814-1932, relating to various Arctic
expeditions and explorations of the Canadian West. (12 reels)
Social Science Research Council of Canada: an additional allotment relating to the Council's
pubUcations program and to the records of three former presidents of the S.S.R.C.C.
were transferred. (25 feet)
Victorian Order of Nurses of Canada, (est. 1898): minutes, correspondence, reports, pam-
I     phlets, dippings, 1897-1950, relating to the activities of the V.O.N, of Canada. (10 feet)
PRIME MINISTERS' PAPERS
Bennett, R. B.—The R. B. Bennett Papers are on loan to the Public Archives from the
University of New Brunswick, for numbering, microfilming and indexing. The 100
volumes of personal papers indexed during 1972 as weU as the last 11 volumes of the
poUtical papers, completed the indexing of the Bennett Papers. A pilot project was
prepared to determine the feasibility of using electronic data processing facilities to sort
the index. An edit print-out of the pUot was received from the Computer Services
Bureau. The editing and input of the complete Bennett index has just begun.
Bowell, Mackenzie—A letterbook of 1895 concerning patronage positions hi the North West
Mounted PoUce was transferred from the Privy CouncU Office.
King, W. L. M.—Fifty-three volumes of King Primary Series correspondence were numbered.
Work was begun on an index of the Primary Series correspondence, 1922-1950. A file
Ust of 255 volumes of the J2 correspondence Series was prepared. Ninety-one volumes
of the King Thbd Series were listed and sorted. The last 12 volumes of the King Memoranda and Notes, 1940-1950, were numbered as weU as 28 volumes of the Black Binder
Series. The last 18 volumes of the King Speeches, 1933-1950, were numbered and a file
Ust was prepared. The original King Diaries to the end of 1931 were numbered and
Usted. Because of the demand for these diaries, three copies of the transcripts were numbered and made available to researchers. On 1 January 1973, the King Papers correspondence, memoranda and notes, and speeches for 1942 were opened to researchers.
Laurier, Sir Wilfrid—Work continued this year on revising and editing the entries in the
Laurier author index so that they may be used as the input for a subject index to be
sorted by electronic data processing. Copyflow xerox copies of the Laurier Papers were
prepared from the microfibn. These copies are now being boxed so that they can be used
by researchers. The originals are being withdrawn from circulation.
Macdonald, Sir John ^.—Transcripts of the Macdonald letterbooks, 1870-1891, were transferred to the Manuscript Division from the PubUcations Division.
Pearson, L. B.—The Pearson Prime Ministers' Office files, 1963-1965, were reboxed and
Usted (205 volumes). Eighty volumes of Pearson clippings were reboxed and listed.
St-Laurent, Louis—-The file Ust of the 145 volumes of Prime Minister's correspondence was
completed. The correspondence in 110 volumes was sorted chronologicaUy within
each file.
Thompson, Sir John—A shelf Ust for these papers was prepared.
Tupper, Sir Charles—A small coUection of additional Tupper material was acquired this year.
'   It consisted of letters collected originally in four albums, 1858-1915; correspondence,
1855-1915; appointment books, 1899, 1907; annotated scrap-book (originaUy a poU-
J PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
book), 1874; autographed banquet program, 1900; scrap-book of newspaper clippings^
and a plan of the House of Commons, 1898. (8 inches).
PUBLIC AFFAIRS ARCHIVES
Associations:
Canadian Council on Social Development: correspondence and working files of the C.C.S.D.,
formerly the Canadian Welfare CouncU. Also some material relating to the Canadian
Youth Commission. (90 feet, additional)
London, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and West India Bank Ltd.: copy of memoranda and
articles of the bank, signed and sealed by David Burwash, London, England, 20 February 1864. (37 pages)
National Council of Women: additional correspondence, clippings and reports. Presented by
the National Council of Women. (1£ feet)
Ontario Temperance and Prohibitory League: a series of campaign pointers used by the
temperance advocates in the Canada-wide prohibition plebisdte of 29 September 1898e
(1 inch)
University Women's Club of Ottawa: additional correspondence, programmes, minutes and
reports.
Education:
Audet, Louis-Philippe (né en 1903) éducateur et écrivain: papiers personnels, 1929-1971,
consistant en correspondance, textes de causeries, articles et cours, manuscrits d'ouvrages
pubUés et non publiés et dossiers ainsi que papiers rassemblés en tant que secrétabe de
la Commission royale d'enquête sur l'enseignement dans la province de Québec, 1961-
1966. Don de M. Louis-Philippe Audet. (42 pieds 2 pouces)
Commission on Relations between Universities and Governments, 1968-1969: Ottawa—correspondence, submissions, related papers and clippings, 1959-1969. Presented by
Professor Donald C. Rowat, Ottawa, Ontario. (9 feet, 4 inches)
Dixon, Frederick A., tutor: family correspondence, 1873-1959, and correspondence with the
Dufferin family, Sb Charles Tupper and the Marquis of Lome. (4 inches)
General:
Botterwell, È. H.: account book, 1868-1908.
Fauquier, Bishop Frederick D.: microfilm of Bishop Fauquier's diaries which recorded his
own duties and the financial records of the Diocese of Algoma, 1878-1880. (1 reel)
Larsen, Henry Asbjorn, R.C.M.P. officer: copy of Mr. Larsen's manuscript that was the
basis of bis autobiography The Big Ship. (3£ biches)
Pétrie, Alfred E. H., public servant and former editor of the Canadian Numismatic Journal:
correspondence dealing with the publication of the Journal and correspondence with
various com clubs throughout the world.
Shaughnessy, Thomas George, 1st Baron: 112 letterbooks of Lord Shaughnessy were received
on loan from the Canadian Pacific Railway Archives in Montreal. These are to be microfilmed and the originals are to be returned.
Shaw, George W., C.N.R. official: letter from Mr. Shaw to Edgar Stone, England, describing
the former's arrival in Canada, 1914. The letter was recovered from the wreck of the
Empress of Ireland and returned to the author. (5 pages)
Stewart, Ethel: copy of an account by the local Hudson's Bay Company manager of Lord
Tweedsmub's visit to Fort MacPherson in 1937. (3 pages) HISTORICAL BRANCH 29
Wolff Family Papers: letter and power of attorney of Charles Wolff, probate of George
Sparks' wtil and a copy of the map of Overbrook area, dated 1868-1883. (46 pages)
Military:
Corlett, General Charles H., U.S. mUitary officer: copy of a portion of Gen. Corlett's unpublished autobiography in which he describes the jomt Canadian-American landing
on Kiska, Aleutian Islands, 15 August 1943. (28 pages)
Crerar, H. D. G., army officer: mUitary diary for 1915. (1 inch, additional)
Henry, General Guy V., mUitary officer: copy of a portion of Gen. Henry's autobiography
written between 1944 and 1967 which covered his duty with the Canada-United States
Permanent Jomt Board on Defence. (68 pages)
Lenihan, Lt. Michael J., U.S. military officer: copy of a page of Lt. Lenihan's unpublished
reminiscences describing an incident in 1887 when Lenihan, a Lieutenant in an infantry
regiment, encountered a body of Indian refugees who had participated in the North
West Rebellion. (1 page)
Licope, Georges,- Collection, museum curator: material collected by Mr. Licope, curator
of the Mons War Museum, relating to the 1918 liberation of Mons by Canadian troops.
Also includes two papers by A. G. L. McNaughton discussing the use of artillery in
World War I. (1 inch)
McNaughton, Gen. A. G. L., soldier, politician, public servant: family correspondence,
genealogical material, articles by Gen. McNaughton. (3 feet, 6 inches, additional)
PoUtical:
Action Canada, poUtical party: correspondence, memoranda, reference material and speeches
relating to Action Canada, 1970-1973. (33 feet)
Bell, Hon. R. A., cabinet minister: these papers, which had been on security deposit were
accessioned. They consist of correspondence, memoranda, speeches and printed material.
(100 feet)
Bracken, John, M.P.: subject files and clippings relating to Mr. Bracken's years as Conservative Leader of the Opposition. (11 feet)
Churchill, Hon. G. C, cabinet minister: these papers, consisting of correspondence, notes,
speeches, memoirs, photographs and clippings relating to Mr. ChurchiU's pariiamentary
career, were accessioned. They had previously been on security deposit. (55 feet)
Drew, Hon. George: clippings relating to Mr. Drew's years as Conservative Leader of the
Opposition. (1 foot)
Kerr, Lilla Muriel: letter from Mrs. Dorise W. Nielson, M.P., dated 1 May 1940, and
clippings. (6 pages)
La Marsh, Hon. Judy, cabinet minister: clippings relating to Miss La Marsh's years as a
Cabinet Minister m the Pearson Government. (10 feet)
liberal Party of Canada: correspondence, photographs, election material, 1963-1972. (2 feet,
additional)
Manion, Dr. R. J., M.P.: subject files and clippings, 1938-1940, were added to the existing
Manion Papers. These files relate to Dr. Manion's years as Conservative Leader of the
Opposition. (7 feet, 8 inches)
Milner, Viscount Alfred, statesman: microfilm copy of correspondence with Sir G. R. Parkin,
1893-1896, as well as correspondence, memoranda and clippings relating to Canadian
topics, 1907-1922. (1 reel) 30
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
New Democratic Party: campaign literature and poster relating to the 1972 federal election.
(1 foot)
Newman, Archibald, writer, alderman: correspondence, clippings and articles relating to
Mr. Newman's career as a free-lance writer, Ottawa alderman and assistant to the
Hon. C. D. Howe. (8 inches)
Progressive Conservative Party: posters and campaign literature relating to the 1972 federal
election. (2 feet)
Ralston, Hon. James L., cabinet minister: diaries, family correspondence and scrap-books.
(3 feet, additional)
Ray, William, M.P.: nomination address by William Ray, M.P., to the electors of Annapolis
County, N.S., 29 January 1874, as weU as several clippings regarding Ray's death.
(13 pages)
Sifton, Hon. Arthur L., jurist, politician: letters and telegrams relating to Sifton's death;
reports and memoranda dealing with peace negotiations and international conventions;
clippings, cards, printed material and commissions. (1 foot, 6 inches, additional)
Thompson, Robert, politidan, educator: correspondence, notes, printed material relating to
Mr. Thompson's parliamentary career, 1962-1972, the Social Credit Party and Ethiopia.
(8 feet)
Tupper, William J.: correspondence with family members, friends and business associates,
1880-1935; Lady Tupper's European journal, 1890; miscellaneous certificates, notes,
memoranda. (8 inches)
PubUc Service and Judiciary:
Ewart, John S., lawyer, author: memoranda relating to legal cases and judicial decisions
before the courts of Canada and Great Britain, 1890-1932. (1 inch, additional)
Heeney, A. D. P., public servant: correspondence, notes, family material relating to Rev.
Bertal Heeney and to A. D. P. Heeney's career in the public service. (15 feet, additional)
Kirkwood, Kenneth P., diplomat: diplomatic journals, five volumes of poetry as well as
journals relating to travel and meditations. (1 foot, additional)
Morin, Louis, lawyer: xerox of the Montreal La Presse, 4 February 1916, reporting the
Parliament Htil fire. Copy of a letter from W. F. Nickle who was an eye witness to
the death of Mme Louis Morin. (6 pages)
Pope, Lt. Gen. Maurice A., soldier, diplomat: copy of a letter from Lt. Gen. Pope to W. L. M.
King, 21 February 1948, regarding King's forthcoming retirement. (3 pages, additional)
Robertson, Norman, public servant: letter from Mr. Robertson to his parents, 30 January
1941, concerning the death of Dr. O. D. Skelton and his feelings on assuming Dr.
Skelton's position as Undersecretary of State for External Affabs. (1 page)
Vanier, Rt. Hon. G. P., governor-general, soldier, diplomat: correspondence, memoranda,
notes, speeches, clippings and awards, 1843-1967. (70 feet) (This accession arrived during
1970-71).
Papers on Deposit
The following units were received for deposit during the year:
Aitken, Gordon, M.P.—3 feet.
Blair, Gordon, M.P.—50 feet.
Cadieu, Albert, M.P.—2 feet.
Greene, Hon. J. J.—Additional, 27 feet.
Harkness, Hon. D. S.—Additional, 13 feet. HISTORICAL BRANCH
Hellyer, Hon. P. T.—2O0 feet.
Knowles, Stanley, M.P.—3 filing cabinets
Ijxing, Hon. Arthur—ZOO feet
Mahoney, Hon. Patrick—20 feet.
Martin, Hon. Paul—Additional, 13 feet.
Monteith, Hon. J. W.—Additional, 6 feet.
Olson, Hon. H. A.—4 biches.
Pepin, Hon. J.-L.—2 feet.
Perrault, Ray, M.P.—38 feet.
Pickersgill, Hon. J. W.—Additional, 128 feet.
Wahn, Ian—5 feet
SPORTS ARCHIVES
During 1972-73 progress was made toward establishing a representative sports history
coUection. A number of organizations have responded favourably and numerous individuals-
sportsmen, writers, and sports executives—have been contacted regarding theb papers.
Articles outlining the program of the Sports Archives were written for the Sports
Federation of Canada Newsletter and similar information was sent to all the degree granting
schools of physical education in Canada.
Accessions:
Canadian Football league: xerox, submissions of the C.F.L. Commission to various federal
government agencies on behalf of the government, 1962-1972. Presented by the C.F.L.
Commission in 1972. (1 inch)
Canadian Ladies Golf Association: originals, 1919-1970, minutes, finances, correspondence,
championship results and scrap-books. Transferred to the Archives in 1972 by the
Association. (1 foot 2 inches)
Canadian Water Ski Association: originals, 1951-1971, National and Ontario region files,
World Tournaments and World Water Ski Union files and posters. Transferred to the
Archives in 1972 by the Association. (6 feet)
Dominion of Canada Rifle Association: originals, ca. 1867-1954, bound volumes of minutes
and publications. Transferred to the Public Archives Library m 1972 by the Association.
(2 feet)
Federation of Canadian Archers: originals, 1942-1972, publications, minutes, correspondence,
finances, membership files, tournament results and scrap-books. Transferred to the
Archives in 1972 by the Association. (3 feet 4 inches)
Ontario Hockey Association: annual meetings and executive meetings minutes, 1913-1959.
Copied by kind permission of the O.H.A. in 1972. (microfUm, 3 reels)
Ottawa-St. iMwrence Athletic Association: minutes, correspondence, competition lists, ca.
1950-1971. Transferred to the Archives in 1973 by Mr. Pugh of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union. (2$ feet)
Connor, Harry, hockey player: original, ca. 1922-1932, scrap-book illustrating his hockey
career. Presented in 1973 by Mrs. Connor. (1 inch)
Cur ran, J. E. G., lacrosse player: originals, ca. 1884-1960, scrap-book, photographs, rule-
books and the minute book of the Ortilia Mechanics Institute, 1867-1872. Also the
back files of the Oriltia News Letter. Presented in 1973 by Mr. E. Curran of Orillia.
(approx. 4 feet)
Gladish, William M., newspaperman: originals, 1900-1944, a scrap-book, miscellaneous
programs and photographs ill ustrating cycling. (2 biches) 32
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
McDonald, Roy, cyclist: originals, 1930-1962, scrap-book of clippings illustrating the great
popularity of six-day bicycle races in the 1930's. Presented in 1972 by Mr. McDonald.
(4 inches)
Mayer, Charles, sports writer: originals, ca.  1920-1971, correspondence, photographs,
scrap-books, publications, drafts of articles and radio shows. Presented in 1972 by
Madame Mayer, (approx. 12 feet)
Simpson, Thomas, amateur tennis player: xerox transcript of taped interview concerning
amateur tennis in the 1920's and 1930's. Presented by Mr. R. J. Taylor of Ottawa.
(16 pages)
BUSINESS ARCHIVES
This past year the Archives received the business records of a number of Canadian
companies. These included: Home Bank of Canada, Yukon ConsoUdated Gold Corporation, Canadian Freight Assodation, Canadian Passenger Assodation, Industrial Mortgage
and Loan Co., and Buntin GiUies Co. Ltd.
Numerous other companies were made aware of our Business Archives Programme.
With our advice and encouragement many companies are considering the possibility of
establishing company archives and records management programmes. Emphasis has been
placed upon acquiring records and familiarizing the business community with our aims and
purposes. This emphasis, and lack of support staff, has resulted in the creation of a considerable backlog. In the next year it is hoped that this unbalance will be corrected.
NATIONAL ETHNIC ARCHIVES
In September 1971 cabinet approved in principle the PubUc Archives program for the
coUection and preservation of archives relating to the history of the cultural communities
whose origins are neither French nor British. The National Ethnic Archives was established
as a unit and received its first full-time staff in April 1972. The staff now numbers four employees in permanent positions and the program permits the hiring of temporary staff to
meet linguistic and other demands. Although the National Ethnic Archives is organized
within the Manuscript Division its interests cover all concerns of the Historical Branch.
The aim of the National Ethnic Archives is to ensure the preservation of archival docu- j
ments of all kinds relating to Canada's cultural minorities. To achieve this goal its emphasis
to date has been: to inform individuals and organizations about the nature and uses of j
archival documents; to prevent as quickly as possible the loss and destruction of archival
material through neglect and ignorance; and to ensure the permanent preservation of aU
historically significant documents by providing for theb deposit in the PubUc Archives or |
another suitable institution. The National Ethnic Archives encourages and assists individuals
and organizations in collecting documents; hundreds of letters have been sent to the ethnic
press, individuals and organizations requesting theb cooperation with the National Ethnic
Archives. Now that its staff is complete this work wtil be expanded. Some contact has been
had with various groups at meetings especiaUy organized for the purpose, or at other meetings such as the Alberta Cultural Heritage Conference, the Ontario Heritage Conference j
and the Montreal Conference on the future of Ukrainian Canadians in Quebec.
The National Ethnic Archives has been weU received and gradually pubUc interest is
being translated into donations. Agreements of cooperation with the Trans-Canada Alliance
of German-Canadians and the Central Organization of Sudeten German Clubs were signed
and about 28 feet of theb records transferred prior to the estabUshment of the National
Ethnic Archives. Since then the Ukrainian Canadian Committee with headquarters in
Winnipeg has signed a similar agreement and transferred its minutes of meetings (about 33
5,000 pages) which have been prepared for microfilming. More of their records will be
transferred shortly. The Canadian Polish Congress also has agreed to deposit its records
and is preparing them for transfer; the first shipment is promised for February. The Polish
Alliance of Canada will transfer a portion of its records early in the next fiscal year. The
National Executive of the Ukrainian Youth Federation of Canada also transferred about
25 feet of its records.
The Jewish Community Council of Ottawa has begun an energetic program of collecting archival documents, including oral history, with the encouragement and advice of
the National Ethnic Archives. This material will be deposited in and become the property
of the Archives. The first deposits, consisting of some unique photographs and approximately three feet of manuscript material have been received. The Estonian Central Council
of Canada has also undertaken the direct collection of archives relating to their community
and expects eventually to transfer the complete collection to the National Ethnic Archives.
Similar arrangements are expected with other communities.
Other major acquisitions include the papers of Walter J. Bossy of Montreal which
contain considerable information relating to the Ukrainian Canadian community. The first
shipment of documents from Norrana Publishing Co. in Vancouver was received. This
consisted essentially of an almost complete set of Nomana, the only Norwegian language
newspaper in Canada, which has been published continuously since 1910. Some unique
water-colours by James Dixon illustrating an early settlement on the prairies were purchased
and the photograph collection of Laslo Vorkony, a Montreal photographer of Hungarian
descent, was acquired.
Smaller acquisitions of the National Ethnic Archives relate to the Coptic, Doukhobor,
Dutch, German, Jewish, Lithuanian, Polish, Spanish and Ukrainian communities.
Several persons have agreed to transfer collections of personal papers to the National
Ethnic Archives. Details will be found in our next annual report.
PUBLIC RECORDS SECTION—Accessions—During the year the Section received 7,190
feet of records, 1,162 reels of microfilm, and 4 inches of microfiche. Total extent of holdings
at the close of the fiscal year was 53,670 feet. The more significant accessions received were :
Department of National Defence. Records of the Royal Canadian Navy, Atlantic Command,
1,123 feet in extent, dealing with all aspects of naval operations during World War II-
Also received were 395 feet of Canadian Military Headquarters files (1939-1947). Further
documentation from this source was transferred as part of a large microfilm accession
(1,080 reels). The microfilm contains records concerning a number of areas of departmental responsibility, and documents the activities of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and
various committees over a fifteen year period commencing with the close of the Second
World War. Unfortunately the original files were destroyed after they were filmed by
the Department
Indian Affairs Branch. In line with the policy of expediting access to records for Indian Claims
research, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development transferred
1,800 feet of Indian Affairs Branch records. The files relate to all aspects of Indian
administration in Canada from about 1870 to 1967.
Department of the Interior. The extant records of the Dominion Lands Branch, 1870-1930,
consisting of over 500 feet of files, 828 reels of microfilm, and 40,000 aperture cards.
The  material  complements   that  abeady  in  our  custody. It includes: records of
some 500,000 letters patent for Dominion Lands granted in Manitoba, Saskatchewan,
Alberta, and British Columbia, 1883-1930; ruling (policy) files concerning western land
patents; registers of rail-way land grants, and Hudson's Bay Company grants; files
concerning lands granted under the Manitoba Act of 1870; lists of Half-Breed Scrip 34
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-19731
redpients; records of all land grants to veterans of the Riel RebeUion of 1870, the I
Northwest RebeUion of 1885, the South African War, and the North West MounteB
Police.
Geological Survey. The field notebooks for the period 1900 to 1925; 2,500 books comprising
33 feet. They are complementary to the field notebooks for the years 1842 to 1900,
which were already in our custody. In addition, two old official letterbooks for thel
years 1865 to 1871, were transferred from the Geological Survey, completing the set
of letterbooks (42 hi all) from 1865 to 1908 inclusive.
Department of Labour. 300 feet of registry files, relating to such activities of the Department
as international labour, coUective agreements, unemployment insurance, accident
prevention, workmen's compensation, and the Norris Industrial Inquiry Commission. ||
Corporations Branch. 1,250 feet of files of individual companies chartered under the federal
Companies Act, which surrendered their charters between 1867 and 1959.
National Parks Branch. The Historic Sites Service, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern
Development, is making available the manuscript reports of some of its past research
projects. They are being distributed, through the Public Records Section, to each of the>
provindal archives and the archives of the Yukon Territory. They are also available m
the PubUc, Archives Library and this Section.
Privy Council Office. The Minutes of the Cabinet War Committee for the period from the
beginning of 1942 to the end of the Second World War were transferred and made available to researchers. The entbe run of these minutes and supporting documents, from
1939 to 1945, is available on microfilm.
Department of External Affairs. Over 600 feet of the main registry system, commonly referred to as the "39" series and covering the years from the formation of the Department
m 1909 to 1961. The files reflect all aspects of the Department's work.
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The records of the Corporation's Ajax Development Project (1947-1957) were transferred from the Records Management Branch.
They document the work involved in saving a wartime housing project and providing
for projected post-war urban growth in the Toronto area. C.M.H.C. applied practical
urban planning principles with the object of creating Canada's "first fully-planned
industrial community." Extent is 10 feet.
Geographical Branch. Approximately 35 feet of files covering the years 1945 to 1968, most of
them created in the Geographical Branch, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys.
Subjects covered include urban geography and port studies, land use in the various
provinces, terrain analysis, area economic surveys, hydrology, and projects falling undetV
the scope of the Agricultural Rehabilitation and Development Act.
Prices and Incomes Commission. General working files, prices and wages reviews, documentation on the National Program to Fight Inflation, and a large block of research files»
comprising 29 feet in extent.
Canadian Transport Commission. Annual Reports, 1877 to 1950, from steam and electric
railways and express companies to the Board of Transport Commissioners and its
predecessors. Extent: 240 feet.
Finding Aids—Progress was made in the preparation of shelf-lists for the various groups.
By the end of the fiscal year such lists had been completed for the records of the Departments
of Mines and Technical Surveys, Northern Affairs and National Resources, and Citizenship and Immigration, as well as for those of the Atomic Energy Control Board, the Mines
Branch, the Surveys and Mapping Branch, the Water Resources Branch, and the Yukon HISTORICAL BRANCH
35
Territorial Government. In addition, the shelf-Usts for the records of the Governor General's
Office, the Department of External Affairs, and the R.C.M.P. are over half completed, and
a start has been made on those of the Treasury Board and the Department of Militia and
Defence. The Data Processing Unit produced key-word indexes for records of the Départaient of Finance, Trade and Commerce, and National Defence (Army), and is working on
similar finding aids for the records of the Northern Administration Branch and a sizeable
portion of the records of the Canadian National Railways. These finding aids are or will be
avaUable on 16mm microfilm.
Publications—Bulletin No. 3, Access Program to Public Records, was published. In addition,
planning began for publication of the inventories of the holdings of the Section. Considerable
thought is being given to the format to be used.
Statistical Summary—During the year the Section accessioned 7,190 feet of records and
processed (i.e. brought under control) 6,563 feet, leaving a backlog of 12,867 feet of unprocessed material. The summary is as foUows:
Organization/ Boxing/
Materia]       Selection        Listing Total
Sub-Section
Processed
Backlog
Backlog
Extent
MUitary
7,947
1,123
4,083
13,153
Judicial and Legislative
9,701
884
454
11,039
Finance, Industry, Culture
8,784
119
518
9,402
Manpower and Resources
7,120
3,070
1,415
11,705
Transportation and Public Works
6,916
676
779
8,371
Totals
40,468
5,872
7,249
53,670
These figures indicate that over the past year the volume of records fully processed has
increased by almost 7,000 feet, the amount to be organized and/or selected has increased by
1,800 feet, and the backlog of records to be boxed and/or Usted has dbnbtished by 370 feet.
RESEARCH AND INQUIRIES SECTION—This Section was established in August 1972
to co-ordinate in a central office all the research activities undertaken by clerical and professional staff in the answering of inquiries received by the Manuscript Division. The clerical-
secretarial work performed by the staff of the secretarial unit in the processing of Divisional
correspondence—registering, typing, filing and indexing of historical research reports, compUation of research statistics for the Division—is also directed by the Section. A genealogical
unit with a permanent staff of three has been added to co-ordinate and to dbect aU the written
research and oral reference service provided to the public by the Division in this area.
AUXILIARY SERVICES SECTION—Mbror of Canada Past Exhibition—The preparation
of display items from the Manuscript Division was co-ordinated through the Auxiliary
Services Section. This included the preparation of location entries and the responsibility for
ensuring that all manuscript items were sent to the Picture Conservation Section for appropriate protective measures, and returned to the appropriate location at the end of the
exhibition. PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973 3
The Ethnic Mosaic
La mosaïque ethnique HISTORICAL BRANCH
Four of the thirty-seven thematic panels from the Public Archives centennial exhibition
Archives: Mirror of Canada Past.
General Index—The General Index is a cross-reference card index to the Mam Entry Catalogue, (located in the Reference Room) and to inventory entries in Manuscript and Record
Group inventories. In addition, it contains nominal and /or subject card indexes to 118 finding
aids or units of papers. There are approximately 90,000 entries in the General Index. Over
the years, the preparation of subject cards with no attempt at standardization meant that
subject cards on any given subject were found under several headings. To date approximately
90% of the subject cards have been edited, retyped and filed into the General Index, along
with appropriate cross-reference cards. At the same time, a catalogue of examples or types
of subject entries is being prepared and is also 90% complete. In future, all subject (as well
as nominal) cards being added wUl be examined for accuracy before they are placed in the
General Index. A set of filing rules has also been prepared to prevent inaccurate filing.
Register of Dissertations—The Register of Dissertations was completed in March and sent to
the printer for pubUcation.
Reference Room—Plans are underway to revise the registration form to ensure that researchers are fuUy advised as to the rules and regulations of the Manuscript and Public
Records Divisions as they apply to the researcher. Because of the expanding use of the registration function, an extra clerk has been added to the Reference Room to assist the registration clerk with her duties. 38
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
Reading Room—Plans are underway to make the Circulation Desk function as an independent
subsection in order to increase the efficiency of this operation. The desk is presently manned
by a circulation co-ordinator and a stackman, with staff from other sections manning the
Cbculation Desk and stacks on a rotational basis. This system wtil be replaced by one in
which the cbculation co-ordinator will be assisted by four stackmen and an assistant.
THE LONDON OFFICE
This Office continued to be very active during the year. Arrangements were made for
the purchase of the Wolfe-Burgoyne-Douglas CoUection and the papers of Major Henry
Dives Townshend. The foUowing groups were presented to the PubUc Archives : the papers of
Dr. J. L. Tiarks; part of the Cyriax CoUection relating to the Arctic; the papers of Witiiam
Loch of New Brunswick.
Sixty reels of microfilm were made from government records in the Public Record
Office (CO. 5 and 323 and Cab. 2 and 41). One reel of the MUner Papers was obtained from
the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Thirty-seven reels of microfilm copied from papers in private
hands were also sent to the Public Archives including the Royal Army Medical College,
Dr. Bernardo's, The Royal ArtUlery Institution and the Army Museums Ogtivy Trust. We
are most grateful to those who made these copying arrangements possible.
In addition, the London Office received a total of 470 enquiries, of which 120 were by
letter and 350 by personal visit or telephone.
THE PARIS OFFICE
The Paris Office saw many changes in 1972. Father René Baudry, C.S.C., its dbector
since 1958, died on July 25, following a long illness which had kept him from his duties for
more than seven months. The PubUc Archives of Canada have lost hi him a dedicated associate. Tribute was paid to him in Paris on March 21,1973, at a meeting of the Association
France-Canada, which was attended by a number of important figures, including Mr. Guy
Duboscq, Dbector General of the French Archives, and several head curators of the Archives
Nationales.
Mr. Jean-Marie LeBlanc, an archivist in the Manuscript Division from 1966 to 1972,
replaced Father Baudry, assuming the dbection of the Office on November 1, 1972. At the
same time, the Office moved from the Embassy to the two rooms which had been assigned
to it at the Canadian Cultural Centre. The Office's present address is 5, rue de Constantine,
75007 Paris.
All these factors—the death of Father Baudry, the arrival of a new dbector, and the
move to new quarters—slowed down the acquisition of documents. The storage of material
on microfilm and the inventory of documents in series E of the Colonial Archives continued
normally, however, as did research for documents of Canadian interest in the records of the
Minutier Central des Notaires (Central Registry Office.)
In the drive to reorganize the Office, two projects have already been carried out: a list
has been made of the volumes in the possession of the PubUc Archives of Canada in Paris, i
and an inventory of the files which have now been accumulating for over twenty-five years
has been prepared. The coUection in the Office's library includes about 1,800 volumes, almost
aU of them on the history of Canada. Once catalogued, this library wtil provide better service
to Canadian students hi Paris and to French researchers who are interested in Canadian
history. An inventory of the files (about 40 Unear feet of documents) was necessary in order
to respond more easily to requests for information and to give a new direction to the program
to locate documents relative to Canada in the repositories of the French Archives.
Other projects designed to reorganize the document acquisition program are under way. I HISTORICAL BRANCH
39
PUBLIC
ARCHIVES
LIBRARY
Internal activities of the Public Archives Library have centered on the
strengthening of its rôle within the Historical Branch of the PubUc
Archives of Canada. The subject fields of each Division in the Archives
have had an impact on the acquisition of new material. Basic works of
historical and descriptive significance must be located, appraised and
purchased to complement the expansion of archival and records coUections.
The Library is now organizing small libraries in the various Divisions of the PubUc
Archives of Canada. Each will have its own author and shelf-list catalogues. These libraries
are an extension of the main Library, and are administered by the Head, Cbculation and
Extension Services Section. All books or pamphlets held in the sub-libraries are also found
fisted hi the main Library's catalogue, and are subject to cbculation within the buUding.
Rare Pamphlet Project—Cataloguing of rare pamphlets is now complete for the years 1867
to 1900. Work has already begun on the subsequent years, and catalogubig of the years 1850
to 1866 inclusive may be completed during 1973-74.
Microfiche Project—This is progressing satisfactorily. The Library wishes to express its
thanks to the Metropolitan Toronto Central Library for its assistance and loans of rare
material.
In 1972-73 the Library contributed to the Annual Archives Training Course, and to a
one-day course on Genealogical Source Material; its contribution to the International
Bibliography of Historical Science was also prepared and edited.
The Library was represented at the foUowing meetings: International Federation of
Libraries Assodation (Budapest); Canadian Library Association (Regina); Association
canadienne des bibliothécaires de langue française (La Malbaie); and the Canadian Historical
Association (Montreal). The Assistant Chief Librarian was appointed a delegate by the
Association canadienne des bibliothécaires de langue française, to the Société canadienne-
française de protection du droit d'auteur.
Activities of the PubUc Archives Library, from April 1, 1972 to March 31, 1973, were
asfoUows:
Service to the public:
Persons registered
Inquiries
Reproductions suppUed
8,959
3,537
75,414
Cataloguing:
Books, pamphlets, broadsides catalogued 4,128
Preparation and filing of library catalogue cards 22,312
Microfiches prepared 584
Volumes, pamphlets, rare books bound, and broadsides
mounted 2,368
Acquisitions:
Gifts
Books and Pamphlets
Microfilms (Reels)
Periodicals
Government pubUcations
1,125
2,975
425
5,214
5,857 40
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
RESEARCH AND REFERENCE SECTION—The number of inquiries received in this
Section is increasing steadily. Although its services are mainly directed towards the professional historian and the adult public, the Section has served students of Canadian history
at aU levels and from aU regions of Canada. Inquiries from remote parts of Canada where
library resources are scarce are handled with special care.
A preliminary inventory and indexing of uncatalogued biographies is almost complete^,
and 350 entries have been added to the Biographical Index.
The Section continues to distribute the Centennial Historical Booklets printed for
Canada's Centennial, as weU as other Centennial Commission publications whenever they
are available.
CIRCULATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES SECTION—Since its creation in October 1970, this Section has studied and implemented standard procedures for circulating library
material to staff and researchers.
It is the Section's responsibility to establish libraries at the Division and Section levels^
throughout the Public Archives of Canada. Activities began in November 1972 with an
analysis of each unit. Three such libraries have been surveyed: Picture Division, Manuscript
Division, and the Public Records Division. Proper shelving areas have been assigned by each
Division Head, and all books, pamphlets, and albums have been sent from these Divisions,
either to the Public Archives Library's Cataloguing, or Acquisition and Bindery Sections,
for proper attention.
The books are gradually being classified, catalogued, and repaired prior to being returned to theb proper quarters. Circulation procedures are being implemented and catalogues
prepared for each collection. The Head of the Circulation and Extension Services Section
assumes full responsibility for these units.
Next year, the Section hopes to complete a full inventory of the Public Archives Library*^;
collection.
CATALOGUING AND BENDERY SECTION—An increase in operations has been
obvious, with the arrival of a new cataloguer and with a program of reassessing the work
within the Section. A new process is being used for the reproduction of library catalogue
cards for current acquisitions. Cataloguing is done on a priority basis hi the following
sequence: reference works, genealogy, current library materials of historical significance, and
rare books. The backlog is increasing in proportion to the expansion program of the different
Divisions within the Public Archives.
A systematic repair program is in progress for the binding, conservation and restoration
of the Library's holdings. However, until additional staff is provided hi the Records Conservation Section, some rare items wtil have to be circulated m an unsatisfactory condition.
The preparation of books for restoration and binding has now been transferred to the new
Acquisition and Bindery Section, to be established April 1, 1973.
PERIODICALS AND GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS SECTION—During the year
rapid progress was made in the inventory of periodicals held by the PubUc Archives Library.
Titles beginning with the letters A to N, and W to Z, have been completed. Holding cards
and finding aids have been updated accordingly.
Among the new titles received, the foUowing three are worth mentioning, although only
one represents a complete coUection :
Art Journal. London. 1839-1912
Canadian Report. Appeal Cases. 1828-1913 (Complete)
Semaine Religieuse de QuSbec. 1888- HISTORICAL BRANCH
41
An inventory of provincial government publications held by the Public Archives Library
was also initiated during the fiscal year, and is still in its preliminary stages.
The Section shows a high percentage of circulation and requires that selected duplicate
titles be maintained in both periodicals and government documents. A list of duplicates is
retained, with regular additions.
Donors to the Public Archives Library for
Mrs. T. D. Aldon
Mr. J. Andreassen
Bernard Amtmann, Inc.
Mrs. V. Barnum
Mr. A. BeauUeu
Mr. M. BeU
Bibliophile du canadiana
Mr. D. G. Blab
Mr. J. C. Bonar
Mrs. F. Booth
Calgary. University
Canada Deposit Insurance Corp.
Canadian Industries Ltd.
Canadian International Development
Agency
Canadian Textile Institute/
Institut canadien des textiles
Mr. K. V. Chandrasekharaiah
Mrs. V. R. Clemmer
Miss S. Club
Mrs. A. Coderre
Conseil régional de développement de
l'Abitibi-Témiscamingue
Mr. G. Cook
Mr. D. Cooter
R. Côté, f.i.c.
Mrs. G. Daniels
Miss D. E. Darwin
Mr. F. A. Dowe
Mme L. Ferland
Mr. J. L. Finn
Miss B. Fisher
France. Musée de la monnaie
Dr. E. L. Gaudet
Mr. F. Gill
Glenbow-Alberta Institute
Mr. R. Gustafson
Mrs. D. Halldorson
Hastings County. Council
Mr. G. E. Higgins
Mr. E. D. Hooper
Dr. R. H. Hubbard
Information Abitibi-Témiscamingue
the year 1972-73.
Institute of Public Affairs,
Dalhousie University
Mrs. A. Johnson
Mr. E. C. Joseph
Mr. J. Kidd
Kingston, Ont. City
Dr. I. Kovacs
Mr. Y. Lamonde
Mme G. Lanctot
Mr. R. LeMoine
Col. R. A. Logan
Mrs. H. Luedemann
Mrs. C. H. McAfee
Mr. G. A. McGibbon
Miss E. MacMUlan
Dr. E. D. MacPhee
Miss D. McQueen
Mr. B. Marceau
Miss D. Martin
Mr. J. J. Martin
Mr. J. R. Matheson
Mrs. H. C. Mathews
Brig. Gen. J. L. Melville
Mika Silk Screening Ltd.
