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Public Archives Canada annual report 1974/1975 Public Archives of Canada 1976

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    ©   Minister of Supply and Services Canada 1976
Cat. No.: SA 1-1975 Contents
Introduction
1
Records Management Branch
5
Headquarters Records Centres Division
5
Regional Records Centres Division
12
Office of Records Management Services Division
17
Historical Branch
23
Manuscript Division
24
Public Records Division
50
National Map Collection
62
Picture Division
69
Public Archives Library
89
National Film Archives Division
95
Machine Readable Archives Division
103
Administration and Technical Services Branch
107
Office of Program Development
107
Office of Technological Studies
107
Official Languages Division
109
Administrative Services Division
109
Management Services Division
112
Personnel Division
113
Technical Division
115
Exhibition Services Division
117
Information Services Division
121
XVth International Round Table on Archives
123
Conference of the Archives Committee of the Pan-American
Institute of Geography and History  Introduction
In his address to archivists from all over the world who were attending the
15th International Round Table on Archives Conference in Ottawa in October
1974, the Secretary of State, the Honourable Hugh Faulkner, referred to the
remarkable expansion of the Public Archives of Canada in the last decade as
shown by the ten-fold increase in its budget, from $970,000 in 1964-1965 to
$9,449,000 in 1974-1975. He pointed out that this expansion was evidence of
the high priority which the government gave to the contribution of archives to
the quality of Canadian life and in facilitating access to the national heritage.
While the ten-fold increase in the budget certainly is remarkable, the financial
figures should be discounted to some extent. Nearly 80 per cent of the Public
Archives budget is devoted to salaries and a large proportion of the increase
during the decade represented increases in salaries. The actual increase in staff
was four-fold, from 150 to 600. Most of the additional resources were required
by the expansion of existing services to meet increased demands, including
those of the National Library in the fields of Administration and Technical
Services. The system of regional records centres was completed from coast
to coast to meet the requirements of regional branches of federal government
departments. The number of researchers, written inquiries, requests for copies
of documents, maps and pictures increased by an average of approximately
25 per cent each year during the decade. The systematic acquisition of archival
materials in the public and private sectors resulted in remarkable increases in
accessions in the whole range of archival materials. These all required arrangement, description, conservation and reference.
Significant new developments have occurred, however, in the last decade:
in the field of records management; in the use of new archival media such as
film, sound and machine readable archives, and Electronic Data Processing
for information retrieval; in improvements in conservation and in major developments in the field of micrographics; in the liberalization of access to public
records and, particularly in Canada, in the diffusion of archives for the benefit
of a greater proportion of the public; and in an expanded participation in the
international aspects of archives.
In most of these areas, Canada, I am proud to say, has found novel solutions
particularly suited to the national context and these have attracted the interest
of the international archival community. It is now generally recognized that the
Public Archives of Canada is at the forefront of archival development in the
world, because of its extensive involvement in records management, the breadth
of its historical collection of documents which encompasses every type of recording medium, the high degree of sophistication of its technical operations
in microphotography and machine readable records, and the variety, importance
and ingenuity of its diffusion activities. These developments have been described
in earlier reports and are prominent in the detailed reports of the branches of
the Public Archives of Canada for the fiscal year 1974-1975. A brief outline here
is sufficient.
1 2 PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Records Management — The modern records management system which has
been applied primarily to paper records and whose major features are uniform
classification systems, disposition schedules with planned destruction and
transfer to archives, and records centres, is well established. In the past year
there was a net volume of approximately 1,000,000 cubic feet (28,300 cubic
metres) of dormant records in our network of records centres and 3,000 requests
were handled each day. Current emphasis is on the integration of machine
readable records into the system and the necessary training for records managers, while a study of micrographics in the federal government will pay particular
attention to the relationship of records managers and micrography. The trend
is towards coordinated information management, regardless of the record
medium.
Historical Branch — The development of the National Film Archives continued
with the staffing of positions and acquisition of equipment, the continued conversion of nitrate films, the acquisition of an additional 7,000,000 feet (2,133,600
metres) of film and the signing of important agreements with the Canadian Film
Institute and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The development of an automated Union Map Catalogue reached a new stage with the signing of an
agreement with the National Library concerning the joint development of a MARC
format for maps. Work proceeded on a revised and expanded edition of the
Union List of Manuscripts by Alphatext. Two interesting microfilm projects were
the filming of a portion of the records of the Hudson's Bay Company in London,
England, before the originals were transferred to Winnipeg, and arrangements
for the filming of Basque records in Spain relating to early North American history,
1550-1750.
The diffusion program continued with the deposit of 4,400 reels of microfilm
in all the provincial archives and the completion of the first sets of colour slides
of historical paintings in the Archives Canada Series in cooperation with the
National Film Board. Work continued on the project to reproduce collections
of paintings and water-colours on colour microfiche. Several exhibitions continued to circulate in 75 venues throughout Canada and new exhibitions were
prepared. The most significant and ambitious exhibition was Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience. Smaller but important exhibitions included an
exhibition of medals by Dora de Pédery-Hunt, the first of a continuing series
of exhibits from the National Medal Collection, and an exhibition of excellent
reproductions, Ottawa in Maps, which was subsequently exhibited in shopping
centres, arousing a great deal of popular interest.
Technical Division — Significant developments include the rapid increase in
the volume of Computer Output Microfilm (COM) and indeed in all micrographie
applications which will make it necessary for the Central Microfilm Unit to move
to a new building. A seminar on COM was arranged for 300 people. A study
on micrography in the federal government was commissioned. The chief event
in the field of conservation was a pilot project for the development of the nonaqueous book de-acidification system conceived by Dr. Richard D. Smith which
will permit the mass de-acidification of documents and books.
Planning for the new building saw continued negotiations with the Department of Public Works and the National Capital Commission concerning a site INTRODUCTION 3
and the preparation of a submission to Treasury Board. The shortage of space
is becoming more critical and the need to decentralize in several buildings is
having an adverse effect on efficiency and is becoming very expensive because
of the need for alterations, additional shelving and increased commissionaire
protective services.
International Affairs — The most notable events with regard to international
activities were the meetings in Ottawa of the International Round Table on
Archives and the meeting of the Archives Section of the Pan-American Institute
of Geography and History. These meetings are described in a separate section
of this report.
The Dominion Archivist was re-elected Rapporteur of the UNESCO International Advisory Committee on Documentation, Libraries and Archives. He also
represented Canada at an international conference on archival development
in Dakar which was partially sponsored by the International Research Development Corporation, while the Public Archives published the information brochure
for the International Archival Development Fund. The Dominion Archivist was
also appointed Chairman of a United States Advisory Committee on the Protection of Archives and Records Centres.
The Assistant Dominion Archivist was a member of the Canadian delegation
to the Intergovernmental Conference on the Planning of Overall National Documentation, Library and Archives Infrastructures in Paris. He is Chairman of the
Archives Section of the Pan-American Institute of Geography and History. Among
other members of the staff who were involved in international archival affairs
were the Senior Technological Advisor, W. D. Wheeler, who continued to play
an active role in several international associations concerned with reprography;
Hugo Stibbe of the National Map Collection who was Chairman of the International Federation of Library Associations working group for International Bibliographic Description (ISBD) for maps; Michael Carroll, Chief of the Machine
Readable Archives Division who attended a UNESCO symposium on Electronic
Data Processing and Peter Ryder who attended an International Council on
Archives meeting on business archives in London. Charles Poole of the Technical
Division participated in a joint project concerning the microfilming of United
Nations records. Archivists from several countries in Africa and Asia participated
in courses at the Public Archives in archives administration, records management, reprography and conservation.
Management and Personnel Relations — Several features which should be
mentioned are the introduction of flexible hours; the publication of The Archivist,
a newsletter for the staff as well as other archivists and users; the establishment
of a Senior Management Committee and ad hoc committees on Electronic Data
Processing and micrography; continued development of management systems
such as Operational Performance Measurement Systems (OPMS) and Management by Objectives (MBO) and the appointment of a Program Development
Advisor to assist in planning.
Death of Major Lanctot — On 2 February 1975, Gustave Lanctot, third Dominion
Archivist and prominent Canadian historian, died in Montreal at the age of 91.
Born in Saint-Constant-de-Laprairie, Quebec, and educated at the College and
University of Montreal, Oxford and the Sorbonne, Lanctot commenced his long PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
career at the Public Archives as a research assistant in 1912. His service was
interrupted only once in the next 36 years. He enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1915 and was promoted to Major in 1917 as a member of the
War Archives Survey. Returning to the Archives he occupied, in succession,
the positions of Associate Archivist, 1918-1920, Assistant Director of War Trophies, 1920-1922, Chief French Archivist, 1922-1937, and Dominion Archivist,
1937-194*
It was Lanctot's misfortune to direct the Archives during a period of economic restraint. This resulted in a reduction of staff and budgets and prevented
the initiation of significant new developments. Service to scholars, however,
was maintained as the highest priority. In addition, several important initiatives
were taken which bore fruit in later years: considerable attention was given
to the more systematic classification of holdings of the Manuscript Division and
the Library; a new Division, Technical Auxiliary Services, was created with the
intention of establishing a film and sound archives; sets of slides illustrating
themes in Canadian history were prepared and loaned to schools; and in 1945
the Public Records Commission was established. Members of the staff of the
Archives who served under Major Lanctot and the many scholars who benefitted
from the service of the Archives remember him with respect and affection.
Lanctot's reputation as an outstanding historian is well founded. Among
his many publications in a span of nearly 50 years were L'Administration de
la Nouvelle-France (1929), Le Canada d'hier et d'aujourd'hui (1934), L'Oeuvre
de la France en Amérique du Nord (1951) and his three volume Histoire du
Canada to 1763 (1967-1969). Thanks to the assistance of his wife and despite
increasing blindness, his research and writing continued until his death.
The range and quality of his work and his contribution to Canadian intellectual life were recognized by his many honours. He was President of the
Canadian Historical Association, the Royal Society of Canada, the Fédération
des Alliances Françaises du Canada, la Société d'histoire de l'Église, and other
national associations. He won several history prizes and a Governor General's
award; he received medals from the Royal Society of Canada, the Académie
française and the Canada Council. He was a Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur
and a member of the Order of Canada. The Public Archives of Canada mourns
the loss of a distinguished former Dominion Archivist.
Acknowledgements — Sincere appreciation should be expressed to the staff
of the Archives, to colleagues in Canada and abroad, to records managers and
others in government departments whose cooperation is so important and to
donors of archival material whose contributions help to ensure the preservation
of our cultural heritage.
31 March 1975
Wilfred I. Smith
Dominion Archivist Records
Management Branch
The fiscal year 1974-1975 was the 9th year of Records Management Branch
operations, and the 19th completed year for the Headquarters (Ottawa) Records
Centres. It was the 10th year for the Toronto Centre, the 9th year for the Montreal
Centre, the 3rd for the Vancouver Centre, and the 2nd year for the centres
serving Winnipeg and Halifax.
Under the terms of the Public Records Order (P.C. 1966-1749 9 September
1966) the Records Management Branch is authorized to provide a comprehensive
service in its field to government departments and agencies in Ottawa and the
larger metropolitan centres across Canada. This service includes: records centre
storage and reference facilities, advice and assistance in records scheduling
and disposal, the provision of training courses, printed standards and guides
in records management, records surveys, audits and evaluations, and assistance
in other related aspects of records management including the federal government's Essential Records Program.