Mrs. E. Mtiler
Mr. E. Minvtile
Missouri Historical Society
Mr. C. A. MitcheU
E. Mitchell, s.g.m.
Mrs. M. Morris
Miss E. Morton
New Brunswick. Provincial Archives
Ottawa. Christ Church Cathedral
Ottawa. Collegiate Institute
Ottawa. University
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission
Mr. E. Phelps
Mr. J. Prémont
Capt. T. C. Pullen
Mr. F. A. Rahmer
Miss L. B. Rhodes
M. l'abbé G. Riou 42
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1972B
Mr. H. Rosebrugh
Mr. J. P. Roy
St-Lawrence Seaway Authority
Saskatoon. Office of the Mayor
Simon and Pierre Publishers
Mr. E. F. S. Smith
Mr. J. G. Stevens
Sir C. Stuart
Mr. R. J. Tarye
Mr. K. W. Totten
Mrs. J. Trielhard
Mrs. G. Train
Mrs. A. Tyler
Mr. A. Vachon
Mr. J. L. Vinke
Waterloo Historical Society
Mr. R. D. Watt
Mrs. L. B. Weaver
Mr. E. D. Weber
Mr. B. Whitham
Mrs. M. G. Willoughby
Mr. D. S. Wilson
Mr. R. Wood
Printed material extracted from Archives' coUections.
Bossy Papers McCracken (G. W.) Papers
Defense Medical Association of Canada MacDonald (A. E.) Papers
Dunn (James) CoUection McGtil University CoUection
Ells (S.C.) Papers MacKenzie (J. A.) Papers
Fortune FamUy Papers National Ethnic Archives Collection
Freiman CoUection National Harbour Board Collection
King (W. L. M.) Collection Sifton (A. L.) Collection
Labour Archives CoUection Tweed (T.) Collection
Important volumes bought during the year 1972-73
Arguments against an elective Legislative Council. Toronto, 1856.
Bourgeois, G. A. État du Haut-St-Maurice ou de la rSserve forestiSre des Trois-RiviSres.
Rome, 1885.
A Brief sketch of the Cape Breton mission. Edinburgh, 1851.
British American Land Company. Quebec Emigrant Agency Office. To emigrants and natives
in search of lands for settlement 20th June, 1842. n.p., 1842.
Canada. Dept. of the Secretary of State. ExposS des réclamations adressées a
fSdéral, en conséquence de l'insurrection survenue dans les Territoin
Ottawa, 1871.
CoUection P. Brunet.
CoUection Ulric Barthe.
A Complete history of the present war. London, 1761.
Contract for a line of steamers to run between Quebec c
1852.
De Boilieu, L. Recollections of Labrador life. London, 1861.
Dennys, N. B. An account of the cruise. London, 1862.
DiérevUle. Relation du voyage du Port Royal de l'Acadie, ou de la Nouvelle-France. Rouen,
1708.
A Full exposure of the C.B.S.; or, Dark Lantern Association. BrockvUle, Ont., 1861(?)
Hare, F. The allies and the late ministry defended against France and the present friends of
France. London, 1711-12.
Hatin, L. E. Histoire pittoresque des voyages dans les cinq parties du monde. Paris, 1844.     a
Histoire des traites de paix et autres négotiacions du dix-septième siScle. Là. Haye, 1725.
u gouvernement^
p du Nord-Ouest.
Montreal and Liverpool. Quebec, HISTORICAL BRANCH 43
Jésuites. Lettres des missions. Lettres des nouvelles missions du Canada, s.l.n.d.
Jésuites. Lettres des missions. Lettres édifiantes et curieuses écrites des missions étrangères.
Vol. 23. Paris, 1738.
Laberge, A. Journalistes, écrivains et artistes. Montréal, 1945.
Peintres et écrivains d'hier et d'aujourd'hui. Montréal, 1938.
Propos sur nos écrivains. Montréal, 1954.
Langdon, J. E. Canadian silversmiths and their marks, 1667-1867. Lunenberg, Vt., 1960.
Mol loy, C. De jure mar it into et navali; or, A treatise of affairs maritime and of commerce.
London, 1782.
Petitot, E. Dictionnaire de la langue Dènè-Dindjié. Paris, 1876.
A Review of the government and grievances of the Province of Quebec. London, 1788.
Rouquette, L.-F. L'épopée blanche. Paris, 1930.
Ryan, A. Caricature politique du Canada. Free lance political caricature in Canada. Montréal,
1904.
Thieme, U. and Becker, F. Allgemeines lexikon der bildenden kunstler von der antike bis zur
gegenwart. Leipzig, 1907-1950.
Upper Canada. An act for granting His Majesty a certain sum of money, out of the funds
applicable to the use of this province to defray the expenses of amending the public
highways and roads, and building of bridges in several districts thereof. Passed the 13th
of March, 1811. n.p., 1811.
Wood. Report of... relative to... Pembina Settlement... Washington, 1850.
JtfA XIONAL MAP ^ne centennial year of the PubUc Archives coincided with four
~g^j j ijifvwTjfYNT international congresses hosted by Canada which were closely
CUL/Lvli#l^ 1 liiiN related to cartography and the work of the National Map
CoUection. These were the International Geographical Union
Congress, the International Cartographic Association Conference, the International Society
of Photogrammetry Congress, and the 24th Session of the International Geological Congress.
A large exhibit of archival maps was prepared by the National Map CoUection for the
International Geographical Congress in Montreal, and a smaller exhibit on resources for
urban studies was prepared for and displayed at the Historical Urbanization of North
America Conference at York University in January 1973.
Conferences hosted by the National Map CoUection—The National Map Collection was
itself host in August to the sixth annual conference of the Assodation of Canadian Map
Libraries and to a special session of the International Cartographic Association on the
History of Cartography.
Association of Canadian Map Libraries, August 28-September 1, 1972—On August 28, the
delegates were officially welcomed by Bernard WeUbrenner, the Assistant Dominion Archivist.
The papers delivered at the conference were: "The role of maps in courts of law" by Dr.
Don W. Thomson, author of Men and Meridians: A History of Surveying and Mapping in
Canada; "Early maps in current city development" by Robert F. Legget, author of The
Rideau Waterway; "Computer mapping—some unanswered questions" by Dr. D. R. F.
Taylor of Carleton University who has compiled the Computer Atlas of Ottawa-HuU; "Maps
of Canada in the British Museum" by Dr. Helen Wallis, Head of the Map Room of the
British Museum; "Nineteenth and twentieth century maps and the teaching of Canadian 44 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197»
Studies" by Dr. John Warkentin, York University, a co-author of the Historical Atlas of
Manitoba; "The urban development of Quebec City, 1800-1900" by Edward Dabi of our
staff, D. T. Ruddell of the National Museum of Man, Hélène Espesset of Université Laval
and Marc Lafrance of National Historic Sites; "Design for a national map coUection" bfl
T. E. Layng; "Some thoughts regarding a foreign map collection" by C. H. Smith; "Cabot's
landfaU—the case for Cape Bonavista" by Fabian O'Dea of St. John's, Newfoundland,
author of the monograph Seventeenth Century Cartography of Newfoundland; and "Inventory
and prospect in Canadian toponymy" by J. A. Rayburn, Toponymie Research, Department
of Energy, Mines and Resources.
In addition L. M. Sebert reported on mapping activities of the Department of Energy!^
Mines and Resources and P. J. Hubert of the Census Division of Statistics Canada discussed
the avaUability of 1971 census reference maps. Visits to Statistics Canada, to the Department
of Energy, Mines and Resources, to the map coUections of Carleton University and the
University of Ottawa, to Bytown Bookcraft (map restoration) as weU as tours of the Public
Archives were arranged. Several workshops, a quiz, and the business meeting rounded out
the conference. On the social side, a wine and cheese party hosted by the Public Archives,
a reception, a banquet and a number of informal gatherings were held.
The conference was judged successful by all who attended, including several delegates
from the United States, England, Scotland and the Netherlands.
History of Cartography Session, International Cartographic Assodation, August 23, 1972—
During this special session, chaired by Dr. Helen WaUis, Head of the Map Room of the
British Museum, papers were detivered by four persons prominent in the history of cartography field. Since delegates were present from many parts of the world, facilities were made
available for instantaneous translation in English, French and Spanish.
The speakers were Dr. Josef Breu of Austria, "Mapping under the Hapsburgh Monarchy
in the nineteenth century"; Dr. Sàndor Radô of Hungary, "Sixteenth and seventeenth
century maps of Hungary" (prepared by Dr. Radô and Klara Nemes); Dr. Francisco Vaz-
quez-Maure of Spam, "Spanish cartographic expeditions to the American coasts of the
North Pacific (1774-1792)" (delivered in Spanish); and Dr. J. B. Harley of England, "Military
cartography in eastern North America, 1760-1785: Some future directions".
The papers were followed by a reception hosted by the PubUc Archives and informal
tours of the National Map CoUection, which acquainted persons from aU parts of the world
with our holdings and facilities.
During 1972-73, 1,362 entries were received for the National Union Catalogue of Maps
(NUQ as compared to a total of 3,353 entries for 1971-72, the first year of operation. This
drop in the number of entries is probably a result of the anticipation by members of new
catalogubig rules for the automated system and theb reluctance to contribute material that
might have to be redone.
However, during 1972 considerable progress was made toward the eventual automation
program. Three meetings of the NUC Committee were held between February 1972 and
February 1973. The third of these was the most productive, at which time the Committee
chairman presented a comprehensive proposal for a Canadian MARC format for maps.
Late in 1972-73 arrangements were completed to hire a permanent staff member to develop
the NUC at the National Map CoUection.
The National Map CoUection was again pleased to assist with the Archives Course by
participating in many of the sessions and by explaining the philosophy and operations of the
Division.
The National Map CoUection was asked to suggest a presentation item for the President
of the United States, Richard Nixon, when he visited Canada in April 1972. A 1775 chart HISTORICAL BRANCH 45
of the St. Lawrence River from Quebec to Anticosti Island, prepared by Thomas Jefferys
(16957-1771) and printed by Robert Sayer (1725-1794) was selected. This attractive hand-
coloured print appeared in the 1775 edition of The American Atlas, which was used extensively by British, American and French mUitary officers during the American War of Independence.
A statistical summary of the Activities of the Division is given below. The items acqubed number 10,000 more than last year.
Acquisitions, Inquiries, Photoduplication and Loans
Canadian
Section
Foreign
Section
Total
Acquisitions
26,027
17,108
43,135
Inquiries
Telephone
519
249
768
Written
938
136
1,074
Researchers and Tours
1,410
130
1,540
Total Inquiries
2,867
515
3,382
Photoduplication
8,876
25
8,901
Loans
-
761
761
CANADIAN SECTION—For the Canadian Section, 1972-73 has been an extremely active
year. Miss Betty May was promoted to Head of the Section on April 1, 1972. The staff was
increased from 11 to 16 during the year. Within the Section there are three functional units—
Accession and Control, Cataloguing, and Reference.
The Canadian Section staff were active in planning the conferences and exhibitions
already mentioned. In addition, the head of the Reference Unit, Edward Dahl, organized
the Public Archives display for the Sodety of American Archivists held in Columbus, Ohio.
Other conferences which staff attended included the Canadian Historical Association in
Montreal and the Kenneth Nebenzahl Jr. lectures on the History of Cartography in Chicago.
Several staff members were active as executive and committee members of the Association
of Canadian Map Libraries. Betty May continued as Publications Officer, and as a member
of the National Union Catalogue of Maps committee; she was also chairman of the committee
to investigate the revision and republication of the Directory of Canadian Map Collections.
Edward Dahl served as chairman of a committee investigating the feasibility of producing
facsimiles of archival maps for sale.
Edward Dahl prepared an article entitled "Map sources for the study of urban history
m the National Map CoUection" for the Urban History Review. Betty May continued to
contribute listings of current Canadian maps to the quarterly Special Libraries Association
Geography and Map Division Bulletin.
Acquisitions—In the last annual report, concern was expressed that only 13% of the total
acquisitions of the Canadian Section could be described as archival. It was suggested that a
35% archival income would be a reasonable objective towards a balanced acquisition programme. This year's intake of 36% archival and 64% current therefore reflects the energies
of the staff members engaged in acquisition work. PUBUC ARCHTVES REPORT 1972-1973§|
In 1972-73, the Canadian Section acquired 26,027 items
vious fiscal year. A tabular breakdown of sources foUows:
s compared to 17,351 the pre-
Canadian Section Acquisitions
Source
Current
Maps
Archival
Maps
Total
Items
Percentage
of Total
Intake
Atlases
Received
Federal agencies
13,931
5,482
19,413
74.4+
6
Provincial agendes
751
150
901
3.4+
3
Municipalities
1,246
200
1,446
5.5+
—
Donations from individuals
1,048
363
1,411
5.3+
12
Map /book dealers, con
companies
nmercial
61
500
561
2.1 +
17
Universities
—
1,056
1,056
3.1+
—
Other divisions (PAC)
14
544
558
2.1+
37
AU others
672
9
681
2.6+
-
Total current intake
17,723
-
-
64.0
-
Total archival intake
-
8,304
-
36.0
-
Total intake for 1972-73
26,027     100.0
(included
in total
intake).
One of the outstanding donations was from Dr. Bertram Mackay of Ottawa. He donated
ten original John By plans of the Rideau Canal and several accompanying worksheets.
Three large architectural donations contributed to the continuing growth of our architectural collection. Miss H. M. Ewart of Ottawa donated her late father's (J. Albert Ewart)
plans of approximately thirty pubUc butidings and private residences in the Ottawa area. An
important collection of plans of a number of New Brunswick buUdings, dating between 1926
and 1963, were donated by the architect's son, Mr. Peter Alward of Ottawa. The Technical
Services Division of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development have
transferred building plans and "as found" drawings.
A large number of significant archival items were purchased by the Canadian Section.
Included was a 1565 map by Giacomo Gastaldi (c. 1500-1565), "La Terre de Hochelaga
nella Nova Francia", which appeared in Giovanni Battista Ramusio's (fl. 1588) Delle Navigation E Viaggi; this is the first known Canadian town plan. Two maps by Cornelius Wytfliet
which appeared in the 1597 Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmenturn were also purchased; the
one entitled "Conibas Regio Cum Vicinis Gentibus" is believed to be the first map to show
the Canadian northwest. An atlas by J. & F. Taltis, c 1851, renowned for its decorative
illustrations and a rare atlas by Nicolas Bellin (1703-72), an early French hydrographer, were
the outstanding atlas purchases. The Canadian Section was fortunate m obtaining two large
groups of rare archival maps—76 in one group, 34 in the other—which included maps by
such weU known cartographers as Buache (1700-73), Bonne (1729-94), Bellin (1703-72),
Ottens (1698-1750), Jefferys (c.1710-71), and De ITsle (1675-1726). HISTORICAL BRANCH 47
Plans of several Montreal churches and other public buildings by W. McLea Walbank,
|were purchased from a rare book dealer in Montreal.
Photoduplication exchange agreements with several map collections were informally
arranged during this fiscal year. Photocopies were exchanged with the Provincial Archives
lof Ontario and the Glenbow Foundation; several other institutions have expressed interest
lin similar exchanges. These agreements could be a valuable source of archival reproductions.
The Collection also gratefully acknowledges the co-operation of other divisions of the
Public Archives, especially the Manuscript Division. Numerous maps have been transferred
to the National Map Collection, including most of the maps in the John A. Macdonald
(Papers, and others have been brought to our attention. Several university map collections
have also been sending their surplus material; this has helped to fill several significant gaps
in the Collection.
Dr. Ir. C. Koeman of the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands took the opportunity
of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries Conference to make a presentation to the
National Map Collection of photocopies of two recently discovered charts of the St. Lawrence and the Labrador coast by Gerard Van Keulen (1687-1727). These photocopies are
for study purposes only; no research information concerning these maps can be pubUshed
without the consent of the Ubrary of the University of Leiden.
Most of the current material received by the Canadian Section is sent by the map producing agencies at no charge. The federal government departments—especially the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources—continue to be our main source of supply. Two
current acquisition programmes should be noted. Form letters were sent to map producers
across Canada to request (a) copies of maps published in the past year, or (b) lists or catalogues of their publications and (c) the addition of the National Map Collection to automatic
mailing lists for maps and/or information. The second programme involved the mailing of
letters to aU incorporated municipalities in Canada; this letter requested current plans and
queried what was done with archival material. Response to both mailing programmes was
encouraging. It is essential that such current material be collected to ensure the completeness
of Canada's cartographical record, to maintain the quality of Canada's contribution to the
Bibliographie cartographique internationale, and to provide a first-rate reference service.
Reference—The number of inquiries increased from 2,302 in 1971-72 to 2,867 in 1972-73, an
increase of approximately 20%. Inquiries made in person accounted for 50% of those re-
osived and telephone inquiries amounted to another 17%. The remaining 33% were written
inquiries. The addition of a new reference officer has eased what was often a considerable
backlog of written inquiries. An interim reply card was developed to send to those who had
sent written inquiries that could not be immediately answered or for whom photocopies were
being prepared.
The number of photoduplications decreased significantly m 1972-73 from 11,329 to
8,776, a decrease of 23%. The staff has observed that researchers tend to be more selective
hi choosing material for reproduction since prices increased in 1971-72.
Cataloguing—During 1972-73, 1,270 entries describing 1,673 items were prepared for the
Main Catalogue of Maps. The decrease of 17% from the previous fiscal year is explained by
the training time required for new cataloguers and the time which cataloguing staff devoted
to the inventory programme. Preliminary entries were prepared for 3,592 maps, as compared
to 1,103 in 1971-72 an increase of 225% ; the majority of these were prepared during inventory
activities. n
48 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
The Canadian contribution for the 1971  Bibliographie cartographique international^
contained 212 entries describing 2,047 cartographical items; it was 70 pages in length. This
publication is published annuaUy in Paris under the auspices of UNESCO.
Detailed descriptive cataloguing involving many hours of research has been done for the
almost 300 rare maps in the Coverdale Collection of the Manoir-Richelieu accession.
The programme of cataloguing the rare archival atlases is continuing; L. Seboek has
been involved in this project for several years. In 1972-73, the first provisional catalogue, one
describing atlases published in the Netherlands, was sent for publication.
Accessions and Control—The 33% increase in acquisitions and the 20% increase in inquiries
ensured that the workload of the Accession and Control staff would rise in proportion, since
accessioning and filing are two major duties of that unit.
The necessity for more time to be allotted for conservation work on maps and other*-?
cartographical material became increasingly obvious as backlogs continued to increase.    M
During 1972-73, the following volume of work was sent to and received from the Records^ I
Conservation Section :
Maps for lamination 1,392
Maps for cotton backing 599
Books to be bound 6
Atlases to be bound 23
Atlases to be labelled 27
Inventory—In September 1972, the Canadian Section plunged into the first phase of an
overall inventory and assessment of its holdings. Thomas Nagy of the Cataloguing Unit was
appointed co-ordinator and staff from all units participated.
The end of the 1972-73 fiscal year saw the largest portion of the first phase completed:"
33,642 maps were checked and approximately 3,000 preliminary entries were made for
uncatalogued material in the main files. The inventory has pointed out both strengths and
weaknesses of various methods employed in the Section. It has illustrated that the National
Map Collection holds few maps for certain geographical areas of Canada as compared to
other areas. The Arctic, for example, is poorly covered.
When this review, which may take several years, is completed, the Canadian Sectiom
wiU have excellent physical as well as intellectual control over its holdings.
FOREIGN SECTION—Acquisitions—The acquisitions of the Foreign Section numbered
17,108 items as compared to 15,098 in 1971-72. Of the 17,108 items accessioned, 13,997 or
82% were added to the main inventory. The remainder was distributed as surplus material.
It is encouraging to see that the percentage of maps added to the inventory has increased
from 50% in 1971-72 to 82% in 1972-73. This means that a higher proportion of the accessions is unique and remaining in the coUection.
The most important acquisition was the receipt of 1,851 sheets of the Joint Operations
Graphic Series 1501, at 1:250,000 scale. Three copies of each map were received for a total
of 5,553 sheets. The 1,851 sheets represent 56% of the total number of JOG sheets held by
the Department of National Defence. It is estimated that complete world coverage of this1
series will comprise about 8,000 sheets. This series is particularly important as it is being
produced very rapidly and is for many areas of the world the only topographic map coverage
available. At present the files of Series 1501 maps are available to federal government officials HISTORICAL BRANCH
49
only, cannot be removed from the building, and cannot be shown to the public. However,
we hope these restrictions wtil eventually be lifted.
Acquisitions for 1972-73 break down as follows in percentages according to the source
of the acquisition.
Surplus—from universities and the Department of Energy, Mines
and Resources
45%
Deposits—from official map producing agencies
35%
Transfers—from other Divisions of PAC
8%
Gifts
7%
Purchases
5%
Total
100%
Although these figures may vary from year to year, and the ranking may change slightly it
can be seen that the majority of items come from official deposits and surplus maps from
university and government collections.
Reference—Inquiries increased by 60% over the previous fiscal year. This was the result of
two main factors, the distribution of about 200 copies of the List of Gazetteers in the Foreign
Section /Liste des rSpertoires gSographiques dans la section étrangère and the advertisement
of the availability for display purposes of over 450 maps from the exhibit of the International
Cartographic Association Conference which was held m Ottawa in August 1972. In connection with the availability of these maps, the Section loaned 761 maps during the year without
the loss of a single map.
Redistribution Programme—The redistribution programme of the Foreign Section has been
hi operation since 1968. The purpose of the programme is to circulate between the university
map collections and the National Map Collection, maps which are surplus to these collections m the hope that these items wiU be useful to other collections. The Foreign Section
co-ordinates this programme by receiving surplus, duplicate or superceded maps, sorting
them, integrating them into its own collection or redistributing them, along with its own
surplus maps, to the contributing coUections. In 1972-73 only 3,111 items were added to
our surplus coUection from the year's accessions. However, the Section did distribute 29,202
items this year.
Staff—One professional position, a PC 1 was established in February 1973. The addition of
tins position brings the total authorized positions for the Section to 4, a PC H (section head),
PC I (cataloguer), SI n (control officer), and a CR U (clerk).
Exchange Agreements—The Section Head attended three of the four international congresses
held in Canada during the summer of 1972 and established contact with representatives of
national mapping agencies with the eye to establishing map exchange agreements. Initial
arrangements were made with most of the 40 agencies contacted. In some cases exchange
agreements are now functioning as a result of these discussions; in others, final arrangements
are still to be made. 50 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
PICTURE For ^ Kcture Division 1972-73 has been a year of expansion and con-
fx-f\7TC¥rvw solidation. The Historical Sound Recordings Unit and National Film
Dl V1MUIN Archives Project, both created and developed within the Picture Division, gained independent divisional status. The Picture Division then
reverted to its primary responsibilities for documentary art and stiU photographs. In these j
areas there has been a reassessment, consolidation and redevelopment of traditional functions. There has also been expansion into new areas to meet growing requirements for the
protection and utilization of our national visual heritage. The foUowing statistical table
reflects the development that has taken place.
Total Holdings
1970-71
1971-72
1972-73    |
Paintings
1,539
1,938
2,205     ?
Drawings
5,690
9,031
12,736
Prints and Engravings
73,625
73,685
78,173
Photo Negatives and Prints
1,399,005
2,545,800
2,742,052
Service to the PubUc
Persons Registered
960
628
1,038
Enquiries
2,923
2,234
2,652
Reproductions Supplied
19,484
16,350
25,217
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS AND PRINTS SECTION—In 1972-73, the Section looked
more closely into its collection, finding out its true content, value, and actual state of conservation. There was also a reassessment of procedures, methods and systems to determine
whether proper tasks were being carried out for the proper reasons. FinaUy, there was an
overview of the total resources available to the Section and the actual demands placed upon
these resources. The new perspectives revealed by this review, although perhaps not previously unknown, have at least become much clearer.
1972-73 was also a year of active development. The Section built upon the solid traditional archival and curatorial foundations established in previous years. It also began to
reach beyond these traditional bases into new areas of acquisition, into more analytical and
interpretative art historical research projects, and into the rapidly advancing technology of
visual information retrieval
Reference Services—Continuing the trend set in the past few years, demands by researchers
for access to the holdings of the Section increased hi quantity, type arid complexity. The
Section met these demands, providing effective service to both the traditional clientele andé;
the new users of visual archives. Every effort was made to satisfy increasingly more complex
enquiries and the almost insatiable requbements for more and different illustrations.
However, it became evident that these demands were placing heavy pressures on Section
resources. Therefore, during the past year the Section took a long hard look at its total reference function. It identified and denned the pressures and evaluated its response to them.
Some attempt was made to predict future trends in reference servicing and to pinpoint new
requirements that would have to be met by the Section. HISTORICAL BRANCH
51
m- Working on the principle that the first responsibility of the Section is to service the
collections which are unique to it (i.e. the Permanent Collection), the Section's reference role
was redefined as being to provide full and safe access to the Permanent Collection and to
minimize servidng of external materials. Full accessibility was seen to be threefold in nature.
First, all the images of the Permanent Collection should be available for viewing rapidly
and accurately. Secondly, the images should be accompanied by a solid core of reliable
information that allows for their proper interpretation and evaluation. Thirdly, full acces-
sibility should encompass the provision of reproductions that are of the best quality and
usefulness to the researcher. Safe accessibility was seen to be the protection of the original
illustrations by restricting handling, and minimizing the risk of deterioration and damage
through exposure.
The Section began to readjust its reference functions to conform with its newly defined
role. Reference work was concentrated on the Permanent CoUection. A total survey of the
Permanent Collection was undertaken to determine which collections were of significance and
were to be made accessible first, and also to gain a preliminary indication of the physical
condition of the items in the Collection. Research projects which supply basic interpretation
and identification data for the documentation were intensified and given greater depth. In
anticipation of future demands and requirements, there was a thorough investigation of
microfilm /microfiche appUcations for visuals; preliminary steps were taken to adopt a
microfiche-based system into the reference services. In an effort to upgrade the provision of
colour reproductions to meet the more sophisticated and exacting requbements of today's
publishers and producers, changes in the colour services were advocated and the decision
made to suspend colour negative production and opt for the provision of original master
colour transparencies. Thus far these readjustments seem to be effective and will be modified
and built upon in the coming years.
Acquisitions—Auctions, public and private sales, and donations from corporate and private
coUectors and individuals brought many additions to the Section's Permanent Collection of
documentary illustrations and heraldic devices. Included among the acquisitions of paintings,
drawings and prints were:
"Father Lacombe preaching to the indians at Rat Portage, 1881", an oil painting by Sb
William Cornelius Van Home (1843-1915) of C.P.R. fame. Long presumed lost, the
painting was recently rediscovered in a private coUection;
"View of Montreal from the River c. 1840", an anonymous oil painting;
portraits of the Simcoes, the famous water-colour of Mrs. Simcoe in Welsh costume in
1790 and a small oil painting of General Simcoe, c. 1871 ;
portrait of Louis Alexandre Taschereau (1867-1952), an oil painting by Simone Hudon,
dated 1937;
portraits of the ancestors of Brigadier H. E. T. Doucet, six oil paintings of this prominent
Quebec notarial family;
a collection of three unique water-colours by Francis Fitzroy Dixon (1856-1914), onetime Dominion Land Officer and career civil servant. Acquired under the National
Ethnic Archives project of the Public Archives these items depict German Mennonite
settlers in Saskatchewan c. 1889;
a coUection of fifty-six drawings, water-colours and prints by Daniel Fowler (1819-1894).
These are mainly indicative of the training and early work of the artist under the tutelage
of J. Harding hi England. Although prindpally juventie, the collection includes the
drawing of one of Fowler's best known pieces presently in the National Gallery, designs 52 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
for Fowler's home on Amherst Island, and two fine water-colours by the EngUsh I
neoclassical architect, Wiltiam Wilkins, ca. 1809;
a collection of twenty-six attractive water-colours by Alfred E.Boultbee Jr. (act. 187»
1929). Twenty of these were executed on the way to the Klondike Gold Fields hi 1898;
a collection of six water-colours by Kay Patterson (b. 1920) dated 1958-70, relating to
subjects hi the region of Chatham, Ontario;
a collection of forty-two pen and ink drawings by Nickolay Sabolotny (b. 1927),
mostly of Canadian political figures, 1969-1971 ;
a coUection of eight pen and ink caricatures by J. Mdntjies of Canadian political
figures, 1971, drawn for the publication House on the HiU.
The most significant acquisition of heraldic documentation was the presentation by Mme P. J
Vanier of the original scroll and seals of the Vanier Coat-of-Arms.
Aware that there is significant historical and cultural value in artistic works such as -
advertising graphics, posters, greeting cards, comic books and a host of related illustrations^ ]
the Section recognized that as a national institution it has a certain responsibUity and commitment in these areas. Thus when opportunities for significant acquisitions presented
themselves, the Section opted for theb inclusion in its holdings. Among these acquisitions!'!
were:
the Canadian Comic Book CoUection, including 2,304 original drawings for comic books
published in Canada and a large number of the comic books themselves;
a coUection of Hudson Essex car advertising illustrations, including one poster and thirteen colourful pamphlets produced to advertise cars made in Tilbury, Ontario, ca. 1927;
the Crowder Postcard CoUection, consisting of four large albums of cards, largely
Canadian, dating from the period 1895-1910.
In addition there were a number of loans made to the Section for reproduction purposes.
The Royal Philatelic Sodety aUowed the duplication of some 450 colour slides relating to
Canadian postal history. The artist Sharon Bolte loaned a series of her current fashions-
drawings to be copied to supplement the extensive Régor Costume Documentation CoUection
presently held by the Section.
During the past year the Section laid the groundwork for the creation and implementation
of an Archives of Canadian Art Project. The Section also took advantage of an opportunity
to acquire from Richard Hayward a coUection of documentation which forms a nucleus of
manuscripts, notes, photographs and other illustrations relating to Canadian sculptors and
theb works.
Negotiations—Effective negotiations are essential to the Section's success in acquiring col-'
lections, exchanging information, and obtaining the co-operation and support of institutions
and individuals. During the past year these negotiations have been carried out both in Canada
and abroad.
Custodial Activities—The custodial function remains basic to the Section: proper care and
preservation of the coUections has been an essential objective of the Section curators. A
sophisticated storage environment is maintained and procedures and methods are designed
to safeguard the documentation. A Picture Conservation Section in the Technical Division
exists to service the Permanent Collection of the PubUc Archives. However, Umited resources, HISTORICAL BRANCH 53
increased acquisitions, rising reference demands, and other departmental priorities have
tempered meaningful progress in the conservation area.
m A preliminary conservation survey of the Permanent Collection was undertaken in
December. With the assistance of conservators from the Picture Conservation Section
twenty-one thousand paintings, drawings and prints were given a cursory visual examina-
-jtion. From this survey it was determined that some two hundred man-years of professional
conservation work would be required to prevent the deterioration of the collections, and that
the Picture Conservation Section should be greatly strengthened to meet even the most
urgent needs.
Organization, Processing and Research—The enormous task of processing the Manoir-
Richelieu CoUection delayed the work of organization and processing the regular collections.
However, organization was begun and almost completed on the large Poster Collection,
inventories were completed for a number of collections, including the Manoir-Richelieu, the
Canadian Comic Book, the Imperial Oil C. W. Jefferys, and the Pease and Crowder Collec-
tions. The staff also completed a survey of the Unknown Artist index and updated the artist
files and various portions of the reference catalogue.
I Research on the works and careers of artists, on the development and utilization of
illustrations, and on the collections, their creators, users, and custodians is another essential
function of the Section: greater in-depth studies were carried out. Work on the preparation
of the Manoir-Richelieu (Coverdale) CoUection hi particular has been most exacting and
time-consuming in order to present a definitive catalogue of this important coUection. Comprehensive research on the artist H. J. Warre was also initiated, and a research study was
completed on Thomas MitcheU, Arctic artist and photographer. Although the research projects
are based primarily in the Public Archives there has been extensive correspondence with
scholars and institutions both in Canada and abroad.
Exhibitions and Diffusion—The Section has had a significant role in the Public Archives'
diffusion program. Image of Canada, a major exhibition of documentary water-colours
prepared by the Section* circulated in numerous venues across Canada. Bookings have been
scheduled for a two-year cbcuit. During 1972-73 the exhibition appeared fbst at the PubUc
Archives, Ottawa, and in September opened at the Montreal Museum of Art. From Montreal
the exhibit travelled to Toronto, opening at the Royal Ontario Museum in November. Image
of Canada was then shown in Regina in February and at the year's end it was on display at
the Winnipeg Art GaUery.
The Exhibition received good coverage in the press. Canadian Magazine, the weekly
Ulustrated supplement to many Canadian newspapers, carried a feature article on it. Other
pubUcations such as the Art Bulletin, the Canadian Collector, and the Canadian Geographical
Journal also carried notice of the exhibition. Radio Station CFRB-Toronto broadcast a
fifteen minute interview with M. Bell on the exhibition and the role of the PubUc Archives.
v The Section also made a major contribution to the PubUc Archives centennial exhibition,
Archives: Mirror of Canada Past and to Towards CN. It also loaned items to the National GaUery for the Thomas Davies exhibition, and the exhibition on Canadian landscape
for presentation hi the United States.
The utilization of reproductions from the Section's holdings continued to be a most
effective means of publicity. The Canadian Overseas Telecommunications Corporation's 1973
calendar used twelve fuU colour reproductions, fuUy captioned and credited to the PubUc
Archives. Throughout the year many other publications, films, and television productions
carried credited illustrations. 54 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197K
In addition, Channel 3-Ottawa televised an interview with G. Delisle and M. Régor on
the Section's Costume Documentation Collection. Two articles prepared by Section staff
were published: an article on the resources of the Section in Urban History Review, and an
article by M. Bell, entitled "Thomas Mitchell : Artist and Photographer in the High Arctic?
in the December issue of Image, the publication of the International Museum of Photography,
Rochester, N.Y.
Staff Resources—The strength of the Section at the end of March was 8 members. It was
evident throughout the year that the resources of the Section were overtaxed. The staffing of
additional positions hi 1973 will do much to alleviate the pressures and allow the Section to
fulfill its traditional role and to make meaningful advancements in new areas.
HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS SECTION—In April the Historical Sound Recordings
Unit and the National Film Archives Project, two structures which had been conceived,
initiated and developed in the Historical Photographs Section, were combined and given
divisional status as the National Film Archives Division. The Historical Photographs Section
once again became solely responsible for sttil photographic records. The greater utilization j
of the Section's holdings by researchers meant greater exposure and increased public aware- !
ness of the Section. This increased awareness, coupled with the successes of the National j
Photography Collection acquisition project, launched last year, placed greater pressures on i
the Section's faculties and resources. Additional financial and staff resources alleviated some
of the pressures. This relief was offset in part by increasing Section involvement in inter-
divisional activities, extended public relations, and more diverse and complex administrative
activities. These factors altered the traditional archival outputs. Nevertheless, mindful of new
demands, new directions, new potentials, and new responsibiUties, the Historical Photographs
Section continued to grow in 1972-73.
Reference Services—Reference services of the Section are best reflected in a comparison of
this year's statistics with those of the previous year. There has been a 48% increase in the
number of reproductions supplied and a 21% increase in enquiries. As was indicated last year
these increases are partially the result of a rapid expansion in holdings. They are also the
result of a greater and better processing of coUections. And as the reputation of the Public
Archives as a valuable national repository and resource centre for our heritage grows, so does
the demand for access to its holdings.
But more significantly, the increased utilization of the Section's reference services is the
result of a growing reliance upon the sttil photograph as a source of evidence and information,
as a tool of communication, as an art form, and as a reflection of the past. There has been a
steady growth hi international requests for photo documentation with some of this year's
requests coming from twelve countries. Thirty departments and agencies of the Government
of Canada used our holdings extensively throughout the year, as did provincial departments
and agencies. More than one hundred major Canadian and foreign publishing houses have
been serviced. The periodical and newspaper publishers remain major users. The faculties
and students of some twenty-five Canadian and foreign universities and colleges, numerous
educational boards and agencies, museums, galleries, libraries, and historical associations
have utilized Section holdings. There has been an increased use of the facilities by major
corporations, private industry, and organizations.
Reference services have been extensively utilized by motion picture agencies, and above
aU by the television production networks as a result of the Canadian Radio and Television Commission content regulations. The subjects of research remained diversified
although there was a steady flow of requests for photos relating to aviation and the military. HISTORICAL BRANCH
55
Acquisitions—Acquisitions for the year totalled 327 collections. Of these, 290 were received
sas donations, purchases or loans from a variety of non-government sources. These collections
-jseontain some 167,647 negatives and prints. The remaining 37 coUections, containing 29,607
-items, were transferred from departments and agencies of the Government of Canada.
Acquisitions from non-government sources mainly resulted from the Section's National
Photography CoUection Project. Additional coUections were also received as a result of the
efforts of other Divisions, through contacts made by our staff with researchers, and from
unsolicited offers from outside organizations and individuals.
The most significant photo acquisition of the year has been the recent purchase of a
unique two-third plate daguerreotype view of Montreal taken about 1852 by an unknown
photographer. Canadian daguerreotype views are extremely rare, and this particular view not
only vividly documents the city, but it is also in good physical condition. It is a fine example
of early Canadian photographic excellence. The daguerreotype was acquired from the coUec-
tion of Mr. Robert Lisle, McGuire Ab Force Base, New Jersey, U.S.A.
National Photography Collection acquisitions form the nucleus of the Section's holdings
of the works of prominent Canadian professional photo studios. This year valuable collections have been received from across the country. Included are two large negative coUections
from contemporary Montreal portraitists, L. Vorkony of Vorkony Studio, and Guy Roy of
- fee-Guy Studio. Selected works of the professional photographic group—Photo Montréal—
were also received. From Capital Press Ltd., Ottawa, came Duncan Cameron's reportorial
photo coverage for the years 1968-72. A valuable collection was received from Ray Mitchell
Rare daguerreotype view of Montreal, ca. 1852, photographer unknown. 56 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
of Alexandra Studios, Toronto, depicting activities in the Toronto area at the turn of the
century and between 1920 and 1950. From George James of James Photo Ltd., Chatham,!
Ontario, came photo coverage of the Chatham area in the 1930's and 1940's, while George j
Hunter of Toronto deposited a series of aerial views of Victoria, Vancouver, and Toronto taken
between 1966 and 1970. Chris Bruun, a professional photographer operating out of Edmon- j
ton, presented a series relating to Port Radium, N.W.T. From British Columbia the National
Photography Collection has been augmented by the inclusion of the large collections of
Vancouver portraitist, Tony Archer, and Victoria press photographer, Jim Ryan.
Other National Photography Collection acquisitions are to be noted. One is a fine j
daguerreotype group portrait taken in Yarmouth, N.S. about 1855 by William Chase ofl
Halifax. Two excellent albums of official photographs taken during the North American
Boundary Commission Survey of 1872-75 were acquired. One was presented by Mrs. M. B.
Millman of Toronto, whose father, Dr. R. Millman, was a physician for the Commission.