Table I gives a breakdown of the total holdings of the Records Management
Branch as it serves Canada from coast to coast.
TABLE I
Total Holdings as of 31 March 1975
Cubic Feet Shelving Occupied
Records Centre of Records (Approximate miles)
Ottawa  573,319 (16,225 cu.m.) 108.5 (174.6 km.)
Toronto  152,183 (4,307 cu.m.) 29 (46.7 km.)
Montreal   131,151 (3,712 cu.m.) 25 (40.2 km.)
Vancouver  55,326(1,566 cu.m.) 10.5(16.9 km.)
Winnipeg  21,983 (622 cu.m.) 4 (6.4 km.)
Halifax         13,050 (369 cu.m.) 2.5 (4 km.)
Total       947,012 (26,800 cu.m.) 179.5(288.9 km.)
Headquarters Records Centres Division
This Division was reorganized on 1 April 1972 and divided into three Sections,
two of which are designated as records centres: the General Records Centre,
the Canadian Forces Records Centre, and the Personnel Records Systems and
Services Section. Reporting procedures were worked out by sections, and
realignment in reporting practices has now been completed. Performance Measurement Indicators have now been worked out to the satisfaction of the
Management Systems and Implementation Division and are submitted to it on
a monthly basis.
5 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
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Projects and Notes of Interest — CLASSIFIED DISPOSALS: During the year
the bottom fell out of the waste paper market and Floreance Paper Company
could not take waste paper as it had no outlets. Perkins Mills, Candiac, was
persuaded that this situation could jeopardize its future claims to acquire this
paper. A compromise was reached where the Division will segregate, to a degree,
the various grades of paper and ensure that plastic, carbon or heavy metal
objects will be removed in order to lower the company's cost of processing.
Had this arrangement not been made, considerable space problems would have
resulted. Nearly 4,000 cubic feet (113 cu.m.) of classified records has been
disposed of.
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION: The Branch had a late involvement in
the Public Service Commission's proposed micrographie system on their Out
of Service (OS) files group. A meeting with PSC officers was held to discuss
procedures for a survey to determine the best way to store and service the
residue from their filming program (only papers within the period 1964-1974)
and microfilm jackets. The Division's proposal was that, as the OS file consisted
now only of Data Stream printouts, microfilm jackets could be destroyed after
one year from date of release rather than be incorporated in the Civilian Personnel Records Centre. The PSC agreed to conduct a survey with its staffing officers
and return with a decision. This has not yet been finalized.
ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE: A meeting was held to develop a
{better method of identifying records classed as Civilian Employees. Depending
on whether they are hired under the RCMP Act or Public Service Employment
Act civilian employees' files are retained for either 70 or 90 years. The RCMP
will now label all records to be retained under the 90 year schedule. Also updated
were the reference procedures for RCMP records.
PUBLIC ARCHIVES AND NATIONAL LIBRARY: On 17 October 1974 a
meeting was held with the Chief, Personnel Division, to discuss the meeting
of the Civilian Personnel Records Centre with those involved in the personnel
records field. This was intended to serve as a test case to determine the general
attitude of personnel administrators to records management. A program to meet
with those officers who control personnel records administration within departments is planned to assess current and future developments regarding personnel
record keeping systems and practices.
Training — Due to heavy staff turnover as well as service demands, much
on-the-job training was carried out. Outside training was provided where it was
considered necessary.
Alterations — There were no major alterations in the Annex during the year.
Alterations pending are installation of a second elevator, air conditioning and
expansion of washroom facilities on the main floor.
Of major importance was the revamping of the intercom system. The Annex
is now adequately wired for sound on one system where previously there were
two inadequate separate systems. The new system is also connected to main
user areas in the Public Archives Records Centre. This has greatly improved
communications within the Annex as well as to the Public Archives Records
Centre building. PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Key-punch /verifier operators on IBM 129's
GENERAL RECORDS CENTRE — Accessions — The total cubic feet (cubic
metres) of general files accessioned for the year increased by 5,922 (168) from
52,526 (1,486) to 58,488 (1,654). With a complete turnover of staff in the accessioning unit, most of the time was spent on training with little done to promote
the use of the General Records Centre.
Compared to last year, this year saw increased accessions from Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation by 4,913, Health and Welfare Canada by
1,911, Indian and Northern Affairs by 1,866 and Supply and Services Canada
by 1,236. However, there were two major decreases, Consumer and Corporate
Affairs by 4,091 and Public Works by 1,163.
New Customers — This is the first year records were accessioned from the
Canadian International Development Research Centre, brining the total of
departments, agencies, boards and commissions served to 78.
Fumigation — Three man-days were expended fumigating some 200 cubic feet
(6 cu.m.) of records from the Historical Branch.
Extra Duties — During the year the accessions unit provided a total of 92
man-days and the use of the stake truck for 24 days to the Office of Records
Management Services Division to service the site, move tape shelving, and deliver
material and supplies to and from records management courses. Two man-days
and the stake truck were supplied to the Administration and Technical Services
Branch. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
Relocations — This year the Personnel Records Centre began operations in
a separate building with the moving of the civilian personnel records from the
Records Centre to the Annex.
Relocation of general records was kept to a minimum this year. The only
groups to be relocated were Supply and Services district office contracts to
provide space for civilian personnel records, Supply and Services financial
records and a few other small groups of records. The total volume of records
relocated and relisted amounted to 3,222 cubic feet (91 cu.m.) from 10 accessions, with a total increase of 93 linear feet (28.4 m.) of shelving used.
Physical Disposals — Waste paper disposal is completely up to date with 27,075
cubic feet (766 cu.m.) of records destroyed this year.
Classified Disposals — The present arrangement of disposal of classified material
with the paper mill is continuing to be beneficial. Last year the Centre
disposed of nearly 4,000 cubic feet (113 cu.m.) of classified records, over
1,000 feet (305 m.) from its holdings and nearly 3,000 cubic feet (85 cu.m.)
forwarded to the Records Centre for disposal action only.
Transfers — During the course of the year, considerable man-days were spent
returning records to departments for review or reactivation and transferring
archival material to the Historical Branch. A total of 11,005 cubic feet
(311 cu.m.) of records was removed, 8447 cubic feet (239 cu.m.) to the
Historical Branch and 2,558 cubic feet (72 cu.m.) returned to various departments. This large transfer of archival material to the Historical Branch was
due to records being held at the Records Centre until the Historical Branch
found suitable accommodation.
Irregular Disposals — Several departments serviced by the General Records
Centre are having problems disposing of classified material. As a result the
Centre has accepted non accession able material for disposal action only.
This year the Centre destroyed 2,797 cubic feet (79 cu.m.) of nonacces-
sioned material forwarded from 11 different departments on 46 separate
occasions.
Reference — There was a record increase of 32,673 (excluding formerly counted
military personnel records) requests on the general records. This year the Reference Unit processed 156,618 requests as compared to last year's all time high
of 131,945.
Again this year Central Mortgage and housing led with the largest increase
in requests, up by 14,872 over last year, followed by National Revenue, up 7,292;
Communications, up 4,114; Indian and Northern Affairs, up 2,624; and Veterans
Affairs, up 2,138. The only significant decreases were with External Affairs, down
4,463 and Consumer and Corporate Affairs, down 2,144.
The five largest customers for requests this year were Central Mortgage
and Housing Corporation with 50,029; Revenue Canada, 35,639; Supply and
Services, 18,158; Veterans Affairs, 6,281 and Communications with 6,012.
Every department was well below the standard for dormant records of one
request per cubic foot per month. Canada Council was closest to this ratio with
an average of three requests per cubic foot per year, or one quarter of the 10
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
standard. However, if all customers decided to request files in accordance with
the standard, then over 4.5 million requests per year would have to be met.
Interfiles — The number of interfiles decreased by 14,708 from 37,317 for the
year due mainly to substantial decreases by Central Mortgage and Housing of
9,946 and by Revenue Canada of 2,594.
Research Hours — This year 84 hours were spent by the staff searching for
information or providing additional services to departments.
Staff Training and Development — With the high turnover rate in the General
Records Centre staff, over half the present employees had to undergo on-the-job
training. With this turnover of staff and personnel away on French training, little
other than on-the-job training could be done. The only outside training received
by the staff included a two day course given by the Public Archives on Staffing
and Interviewing Techniques.
CANADIAN FORCES RECORDS CENTRE - Due to retirements and heavy staff
turnover, maintaining a high level of service was difficult. Due to the prolonged
illness of the Division Chief many important matters had to be held in abeyance.
Reporting procedures have now been standardized in accordance with the
Branch System and the Operational Performance Measurement System (OPMS).
This Section has assumed complete responsibility for servicing RCMP records.
This was previously done by the Personnel Records Systems Services Section.
This Section has also assumed responsibility for accessioning and disposal of
ancillary personnel related records as well as X-rays.
For the first time since the formation of the Canadian Forces Records Centre
statistics on this Section's activities have been compiled.
Manual reserve military card index prior to microfilming. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
11
PERSONNEL RECORDS SYSTEMS SERVICES SECTION - There was a considerable amount of staff turnover resulting in much time lost in vacancies and
training. Despite these problems, all ongoing projects carried on without major
interruptions.
Statistics — Total persons processed were 322,345 compared to last year's
395,152 (-72,807). The main reasons for this decline are staffing problems
coupled with defective IBM punch cards.
Conversion — The number of files converted was 226,119 compared to last
year's 186,187 ( + 39,932). Due to conversion, operations in processing personnel records have been reduced from five to four. All Reserve Forces indices
have been converted to the automated system. Also, current civilian records
are being processed on the automated system, and a start has been made on
key punching the civilian manual index system. These operations, with their
total production were:
Persons Processed: Civilian   40,618
Military 280,552
RCMP      1,175
Total 322,345
Conversion: Civilian  112,773
Military 113,346
Total 226,119
Civilian personne) files index area. 12
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Civilian Personnel Reference Service:
Requests  11,022
Interfiles  11,845
Research (hrs.)....   2,127
( + 2,017 from 1973-74)
(-16,746 from 1973-74)
( -169 from 1973-74)
A feasibility study was carried out by IBM on computerization of the system.
This necessitated many hours of ground work prior to the actual study in order
to minimize costs. The reason for this study was due to the largest customer
and creating agency, Department of National Defence, computerizing its system,
thus making the two systems incompatible. Assuming funds were available,
conversion could be achieved as early as 1976-1977.
Regional Records Centres Division
The Regional Records Centres Division has three main activities
corresponding roughly to those general activities in the preceding pages dealing
with the Headquarters Records Centres Division. Variances in such activities
arise largely from geographical location and differing types of records held and
serviced. Activities include:
1. Providing economical storage facilities for departmental dormant records
of the general or subject category in the regions where the federal government has its main metropolitan areas of activity — Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Winnipeg and Halifax. This does not include the servicing of personnel records (civilian or armed forces) all of which are centralized in
Ottawa and referenced by automated indices.
2. Providing to departments and requesting agencies a complete reference
in the local records stored in the regional records centres.
3. Providing a service for the physical destruction of obsolete or dead records
by incineration or shredding, baling and despatch to waste paper contrac-
tors.This is done to obtain money from the sale of such waste paper, to
assist departments crowded for space arid to create more storage space
in the records centres.
In addition to these main functions, the Division provides coordinating
services to other units of the Public Archives. These include: arrangements for
the destruction of security records forwarded periodically from the Headquarters
Records Centres (Ottawa) to the Montreal area; reception and temporary storage
in regional centres of local records designated as historical by the Historical
Branch; and safeguarding those records until they may be transferred to Public
Archives in Ottawa for permanent retention.
General — The year 1974-1975 was one of continued expansion within the
regional field. The two newest regional centres, Winnipeg and Halifax, are now
developing satisfactorily. Increasing demands for service throughout the country
have led to increased workloads in all areas.
Past experience and surveys made of records that can be destroyed during
specific years due to scheduling indicate that it will be unrealistic to expect B^
RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
13
to maintain an ideal balance between incoming and outgoing records. On
average, departments are transferring to the centres each year a two per cent
'increase over the previous year. In the case of large departments this increase
may amount to several thousand cubic feet. This has largely been the reason
for the further expansion of the Montreal and Toronto facilities.
The Montreal expansion was ready ahead of time, but with a smaller area
than originally requested. Identification for extra space will probably have to
be made early in 1975.
The Toronto expansion, which was required for December of 1974, though
approved in principle is still in abeyance. As a corrective measure interim space
had to be provided and records are temporarily placed upon the floor.
An unexpected problem now facing the Winnipeg Records Centre is the
disposal of waste paper. The paper market is saturated, and paper companies
are reluctant to pick up paper even when it is provided free. Crown Assets
Disposal Corporation could not secure a tender for the Winnipeg area. Authorization was received to dispose of the paper as conveniently as possible. This
was done and part of the paper was sold on the condition that the company
would also remove the lower quality paper. At all other centres, firm contracts
have been established and no trouble is being experienced at this stage.
The proposed Edmonton Centre is progressing slowly. Land has been acquired from the City of Edmonton and preliminary location plans have been
approved and a set of building plans are being prepared. It is hoped that the
proposed Edmonton Centre will open sometime during the late fall of 1975.
Expansion was also identified for the Vancouver Centre, although there,
as elsewhere, only 5,000 square feet (465 sq.m.) of floor space was obtained.
Further requests for expansion will likely be forthcoming in the near future.
A situation which is now arising, and causing concern, is the ever increasing
number of reference requests from the Department of National Revenue, despite
the fact that this Department is well within the established standard of one request
per box per month. Naturally this is to be expected in cities with large populations
such as Montreal and Toronto. This situation will have to be examined very
closely in the future. Table III points out the services rendered to this Department
in comparison with all the other departments combined.
TABLE III
Total Annual
Number of
Requests
for 1974-75
Department of
National Revenue
Number of Requests
Customs and
Excise Taxation
Total Number      Balance of
of Requests
for the
Department
in 1974-75
Yearly Requests
for the
Other 30
Departments
Serviced
Montreal .
Toronto .
150,626
160,129
182,073
41,733
Balance of
Yearly Requests
for the Other 25
Departments
Serviced
31,845 14
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
HALIFAX RECORDS CENTRE — After a year of existence the Halifax Records
Centre is progressing exceptionally well. Ten departments are now being serviced
and a total of 13,456 cubic feet (381 Cu.m.) of records has been accessioned.
The flow of reference requests is normal, unlike the abnormal increase in requests experienced in other centres.
The Head of the Halifax Centre has worked hard to publicize the nature
of records management and has established liaison with several departments.
Regular progress reports on the results of field trips enabled Ottawa to evaluate
the development of the newly-established centre.
The Head, as a preliminary measure, forwarded a circular letter to government departments describing the nature of our operation, notifying them that
they would be contacted in the near future, and extending an invitation to visit
the Centre.
The Head has visited departments in various areas. In November 1974 the
following departments in Saint John, N.B. were visited: Post Office, Bureau of
Pension Advocates, Labour, Agriculture, Revenue, National Parole Service,
Supply and Services and Public Works.
During January 1975, another group of departments and agencies within
the Halifax-Dartmouth area were visited, namely Manpower and Immigration,
Environment Canada, Bedford Institute, Consumer and Corporate Affairs,
Canadian Film Board and Defence Construction.
CNR officials who visited PARC were greatly impressed with the operation
and foresaw their full use of the facilities. Arrangements have already been made
to transfer CNR records to the Records Centre as soon as convenient.
During March the Head of the Centre proceeded to Moncton and met further
with CNR authorities, as well as lecturing on records management. A first shipment of approximately 10,000 cubic feet (283 cu.m.) of records is now expected.
At the same time the Head visited the Department of Transport and UIC offices.
MONTREAL RECORDS CENTRE — As statistics indicate, this centre had another
excellent year. The Centre brought in 37,890 cubic feet (1,072 cu.m.) of records
and destroyed 26,235 feet (7,996 m.) of accessioned records, as well as 3,054
(931 m.) of nonaccessioned material. The disposal figure accounts for all the
records that could be destroyed during the 1974-1975 fiscal year. Two new
departments were serviced for a total of 31.
Reference requests in Montreal have increased by 15 per cent to reach
a new height of 201,862. Planning indicates that the 16,000 square feet
(1,486 sq.m.) obtained — against25,000 feet (2,323 sq.m.) requested — will barely
carry the operations to the end of 1975.
The Head of the Centre visited many out-of-town areas, including Quebec
City, Sherbrooke, Drummondville and Trois-Rivières and found the prospects
for obtaining additional clients mostly encouraging.
TORONTO RECORDS CENTRE — During this fiscal year the Toronto Records
Centre accessioned 32,253 cubic feet (913 cu.m.) and destroyed 11,782 cubic
feet (333 cu.m.) of regularly accessioned records and 2,099 feet (640 m.) of RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
nonaccessioned records. This was the maximum possible amount that could
be destroyed in accordance with the schedules. Next year, provided authorizations are received, schedules open the possibility of destroying 24,600 cubic
I feet (696 cu.m.). Five new departments were serviced for a total of 26. Despite
the fact that the need for expansion was identified in 1973, delays have been
incurred. By January 1975 customer departments had to be placed on a waiting
list and records placed upon the floor, where possible, within the building.
Fortunately, temporary leased space was made available elsewhere and in early
March records were brought in as usual and temporarily stored on the floor.
Reference requests increased by 15 per cent over last year's total and this
increased workload taxed the staff to the limit, excluding servicing from the floor
which greatly reduced operating efficiency.
The Head visited many out-of-town departments and has approached the
Canadian National Railway for records. It would appear that railway authorities
in Toronto will use the services of the Toronto Records Centre in the very near
future.
The Toronto Centre completely exhausted its storage space this year, and
unless the proposed expansion takes place early in 1975 it is quite possible
that services may have to be curtailed until such time as permanent accommodation is provided.
WINNIPEG RECORDS CENTRE — The Winnipeg Centre is well on its way. This
year it accessioned 10,568 cubic feet (299 cu.m.) for a total holding of 21,983
cubic feet (622 cu.m.). Five new departments were serviced for a total of 15.
The Centre however, has been faced with an increase in excess of 500 per
cent in reference requests, from a total of 5,072 to 26,452 and was the hardest
hit in this respect. Despite the size of the staff, services were maintained.
The Head visited eight departments in Regina and seven in Saskatoon. Visits
to areas where no centes formerly existed were almost a public relations function.
Some officials did not realize that the facilities provided by the Public Archives
were available to them. Others were sceptical that records once removed from
their immediate possession could readily be made available to them when required. Subsequent visits with these officials proved that their fears were groundless. Although the future looks promising, it is the opinion of the Winnipeg head
that closer relationships'must be maintained with records managers and that
the areas of scheduling and disposal of records should be constantly encouraged.
VANCOUVER RECORDS CENTRE — The Vancouver Centre has experienced
gradual and constant progress. As elsewhere, lack of shelving has to some
extent slowed down work. Records which were stored upon the floor had to
be shelved later. Vancouver, like most centres, has experienced an increase
in demands for requests. The area occupied by the Centre will soon be exhausted, and a request for whatever expansion can be made available elsewhere
in the same building has been identified with the Department of Public Works.
This year the Vancouver Centre accessioned 11,903 cubic feet (337 cu.m.)
of records, destroyed 1,758 cubic feet (50 cu.m.) of accessioned records, and PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
3= O»
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: E g E s E o
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iEo E^Ec RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 17
disposed of 4,666 cubic feet (132 cu.m.) of nonaccessioned records. The Centre
I serviced one new department this year, Justice, for a total of 17 departments
or agencies whose records are being held and serviced.
The Head proceeded to Victoria, Nanaimo and Kamloops in order to contact
or visit some of the Departments. Talks or discussions were also held with the
following: Insurance Corporations of B.C.; B.C. Provincial Records Officers; and
the Alberta Provincial Records Managers. Assistance was also provided in
gathering historical records for the Public Archives Historical Branch.
Office of Records Management
Services Division
The Office of Records Management Services Division has basic responsibilities for the following activities:
1. To assist government departments in the development of records schedules
for both manual and automated records, to process and apply these
schedules and to make recommendations to the Dominion Archivist concerning the disposal of records.
2. To survey and audit the performance in records management of departments; to prepare reports for departments, the Dominion Archivist and the
Treasury Board; and to maintain an inventory of records holdings, equipment and staff.
3. To provide an advisory service in records management for government
departments and to assist them in projects to improve efficiency in records
management.
4. To conduct regular training courses in records management for the staff
of government departments and agencies and in other ways to provide
formal instruction in records management.
5. To prepare and publish manuals and guides for the use of government
departments in establishing and maintaining efficient procedures and
acceptable standards in records management.
6. To service the government's Essential Records Program to ensure protection of vital records against nuclear or natural disaster.
7. To identify the requirements for additional records centres across Canada.
8. To provide for the ultimate disposal of all records held at the Ottawa Records
Centre.
9. To promote the use of records centres by government departments and
agencies in the interest of efficiency and economy.
Records Scheduling and Microfilm Submissions — Table V indicates the number
of departmental submissions concerning records schedules, records destruction
proposals and microfilm submissions from 1961, when the Public Archives as- 18
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
sumed the responsibility for the examination of these submissions, to 31 March
1975.
TABLE V
No. of
Records
Schedules or
Destruction
No. of
Fiscal
Five Year
Proposals
Microfilm
Annual
Five Year
Cumulative
Year
Period
Submitted
Submissions
Total
Total
Total
_
1961-66
(March)
194
58*
—
252
252
—
1966-71
(March)
373
52
—
425
677
1971-72
—
50
28
78
—
755
1972-73
—
40
41
81
—
836
1973-74
—
26
59
85
—
921
1974-75
—
45
50
95
—
1,016
Totals - 728 288 - - 1,016
"Includes proposals for microfilm equipment from 1961 to 1966 inclusive.
The total number of submissions processed has been climbing steadily for
the last four years.
A total of 96 man-days was devoted to the examination of, and reporting
on, the 95 records scheduling and microfilming submissions.
Records Disposal — The Office of Records Management Services is responsible
for the application of approved records schedules to the Public Archives holdings
of dormant departmental records.