The other album was purchased from the estate of Lord Dufferin from D. M. Beach, Book- J
sellers, Salisbury, England. From this latter source also came an album of CPR survey viewsm
of 1871-73 by the surveyor and photographer Charles Horetzky. A large 1874 tintype portrait!
was received from M. Yvon Lavoie. La Sodété d'archéologie de Rivière-du-Loup trans-]
ferred photos documenting Rivière-du-Loup and envbons from 1886 to the 1920's. A series
of albums documenting nineteenth century life in British Columbia, particularly amongst the 1
Chinese, and containing superb examples of prints taken with a Kodak No. 1 were purchased. 1
The Toronto Camera Club transferred the T. Cannon collection of lantern slides of the
1900-1915 era. Mr. Austin Edwards of Quebec, P.Q. has forwarded some 3,000 reportoriflH
negatives documenting activities in Quebec between 1930 and 1960. An extensive collection 1
has also been received from Mr. W. M. Cottingham of Lachute, P.Q. documenting his
career as Minister of Mines and Forests in the Province of Quebec, bis earlier career, and 1
activities in Lachute and Sorel from 1901 to 1954. Photo coUections continued to be received
from Canadian newspapers: additions were made to the Toronto Globe and Mail and to the
Montreal Gazette coUections; the Windsor Star began its transfer of non-current photo files j
by turning over some 8,000 negatives to the National Photography Collection.
Various coUections have been received as a result of the Manuscript Division's acquisition program. These include photo documentation of the careers of Prindpal W. L. Grant J
of Queen's University, historian Frank Underhill, author Frank Packer, dramatist Tommy J
Tweed, and sportsman J. E. H. Curran. An extensive collection from Mr. Lawrence Freiman
documents the careers and activities of this prominent Ottawa family. Portraits of the mem- ]
bers and descendants of the Nicholas Sparks famUy of Ottawa are included in another collec- 1
tion. Through the Manuscript Division Canadian Sports Archives the Section has received 1
photo collections from the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada, the Federation of Canadian
Archers, the Canadian Ladies Golf Association, and from Mr. E. Fitzsimmons, a hockey
devotee from Gander, Nfld. From the Canadian Labour CouncU has come a documentary
series on various conventions of national and provincial labour organizations.
There have been many other acquisitions from non-government sources. These cover a
variety of subjects of which mention can be made of only a few. Further photo coverage of
the operations of the Canadian Siberian Expeditionary Force in Vladivostock in 1919 has
been received from the Manitoba Museum of Man. From Mrs. Avis Walton of Victoria have
come photos documenting the career of her father, Charles F. Gray, former mayor of Winnipeg, and of the Chataqua Lecture Movement of the 1920's and 1930's. The North West
RebeUion photo documentation has been augmented by receipt of a portrait of Captain James
Peters, RCA, who aside from his military activities photographed the RebeUion at Batoche.
Also received were four BeU photos of regiments engaged in the RebeUion. The activities of
Canada House, London, between 1946 and 1960 are well documented in a series of negatives i HISTORICAL BRANCH 57
■recently purchased in England. Another acquisition from abroad has been an 1880-1890
album of views of Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa, and military activities purchased from Ms.
- M. E. Prior-Wandesford of Carlow, Eire.
Geographical documentation has also been increased with the receipt of collections.
Knere is exceUent coverage of Newfoundland in collections received from Dr. Eugene Forsey,
Mr. John Maunder, Mr. P. E. I. Smith, and from the United Church Archives. A collection
from Mr. Gilles Morin of Lachine documents Lachine, P.Q. A loan of glass plates from Mr.
R. E. Borrowman documents Lanark, Ontario at the turn of the century whtie a collection
from J. B. L. Heeney covers Ottawa during the 1930's. There is new coverage on southern and
I western Ontario, on river and lake transportation. Western Canada documentation includes
H series of views from Winnipeg to the West Coast taken in 1899 ; coverage of the Fernie, B.C.
fire; some 700 prints taken in 1920-30 of Alberta riverboats, oil wells and a buffalo drive; and
a series on surveying in the Rockies between 1907 and 1925. Documentation on the Yukon
and the North West Territories includes the CA. Keefer CoUection relating to the Dog Rib
I Indians in the Great Slave Lake area in 1937, the Leech Collection of 1939-46 containing
- views of Yellowknife and prospecting in the North West Territories, and a series of 1890-1910
lantern slides relating to the Klondike and Yukon received from Sister Helen Nolan. There
have also been several new collections relating to aviation, including the John Maunder
CoUection which documents various trans-Atlantic nights and their crews, 1915-37, and
photos of various aircraft and air activities, 1921-1945, received from various individuals.
Government photographic records have been transferred from a number of departments
and agencies. The National Design Council of the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce continued to forward theb photo records of Canadian products. The recent transfer
included some 8,500 prints. More than 50,000 prints and negatives have been transferred
from the Department of National Health and Welfare. The National Museum of Natural
Sciences transferred some 4,000 lantern slides relating to bbds and bird sanctuaries in Canada
Whtie the Earth Physics Branch of Energy, Mines and Resources forwarded some 1,000 slides
relating to astronomy, missions and the North West Territories between 1900 and 1930. The
Department of the Environment, Forestry Information Services forwarded some 4,000
photos relating to forestry operations and forest conditions between 1902 and 1928. The
Department of National Defence transferred aerial photos of Canadian Corps Sectors and
operations along the Western Front, 1915-18. The Department of Agriculture transferred
some 3,500 views of its facilities and offices across Canada while both Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation and the Department of Veterans Affairs transferred extensive coUections relating to housing. Information Canada forwarded a series relating to Canadian exhibitions from 1911 to 1967. Manpower and Immigration transferred a group of photos showing
conditions m construction camps along the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in 1907.
Collections have also been transferred from CNR and the Canadian Citizenship Coundl.
Negotiations—Negotiations for the acquisition of private photo-collections and the estabUshment of closer contacts with various Canadian photographic groups and institutions are
the main activities of the National Photography CoUection Project. These activities, carried
out by A. BirreU and C. Mbiotto, were stepped up during the past year as the Section extended
itself across Canada.
A key series of negotiations undertaken this past year were with the executive of the
Professional Photographers of Canada Limited (PPOC), which is the national federation
of aU professional photographers' associations excepting Quebec. Arrangements were made
for the transfer of their records to the Public Archives. These records and the records of other
photographic organizations form the nucleus of documentation on the history of Canadian
photography. 58 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973 I
Negotiations have been initiated with a number of other Canadian photographic associa- 1
tions, both amateur and professional, with a view to building up historical documentation, j
The Toronto Camera Club has arranged to transfer theb records. Another important series 1
of records acquired were those of CAPPAC—the Commerdal and Press Photographers 1
Assodation of Canada—a forerunner of the PPOC.
Claude Minotto addressed the Annual Convention of the Assodation of Professional
Photographers of the Province of Quebec (APPPQ) held in Montreal last October. It was |
through the address and participation in the Trade Show of the Convention that many con- J
tacts, negotiations and successful acquisitions were realized with photographers and photo
repositories in the province of Quebec. Collections have been acqubed from a number of
Montreal photographers including Henri Paul, Guy Roy, L. Vorkony, Pierre Gaudard, and
Michel Campeau. Austin Edwards of Quebec City, Marc EUefsen of Chicoutimi, André I
Halle of Charlesbourg and Jean Dumouchel of Longueuil have transferred collections. I
Archivists in several Quebec institutions have also expressed an interest in our efforts to
protect Canada's photographic heritage and negotiations have begun to assist them in J
protecting their photo collections. Andrew BirreU continued to contact numerous sources I
in Toronto and southern Ontario. CoUections have been received from George Hunter,
Everett Roseborough, Strathy Smith, and the Windsor Star.
Western Canadian photographers, repositories, and collectors were also contacted.
Important collections were acqubed from Jim Ryan and A. V. Pollard of Victoria, J. R.
WrathaU of Prince Rupert, and Nicholas Morant of Calgary.
Negotiations for the transfer of Government photographic records continued throughout
the year. Final arrangements were made for the transfer of non-current National Film Board
negatives held by the Canadian Government Photo Centre.
Custodial and Research Activities—All new acquisitions were properly transferred and stored
in the photo stack areas. The vast influx of acquisitions over the past two years placed extreme
pressures on the available storage areas and a consolidation and rearrangement of the collections was made necessary. A review of the storage system was undertaken and the recom- I
mended changes have gradually been implemented.
Selected coUections have been rephotographed for preservation, organized, identified,
evaluated, and catalogued. The criteria used in the selection of collections for this processing
included the state of preservation or deterioration of the photographs, their potential histor-1
ical and sodo/cultural value, and the expected immediate demands for the photos by re-si
searchers. During the year several hundred collections, containing several hundred thousand
negatives and prints, were processed.
Research projects were undertaken by several professionals at different times during
the year. P. Robertson continued his research into Canadian mUitary photography and his"
work on the Index to Canadian Photographers. C. Minotto carried out research on a number
of private collections and on photographers relating to Canadian Arctic and Northern explorations. K. McLean was hired on contract for six months and undertook research into the
photo files of the Montreal Gazette. R. Huyda completed bis research on H. L. Hime and
Wet-Plate Photography.
PubUcity, Lectures, Exhibitions—Many publications pubUcized the activities of the Section.
In addition to reporting regularly on our activities, Canadian Photography has initiated a
series of articles on Canadian photographic history, the fbst of which appeared in the February 1973 issue. Written by A. BirreU, it dealt with the photographic career of W. J. Topley,
the prominent Ottawa photographer who was active between 1868 and 1926. National News,
the official publication of the Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOQ, also carried an HISTORICAL BRANCH 59
Ulustrated article on the history of Canadian photography and the work of the Section m
theb March, 1973 issue. American coverage of our activities included a three-page illustrated
feature article by R. Huyda in the November, 1972 issue of Professional Photographer, the
official monthly of the Professional Photographers of America. The Section itself issued two
brochures aimed specificaUy at Canadian professional photographers to alert them of the
existence and interests of the National Photography CoUection Project. The brochures were
distributed widely.
Lectures, speeches, courses and guided tours given during the past year by the staff were
varied and numerous. Preparatory work was begun for a major national symposium on
"Photography as Record and Archive", tentatively scheduled for 1974. The major exhibition
activity of the Section has been concentrated on the preparation for the faU of 1973 of an
exhibition on Canadian MUitary Photography. Much staff time was also given to other
Public Archives exhibitions.
NATIONAL FILM The Natiomu Film CoUection and the Historical
ADrnTWG TUXTTCirkKT Sound Recordings Unit have been grouped and
AKC1U V iL9 Ul V1MUJM recognized as a separate division, the National Film
Archives Division. Mr. Georges Delisle, Chief of
the Picture Division, was seconded from his post to oversee the estabUshment of the new
Division. While activities were restricted to acquisition, conservation and cataloguing, as
diffusion, documentation and exhibitions are subjects of further study under the direction
of the Secretary of State, activities in the field of audio-visual materials increased substantially.
Acquisitions—All the rights to the Julian Roffman CoUection, which had been deposited in
the PubUc Archives earlier, were acqubed hi 1972. It constitutes a comprehensive record
of early color footage of Canadian interest. The coUection of Canadian historical films from
Graphic Consultants Limited of Toronto was another outstanding acquisition. This collection, the best of its type, presents a cross-section of Canadian lue for the period 1896-
1930. It comprises approximately 2,400 reels of 28mm film, that is more than 750,000 feet
of early documentaries, movies and travelogues. This was the former tibrary of the Ontario
Motion Picture Bureau which had been disbanded by Premier Hepburn in 1934. Thanks
to the assistance of the National Film Board of Canada, this impressive coUection wtil be
transferred on 35mm and 16mm film gauge m order to be accessible to the pubUc. Other
coUections include:
the Bechtel films on Canada—early film footage on pipelines, oti and bon explorations;
the C.A.F.U. CoUection—relating to the Canadian troops during World War H;
the Bellevue-Pathé films—approximately 1,000,000 feet of early feature films, commercials and documentaries;
the Onyx CoUection—approximately 5,000,000 feet of feature films, out-takes, documentaries and commercials.
With these additions, more than 12,000,000 feet of films are preserved in the vaults of the
National Film Archives.
Plans were made to upgrade the offices and security film storage areas of the Film
Archives in the West Memorial Building. Improvements made to the vaults for the nitrate
films can accommodate our needs for the next few years. Thanks to the expert knowledge
and co-operation of Film Opticals (Quebec) Ltd., a crash program has been implemented 60
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973 \
for the conversion of old nitrate films in great danger of annihilation. The conversion rate ]
of about 25,000 feet per month wtil be maintained in the interest of preservation for some f
more years to come.
With the adoption of the Sony Colour Cassette System, f inch consultation copies
for archival films and videotapes are prepared for reference and promotional purposes.
Besides its practical advantages, considerable savings are realized. It also gives the National |
Film Archives the added advantage of making its preservation copies available on very
short notice; this represents an achievement in this field.
The general public was shown, for the first time, fourteen films from our collections
documenting many aspects of our history. "Retrospective 1898-1963", part of Festival
Canada 1972, was presented in coUaboration with the Secretary of State Department. One
of the films presented, The Viking, deserves special mention as being the first Canadian
sound feature film to be shot on location in this country. Produced by Varick Frissell and
directed by one of the best Hollywood directors, George Melford, the copy used was prepared directly from original negatives offered to the National Film Archives by its present
owner, Miss Toni FrisseU.
L
HISTORICAL SOUND RECORDINGS SECTION—In May 1972 the Historical Sound
Recordings Unit became a section of the newly-formed National Film Archives Division.
The objectives of the Section were redefined and requbements for personnel and material
resources were reexamined. In February 1973, two new members joined the staff as research
officer and custodial clerk respectively.
Total acquisitions for the year consist of 799 discs, 1,473 tapes, and 60 wire recordings
for a total of 2,833 hours of recordings. The major acquisitions include: the House of Commons debates and committee proceedings for the 4th session of the 28th Parliament; the
Canadian Labour Congress collection of speeches and convention proceedings, 1947 to
1960; the Radio and Television News Directors Association coUection of broadcasts awarded
prizes for 1970 and 1971; the CBC collection of the radio program Ideas, 1965 to 1971;
the CFCF coUection of radio programs, 1938 to 1956; the Compo Company collection of
radio talks and commercials; the Ches Beachell collection of talks by Members of Pariia-^.
ment recorded by the Radio Bureau; the Ed Moogk collection of radio commercials from*
the 1960's; the Lawrence Freiman collection of speeches, talks, interviews, and broadcasts,
1953 to 1971 ; Envbonment Canada, Canadian Forestry Services collection of interviews
with pioneer foresters, 1973; the Canadian Psychological Association collection of interviews with psychologists recorded by Dr. Myers, 1969 to 1972; the Dr. M. Shimpo collection
of interviews with Japanese Canadians, 1971; the David Gustafson collection of interviews
on professional theatre in Canada, 1972; the Donald B. Smith coUection of interviews about
Grey Owl, 1970 to 1972; and the Peter Stursberg coUection of interviews with members of
the Diefenbaker cabinet. The interviews from the Canadian Psychological Assodation and
from Envbonment Canada, Canadian Forestry Services, have been recorded on archival-
quality tape.
A project for the acquisition of sound recordings from private broadcasters is being
formulated and developed with the co-operation of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and the Museum of Canadian Broadcasting. Exchanges of sound recordings with
the Société d'Études et de Relations pubUques in France have been continued.
A considerable number of man-hours were spent preparing finding aids to facilitate
the increased reference use of our holdings. There has been a greater number of requests
for taped copies of items in our holdings. These have come prindpally from broadcasting
agencies and producers of audio-visual pubUcations. Research institutions, government HISTORICAL BRANCH SI
-researchers, professors, students, and the general pubUc have also requested historical
sound recordings.
Exchange of information—Communications have been established with the International
Assodation of Sound Archives, of which we have become a member, and the Section Head
was present at the annual colloquium of the Oral History Association.
Research was conducted into the operations and procedures of the United Nations
Sound Archives, the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound, and the
National Voice Library, by personal visits m April and July. Continuing research into the
history of sound recordings and broadcasting, and into oral history techniques was done
through the consultation of printed and manuscript sources.
The Section has been very active in the field of oral history by giving information,
assistance, and advice to individuals and agencies in both the private and pubUc sectors as
weU as to staff members in other divisions and sections of the Department. Oral history
mterviewing projects with individuals who have been prominent in sound recording, broadcasting, and the public service of Canada were initiated by the Section. The Standing Committee on Oral History of the Canadian History Association hdd its meetings in the PubUc
Archives.
Publicity—It is most fitting that publicity on our holdings and activities was made by radio
stations. Station C JOH reported on our House of Commons recording broadcast on October
3, 1972. The CBC presented a 20-minute documentary on sound recordings as part of the
April 3, 1973 edition of As It Happens. The documentary included comments by the Section
Head and extracts of recordings held by the Section. It also launched a series entitled The
Sounds of History, consisting of 3-minute presentations of historical events through the use
of sound recordings in the Public Archives and in the CBC Program Archives.
A section on sound recordings was prepared for the Archives centennial exhibition
Archives: Mirror of Canada Past; a tape recording of extracts of sound recordings was
included in the exhibition. Articlesi on sound recordings and oral history hi Canada were
also prepared and wtil soon be publshed.  ADMINISTRATION
AND TECHNICAL
The Administration and
Technical Services Branch
is responsible for providing central managers T7<TÏ\ 7T/"117 C    -r>Tl A XT/^TT   ment' Publication'  and
^H/JY V IV/Jl/O     ISK AIM L-Xl     P"°»c"y services for the
Public Archives. It also
provides administrative, financial, personnel, technical, and exhibition services common to
'fboth the Public Archives and the National Library. Operational and technical advisory
microfilm services are made available by this Branch to other government departments and
agencies.
The Administration and Technical Services Branch, together with the Department as
a whole, has again witnessed continuing expansion. During the 1972-1973 fiscal year the
Branch budget, including the Dominion Archivist's Office, increased from $1,343,000 to
$1,826,000. Its authorized man-year staff increased from 113 to 133.
DIVISION
TECHNICAL The Technical Division offers comprehensive operational and
advisory microfilm services to all government departments and
agencies. It also provides both the Public Archives and the National
Library with services involving reproduction, photography, and
the conservation of records and pictures.
The work of the Division is co-ordinated by: Central Microfilm Unit; Micrographie
Advisory Section; Micrographie Evaluation and Development Unit; Picture Conservation
Section; Records Conservation Section; and Reprography Section.
Central Microfilm Unit (CMU)—This Unit offers a complete microfilm serivce not only to
the Public Archives and to the National Library, but to all departments and agencies of
the federal government. A revolving fund finances the service on a cost-recovery basis.
Computer Output Microfibn (COM) services, also available to aU federal government
departments and agendes, contributed significantly to the CMU's production total for the
year. The acquisition of high speed duplicating equipment is expected to increase the Unit's
microfiche production. The CMU continues to maintain the critical processing standard
required when microfilm is to be used for computer input, as in the Statistics Canada Census
Program.
Archival material microfilmed for the Public Archives during 1972-73, included: Prime
Ministers' Papers; CPR Van Home Letterbooks; Immigration Records; Log Book of
HMS Pegasus, and Shipping Registers. Total production of the CMU for 1972-73, was
15,589,034 camera exposures. This compares favourably with the 1971-72 production figure
of 13,489,913 camera exposures. An itemized breakdown appears on page 64.
MICROGRAPHIC ADVISORY SECTION—In the field of micrographics, the Section is
solely responsible for: developing and promoting micrographie activities in the federal
government; providing consultative and advisory services; recommending systems for
approval by the Dominion Archivist; and conducting training courses. At the request of
government departments, the Section directs the application of micrographics as an active
information retrieval tool for records management, library holdings, engineering, architec-
63 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-19731
Central Microfibn Unit's Production for 1972-73
Microfilming—Source Documents
(millions of images)
9.6
Computer Output Microfilming
(       "       "     "   )
5.9
Developing of Microfilm
(millions of feet)
2.9
DupUcating of Microfilm
(       "     "     ")
3.4
Aperture and Duplicate Card Mounting
(thousands of units)
75.7
Microfiche, Duplicates and Jackets
(     "       "     "      )
49.5
Magazine Loading
(     "       "     "     )
3.4
tural and archival systems. It is also the responsibility of this Section to developandto promote
new microfilm processing techniques.
In 1972-73, the Section received 78 requests to design and to implement micrographie
systems. This was a 110 per cent increase over the previous year. In addition, all records-
microfilming submissions presented to the Dominion Archivist by government departments s
were reviewed by the Section to ensure that technical requirements were met. The 31 submissions reviewed represented a 10 per cent increase over 1971-72.
Presented as a 10-day session by the Section's staff, the seventh annual Microrecording
Technology Course provided training in microfilm techniques for 30 persons from federal,
provincial and municipal levels of government. A catalogue describing all available micro-
graphic equipment and supplies in North America and Europe, was completed in microfiche
format during 1972-73. Micrographics and the facilities of the Public Archives were jointly
promoted through a Micrographics Users Booth set up by the Section at two national
conventions held respectively by the Canadian Micrographie Society and the Data Process-
big Institute.
Micrographie Evaluation and Development Unit—This Unit evaluates microfilm equipment
to establish the capabilities of each device in relation to its application in microfilm systems.
Construction, electrical components and optical systems are examined to determine theb
quality and operating limitations. By recommending suitable equipment for microfilm
applications, the Unit assists the Division's Micrographie Advisory Section. The Unit
examines and reviews purchase requisitions submitted by government departments to ensure
the proper choice of microfilm equipment has been made.
In the coming year the Technical Division plans to produce a publication of micro-
graphic evaluation information for general use.
PICTURE CONSERVATION SECTION—A variety of conservation services are provided to the Public Archives of Canada by this Section, including the handling of irreplaceable works of art. This requires knowledge of organic and inorganic chemistry; instrumental
methods of analysis; microchemistry; photography, (photomacrography, photomicrography
and darkroom work); radiography; art history; and studio art (oils, water-colours and
graphics). All this must be combined with years of experience in museums and conservation
laboratories.
A conservation chemist employed by the Section has improved the application of
scientific conservation knowledge. The Section's laboratory has successfully adapted new
methods of identifying paper-making fibres, and of bleaching and deacidifying paper.
In March 1973, Roger Roche, Head of the Section, left the Archives to join the Canadian Conservation Institute. His appointment should ultimately benefit the whole art conservation field. ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
Picture Conservation Production 1972-73
Oil Paintings
9
Water-Colours and Prints
128
Books
11
Maps, Parchments, Manuscripts
118
Photographs
30
Metal, Ivory, Seals
10
Examinations and Exhibitions
138
Special Projects
2,254
Wood Sculpture and Frames
4
Storage and Handling
8
Analyses
326
Documentation
188
Total
3,224
RECORDS CONSERVATION SECTION—Facing this Section is the critical problem of
constantly deteriorating records. The Section is responsible for restoring and rebinding rare
books, and for conserving manuscripts, maps, atlases, and other archival material for the
PubUc Archives and for the National Library.
Records Conservation Production 1972-73
Rare Books Restored
446
Protective Cases for Books
361
Special Deluxe Binding
25
Library Binding
1,951
Commercial Binding of Books
21,063
Pamphlet Binding
120
Books Repaired
119
Post Binding
169
Repair of Sections with Guards
10,678
Book Pages Bleached
10,652
Book Pages Deacidified Only
76,454
Book Pages Deacidified and Laminated
54,435
Atlases Restored
30
Atlas Cases
26
Maps and Posters Mounted or Laminated
4,006
Restoration of Manuscripts
13,810
Restoration of Parchments
12
Gold Lettering Certificates
241
Protective Cases for Art Objects
14
Total
187,602 66
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197JÉB
Becoming estabUshed in larger quarters during the year, the Section was able to install
additional laminating and deacidifying equipment. The latter has substantially increased j
the number of book pages and manuscripts treated. The number of maps treated has also
increased: the Section introduced a new and improved method of map-backing.
The problem of the unavailability of qualified personnel in this field has intensified
due to the demand for skilled personnel by similar institutions. A search for personnel is
to be conducted in Europe by the Public Archives' London and Paris Offices.
REPROGRAPHY SECTION—Specialized copy photography, negative duplication, and
photostatic and electrostatic copying are the functions of this Section. Demand for these
services is directly related to programs prepared by the Public Archives' Branches and
Divisions, and to requests from such patrons of the Public Archives as libraries, universities
researchers, private individuals and companies, and provincial and municipal government
departments and agendes.
During 1972-73, requests again increased for the production of black and white photographs of rare and valuable historic documents, and for electrostatic copying.
Reprography Section Production 1972-73
Photo Negatives
9,540
Photostats
19,554
Microfilm Enlargements
1,841
Xerox
1,142,245
Negative File Cards
18,984
Photo Prints (8" x 10")
32,634
Colour Negatives
185
Colour Positives (8" x 10")
106
Colour Transparencies
462
Total
1,225,551
ADMINISTRATIVE For tne PuDUC Archives, this Division provides a
CCDX/Ifirc support service that includes records management,
SlUvV 11^11(3 materiel management,  property management,  com-
DIVISION munications, accommodation, safety, fire prevention,
security, parking, and co-ordinating the use of auditorium and meeting rooms. The Division comprises five Sections: Records Services; Materiel
Management; Accommodations and Building Services; Audio-Visual Services; and the
Transcribing Unit.
RECORDS SERVICES SECTION—The Section plans, organizes and controls the Records
Management Program of the Public Archives. Areas involved include file classification,
scheduling, disposal, creation of filing systems, and mail and messenger services.
A total of 36,000 letters processed during the year represented an increase of 10,000;
a total of 14,000 parcels wrapped represented a 4,000 items increase; mail increased from.
110,000 to 156,200, whtie external messages rose from 3,700 to 7,700. ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 67
MATERIAL MANAGEMENT SECTION—A total of 2,066 procurement requests involving some $650,000 were processed by the Section on behalf of the Department. In addition, 423 procurement requests representing $450,000 were received from the Central
Microfilm Unit. Purchases included cantilever shelving, office equipment, motor vehicles,
cameras, television equipment, projectors, dryers, enlargers, and television monitors.
More than 40 tons of material (mainly books), representing a 50-60 per cent increase
over 1971-72, were shipped from the Public Archives building for the Archives and National
Library. Value of stationery provided to the Department increased by 63 per cent over
1971-72, and amounted to $36,722.
ACCOMMODATIONS AND BUILDING SERVICES SECTION—During the past fiscal
year the Section handled 775 projects, and co-ordinated and supervised 619 other projects
involving the Department of PubUc Works and outside contractors. A new sprinkler system
was installed in the Tunney's Pasture Records Centre. A mezzanine floor was constructed
in the Vancouver Records Centre. A two-ton air conditioning unit for video-tape storage
was installed in the West Memorial BuUding. Various transfers and alterations of accommodation were carried out.
AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES SECTION—Many national conferences were held in the
auditorium and in the boardrooms, making it a busy year for the conference complex. The
Section acqubed a new colour video projector; provided projectors for the Displays and
Publicity Division; taped 12 television programs for Channel 3; and provided taping faciUties
for Personnel Division's Training and Development Section.
TRANSCRIBING UNIT—During the year, the Unit performed 25,586 typing jobs. Flexi-
bility is required of the small staff whose varied duties stem from technical, personnel,
financial and general administrative activities.
MANAGEMENT ^*s Dbtision k responsible for co-ordinating and analyzing
e*wji-rf-\rwAri-c>Q program forecasts and estimates, and for providing finandal,
MSKVIUfio bookkeeping and management improvement services for the
DIVISION PubUc Archives. The Division comprises three Sections:
Program Planning and Budget; Management Improvement;
Finance.
PROGRAM PLANNING AND BUDGET SECTION—The Section co-ordinates and analyzes the program forecasts and estimates of the Public Archives. These forecasts and estimates are prepared annually to reflect expenditures to the level of four activities and 29
sub-activities. The Section is also responsible for providing advice to departmental management on financial matters. The department's forecasts and estimates are analyzed, compiled
and submitted for Parliamentary approval. The pattern of expenditure in departmental
budgets is reviewed monthly, and cash-flow forecasts are prepared for the Department's 20
responsibUity centres. Members of the Section are serving on a Task Force to assist in
designing and developing a Performance Measurement System for the PubUc Archives.
MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT SECTION—The Section is responsible for planning
and implementing an organization and methods program; for providing a management
improvement advisory service to managers and officials; for planning and carrying out
organization and methods studies; and for forms management and information systems. 68 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973 i
FINANCE SECTION—The Section provides financial accounting services for the Public
Archives which this year had a budget of $5,800,000. The Department's responsibility for
commitment and expenditure control, the pre-audit of accounts and normal expansion ml
the Branches has increased the functions of this Section.
PERSONNEL     RaPid growth in the size and complexity of the Department has inM
T*TC7¥C¥rkXT creased staff relations problems, and has emphasized the need for
U* V l&MJIN comprehensive staff training and development programs at all level s,
in both official languages.
The Division has been required to meet greatly increased demands for classification,
staffing, and compensation. In addition, information for the Department's management and
for the Central Agencies (Treasury Board and the Public Service Commission) has had to
be improved and expanded. The bilingual capacity of the Division has also grown: four ofl
the nine personnel administrators are bilingual; three are on language training; and of
twelve support staff members, five are bilingual.
Three Sections handle the varied responsibilities of the Division : Classification, Compensation and Staff Relations; Staffing and Manpower Planning; Training and Develop- I
ment.
CLASSIFICATION, COMPENSATION AND STAFF RELATIONS SECTION—Responsibilities of this Section include the administration of position classification, compensation and benefits and staff relations programs. A special Personnel Services Unit
documents and inducts new employees.
Classification—During the year, the Section reviewed 321 positions, evaluating 65 term and
113 new continuous positions, and reclassifying 143 positions. The Section also participated j
in an orientation course in Classification for Line Managers.
Effective October 1, 1972, Treasury Board significantly increased the Department's
delegated authority in the classification area.
Staff Relations—Responsible for the administration of 18 collective agreements, the Section
provides Treasury Board with suggestions regarding contract demands for groups of prime
concern to the PubUc Archives. It also proposes and updates managerial and confidential
exclusions. By encouraging prior consultation, and by developing good communications
with employees and theb unions through such methods as a Union-Management Consultation Committee, many potential grievances are resolved without recourse to the formal
grievance process. One formal grievance was initiated during the year but was resolved at
the fbst step in the grievance procedure.
Personnel Services Unit—The Unit processes records of attendance, hours of work, leave,
transfer and separation, as well as documents relating to salaries, superannuation, workmen's
compensation and other entitlements and benefits. In addition, it prepares numerous reports
for the management of the Public Archives, for the Department of Supply and Services, for
Treasury Board, and for others; it also answers Parliamentary inquiries about aspects of
pay and employee benefits in the Department.
STAFFING AND MANPOWER PLANNING SECTION—This Section is responsible for
the recruitment and selection of applicants for positions in the Public Archives. It administers
the data stream program as well as the departmental appraisal and performance review
system; advises line managers on the effective utilization of staff; and provides a personal ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 69
counselling service. Staff members are currently developing a data base from which to forecast manpower needs, extract skill profiles, and respond more efficiently to Parliamentary
or Treasury Board queries. The Section also prepares and issues the monthly Personnel
Administration Information Report for the Department's management. This requires
gathering and maintaining varied statistics.
Staffing activities in the Public Archives for the period of April 1, 1972 to February 28,
1973 are outlined below:
Personnel taken on strength
215
Personnel struck off strength
136
Promotions
128
Total competitions
9
Total appointments made by Department
250
Total appointments made by P.S.C.
93
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT SECTION—The Training and Development Section
provides out-service training through the Public Service Commission and other departments;
develops in-house courses to fulfill Department needs; furthers the career development of
employees by counselling and researching the availability of evening and correspondence
courses; assists the Departmental Education Committee with the concept of educational
activities hi the training area; prepares reports related to training and personnel research.
From April 1, 1972 to March 31, 1973, a total of 576 man-days were expended by the
Public Archives on training, other than language training or educational leave.
Man-days Expended in Public Archives Training Courses
Department's
Internal
Courses
Government
Courses
Non-
Government
Courses
Dominion Archivist, and Administration and Technical Services
Branch
134
132
48
Historical Branch
132.5
18
—
Records Management Branch
101.5
10
—
Identified training needs led to the provision of two courses on Staffing and Interviewing,
two courses in Staff Relations, one course on Classification for Line Managers and Administrative Officers, and three Clerical Supervision courses, two in EngUsh and one in
French.
OFFICE  OF  THE  ADVISER   of437 employees at the Public Archives, 79
are considered bilingual. Each has met the
ON BILINGUALISM
bilingual requbement of the particular posi-
AND  BICULTURALISM bon held by successfully completing
second-language test. Positions requiring
EngUsh only number 375; 62 positions require knowledge of both official languages; there
are no positions requiring French only. PUBUC ARCHTVES REPORT 1972-1973■
Disposition of Bilingual Employees and Positions
Positions
Requbement
Number Only
of PAC    	
Employees     EngUsh      French
Positions Employees
Designated Considered
Bilingual       Bilingual Position Category
—
—
—
0
1
Executive
—
—
—
11
7
Administrative and
Foreign Service
—
—
—
10
18
Scientific and
Professional
—
—
—
33
43
Administrative Support
—
—
—
4
7
Technical
—
—
—
4
3
Operational
437
375
0
62
79
Total
The Public Archives sent 48 people on language training in 1972-73: 46 were enrolled
in the three-weeks cycle program; 2 were registered in evening courses. However, 5 employees
have cancelled theb language training.
To facilitate its language program the PubUc Archives was allocated eight man-years
and $87,900 for 1972-73. The money was distributed as foUows: six man-years and $60,000
for language training replacement; two man-years and $18,000 for bilingualism administration; $9,900 to be spent on such things as terminological research and glossaries, training 1
and development. At the same time the Language Bureau provided the PubUc Archives with
three monitors to help students retain French acquired through the Language Bureau. Most
students find this a useful and stimulating service. Unfortunately, of 270 prospective students,
only 180 employees of the Public Archives and the National Library attended scheduled
meetings with theb monitors each month.
J. M. Caza, Bilingual Co-ordinator, has undertaken a study of the PubUc Archives'
three French language units operated by 37 staff members. The study wUl be a thorough
analysis of each unit, accompanied by specific recommendations in keeping with the objectives set out by Treasury Board. Following the new poticies and guidelines announced by
the President in December 1972, more precise and more comprehensive language programs
wtil be implemented.
DISPLAYS AND
PUBLICITY DIVISION
Exhibitions—The Displays and Publicity Division^,
prepared two major exhibitions for the Public
Archives of Canada. The first of these, opened
by the Right Honourable Pierre EUiott Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, on June 1,1972,
was Archives: Mirror of Canada Past, prepared on the occasion of the centennial of the PubHaï
Archives of Canada. Items for the exhibition were selected from the vast holdings acquired!
by the Public Archives during its fbst one-hundred years. A prestigious catalogue, consisting
of 313 fuUy iUustrated pages, was produced to accompany the exhibition. On June 20,1972^
another smaller exhibition, Behind the Scenes at the Archives, was opened by Dr. W. I. Smith,
Dominion Archivist. This exhibition was of two parts; the first was a display of documents
outlining the history of the PubUc Archives over its fbst one-hundred years, and the second ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
One of the panels from the exhibition Towards CN: from portage railway to a national system,
prepared on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Canadian National Railway Company.
was a display of a selection of colour photographs tilustrating the "behind the scenes"
operations of the Department.
The second major exhibition was Towards CN: from portage railway to a national
system. This exhibition was prepared on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the incorporation of the Canadian National Ratiway Company, as a tribute to the pioneer railway
builders and operators who created the ratiways which eventuaUy combined to form the
CN.R All items in the exhibition were drawn from the resources of the PubUc Archives and
a catalogue was produced to accompany the exhibition. The exhibition was opened on
October 6,1972 by Mr. J. W. G. Macdougall, Q.C., Executive Vice-President of the C.N.R.
During July the Division was also responsible for presenting a series of films, drawn
from the holdings of the National Film Archives, in the auditorium of the building. This
was done in co-operation with various other agencies under the portfolio of the Secretary
of State to celebrate Canada's birthday.
The Division prepared two major and three minor exhibitions and two book displays
for the National Library.
A new field into which the Division ventured in 1972 /73 is that of seminars. One seminar,
a pUot undertaking, was sponsored by McGill University Archives. The seminar was presided
over by two staff-members of the Division. It was attended by 17 individuals from 13 different
libraries, museums and archives hi the Montreal area. Topics covered in relation to exhibitions
included: selection and care of documents, design of exhibitions, merchandising and pub- 72
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973,1
licising of exhibitions. The seminar was widely praised by those who attended, so much so j
that other seminars to be presided over by divisional personnel are currently in the planning
stages for 1973 in other Canadian mstitutions.
PubUcity—The publicity efforts of the Displays and Publicity Division concentrated on
bringing to public attention exhibitions and other events sponsored by the Public Archives.
Generous coverage was obtained in newspapers and magazines across Canada hi support
of these events. The local media, in particular newspapers, tourist publications, television
and radio, all participated in bringing the historical attractions of the Department's centennial year to the attention of the public. PubUcity for acquisitions of historical rignificance
by the Department was actively pursued. The purchase of a rare daguerreotype of Montreal
was publicised by over 50 newspapers and specialized journals across Canada. 1972-73 also
saw the production by the Ontario Educational Cornmunications Authority of two films,
based on the PubUc Archives' exhibitions Archives: Mirror of Canada Past and Towards CNm
In addition, the Division continued to support embassies and other cultural, non-profit
agencies and organizations exhibiting in the Public Archives/National Library building in
garnering publicity for theb efforts. It also handled all pubUcity for the National Library j
for most of the year. The workload involved in performing these functions for two Departments was a strenuous undertaking for one publidty officer. The National Library therefore
set up its own Public Relations Division and appointed a publicity officer for the Department in December 1972.
I
Laurier House—Many changes and improvements took place m Laurier House during the
year. These include interior renovations, the installation of a new fire alarm system, and the
replacement of electrical wiring throughout the entire House.
The most significant acquisition is the collection of furniture and other memorabilia of
Laurier origin purchased from Mrs. Pauline Laurier-Harvey of Montreal, the last surviving
niece of Sir Wilfrid and Lady Laurier. A Louis XI set, comprising four chairs and a settee
was once a prominent part of the Salon on the ground floor. Other items in the collection
include a large Sevres vase and a green onyx stand, a 'vernis martin' display cabinet, and a
chair and a table with painted pastoral scenes. Numerous gifts accompanied the purchase:
a large Japanese tapestry which used to separate Laurier's study from the rest of the house;
an 8' X 6' portrait of Sir Wilfrid Laurier by Detibsse with over one-hundred names of the
supporting subscribers verso; several other paintings and sculptures; original drapes and a
bowl-shape settee. Among the more personal items were: 38 assorted medaUic curiosities
(many of souvenir nature); gold knitting needles used by Mme Laurier; rosaries (said to be
made from flowers in Laurier's funeral wreath); leather-covered prayer book with inscription
and signature by Pius X; 'Victorian Era Ball' printed souvenir book with facsimUe forward
by Lady Aberdeen; numerous photographs; two visitors' books from Laurier House and
over 70 illuminated addresses commemorative of Laurier's political career. To accommodate
this new coUection, the former Guest Bedroom on the second floor has been converted into
the new 'Salon Laurier-Harvey'.