Table VI indicates the total volume of records disposed of at the Ottawa
Records Centre (both general subject files and civilian personnel files) for the
years indicated. For the first 15 years the figures are listed in five year blocks.
For subsequent years each individual year is shown for purposes of comparison.
In the twelve month period from 1 April 1974, to 31 March 1975, a total of 39,576
cubic feet (1,120 cu.m.) of records was disposed of, comprising 312 cubic feet
(9 cu.m.) of civilian personnel files and 39,264 cubic feet (1,111 cu.m.) of general
files. The total volume of general subject records and civilian personnel records
disposed of between 1956 and 31 March 1975 is 477,140 cubic feet (13,503
cu.m.), considerably more than the capacity of the main Ottawa Records Centre
building and enough records to fill over 90 miles (145 km.) of shelving.
The total volume of records destroyed would have been greater if the retention periods for most financial records, cheques and related instruments had
not been increased to six fiscal years, from five, late in 1973. Accordingly, in
the fiscal year 1974-1975 relatively few financial records were destroyed. In
1975-1976 the volume of financial records eligible for destruction will return to
its usual level.
A total of 339 man-days was devoted to this activity, which included 175
separate disposal actions. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
19
TABLE VI
Ottawa Records Centres
Cubic Feet (Cubic Metres) Disposed of from 1956 to 31 March 1975*
Five
Five
Cumu
Fiscal
Year
General
Personnel**
Annual
Year
lative
Year
Period
Files
Ries
Total
Total
Total
-
1956-60
21,091
153
_
21,244
21,244
(597)
(4)
(601)
(601)
—
1961-65
92,401
1,617
—
94,018
115,262
(2,615)
(46)
(2,661)
(3,262)
—
1966-71*
207,316
2,707
—
210,023
325,285
(March)
(5,867)
(77)
(5,944)
(9,206)
1971-72
—
37,001
465
37,466
—
362,751
(1,047)
(13)
(1,060)
(10,266)
1972-73
—
38,274
69
38,343
—
401,094
(1,083)
(2)
(1,085)
(11,351)
1973-74
—
36,221
249
36,470
—
437,564
(1,025)
(7)
(1,032)
(12,383)
1974-75
—
39,264
312
39,576
—
477,140
(1,111)
(9)
0,120)
(13,503)
Totals
19 years
471,568
(13,345)
5,572
(158)
-
-
477,140
(13,503)
*On 1 April 1967, the Records Management Branch converted from a
calendar year to
a fiscal year
*This total includes only Civilian Personnel files.
Publications and Directives on Records Management — During the year the
Office of Records Management Services Division worked closely with the Information Services Division and the Translation Bureau of the Department of
Secretary of State, revising the English texts of various records management
publications, having them translated into French by the Translation Bureau,
reviewing the translations and then forwarding them for printing. Also, the decision was made to change the series name from "Paperwork Management Series"
to the "Records Management Series". As the publications are revised and
reprinted, they are being listed as items in the Public Archives "Records
Management Series".
The publications include:
Mail Management in Government Departments and Agencies, translated
under the title of La Gestion du courrier au sein des ministères et organismes gouvernementaux. Revised editions in both languages have been
completed, received and distributed.
Records Scheduling and Disposal, translated under the title of Plan de
conservation et d'élimination des documents. Revised editions in both
languages have been completed, received and distributed.
Subject Classification Guide, originally translated under the title of Guide
de classement idéologique des dossiers administratifs. The English edition
has been drastically revised, edited and forwarded for printing. It should
be completed early in the new fiscal year. The French edition was translated
and checked. It will be going to print in the new year. 20
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Records Organization and Operations, translated under the title of Organisation et opérations relatives à la gestion des documents. Revised
editions in both languages have been completed, received and distributed.
General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada, translated under the title of Plans généraux d'élimination des documents du
gouvernement du Canada. The French edition has been completed, received and distributed.
A total of 130 man-days was devoted to publications in the fiscal year.
Training — The Division conducted two full four-week Records Management
Courses, numbers 22 and 23, with an enrolment of 59 students, 47 from departmental headquarters, 10 from departmental field offices and 2 from the Province
of Ontario. In addition, the Division contributed resource people on records
management topics to short courses of other government departments and of
the Public Archives on Archives Principles and Techniques, both English and
French, and Microrecording Technology. The Division has also collaborated with
the Machine Readable Archives Division of the Historical Branch and the Control
Data Corporation in the presentation of the second course on EDP Records
Management given to Records Managers by the Public Archives. There are plans
to repeat this course late in the coming year. Finally, the Division is continuing
to develop training aids, publications, and lectures for a French Records
Management Course.
A total of 291 man-days was devoted to the training activity.
Essential Records — Total holdings of records essential to the continuity of
government in the event of a natural or nuclear disaster are now approximately
9,348 cubic feet (265 cu.m.), an increase of 378 cubic feet (11 cum.) over the
previous year. During the year additional shelving for the storage of computer-
generated material was installed. Man-days devoted to the activity totalled 136.5.
Departmental Projects — The Public Archives, under the Public Records Order,
ensures that departments properly document their programs and policies. In
addition, departments refer many of their records management problems to the
Public Archives for advice and assistance. Consequently, the Office of Records
Management Services, as usual, was deeply involved during the year with various
projects for departments: conducting surveys and preparing reports; developing
new, or revising old classification systems; developing procedural manuals;
conducting mail management surveys; and giving assistance and advice in
records office organization, staffing matters, equipment, layout and space. Division staff members travelled widely across Canada in the performance of their
duties. Table VII indicates the number of projects undertaken for departments
from 1967-1968 to 1974-1975.
Other projects — In addition to assisting specific departments, the Division was
involved in projects for the general improvement of records management in the
federal government. The Advisory Council on Public Records had several subcommittees active during the year. There were 24 meetings of the following:
the Sub-Committee on Records Office Forms; the Sub-Committee on Classi- RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 21
TABLE VII
Technical Assistance Provided to Departments and Agencies
Fiscal Year Total Number of Projects
1967-68  10
1968-69  13
1969-70  15
1970-71  13
1971-72  16
1972-73  18
1973-74  94
1974-75  76
Totals    8 years   255
A total of 1,170 man-days was devoted to this activity.
fication of Records Office Positions; the Sub-Committee on the Disposal of
Classified Waste.
In addition, the Division contributed members to the Records Management
Institute's Training Committee, which held five meetings, and the Canadian
Government Specification Board's Committee on Microfilm, which held two
meetings.
Internally the Division contributed members to the Publications Policy Committee, which held three meetings, and to the Archives Legislation Committee,
which met twice.
The Records Management aspects of Electronic Data Processing occupied
the attention of several Divisions of the Public Archives including the Office
of Records Management Services. The Departmental Ad Hoc Committee on EDP
Records Management met 20 times during the year. The Departmental EDP
Committee was created late in the year, absorbing the Ad Hoc Committee, and
held two meetings. The Departmental EDP Committee also held two additional
joint meetings with the Departmental Senior Management Committee. The Division contributed members to all of these committees.
Another project which the Division undertook was a comprehensive survey
of the records management practices and procedures of the Alberta Government,
at the request of the Alberta Public Records Committee and the Alberta Department of Culture, Youth and Recreation. The Alberta project occupied 88 man-
days during the fiscal year. A report will be completed early in the new fiscal
year. In all, Divisional representatives attended 65 meetings dealing with the
various subjects in this category (Other Projects) alone. The projects mentioned
consumed some 310 man-days.
Visitors — In addition to visitors from the federal government, the Division
welcomed representatives from Argentina, Brazil, Guyana, the United States,
Ontario and Alberta to provide and exchange information on projects of mutual
interest in records management theory and practice.
Selection Boards — During the year staff of the Division sat on various selection
boards to assist departments in choosing the best available records management 22
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1974-1975
personnel. There was a total of 24 such selection boards and this activity consumed 51.5 man-days.
Operational Performance Measurement System — This was the second full year
of the introduction of the Operational Performance Measurement System within
the Division. The major output volumes, man-day inputs, percentage of total
man-days used for each activity, were:
Authorized Man-Days    —
Vacancies (Man-Days)   —
4,902
1,097
Available Man-Days
Input
Activity (Man-Days)
Training Courses   291
Departmental Projects  1,170
Essential Records  136.5
Records Scheduling and
Microfilming Submissions  96
Records Disposals  339
Publications Preparation  130
Selection Boards   51.5
Meetings with Departments  40.5
Administrative Overhead**   526
Non-productive Time
Vacations  239
Illness Leave  318.5
Special Leave  10
Courses Taken   58.5
Language Training   181.5
Statutory Holidays  155
Secondments to Other Units  62
Total Non-productive Time  1,024.5
'Rounded off to nearest whole number
* *310 man-days of this total were devoted to "Other Projects"
Output
(Number
Done)
Percentage of
Available
Man-Days*
5
76
72
94
175
24
65
31
4
2
9
3
1
1
14
General Comments — The Office of Records Management Services Division's
authorized establishment during the fiscal year 1974-1975 was 19 man-years,
including four man-years authorized on 1 April 1974. At the very end of the
previous fiscal year, however, two staff members had won competitions in other
departments. Early in 1974-1975 two more staff members won positions outside
the Department. As a result, eight new staff members joined the staff between
September 1974 and January 1975. Unfortunately, 1,097 man-days, almost five
man-years were lost in vacancies. In addition, 181.5 man-days were invested
in language training. Illness accounted for 318.5 man-days. The combined total
of vacancies, language training and illness accounted for 1,597 man-days or
almost 38 per cent of the authorized 19 man-years of the Division. The work
load on the 11 staff members with the Division for the entire year, therefore,
was extremely heavy. At the end of the fiscal year the Division was again at
full authorized strength. Historical Branch
With the exception of the Machine Readable Archives and the National Film
Archives, which are rapidly being built up to become fully operational, divisions
of the Historical Branch are moving into a period of consolidation, tentative
exploration of new directions and careful reappraisal of their service to the public,
particularly in the areas of information retrieval, documentation and diffusion.
The Branch has begun to prepare for an integrated Electronic Data Processing retrieval system for its own use and possibly that of other repositories outside
the Public Archives (as prefigured in the new automated edition of the Union
List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories). A Branch committee has been
formed to ensure proper coordination on the assumption that effective manual
systems of retrieval must be devised as models for good automated systems.
Close cooperation with the Canadian Machine Readable Cataloguing (MARC)
Office of the National Library has been established to ensure that a Canadian
MARC format will be used for all archival media wherever possible.
The Branch is also concerned with an overall strategy for conservation.
A permanent committee of divisional conservation officers has produced a report
outlining major areas of concern and calling for immediate action in better care
and handling of archival materials. Although it is impossible to put an accurate
valuation on the total holdings of the Historical Branch, estimates have placed
its total worth at upwards of 150 million dollars. This merits considerable investment to prevent serious loss through deterioration.
In the diffusion program, the use of microfiche is gaining ground steadily
as a supplement to microfilm, both in the publication of reports and finding
aids and in the reproduction in colour of paintings, drawings and prints. In
addition, colour slides, when coupled with colour microfiche, will provide re-
seachers with an invaluable teaching aid. The traditional illustration of history
textbooks may well undergo a radical change as a result of this program.