A registration system has been initiated to create background files on the individual
artifacts exhibited in Laurier House. Historical research also took place in connection with
the original owner of the House, an Ottawa jeweller, John Leslie. Over thirteen thousand
visitors toured the House during the fiscal year 1972/73. They came from all parts of Canada
and the United States as well as from Great Britain, France, AustraUa, Roumania, Czechoslovakia, Israel, Venezuela, Mexico, Trinidad, Honduras and the Dominican RepubUc, ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
The new Salon Laurier-Harvey, Laurier House, 335 Laurier Avenue East, Ottawa.
National Medal CoUection and Tours—2,674 medals and badges were acqubed by the National
Medal CoUection m 1972/73.
128,268 persons visited the PubUc Archives during the period in review. Of this number
approximately 7,000 were personaUy escorted by the officer m charge of tours.
PUBLICATIONS
DIVISION
During the fiscal year 1972-1973 the PubUcations Division of
the PubUc Archives of Canada was restructured. Prior to this
the National Library had also relied in part upon the Division
for its pubUcation requirements. The change became effective
on November 15, 1972, when Madeleine Wagner was appointed Division Chief. A French-
language editor, an English-language editor and two proofreaders were added to the staff
of the Division.
In 1972 the Archives celebrated its centenary. To mark the event, it co-operated with
the University of Toronto Press in the production of a catalogue, Archives: Mirror of Canada
Past. The introduction of this bilingual volume gives a brief history of the development of
the Public Archives of Canada. Through its many illustrations and explanatory notes the
book reveals to the Canadian pubUc samples of the countless items acqubed over the years
by the Archives.
Another centennial project of the Archives was the preparation of a Guide to the Reports
of the Public Archives of Canada, 1872-1972. This volume wtil factiitate the use of the many 74
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973RJ
ill
detatied calendars of French, British and Canadian records and coUections of private papers
that have been pubUshed in the Annual Reports of the Archives. Work on the Guide is now
nearing completion.
A series of publications of special interest to scholars and researchers is the General
Inventory: Manuscripts prepared by the Manuscript Division. Volume 5: MG 26-27 appeared early in the year. Volume 4: MG 22-25 became available hi March, 1973. In addition
the National Map CoUection prepared Atlases published in the Netherlands in the rare atlas
coUection. This is the fbst of a series of catalogues, to be pubUshed over the next two years,
describing the complete atlas coUection.
List of Gazeteers in the Foreign Section, published for the National Map CoUection in
the spring of 1972, is the fbst of several Usts planned. Another pubUcation that appears
periodically is the Access Programme to Public Records, compUed by Jay Atherton and
Harold Naugler of the Manuscript Division. Bulletin No. 3, Significant Accessions, August
1970—December 1971, appeared during the faU.
An important area of involvement for the PubUcations Division was the preparation
of exhibition catalogues and brochures. An illustrated catalogue, Towards CN: from portage
railway to a national system, was produced to complement an exhibition prepared by the
PubUc Archives. Image of Canada, a poster catalogue, appeared in August, 1972. It supplemented a catalogue by the same title that was produced the previous year. In addition, a
PubUc Archives Centennial Medal leaflet was prepared for the official ceremony marking
the centennial of the PubUc Archives.
Leaflets were pubUshed during the year explaining various archival services and facilities.
These included The National Map Collection, The Picture Division, The Public Archives
Library, and Reproduction Services.
The Publications Division prepared a new edition of a records management manual,
General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada. A major effort was directed
towards the translation of records management manuals.
During the year work continued on the French edition of the second volume of the
Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald. An errata and addenda to the Canadian Directory of Parliament, 1867-1967 has been prepared. It is being incorporated into the original and it is expected that a second, revised edition wtil soon appear. There wtil be separate French and
English editions. The translation of the manuscript of Champlain's last voyage to Canada
was begun. It wtil appear m both languages. A revised version of the Guide to Canadian
Ministries since Confederation is near completion and will appear in French and English
editions.
The collation and editing of the PubUc Archives Annual Reports is also the responsibility
of the PubUcations Division. The Annual Report: 1971-1972 is now at the printers. Celebrations on the Centenary
of the
Public Archives of Canada  The special centennial celebrations were inaugurated in January 1972 with the opening
of the exhibition Image of Canada. The main public celebrations were held during the
first week of June, while the staff celebration was held on June 20. Here we present a summary of these celebrations, and the text of the main addresses delivered by the special guests.
Opening of the Exhibition Archives/Mirror of Canada Past, on June 1,1972.
The ceremony, hdd in the auditorium, opened with an address by the Honourable
Gérard PeUetier, Secretary of State, minister responsible for the Public Archives. The text
of that address follows.
First, I would like to welcome you to the Archives and to express my gratitude
that so many of you have accepted my invitation*
I wish in particular to welcome the Prime Minister, several of my predecessors
as ministers responsible for the Archives, two former Dominion Archivists (Dr.
Lanctot and Dr. Lamb), the representative of the International Council on Archives,
the Directors of the National Archives of France, Great Britain and the United
States, the Provindal and Territorial Archivists, the representatives of archival
and historical assodations.
We are gathered here today for the opening of an exhibition of the Public Archives. This is not an ordinary exhibition. It marks the one hundredth anniversary of
the Archives and is an attempt to present a selection of the material gathered during
the first one hundred years of its existence. What better opportunity to take a quick
look at the past and at what the future has in store for the Public Archives of Canada!
In 1872 Douglas Brymner was appointed first Dominion Archivist of the newly
founded Archives. His job was to gather historical documents, and not surprisingly
his search led him from Canada to France and England to obtain copies of the many
documents dealing with Canada's history that were located in the mother countries.
In 1903 he was given responsibility for government records by an order in council,
and the first Archives building was constructed in 1904-1905. In 1912 an act was
passed making the PubUc Archives a separate agency. The groundwork had been laid.
It was not until 1956, after several fruitless attempts, that a huge building was erected
at Tunney's Pasture and the Archives was able to play a decisive role in the field of
departmental administrative records. The results were convincing and in 1966 the
Dominion Archivist was assigned the general responsibility for the management of
government records, as recommended by the Glassco Commission.
In contrast to Brymner, who on taking up his duties in 1872 received, to use his
own words, "three smaU rooms and very vague instructions", the director of the
PubUc Archives must now fiU a very large mandate. He must gather, preserve and
make available to researchers archival materials of all sorts, see to the efficient
management of existing federal government records, provide microfilm services and
advise interested parties on the use of that medium. He has a staff of nearly 500 to
help him discharge this duty, housed since 1967 in this impressive building in which
we now find ourselves.
'Italicized sections have been translated from language of delivery, French, to English. J PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
In the course of the last hundred years, the Archives has accumulated a very    j
rich collection of archival materials coming from public and private sources and of
aU types: federal government records, as weU as copies of documents from France,
Britain and other countries; papers and records of mdividuals, associations and
businesses; manuscripts, maps and plans, paintings, drawings, water-colours, prints     j
and photographs, pubUcations, sound recordings, films and medals. Its responsibUities wiU soon be enlarged and rounded up with the creation of the National Film     j
Archives, and the expansion of faculties for motion picture films, videotapes and
recorded sound.
In 1889, Douglas Brymner wrote that he dreamed that one day "Ottawa might
become on this continent the Mecca to which historical investigators would turn
theb eyes and direct theb steps". This dream has not come true, but more and more
researchers in Canadian studies recognize the Public Archives as the essential centre
for original documentation.
The records management programme of the PubUc Archives is functioning
smoothly and a string of regional records centres wiH soon extend across the
country from Halifax to Vancouver.
The Archives' technical facilities are most modern, restoration and conservation
specialists taking care of its archival material, and its photographic and micro-
recording services meet always increasing demands.
Finally, the research facilities of the Archives have always been one of its pride.
In the old building on Sussex Drive (now the War Museum) searchers found
a warm welcome, an attentive and friendly staff, and a door always open, night and
day, all year round. In the present building, if some of the intimacy has gone, the
same desire to serve the researchers continues, and the rooms are larger and more
comfortable.
For a century, the federal archivists and their staff have shown a remarkable
devotion to their tasks, and we are thankful to them. They have been supported by
the interest and assistance of other archivists, of historians, and many people who
have donated their own papers, those of their families, the records of associations
and businesses, or even documents that they had acquired for theb own enjoyment,
but that they wanted to share with the people of Canada. I wish to take this occasion
to thank each and every one of them for theb part in preserving our cultural heritage.
As for the Canadian government, it may be that it has not always given to the
Public Archives all the support it merited or requested. But the modern faculties,
the remarkable increases in staff and budget granted to the Archives in the last
ten years is proof, I believe, of a greater awareness, on the part of the people, and of
the government, of the important role played by the PubUc Archives m its preservation and servicing of the authentic records of the past, even the most recent past.
The Public Archives is now on the threshold of another century which promises to
be even more exciting than the last. It will continue its present activities, especially
the locating of original documentation useful to researchers, but technological and
sociological developments will bring about a revolutionary change in the concept and
utilization of archives. Technical innovations in the creation and transmission of
information, and the promotion of a mass culture embracing all social strata, will
present the Archives with tremendous challenges.
Although the profound impact modern technology has had on the Archives cannot
be denied, the major concern should still be the new concept of culture. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
Now that the Archives is firmly established, a determined effort should be made
over the next few years to decentralize and to popularize its resources, and to make
them available to the general public. As the PubUc Archives enters its second century,
the new programmes can be classified under three headings: distribution of material,
distribution of knowledge, and research.
Already the Public Archives is storing computer tapes and making extensive use
of computers in the preparation of finding aids to private papers and government
files. These techniques will be applied to maps, paintings, photographs, films and
publications. It wUl not be long before information, images and sound can be
projected to terminals in research centres throughout the country or made available
in homes and schools through cassettes and other miniaturized packages. Improved
communications, which is an essential goal of the new technology, will considerably
reduce the problem of distance and help equalize opportunities for Canadians of
all regions.
But without waiting until the more sophisticated technology becomes economically possible, more conventional means will be used to bring close to the people of
Canada the rich resources of the PubUc Archives. Microfilms, microfiches, slides,
photographs, tapes will be used to decentralize at least the most important archival
sources and theb finding aids, whether they be manuscripts, maps, pictures, sound
recordings or films. By these methods, the wealth of resources of the Public Archives
will reach a much larger portion of the Canadian public than is the case today.
The staff of the PubUc Archives would also like to share with other institutions in
Canada and elsewhere their knowledge and experience in the fields of restoration and
nUcrophotography, as well as the theory and practice of the management of administrative and historical records.
They would also like to conduct or finance archival research. In particular they
wiU be examining the value or relevance of documents as instruments of culture in a
given social context, whether this be the educational sector, underprivileged areas,
or minority cultural communities. Although traditionally it was taken for granted
that documents were the major source for a study of man and society, it can be asked
whether, in a continually changing society, they might not have a positive effect on the
average citizen, reminding him of the timeless and unchanging values of human nature,
and of the rich and varied experience of man in society.
But to be effective, these programmes will reqube the close co-operation of
many institutions, associations and individuals of related interests and preoccupa-
■ tions. We will certainly need the collaboration of the provincial and territorial
archives, strategically located across the country, and possessing in many cases a
valid experience in these fields. We wtil also hope for the assistance of research centres such as the universities, of information centres such as the libraries, of archivists
and historians, of schools, of community centres, indeed of the whole population
that the Archives would want to serve.
/ am therefore happy to say that these programmes and the co-operation that
will be needed to implement them will be discussed during the next few days at the
annual meeting of federal and provincial archivists, and that they will also be the topic
of sessions organized by the Canadian Historical Association to be held here on
Monday.
It is gratifying that the representative of the International Council on Archives
and the directors of the National Archives of Great Britain, France and the United 80 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-19?»
States have agreed to let us profit from their experience and wisdom by discussions
on the future role of the Archives.
The results of these discussions and of other such meetings should provide us with
useful opinions that will enable us to define the goals and programmes of the Public
Archives.
In a quiet way, the Public Archives has always been responsive to the present
and the future needs of its clientele. I am confident that as it enters its second century,     j
it wtil be even more effective in its mission to assemble, preserve and communicate    |
to all Canadians a true reflection of Canada and its people.
Thus, to borrow the metaphor used in the exhibition's title, I am confident that
the Public Archives of Canada will provide Canadians with an increasingly faithful    \
mirror of their past.
The Minister then invited Dr. Morris Rieger, representative of the International Council
on Archives, to speak. Dr. Rieger's address was followed by those of: M. Guy Duboscq,
Dbecteur général des Archives de France; Mr. Jeffery Ede, Keeper of the Public Record
Office of Great Britain; and Dr. J. B. Rhoads, Archivist of the United States.
Address by Dr. Morris Rieger
I am honoured, on behalf of the International Council on Archives, the world
organization of the archival profession, to have this opportunity to congratulate the
PubUc Archives of Canada on the occasion of its Centennial.
Our profession knows the PubUc Archives as a vigorous, dedicated and progressive institution which has taken its place among the world's foremost archival
administrations. Under the distinguished leadership of M. Lanctot and Dr. Lamb
for so many years and now under that of Dr. Smith, the Public Archives has expanded and perfected the services it renders to government, to scholarship and to
the citizen at large in every area of archival operation. Belieing its apparent age it
makes use of the most advanced methods and indeed has contributed substantially
to theb development as it is now doing in connection with the application of the
techniques of automation to archives administration.
I am naturally particularly aware of the international role of the PubUc Archives. As a member of the International Council's Executive during most of the
decade of the 1960s, Dr. Lamb played a prominent part m the Council's own progress to maturity during this period and through his effective advocacy at the 1966
Washington archives congress of liberalization of scholarly access to archives on an
international scale, he set in motion the process that led directly, two years later,
to the formal adoption of international standards having this effect. During the
past few years as the International CouncU has focused increased attention on the
problems of archival underdevelopment in the emerging nations of the world, the
PubUc Archives, among other things, has co-operated wholeheartedly in providing
professional training for beginning archivists from these countries and hi making
available archival experts to advise them on the solution of theb more urgent.
problems.
In the future, as in the past, the Public Archives of Canada wtil continue to
operate as one of the world's principal archival powers and hi recognition of this
fact it now seems clear that later this year at our Moscow congress the Dorninion
Archivist wtil once again be elected to membership on the Council's Executive Committee. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
To conclude, in the name of the International Council on Archives, I salute the
Public Archives of Canada on this very happy occasion and extend the Coundl's
best wishes for the many centuries to come.
Address by M. Guy Duboscq
/ would like to take this opportunity to briefly express my thanks and to extend
my congratulations.
The thanks go to the Canadian government for kindly inviting me to participate in
the commemoration of the Centennial of the Public Archives of Canada and in the
opening of the exhibition in honour of this occasion. I am deeply moved to be here
with you today at this event.
My congratulations go to the organizers of these proceedings, and particularly to
the Dominion Archivist for the high degree of success that he has achieved. Since a
speech, however short, must according to classical tradition have three parts, I will
close my remarks on a note of envy.
The Archives of France are, to be sure, housed in magnificent historical palaces,
but people frequently don't realize that this can be a handicap; unlike the PubUc
Archives of Canada, we do not have a building which is both attractive architecturally
and well-suited to the archives' role in the 20th century. Dr. Smith can be proud to
have such a superb building which is at the same time such an excellent work tool.
Address by Mr. Jeffery Ede
It is a great honour and privilege for me to be invited to participate m your
Centennial celebration, together with the Director General of the Archives of
France, the Archivist of the United States and the Deputy Secretary General of the
International Council on Archives.
I see, hi the course of a year, a good deal of the three of them; we are aU very
good friends and we seem to be always bumping into each other on various occasions, conferences, committee tables, not to mention banqueting tables.
Tonight, however, is a very special and intimate occasion for us because of the
close links we share with Canada. Now this is not the moment for me to dweU on
the bonds of friendship which have been forged over the years between the PubUc
Record Office in London and the PubUc Archives hi Ottawa, except to say that we
value greatly this sped al relationship. I have abeady given to the Dominion Archivist
a smaU memento documenting the earbest contacts between our countries in the
15th century and our two mstitutions nearly a hundred years ago.
My colleagues in the PubUc Record Office join me on this occasion in congratulating Dr. Smith, his predecessors and the staff of the Public Archives of
Canada on theb remarkable achievements during the last hundred years. We
rejoice with you hi these achievements and in the high reputation which they have
earned for the PubUc Archives of Canada and I can assure you, Prime Minister and
Minister, that your PubUc Archives enjoys an international reputation second to
none.
I have also been asked to convey the warmest congratulations and fraternal
greetings of the Sodety of Archivists in Britain, a Sodety which is proud to have
had as a Past President a great former Dominion Archivist, Dr. W. Kaye Lamb. 82 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
Finally, Prime Minister and Minister, if I may presume to address you a few
words in your mother tongue.
I would simply like to express my most sincere thanks for your warm welcome
and my fervent wishes for the success and prosperity of the Public Archives of Canada     j
during its next century.
Address by Dr. J. B. Rhoads
It is a distinct pleasure for me to join with my distinguished colleagues from
France and Great Britain in honouring the Public Archives of Canada on the    1
occasion of its Centennial.
The National Archives of the United States is very much the junior archival a
institution represented here this evening. We are a long, long way from our own 1
Centennial—62 years to be exact—and though I am respectful of age, I am im- I
pressed by accomplishment. The Public Archives of Canada has a tremendous "j
record of accomplishment. It is recognized throughout the archival world for its JI
effectiveness, for the ingenuity with which it has surmounted problems, for the |
quality of its service to its government, to historical scholarship and to the enhance- j
ment of the Canadian culture. It is therefore a very great honour for me to extend I
the official greetings of the United States of America to the Public Archives of ï
Canada on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its establishment and to wish m
it well as it enters into a second century of service.
Mr. Pelletier then introduced the Prime Minister, the Right Honourable Pierre Elliott
The PubUc Archives centennial exhibition Archives: Mirror of Canada Past was officially opened
on June 1,1972 by the Right Honourable Pierre Eltiott Trudeau. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
Hv           ^^Ê
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Prime Mbùster Trudeau and the Honourable Gérard Pelletier with Dr. and Mrs. Smith
at the centennial ceremonies, June 1,1972.
Official Opening Address by the Right Honourable Pierre Elliott Trudeau
A hundred years ago, when the first Dominion Archivist was appointed, Canada
acquired what we might call her official memory. It is true that the years before
Confederation had yielded a rich harvest of mementos, but they were not really our
own—some lay in the archives of the mother countries and others, though still on
Canadian soil, were scattered across the land.
The title of the exhibition it is my pleasure to open today describes the Archives
as the "Mirror of Canada Past". This phrase is apt in more ways than one; the
Archives mirrors the history of this country not only in its content, but also in the
way it has developed from its modest beginnings. It has grown with this country;
as Canada has gradually asserted her presence in North America, extending her
authority across the continent and into the Arctic, so the Archives has grown from
an obscure branch of government into a complex and prestigious institution. 84 PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973
The development of the Archives has not been a passive process. The learned and
patient men to whom it has been entrusted have all been able to convince successive    |
governments of the importance of their task, and to persuade them to allocate the
necessary resources to discharge it worthily. Our presence here, this exhibition and its fl
theme all testify to a most remarkable accomplishment. For the Public Archives of
Canada, unlike the archives of many countries, is not merely government archives;  fl
it is very much the Archives of Canada the nation. In addition to all the official files    j
and papers, it contains all manner of private documents that help to illustrate and to   -^
enrich the history of Canada.
The Dominion Archivist would doubtless react most unfavourably to any suggestion that his function is a passive one. His protest would be entirely justified—and M
etymology, moreover, is quite clearly on his side. The word "archives" comes from 9
the Greek "arkheion", which originally designated the residence of the principal fl
magistrates and came to mean "the repository of official documents". The word '%
"arkheion" itself comes from "arkho", to rule. The same root also denotes age or fl
seniority; in ancient times, government was in the hands of those who were, or were ~flj
called "senior". We stand, then, in the home of the archons of history, those who i
preserve the national heritage and cultivate its rich resources.
A country's heritage is a dynamic phenomenon; it shapes the personality of both
individuals and peoples, and exerts a vital influence on their lives. It is of the utmost    3
importance that the national heritage be constantly referred to, consulted, enriched    I
and illuminated.
Since the time of the Pharaohs, all civilizations have recognized the need to
extract the essence of their past out of the masses of records and documents. History ™
hands on to us the experiences that alert against error, that inspire daring and that I
instil wisdom. It preserves the basic characteristics of national personalities; it
shelters the patterns of political thought and action that successive generations
interpret, revise and modify to meet the needs of their times. Thus nations grow
and acquire identity, and thus the mirror of our past becomes the inspiring teacher
of our history.
The treasures of the Public Archives are playing an increasingly important role
in the intellectual life of this country. I rejoice that this is so. In paying tribute to
their predecessors, I wish to congratulate Dr. Smith and his staff on the occasion
of the Centennial of the institution they serve with such skill and devotion.
A specially designed Centenary Medal, the work of Dora de Pédery Hunt, was then
presented by Mr. PeUetier to Mr. Trudeau. Mr. Trudeau expressed his thanks, and declared
the exhibition officially open. A reception and dinner for a limited number of invited guests
concluded the June 1, 1972 ceremonies.
Annual Meeting of Federal and Provincial Archivists, June 2-4,1972
This third annual meeting was held to coincide with the Centenary celebrations. ISjF\
ticipating in the proceedings were our distinguished visitors from the international archival
community, Messrs. Rieger, Duboscq, Ede and Rhoads. At the dinner, held Saturday
evening, these gentlemen, representing the three countries with which Canadian history has
been most closely associated, were presented with Centenary Medals. On Sunday a garden
party was held at the home of the Dominion Archivist. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
Recipients of the Centenary Medal with Dr. W. I. Smith are from left to right: M. Guy Duboscq,
Directeur général des Archives de France, Dr. W. Kaye Lamb, former Dominion Archivist,
Dr. J. B. Rhoads, Archivist of the United States, and Mr. Jeffery Ede, Keeper of the
Public Record Office of Great Britain.
Special Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, June 5,1972
On Monday June 5, the Canadian Historical Association held a special one-day meeting.
Following a tour of the Public Archives buUding, Mr. Ian Wilson, Chairman of the Archives
Section of the Canadian Historical Assodation and Archivist of Queen's University, delivered
a paper on Sir Arthur Doughty, Dominion Archivist, 1904-1935. In the afternoon there
were two panel discussions. The fbst, chaired by the Dominion Archivist, was devoted to the
diffusion of archives. Participants were Messrs. Guy Duboscq, Jeffery Ede, J. B. Rhoads and
Morris Rieger. The second session was entitled "Archives, Temple or Market Place". The
Chairman was Dr. John Archer, President of the University of Saskatchewan (Regina)
and the panellists were Allan Turner, Provindal Archivist of Saskatchewan, Professors
Craig Brown (University of Toronto), Julian Craft (George Harvey Secondary School),
T. D. Regehr (University of Saskatchewan), Jean-Pierre Wallot (Sir George WUliams University) and Dr. Wilfred I. Smith. The session dealt with the present services and poUcies
of the Public Archives and its proposed diffusion program.
The day concluded with a dinner and an address by Col. Charles P. Stacey, a leading
historian, and long-time client of the Public Archives. In his speech, Col. Stacey underlined
the high quaUty service provided in the past by the PubUc Archives. He stressed the need to
continue to place scholarship first, and warned against the danger of a bureaucratic approach
to the management of the Public Archives of Canada. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-1973r|
Dr. W. I. Smith presenting Centenary Medals to Dr. Gustave Lanctot, Dominion Archivist from
1937 to 1948, and to Mrs. John Dawson and Miss Grace Brymner, grand-daughters of
Sb Arthur George Doughty, Dominion Archivist from 1904 to 1935. CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS
Miss Juliette Bourque, employee with the longest uninterrupted service to the Public Archives, was
presented with the Centenary Medal. Dr. Smith is holding a plaque presented to him by the Staff
Association to commemorate the June 20,1972 celebrations. 1
PUBUC ARCHIVES REPORT 1972-197J||
Staff Celebrations on the 100th Anniversary of the Founding of the Public Archives,
Jane 20,1972
The celebration was reserved to former and present staff of the Public Archives. The
Dominion Archivist honoured former staff, and a Centenary Medal was presented to Dr.
Gustave Lanctot, Dominion Archivist from 1937 to 1948, and to Mrs. John Dawson and
to Miss Grace Brymner, grand-daughters of Sb Arthur George Doughty, Dominion Archivist
from 1904 to 1935. MUe Juliette Bourque, Chief of the PubUc Archives Library, and employee with the longest uninterrupted service to the Archives was also presented with a
medal. The Staff Assodation presented Dr. Smith with a plaque to commemorate the occasion. An exhibition, Behind the Scenes at the Archives, was then opened. This was followed
by a reception and a dance.  CANADA
ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
Ri      MÊ  LES
ARCHIVES
PUBLIQUES
DU
CANADA
RAPPORT
1972/1973 Information Canada
Ottawa, 1974
N° de cat.: SA1/1972-73 SOMMAIRE
Introduction
Page
1
Direction de la gestion des documents
3
Division du dépôt central des archives d'Ottawa
3
Division des dépôts régionaux
7
Bureau de gestion des documents, division des services
10
Direction des archives historiques
15
Division des manuscrits
17
Bibliothèque des archives publiques
45
Collection nationale de cartes et plans
50
Division des gravures et photos
57
Division des archives nationales du film
68
Direction de l'administration et des services techniques
71
'"    Division des services techniques
71
Division des services administratifs
75
Division des services de gestion
76
Division du personnel
76
Bureau du conseiller en bilinguisme et en biculturaUsme
78
Division des expositions et de la publicité
79
Division des publications
83
Célébrations du centenaire des Archives publiques du Canada
85
L                                                                         tiL  INTRODUCTION
L'événement le plus important de
l'année fut la célébration du centenaire des Archives publiques,
dont la création remonte à la nomination, le 20 juin 1872, du premier archiviste fédéral,
M. William Brymner. L'année 1972 marque aussi le soixantième anniversaire de
l'adoption de la Loi sur les Archives publiques, qui donna à l'institution son nom
et son autonomie et définit son rôle.
Le centenaire nous a permis de passer nos progrès et nos buts en revue, à la
lumière de notre premier siècle d'expérience, et d'envisager pour celui qui s'ouvre de
nouveaux plans, objectifs et orientations. Durant tout ce premier siècle, on a cherché
à organiser des archives nationales qui acquerraient et conserveraient des documents
de toute nature et de tout genre, dans lesquels seraient consignés les divers aspects de
l'histoire du pays. Nous avons atteint cet objectif dans des proportions remarquables.
J'ai déjà fait un bref compte rendu de l'expansion des Archives publiques dans
l'introduction au catalogue de l'exposition Archives: miroir du passé du Canada, mise
sur pied pour commémorer notre centenaire; j'invite le lecteur à s'y reporter.
L'expansion s'est faite à un rythme inégal. Pendant la majeure partie du siècle,
les progrès furent entravés par le manque de personnel, de ressources et d'espace.
Le développement s'est toutefois accéléré au cours des deux dernières décennies grâce
à l'accroissement rapide du volume et de la gamme des acquisitions, des services offerts
aux chercheurs, de l'avancement des techniques de gestion des documents et des inno-
vations techniques, surtout en ce qui a trait aux microfilms.
Les Archives publiques ont toujours accordé beaucoup d'importance à la qualité
des services qu'eUes offrent au public et des centaines de chercheurs écrivent régulièrement pour remercier le personnel. Mentionnons, à ce propos, quelques innovations,
comme l'utilisation de la salle de recherche 24 heures par jour et le prêt de microfilms
entre bibliothèques.
Au début de ce second siècle, notre volonté constante de conserver un témoignage
aussi complet que possible de la vie canadienne et d'être plus sensibles aux besoins de la
| coUectivité toute entière débouche sur de nouvelles avenues et se trouve confrontée à de
nombreux défis. Tous les secteurs feront l'objet d'améliorations: la compétence du per-
sonnel, l'envergure de nos services, y compris les nouveaux moyens de diffusion comme
le film et les documents ordinolingues, la portée et la qualité de notre programme de
conservation et, surtout, l'expansion du programme de diffusion des documents que
nous conservons pour l'enrichissement des chercheurs et du public en général.
Ce dernier aspect était d'ailleurs le thème des célébrations marquant notre centenaire et vous en trouverez une description plus détaillée dans une autre partie de
ce rapport. Il fut discuté par des archivistes canadiens et étrangers, par des professeurs
et des chercheurs en histoire. C'était aussi l'objectif visé par l'exposition organisée
pour le centenaire et soulignée par le catalogue établi pour l'occasion. Ces discussions
et consultations aboutirent à la préparation de projets précis que l'on mettra en œuvre
au cours des prochaines années. J'y reviendrai d'ailleurs dans mon prochain rapport.
Pendant ce temps, tous les secteurs d'activité des Archives publiques ont connu
une expansion générale, ce qui nous a obligés à utiliser, temporairement, des bureaux
et des installations d'emmagasinage externes, et à accélérer l'élaboration des plans
Bun nouvel édifice qui répondra mieux à nos besoins futurs.
1 2 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
Cette croissance a notamment entraîné la création de la Division des archives fédérales et de la Division des archives nationales du film, issues respectivement de la
Division des manuscrits et de la Division des gravures et photos. Nous avons en
outre constitué une section spéciale réservée aux archives des communautés cultureUes
autres que française et anglaise. Nous projetions également d'ouvrir deux dépôts
régionaux d'archives, l'un à Winnipeg et l'autre à Halifax.
Un comité des Archives publiques a été constitué en vue d'étudier les documents
ordinolingues et leur conservation à court et à long terme, à des fins administratives et historiques. Mm" Caroline K. Keck, professeur et administratrice du programme d'études supérieures sur la conservation d'ouvrages historiques et artistiques
de Cooperstown, et autorité reconnue dans ce domaine, fut chargée de faire une
étude spéciale sur la conservation des documents et des ouvrages d'art. Son exceUent
rapport constituera un outil précieux pour l'adoption de politiques et de méthodes
concernant cet élément essentiel de notre travaU, que nous avons pour diverses raisons,
quelque peu négligé jusqu'à ce jour.
Au cours de l'année, les Archives publiques ont reçu aide et collaboration d'un
grand nombre de personnes, et je tiens à remercier les particuliers et les institutions,
les ministères et les représentants de l'administration fédérale,- ainsi que les généreux
donateurs de documents d'archives. Je tiens en outre à exprimer ma gratitude aux distingués invités qui ont participé aux célébrations de notre centenaire.
L'archiviste fédéral,
Wilfred I. Smith
J DIRECTION DE
LA GESTION
DES DOCUMENTS
Le Décret sur les documents pubUcs (C.P. 1966-
1749, en date du 9 septembre 1966) autorise la
Direction de la gestion des
documents à assurer un
service complet aux ministères et organismes gouvernementaux dont les
bureaux sont situés à Ottawa et dans les grands centres urbains du Canada: installations d'entreposage et de consultation d'archives; conseils et assistance en matière de
conservation et d'élimination des documents; cours de formation; rédaction de
recueils de normes et de manuels de gestion des documents; relevés des documents;
vérifications et évaluations; assistance dans d'autres domaines connexes à la gestion
des documents.
La Direction a connu, en 1972-1973, une année de grandes transformations: mutations de personnel, réorganisation des fonctions et responsabilités, créations de nouveUes sous-sections à Ottawa et dans les diverses régions. Cette année coïncida aussi
avec le premier anniversaire du dépôt des archives de Vancouver.
2 La Dbection comprend trois divisions: le Dépôt central des Archives d'Ottawa; la
Division des dépôts régionaux; et la Division de la gestion des documents.
Le tableau I donne la ventilation des fonds de tous les dépôts d'archives de la
Dbection de la gestion des documents.
TABLEAU I
Fonds de la Dbection de la gestion des documents au 31 mars 1973
Dépôts d'archives
Pieds cubes
de documents
Rayonnage occupé
(arrondi au mille)
Ottawa
528 648
100
Toronto
121 137
23
Montréal
102 099
19
Vancouver
30 853
6
Total
782 737
148
DIVISION DU
DÉPÔT CENTRAL DES
ARCHIVES D'OTTAWA
Cette année, le Dépôt central d'Ottawa a reçu
65 160 pieds cubes de documents au sujet desquels U a dû répondre à un nombre record de
187 281 demandes de renseignements, soit une
moyenne de plus de 15 600 demandes par mois.
Pour ce qui est des dossiers du personnel, ce fut également une année record: on a
traité 282 866 dossiers individuels, tant civils que mtiitabes.
fi   Cette division, en date du 1" avril 1972, a été remaniée et divisée en trois sections, dont deux portent le nom de dépôt: le Dépôt des documents généraux, le Dépôt
L 4 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
des archives des Forces canadiennes et le Service des dossiers du personnel. Les sections ont arrêté des méthodes de déclaration et l'on a dû remanier considérablement
les méthodes en vigueur, tâche qui n'est pas encore tout à fait terminée. L'an prochain,
le travail portera sur l'établissement d'indicateurs de rendements pour le dépôt des
archives des Forces canadiennes et l'on espère en tirer des normes significatives.
On trouvera au tableau II les chiffres se rapportant aux activités de la Division.
DÉPÔT DES DOCUMENTS GÉNÉRAUX—Acquisitions—Étant donné les problèmes
causés par la réorganisation, on n'a pu encourager vraiment l'utilisation des installations du Dépôt. La plus grande partie du temps étant consacrée à répondre aux
demandes de renseignements, il a également été impossible de solliciter de nouveaux
documents. Le total normal des acquisitions a donc très peu augmenté (1 100 pieds
cubes), si l'on excepte les documents du Dépôt des archives mtiitabes de guerre acquis
l'an dernier. Parmi les acquisitions, on compte également 914 pieds cubes de documents de l'Organisation des mesures d'urgence à mettre en sûreté et 3 773 pieds cubes
de dossiers du personnel civil et militaire. Des dispositions ont été prises pour opérer
le transfert, au Dépôt des Archives, des dossiers microfilmés du personnel du ministère
des Postes et de la Défense nationale. Nous avons reçu pour la première fois des documents du Conseil des sciences du Canada et du bureau de l'Auditeur général.
Consultation—Le nombre d'heures de recherches a décliné de 136 hemes cette année.
Notre plus important client a été le Revenu national (27 991 demandes) suivi de la
Société canadienne d'habitation et de logement (S.C.H.L.) avec 25 300 demandes et
du ministère des Approvisionnements et Services (15 299).
Les demandes de consultation des dossiers généraux se sont accrues de 17 945,
surtout du fait de l'augmentation des demandes (12 000) de la Division des impôts
du Revenu national qui travaillait sur les T-2 (impôts des sociétés) et en raison de
10 000 demandes supplémentaires de la Société centrale d'hypothèques et de logement, dont la plus grande partie était des appels concernant des dossiers de prêts
presque entièrement payés.
Le nombre des insertions a également diminué de 14 899, surtout pour des
raisons de changements de procédure de la part de la Société centrale d'hypothèques
et de logement, ce qui a entraîné une baisse totale de 12 638.
Éliminations—Aucun retard dans l'élimination des papiers de rebut. En ce qui concerne
les papiers portant une cote, la situation est plus difficile et nous multiplions nos efforts
pour résoudre ce problème.
Transferts—On a renvoyé 1 113 pieds cubes de documents aux ministères d'origine
pour qu'Us y soient conservés ou réexaminés et envoyé 4 610 pieds cubes à la Section
des archives fédérales de la Dbection des archives historiques.
Déplacements—Nous avons été obligés de libérer la section d'entreposage du Centre
d'informatique. Les documents qui y étaient emmagasinés ont été déménagés à l'annexe
du Dépôt central, ce qui a nécessité de nombreux réaménagements.
L'inventaire—On a consacré beaucoup de temps à dresser un inventaire complet des
fonds du Dépôt des documents généraux. Grâce à cet inventaire, on a pu établir un
répertobe exact des acquisitions des pièces et documents de chaque ministère, répertobe qui sera nus à jour annuellement au moyen des chiffres des rapports mensuels
du Bureau de gestion des documents. DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
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5|Ji RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Plusieurs réunions avec des représentants du ministère des Approvisionnements
et Services nous ont permis d'apporter des solutions satisfaisantes aux problèmes de la
fréquence des transferts de documents, de la dimension des boîtes de chèques et du
recyclage des papiers de rebut. À la demande de ce ministère, nous avons étudié les méthodes de conservation des documents des services ministériels du ministère. Nous
avons proposé diverses recommandations visant à améliorer leurs méthodes de gestion des documents. Nous avons aussi étudié avec des représentants du ministère de
la Santé et du Bien-être social et nous nous sommes entendus pour faire entreposer
dans des contenants spécialement conçus à cet effet les films miniatures du Bureau de
la radioprotection.
Il nous a aussi été possible de fournir des services de déménagement à la Direction de l'administration et au Bureau de gestion des documents et de faire traiter par
fumigation quelque 200 pieds cubes de documents.
DÉPÔT DES ARCHIVES DES FORCES CANADBENNES—Ce dépôt a été créé en
1971, par suite du transfert des Archives miUtaires à la Dbection de la gestion des
documents des Archives publiques. La réorganisation entreprise alors s'est réalisée
sans interruption de service. Un certain nombre de lettres circulaires ont été établies
en vue d'améliorer le service et les délais de correspondance sont passés d'un mois
à trois jours au maximum. Les secteurs où existent des problèmes d'accès ou d'intrusion sont identifiés et la situation sera normalisée avec les ministères d'origine et
les usagers à une date ultérieure.
On a tenu des réunions avec le personnel des archives de la Défense nationale
pour étudier les problèmes immédiats; ainsi, on a pu rédube de beaucoup les insertions
et éliminer beaucoup de travail superflu.