Studies will be carried out to measure user reaction and response to services
more accurately and to further define objectives. In the past the Branch has
counted researchers. However, the resources and services of the Branch reach
the public indirectly through the books, documentary films and broadcasts in
which material obtained from the Historical Branch has figured prominently. An
estimate of the size of the public reached by these media will enable the Branch
to assess more accurately the effect of its services on the general public whose
taxes support the work of the Public Archives.
Archives Courses — The course in English in association with the Archives
Section of the Canadian Historical Association was again directed by Harold
Naugler and there were 17 participants. A reduction in the number of written
assignments allowed for a more relaxed approach. As usual there was some
good constructive criticism and this will be taken into account when the next
course is planned in 1975.
23 24
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
For the first time an archives course was offered in French with Robert
Garon of the University of Laval as Director, and there were 15 participants.
This course was also a success and will be held again in 1975.
Manuscript Division
The major responsibility of the Manuscript Division is the acquisition and
preservation of private papers, corporate records and non-federal public records
of historical value, and the provision of reference services to these documents.
In addition, the Division is responsible for research undertaken in response to
public inquiries conducted in both the Manuscript and Public Records Divisions.
It is also responsible for the preparation and publication of the Union List of
Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories and the Register of Dissertations.
The acquisition program has been highly successful. Four hundred and
fifty units of papers were accessioned, totalling 1,972 linear feet (601 m.), and
225 reels of microfilm, an increase in volume over previous years. An important
agreement was concluded with the national archives of Australia and New
Zealand to copy the Colonial Office 616 records in the Public Records Office,
England. This includes a large class of documents relating to Commonwealth
participation in the First World War which has never been microfilmed. Other
consortium purchases will follow.
The publication program continued on schedule. Volume 7 of the General
Inventory, covering Manuscript Group 29, was completed and printed; Volume 3,
MG 17-21 was distributed and was highly acclaimed by archivists and historians.
Preparation began on Volume 8 and work continued on Volume 2. The Union
List of Manuscripts was revised and expanded and will be printed early next
year. The Guide to the Reports of the Public Archives of Canada, 1872-1972
was also completed, as was the Guide des sources d'archives sur le Canada
français, au Canada, and both will soon be printed. The Register of Dissertations
was prepared again.
The Division contributed to a major exhibition and several displays. An inter-
divisional exhibition, Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience, opened
at the Public Archives in October and was later shown at the Museum of Science
and Technology in Ottawa. Commemorative displays on W. L. M. King, J. S.
Woodsworth and A.M. Klein were also mounted and an exhibit on Toronto's
Italian Community Sixty Years Ago was prepared. A major exhibition on the
history of sport in Canada is presently in preparation.
Staff participated in many archival and historical conferences, including
those of the Canadian Historical Association, l'Association des archivistes de
Québec, l'Association pour l'avancement des sciences et des techniques de
la documentation, the Pan-American Institute of Geography and History and
the International Council on Archives.
PRE-CONFEDERATION SECTION — The Pre-Confederation Section is responsible for all private papers and public records of the period before 1867. It is
divided into three Subsections: French Records, British Records and Canadian
Records. HISTORICAL BRANCH
25
Several of the documents making up the Telecommunications:
The Canadian Experience exhibition. In 1901 Guglielmo Marconi
succeeded in transmitting the first trans-atlantic telegraph
message. 26
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Inventory revision was a priority again this year. Volume 2 of the General
Inventory, comprising MGs 11-16, is being prepared in the British Records
Subsection. The Canadian Subsection is working on RGs 1, 4 and 5 and related
series in other groups in preparation for compiling a guide to pre-Confederation
public records. The French Subsection has negotiated with the Archives nationales du Québec to exchange a copy of the index to the Quebec Gazette
for a copy of the Jugements et deliberations du Conseil souverain, representing
a very significant addition to holdings on the French regime. Approximately 400
volumes of finding aids of the Archives nationales de France were examined
at the Library of Congress to determine those which would be useful to the
Division.
New finding aids were prepared for the following French records: Archives
des Colonies, Série C^C, Amérique du Nord, volumes 11-14; Archives de la
marine, Série B1, Décisions; and the Archives du Ministère des Affaires étrangères, Correspondance politique, Angleterre. The British Subsection prepared
and consolidated finding aids for Audit Office, British Museum, General Post
Office, Cabinet 41 and Colonial Office 1. Work on the index for Colonial Office
323 continued. Finding aids were compiled by the Canadian Subsection for the
records of the Association de la propagation de la foi de Paris, John Galt Papers,
William Lyon Mackenzie Papers, records of the Norfolk Historical Society,
Louis-Joseph Papineau Papers, records of the Seigneurie des Êboulements,
Gordon and Sandilands Papers, Montgomery Papers, Boivin Papers, Jonas
Jones Papers and Henri Gerin-Lajoie Papers. Improvements and additions were
made to the finding aids for the Baby Collection, Brome County Historical Society
Collection, Sir John Colborne Papers, Joseph Howe Papers, and Dr. Jan Kupp
Papers. The calendar to the Upper Canada Sundries was completed.
Acquisitions
FRENCH RECORDS
Archives des Colonies, Série E.
Microfilm, 6 reels, additional.
Personnel files, Lagoanèreto Millon, files 247-312.
Archives communales de Saint-Jean-de-Luz.
Microfilm, 2 reels. 1556-1787.
Documents relating to Basque fishing and other activities on the North American
Coast.
Archives communales de Biarritz.
Microfilm, 1 reel. 1579-1749.
Documents on the Basque exploitation of Newfoundland marine fauna.
Archives départementales de Calvados (Caen).
Microfilm, 1 reel. 1751-1789.
Documents concerning Acadian refugees established in the vicinity of Caen.
Also included are the Surlaville papers.
BRITISH RECORDS
British Museum Additional Manuscript 29237. Johnson Papers.
Microfilm, 1 reel. HISTORICAL BRANCH 27
Correspondence of Sir William Johnson (1715-1774), superintendent of Indian
| Affairs, and of his son, Sir John Johnson (1742-1830), Loyalist military officer
and later Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs in British North America. The
correspondence, 1774-1783, relates primarily to transactions with Indian bands
and to the American revolutionary war.
Colonial Office 5.
Microfilm, 6 reels, additional. C. 1686-1756.
Massachusetts session papers.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
Berens, Henry Hulse (1804-1833), Governor, Hudson's Bay Company.
Original, 76 pages. 1832.
A journal identified as that of Henry Hulse Berens, describing his passage from
London, England through the Hudson Straits to York Factory and from there
to the Red River Colony.
Fort Kamloops, Hudson's Bay Company Post.
Microfilm, 1 reel.
Accounts.
Copied from the British Columbia Archives.
Fort Kanaaupscow, Hudson's Bay Company Post.
Original, between 6 and 12 inches (15.24 and 30.48 cm.), c. 1900.
Some Hudson's Bay Company records were found this year on the site of Fort
Kanaaupscow, Quebec by an archaeologist. The documents appear to be early
20th century records from the Hudson's Bay Company post.
CANADIAN RECORDS
Barclay, Thomas (1753-1830), Politician, Diplomat.
Original, 6 pages. 1801.
Letter from Edward, Duke of Kent, concerning political affairs in Nova Scotia,
England and the United States.
Boivin Family (1746-1922).
Original, 8V2 inches (21.59 cm.).
Notarial records, account books, printed matter and miscellaneous items concerning the Boivin family.
Acquired from Mlle Marguerite Boivin of Quebec City.
Coleman, Thomas.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.). 1811-1813.
Papers of Captain Thomas Coleman of the Canadian Light Dragoons, including
letters, lists, discharge papers and an account book. Presented by Miss D. L.
Hogle of Belleville, Ontario.
Coons, Charles Edward, Confederate Soldier.
Original, 1/2 inch (1.27 cm.) 1863-1865.
Letters written to Eliza Moore concerning his escape from a Union camp and
his life as a refugee in Canada. 28
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1974-1975
De Bonot, .
Original, 34 pages. 1756-1758.
Correspondence between Mr. Kelly, a Swiss banker, and Mr. De Bonot concerning various events during the early years of the Seven Years War.
Dunham, Quebec.
Photocopy, 222 pages. 1806-1882.
Circuit steward's book.
Original (30 pages) in the possession of the Rev. Mr. Purdon, Sutton, Quebec.
Photocopied through Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Frelighsburg, Quebec.
Everitt, Anne Thurtell (c. 1794-1857).
Original, 137 pages; typescript copy, 56 pages. 1853.
Diary of her journey from England to Guelph, Canada West.
Donated by Mrs. Grace Crooks Leigh of Orillia, Ontario.
GENEALOGICAL RECORDS
There were thirty acquisitions of various family papers including the Gérard
Jalbert Collection presented by Mr. Gérard Jalbert, O.M.I., of Beloeil, Quebec,
and the Gordon and Sandilands Family Papers presented by Mrs. Marcel Fortier
of Westmount, Quebec.
Copies of the following parish registers were acquired: St. Joseph's Roman
Catholic Church, Ottawa; St. Anthony de Padua Roman Catholic Church, Cen-
treville, Ontario; St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church, Perth, Ontario;
Church of Scotland, Eastern District, Ontario, and the Richelieu County Roman
Catholic Churches.
Other genealogical sources acquired this year include cemetery and tombstone recordings for Ontario and Prince Edward Counties presented by W. T. L.
Harper of Willowdale, Ontario, and Mr. and Mrs. C. L. R. Wanamaker of Belleville,
Ontario, respectively.
Halloran, Laurence, Military Officer.
Photocopy, 36 pages. 1759.
Diary of the siege of Quebec believed to have been kept by Colonel Laurence
Halloran.
Original in the possession of Mr. H. A. H. King of Brecon, Wales.
Association de la propagation de la foi de Paris.
Microfilm, 17 reels. 1833-1922.
Correspondence, reports on missions and financial records of the work of the
Association in Canada.
Copied from microfilm held by the Research Centre in Religious History at St.
Paul's University, Ottawa.
Masham Township, Quebec.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.).
Minute book, 1893-1915, and miscellaneous papers, 1855-1926, of the Municipal
Council of the Township of Masham. Poll tax and valuation roll records, 1857-
1863, attendance records and daily register sheets, 1860-1885, cash book, 1913-
1927, and miscellaneous papers, 1857-1886, of the Masham School Commission.
Presented by Mrs. H. Dodds of Ottawa. HISTORICAL BRANCH 29
Ottawa, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.
Original, c. 40 feet (12.20 m.).
Financial records, correspondence and minute books of the'Kirk Session, Temporal Committee, Globe Trustees and other Church organizations.
Deposited by St. Andrew's Church.
Parker, William Henry (c. 1837-1921).
Original, Vz inch (1.27 cm.). 1820-1912.
Family correspondence and miscellaneous documents.
Presented by Mrs. Emily Mcintosh of Perth, Ontario.
Perkins, James.
lOriginal, 3 pages. 1918.
Letter dated 20 January 1918 from Vice Admiral Sir Francis Pickmore, Governor
of Newfoundland, to James Perkins and others of Boston acknowledging receipt
of relief supplies for the victims of the St. John's fire.
Philips, James, Merchant.
Photocopy, 172 pages. 1828-1830.
Day book kept by James Philips of Philipsville, Ontario.
Presented by Mr. Frank C. L. Wyght of Ottawa.