SECTION DES SYSTÈMES DE DOSSIERS DU PERSONNEL—À cette section sont
traités les dossiers du personnel civil aussi bien que ceux du personnel militaire. Pour
l'année financière 1972-73, le nombre de dossiers traités a atteint le chiffre de 282 866,
soit une augmentation de 139 960 sur l'année précédente. Il s'agit de 182 693 dossiers de
démobilisation en temps de guerre et de licenciements courants (traitement automatisé),
de 59 153 dossiers de forces de réserves et de 41 020 dossiers de personnel civil. Les
chiffres des dossiers du personnel se décompose comme suit:
Dossiers du personnel civil
1972-1973
1971-1972
Augmentation
ou diminution
Demandes
10 913
8 919
+1 994
Insertions
12 414
45 452
-33 038
Hemes de recherches
1 622
2 278
-656
Dossiers personnels traités
41 020
50 177
-9 157
l_
Services automatisés—Le 1" septembre 1972, les travaux commencèrent; on s'occupa
des Ucenciements de 1971 des forces régulières, puis de ceux de la Seconde Guerre
mondiale et enfin, de ceux de l'ARC. Depuis, nous avons traité 21 526 dossiers des
forces régulières et 161 167 de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et de l'ARC.
Pochettes à dossiers—Ayant éprouvé quelques difficultés à obtenir des pochettes à
dossiers, nous avons dû suspendre le traitement pendant quelque temps. Il n'y eut toutefois aucune perte de temps, puisque, au cours de cette période, nos mécanographes ont DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
converti 35 220 fiches «Soundex» des forces régulières antérieures à 1971 pour les
adapter à la perforatrice. Nous espérons convertir éventuellement tout l'index des forces
régulières en fiches perforées. Nous avons conçu un nouveau genre de pochette à dossiers qui coûte 13.5 cents contre 26.9 cents antérieurement, et nous avons épargné ainsi
$48 000 cette année seulement.
Enveloppe économique—Nous avons conçu une enveloppe économique pour conserver
! les archives des forces de réserve. L'utilisation de cette enveloppe représentera une
économie considérable tant en frais de production qu'en frais de main-d'œuvre.
I Archives microfilmées—Sur le plan des archives microfilmées, nouveau domaine pour
nous, nous avons fait l'acquisition cette année de 1 500 bobines du ministère des Postes
et de celui de la Défense nationale.
Service de soutien et d'intégration des dossiers—Cette sous-section a complété l'inté-
| gration de 33 624 pieds cubes de dossiers et consacré 8 125 heures de soutien aux
| autres sous-sections. Outre ses fonctions normales, le personnel de la sous-section a:
trié, classé et inséré 138 129 feuilles de paye reçues de 28 bases militaires au pays; filtré
et trié 2 385 pieds cubes de documents et les a groupés selon le genre de service;
| acheminé à la Section des archives fédérales tous les documents sur l'invasion des
! Fenians et la rébellion du Nord-Ouest; démonté puis rassemblé 2 500 pieds linéaires
de rayons pour entreposer les archives des bibliothèques médicales.
Formation—Dans l'ensemble, 20 semaines-hommes ont été consacrées à la formation
de cadres supérieurs et 16 semâmes à celle de cadres moyens de la division.
I DIVISION ^a division des dépôts régionaux a trois fonctions principales
rjtfc  Tlï^p/YTG        correspondant à peu près à celles qu'on attribuait, dans les
^ .^        paragraphes précédents, à la Division du dépôt central des
I KIlivrlONAlJX        archives d'Ottawa. Ces divisions ne diffèrent en effet que
par leur situation géographique et la nature des documents
i qui leur sont confiés. Elles ont pour fonctions de:
Loger à bon marché les documents ministériels inactifs appartenant aux catégories
«généralités» ou «matières» (à l'exclusion des dossiers du personnel), dans les régions
où se trouvent les principaux champs d'action métropolitains du gouvernement fédéral.
Fournir aux ministères un service complet de références sur les documents d'intérêt
local (par opposition à la documentation intéressant le Dépôt central) conservés par
les dépôts régionaux.
Assurer la destruction des archives périmées ou mutiles, en les déchiquetant, enliassant,
incinérant, ou encore en les remettant à des entrepreneurs privés, afin de libérer les
locaux pour d'autres documents.
GénéraUtés—Tandis que l'année financière 1972-1973 voyait l'expansion rapide du
nouveau Dépôt d'archives de Vancouver, la préparation des plans des dépôts de Winnipeg et d'Halifax se poursuivait sans relâche. Nous prévoyons maintenant que les
dépôts de Winnipeg et d'Halifax ouvriront leurs portes au cours de l'année financière
1973-1974.
Les ministères  deviennent de plus en plus exigeants en matière  de services,
même pour leurs bureaux situés dans les régions où U n'existe encore aucun dépôt. 8 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
C'est là un indice des plus favorables à la création de nouveaux dépôts. De fait, nous
avons déjà commencé à envisager la construction d'un centre régional à Edmonton
qui desservbait au moins toute la province d'Alberta, là où un sondage antérieur
indiquait clabement qu'un dépôt d'archives y serait viable. On trouvera au tableau UI
des données statistiques relatives aux divers dépôts régionaux.
DÉPÔT RÉGIONAL DE TORONTO—Ce dépôt a fait l'acquisition de 33 731 pieds
cubes, soit le chiffre le plus élevé jamais atteint à Toronto et qui représente une augmentation de 61% sur le total de l'année 1971-1972.
Les demandes de consultation ont atteint un nouveau sommet de 151 061, soit une
augmentation de 59 368 par rapport au total de 1971-1972. L'élimination des documents est passée de 13 067 pieds cubes à 28 990, soit une augmentation de 100%
par rapport à l'année précédente. Quelque 223 tonnes de papier ont été déchiquetées,
enliassées et vendues $31 la tonne, contre $20 en 1971-1972. Les fonds ont atteint
121 137 pieds cubes en 1972-1973, malgré le volume des documents détruits. Le
nombre de ministères, d'organismes et de sociétés de la Couronne desservis est passé
de 17 à 19.
Le dépôt a eu, en outre, l'occasion de recevoir des visiteurs du Nigeria ainsi que
des fonctionnaires canadiens s'intéressant à la gestion des documents. À la suite de la
visite de nombreux ministères clients, deux autres organismes, Ab Canada et Radio-
Canada, sont venus s'ajouter au nombre des usagers.
On estime, en se fondant sur la croissance et la diversité de la demande, que les
instaUations d'entreposage actueUes pourraient être saturées en 1974-1975.
DÉPÔT RÉGIONAL DE MONTRÉAL—Au cours de l'année financière 1972-1973, le
dépôt régional de Montréal a fait l'acquisition de 24 197 pieds cubes de documents,
a répondu à un chiffre record de 187 018 demandes, et a éliminé 29 542 pieds cubes
de documents. Le volume des documents à la fin de l'année s'établissait à 102 099 pieds
cubes et le dépôt comptait 13 employés à plein temps. À la fin de l'année finandère
1972-1973, le dépôt comptait 12 000 pieds cubes d'espace d'entreposage disponible.
Les 25 000 entrées prévues pour l'année 1973-1974 laisseront approximativement
7 000 pieds cubes d'espace disponible avant la fin de l'année finandère 1973-1974.
Il importe, par conséquent, de suivre de près la situation au dépôt de Montréal. On
envisage également de réunb tous les services du dépôt sous un même toit, en vue
d'assurer une meilleure répartition de l'espace, une utilisation maximale de tous les
secteurs accessibles, et, ainsi, de regrouper l'ensemble des opérations. Les champs
d'activités de son chef étaient multiples: organisation de séminaires, conférences à
l'extérieur et pourparlers avec l'Université de Montréal relativement à la possibitité
d'étabUssement d'un cours de gestion des documents pour le ministère provincial de
l'Éducation. Ses visites aux ministères environnants ont eu comme résultat de pouvob
desservir deux nouveaux ministères, ce qui porte à 24 le nombre total de ministères
et organismes desservis.
DÉPÔT RÉGIONAL DE VANCOUVER—Au début de l'année finandère 1972-1973,
le dépôt de Vancouver fonctionnait normalement. Nonobstant certains inconvénients, I
attribuables à diverses causes, le dépôt de Vancouver a acquis 30 853 pieds cubes de
documents, a répondu à 38 300 demandes et placé 4 943 insertions. Le chef a aussi
eu l'occasion de rencontrer des représentants officiels des Archives provinciales de la
Colombie-Britannique, des Archives municipales de Vancouver, et des Archives nationales des États-Unis. DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
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BUREAU DE  GESTION ** Bureau de ^ûon des documents
(autrefois appelé Division des services
DES DOCUMENTS,
consultatifs) est né de la réorganisa-
DIVISION DES SERVICES tion complète de la Dbection de 1
gestion des documents qui a eu lieu en
1972-1973. La Division comprend deux sections: vérification, formation et inventaire,
et vérification, normes et distribution.
Le Bureau de gestion des documents, Division des services, a pour fonction de
promouvob le recours aux centres de dépôt par les ministères et organismes du gouvernement pour des raisons d'efficacité et d'économie et de déterminer, par suite de
ses recherches et inventaires de la situation nationale, s'il y a Ueu de créer de nouveaux dépôts d'archives au Canada.
La Division a pour fonctions essentielles les activités suivantes:
Tableaux de conservation des documents—Aider les ministères à établir des tableaux de
conservation des documents, les étudier et en assurer l'application, et faire des recommandations à l'Archiviste fédéral en matière d'élimination des documents.
Inventabe et vérification—Tenir l'inventaire des fonds, du matériel et du personnel;
examiner et vérifier les modes de gestion des documents des ministères; rédiger des
rapports pour les ministères, l'Archiviste fédéral et le ConseU du trésor.
Service consultatif—Assurer aux ministères un service consultatif en matière de gestion
des documents et les aider à améliorer leurs méthodes de gestion.
Cours de formation—Diriger des cours périodiques de formation en matière de gestion
des documents à l'intention du personnel des ministères et organismes; et, par divers
moyens, assurer l'enseignement des méthodes de gestion des documents.
PubUcations—Rédiger et pubUer des manuels et des guides à l'usage des ministères
pour établir et appliquer des méthodes et des normes uniformes de gestion des documents.
Archives essentieUes—Assurer la mise en œuvre du programme fédéral de protection
des archives essentieUes contre les catastrophes nucléaires ou naturelles.
Élimination des documents—Assurer l'élimination finale de tous les documents conservés
au dépôt d'archives d'Ottawa.
Les principales fonctions de la division sont exposées ci-dessous, par sujet, mais
non nécessairement par ordre d'importance.
Examen des propositions de conservation, d'élimination et de microfilmage—En 1961,
les Archives pubUques se sont chargées de l'examen des demandes concernant l'établissement de tableaux de conservation, d'élimination et de microfilmage de documents.
Bien que le nombre de demandes de microfilmage ait augmenté de moitié au
cours de l'année, le nombre de tableaux de conservation proposés a diminué; ce fait
révèle que la préparation des tableaux, imposée aux ministères par le Décret sur tes
documents pubUcs, est presque terminée.
Plus de 90% des ministères ou autres organismes décrits aux annexes A et B,
ou l'équivalent, de la Loi sur l'administration financière ont terminé leurs tableaux
de conservation des documents d'exploitation, contre environ 35% des ministères au
1" mai 1969. D'après nos études, si l'on mesure le volume des documents en pieds
cubes, plus de 85% de tous les fonds de ces mêmes ministères figurent dans les tableaux de conservation. DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
■ Le tableau TV indique le nombre de propositions reçues au cours de la période
de 12 ans allant de 1961 à 1973.
TABLEAU D7
Nombre de
tableaux de
conservation
ou d'élimination
Nombre de Nombre
demandes de cumulatif
Période
proposés
microfilmage*
de demandes
861-1971 (mars)
567
110
677
Bh-1972
50
28
755
1972-1973
40
41
836
Total des 12 années
657
179
836
'Comprend aussi les propositions touchant le matériel de microfilmage, de 1961 à 1966 inclusivement.
Documents inactifs—Il incombe au Bureau de gestion des documents d'appliquer les
tableaux d'élimination approuvés aux documents ministériels inactifs conservés aux
Archives publiques.
k Le tableau V ci-dessous indique le volume de documents éliminés au dépôt
d'archives d'Ottawa (documents généraux et dossiers du personnel) pour les années
précisées. Le volume total des documents éliminés entre 1956 et le 31 mars 1973
s'élève à 401 094 pieds cubes, soit plus que ne peut en contenir le dépôt principal
d'Ottawa et assez pour remplir près de 76 milles de rayonnage.
Dépôt d'archives d'Ottawa
Pieds cubes de documents éliminés, de 1956 au 31 mars 1973*
Période
Documents
généraux
Dossiers
du
personnel
Total
annuel
Total
pour
cinq ans
Total
cumulatif
1956-1960
21 091
153
—
21 244
21 244
1961-1965
92 401
1 617
—
94 018
115 262
1966-1972*
(mars)
207 316
2 707
—
210 023
325 285
&71-1972
37 001
465
37 466
—
362 751
«72-1973
38 274
69
38 343
—
401 094
Total pour
es 17 années
396 083
5 011
—
—
401 094
PubUcations et directives relatives à la gestion des documents—Le Bureau de gestion
des documents envisage maintenant de publier, paraUèlement au General Records
Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada (dossiers internes seulement), un
tableau de conservation pour les documents d'exploitation; ainsi, les ministères nouvellement créés ou en voie de réorganisation pourront immédiatement utiliser un plan
déjà établi. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Au cours de l'année, le Bureau de gestion des documents a publié bon nombre
de révisions et de traductions, comme on peut le vob au tableau suivant (tableau VI)
TABLEAU VI
PubUcations du bureau de gestion des documents
Titre de la publication
General Records Disposai
Schedules of the Goi
of Canada
Mail Management in
Government Departments
and Agencies
Records Scheduling and
Disposai
Records Organization
and Operations
Essential  Records  for
Industry
Traduction et définitio
des termes employés
dans la gestion des
documents
Détails
Réimpression révisée et publiée par les soins du Bureau
de gestion des documents. L'édition française de cette
pubUcation est prévue pour la fin de l'année financière
1973-1974.
La révision de cette pubUcation, ainsi que sa traduction
sont prévues pour l'année financière c
La traduction française de ce manuel est complétée <
sera pubUée au cours de l'année financière courante.
En cours de traduction en français.
Rédigée par la division et pubUée pour le compte du
ministère de la Production de défense en 1964, cette
brochure a été révisée et mise à jour par la division pour
le compte de la Division des plans d'aménagement industriel d'urgence du ministère des Approvisionnements et
Services. Ce dernier se chargera, en 1973, de la publication de cet ouvrage, en anglais et en français.
Cette brochure, fondée sur l'appendice B de la pubUcation «Records Organization and Operations* a été préparée conjointement par l'Institut de gestion des documents, le Conseil consultatif des Archives publiques et
les Archives pubUques du Canada. Cet ouvrage s'est
avéré des plus précieux lorsqu'il s'est agi de traduire
d'autres pubUcations sur la gestion des documents.
Formulaires pour la gestion des documents—La Division a assuré le service de secrétariat pour le Conseil consultatif des Archives pubUques. Un sous-comité du ConseU
a collaboré étroitement avec l'Office des normes du gouvernement canadien à la mise
au point de formulaires normalisés pour les services ministériels de documents. Ainsi,
seize formulaires ont reçu l'approbation du groupe de travaU, tandis que quelques
autres feront l'objet d'études. Grâce à l'usage de ces formulaires, on prévoit réaliser
des économies appréciables.
Formation—La division a organisé deux séries de cours (n0* 18 et 19) de quatre
semaines chacune sur la gestion des documents. Y ont pris part 59 personnes, dont
41 de l'administration centrale du ministère, 12 des bureaux régionaux, 3 des gouvernements provinciaux, et 3 stagiaires étrangers sous l'égide de l'Agence canadienne de
développement international. En outre, la division a délégué des spécialistes à des
cours de gestion des documents offerts par les ministères et a dirigé plusieurs séminaires
à la demande de certains ministères.
Archives essentielles—Les archives essentielles à la poursuite des affaires de l'État en
cas de catastrophe nucléaire ou naturelle atteignent maintenant un volume total de
8 400 pieds cubes, soit une baisse de 2 000 pieds cubes, grâce à une élimination con- DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
sidérable de documents. Les installations d'entreposage ont subi des améliorations qui
permettent d'assurer un metileur contrôle de l'humidité et de la température pour
l'emmagasinage de bandes magnétiques et de microfUms inactifs.
Programmes ministériels et autres travaux—Les Archives pubUques, aux termes du
décret sur les documents pubUcs, doivent s'assurer que les ministères possèdent la
documentation voulue pour bien appuyer leurs politiques et leurs programmes. En
outre, les ministères sollicitent souvent l'aide et les conseils des Archives publiques
lorsqu'ils font face à des problèmes de gestion des documents. Par conséquent, le
Bureau de gestion des documents a participé activement au cours de l'année à divers
projets intéressant les ministères: il a organisé des sondages et rédigé des rapports;
élaboré de nouveaux systèmes de classification ou révisé les anciens; mis au point des
manuels de procédure; fait des sondages sur la gestion du courrier et joué le rôle de
conseiller en matière d'organisation de services de documents, de dotation en personnel,
de matériel, d'aménagement et de locaux.
Il a accordé son aide au gouvernement de l'île-du-Prince-Édouard afin de mettre
en place un système de recherche de l'information à l'intention du Conseil exécutif
mDvincial.
K Enfin, U a consacré beaucoup de temps et d'énergie au comité des documents automatisés des Archives pubUques qui étudie le rôle des Archives publiques dans le domaine des archives automatisées; il a aussi collaboré avec le ConseU du trésor à
l'élaboration des divers principes directeurs sur le traitement électronique des données.
Le tableau VII ci-dessous indique l'aide technique fournie aux ministères sur une période de six années financières:
TABLEAU VH
Aide technique fournie aux ministères et organismes
1967-1968
1968-1969
1969-1970
1970-1971
1971-1972
1972-1973 Total
Projets mineurs        9
11
11
9
9
9            58
Projets moyens         1
2
2
3
6
8            22
Projets d'envergure —
-
2
1
1
1              5
Nombre total
de projets                 10
13
15
13
16
18            85
Légende: Projet mineur:
Projet moyen:
Projet d'envergure:
d'au plus 30 jours
de 31 à 100 jours
de plus de 100 jours
Remarques d'ordre général—Parmi les principaux projets de la Division pour l'année
qui vient, citons: (a) les résultats des études dans le domaine des archives automatisées;
(b) la traduction en français de diverses publications, directives, etc., sur la gestion des
documents; (c) l'élaboration et la présentation d'un cours de gestion des documents
en langue française; (d) la rédaction là où la chose est possible, de manuels supplémentaires dans les domaines des documents d'exploitation, de la classification et des
I tableaux de conservation.  r~
DIRECTION
DES ARCHIVES
HISTORIQUES
L'année écoulée a permis à la
Direction des archives historiques
de faire le point sur son passé et
son avenir. En effet, nous avons,
d'une part, jeté un regard rétrospectif sur les 100 ans de croissance soutenue que l'exposition et
le catalogue Archives: miroir du
passé du Canada ont en partie com-
| mémorés; d'autre part, nous anticipons un brillant avenir pour la Division des archives
I nationales du film et la Division des archives fédérales, sans compter que nous pré-
i voyons mettre l'informatique au service des archives et lancer un programme de dif-
I fusion qui aura pour effet de mettre nos ressources à la portée d'un plus grand nombre
de personnes et dans une présentation plus attrayante qu'auparavant.
j Le programme de diffusion—Par ce programme, la Direction donne suite à la volonté
j du Secrétariat d'État de diffuser, autant qu'il est possible, les richesses culturelles de la
j nation. Bien sûr, il n'y a rien de neuf dans cette volonté de diffusion. Les publications,
I les expositions et les prêts de microfibns entre bibliothèques sont choses courantes
I depuis plusieurs années. Mais le nouveau programme est un véritable programme de
i vulgarisation à quatre volets:
B1.  Petites  expositions  suffisamment mobiles  pour pouvob circuler partout au
JH   Canada. Les pièces originales ne seront montrées que dans les grands musées et
■   les principales galeries, contrairement aux copies et aux fac-similés, qui feront
l'objet d'une plus large diffusion.
2. Dépôt dans les Archives des dix provinces de copies microfilmées des papiers
des anciens premiers ministres et des instruments de recherche afférents, ainsi
que d'archives publiques et d'instruments de recherche récemment microfilmés.
qui présentent un intérêt particulier pour les différentes régions du Canada
exemple, registres d'immigration pour les provinces des Prairies, articles divers sut
le Haut-Canada pour l'Ontario, documents seigneuriaux pour le Québec). Le
format cinématographique du nouveau microfUm sera de 16 mm; un microlecteur, expédié à chacune des provinces, viendra compléter le matériel déjà en place.
3. PubUcation d'une série de volumes (dont quelques-uns sont parus à l'occasion
d'une exposition), précédés chacun d'une brève introduction présentant un texte
cursif agrémenté d'illustrations, le tout dans une forme attrayante pour le lecteur
qui s'intéresse à l'histobe et à ses archives sans toutefois vouloir être enseveli sous
des monceaux de notes et de commentaires.
4. PubUcation de répertoires de cartes et plans selon des thèmes choisis, tels que
levés ou cartes topographiques de cantons ou de comtés, vues à vol d'oiseau, etc.,
accompagnés d'illustrations et de microfilms.
La participation des divisions à ce programme sera flexible et pourra varier d'une
Iannée à l'autre. Le programme de diffusion veut éveiller l'intérêt du chercheur au
[moyen de microfilms et d'instruments de recherche; il s'adresse aussi à l'amateur, par
la publication de textes et d'illustrations, et au grand public, par le biais des expositions.
IU faut espérer que le dépôt de microfilms dans les Archives provinciales permette aux
15 16 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
chercheurs d'étudier les richesses des Archives publiques du Canada dans le contexte
des sources provinciales, sans qu'ils aient à se rendre d'abord à Ottawa. Et même,
pourquoi ne trouverait-il pas de plus en plus d'instruments de recherche, en provenance
des provinces, dans les Archives publiques du Canada pour répondre aux besoins particuliers et du personnel et des chercheurs?
Les archives et l'informatique—Depuis quelque temps déjà, il appert que le dernier-né
de la famille des archives, la gestion électronique des documents, ait été quelque peu
négligé, pour ne pas dire plus.
Cette année, la Direction des archives historiques a entrepris de reconstituer des
séries de données et des registres de codes à partir des données brutes, enregistrées
sur cartes perforées, pour la Commission royale d'enquête sur le bilinguisme et le biculturaUsme. Il est tout de suite apparu évident qu'en plus de ses lacunes, ce vaste champ
d'information présentait de graves défectuosités matérielles imperceptibles à l'œil nu
(par exemple, toute carte perforée, légèrement déformée est automatiquement rejetée
par l'ordinateur). Et il s'agissait de renseignements uniques, inestimables pour toute
étude comparative, et perdus à jamais.
Michael Carroll, détaché de l'ancienne Section des archives fédérales, a été mis
à la disposition du bureau du directeur pour surveiller ce projet et représenter la
Direction au sein du groupe d'études chargé d'élaborer des dbectives générales sur la
gestion électronique des documents, équipe qui a déjà produit plusieurs projets de
rapports d'une grande portée. Les documents électroniques, ayant une valeur permanente, seront probablement transférés, le moment venu, à une Division des archives
électroniques. Ainsi, après avoir étendu son activité à toutes les formes d'archives, la
Direction pourra ensuite faire de l'application de l'holographie sa nouveUe conquête!
Le cours d'archives—1972—Les treize étudiants inscrits ont tous suivi le cours avec
succès, du 5 septembre au 6 octobre. Donné avec l'appui des Archives pubUques et de
la Section des archives de la Société historique du Canada, le cours devait permettre
à ceux qui avaient au moins une année d'expérience comme archiviste d'acquérir une
connaissance générale des principes des archives et des méthodes administratives.
Après six jours «d'immersion» dans les diverses divisions des Archives publiques,
les stagiaires se sont réunis en séminaires comme par les années passées. De cette façon,
ils ont eu l'occasion de saisir les contrastes et les similitudes entre les différentes techniques et de prendre conscience de la corrélation qui existe entre les diverses formes
d'archives, prises au sens large de moyens d'information. Le cours s'est terminé par
un examen. Michael Carroll en était le coordonnateur.
L'avenir—Un coup d'œil sur les rapports des divisions révèle que la Direction est
engagée très avant dans un réseau de programmes aussi bien nouveaux qu'andens.
Quelques-uns des rapports sont relativement brefs, mais il ne faut pas en conclure à
un manque de rendement. En effet, le programme est parfois si bien connu qu'il peut
se passer de description, ou encore il est trop récent pour pouvob être disséqué et
expliqué clairement.
La Division des gravures et photos s'est particulièrement mise en valeur cette
année, après avoir longuement mûri des projets qui ont finalement porté des fruits dans
de nombreux secteurs d'activité. Ainsi, elle est maintenant mieux outtilée pour répondre
aux exigences croissantes du public, pourvu évidemment que la conservation et la
reprographie puissent suivre le rythme. DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
17
On a craint que la Dbection n'aille trop loin, trop vite et dans trop de directions
à la fois mais, en fait, nous sommes unis dans un même élan naturel, ralenti durant
les quatre-vingt-quinze premières années des Archives publiques, puis de plus en plus
accéléré ces cinq dernières années.
L'époque est révolue ob chaque division pouvait sans inquiétude poursuivre son
propre objectif sans souci de coordination avec les autres divisions. L'instauration de
nouveaux programmes, tels le programme national d'acquisition systématique (PNAS)
de la Division des manuscrits, a amené les archivistes à entrer en contact avec des
média qui leur étaient étrangers, de même qu'à s'intéresser de plus en plus au travail
des autres divisions. Entre-temps la clientèle des Archives publiques se renouvelait et
ses demandes débordaient les frontières de toutes les divisions, ces dernières ne pouvant plus y satisfaire individuellement. Nous tâchons dorénavant de résoudre globalement les multiples problèmes que pose, aux Archives nationales, leur engagement de
plus en plus total dans le domaine de l'information et de la conservation.
g Notre but ultime ne devrait être rien moins que l'identification, l'accessibilité, la
préparation, pour les chercheurs, de tous les documents d'origine canadienne, où qu'Us
se trouvent. Pour ce faire, nous comptons sur la collaboration des dépôts reconnus, nos
associés pour la garde des documents, mais nous prendrons l'initiative de déterminer
les instruments de recherche, de miniaturiser et de distribuer des copies de nos documents et de venb en aide aux dépôts plus modestes, qui pourraient manquer de personnel spécialisé, afin d'examiner et d'évaluer leurs collections. De plus en plus nous
aurons l'obligation de diffuser l'information par le biais des pubUcations et des expositions, de la bande vidéo et du montage télévisuel, de la cassette et du terminal à
accès direct, pour mettre à la disposition des chercheurs tout le passé récupérable.
DIVISION DES
MANUSCRITS
Le volume du travail de la Division a de nouveau augmenté en 1972, du fait de l'accroissement de ses attributions. Les demandes de renseignements, de références, de
prêts de microfilms et les acquisitions ont été beaucoup
Buis élevées qu'en 1971.
Le programme national d'acquisition systématique a été particulièrement florissant.
De vastes coUections de papiers, ayant appartenu à des particuliers ou à des sociétés,
sont entrées dans les diverses sections: archives artistiques, commerciales, des groupes
ethniques, du travail, judiciaires, médicales et scientifiques, mtiitabes, des affaires publiques et des sports.
La Division a pubUé deux autres volumes de l'Inventaire général: le volume 4
(MG 22 à 25) et le volume 5 (MG 26 et 27).
La fin de l'année financière correspond également à une restructuration en profondeur de la Division. La Section des archives fédérales est devenue une division à
part entière et la réorganisation de la Section des archives postérieures à la Confédération tiendra compte de la diversité de ses fonctions et de ses attributions.
SECTION DES ARCHIVES ANTÉRIEURES À LA CONFÉDÉRATION—Comme
par le passé, la mise à jour des inventaires a occupé la majeure partie de l'année. La
série MG 22 à 25 a été mise en forme et pubUée au cours de l'hiver 1972, constituant
ainsi le volume 4 de l'Inventaire général. La pubUcation du volume 3, comprenant la
série MG 17 à 21, est prévue pour l'été 1973, et ceUe du volume 2, comprenant la
série MG 11 à 16, pour l'automne 1973. On pense terminer, au cours de l'hiver 1973,
la dernière phase du programme, à savob les séries RG 1, 4 et 5. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
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19
E Des instruments de recherche ont été dressés pour un grand nombre de nos collections, nouvelles et anciennes. On a profité de la mise à jour des inventaires pour
compléter les instruments de recherche des papiers Askin (MG 19, A 3), de la collection Ermatinger (MG 19, A 2) 3), des papiers Hargrove (MG 19, A 21), des papiers
Claus (MG 19, F 1), des papiers Selkirk (MG 19, E I), des papiers de l'American
Fur Company (MG 19, B 2), et des papiers du Quartier génSral britannique (MG 23,
B 1). Grâce à ces amétiorations, on a constaté une augmentation sensible de l'utilisation de plusieurs collections, notamment des papiers du Quartier général britannique.
De nouveUes acquisitions, inscrites dans les instruments de recherche appropriés ont
été versées dans un grand nombre de coUections dont les archives des FrSres moraves
(MG 19, D 1), du séminaire de Saint-Sulpice (MG 17, A 7-2), et des Oblats de
fMarie-ImmacuIée (MG 17, A 17), les sources sur les biens des jésuites (FA. 429),
la collection Kupp (MG 18, O 12), et les papiers d'Abraham Joseph (MG 24, I 61)
et de Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine (MG 24, B 14).
Au nombre des fonds anciens pour lesquels on a dressé de nouveaux instruments
de recherche se trouvent les papiers de Joshua S harpe (MG 23, I 13), de James
Anderson (MG 19, A 29), et d'Edward Walsh (MG 19, F 10), la coUection Masson
(MG 19, C 1), les papiers de Ludger Duvernay (MG 24, C 3) et ceux de la famille
Amherst (MG 18, L 4). On a aussi dressé un index sur fiches des documents relatifs
aux demandes de commissions de notaires et d'avocats du Bas-Canada, 1760-1841,
(RG 4, B 8).
Les instruments de recherche établis pour les nouveaux fonds comprennent des
répertoires descriptifs pour les papiers de sir James William Montgomery (MG 23,
E 6) et de John Forrest (MG 24, I 158), les archives financières du commandement de
la Nouvelle-Ecosse (MG 9, B 12), les registres paroissiaux de la paroisse Sainte-
Famille de Boucherville (MG 8, G 4), les archives seigneuriales se trouvant dans la
collection Mackay-Papineau (MG 24, I 160), les papiers de Nicholas Sparks (MG 24,
I 40), d'Henry Dives Townshend (MG 24, F 87), d'Henry Elliott, père et fils, (MG 28,
ID 41), de William Loch (MG 24, D 82) et de Johann Ludwig Tiarks (MG 24, H 64).
Des guides détaillés ont également été étabtis pour la série C 13 B, Louisiane, des
Archives des colonies (MG 1), les coUections Arnoul et Mélanges de Colbert de la
Bibliothèque nationale (MG 7), la série B 1, décisions, des Archives de la marine
(MG 2), et la série C 11 C, volume 7b, possessions britanniques—Terre-Neuve, des
Archives des colonies. On dispose maintenant d'un index de classement pour les
archives de Y Admiralty Pacific Station (RG 8, ID, série B) et des reproductions sur
support rigide des index des volumes 11 à 21 de la série CO 189, registres des entrées
du Nouveau-Brunswick (G 11). On a aussi dressé des catalogues topographiques des
dossiers de correspondance des secrétaires provinciaux du Canada-Est et du Canada-
Ouest, 1841-1867, (RG 4 et 5, série C 1) qui servent d'annexé aux inventaires de ces
groupes.
Il est entré plusieurs documents intéressants et importants au cours de 1972,
mais très peu pour les archives britanniques ou françaises.
ARCHIVES BRITANNIQUES
MG 11 Colonial Office 5: papiers coloniaux, série générale, 1679-1778 (microfUm,
bobines B-3775 à B-3799): extraits tirés des volumes 536-1053, concernant le
New Hampshbe, le New Jersey, l'État de New York, le Connecticut, le Rhode
F   Island, la Pennsylvanie et le Massachusetts.
MG 11    Colonial Office 323: correspondance du secrétabe d'État, 1922-1924 (micro-
W film, bobines B-3751 à B-3755 et B-3763 à B-3774) : tirée des volumes 886-933. 20 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
MG 13 Foreign Office 802: index des séries 5 et 27 du Foreign Office (microfilm,
bobines B-3756 à B-3762).
MG 13 Foreign Office 804: index de la série 27 du Foreign Office (microfibn,
bobine B-3762).
MG 21—Ms. Egerton 259-262: débats de la Chambre des communes, 1774 (microfilm, bobines A-873 et A-874): débats, pétitions, examens des témoins et documents connexes concernant la première et troisième lecture de l'Acte de Québec
accompagnés d'un répertoire des orateurs.
ARCHIVES FRANÇAISES
MG 1, 15 Archives des colonies, série E: dossiers personnels (microfibn, bobines
F-822 à F-827): cartons 82 à 146, Ciraud à Dufossat, 1626-1817.
ARCHIVES CANADIENNES
Début de l'époque coloniale
MG 18, 0 12—Collection Kupp, volumes 5-8 (photocopies, 8 pouces): versement
complémentaire de documents ayant trait à la participation des Hollandais à la
traite des pelleteries et à la pêche à la morue en Amérique du Nord, et à l'influence qu'ils y ont exercée, 1595-1743; copies de papiers notariaux hollandais,
faites par M. Jan Kupp, de Victoria, au Gemeente Archief d'Amsterdam en particulier. Les transcriptions et les traductions anglaises sont interfoUées. Un instrument de recherche détaillé porte le numéro 740.
MG 23, C 25 Anthony Wayne (1745-1796, soldat, fondateur de colonies), 1764-
1771 (originaux, 26 pages; photocopies, 29 pages): correspondance, comptes,
contrats et mémoires ayant trait aux efforts déployés par Anthony Wayne, John
Hughes et plusieurs baUleurs de fonds de PhUadelphie pour encourager la colonisation en Nouvelle-Ecosse. On a ajouté aux documents originaux des photocopies de
documents connexes appartenant à la Historical Society of Philadelphia.
MG 18, N 49 Henry Fox, 1" baron Holland (1705-1774), 1755-1762 (originaux,
118 pages): correspondance, pétitions, rapports et papiers connexes, extraits vraisemblablement des dossiers d'Henry Fox, ayant trait aux affabes de la Vbginie
à l'époque de Robert Dinwiddie, à la stratégie miUtabe, à l'état des fortifications
en Amérique du Nord britannique et à des questions connexes pendant la guerre
entre les Français et les Indiens.
La traite des pelleteries
MG 19, D 8 Fort Kilmaurs, 1826 (original, 55 pages): journal tenu par Wtiliam
Brown au Fort Kilmaurs sur le lac Babine, de mars à juin 1826.
Levés topographiques
MG 24, H 64 Johann Ludwig Tiarks (1789-1837, astronome et mathématicien),
1808-1838 (originaux, 1 pied et 8 pouces): journaux particuUers et correspondance de Johann Ludwig Tiarks; rapports, mémobes, notes et papiers divers se
rapportant surtout à son travail pour la Commission d'abornement étabbe en
vertu du traité de Gand (Maine-Nouveau-Brunswick, New York-Québec et
Ontario-lac des Bois). Il y a lieu de signaler l'intérêt qu'il portait aux langues
indiennes et aux coutumes locales. Une collection de cartes et de plans, comprise dans ce fonds, a été versée à la Division des cartes et plans  Don de ML r
DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
21
Henry F. Tiarks de Foxbury (Angleterre). Ce fonds est un des plus importants
P   qui soit entré aux Archives en 1972. L'instrument de recherche n° 829 offre une
description détaillée de ces papiers.
MG 24, 1 157   Famille Fortune, 1793, 1844 (originaux, 3 pouces): correspondance
■ de William Fortune (vers 1747-1821) et de son fils, Joseph Fortune (vers 1788-
1844), rapports du ministère des Levés et Plans du Haut-Canada, 1793; carnet
i    d'arpentage du township d'Hawkesbury, 1798; et divers comptes rendus, mandats,
*a   commissions et pétitions rassemblés par William et Joseph Fortune au cours de
ug leur carrière d'arpenteur, exercée surtout dans l'Est de l'Ontario. Don de M""
O'Neil d'Ottawa.
Chemins de fer et canaux
MG 24, I 106   Collection Keefer (original, 3A de pouce) : carnet d'ingénieur ayant
W   trait à la construction des écluses et canaux du Saint-Laurent, entre le Long Sault
et Cornwall, et un bordereau des prix des travaux exécutés de 1834 à 1838.
MG 24, E 21     William Hazen (vers 1853-1860, ingénieur des chemins de fer), 1853
i    (original, 113 pages): code de génie civil et de construction de chemins de fer,
dressé par William Hazen.
Archives commerciales
MG 24, D 81    Joseph Masson (1791-1847, homme daffaires), 1830-1847 (originaux,
34 pages) : lettres d'affaires et documents connexes se rapportant aux activités des
maisons auxquelles Joseph Masson était intéressé.
MG 24, I 40    Nicholas Sparks (1792-1862, homme daffaires), 1808-1880 (originaux,
Ë;  1 pied) : baux, obligations, hypothèques, contrats et actes de vente; testaments,
I    certificats de mariage et extraits de baptême; divers autres papiers connexes ayant
I     appartenu à Nicholas Sparks, père, et à sa famille. La collection est décrite en
I    détaU dans l'instrument de recherche n* 804. EUe constitue une excellente source
de renseignements sur les transactions foncières  de Nicholas Sparks,  lors de
l'arrivée des premiers colons à Ottawa. Don de M. J.B.L. Heney d'Ottawa.
MG   24,  D   82    William Loch   (1786-1856,  marchand),   1808-1907   (originaux,   8
■ pouces): correspondance, comptes, actes, obligations et papiers connexes accu-
K    mules par William Loch lorsqu'il était marchand et l'associé d'Archibald Duncan
à Newcastle (N.-B.); correspondance, comptes et papiers connexes de William
L Loch Stuart se rapportant au règlement de la succession de son oncle. Un réper-
f toire détaillé constitue l'instrument de recherche n° 838. Don des héritiers de
I     William Loch Kidston transmis en 1972 par les soins de M. M.L. Wells, de
Weybridge (Angleterre).
MG 28, III 41 Henry Elliott, pSre et fils, (originaux, 4 pieds et 8 pouces) : correspondances, comptes, journaux et documents commerciaux connexes, accumulés
par Henry EUiott (1809-1905) et son fils, Henry Elliott (1835-1915), alors qu'ils
| étaient marchands et maîtres de poste à Hampton (Ont.); comprend aussi de la
correspondance privée et quelques documents ayant trait à l'ordre indépendant des
Templiers et aux Sons of Temperance. L'instrument de recherche n° 817 constitue
une description détaUlée de la coUection.
Colonisation
MG 24,1 160   CoUection Mackay-Papineau (photocopies, 1 pied et 6 pouces): papiers
[     légaux, comptes, rentes seigneuriales, etc. Copiés en 1970 des originaux, possession RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
du Centre de recherches en histoire du Canada français, à Montréal. L'inventaire
(instrument de recherche n" 839) a été préparé sous la direction de Cameron
Nish.
MG 29, E 23 Traver Van Vliet (1800-1890, maître de poste), 1863-1890 (microfilm, bobine M-2302): journal de Traver Van Vliet, maître de poste de LacoUe
(Québec). Copié en 1972 de l'exemplaire dactylographié conservé par WiUiam
H. Van VUet de Granada Htils (Californie).
MG 24, I 158 John Forrest (vers 1798-1877, tisserand), 1798-1878 (originaux, 132
pages) : correspondance et papiers divers de John Forrest, colon dans le township
de McNab (Ont.). Plusieurs lettres contiennent de captivantes descriptions de la
vie des immigrants.
MG 23, E 6 Sir James WiUiam Montgomery (1721-1803, juriste), 1767-1803 (microfUm, bobine A-865) : correspondance échangée avec John Spottiswood concernant
ses propriétés dans l'île-du-Prince-Édouard et autres affabes; également, quelques
pièces ayant trait à Québec, 1765-1775. Copiées en 1972 des originaux conservés
dans le Scottish Record Office d'Edimbourg. L'instrument de recherche n" 765
contient un répertoire descriptif des documents.
Archives législatives
MG 24, B 147 Robert Hoyle (1782-1857, dSputS), 1826-1844 (originaux, IVi
pouces): correspondance de Robert Hoyle avec sa femme ématilée de réflexions
sur la vie politique et sociale de l'époque, ainsi que sur ses affaires personnelles
et commerciales. Don fait en 1972 par W. H. Van VUet de Granada Hills (CaU-
fornie).
MG 24, B 14 Sir Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine (1807-1864, juriste), 1859-1861 (originaux, 8 pouces): facturns en appel pour les districts de Montréal et de Québec.
Reçus en 1972 de la bibliothèque des Archives. L'instrument de recherche n' 283
constitue un inventaire descriptif des factums.
MG 24, B 2 Louis-Joseph Papineau (1752-1841, homme poUtiqué), et famtile (originaux, envbon 3Vi pouces): correspondance de Louis-Joseph Papineau et de sa
famille concernant tous les aspects de sa longue carrière à l'Assemblée législative,
de son rôle de chef des Patriotes et de son exil. On retrouve parmi les correspondants de nombreux personnages importants de l'époque: WiUiam Lyon Mac-
Kenzie, Edmund O'Callaghan, Robert Nelson, Robert Christie, etc.
MG 9, D 3 Haut-Canada: AssemblSe ISgislative (original, 348 pages): journal de
l'Assemblée législative du Haut-Canada, novembre 1823-janvier 1824.
Archives financières
MG 9, D 10 Haut-Canada: inspecteur général des comptes publics (originaux, 81
pages): ordonnances de paiement de pensions civties et militaires, de salabes et
de soldes, 1813-1815, ainsi que quelques comptes et reçus.
MG 8, A 20 Bas-Canada: inspecteur général des comptes pubUcs (originaux, 38
pages): ordonnances de paiement de salabes et de soldes, 1812-1815.
MG 9, B 12 Grande-Bretagne: armée, commandement de la Nouvelle-Ecosse (originaux, 115 pages): correspondance, états de comptes, reçus et documents connexes
concernant les comptes payés par le trésorier général avec l'autorisation du commandant des Forces du commandement de la Nouvelle-Ecosse, 1777-1822.
L'instrument de recherche porte le n° 790. r
DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
23
Archives militaires
MG 23, K 4 John Fife (vers 1780-1820, soldat et musicien), vers 1872-1804 (microfilm, bobine M-2233): cahier de musique de John Fife, contenant quelque 800 airs
E et une table des titres. Des négatifs en couleurs de quelques-unes des illustrations
K sont conservés à la Division des photos et gravures; le recueil contient des aqua-
I reUes représentant les flottes françaises et britanniques au large de Saint Kitts, en
j> 1782, des drapeaux et des uniformes, et la flotte française à l'embouchure du Nil,
f vers 1797. Copié en 1972 de l'original que possède MUe Claudia Cameron de
I    Kanata (Ont.).
MG 24, F 87 Henry Dives Townshend (1795-1882, soldat), 1654-1920 (originaux,
W- 2 pieds): correspondance du général Henry Dives Townshend, 1836-1877, com-
K prenant ses états de service au Canada pendant la RébeUion de 1837, et divers
f documents de famtile et de succession. Une importante collection de lettres se
k rapporte au règlement de la succession du major général Charles Lee, ancien com-
1 battant de la guerre d'Indépendance des États-Unte. L'instrument de recherche
n° 809 donne une description très détaillée des documents.
Archives historiques locales
MG 24, K 2 George Coventry (vers 1816-1866, collectionneur et historien), 1839-
1884 (originaux, 6 pouces): correspondance ayant trait à ses travaux en histoire,
à sa vie à Cobourg (Ont.) et à ses affaires; notes sur l'histoire du Haut-Canada et
I    ébauches de poèmes, 1783-1866. Offerts en 1972 par l'Ontario Historical Society.
MG 9, D 8-54    Comté de Simcoe, s.d. (manuscrit dactylographié, 159 pages) : manus-
P* crit anonyme et incomplet d'une histoire du comté de Simcoe (Ont.). Offert en
1972 par M1" Marion Wilson de Belleville (Ont.).
MG 9, D 8-55    Comtés de Prescott et de Russell, 1882-1912 (originaux, 6 pouces) :
code de procédure de la cour de division n° 9 de Prescott et Russell. Offert en
r   1972 par le révérend père Paul Drouin, de la bibUothèque de l'Université d'Ottawa.
Vie reUgieuse
MG  24,  J  42    Nicolas Burtin   (1828-1902,   missionnaire),   1851-1878   (microfUm,
I bobine M-2216): lettres de Nicolas Burtin à sa famille résidant en France. Microfilm des copies dactylographiées en possession des archives historiques oblates à
Ottawa, réalisé en 1972. Une table des matières servant d'instrument de recherche
\     se trouve à la fin de la bobine.
MG 24, J 43 Eugène-Bruno Guigues (1805-1874, Svêque), 1848-1880, (45 pages):
mandements, lettres pastorales et autres documents concernant l'œuvre d'Eugène-
Bruno Guigues.
MG 17, A 7-2 Archives du sSminaire de Saint-Sulpice, Montréal (microfilm, bobmes
M-2234 à M-2242): documents relatifs aux terres de l'Ue de Montréal, 1672-1802;
I contrats de concessions, de rétrocession, de vente, de constitution de rente; procès-
verbaux d'arpentage et de bornage, etc.
MG  17, D  1    FrSres moraves  (originaux, 3 pouces): divers papiers en esquimau
' provenant de la mission Hebron, 1827-1955, comprenant des commentabes bibti-
ques, des comptes, des reçus, des factures et des registres de mariages, 1904-1918.
Registres paroissiaux
MG 8, G 49   Église unie de Quyon (microfilm, bobine M-2212): registres de la mis-
T    sion Onslow de l'église méthodiste wesleyenne, et de ses successeurs, la cbconscrip- 24
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
L
tion ecclésiastique et le pastorat de Quyon (Québec), 1859-1923. Copiés en 1972
des documents originaux prêtés par S. Wyman MacKechnie du pastorat de Quyon.
MG 8, G 51 Quyon: L'Sglise anglicane St. John the Evangelist (microfUm, bobine
M-2226): registres des égtises St. John de Quyon et St. Luke d'Eardley, 1857-
1909, ancienne mission Onslow. Copiés en 1972 des originaux conservés par le
révérend E. N. McColl de Quyon.
MG 8, G 52 Église presbytSrienne de Côte-Saint-Georges (microfibn, bobine M-
2228): registres de l'égtise presbytérienne de Côte-Saint-Georges (Québec), 1862-
1871, et recueil des procès-verbaux du tribunal ecclésiastique, 1861-1867. Copiés
en 1972 des originaux prêtés par le révérend Kenneth McDonald de Martintown
(Ont.).
MG 8, G 53 Église unie de Shawville (microfilm, bobine M-2243): registres de la
congrégation presbytérienne de Lichfield, 1854-1904, de la cbconscription wes-
leyenne de Clarendon, 1851-1898, et de la mission méthodiste de Portage-du-
Fort, 1860-1879, remplacées par l'église unie de ShawviUe. Copiés en 1972 des
originaux prêtés par le révérend Alistair J. Macintosh de ShawviUe (Québec).
MG 8, G 4 Boucherville: Sainte-Famille (église catholique) (microfilm, bobines M-
2369 à M-2371): registres de l'église Sabite-Famtile, 1669-1790. L'instrument de
recherche n° 831 est une liste des dates et du contenu. Copies reçues en 1972 du
Département de démographie de l'Université de Montréal (Québec).
MG 8, G 54 Inscriptions sur les pierres tombales des comtés de LotbiniSre et de
MSgantic (QuSbec) (transcription, 46 pages): inscriptions relevées dans 14 cimetières de la région. Offert en 1972 par M. W.T.L. Harper de WiUowdale (Ont.).
MG 9, D 7-26 Église unie d'Almonte (microfilm, bobines M-2217 et M-2229):
registres de l'«Auld Kirk» de Ramsay, de l'église presbytérienne St. Andrew du
township de Ramsay, de la cbconscription méthodiste wesleyenne de Carleton
Place, de la cbconscription méthodiste d'Almonte, de l'église presbytérienne St.
John d'Almonte, de l'égUse unie de Bethany, 1833-1962, et de l'égUse presbytérienne d'Ashton, 1896-1926; procès-verbaux du tribunal ecclésiastique de l'église
presbytérienne d'Appleton, 1889-1962, et la Uste des communiants, vers 1889-
1917. Copiés en 1972 des originaux conservés à l'église unie d'Almonte et par
M. Cecil Turner d'Almonte (Ont.).
MG 9, D 7-32 Perth: Église unie St. Paul (microfilm, bobine M-2232): registres de
l'égUse unie St. Paul de Perth et des églises presbytériennes et méthodistes qui l'ont
précédée: congrégation presbytérienne de l'égUse libre de Perth, l'église presbytérienne Knox, l'église presbytérienne calviniste de Bathurst, l'égUse méthodiste
d'Ashbury, 1858-1968. Copiés en 1972 des originaux conservés à l'église unie St.
Paul de Perth (Ont.).
MG 9, D 7-33 Église presbytSrienne de Lochwinnoch (microfilm, bobine M-2368):
registre de la congrégation presbytérienne de Lochwinnoch, 1877-1919, et recueil
des procès-verbaux du tribunal ecclésiastique, 1875-1971. Copiés en 1972 des
originaux prêtés par M. Robert MacGregor, greffier du tribunal de Lochwinnoch
(Ont.).
MG 9, D-34 CongrSgation de l'Sglise d'Ecosse de Lochiel (microfilm, bobine
M-2246): registre de la congrégation de l'église d'Ecosse de Lochiel (Ont.),
1820-1911 connue plus tard sous le nom de St. Columba, Kirkill. Copie offerte
en 1972 par M"" Mary Beaton d'Ottawa. DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
25
Généalogies—La série MG 25 s'est, enrichie de notes et d'arbres généalogiques, de
correspondance et de papiers connexes ayant trait à un très grand nombre de familles,
dont les suivantes:
Famille Cole, n° 148 (photocopies, Vz pouce), don de Lloyd B. Rochester d'Ottawa.
Famille Clarke, n" 139 (photocopies, 38 pages), don de Mm* Arthur Field de Strathroy
(Ont.).
Famille Desautels, n° 32 (photocopies, 36 pages), don de sœur Marie-Jeanne Desautels
de Gravelbourg (Sask.).
Famille Elliot, n°  140 (transcriptions,  118 pages), établies par M. R. Edwin Elliot
de Saint-Jean (Québec) qui en a fait don aux Archives.
Famille Gunsolus, n" 142 (photocopies, 1 pouce), établies par M"* Clarabell Morris
de Surrey (C.-B.) qui en a fait don aux Archives.
Famille Kidd, n" 147 (photocopies, 34 pages), don de M. Kenneth E. Kidd de Peterborough (Ont).
Famille Morris, n" 143 (photocopies, Vz pouce), don de M. C. D. Morris de Surrey
(C.-B.).
Famille Moxley, n° 92 (transcriptions, 95 pages), don de M. George P. DeKay de
Hyde Park (Ont.).
La collection Gother Mann (MG 23, J 10), s'est enrichie de notes généalogiques et de
f     quelques lettres (microfibn, bobine A-852). Copiées en 1971 des originaux con-
I     serves par M"* Julia de Lacy Mann, par l'intermédiaire du bureau de Londres.
SECTION DES ARCHIVES POSTÉRIEURES À LA CONFÉDÉRATION—Au 31
mars 1973, la section se composait de seize archivistes, de deux employés de soutien
et d'une dactylo-réceptionniste. M. D. L. McDonald en est devenu le chef en jutilet
K72'
I     L'organisation de la section est restée sensiblement la même que l'an dernier. EUe
se spécialise dans les six domaines suivants: les premiers ministres, les affaires publiques, les arts, les syndicats, la médecine et les sciences, et les sports. Le personnel
de la section a également travaillé au Catalogue collectif des manuscrits.
TRAVAUX
Catalogue collectif des manuscrits. En 1972-1973, nous avons terminé nos visites aux
I dépôts participants. Nous avons reçu et revu un grand nombre de questionnaires
} dûment remplis. Nous avons discuté, avec les représentants d'Alphatext Limitée,
de la possibilité de leur confier le traitement du Catalogue collectif des manuscrits.
Inventaires préliminaires. Mm* Françoise Houle a dirigé les travaux de rédaction du
volume 4 de l'Inventaire gSnSral.
ARCHIVES ARTISTIQUES
Bierstadt,   Albert,   artiste.   Copies   de   la   correspondance   du   marquis   de   Lome,
1882-1889 et de lord Dufferin,  1874-1884, avec Albert Bierstadt.  Offertes par
YAmon Carter Museum of Western Art par l'intermédiaire de la Division des
photos et gravures des Archives publiques (Vu de pouce).
116e escadrille de bombardiers de reconnaissance de l'A.R.C. Partition contenant ce
*      qui est sans doute la plus ancienne version connu de The North Atlantic Squadron,
1943. Don d'un ancien membre de l'escadrille (13 pages). 26 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
Canadian Theatre Centre. Comptes rendus, correspondance, imprimés et autres documents provenant du Canadian Theatre Centre de Toronto (environ 200 pieds).
Collection Bliss Carman (1861-1929), poète et écrivain. Une lettre écrite en 1916 par
Bliss Carman aux éditeurs d'un livre de poésie intitulé Canadian Poets les autorisant à y inclure quelques-uns de ses poèmes (2 pages, additionnel).
Chadwick, Ethel. Journaux personnels et albums souvenirs relatant la vie théâtrale et
mondaine à Ottawa, de 1890 à 1970. Obtenus par l'intermédiaire du Centre national des arts (environ 3 pieds).
Collection M"" E. Coffin. Programmes sans date des productions de théâtres professionnels et amateurs d'Ottawa, de 1912 à 1960, dont le Canadian Repertory
Theatre, 1950-1953, et plusieurs programmes du Russel Theatre datant de 1912
et dé 1920 à 1928. Offerts par M"" Christopher Young d'Ottawa (4 pouces).
Partition de Beyond the Hills of Dream, 1910. Don de Mn,e G. M. Coffin d'Ottawa
(3 pages).
Cohen, Nathan (1923-1971), critique de théâtre. Copies des articles écrits par
Nathan Cohen en 1941-1942 alors qu'il était rédacteur en chef de Y Argosy Weekly,
à l'Université Mount Allison qui conserve les originaux (19 pages), Correspondance sur microfilm concernant le Toronto Star et Fighting Words, 1970-1971;
manuscrits de conférences et de scripts radiophoniques, 1948-1971; copies d'albums de coupures et d'affiches de 1947 à 1971, dont les originaux sont la propriété de M"" Nathan Cohen, 1969, Glencedar Road, Toronto 10 (Ont.) (8
bobines).
Commercial and Press Photographers' Association of Canada (créée en 1847). Documents financiers, procès-verbaux, listes de membres, correspondance, imprimés et
autres documents de 1947 à 1962. Achetés à M1" Edna Boyd de Toronto par la
Division des photos et gravures des Archives publiques (environ 7 pieds et 8
pouces).
Collection James E. Cooke, fonctionnaire. Programmes sans date de pièces de théâtre
amateur et professionnel en Ontario, de 1957 à 1972. Offerts par James E.
Cooke de Toronto (2 pouces).
Collection M"" N. K. Crowder. Partitions et chansons du Canada et des États-Unis,
sans date, de 1897 à 1927. Offertes par M"" N. K. Crowder, d'Ottawa, par l'intermédiaire de la Division des photos et gravures des Archives publiques (1 pouce).
Collection Mazo de la Roche (1885-1961), écrivain. Une lettre écrite en 1955 par
Mazo de la Roche à M"'* Watson dans laquelle elle fait des commentaires sur
Oakville et la possibilité d'une alliance entre les familles Whiteoak et Chisholm.
Achetée à M°" Joan Enders d'Albuquerque, Nouveau-Mexique (États-Unis)
(1 page).
Festival d'art dramatique du Canada (créé en 1932). Copie sur microfilm de l'album
de PEastern Ontario Drama League, 1933-1971; l'original est en la possession de
M. J. L. Caroll de Brockville (Ont.) (1 bobine, additionnel).
Fraser, Donald A. (1875-1948), écrivain et professeur. Manuscrits dactylographiés de
The Maiden Months, spectacle poétique de Donald A. Fraser et lettre qui accompagne le manuscrit soumis à la maison d'édition B. J. Brimmer Co., Boston,
Massachussets, 1928, (29 pages).
Gardner, David (1928- ), acteur et directeur. Copies sur microfilm d'albums de
1935 à 1955, contenant des coupures de journaux, des lettres, des photographies, des DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
27
programmes et autres documents illustrant sa carrière. Les originaux sont la propriété de M. David Gardner de Toronto (2 bobines).
Gauthier, Eva  (née en  1885),  chanteuse.  Programme  d'un  récital  donné par  Éva
Gauthier au Greenwich Village Theatre de New York, le 11 janvier 1920. Offert
par M"" Mary Gauthier de Mundelein, Illinois (1 page).
Gauthier, Juliette, cantatrice et interprète de chansons folkloriques. Programmes, docu-
Wf ments publicitaires, coupures de journaux et un manuscrit de Lilla M. Kerr, intitulé
P «Juliette Gauthier de la Vérendrye», s.d., 1929, 1932, 1934. Offerts par M1" Kerr
d'Ottawa, (i de pouce, additionnel).
Johnston, Clifford M. (1897-1951) photographe amateur. Correspondance et imprimés
se rapportant surtout aux expositions auxquelles il a participé en qualité de photographe amateur; documents relatifs à la création, en 1934, du Salon annuel international de la photographie du Canada, s.d.,   1888,   1911-1940.  Transférés de la
w collection de photographies de Clifford M. Johnston, Division des photos et gravures
(8 pouces).
Laberge, Albert (1871-1960), auteur. Lettre d'Arsène Bessette au sujet du don du
■ manuscrit de son roman le Débutant à Albert Laberge en 1918. Acquise d'Amt-
K mann (1 page).
Lampman, Archibald (1861-1899), poète. Copie sur microfilm de manuscrits origi-
B naux, 1893-1894, en la possession des Archives publiques (papiers Archibald
Lampman, MG 29,   G40)  (2 bobines, additionnel).
Le Moine, sir James MacPherson (1825-1912), écrivain et avocat. Papiers datant de
m- 1785 à 1905 relatifs à la famille Le Moine et comprenant des lettres, un Uvre
■ autographié, des médaiUes, des coupures de journaux, un arbre généalogique et une
r    bible de famille. Offerts par sa petite-fille, M11* Lily B. Rhodes (4 pouces, addi-
■ tionnel). Note écrite en 1893 par M11* Marjorie A. Hamilton-Gordon (fille de lord
K~ et lady Aberdeen) à sir James M. Le Moine pour le remercier de lui avoir offert
m   son livre: Picturesque Quebec. Don de M1Ie Rhodes de Québec (2 pages, additionnel).
Macdonald, J. E. H. (1873-1932), artiste. Poèmes manuscrits et dactylographiés et
notes de conférences (1918-1931). Don de M. Thoreau Macdonald de ThornhUI
(Ont.) (1 pied et 4 pouces, additionnel).
Nakash, George (1892- ), photographe. Copie d'une conférence, ponctuée de
B réflexions personnelles sur la technique du portrait, donnée le 14 décembre 1971
m au club Rotary de Montréal. L'original est la propriété de M. George Nakash de
p   Montréal (18 pages).
Ottawa Little Theatre  (créé en  1913). Décisions motivées et manuscrits des pièces
§    gagnantes à PAnnual Canadian Playwriting Competition placée sous le patronage
de l'Ottawa Little Theatre, s.d., 1944-1971. Offerts par l'Ottawa Little Theatre par
m   l'intermédiabe de M°" Roy MacGregor Watt, 244, avenue Powell, Ottawa (2 pieds
■ et 11 pouces, additionnel).
Packard, Frank L. (1877-1942), écrivain. Correspondance, albums souvenirs et im-
m- prunes relatifs à la carrière de Frank L. Packard, 1906-1937. Également, un
I journal personnel et un manuscrit non publié de Mm" Frank L. Packard qui y
I raconte leur voyage dans les mers du Sud en 1912-1913. Don de M. Robert
|     Packard de New York (États-Unis) (5 pouces, additionnel). 28
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Papiers de Vida Peene, mécène. Procès-verbaux, correspondance et coupures de journaux se rapportant à divers comités consacrés aux arts dont M"' Vida Peene fut
membre. Don de M1U Vida Peene de Toronto (10 pieds, additionnel).
Collection d'affiches thSâtrales Collection d'affiches canadiennes et étrangères de spectacles amateurs et professionnels, de 1872 à 1973, rassemblée par les Archives
nationales des arts (5 pieds).
Professionnal and Press Photographers' Association of Canada (créée en 1963). Correspondance, listes de membres, imprimés et autres documents, 1963-1968. Achetés à M"* Edna Boyd de Toronto par la Division des photos et gravures des
Archives publiques (environ 1 pied).
Roy, Marie-Anna-AdSle (1894- ). Manuscrits (quelques versions) du «Journal
intime d'une âme solitaire: reflet des âmes dans le miroir du passé», 1972, de Marie-
Anna-Adèle Roy, sœur de Gabrielle Roy. Acquis de Marie-Anna-Adèle Roy (8
pouces, additionnel).
Royal Lyceum Theatre, Toronto (MG 55/24, n" 425). Programme datant de 1855
(1 page).
Sadler, M. et Mm" Filmore, propriétabes de théâtres et producteurs. Neuf albums souvenus retraçant l'histoire du théâtre et de l'école Brae Manor de Knowlton (Québec), et diverses coupures de journaux relatives au Montreal Repertory Theatre,
s.d. 1934, 1936-1956. Offerts par M" F. Sadler de Montréal (1 pied et 1 pouce).
Showalter, H. A., premier président de la Fondation du festival shakespearien de Stratford. Copies de la correspondance, des notes de service et des procès-verbaux
concernant la création et les premières saisons de festival shakespearien 1951-
1963; les originaux sont en la possession de M. H. A. Showalter, 454, avenue
Briar, Ottawa (6 pouces).
Collection Sally Starke théâtre. Exemplaire du souffleur, programmes, communiqués et
coupures de journaux, 1851, 1967-1973. Offerts par M11' S. Starke de Montréal
(1 pied et 6 pouces).
Stearns, Dawson, journaliste. Manuscrit dactylographié de «Where Fog and Fish FaU
Not», de Dawson Stearns, illustré de photographies originates et de la lettre qui
accompagne le manuscrit soumis à la maison d'édition Brimmer Co., de Boston,
Massachussets, 1928, s.d. (14 pages).
Stone, Edgar (1897- ), dbecteur de radio et de théâtre. Programmes et coupures de
journaux, 1921-1941. Offerts par M. Edgar Stone de Toronto (Vz pouce, additionnel).
Collection Traill. Fleurs séchées (vers 1854-1899) de la main de Catharine Parr Trtffl
surtout, épreuves d'imprimerie et planches du Uvre Canadian Wild Flowers, écrit
par C. P. Tratil et pubUé en 1868-1869. Achetées de la succession de M1" Anne
Atwood de Lakefield (Ont) (4 pieds, additionnel). Manuscrits, carnets de notes,
journaux personnels et correspondance relatifs à la famtile Tratil, 1822-1970. Offerts par les héritiers de M1" Anne Atwood de Lakefield (Ont) (9 pieds, additionnel).
Tweed, Tommy (1908-1971), acteur et vedette de la radio. Correspondance, mémobes,
notes, scénarios, papiers financiers, revues, coupures et journaux, s.d., 1928-1971.
Offerts par M"" T. W. Tweed de Toronto (26 pieds et 8 pouces). DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES 29
LpCHIVES JURIDIQUES
Juge E. M. Hall, juge de la cour suprême du Canada: correspondance et notes, 1960-
1973, concernant sa carrière à la cour suprême, à la Commission royale d'enquête
sur les services de santé et au Comité des buts et objectifs de l'éducation en Ontario, plus des documents se rapportant à ses activités dans le domaine du bien-
être social touchant l'Université du Botswana et les villages internationaux d'enfants (4 pieds).
Association canadienne du barreau, papiers: correspondance, notes et brochures d'anciens présidents, 1912-1965, comprenant de rares documents des années 20 et 30
(8 pieds).
Juge André Taschereau, juge de la cour supérieure du Québec et ancien président de
l'Association canadienne du barreau: correspondance et notes se rapportant à
l'Association canadienne du barreau, 1944-1972 (4 pieds).
luge Jacques Dumoulin, de la cour fédérale du Canada: papiers de famille, 1852-
1900, (coupures, photographies et documents) (4 pouces).
Gravel et Associés, papiers relatant l'histobe de ce cabinet juridique de Québec, 1801-
1972.
Archives des syndicats
Broten, L. J. (né en 1914), chef syndicaliste. Transcription de deux entrevues faites en
1969 et 1970, et portant principalement sur l'étabUssement de la United Transportation Union (Travatileurs unis des transports) en 1968. Les originaux se trou-
K vent au Labour Management Documentation Centre, New York State School of
Industrial and Labour Relations, Université Cornell (143 pages).
Congrès du travail du Canada (créé en 1956). Compte rendu des délibérations des
congrès de 1962 et de 1964. Divers dossiers par matière, 1945-1966. Divers rapports, mémobes et décisions d'arbitrage. Différents numéros du Socialist International Information, 1960-1963, et de l'Examiner de Saint-Jean, 1961, ainsi que
des coupures de journaux. Transférés par la bibliothèque du Congrès du travail du
I    Canada (7 pieds, additionnel).
Cohen, J. L., avocat spécialiste du droit du travaU. Papiers offerts par Mm* PhylUs
m   Clarke de Toronto (environ 60 pieds).
Dupuis, Michael (né en 1945), étudiant. Correspondance compilée pour sa thèse de
■ maîtrise intitulée The Toronto Daily Press and the Winnipeg General Strike of
1919. Trois bandes d'entrevues ont été transférées au Service des archives sonores
(71 pages).
Forsey, Eugene (né en 1904), spécialiste en sciences poUtiques. Correspondance,
dossiers-matières, lettres au rédacteur et coupures de journaux. Un exemplaire de
la thèse de doctorat de W. J. C. Cherwinshis, Organized Labour in Saskatchewan:
m The TLC Years, 1905-1945. Offerts par M. Eugene Forsey (2 pieds, additionnel).
Correspondance, articles, discours, notes et coupures de journaux divers et un
dossier intitulé, «Capital Region in Canada». Offerts par M. Eugene Forsey (3 pou-
■ ces et demi, additionnel).
Gray, Charles F. (1879-1954), politicien municipal. Pièces à conviction présentées par
I  la Couronne, lors du procès des meneurs de la grève générale de Winnipeg, dont la
correspondance du Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council, du comité de grève et du
■ maire, Charles F. Gray, et quelques numéros du Western Labour News et du 30 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
Socialist BuUetin. Deux albums de coupures de journaux au sujet des campagnes
électorales de M. Gray en 1916 et 1917. Deux photographies transférées à la
Division des photos et gravures et deux livres transmis à la bibliothèque. Don de
Mme Avis Walton de Victoria (2 pouces).
Kaplansky, Kalmen (né en 1912), chef syndicaliste. Correspondance et dossiers-matières,
1935-1964. Discours, articles et coupures de journaux. Procès-verbaux et correspondance du Parti travailliste du Canada (section du Québec), ConseU du district de
Montréal, 1935-1938. Offerts par M. Kalman Kaplansky (8 pouces).
Kitchener-Waterloo District Labour Council. Registre des délibérations, 1942-1971.
Statuts, 1912, 1957-1966 et règlements, 1969. Enregistrement sur bande d'un discours de Claude Jodoin transféré au Service des archives sonores. Don du
Kitchener-Waterloo District Labour Council (8 pouces).
Ontario Labour Committee for Human Rights (créé en 1947). Correspondance,
procès-verbaux, états financiers, dossiers-matières, coupures de journaux et imprimés, 1946-1972. Don de l'Ontario Labour Committee for Human Rights (35 pieds).
Toronto District Labour Council (créé en 1871). Copie sur microfibn des procès-
verbaux, 1922-1926 et 1939-1968. Procès-verbaux du Toronto National Labour
Council (A.C.C.L.), 1934-1940, du Toronto Labour Council et du Toronto and
Lakeshore Labour Council (C.C.L.), 1940-1943 et 1945-1956. Ces documents ont
été prêtés par M. Louis Lenkinsky du Labour Council of Metropolitan Toronto,
pour qu'on en fasse une copie (2 bobines).
Ouvriers unis de l'SlectricitS, de la radio et de la machinerie dAmSrique (É.U.).
Papiers, 1937-1956, à microfilmer (29 bobines). Imprimés, 1948-1972 (3 pieds).
U.E. Canadian News, 1956-1971. Obtenus par l'intermédiaire de M. C. S. Jackson,
président du syndicat.
Winnipeg Independent Labour Party. Registre des délibérations 1920-1923. Copie de
l'original qui se trouve aux Archives provinciales du Manitoba ( 1 pouce).
ARCHIVES MÉDICALES ET SCIENTIFIQUES
SociStS canadienne de neurologie (fondée en 1948). Correspondance et procès-verbaux
de la société, 1949-1971 (5 pieds).
Collection de l'Association des psychiatres du Canada (fondée en 1951). Procès-
verbaux, correspondance, listes de membres et imprimés, de 1949 à 1971, se
rattachant directement à ses activités; il y a également une coUection de manuscrits et d'imprimés, de 1835 à 1971, sur l'histoire de la psychiatrie et plus
particulièrement sur son évolution au Canada (10 pieds).
Association des psychologues du Canada (fondée en 1939). Correspondance, mémoires
et rapports concernant les travaux de l'association; procès-verbaux et programmes
des réunions annuelles, et de celles du conseil d'administration; collection de docu- i
ments sur la psychologie au Canada comportant des bulletins d'associations régionales, des brochures, des livrets et des rapports; transcriptions de l'enregistrement
d'interviews d'éminents psychologues canadiens (24 pieds).
Lockhead, Allan G.    Correspondance, 1914-1972, petit agenda, 1914 et 1930, rapports,  !
manuscrits, imprimés et articles divers relatifs aux travaux de bactériologie de
M. Lockhead, au ministère de l'Agriculture, et à son emprisonnement pendant la
Première Guerre mondiale au camp Ruhlcken (2 pieds et 8 pouces). DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
31
Macphail, sir Andrew. Correspondance, journaux personnels, coupures de presse, ma-
■ nuscrits et réimpressions, 1880-1938 appartenant à sb Andrew Macphail et por-
■ tant sur sa vie d'écrivain, de soldat et de médecin; papiers, 1816-1905, de son
I    grand-père, WiUiam Macphail le premier, et de son père, William Macphail, le
second (6 pieds).
Millman, Thomas. Journal écrit par te docteur Thomas Millman alors qu'il était chi-
W  rurgien adjoint à la British North American Boundary Commission,  1872-1875
(bobine M-2231).
Collection de la Royal Geographical Society. Documents d'un intérêt marqué pour le
W   Canada, choisis dans la collection de la Royal Geographical Society de Londres
■ (Angleterre). Il s'agit de correspondance, de journaux de voyage, de livres de
B    bord et autres documents, de 1814 à 1932, relatant diverses expéditions dans
l'Arctique et plusieurs explorations de l'Ouest canadien (12 bobines).
Conseil canadien de recherches en sciences sociales. On a transféré aux Archives les
B dossiers de trois anciens présidents du C.C.R.S.S. et des documents .supplémen-
m   tabes concernant le programme des publications du conseil (25 pieds).
InfirmiSres de l'ordre de Victoria (association créée en 1898). Procès-verbaux, cor-
K   respondance, rapports, brochures et coupures de journaux, 1897-1950, relatifs aux
activités des infirmières de l'ordre de Victoria du Canada (10 pieds).
HAPIERS DES PREMIERS MINISTRES
Bennett, R.B. Les papiers de R.B. Bennett, qui appartiennent à l'Université du Nouveau-Brunswick,  ont été prêtés  aux Archives  publiques  pour être  numérotés,
F   microfilmés et répertoriés. En 1972, nous avons dressé l'index des 100 volumes de
M papiers personnels et des 11 derniers volumes de papiers politiques, mettant ainsi
■   un point final à l'indexage des papiers du Premier ministre Bennett. La section
a mis au point un projet-pilote,  afin de  déterminer la possibilité  d'appliquer
K   l'électronique au triage de l'index. Nous avons reçu du Bureau des services de l'hiformatique une feuille d'imprimante type. On vient d'entreprendre l'édition et la
mise en ordinateur de l'intégrale de l'index Bennett.
Bowell, Mackenzie. Le bureau du Conseil privé a transféré un Uvre de copies de lettres
de 1895 sur le favoritisme dans la Gendarmerie royale du Nord-Ouest.
King, W.L.M. Cinquante-trois volumes de correspondance de la série primaire ont été
B numérotés et nous avons commencé l'index de la série primaire de correspon-
B dance, 1922-1950. Nous avons établi une liste de classement de 255 volumes de
correspondance de la série J2, trié et répertorié 91 volumes de la troisième série
Il des papiers King. Les 12 derniers volumes des mémobes et notes 1940-1950,
B ainsi que 28 volumes de la série à reliure noire ont été numérotés. Les 18 derniers
B volumes des discours, 1933-1950, ont également été numérotés et nous avons
K établi une liste de classement. Les originaux du journal de M. King jusqu'à 1931
K ont été numérotés et répertoriés, et, comme ils sont fréquemment demandés, on a
mis à la disposition des chercheurs trois copies numérotées de la transcription. Le
B 1" janvier 1973, la correspondance, les mémoires, les notes et les discours de
B M. King, datant de 1942, ont été mis à la disposition des chercheurs.
Laurier, sir Wilfrid. Nous avons continué à réviser et à éditer les notices de l'index
B des auteurs pour qu'on puisse les mettre en mémoire, afin de dresser un index des
B matières qui sera trié par ordinateur. On a fait, à partir des microfilms, des copies 32 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
des papiers de sir Wilfrid Laurier. Ces copies sont placées dans des boîtes
pour que les chercheurs puissent les consulter; les originaux sont retirés de la
cbculation.
Macdonald, sir John A. La Division des pubUcations a transféré la transcription des
Uvres de copies de lettres de sb John A. Macdonald à la Division des manuscrits.
Pearson, L.B. Les dossiers (205 volumes) du cabinet du Premier ministre Pearson,
1963-1965, ainsi que 80 volumes de coupures de journaux, ont été placés dans
d'autres boîtes et répertoriés.
Saint-Laurent, Louis-Stephen. On a terminé la Uste de classement des 145 volumes de
correspondance du Premier ministre. La correspondance dans chaque classeur de
110 de ces volumes a été triée par ordre chronologique.
Thompson, sir John. On a étabU un catalogue topographique de ces papiers.
Tupper, sir Charles. Cette année la section a fait l'acquisition d'une petite coUection
de documents supplémentaires de Tupper. EUe comprend des lettres réunies à
l'origine en quatre albums, 1858-1915, de la correspondance, 1855-1915, des
carnets de rendez-vous, 1899, 1907; un album souvenu annoté (qui était à
l'origine un cahier de scrutin), 1874; un menu de banquet autographié, 1900; un
album de coupures de journaux et un plan de la Chambré des communes, 1898
(8 pouces).
AFFAIRES PUBLIQUES
Associations
Conseil canadien de développement social. Correspondance et dossiers de travaU du
CCD.S., autrefois le ConseU canadien du bien-être. Quelques documents sur la
Commission canadienne de la jeunesse (90 pieds, additionnel).
London, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and West India Bank Ltd. Copies de notes de
service et d'articles de la banque, signées et sceUées le 20 février 1864, par David
Burwash, de Londres (Angleterre) (37 pages).
National Council of Women. Correspondance, coupures de journaux et rapports additionnels, offerts par le National Council of Women (1 pied et demi).
Ontario Temperance and Prohibitory League. Série de slogans utilisés par les apôtres
de la tempérance, lors de la campagne précédant le plébiscite pour ou contre la
prohibition, qui eut lieu au Canada le 29 septembre 1898 (1 pouce).
University Women's Club of Ottawa. Correspondance, programmes, procès-verbaux et
rapports additionnels.
Éducation
Audet, Louis-Philippe (né en 1903). Éducateur et écrivain. Papiers personnels, 1929-
1971, consistant en correspondance, textes de causeries, articles et cours, manuscrits
d'ouvrages publiés et non pubUés et dossiers ainsi que papiers rassemblés en tant
que secrétaire de la Commission royale d'enquête sur l'enseignement dans la province de Québec, 1961-1966. Don de M. Louis-Philippe Audet (42 pieds et
2 pouces).
Commission dStude sur les relations entre les universités et les gouvernements 1968-
1969. Ottawa. Correspondance, mémoires, documents et coupures de journaux,
1959-1969, offerts par le professeur Donald C. Rowat d'Ottawa (9 pieds et
4 pouces). DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
Dixon, Frederick A., professeur particulier. Correspondance familiale, 1873-1959, et
correspondance avec la famille Dufferin, sb Charles Tupper et le marquis de
Lorne (4 pouces).