Quebec Circuit Court.
Original, 3 inches (7.62 cm.).
Register of salaries, fees, emoluments and pecuniary profits attached to the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, district of Quebec.
Transferred from the National Library.
Quebec Superior Court.
Original, 3 inches (7.62 cm.).
Register of salaries, fees, emoluments and pecuniary profits attached to the
Office of the Clerk of the Superior Court, district of Quebec. Transferred from
the National Library.
Wilmot Township, Ontario.
Photocopy, Va inch (6.35 mm.). 1859-1900.
Trustee book of School Section 18, New Prussia, Ontario.
Original in the possession of Mr. George Bucheit of Wellesley, Ontario.
PRIME MINISTERS SECTION — The major projects were the processing of the
papers of R. B. Bennett and William Lyon Mackenzie King. The finding aid to
the Bennett Papers is being computerized and the index is being edited in
preparation for Electronic Data Processing. The program format has been finalized and input via Optical Characer Recognition continues on a regular basis.
It was decided to index, edit and microfilm the Bennett Invitation series so that
the Public Archives may retain a copy when the original papers are returned
to the University of New Brunswick. Work on this is now in progress.
Detailed indexing of the Primary Correspondence Series of the King Papers,
1922-1950, was completed to the end of 1928, as was the microfilming of this
series for 1944. A file list of the Prime Minister's Office Correspondence Series
is now available for researchers and the arrangement and listing of the Laurier
House Correspondence is in progress. On instructions from the Trustees of the 30
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
King Estates, the Diaries for 1932-1944 were opened for public research. The
Family Correspondence Series has also been opened.
Plans are underway to begin the selection, arranging, indexing and copying
of papers of the Right Honourable J. G. Diefenbaker. This extensive collection,
currently measuring over 1,600 feet (487.68 m.), will remain at the Public Archives
until the work is completed.
Acquisitions
Abbott, Sir J. J. C.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), additional.
Correspondence, clippings and printed material relating to the first
Canadian-born Prime Minister.
Presented by his grandson, Mr. Arthur C. Abbott of Beaconsfield, Quebec.
Borden, Sir R. L.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), additional.
Family and political correspondence.
Diefenbaker, Rt. Hon. John G.
Original, 40 feet (12.19 m.), additional.
Received on deposit.
Laurier, Sir Wilfrid.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), additional.
Scrolls and petitions.
Transferred from Laurier House.
Macdonald, Sir John A.
Photocopy, 2 pages, additional. 1879.
Letter from Macdonald to John Blevins.
Original in the possession of Mr. W. Kenneth Robinson, M.P.
Photocopy, 4 pages, additional. 1883.
Two letters from Macdonald to William Little concerning the Reciprocity Treaty
with the United States.
Originals in the R. B. Bennett Papers.
Meighen, Rt. Hon. Arthur.
Original, 6 pages, additional.
Papers relating to the declaration of war in August 1914 and Canada's entry
into the First World War.
Received from the Department of External Affairs.
Pearson, Rt. Hon. L. B.
Original, additional.
Papers received from the Department of External Affairs and the Secretary of
State.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.).
Honourary degrees.
Presented by the Pearson family via Laurier House. HISTORICAL BRANCH 31
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.).
Personal papers.
Presented by Geoffrey Pearson.
Original, c. 30 feet (9.14 m.).
Diaries and memoirs.
Received through Alex Inglis.
St-Laurent, Rt. Hon. L. S.
Original, 21 feet (6.40 m.), additional.
Subject files, clippings and speeches.
Received from the former Prime Minister's Quebec City residence through
Madame Lafferty, Mr. St-Laurent's daughter.
Trudeau, Rt. Hon. Pierre E.
Original, 176 feet (53.66 m).
Papers.
Received on security deposit.
Tupper, Sir Charles.
Photocopy, 16 pages, additional. 1841-1901.
Commissions, letters patent and awards.
Presented by Mrs. F. Settler.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SECTION — The Section is responsible for collecting and
preserving the papers of individuals prominent in public affairs: politicians (excluding prime ministers), soldiers, judges, diplomats and other public servants
in the post-Confederation era. During the year, a number of important collections
were added to each of these categories. A large number of political manuscripts
were acquired or placed "on deposit" as a result of the 1974 federal election.
Both retiring and defeated Members of Parliament were contacted. Some donated their papers, while others placed them in security storage pending final
disposition at a later date. The latter records are not made available for public
reference unless permission is granted by the depositor.
Acquisitions
GOVERNORS GENERAL AND ASSOCIATED INDIVIDUALS
Letellier de Saint-Just (1820-1881).
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.). 1878.
Petition of Chapleau, Church and Angers in favour of the dismissal of Letellier,
Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec, 1876-1879. A record book of Letellier's
correspondence covering the period of the "Coup d'état", 1878.
Presented by the Glenbow-Alberta Institute of Calgary.
Massey Family
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), additional. 1887-1888.
A diary maintained by Walter Edward Hart Massey, President of the Massey-Harris
Company, during his trip around the world. Presented by Mr. F. M. Tovell of
Rockcliffe, Ontario. 32
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS
Canadian Labour Party
Transcript, 1 page. 1921.
Minutes of a convention to organize the Canadian Labour Party.
Presented by Mr. Clifford Scotton of Ottawa.
C.C.F.-N.D.P.
Original, 23 feet (7.01 m.), additional.
Records of the C.C.F. and N.D.P.
Presented by Clifford Scotton, National Director.
C.C.F. Youth-N.D.P.
Original, 9 feet (2.74 m.).
Correspondence and publications.
Presented by Mr. Russell Rothney of Winnipeg.
Liberal Party of Canada.
Original, 46 feet (14.02 m.), additional. 1890-1940.
Papers of the Liberal Party Headquarters, including records of national conventions, political campaigns and an annotated pamphlet series maintained by the
Party.
Presented by the Liberal Party of Canada.
POLITICAL FIGURES
Balcer, Léon (b. 1917), Member of Parliament.
Original, 40 feet (12.19 m.).
Papers relating to Mr. Balcer's career as Member of Parliament for Trois-Rivières.
Presented by Mr. Balcer.
Claxton, Brooke (1898-1960), Cabinet Minister.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), additional.
Papers pertaining to Claxton's career during the First World War and the 1920s
and 1930s.
Presented by John Claxton through Professor McDougall of Carleton University.
Drew, George A. (1894-1973), Member of Parliament.
Original, 9 feet (2.74 m.), additional.
Papers relating to Mr. Drew's career as Leader of the Opposition, 1949-1956,
and Member of Parliament for Carleton.
Presented by the Drew Family.
Fergusson, Muriel McQueen (b. 1899), Senator.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.).
Scrap-books containing clippings relating to Senator Fergusson's career and
to women's rights.
Good, William Charles (1876-1967), Member of Parliament.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), additional.
Family correspondence, diaries and clippings.
Presented by Mrs. Latzer of Missouri.
Herridge, Herbert W. (1895-1973), Member of Parliament.
Original, 112 feet (34.15 m). HISTORICAL  BRANCH 33
Personal correspondence, constituency files and clippings.
Presented by Mr. Herridge's family.
Lachance, Georges-C. (b. 1926), Member of Parliament.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.).
Working files, correspondence, reports and newspaper clippings concerning
joint Parliamentary committees on the state of penitentiaries and the constitution.
Presented by Mr. Georges-C. Lachance.
Lewis, David (b. 1909), Member of Parliament.
Original, 37 feet (11.28 m.).
Papers relating to Mr. Lewis' office as leader of the New Democratic Party,
1971-1974, and Member of Parliament for York South, 1962,1965-1974.
Presented by Mr. Lewis.
Maclnnis, Grace (b. 1905), Member of Parliament.
Original, 20 feet (6.10 m.).
Correspondence, clippings and speeches relating to Grace Maclnnis' political
career as Member of Parliament for Vancouver-Kingsway.
Macnaughton, A. A. (b. 1903), Senator.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), additional.
Correspondence with George R. Long, former Acting Auditor General, 1973-1974,
a diary of a trip through England in 1924, and a 1944 postcard relating to radio
broadcasts.
Presented by Senator Macnaughton.
MacRae, John Chester (b. 1912), Member of Parliament.
Original, 17 feet (5.18 m.), additional.
Papers relating to MacRae's Parliamentary career.
Presented by J. Chester MacRae.
Martin, Paul (b. 1903), Cabinet Minister, Senator.
Original, 103 feet (26.32 m.), additional.
Papers, including scrap-books and transcripts of tapes.
Presented by Senator Martin.
Mather, Barry, Member of Parliament.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.).
Constituency files relating to his career as Member of Parliament for New Westminster, British Columbia.
Presented by Mr. Mather.
Mulock, Sir William (1844-1944), Cabinet Minister.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), additional.
A scrap-book of press clippings and miscellaneous notes.
Acquired at auction.
Nose worthy, Joseph W. (1888-1956), Member of Parliament.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.).
Papers relating to Noseworthy's political career with the C.C.F.
Presented by Mr. A. W. Noseworthy.
Ryan, Thomas (1804-1889), Senator.
Original, 23 pages. 34 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Letters from Robert Bell and John S. Dennis regarding the opening of a Hudson
Bay route and the development of the North-West.
Stanbury, Richard (b. 1923), Senator.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), additional, 1968-1973.
Correspondence of Mr. Stanbury while President of the Liberal Federation of
Canada.
Presented by Senator Stanbury.
PUBLIC SERVICE AND JUDICIARY
Audette, Louis de la Chesnaye (b. 1907), Public Servant.
Original, 2 feet, 4 inches (71.12 cm.).
Personal files relating to the Commission of Enquiry into certain incidents aboard
ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, 1949; to the North-West Territories Council
and to separate schools in the N.W.T.; and confidential testimony before the
1949 Commission.
Presented by Mr. L. C. Audette.
Biggar, O. M. (1876-1948), Public Servant.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.), additional, 1927-1947.
Correspondence, memoranda, and drafts relating to the "Act Respecting Unfair
Competition in Trade and Commerce".
Presented by Smart & Biggar of Ottawa.
Bourinot, Sir J. C. (1837-1902), Public Servant.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.), additional.
Letters, notes and addresses of Dr. Bourinot, Secretary of the Royal Society
of Canada 1897-1898. Included are documents relating to negotiations with the
Canadian Magazine regarding publication of the Makers of Canada series of
which Bourinot was editor.
Transferred from the Public Records Division.
Brunet, Pierre (1898-1973), Public Servant.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.), additional.
Correspondence, notes, genealogical information and drafts of manuscripts.
Presented by Mrs. Pierre Brunet of Ottawa.
Howland, Dr. R. D., Public Servant.
Original, 17 feet (5.18 m.).
Papers relating to Dr. Howland's participation on the Royal Commissions on
Energy and Canada's Economic Prospects.
Presented by Dr. Howland.
Hyndman, J. D. (1874-1972), Judge.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm), additional.
Papers relating to Justice Hyndman's work on the Pension Appeal Board.
Presented by Mrs. Victor Belcourt of Rockcliffe, Ontario.
Kearney, J. D., Diplomat.
Original, 10 inches (25.40 cm.).
Personal diaries kept by Kearney while serving as High Commissioner and
Ambassador.
Presented by J. D. Kearney. HISTORICAL BRANCH 35
Kirkwood, Kenneth P. (1899-1968), Diplomat.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm), additional, 1927-1932.
Reference files, drafts and memoranda.
Presented by Mrs. Kirkwood of Ottawa.
Wilson, Bernard (b. 1908), Public Servant.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.).
A history of labour relations during the Second World War prepared for the
Industrial Relations Branch of the Department of Labour.
Presented by Mr. Bernard Wilson.
MILITARY FIGURES
Adamson, Agar S. A. M. (1865-1929), Military Officer.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.), additional.
Correspondence relating to the Boer War.
Presented by Mr. Anthony Adamson.
Brick, John C, Military Officer.
Photostat, 58 pages.
Diary of experiences during the Dieppe Raid and his subsequent capture, and
transcripts of letters written during his internment.
Copied from originals in the possession of Mr. John Brick.
Crawford, John (b. 1906), Military Officer.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.).
Medical reports of Canadian prisoners of war in Hong Kong compiled by
Dr. Crawford during their internment.
Presented by Dr. Crawford of Ottawa.
Governor-General's Foot Guards.
Photostat, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Memoranda and an order book, 1872-1875.
Copied from originals in the possession of the regimental museum.
Law, C. A. E. (1878-1924), Military Officer.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Unpublished manuscript about motor torpedo service during the First World
War.
Presented by Mr. Louis Audette.
Lundberg, S. T. (b. 1921), Military Officer.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Diary of a Second World War prisonefof war.
Presented by Mr. Lundberg of Stittsville, Ontario.
Mac Brien, J. H. (1878-1938), Military Officer.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.).
Correspondence and newsclippings relating to Major-General MacBrien's career.
Presented by Mrs. H. Keller of Ladysmith, Quebec.
Mainguy, Rowell (b. 1901), Military Officer.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.). PUBLIC  ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Correspondence and daily journals relating to his career as Vice-Admiral and
Chief of Naval Staff.
Nixon, C. A. E. (1878-1924), Military Officer.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.).
Commander Nixon's correspondence and memoranda relating to the Royal Naval
College of Canada.
Presented by Captain C. P. Nixon through the Directorate of History of the-.
Department of National Defence.
Stewart, John Smith (b. 1878), Military Officer.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.).
Correspondence, memoranda, clippings and memorabilia relating to Brigadier-General Stewart's military career and his participation in the South African
and First World Wars.
Presented by Mr. J. S. Stewart through the Canadian War Museum.
Wilson, Haliburton (b. 1899), Military Officer.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Log book, correspondence, memoranda and speeches dealing with aviation
history.
Presented by Mr. Wilson of Vancouver.
The following papers were received for security storage:
Andras, Robert — 56 feet (17.06 m.), additional.
Basford, Ronald — c. 210 feet (64 m.).
Bell, Thomas - 26 feet (7.91 m).
Baker, Walter - 7 feet (2.13 m.).
Danford, Harold — 9 feet (2.74 m.).
Davis, Jack - 122 feet (37.17 m.).
Dubé, J.-E. - 50 feet (15.24 m).
Francis, Lloyd — 16 feet (4.86 m.).
Gillespie, Alastair — 4 feet (1.21 m.), additional.
Gray, Herbert — c. 210 feet (64 m.).
Haidasz, Stanley — 20 feet (6.09 m.).
Hales, Alfred - 10 feet (3.04 m.).
Harney, John - 12 feet (3.64 m.).
Howard, Frank — 51 feet (15.54 m.).
Jamieson, Donald — 114 feet (34.73 m.).
Knowles, Stanley — 2 filing cabinets.
Latulippe, Henri — 19 feet (5.78 m.).
MacQuarrie, Heath — 55 feet (16.76 m.).
Nesbitt, Wallace — 25 feet (7.61 m).
Rose, Mark - 25 feet (7.61 m.).
Sharp, Mitchell - 17 feet (5.17 m.).
Stanbury, Robert — c. 110 feet (33.52 m.).
SOCIO-ECONOMIC SECTION - The Socio-Economic Section is responsible
for the acquisition and custodial care of private papers which document the
economic, social and cultural history of Canada since Confederation and for
the provision of reference services to these papers. The Section continued its HISTORICAL BRANCH 37
broadly defined acquisitions program, as indicated by the list of new collections
which follows. There were significant additions to the holdings of sources related
to major business corporations and associations, railway workers and their
unions, performing arts, women's organizations, sports associations and science.
The Section provides an advisory service for large organizations wishing to
establish their own archives. This service consists of advising the organization
on archival procedures and facilities in return for its commitment to allow researchers access to records. Several major business firms availed themselves
of the plan. Inventory revision and related duties absorbed a great deal of time.
This resulted in the completion of Volume 7 of the General Inventory, covering
MG29.
Acquisitions
ARTS
Allan, Andrew (1929-1973), Author and Producer.
Original, 29 feet 2 inches (8.89 m.).
Correspondence, financial records, scripts and clippings of Andrew Allan.
Presented by Garry Allan of Toronto.
Anderson, Patrick (b. 1915), Poet.
Original, 9 feet 8 inches (2.95 m.).
Correspondence, diaries, manuscripts and other papers.
Acquired from Patrick Anderson.
Association of Canadian Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA).
Original, 40 feet (12.19 m.).
Minutes, correspondence, negotiation and contract files and publications from
I the national office of ACTRA.
Bourdon, Louis-Honoré (1899-1974), Impresario.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm).
Correspondence, programs and newspaper clippings.
Donated by Jules Dubois of Outremont, Quebec.
Canadian Theatre Centre (1958-1973).
jbriginal, 20 feet (6.10 m.).
Records relating to administration, finance, membership, publications, surveys,
exhibitions, playwrights and other activities.
Presented by the Canadian Theatre Centre through Jack Gray.
Canadian Film Awards.
Original, c. 20 feet (6.10 m).
Records.
Presented by Jack Gray, Acting Chairman of the Canadian Film Awards and
Marcia Couelle of the organization's Montreal Office.
Canadian Federation of Music Teachers' Association, (est. 1935).
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.).
Minute books and cash books.
Presented by Mrs. W. M. Phillips, Secretary-Treasurer of the Association.
Deyglun, Henri (1903-1971), Dramatist.
Original, 2 feet 8 inches (81.28 cm.). 38
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Personal papers, theatre programs and scripts.
Presented by Mme Janine Sutto-Deyglun.
Empry, Gino.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), additional, 1968-1970.
Papers relating to publicity for the Dominion Drama Festival and various
Canadian theatre productions.
Presented by Mr. Empry.
Fischer, Sarah (b. 1896), Opera Singer.
Original, c. 8 feet (2.44 m.), c. 1913-1914.
Papers relating to Mme Fischer's opera career in Europe and to the Sarah Fischer
Concerte in Montreal; including correspondence with Emma Albani. Acquired
from Mme Fischer.
Gotlieb, Phyllis (b. 1926), Author.
Original, 28 pages, additional.
Typescript with revisions of "Hassidism in the Work of A. M. Klein", a paper
delivered by Phyllis Gotlieb at the A. M. Klein Symposium on 5 May 1974 at
the University of Ottawa.
Presented by Mrs. Gotlieb.
Gray, Jack (b. 1927), Playwright and Arts Administrator.
Original, 9 feet 3 inches (2.82 m).
Script and related papers.
Harris, Robert (1849-1918), Artist.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Correspondence relating to commissioned portraits, the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts and Harris' knighthood; including six letters to Mrs. Harris.
Presented by Mary Bell Harris of Charlottetown.
Hendry, Tom (b. 1929), Playwright.
Original, 21 feet IVi inches (6.59 m.).
Correspondence, manuscripts, diaries, financial papers and clippings relating
to Hendry's career and miscellaneous materia! relating to the theatre in general;
including records of the Manitoba Theatre Centre (1957-1962).
Presented by Tom Hendry.
Macdonald, J. E. H. (1873-1932), Artist.
Original, 6 pages, additional.
One letter from A. Y. Jackson (1920) and one from Yoshida Sakide (1929) to
J. E. H. Macdonald.
Presented by Thoreau Macdonald of Thorn hill, Ontario.
Macdonald, Thoreau (b. 1901), Artist.
Original and photocopy, 26 pages.
Ten original letters from A. Y. Jackson to Thoreau Macdonald and photocopies
of manuscript notes by Macdonald on the life and work of his father, J. E. H.
Macdonald.
Macmillan, George, Author.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.). HISTORICAL  BRANCH
39
Letters from Lucy Maud Montgomery to George Macmillan of Scotland.
Acquired from Mr. Macmillan through Mrs. Mollie Gillen.
Macpherson, Jay(b. 1931), Poet.
Original, 41/2 inches (11.43 cm.).
Manuscript drafts of poems.
Mallett, Jane, Actress.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.), 1912-1974.
Papers relating to Mrs. Mallett's career and to Canadian theatre in general.
Performing Arts Collection.
Original, 7 feet 6 inches (2.29 m.).
Newspaper clippings relating to the performing arts in Canada.
Presented by the Canada Council Library.
Professional Photographers of Canada (eat. 1947).
Original, 5 feet 5 inches (1.68 m.), additional.
Records relating to the organization, services and publications of the association;
including general correspondence (1954-1972).
Rosenblatt, Joe (b. 1933), Poet, Artist.
Original, 5 feet 3 inches (1.60 m.).
Papers, including correspondence, poetry and prose in manuscript and typescript, and manuscripts submitted to Jewish Dialogue by other writers.
Acquired from Mr. Rosenblatt.
Salverson, Laura Goodman (1890-1971), Author.
Original, Va inch (0.31 cm.).
Periodicals relating to Laura Salverson.
Presented by George Salverson of Toronto.
Sculptors Society of Canada (est. 1931).
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), 1923-1974.
Records of the Society.
Donated by Mrs. Dora de Pédery-Hunt of Toronto.
Theatre London (est. 1934).
Original, c. 12 feet (3.66 m).
Correspondence, scripts, prompt books, programs and scrapbooks relating to
Theatre London and its predecessor, London Little Theatre.
Presented by Theatre London.
Traill Family Collection.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.), additional.
Papers including correspondence of various members of the Traill and Strickland
families, c. 1840-1929; manuscripts of Catherine Parr Traill.
Presented by Mr. T. R. McCloy of Calgary.
BUSINESS
Ames, A. J. (1880-1973), Businessman.
Original, 7 feet (2.13 m.).
Papers related to Mr. Ames and his Ottawa business, Instruments Ltd.
Acquired from Miss E. M. August of Ottawa. 40
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Breton, Aimé (1907-1973), Hotel Owner, Prospector.
Microfilm, 1 reel.
Legal documents, correspondence, clippings, photographs and other items
documenting Mr. Breton's claim to be discoverer of the Blind River uranium
fields and thus to be entitled to compensation by the mine's developers.
Buffalo-Ankerite Mines Ltd.
Original, 26 feet (7.92 m.)
Correspondence, plans, employee and financial records of the company, now
defunct.
Burke, Joe (b. 1891), Prospector.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Memoirs of Joe Burke who was associated with a number of important gold
discoveries in northern Canada.
Presented by Mr. Burke of Ottawa.
Canadian Lumbermen's Association.
Original, 6 inches (15.24 cm.), 1912-1940.