0énéraUtés
Botterwell, E. H.    Livre de comptes, 1868-1908.
Fauquier, Frederick D., évêque.    Microfilm du journal de Son Eminence Frederick
B Fauquier, dans lequel il décrit ses fonctions et tient les comptes du diocèse
d'Algoma, 1878-1880 (1 bobine).
Larsen, Henry Asbjorn, officier de la Gendarmerie royale.    Copie du manuscrit de
M. Larsen qui servit de base à son autobiographie, The Big Ship (3 pouces et
f    demi).
Pétrie, Alfred E. H., fonctionnaire et ancien rédacteur du Canadian Numismatic Journal.
Correspondance traitant de la publication de cette revue et lettres échangées avec
divers cercles de numismates dans le monde entier.
Shaughnessy,   Thomas George,  1er  baron.    Les  archives  du  Canadien  Pacifique,  à
I    Montréal, ont prêté 112 livres de copies de lettres de lord Shaughnessy, qui seront
W- microfilmés puis retournés à Montréal.
Shaw, George W., employé du Canadien National. Lettre de M. Shaw à Edgar Stone
I d'Angleterre, lui décrivant son arrivée au Canada, en 1914. La lettre a été ré-
7 cupérée après le naufrage de Y Empress of Ireland et rendue à son auteur (5 pages).
Stewart, Ethel.    Copie du récit de la visite de lord Tweedsmub à Fort MacPherson, en
1937, fait par l'administrateur local de la Compagnie de la baie d'Hudson (3 pages).
Papiers de la famille Wolff. Lettre et procuration de Charles Wolff, homologation du
I    testament de George Sparks et copie de la carte de la région d'Overbrook, datée
1868-1883 (46 pages).
Archives militaires
Corlett,  génSral Charles H.,
l'autobiographie i
L    ment canado-a
(28 pages).
Crerar, H. D. G., officier. Acquisition d'un journal militaire rédigé en 1915 (1 pouce,
additionnel).
Henry, général Guy V., officier. Copie d'une partie de l'autobiographie du général
Henry, écrite entre 1944 et 1967, et décrivant ses fonctions au sein de la Commis-
I     sion mixte permanente pour la défense Canada-États-Unis (68 pages).
Lenihan, lieutenant Michael J., officier de l'armée américaine.    Copie d'une page des
souvenirs non publiés du lieutenant Lenihan, décrivant un incident qui se produisit
en 1887, alors qu'U était lieutenant dans un régiment d'infanterie, lorsqu'il rencontra un groupe de réfugiés indiens qui avaient participé à la RébelUon du Nordic Ouest (1 page).
Collection de Georges Licope, conservateur. Documents réunis par M. Licope, conservateur du musée de la Guerre de Mons, relatant la libération de Mons par les
troupes canadiennes, en 1918. Il y a également deux communications du général
A. G. L. McNaughton sur l'utilisation de l'artillerie pendant la Première Guerre
Ë   mondiale (1 pouce).
officier de l'armée américaine.    Copie d'une partie de
pubUée du général Corlett dans laquelle il décrit le débarque-
Kiska,  dans les ties Aléoutiennes, le  15 août  1943 34 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
McNaughton, général A. G. L., miUtabe, homme politique et fonctionnabe. Correspondance familiale, arbre généalogique, articles écrits par le général McNaughton
(3 pieds et 6 pouces, additionnel).
Archives poUtiques
Action Canada, parti politique.    Correspondance, mémoires, ouvrages de référence et
discours concernant Action Canada, 1970-1973 (33 pieds).
Bell, l'honorable R. A., ministre fédéral.   Ces papiers, qui étaient en dépôt de sécurité,
viennent d'être acquis. Il s'agit de correspondance, de mémobes, de discours et
d'imprimés (100 pieds).
Bracken, John, député.   Dossiers-matières et coupures de journaux se rapportant à sa
carrière de leader conservateur de l'Opposition (11 pieds).
Churchill, l'honorable G. C, ministre fédéral.   La section a acquis ces papiers relatifs
à la carrière parlementaire de M.  Churchill:  correspondance, notes, discours,
souvenus, photographies et coupures de journaux. Us étaient auparavant en dépôt
de sécurité (55 pieds).
Drew, f honorable George.   Nous avons reçu des coupures de journaux se rapportant
à la carrière de M. Drew, leader conservateur de l'Opposition (1 pied).
Kerr, Lilla Muriel.   Lettre de Mm* Dorise W. Nielson, député fédéral, en date du
1er mai 1940, et coupures de journaux (6 pages).
LaMarsh,   l'honorable  Judy,   ministre   fédéral.   Coupures   de   journaux   concernant
la carrière ministérielle de M11* LaMarsh au sein du gouvernement Pearson
(10 pieds).
Parti libéral du Canada.   Correspondance, photographies et documents de propagande
électorale, 1963-1972 (2 pieds, additionnel).
Manion, R. J., député fédéral.   Des dossiers-matières et coupures de journaux, 1938-
1940, sont venus enrichir la collection de papiers de M. Manion. Ces dossiers se
rapportent aux années pendant lesquelles M. Manion fut leader conservateur de
l'Opposition (7 pieds et 8 pouces).
Milner, vicomte Alfred, homme d'État.   Copie sur microfibn de sa correspondance avec
sb G. R. Parkin, 1893-1896, ainsi que de la correspondance, des mémobes et des
coupures de journaux portant sur des sujets canadiens, 1907-1922 (1 bobine).
Nouveau parti démocratique.   Documents de propagande électorale et affiches utilisés
lors des élections fédérales de 1972 (1 pied).
Newman, Archibald,  écrivain,  échevin.   Correspondance, coupures de journaux et
articles relatifs à sa carrière de journaliste indépendant, d'échevin à Ottawa et
d'adjoint de l'honorable C. D. Howe (8 pouces).
Parti progressiste conservateur.   Affiches et documents de propagande électorale utilisés
lors des élections fédérales de 1972 (2 pieds).
Ralston, l'honorable James L., ministre fédéral.   Journaux personnels, correspondance
famUiale et albums souvenus (3 pieds, additionnel).
Ray, William, député fédéral.   Discours de M. WiUiam Ray, prononcé le 29 janvier
1874 devant les électeurs du comté d'Annapolis (N.-É.) qui l'ont choisi pour être
candidat aux élections; plusieurs coupures de journaux sur le décès de M. Ray
(13 pages). DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
35
Sifton, l'honorable Arthur L., juriste et homme politique. Lettres et télégrammes envoyés lors du décès de M. Sifton; rapports et mémoires concernant des pourparlers
de paix et des ententes internationales; coupures de journaux, cartes, imprimés et
charges diverses (1 pied et 6 pouces, additionnel).
Thompson, Robert, homme politique et éducateur. Correspondance, notes et imprimés
se rapportant à la carrière parlementabe de M. Thompson, 1962-1972, au Parti du
m< crédit social et à l'Ethiopie (8 pieds).
Tupper, William J. Correspondance avec des membres de sa famUle, des amis et des
associés, 1880-1935; journal écrit par M°" Tupper lors de son séjour en Europe,
I    1890; divers certificats, notes et mémobes (8 pouces).
Fonction publique et magistrature
Ewart, John S., avocat et écrivain. Mémoires concernant des procès et des arrêts
judiciaires au Canada et en Grande-Bretagne, 1890-1932 (1 pouce, additionnel).
Heeney, A. D. P., fonctionnaire. Correspondance, notes et papiers de famille concernant le révérend Bertal Heeney et la carrière de M. A. D. P. Heeney dans la
Fonction pubUque (15 pieds, additionnel).
Kirkwood, Kenneth P., diplomate. Journaux diplomatiques, cinq recueUs de poésie,
carnets de voyages et de méditations (1 pied, additionnel).
Morin, Louis, avocat. Copie du numéro du 4 février 1916 du journal la Presse,
de Montréal, relatant l'incendie du Parlement. Copie d'une lettre de W. F. Nickle,
témoin oculaire de la mort de M"' Louis Morin (6 pages).
Pope, lieutenant général Maurice A., militaire et diplomate.    Copie d'une lettre du
I lieutenant général Pope adressée le 21 février 1948 à M. W. L. M. King et concernant la retraite prochaine de ce dernier (3 pages, additionnel).
Robertson, Norman, fonctionnaire. Lettre de M. Robertson à ses parents, en date du
30 janvier 1941, dans laquelle U parle du décès de M. O. D. Skelton et des senti-
î ments qu'il éprouve à remplacer ce dernier au poste de sous-secrétaire d'État aux
Affaires extérieures (1 page).
Vanier, le très honorable G.-P., gouverneur général, militaire et diplomate. Correspondance, mémorandums, notes, discours, coupures de journaux et distinctions, datant
de 1843 à 1967, acquis en 1970-1971 (70 pieds).
Papiers en dépôt
|    Les documents suivants ont été mis en dépôt cette année:
Ait ken, Gordon, député fédéral, 3 pieds.
Blair, Gordon, député fédéral, 50 pieds.
Cadieu, Albert, député fédéral, 2 pieds.
Greene, l'hon. J. J., additionnel, 27 pieds.
Harkness, l'hon. D. S., additionnel, 13 pieds.
Hellyer, l'hon. P. T., 200 pieds.
Knowles, Stanley, député fédéral, 3 classeurs.
Laing, l'hon. Arthur, 300 pieds.
Mahoney, Vhon. Patrick, 20 pieds.
Martin, l'hon. Paul, additionnel, 13 pieds.
Monteith, l'hon. J. W., additionnel, 6 pieds.
L. 36 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Oison, l'hon. H. A., A pouces.
Pépin, l'hon. J.-L., 2 pieds.
Perrault, Ray, député fédéral, 38 pieds.
PickersgiU, Thon. J. W., additionnel, 128 pieds.
Wahn, Ion, député fédéral, 5 pieds.
ARCHIVES SPORTIVES
Les documents acquis pendant l'année 1972-1973 ont enrichi et diversifié la coUection des archives sportives. Un certain nombre d'organismes ont répondu favorablement
à l'appel lancé par la section, qui est, en outre, entrée en contact avec de nombreuses
personnes (sportifs, auteurs et dbecteurs sportifs) pour leur demander leur coUaboration.
Des articles décrivant le programme des Archives sportives dans ses grandes
lignes, ont paru dans le Bulletin de la Fédération des sports du Canada. On a fait
parvenu des renseignements similaires à toutes les écoles d'éducation physique du
Canada qui décernent des diplômes.
Acquisitions:
Ligue canadienne de football, copie. Mémoires de la Commission de la L.C.F. à
divers organismes fédéraux, au nom du gouvernement. Don de la commission
en 1972 (1 pouce).
Canadian Ladies Golf Association, originaux, 1919-1970. Procès-verbaux, documents
financiers, correspondance, résultats de championnats et albums souvenirs. Transférés aux Archives par l'association en 1972 ( 1 pied et 2 pouces).
Canadian Water Ski Association, originaux, 1951-1971. Dossiers du district national
et de la région de l'Ontario, dossiers et affiches de compétitions internationales
et de la World Water Ski Union. Transférés aux Archives par l'association en
1972 (6 pieds).
Dominion of Canada Rifle Association, originaux, vers 1867-1954. Volumes reUés
de procès-verbaux et de pubUcations. Transférés par l'association à la bibliothèque des Archives pubUques en 1972 (2 pieds).
Federation of Canadian Archers, originaux, 1942-1972. Publications, procès-verbaux, correspondance, documents finanders, listes de membres, résultats de
tournois et albums souvenirs. Transférés aux Archives par l'association en 1972
(3 pieds et 4 pouces).
Ontario Hockey Association. Procès-verbaux des réunions annuelles et des réunions
du conseU d'administration, 1913-1959. Copiés en 1972 grâce à l'autorisation de
1'O.H.A. (microfilm, 3 bobmes).
Ottawa-St. Lawrence Athletic Association. Procès-verbaux, correspondance, Ustes de
compétitions vers 1950-1971. Transférés aux Archives en 1973 par M. Pugh,
de la Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union (2 pieds et demi).
Connor, Harry, joueur de hockey. Original, album souvenir illustrant sa carrière,
vers 1922-1932. Offert en 1973 par Mm* Connor (1 pouce).
Curran, J. E. G., joueur de crosse. Originaux, vers 1884-1960, album souvenu,
photographies, règlements, registre des déUbérations de l'OriUia Mechanics Institute, 1867-1872. Également, les dossiers du News Letter d'OriUia. Offerts en
1973 par M. E. Curran d'Orillia (envbon 4 pieds). DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
37
Gladish, William M., journaliste. Originaux, 1900-1944, album souvenir, divers programmes et photographies sur le cyclisme (2 pouces).
McDonald, Roy, cycliste. Originaux, 1930-1962, album souvenir illustrant la grande
popularité des courses cyclistes de Six jours pendant les années 30. Offerts en
1972 par M. McDonald (4 pouces).
Mayer, Charles, rédacteur sportif. Originaux, vers 1920-1971, correspondance, photographies, albums souvenirs, publications, projets d'articles et d'émissions de radio.
Offerts en 1972 par Mme Mayer (environ 12 pieds).
Simpson, Thomas, joueur de tennis amateur. Copie, transcription d'une entrevue
enregistrée sur bande magnétique concernant le tennis amateur pendant les années
20 et 30. Offerte par M. R. J. Taylor d'Ottawa (16 pages).
raJRCHJVES COMMERCIALES
Cette année, les Archives ont reçu des documents de plusieurs sociétés canadiennes,
notamment de:
Home Bank of Canada
Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation
Canadian Freight Association
Canadian Passenger Association
Industrial Mortgage and Loan Co.
Buntin Gillies Co. Ltd.
Nous avons informé bon nombre d'autres entreprises de notre programme d'archives
commerciales. Grâce à nos conseils et à nos encouragements, plusieurs sociétés envisagent la possibilité de mettre sur pied des archives commerciales et des programmes
de gestion des documents. Au cours de l'année, nous avons mis l'accent sur l'acquisition
de documents et sur la nécessité de familiariser le monde des affaires avec nos buts et
nos objectifs. Cette préoccupation et la pénurie de personnel de soutien ont entraîné un
retard considérable dans la réalisation de nos projets. Nous espérons pouvoir nous
^reprendre au cours de l'année qui débute.
ARCHIVES DES GROUPES ETHNIQUES
En septembre 1971, le Cabinet a donné son accord de principe au programme des
Archives publiques visant à recueillir et à conserver les archives des communautés culturelles dont les origines ne sont ni françaises ni anglaises. En avril 1972, on a créé la
■àsous-section des archives des groupes ethniques et on l'a dotée d'un personnel à temps
plein. EUe compte actueUement quatre employés permanents, et le programme prévoit
Be recrutement d'employés temporaires pour satisfaire aux exigences linguistiques et
■autres. Bien que la sous-section fasse partie de la Division des manuscrits, elle s'intéresse à la totalité des sujets qui concernent la Direction des archives historiques.
Les Archives des groupes ethniques ont pour but d'assurer la conservation des
f documents d'archives de toutes sortes ayant trait aux minorités culturelles du Canada.
À ce jour, nous avons pris les moyens suivants pour arriver à cette fin: informer les
^particuliers et les organisations sur la nature et l'utilisation des documents d'archives;
prévenir aussi rapidement que possible la perte et la destruction de tels documents pour
des raisons d'ignorance ou de négligence; assurer la conservation permanente de tous les 38
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
documents présentant un intérêt historique en veillant à ce qu'Us soient déposés aux
Archives publiques ou dans un autre établissement de cette nature. La sous-section des
archives des groupes ethniques encourage et aide les particuUers et les organisations
à rassembler des documents et leur demande de collaborer à ses programmes.
Nous avons expédié des centaines de lettres aux journaux de ces groupes ethniques,
à des organisations et à des particuUers pour leur demander de collaborer au travaU des
Archives des groupes ethniques. Maintenant que le personnel est au complet, nous
élargirons notre travail dans ce domaine. Nous avons pris contact avec divers groupes,
lors de réunions spécialement organisées à cet effet et lors d'autres réunions, telles
YAWerta Cultural Heritage Conference, l'Ontario Heritage Conference ou encore la
Montreal Conference on the Future of Ukrainian Canadians in Quebec.
Les Archives des groupes ethniques ont reçu un accueil favorable et, peu à peu, cet
intérêt du public s'est traduit par des dons. Nous avons signé un accord de coopération
avec la Trans-Canada Alliance of German-Canadians et avec la Central Organization of
Sudeten German Clubs et ces organismes ont transmis aux Archives 28 pieds de documents avant la création de la sous-section. Depuis lors, le Comité canado-ukrainien
( Ukrainian Canadian Committee), qui a son siège social à Winnipeg, a signé un accord
analogue et nous a fait parvenu les procès-verbaux de ses réunions (envbon 5 000
pages) que nous avons préparés pour le microfilmage. D'autres documents de cet
organisme seront versés sous peu aux Archives. Le Canadian Polish Congress a aussi
convenu de déposer ici ses archives et en prépare le transfert. La première livraison doit
avoir Ueu en février. L'Alliance polonaise du Canada (Polish Alliance of Canada) nous
fera parvenir une partie de ses documents au début de la prochaine année financière.
Le conseU exécutif de la Fédération des jeunes Ukrainiens du Canada (Ukrainian Youth
Federation of Canada) a aussi transféré envbon 25 pieds de documents.
Le ConseU communautaire juif d'Ottawa (Jewish Community of Ottawa) a mis sur
pied un programme dynamique de rassemblement de documents d'archives, y compris
d'histobe orale, avec l'encouragement et les conseils des Archives des groupes ethniques. Les documents seront déposés ici et deviendront propriété des Archives. On a reçu
les premiers dépôts, qui comprennent des photographies exceptionnelles et envbon trois
pieds de documents manuscrits. Le ConseU central estonien du Canada (Estonian
Central Council of Canada) a également pris des mesures pour rassembler directement
des archives traitant de sa communauté et envisage de transférer éventuellement la
coUection complète aux Archives des groupes ethniques. On s'attend que des dispositions
similaires soient prises avec d'autres communautés.
Figurent aussi, au nombre des acquisitions importantes, les papiers de M. Walter
J. Bossy, de Montréal, qui contiennent des renseignements précieux sur la communauté
canado-ukrainienne. Nous avons reçu une première Uvraison de documents de Nor-
r0na Publishing Co. de Vancouver. JJ s'agit essentiellement de la presque totalité des
numéros de Norr0na, le seul journal norvégien du Canada, publié sans interruption
depuis 1910. Nous avons fait l'acquisition d'aquarelles remarquables de James Dixon,
montrant l'étabUssement de colons dans les Prairies, de même que de la coUection de
photographies de Laslo Vorkony, photographe montréalais d'ascendance hongroise.
Les Archives des groupes ethniques ont fait des acquisitions de moindre importance
qui portent sur les communautés copte, doukhobor, hollandaise, aUemande, juive,
lithuanienne, polonaise, espagnole et ukrainienne.
SECTION DES ARCfflVES FÉDÉRALES—Acquisitions—Au cours de l'année, la
section a reçu 7 190 pieds de documents, 1 162 bobines de microfilm et 4 pouces de DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
microfiches. Nous possédions 53 670 pieds de documents au total à la fin de l'année
financière. Nos acquisitions les plus importantes cette année sont les suivantes:
MinistSre de la DSfense nationale. Mille cent vingt-trois pieds de documents de la
■L Marine royale canadienne, commandement de l'Atlantique, portant sur tous les
m aspects des opérations navales, effectuées pendant le Seconde Guerre mondiale, et
B 395 pieds de documents en provenance des quartiers généraux des Forces cana-
m diennes (1939-1947). Plus tard, les QG nous ont fait parvenir d'autres documents
K. dans le cadre d'un important transfert de microfilms (1 080 bobines); les sujets
K traités dans ces microfilms sont soit du domaine administratif, soit des documen-
K taires sur l'activité de l'armée, de la marine, de l'aviation et de divers comités
s'échelonnant sur une période de quinze années, depuis la fin de la Seconde Guerre
B mondiale. Malheureusement, tes documents originaux, filmés par le ministère, ont
été détruits.
Direction des affaires indiennes. Afin de faciliter aux chercheurs l'accès aux documents
B; concernant les réclamations des Indiens, le ministère des Affaires indiennes et du
g Nord a transféré 1 800 pieds de documents de la Direction des affabes indiennes.
K Les dossiers portent sur tous les aspects de l'administration des affaires indiennes
au Canada, de 1870 à 1967.
MinistSre de l'IntSrieur. L'ensemble des documents de la Direction des terres fédérales,
de 1870 à 1930, comprenant plus de 500 pieds de dossiers, 828 bobines de micro-
K    film et 40 000 fiches à fenêtre. Leur contenu complète notre collection sur le sujet.
E   Ils renferment 500 000 lettres patentes dans lesquelles on accordait des terres fédé-
m  raies du Manitoba, de la Saskatchewan, de l'Alberta et de la Colombie-Britannique,
1    de 1883 à 1930; des directives sur les concessions de terres dans l'Ouest canadien;
Ë - des registres sur les concessions de terres aux sociétés de chemins de fer et à la
Compagnie de la baie d'Hudson; des dossiers sur les terres accordées selon les dis-
m   positions de la Loi du Manitoba de 1870; des listes des bénéficiaires de certificats de
K~ concession de terres aux Métis; des dossiers sur toutes les terres concédées aux
|     anciens combattants, qui ont vécu la résistance de Riel de 1870, la RébeUion du
I    Nord-Ouest de 1885 et la guerre d'Afrique du Sud, et sur les terres concédées aux
vétérans de la Gendarmerie royale du Nord-Ouest.
Commission gSologique. Notes d'arpentage couvrant la période 1900 à 1925:   2 500
m   carnets, soit 33 pieds. Ces notes complètent les carnets rédigés entre 1842 et 1900,
I,    que nous possédions déjà. En plus, la commission a transféré deux livres de copies
I    de lettres officielles d'époque, rassemblés entre 1865 et 1871; ils viennent compléter
m    le groupe de livres de copies de lettres (42 au total) datant de 1865 à 1908 inclusivement.
Ministère du Travail. Nous avons reçu pendant l'année 300 pieds de documents rela-
i    tifs à divers champs d'activité du ministère: syndicalisme international, conventions
f    collectives, assurance-chômage, prévention des accidents, indemnités pour les accidents du travail et Commission d'enquête Norris sur le commerce.
Direction des entreprises. Mille deux cent cinquante pieds de documents provenant de
sociétés à charte, créées selon les dispositions de la Loi fédérale sur les sociétés, et
qui ont renoncé à leur charte entre 1867 et 1959.
Direction des parcs nationaux. Le Service des sites historiques, du ministère des Affaires
I     indiennes et du Nord, a décidé de rendre accessibles les rapports manuscrits de
;     quelques-uns de ses anciens travaux de recherche. Us sont actueUement distribués, L
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES j
par l'entremise de la Section des archives fédérales, aux Archives des provinces et I
aux Archives du territoire du Yukon. On peut aussi les trouver à la bibliothèque I
des Archives publiques et à notre section.
Bureau du Conseil privé. Les procès-verbaux du Comité de guerre du Cabinet, rédigés I
entre le début de 1942 et la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, nous ont été I
transférés; nous les avons mis à la disposition des chercheurs. La totalité de ces
procès-verbaux et des pièces à l'appui (1939-1945) se trouve sur microfUm.
Ministère des Affaires extSrieures. Plus de 600 pieds de pièces tirées des archives cen- I
traies; U s'agit de la série «39», qui porte sur la période allant de la formation du I
ministère, en 1909, jusqu'à 1961. Les dossiers traitent de tous les secteurs d'activité I
du ministère.
Société centrale d'hypothèques et de logement. Les documents du projet Ajax de déve- I
loppement des entreprises (1947-1957) nous sont venus de la Direction de la ges- I
tion des documents, Us relatent les efforts qui ont permis de sauver un projet d'habi- I
tation conçu pendant la guerre, ainsi que le travail de planification accompli en I
prévision de la croissance de la région de Toronto après la guerre. La SCHL a I
appliqué des principes pratiques d'urbanisme dans le bût de créer la «première I
communauté industrielle canadienne entièrement planifiée». Cette acquisition repré- I
sente 10 pieds de documents.
Direction de la géographie. Environ 35 pieds de documents couvrant les années 1949- I
1968, créés pour la plupart à la Division de la géographie du ministère des Mines I
et des Relevés techniques. Ils portent sur la géographie urbaine, les études sur les I
ports, l'utilisation des terres dans les provinces, l'analyse du terrain, les études I
économiques régionales, l'hydrologie et les projets du ressort de la Loi sur la remise I
en valeur et l'aménagement des terres agricoles.
Commission des prix et des revenus. Documents de travail généraux, études sur les prix I
et les salaires, documentation sur le programme national de lutte contre l'inflation I
et un grand nombre de documents de recherche, soit au total 29 pieds.
Commission canadienne des transports. Rapports annuels de 1877 à 1950, depuis les I
locomotives à vapeur et électriques et les messageries jusqu'à la Commission des I
transports du Canada et ses prédécesseurs: en tout, 240 pieds.
Instruments de recherche—La préparation de catalogues topographiques pour les divers I
groupes avance. À la fin de l'année financière, nous avions terminé les catalogues
des documents des ministères des Mines et des Relevés techniques, du Nord cana- I
dien et des Ressources nationales, de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration et de la I
Commission de contrôle de l'énergie atomique, de la Direction des mines, de la I
Direction des levés et de la cartographie, de la Direction des ressources hydrauU- I
ques et du gouvernement du territobe du Yukon. De plus, les catalogues topogra- I
phiques des documents du Cabinet du gouverneur général, du ministère des Af- I
faires extérieures et de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada sont aux trois quarts ter- I
minés, et nous avons commencé ceux du ConseU du trésor et du ministère de la I
MiUce et de la Défense. Notre service de traitement des données a créé des réper- I
tobes de mots clefs pour les documents des ministères des Finances, de l'Industrie I
et du Commerce et de la Défense nationale (armée), et prépare des instruments I
de recherche analogues pour les documents de la Direction de l'administration du |
Nord et pour une bonne partie des documents du Canadien National. Ces instruments de recherche sont ou seront disponibles sur microfilm de 16 mm. ERECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
41
Publications—Le numéro trois de notre petit bulletin (Programme d'accès aux fonds
officiels) a été publié. On a de plus commencé à préparer la publication des inven-
1    taires des fonds de la section. Nous sommes à choisir le format adéquat.
Résumé statistique—Pendant l'année, la section a acquis 7 190 pieds de documents et a
I traité (c.-à-d. vérifié) 6 563 pieds d'archives; l'accumulation des articles non traités
se chiffre à 12 867 pieds. Voici un tableau de la situation:
Retard/
organi
Retard/
Total
Documents
sation-
mise en
des
Sous-ss
«tion
traités
sélection
caisse
pièces
Archives militaires
7 947
1 123
4 083
13 153
Archives législatives et judiciaires
9 701
884
454
11 039
Archives financières, commerciales
41 cull urelles
Archives de la main-d'œi
ressources nationales
vre et des
7 120
3 070
1 415
11 705
Krchives des transports e
publics
t des travaux
6 916
676
779
8 371
Total
40 468
5 872
7 249
53 670
Ces chiffres nous montrent qu'au cours de l'année, le volume de documents
entièrement traités s'est accru d'environ 7 000 pieds, que la quantité de documents
à organiser ou choisir a augmenté d'à peu près 1 800 pieds, et que le nombre de
pièces à mettre en caisse et à répertorier a diminué de 370 pieds.
SECTION DE LA RECHERCHE ET DES RENSEIGNEMENTS—Cette section a été
créée en août 1972 dans le but de coordonner dans un bureau central tous les travaux de
JBcherche entrepris par les commis et le personnel professionnel pour répondre aux demandes de renseignements que reçoit la Division des manuscrits. La section dirige^ aussi
le travail de bureau et de secrétariat, exécuté par le personnel des services de secrétariat
pour traiter la correspondance de la division (enregistrement, dactylographie, classement
et répertoriage des rapports de recherche historique, compilation de statistiques de
œcherche pour le compte de la division). On a ajouté une sous-section de généalogie,
composée de trois employés permanents, chargés de coordonner et de dbiger les
recherches écrites et les services de consultation sur place ou par téléphone que la
division offre au public dans ce domaine.
SECTION DES SERVICES AUXILLURES—Exposition «Miroir du passé du Canada».
La préparation des pièces d'exposition provenant de la Division des manuscrits a
été coordonnée par la Section des services auxiliaires. Cela comprenait la préparation
des notices de localisation et la responsabilité de veUler à ce que tous les documents
manuscrits soient envoyés à la Section de restauration des peintures et estampes,
pour y être l'objet de mesures de protection appropriées, et qu'ils soient retournés
à qui de droit à la fin de l'exposition.
Index général—L'index général est un index à références multiples au catalogue général
(placé dans la salle de consultation) et aux notices d'inventaire des répertoires de
manuscrits et de groupes d'archives. En outre, il contient des fichiers nominaux
ou par matière se rapportant à 118 instruments de recherche ou groupes de papiers. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
The Ethnic Mosaic
La mosaïque ethnique
Urban Development
Le développement urbain DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
les divers aspects de la vie canadienne.
L'index général compte envbon 90 000 notices. Au fil des ans, on a préparé des
fiches par matière sans souci de normalisation, ce qui a eu pour résultat que des
fiches, traitant de tel ou tel sujet, pouvaient se retrouver sous plusieurs vedettes.
Jusqu'à maintenant, on a révisé, redactylographié et classé dans l'index général envbon
90 % des fiches par matière, de même que les fiches de renvoi appropriées. En même
temps, nous avons dressé un catalogue de spécimens ou de types de notices par
matière, lequel est aussi achevé à 90 %. À l'avenir, l'exactitude de toutes les fiches
nominales et par matière à ajouter sera vérifiée avant qu'elles ne soient placées dans
l'index général. On a aussi élaboré un ensemble de règles pour éviter les erreurs de
classement.
Répertobe des thèses—La rédaction du répertobe des thèses a été terminée en mars et
remise à l'imprimeur en vue de sa pubUcation.
Salle de consultation—On se prépare actuellement à modifier la formule d'inscription
pour s'assurer que les chercheurs sont parfaitement au courant des règles et règlements des divisions des manuscrits et des archives fédérales qui les concernent En
raison de l'emploi croissant du mode d'inscription, on a retenu les services d'un commis
I supplémentaire qui aide le commis à l'inscription dans ses fonctions à la salle de
¥ consultation. RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Bureau de prêt—On élabore actueUement des plans pour fabe du bureau de prêt une
sous-section autonome et indépendante, dans le but d'accroître son efficacité. Le
bureau comprend actueUement le coordonnateur des prêts et un préposé au magasin,
ainsi que du personnel d'autres sections qui y travatilent par roulement. Ce système
sera remplacé par un nouveau ob le coordonnateur sera secondé par quatre préposés
au magasin et un adjoint.
LE BUREAU DE LONDRES
Les activités du bureau sont demeurées très nombreuses tout au cours de l'année.
Ainsi, le bureau a pris des dispositions pour l'acquisition de la coUection Wolfe-
Burgoyne-Douglas, et les papiers du major Henry Dives Townshend. Parmi les fonds
offerts aux Archives pubUques, on trouve les papiers de M. J. L. Tiarks, une partie de
la coUection Cyriax touchant l'Arctique et les papiers de M. WiUiam Loch du Nouveau-
Brunswick.
On a réaUsé au PubUc Record Office (CO. 5 et 323; cab. 2 et 41) soixante
bobines de microfilm avec les dossiers ministériels. Une bobine des papiers Milner a été
obtenue de la bibliothèque Bodleian d'Oxford. Trente-sept bobines de microfilm de
documents appartenant à des particuliers ont de plus été envoyées aux Archives pubUques dont les dossiers du Royal Army Médical CoUege, de M. Bernardo, du Royal
ArtiUery Institution et de PArmy Museums Ogtivy Trust. Nous sommes très reconnaissants envers les personnes qui ont permis de mener à bien nos travaux de reproduction.
De plus, le bureau de Londres a reçu 470 demandes de renseignements, dont 120
par correspondance et 350 personnelles ou téléphoniques.
L
BUREAU DE PARIS
L'année 1972 aura été marquante dans le destin du bureau de Paris. Tom d'abord
le R. P. René Baudry, c.s.c, qui dirigeait ce service depuis 1958, est décédé le 25 juillet
1972 à la suite d'une longue maladie qui l'avait empêché pendant plus de sept mois de
remplb ses fonctions. Les Archives pubUques du Canada ont perdu en lui un collaborateur dévoué. Un hommage posthume lui a été rendu à Paris le 21 mars 1973, au
corns d'une réunion de l'Assodation France-Canada à laqueUe assistaient, entre autres
personnalités, M. Guy Duboscq, directeur général des Archives de France, et plusieurs
conservateurs en chef des Archives nationales.
Monsieur Jean-Marie LeBlanc, archiviste à la Division des manuscrits de 1966
à 1972, a remplacé le R. P. Baudry. Il a pris la direction du bureau le 1" novembre
1972. Au même moment, le bureau quittait l'ambassade pour emménager dans les deux
pièces qui lui avaient été assignées au Centre culturel canadien. L'adresse actueUe du
bureau est 5, rue de Constantine, 75007 Paris.
La mort du R. P. Baudry, l'arrivée d'un nouveau directeur, le déménagement,
autant de facteurs qui ont ralenti le rythme des acquisitions de documents. Le microfilmage et Pinventabe des documents de la série E des Archives des Colonies se sont
poursuivis cependant de façon régutière. Il en est de même de la recherche de documents d'intérêt canadien dans les fonds du Minutier central des notaires.
Dans le cadre de la réorganisation du bureau, deux projets ont déjà été réaUsés:
une liste des volumes en possession des Archives pubUques du Canada à Paris, et un
inventaire des dossiers accumulés depuis plus de vingt-cinq ans. La bibUothèque du
bureau comprend envbon 1 800 volumes, presque tous sur l'histobe du Canada. Une
fois cataloguée, cette bibliothèque rendra de meilleurs services aux étudiants canadiens DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
45
à Paris et aux chercheurs français qui s'intéressent à l'histoire du Canada. L'inventabe
des dossiers (environ 40 pieds de documents) s'imposait pour répondre avec
plus de facilité aux demandes de renseignements et pour réorienter le programme de
tecberche de documents relatifs au Canada dans les dépôts d'archives de France.
B D'autres projets sont en cours en vue de réorganiser le programme d'acquisition
de documents.
BIBLIOTHEQUE
DES ARCHIVES
PUBLIQUES
La bibliothèque des Archives publiques a centré ses
activités internes sur le renforcement de son rôle et de
sa position au sein de la Direction des archives historiques.
Chaque division influence, par ses objectifs propres, l'acquisition de nouveaux documents. Il faut trouver, évaluer et acheter des ouvrages de base ayant une valeur historique et descriptive pour compléter les collections d'archives et autres documents.
La bibliothèque est en train d'organiser des petites bibliothèques dans toutes les
ravisions des Archives publiques du Canada. Chacune a son propre catalogue-auteurs
et son catalogue topographique. Ces bibliothèques, qui sont des annexes de la bibliothèque principale, sont gérées par le chef de la Section des services extérieurs et de la
circulation. Tous les livres et brochures sont inscrits au catalogue général et peuvent
cbculer à l'intérieur de l'édifice.
Catalogage des brochures rares—Le catalogage des brochures rares, datant de 1867 à
1900, est achevé. Le travail est déjà commencé pour la tranche suivante. Nous espérons
terminer cette année, (1973-1974) le catalogage pour l'années 1850 à 1866 inclusivement.
Reproduction sur microfiches—Les travaux progressent d'une façon satisfaisante. La
bibliothèque tient à remercier la Metropolitan Toronto Central Library pour son aide
et pour les ouvrages rares qu'elle lui a prêtés.
En 1972-1973, la Bibliothèque a contribué au cours d'archives et à une journée
de formation ayant pour thème les sources généalogiques; elle a envoyé sa part de
notices à l'International Bibliography of Historical Science.
La Bibliothèque était représentée aux réunions des associations suivantes: la
Fédération internationale des associations de bibliothécaires, à Budapest; la Canadian Library Association, à Regina; l'Association canadienne des bibliothécabes de
langue française, à La Malbaie, et la Société historique du Canada, à Montréal. Le
purecteur général adjoint a été désigné comme délégué de l'Association canadienne
des bibliothécaires de langue française à la Société canadienne-française de protection du droit d'auteur.
Voici les statistiques résumant les activités de la bibliothèque des Archives
■publiques du 1er avril 1972 au 31 mars 1973:
Services au public-
Personnes inscrites
Demandes de renseignements
Reproductions
8 959
3 537
75 414 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Catalogage:
Livres, brochures et in-plano catalogués 4 128
Fiches du catalogue de la bibUothèque rédigées
et dassées 22 312
Microfiches 584
Volumes, brochures et Uvres rares reUés
in-plano montés 2 368
Acquisitions:
Dons 1 125
Livres et brochures 2 975
Microfilms (bobines) 425
Périodiques 5 214
PubUcations officielles 5 857
SECTION DE LA RECHERCHE ET DE LA RÉFÉRENCE—Le nombre de demandes
de renseignements reçues par la section augmente régulièrement. Bien qu'eUe s'adresse
surtout aux historiens et au grand pubUc, la section s'intéresse beaucoup aux étudiants
en histoire du Canada quels que soient leur niveau et leur Ueu de résidence au Canada.
Nous portons une attention toute particuUère aux demandes de renseignements qui nous
viennent des régions les plus reculées du Canada, pauvres en bibUothèques.
Nous achevons l'inventaire préliminabe et Pindexage des biographies non cataloguées; 350 notices ont été ajoutées à l'index biographique.
La section poursuit la diffusion des brochures historiques imprimées à l'occasion
du centenaire du Canada, ainsi que d'autres pubUcations de la Commission du cen-
tenaire.
SECTION DES SERVICES EXTÉRIEURS ET DE LA CIRCULATION—Depuis sa
création en octobre 1970, la section a étudié et implanté une méthode uniforme de
circulation de la documentation qui est communiquée au personnel et aux chercheurs.
Les services extérieurs, qui sont responsables de l'établissement de bibUothèques
dans les divisions et/ ou les sections des Archives publiques du Canada, ont entrepris,
en novembre 1972, l'analyse de chacune d'entre elles. Le relevé des bibliothèques des
trois divisions suivantes est achevé: gravures et photos, manuscrits et archives fédérales.
Dans chacune de ces divisions, le chef a désigné un emplacement convenant aux rayonnages et tous les Uvres, brochures et albums ont été envoyés aux sections du catalogue,
des acquisitions ou de la reliure de la bibliothèque des Archives publiques, selon le cas.
Avant d'être retournés, les Uvres sont classifies, catalogués et réparés. Pour chaque
collection on est en train d'implanter une méthode de cbculation et de dresser des
catalogues. Le chef de la Section des services extérieurs et de la cbculation assume
l'entière responsabilité de ces bibliothèques.
La section espère achever l'an prochain l'inventaire complet du fonds de la
bibUothèque des Archives pubUques.
SECTION DU CATALOGUE ET DE LA RELIURE—Cette année, la section a connu
une activité plus intense en raison de la réévaluation de son programme de travaU et de DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
47
l'arrivée d'un nouveau catalographe. Elle utilise maintenant un nouveau procédé de
reproduction des fiches du catalogue pour les entrées courantes. Le catalogage se fait
selon l'ordre de priorité suivant: ouvrages de référence, documents généalogiques, documentation courante de valeur historique, Uvres rares. L'accumulation de travaU est proportionnelle à l'expansion des diverses divisions des Archives pubUques.
Un programme systématique de reliure, de conservation et de restauration du fonds
de la Bibliothèque est en cours. Mais, tant que la Section de la conservation des documents manquera de personnel, certains ouvrages rares continueront à circuler dans un
état peu satisfaisant.
La préparation des livres pour la restauration et la reliure a maintenant Ueu à la
nouvelle Section des acquisitions et de la reUure, créée le 1" avril 1973.
SECTION DES PÉRIODIQUES ET DES PUBLICATIONS OFFICEELLES—L'inventaire des périodiques de la bibliothèque des Archives publiques avance rapidement.
On a achevé celui des titres commençant par les lettres A à N, et W à Z, et mis à jour
les fiches des périodiques et les instruments de travaU.
Parmi les nouveaux titres, mentionnons les trois suivants qui, même s'ils ne représentent pas une collection complète, sont d'une importance certaine:
Art Journal, Londres, 1839-1912;
E   Canadian Report, cause en appel, 1828-1913 (complet);
Semaine religieuse de QuSbec, 1888-
Cette année, la section a aussi entrepris l'inventaire des publications officielles
provinciales que possède la bibliothèque des Archives publiques; ce dernier n'en est
encore qu'au stade préliminaire.
< Par suite d'un taux élevé de cbculation, la section doit conserver les doubles de
fertains périodiques et publications officielles. Elle tient une Uste de ces doubles et y
apporte régulièrement les modifications voulues.
Liste des donateurs, 1972-1973
Br* T. D. Aldon
M. J. Andreassen
Bernard Amtmann, Inc.
pM"1* V. Barnum
M. A. Beaulieu
M. M. Bell
Bibliophile du Canadiana
M. D. G. Blair
M. J. C. Bonar
\Mm° F. Booth
Université de Calgary
Canada Deposit Insurance Corp.
R. Côté, f.i.c.
|M1Ie D. E. Darwin
Étfme L. Ferland
■["• B. Fisher
[Docteur E. L. Gaudet
Glenbow-Alberta Institute
Mrae D. HaUdorson
M. G. E. Higgins
M. R. H. Hubbard
Institute of Public Affairs,
Université Dalhousie
M. E. C. Joseph
Mairie de Kingston (Ont.)
M. Y. Lamonde
M. R. LeMoine
M"" H. Luedemann
M. G. A. McGibbon
Docteur E. D. MacPhee
M. B. Marceau
M. J. J. Martin
Mm* H. C. Mathews
Mika Silk Screening Ltd.
M. E. MinvUle RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
M. C. A. MitcheU
Mme M. Morris
Archives provinciales du Nouveau-
Brunswick
Canadian Industries Ltd.
Agence canadienne de développement
international
Canadian Textile Institute/Institut
canadien des textiles
M. K. V. Chandrasekharaiah
Mme V. R. Clemmer
M"" S. Club
M"" A. Coderre
Conseil régional de développement
de l'Abitibi-Témiscamingue
M. G. Cook
M. D. Cooter
Mme G. Daniels
M. F. A. Dowe
M. J. L. Finn
France, musée de la Monnaie
M. F. Gill
M. R. Gustafson
Conseil du comté d'Hastings
M. E. D. Hooper
Information Abitibi-Témiscamingue
Mm° A. Johnson
M. J. Kidd
Docteur I. Kovacs
Mme G. Lanctot
Colonel R. A. Logan
M,n" C. H. McAfee
M"e E. MacMUlan
M"* D. McQueen
M1" D. Martin
M. J. R. Matheson
Brigadier général J. L. Melville
M",e E. Miller
Choix d'imprimés extraits du fonds d'archives
Papiers Bossy
Collection Dunn (James)
Papiers Elis (S. C.)
Collection Frieman
CoUection d'archives des syndi
Papiers MacDonald (A. E.)
Missouri Historical Society
E. MitcheU, s.g.m.
M"e E. Morton
Christ Church Cathedral, Ottawa
Collegiate Institute, Ottawa
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission
M. J. Prémont
M. F. A. Rahmer
M. l'abbé G. Riou
M. J.-P. Roy
Bureau du maire de Saskatoon
M. E. F. S. Smith
Sir C. Stuart
M. K. W. Totten
M'"e G. Train
M. A. Vachon
Waterloo Historical Society
M'"e L. B. Weaver
M. B. Whitham
M. D. S. Wilson
Université d'Ottawa
M. E. Phelps
Capitaine T. C. Pullen
M"e L. B. Rhodes
M. H. Rosebrugh
Administration de la Voie maritime
du Saint-Laurent
Simon and Pierre Publishers
M. J. G. Stevens
M. R. J. Tarye
M"' J. Trielhard
Mme A. Tyler
M. J. L. Vinke
M. R. D. Watt
M. E. D. Weber
Mme M. G. Willoughby
M. R. Wood
Papiers MacKenzie (J. A.)
CoUection du Conseil des ports
nationaux
Collection Tweed (T.)
Defense Medical Association of Canada
(Association canadienne pour la
médecine préventive)
Papiers de la famille Fortune
Collection King (W. L. M.)
Papiers McCracken (G. W.)
Collection de l'Université McGill
Collection des Archives nationales
ethniques
Collection Sifton (A. L.) DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
49
Volumes importants achetés pendant l'année 1972-1973
Mfguments against an Elective Legislative Council, Toronto, 1856.
Bourgeois, G.-A., État du Haut-Saint-Maurice ou de la rSserve forestiSre des Trois-
I    Rivières, Rome, 1885.
A Brief Sketch of the Cape Breton Mission, Edimbourg, 1851.
British American Land Company, Quebec Emigrant Agency Office, To Emigrants and
W   Natives in Search of Lands for Settlement . . . 20th June 1842, s.d.1842.
Canada, Secrétariat d'État, Exposé des réclamations adressées au gouvernement fédéral,
Wk  en conséquence de ^insurrection survenue dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest,
I    Ottawa, 1871.
Collection P. Brunet.
Collection Ulric Barthe.
A Complete History of the Present War, Londres, 1761.
Contract for a Line of Steamers to Run between Quebec or Montreal and Liverpool,
I    Québec, 1852.
De Boilieu, L., Recollections of Labrador Life, Londres, 1861.
Dennys, N. B., An Account of the Cruise, Londres, 1862.
Diéreville, Relation du voyage du Port Royal de l'Acadie, ou de la Nouvelle-France,
I     Rouen, 1708.
A Full Exposure of the C.B.S.; or, Dark LanternAssociation, Brockvtile, Ontario, 1861 (?)
Hare, F., The Allies and the Late Ministry Defended against France and the Present
m   Friends of France, Londres, 1711-1712.
Hatin, L.-E., Histoire pittoresque des voyages dans les cinq parties du monde, Paris,
i     1844.
Histoire des traités de paix et autres négociations du dix-septième siècle, La Haye, 1725.
Jésuites, Lettres des missions. Lettres des nouvelles missions du Canada, s.Ln.d.
Jésuites, Lettres des missions. Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, écrites des missions étrangères, vol. 23, Paris, 1738.
Laberge, A., Journalistes, écrivains et artistes, Montréal, 1945;
Peintres et Scrivains d'hier et d'aujourd'hui, Montréal, 1938;
Propos sur nos écrivains, Montréal, 1954.
Langdon,  J.  E.,  Canadian Silversmiths and Their Marks,   1667-1867,  Lunenberg,
^Vermont, 1960.
Molloy, C, De jure maritimo et navati; or, A Treatise of Affairs Maritime and of
Commerce, Londres, 1782.
Petitot, E., Dictionnaire de la langue DSnS-DindjiS, Paris, 1876.
A Review of the Government and Grievances of the Province of Quebec, Londres,
[     1788.
Rouquette, L.-F., YÉpopSe blanche, Paris, 1930.
Ryan, A., Caricature politique du Canada. Free Lance Political Caricature in Canada,
i   Montréal, 1904.
Thieme, U. et Becker, F., Allgemeines lexikon der bildenden kunstler von der antike bis
\     zur gegenwart, Leipzig, 1907-1950.
Upper Canada, An act for granting His Majesty a certain sum of money, out of the
funds applicable to the use of this province to defray the expenses of amending the 50 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
public highways and roads, and building of bridges in several districts thereof,
adopté le 13 mars 1811, n.p., 1811.
Wood, Report of... Relative to ... Pembina Settlement..., Washington, 1850.
COLLECTION NATIONALE ^ centième anniversabe des Archives
ïyc rADTEC xtt" r»T A 1\JC publiques coïncidait avec la tenue de qua-
DEL CAKlli& Jil  rL,ATN& ^ congrès internationaux au Canada,
tous liés de près à la cartographie et au
champ d'activité de la Collection nationale de cartes et plans; ce sont le congrès
de l'Union géographique internationale, la conférence de PAssodation cartographique
internationale, le congrès de la Société internationale de photogrammétrie et la 24*
assemblée du Congrès géologique international. La Collection nationale de cartes et
plans avait préparé une grande exposition de cartes, établies comme archives, à l'occasion du Congrès géographique international, tenu à Montréal. Pour la conférence sur
l'histoire de l'urbanisation en Amérique du Nord, la coUection avait organisé à l'Université York, en janvier 1973, une autre exposition moins importante sur les ressources
documentabes d'études en urbanisme.
Congrès reçus par la CoUection nationale de cartes et plans —En août dernier, la
CoUection nationale de cartes et plans était l'hôte de la sixième conférence annuelle
de l'Association des cartothèques canadiennes et d'une assemblée extraordinaire de
l'Association cartographique internationale sur l'histoire de la cartographie.
Assodation des cartothèques canadiennes, 28 août—1er septembre 1972—Le 28 août,
l'archiviste fédéral adjoint, M. Bernard Weilbrenner, accueillait officiellement les délégués. Voici la Uste des exposés présentés: «The Role of Maps in Courts of Law» (Le
rôle des cartes et plans dans les corns de justice), par Don W. Thomson, auteur de
Men and Meridians: A History of Surveying and Mapping in Canada; «Early Maps
in Current City Development» (Les cartes anciennes et l'expansion urbaine contemporaine), par Robert F. Legget, auteur de The Rideau Waterway; «Computer Map-
ping. Some Unanswered Questions» (Cartographie électronique—quelques questions),
par D. R. F. Taylor, de l'Université Carleton, qui a compilé le Computer Atlas of
Ottawa-Hull; «Maps of Canada in the British Museum» (Cartes du Canada au British
Museum), par Helen WaUis, chef de la saUe des cartes et plans au British Museum;
«Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Maps and the Teaching of Canadian Studies»
(Cartes et plans des xix" et xx" siècles et l'enseignement des études canadiennes),
par John Warkentin, Université York, coauteur de l'Historical Atlas of Manitoba;
«The Urban Development of Quebec City 1800-1900» (L'expansion urbaine de la
vtile de Québec, 1800-1900), par Edward Dabi, membre de notre personnel, D. T.
Ruddell, du Musée national de l'Homme, Hélène Espesset, de l'Université Laval, et
Marc Lafrance, des Sites historiques nationaux; «Design for a National Map CoUection» (Ébauche d'une collection nationale des cartes et plans), par T. E. Layng;
«Some Thoughts Regarding a Foreign Map CoUection» (Une coUection de cartes
étrangères—quelques considérations), par C. H. Smith; «Cabot's LandfaU—The Case
for Cape Bonavista» (L'arrivée de Cabot—pourquoi le Cap Bonavista?), par Fabien
O'Dea, de Saint-Jean (Terre-Neuve), auteur de la monographie Seventeenth Century
Cartography of Newfoundland; et «Inventory and Prospect in Canadian Toponymy»
(Inventaire et perspectives de la toponymie canadienne), par J. A. Rayburn, chef
du service de recherche toponymique, ministère de l'Énergie, des Mines et des Res- MRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
51
■L Depuis, M. L. M. Sebert a rendu compte des travaux cartographiques, du
ministère de l'Énergie, des Mines et des Ressources et M. P. J. Hubert, de la Division
du recensement de Statistique Canada, a parlé de l'accessibilité des cartes de référence
qui ont servi au recensement de 1971. Les délégués ont pu visiter Statistique Canada,
le ministère de l'Énergie, des Mines et des Ressources, la cartothèque de l'Université
Carleton et celle de l'Université d'Ottawa, le By town Booker aft (restauration de
cartes et plans), ainsi que les Archives publiques. Plusieurs commissions, un questionnaire et l'étude des affaires courantes ont retenu l'attention des participants. Reçus
par les Archives publiques à une dégustation de vins et fromages, les délégués ont
aussi été les hôtes d'une réception, d'un banquet et de quelques réunions sans caractère
officiel.
K. Tous ont été unanimes à reconnaître le succès de la conférence à laquelle les
États-Unis, l'Angleterre, l'Ecosse, les Pays-Bas et le Canada étaient représentés.
Séance sur l'histobe de la cartographie, Association cartographique internationale,
23 août 1972—-On a demandé à la Collection nationale des cartes et plans d'être l'hôte,
pendant la conférence de l'Association cartographique internationale, d'une séance
extraordinaire où quatre éminents spécialistes de l'histoire de la cartographie pré-
senteraient des communications.
La séance fut présidée par Helen Wallis, chef de la salle des cartes au British
Museum, qui avait organisé le programme. Grâce à la traduction simultanée, les
délégués, venus de plusieurs parties du monde, ont pu suivre les conférences en anglais,
en français ou en espagnol.
Us ont entendu M. Joseph Breu, d'Autriche, parler de la cartographie sous la
dynastie des Habsbourg au xrx* siècle («Mapping under the Hapsburg Monarchy
in the Nineteenth Century»); M. Sândor Radô, de Hongrie, des cartes de Hongrie
des xvi° et xvif siècles («Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Maps of Hungary»),
en collaboration avec Klara Nemes; Francisco Vazquez-Maure, d'Espagne, a traité
en espagnol des expéditions cartographiques espagnoles sur le littoral du Pacifique
du continent nord-américain, 1774-1792 («Spanish Cartographie Expedition to the
American Coasts of the North Pacific 1774-1792»; J.B. Harley, d'Angleterre, de
«La cartographie militaire dans l'Est de l'Amérique du Nord, 1760-1785: orientations
futures» («Military Cartography in Eastern North America, 1760-1785: Some Future
Directions»).
* À l'issue de ces communications, les Archives publiques donnèrent une réception en l'honneur de tous les participants qui purent visiter à loisir la Collection
nationale des cartes et plans,  faisant  aussi connaissance avec notre fonds et nos
. install ations.
f   En   1972-1973,   1 362  inscriptions ont été  reçues  pour le Catalogue coUectif
national des cartes, comparativement à 3 353 en 1971-1972, première année d'existence du service. Cette baisse est probablement attribuable à la publication prochaine
de nouvelles règles catalographiques pour le système  automatisé,  les bibliothèques
■membres hésitant à transmettre des données qui devront peut-être être reprises au
Hmplet.
Le programme d'automatisation lui-même a toutefois considérablement progressé
au cours de l'année. Le comité du Catalogue collectif national s'est réuni trois fois,
de février 1972 à février 1973. L'une de ces réunions a particulièrement porté fruit:
le président du comité y a présenté une proposition générale visant l'établissement
p'un format MARC canadien pour les cartes. Vers la fin de la période à l'étude, des 52
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
dispositions étaient prises pour l'affectation permanente d'un employé à l'inscription
dans le Catalogue collectif national de la Collection nationale de cartes et plans.
La CoUection nationale de cartes et plans a une fois de plus contribué au cours
d'archives en participant à bon nombre des séances et en expliquant sa philosophie
et ses activités au cours des deux journées consacrées à la division.
On a demandé au service de la Collection nationale de cartes et plans de
faire des suggestions sur ce qu'on pourrait offrir au président des États-Unis, Richard
Nixon, à l'occasion de sa visite au Canada en avril 1972. Nous avons choisi une
carte maritime, datant de 1771, du fleuve Saint-Laurent, de Québec à l'île d'Anticosti,
établie par Thomas Jefferys (16957-1771) et imprimée par Robert Sayer (1725-1794).
Cette attrayante gravure, coloriée à la main, a paru dans l'édition de 1775 de
Y American Atlas, que les officiers britanniques, américains et français ont énormément consulté pendant la guerre de l'Indépendance des États-Unis. Le tableau ci-
dessous indique le nombre total des acquisitions faites, des renseignements fournis,
des photographies reproduites et des prêts consentis par la Collection nationale de
cartes et plans. En 1972-1973, les acquisitions se sont chiffrées au-delà de 10 000
pièces de plus qu'en 1971-1972.
Acquisitions, renseignements, reproductions photographiques et prêts
Section
des cartes
canadiennes
Section
des cartes
étrangères
Total
Acquisitions
26 027
17 108
43 135
Renseignements
par téléphone
519
249
768
par lettre
938
136
1 074
par les chercheurs au cours
de visites guidées
1 410
130
1 540
Demandes totales
2 867
515
3 382
Reproductions photographiques
8 876
25
8 901
761
761
SECTION DES CARTES CANADIENNES—L'année 1972-1973 a été très animée à
la Section des cartes canadiennes. M"'' Betty May fut nommée chef de la section le
1er avril 1972. Le nombre des employés est passé de 11 à 16. La Section des cartes
canadiennes est divisée en trois secteurs de travail: acquisitions et contrôle, catalogage
et référence.
Le personnel de la Section des cartes canadiennes s'est occupé activement de la
préparation des conférences et des expositions dont U est question dans la première
partie. Le chef du secteur référence, M. Edward Dahl, a de plus mis au point le kiosque
des Archives publiques dans le cadre de l'assemblée de la Société des archivistes américains qui s'est tenue à Columbus (Ohio). L'équipe a assisté aux conférences de
l'Association historique canadienne, à Montréal, et à celle de Kenneth Nebenzahl Jr.,
à Chicago, sur l'histoire de la cartographie. Plusieurs de nos membres ont fait partie du
bureau et de comités de l'Association des cartothèques canadiennes. M1" Betty May est
demeurée agent des publications et membre du comité du Catalogue collectif national DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
53
des cartes; elle était de plus présidente du comité chargé d'examiner la révision et la
nouvelle publication du RSpertoire des collections canadiennes de cartes. M. Edward
Dahl a assumé la présidence d'un comité chargé d'étudier la possibilité de produire des
fac-similés de cartes considérées comme archives, destinés à la vente.
I M. Edward Dahl a rédigé un article intitulé «Cartes de référence pour l'étude de
l'histoire urbaine, dans la Collection nationale de cartes et plans», pour la Urban History
Review. Betty May a continué à fournir des noms de cartes canadiennes actuelles au
Bulletin trimestriel de l'Association des bibliothèques spécialisées, division géographie
et cartes.
Acquisitions;—Dans le dernier rapport annuel, on déplorait le fait que 13% seulement
des acquisitions totales de la Section des cartes canadiennes se révélaient des matériaux
d'archives. On estimait que cette proportion devrait être de 35% pour que le programme
d'acquisitions soit bien équilibré. Cette année, la répartition des acquisitions, soit 36%
de documents d'archives et 64% de documents courants, reflète les efforts déployés en
ce sens par le personnel chargé des acquisitions.
W En 1972-1973, la Section des cartes canadiennes ajoutait 26 027 pièces à sa col-
Iection, comparativement à 17 351 l'année financière précédente. Voici, sous forme de
tableau, les diverses sources de ces acquisitions:
Acquisitions de la Section des cartes canadiennes
Sources
Documents
courants
Documents
d'archives
Total
%des
acquisitions
totales
Atlas
reçus
Organismes fédéraux
13 931
5 482
19 413
74.4+
6
Organismes provinciaux
751
150
901
3.4+
3
Municipalités
1 246
200
1 446
5.5 +
—
Dons de particuliers
1 048
363
1 411
5.3 +
12
Marchands de cartes et livre
entreprises commerciales
61
500
561
2.1 +
17
Universités
—
1 056
1 056
3.1+
—
Autres divisions
14
544
558
2.1 +
37
Toutes autres sources
672
9
681
2.6+
—
Acquisitions totales de
documents courants
17 723
64.0
.-- __T *~
Acquisitions totales de
documents d'archives
_
8 304
_
36.0
—
Acquisitions totales
Bour 1972-1973
75
(compris
dans les
acquisitions
totales)
\     L'un des dons les plus intéressants vient de M. Bertram Mackay d'Ottawa, qui nous
R remis dix plans originaux du canal Rideau de John By et plusieurs documents de
travail s'y rapportant.
Trois dons précieux sont venus enrichir notre coUection de documents d'arehitec-
fcire. M"e H. M. Ewart, d'Ottawa, nous a remis les plans de feu son père (J. Albert
pwart) concernant quelque trente édifices publics et résidences privées de la région
■Ottawa. Une importante coUection de plans d'édifices érigés au Nouveau-Brunswick, 54 RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES
dessinés entre 1926 et 1963, nous vient de M. Peter Alward d'Ottawa, fils de l'architecte
s du ministère des Affaires indiennes
s et plans des plans d'édifices et
i grand nombre de pièces d'archives
î carte datant de 1565 de Giacomo
qui les a conçus. La Direction des services techniquf
et du Nord a transféré à la Collection nationale de c
des dessins originaux.
La Section des cartes canadiennes a acheté i
intéressantes au cours de l'année financière, dont uni
Gastaldi (vers 1500-1565), «La Terre de Hochelaga nella Nova Francia», qui figure
dans l'œuvre de Giovanni Battista Ramusio (vers 1588) Délie Navigationi E Viaggi;
c'est le premier plan connu d'une ville canadienne. Nous sommes aussi entrés en possession de deux cartes de Cornelius Wytfliet, publiées dans Descriptionis Ptolemaicae
Augmentum de 1597; l'une d'entre elles, intitulée «Conibas Regio Cum Vicinis
Gentibus», est considérée comme étant la première carte faisant état du Nord-Ouest
canadien. Nous avons fait deux importants achats d'atlas, un atlas de J. et F. Tallis
(vers 1851), célèbre pour ses illustrations décoratives, et un atlas rare de Nicolas Bellin
(1703-1772), l'un des premiers hydrographes français. La Section des cartes canadiennes a eu la chance d'obtenir deux grandes séries de cartes rares—l'une compte 76
cartes, l'autre 34—œuvres de cartographes aussi célèbres que Buache (1700-1773),
Bonne (1729-1794), Bellin (1703-1772), Ottens (1698-1750), Jeffreys (vers 1710-
1771) etDel'Isle (1675-1726).
Nous nous sommes procuré, chez un marchand de livres rares de la métropole, des
plans d'églises et d'édifices publics de Montréal dessinés par W. McLea Walbank.
Nous avons officieusement conclu des accords d'échanges de reproductions photographiques avec plusieurs collectionneurs de cartes pendant l'année financière. Nous
avons échangé des photocopies avec les Archives de la province de l'Ontario et la
fondation Glenbow; plusieurs autres organismes se sont dits intéressés à ces échanges, qui
pourraient représenter une source valable de reproductions de pièces d'archives.
La Collection remercie aussi de leur collaboration d'autres divisions des Archives
publiques, et particulièrement la Division des manuscrits. En effet, de nombreuses cartes
ont été transférées à la Collection nationale de cartes et plans, dont la plupart de celles
qui ont appartenu à John A. Macdonald, et beaucoup d'autres ont été portées à notre
attention. Plusieurs universités nous ont envoyé leurs collections de cartes excédentaires
et nous avons pu, par conséquent, combler plusieurs lacunes importantes de la Collection.
M. I. C. Koeman, de l'Université d'Utrecht (Pay-Bas), a profité de la conférence
de l'Association des cartothèques canadiennes pour présenter à la CoUection nationale
de cartes et plans des photocopies de deux cartes récemment découvertes du Saint-
Laurent et de la côte du Labrador, réalisées par Gerard Van Keulen (1687-1727). Ces
photocopies sont réservées à des fins d'étude seulement, aucune information sur ces
cartes ne peut être publiée sans l'approbation de la bibliothèque de l'Université de
Leiden.
La plupart des documents courants, que reçoit la Section des cartes canadiennes,
lui sont envoyés à titre gracieux par les organismes distribuant des cartes. Les ministères
du gouvernement fédéral, et surtout le ministère de l'Énergie, des Mines et des Ressources demeurent nos principaux fournisseurs. Deux de nos programmes d'acquisitions
courantes en 1972-1973 méritent d'être signalés. Nous avons fait parvenu des lettres
stéréotypées aux fabricants de cartes du Canada entier, leur demandant: a) des exemplaires des cartes publiées au cours de l'année précédente; b) des listes ou des catalogues
de leurs publications; c) l'inscription de la Collection nationale de cartes et plans sor
leurs listes d'adresses. D'autre part, nous avons écrit à toutes les municipalités du Canada
pour les prier de nous fournir leurs plans courants et leur demander ce qu'elles faisaient BPUECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
55
de leurs matériaux d'archives. La réaction des destinataires fut encourageante. Nous
tenons à obtenir les documents courants pour tenir un dossier cartographique du Canada
aussi complet que possible, pour maintenir la qualité de la contribution canadienne à la
Bibliographie cartographique internationale, et pour fournir un service de référence de
premier ordre.
Référence—Le nombre des demandes de renseignements est passé de 2 302 en 1971-
1972 à 2 867 en 1972-1973, soit une hausse d'environ 20 %. Les visiteurs venus chercher
un renseignement représentent 50 % des demandes totales, les demandes par téléphone,
17 % et les demandes par écrit, 33 %. L'entrée en fonction d'un nouveau préposé aux
renseignements a permis de rattraper quelque peu le retard, souvent considérable, dans
les réponses aux demandes par écrit. On a établi une carte-réponse provisoire à l'intention de ceux à qui on ne pouvait répondre tout de suite ou à qui des photocopies seraient
envoyées un peu plus tard.
Le nombre des reproductions photographiques a décru considérablement en 1972-
1973; il est passé de 11 329 à 8 776, soit une baisse de 23 %. Le personnel a remarqué
la tendance des chercheurs à choisir avec plus de soin les documents qu'ils désirent
faire photocopier depuis la hausse des prix de 1971-1972.
Catalogage—En 1972-1973, on a préparé 1 270 notices pour 1 673 pièces pour le
catalogue principal des cartes et plans. La baisse de 17 % par rapport à la dernière
année financière s'explique facilement par le temps qu'il a fallu consacrer à la formation
des nouveaux catalographes et au programme d'inventaire. On a préparé des notices
provisoires pour 3 592 cartes et plans, comparativement à 1 103 en 1971-1972, soit une
augmentation de 225 %; la plupart de ces notices ont été faites en même temps que
l'inventaire.
L'apport du Canada à la Bibliographie cartographique internationale se chiffre
à 212  notices  décrivant  2 047  pièces  cartographiques,  soit  70  pages  en  tout.  La
Bibliographie est publiée annuellement à Paris, sous les auspices de PUnesco.
$:    Le catalogue descriptif détaillé de la collection Coverdale du manoir Richelieu, qui
compte près de 300 cartes rares, nous a demandé beaucoup d'heures de recherche.
Le programme d'inventaire des atlas rares se poursuit; M. L. Seboek s'occupe de ce
projet depuis quelques années. En 1972-1973, le premier catalogue provisoire, qui
donnait la description des atlas publiés aux Pays-Bas, parvenait chez l'éditeur.
^Requisitions et contrôle—La hausse de 33 % des acquisitions et celle de 20 % des
demandes de renseignements ont inévitablement accru la charge de travail du service
des acquisitions et du contrôle, l'enregistrement et le classement des acquisitions étant
deux de ses principales tâches.
À mesure que le retard s'accentue, il devient évident qu'il faut prévoir plus de
temps pour le travail de conservation des cartes et des autres documents cartographiques.
Documents envoyés à la Section de la conservation des documents et récupérés
en 1972-1973:
Cartes, pour contre-collage 1 392
Cartes, pour endossure au coton 599
I Livres, pour reliure 6
Atlas, pour reliure 23
Atlas, pour étiquetage 27 56
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
Inventaire—En septembre 1972, la Section des cartes canadiennes entreprenait la
première étape de l'inventabe général de ses documents. Thomas Nagy, de la sous-
section du catalogage, a été nommé coordonateur de l'inventaire à l'établissement
duquel toutes les sous-sections ont participé.
À la fin de l'exercice 1972-1973, la première étape était presque terminée. On
avait vérifié 33 642 cartes et plans et établi environ 3 000 notices préliminaires pom
les documents non catalogués dans les fichiers principaux. L'inventabe a révélé à la
fois les points forts et les faiblesses des diverses méthodes suivies à la section, entre
autres choses, que certaines régions géographiques du Canada, par exemple l'Arctique, étaient moins bien représentées que d'autres dans la Collection nationale de
cartes et plans.
L'inventaire se poursuivra pendant plusieurs années. Lorsqu'il sera terminé, la
Section des cartes canadiennes aura un excellent moyen de contrôler matériellement
et, nous l'espérons, intellectuellement, les documents confiés à sa garde.
SECTION DES CARTES ÉTRANGÈRES—Acquisitions—Les acquisitions de la Section des cartes étrangères se chiffrent à 17 108 pièces en comparaison de 15 098
pour l'année 1971-1972. Sur ce nombre, 13 097 ou 82% ont été versées au catalogue principal, et on a distribué tout le reste. Il est encourageant de constater que
le pourcentage de cartes et plans ajoutés au catalogue est passé de 50 % en 1971-1972
à 82 % en 1972-1973. Cela signifie que, dans une plus forte proportion les acquisitions
sont uniques et demeurent dans la collection.
L'acquisition la plus importante comprend 1 851 feuilles de la Joint Operations
Graphie Series 1501, à l'échelle de 1:250000. La section a reçu trois exemplaires
de chaque carte, soit un total de 5 553 feuilles. Les 1851 feuUles représentent 56 %
du nombre total de feuilles «JOG» conservées par le ministère de la Défense nationale.
Une fois complétée, cette série (qui doit englober le monde entier) renfermera à peu
près 8 000 feuilles, estime-t-on. Cette série est particulièrement importante du fait
qu'elle est publiée à un rythme très rapide et qu'elle est la seule à offrir les cartes
topographiques de plusieurs régions du monde. À l'heure actuelle, seuls les fonc-
tionnabes fédéraux ont accès aux cartes de la série 1501, qui doivent rester dans
l'édifice et ne peuvent être montrées au public. Cependant, nous espérons que ces
restrictions seront un jour abolies.
Les acquisitions faites en 1972-1973 se répartissent comme suit entre les diverses
sources:
Surplus—des
universités
et du MEMR
45%
Dépôts—des
organismes
officiels publiant
des
cartes
et plans
35%
Transferts—
(d'autres divisions des Archives)
8%
Dons
7%
Achats
5%
Total
100%
Ces chiffres peuvent varier d'une année à l'autre, de même que la répartition f$0i
se modifier légèrement, mais il est clab que k majorité des pièces provient des dépôts
officiels et des excédents des collections universitaires et gouvernementales. DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
57
Consultation—Les demandes de renseignements ont augmenté de 60% par rapport à
l'année financière précédente. Cela est dû surtout à deux facteurs: premièrement, à la
distribution de près de 200 exemplaires de la List of Gazetteers in the Foreign Section
—Liste des répertoires dans la section étrangère et, deuxièmement, à la publicité donnée
à la possibilité d'emprunter et d'exposer les quelque 450 cartes montrées à la Conférence cartographique internationale, tenue à Ottawa en août 1972. À la suite de cette
annonce et d'autres demandes de renseignements, la section a prêté 761 cartes pendant
l'année, sans en perdre une seule.
Personnel—Un poste de la catégorie professionnelle (PC I) a été créé en février 1973
pour un catalographe qui travaillera au catalogue général des cartes et plans de la section, notamment le Catalogue collectif national des cartes et plans, les listes des fonds
de la collection et la liste des nouvelles acquisitions. La création de ce poste porte à
quatre le nombre des postes autorisés de la section: un PC II (chef de la section),
un PC I (catalographe), un SI II (agent de contrôle), un CR II (commis)...
Programme de distribution—Le programme de redistribution de la Section des cartes
étrangères fonctionne depuis 1968. L'objectif de ce programme est de faire circuler
entre les collections de cartes des universités et la Collection nationale de cartes et
plans les cartes excédentaires, dans l'espoir de voir ces pièces utiles à d'autres collections. La Section des cartes étrangères coordonne ce programme en se chargeant de
recevoir les cartes en excédent, doubles ou périmées. Les ayant triées, elle les intègre
à sa propre collection ou les redistribue, ainsi que son propre surplus de cartes aux
collections qui participent au programme d'échange. Au cours des années 1972 et
1973, seulement 3111 pièces des acquisitions de l'année ont été ajoutées à notre collection d'excédents; toutefois, la section en a distribué 29 202 durant la même période.
Accords d'échanges—Le chef de la section a participé à trois des quatre congrès inter-
nationaux qui se sont tenus au Canada au cours de Pété 1972. Elle en a profité pour
prendre contact avec les représentants d'une quarantaine de services cartographiques
nationaux en vue de conclure des accords d'échanges de cartes. On a pu ainsi prendre
toutes les dispositions préalables voulues avec la plupart des 40 organismes. Dans certains cas, les accords d'échanges sont même déjà en vigueur; dans d'autres, il reste
à régler certains détails.
DIVISION DES GRAVURES
ET PHOTOS
L'année 1972-1973 a été pour la Division des gravures et photos une année
d'expansion et de croissance. Le Service des archives sonores et les Archives nationales du film, créés au sein de la Division des gravures et photos, ont pris
lune ampleur telle qu'ils constituent maintenant une division indépendante. La Division
des gravures et photos est revenue à ses responsabilités premières en matière d'art
documentaire et de photographies. Les fonctions traditionnelles relatives à ces domaines
ont connu un nouvel essor à la suite de leur réévaluation. De nouveaux domaines ont
également été élargis de façon à satisfaire les besoins croissants de protection et d'uti-
lisation de notre patrimoine visuel national. Le tableau suivant retrace l'évolution de
ces dernières.
SECTION DES TABLEAUX, DESSINS ET ESTAMPES—Au cours de l'année 1972-
M^73, la section a étudié plus à fond sa collection, son contenu et sa valeur véritable
et vérifié son état de conservation. La réévaluation des méthodes et des systèmes a Service au pubUc
Négatifs et épreuves sur papier
RAPPORT DES ARCHIVES PUBUQUES
1970-1971 1971-1972 1972-1973
Personnes inscrites
960
628
1 038
Demandes de renseignements
2 923
2 234
2 652
Reproductions fournies
19 484
16 350
25 217
Fonds totaux
Tableaux
1 539
1 938
2 205
Dessins
5 690
9 031
12 736
Estampes et gravures
73 625
73 685
78 173
permis de déterminer si on faisait ce qu'il fallait quand il le fallait. Enfin, la section
a fait l'inventabe de l'ensemble de ses ressources et des demandes dont eUes font
l'objet. Les nouvelles perspectives ainsi révélées n'étaient peut-être pas entièrement
inconnues; eUes ont néanmoins été précisées.
Cette année a également été une période d'expansion. Tout en restant fidèle aux
traditions établies par le passé en matière d'archives et de leur conservation, la section
a commencé à explorer de nouveaux domaines d'acquisition, a entrepris des programmes
de recherche en histoire de Part plus analytiques et interprétatifs, et s'est initiée aux
techniques changeantes de la recherche documentaire.
Consultation—Conformément à la tendance des années précédentes, les demandes des
chercheurs ont augmenté, se sont diversifiées et sont devenues plus complexes. La section y a pleinement satisfait, desservant avec une efficacité égale clients réguliers et
nouveaux usagers. Aucun effort n'a été ménagé pour répondre à des demandes de
renseignements de plus en plus complexes et aux besoins quasi insatiables en illustrations nombreuses et variées.
Il est toutefois apparu que ces demandes surchargeaient la section; on a donc
procédé à une réévaluation complète de ses fonctions de consultation, identifié et défini
la surcharge de travail et apprécié la façon dont elle y fait face. La section a tenté de
prévoir les tendances futures en matière de consultation et de déterminer les nouveUes
exigences qu'elle devra satisfaire.
Partant du principe qu'elle se devait avant tout aux collections qui lui sont particulières (c'est-à-dire la collection permanente), eUe a défini son rôle de consultation
de la façon suivante: garantir la protection de la coUection permanente tout en la mettant à l'entière disposition des usagers et s'occuper de moins en moins des documents
externes. Cela veut dire que, premièrement, on doit pouvoir vob rapidement et sans
risque d'erreur, toutes les images de la collection permanente, que, deuxièmement,
elles doivent être accompagnées de renseignements complets et sûrs qui en permettent
l'interprétation et l'évaluation et que, dernièrement, les chercheurs puissent se procurer
les reproductions de qualité supérieure dont ils ont besom. Pour protéger les originaux,
il faut en limiter la manipulation et l'exposition aux agents extérieurs.
La section a commencé à adapter ses fonctions de consultation à son rôle nouvellement redéfini. La coUection permanente a fait l'objet de presque toutes les consultations. La section a entrepris de dresser l'inventaire de la collection permanente en
vue de déterminer celles des collections qui sont les plus importantes et qui doivent
être rendues accessibles les premières, et pour avoir une idée de leur état. On a intensifié et approfondi les recherches en vue d'enrichir la documentation de données facilitant l'interprétation et l'identification des œuvres. En prévision des demandes et exi- DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES
59
' gences futures, on a fait une étude approfondie des applications du microfilm et des
microfiches aux documents visuels. On a pris des dispositions préliminaires à l'adoption d'un système de microfiches pour les services de consultation. Dans le but d'améliorer la qualité des reproductions en couleurs, demandées par les éditeurs et les producteurs qui se doivent d'être de plus en plus exigeants sur ce point,