Reports of annual meetings.
Presented by the Association.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
Original, 91 feet (27.74 m.).
Minute books, correspondence, scripbooks, photographs and brochures of the
Association and its various sections. Also included are a large number of government publications relating to commerce in Canada and the United States.
Canadian Western Power and Fuel Company.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.), 1911-1969.
Minute books, stock ledgers, sales agreements and other documents relating
to the Company and its predecessors.
Presented by the Company.
Dominion Glass Company.
Original, 4 feet (1.22 m), additional.
Batch formulae, cost records (1928-1937) and stock inventories (1933-1935). Also
a minute book and catalogue of oil lamps manufactured by the Jefferson Glass
Company.
Dora Hood's Bookroom.
Original, 70 feet (21.34 m.).
Correspondence, minute books, annual reports and financial records dealing
with customer purchases, institutional orders and subscription lists, including
both Canadian and foreign accounts.
Edwards, W. S. (1861-1926), Businessman, Prospector.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), 1908-1926.
Correspondence, legal documents and newspaper clippings relating to W. S.
Edwards, discoverer of the Dome Mine.
Presented by Louise Ouroussava-Bryant of New York.
Henry Birks and Sons Limited.
Original, 12 feet (3.66 m.). HISTORICAL BRANCH 41
Minute books, annual reports, financial statements, legal agreements, catalogues
and correspondence concerning Henry Birks and Sons Limited and its associated
business.
Toronto Board of Trade.
Original, 60 feet (18.29 m), 1850-1955.
Minute books, reports to council, committee minutes, annual reports, journals,
correspondence, pamphlets, photographs and other material related to all
aspects of the Board's operations.
LABOUR
Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation (est. 1938).
Original, 6 feet (1.82 m.), 1942-1965.
Proceedings of annual meetings.
Presented by the Secretary of the Association.
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers (est. 1908).
Original, 70 feet (21.34 m.).
Records of the national office of the Union including convention proceedings,
executive board minutes, correspondence and subject files.
Presented by the Secretary-Treasurer.
Toronto Pressmen and Assistants Union, Local 10.
Microfilm, 1 reel, 1883-1900.
Loaned for copying by Edward Seymour, Education and Publicity Director of
the Textile Workers' Union of America.
Trades and Labour Congress of Canada.
Microfilm, 1 reel, 1920-1928.
Minutes of the executive council of the Congress.
Loaned for copying by the Canadian Labour Congress.
United Transportation Union (est. 1968).
Original, 100 feet (30.49 m.), c. 1900-1970.
Records of the legislative and protective branches of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, one of the four rail unions which amalgamated
in 1968 to form the United Transportation Union. Included are correspondence,
reports and submissions and printed matter.
Presented by Dave McDuffe and Ozzie Miles, officers of the Union.
Original, 20 feet (6.10 m), c. 1900-1968.
Records of the protective branch of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.
Presented by Ken Strickland, Public Relations Director of the Union.
SPORTS
Amateur Athletic Union of Canada (1883-1972).
Microfilm, 1 reel.
Annual minutes, minutes of executive meetings, correspondence and results
of annual athletic meets.
Canadian Badminton Association.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.). 42
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Correspondence, financial records and bulletins.
Presented by Mr. Folinsbee, Executive Director.
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union (est. 1961).
Original, 16 feet 4 inches (4.98 m.).
Minutes, correspondence, financial records and sports files of the Union and
two of its affiliated organizations, the Ottawa-St. Lawrence Athletic Association
and the Western Intercollegiate Athletic Association, 1942,1947-1972.
Presented by the national office of the Association.
Canadian Track and Field Association.
Original, 12 feet (3.66 m.).
Correspondence, minutes and reports.
Presented by Mr. Harry Kerrison, Executive Director.
Canadian Water Ski Association (est. 1950).
Copies, 4 inches (10.16 cm.), additional, 1973-1974.
Presented by the Canadian Water Ski Association.
Denholm Angling Club.
Original, c. 4 feet (1.22 m.), 1890-1969.
Minutes, fishing records and photographs.
Presented by Mr. Ted Price of Ottawa.
Echlin, Russell (d. 1973).
Original, 12 feet (3.66m.), 1958-1972.
Correspondence and reports collected by Echlin as an official of the Amateur
Athletic Union of Canada.
Transferred from the Department of Health and Welfare.
Gorman, Thomas P. (1886-1961).
Original, c. 2 feet (60.96 cm.), additional.
Papers relating to Thomas Gorman's career as sports promoter, manager and
coach.
Presented by Frank Gorman of Ottawa.
Ottawa Valley Cricket Council.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm), 1967-1973.
Statistics, minutes, financial statements, correspondence and match summary
sheets kept by the Council statistician.
Presented by Peter Robertson of Ottawa.
Ward, Howard H. (1882-1973).
Original, c. 6 feet (1.83 m.).
Photographs, notes and books concerning Ward's career as a civil servant and
curling historian.
Presented by the Canadian Branch of the Royal Caledonia Curling Club through
Allen Ward of Welland, Ontario.
RESEARCH MATERIAL ACQUIRED IN OTHER FIELDS
Baker, Edwin Albert (1893-1969).
Typed transcripts, 936 pages.
Typed transcripts of Marjorie Wilkins Campbell's oral history project on Edwin HISTORICAL BRANCH 43
Albert Baker, founder of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind.
Presented by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind through Miss Grace
Worts.
Bishop, W. A.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.), 1915-1956.
Notes for his biography of his father, Billy Bishop, and correspondence, speeches
and clippings concerning his father's career.
Transferred from the Picture Division.
Branch, Charles James (1867-1896), Clergyman.
Typescript, 2 inches (5.08 cm).
Typescript copy of a notebook kept by Charles James Branch, Bishop of Antigua.
Brunet, Ludovic (1865-1896), Clerk of the Court.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Correspondence from Henri Bourassa, 1898-1902, and family correspondence
concerning his stay in Europe 1887-1888.
Canadian Dietic Association (est. 1935).
Original, 4 feet 4 inches (1.32 m.).
Records of the Association, including the minutes of meetings, annual reports
and scrapbooks.
Presented by the Association through Mrs. Jane Willy of Waterloo, Ontario.
Canadian Library Association (est. 1946).
Original, 60 feet (18.29 m.).
Minutes, correspondence, memoranda, reports and newsletters relating to the
activities and operations of the organization from its founding to the early 1970s.
Presented by the Association.
Canadian Society of Microbiologists (est. 1951).
Original, 13 feet (3.96 m.).
Correspondence, minutes of meetings and annual reports of the Science Policy
Committee; briefs to the Bilingualism and Bi-Culturalism Commission; office and
financial records and papers on science policy.
Presented by the Society through Dr. John Robinson of London, Ontario and
Dr. A. J. Rhodes of Toronto.
Casault, Atala.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), 1930-1939.
Personal diary of Atala Casault, wife of Edgar Rochette, a cabinet minister of
the Taschereau government.
Acquired from Mr. Pierre A. Leclere.
Central Canadian Veterinary Association (est. 1903).
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.).
Minutes of meetings, correspondence, programs and financial accounts.
Presented by Dr. D. C. Alexander of Ottawa.
Forsey, Eugene (b. 1904), Senator.
Original, 51/2 inches (13.97 cm.), additional.
Subject files, articles, notes, correspondence with R. L. Stanfield (1968-1973),
and miscellaneous items. 44
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Humanities Association of Canada (est. 1951).
Original, 6 feet (1.83 m.), 1951-1969.
Minutes of meetings, correspondence with branches, bulletins and financial
statements relating to the activities of the Association.
Presented by Dr. Gerald Morgan of Victoria, B.C., on behalf of the Association.
International Council of Women (est. 1888).
Original, c. 27 feet (8.25 m), 1904-1939.
Minutes and correspondence of the Council.
Presented by the National Council of Women.
Keir, Ernest J. (1878-1941), Photographer.
Original, V* inch (6.35 mm), 1898-1900.
Keir's diary describing a trip to the Klondike where he took photographs and
prospected.
Presented by Louis G. Keir of Garibaldi, Oregon, through the Picture Division.
Kelso, John Joseph (1864-1935), Child Welfare Worker.
Original, 20 feet (6.10 m.).
Correspondence, subject files, reports and pamphlets of J. J. Kelso, founder
of the Children's Aid Society movement in Ontario and the Provincial Superintendent of Neglected and Dependent Children, 1893-1934.
Presented by Mr. Martin Kelso of Toronto.
MacLellan, Margaret E. (d. 1973), Public Servant.
Original, 7 feet 4 inches (2.23 m.).
Correspondence, memoranda, pamphlets, clippings and subject files relating
primarily to women's rights.
Presented by Mrs. F. W. Underhill of Toronto.
McKinlay, William L. (b. 1888), Arctic Explorer.
Original, 6 inches (15.24 cm), additional.
Manuscripts, correspondence, a diary and summary account prepared by Lome
Knight, and an annotated copy of Stefansson's Adventures of Wrangel Island.
Presented by Mr. William McKinlay of Glasgow, Scotland.
Montreal Council of Women (est. 1893).
Original, 10 feet (3.05 m.).
Minutes, annual reports, subject files and scrapbooks.
Presented by the Council.
Morgan, Martha, Domestic Servant.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.).
Letters written from Martha Pritchard to Miss Morgan describing her life and
work as a domestic servant of Cannington Manor, North West Territories, and
her reaction to the isolation and climate of the Canadian prairies, 1892-1893.
Presented by Mr. A. H. Higgs of Bristol, England.
Murrary, E. G. D. (1890-1964), Bacteriologist.
Original, 13 feet (3.96 m).
Personal papers, notebooks on experiments and correspondence.
Presented by Dr. R. G. E. Murray of London, Ontario. HISTORICAL  BRANCH
45
Newton-White, Ernest (b. 1892), Conservationist.
Original, 28 feet (8.53 m.), additional.
Papers including research files and manuscripts, relating to conservationist
Ernest Newton-White.
Presented by Miss Muriel E. Newton-White of Haileybury, Ontario.
Ottawa Horticultural Society (est. 1893).
Original, 1 foot 4 inches (40.64 cm.).
Minutes of meetings, 1912-1954, annual reports, 1912-1974, and membership lists,
1950-1967.
Presented by Mr. W. M. Cavaye of Ottawa.
Ottawa Society of Comparative Medicine.
Original, AVa inches (10.79 cm.).
Minutes of meetings, financial receipts and expenditures and abstracts of learned
papers.
Presented by Dr. D. C. Alexander of Ottawa.
Sellar Family.
Copy, 1/2 inch (1.27 cm.), 1863-1947.
Correspondence, accounts, diary and printed material relating to the Sellar family
of Huntington, Quebec.
Copied from originals in the possession of Mr. Robert Hill of Lorraine, Quebec.
Sise, Hazen Edward (1906-1974), Architect.
Original, 30 feet (9.14 m.).
Papers of the Porteous and Sise families. Correspondence, manuscripts, financial records, and subject files of Hazen Sise.
Presented by Mrs. Hazen Sise of Montreal, and the National Capital Commission.
United Nations Association in Canada.
Original, 40 feet (12.16 m).
Correspondence, memoranda and publications.
Presented by Mr. J. Bourget of the Association.
University Women's Club of Ottawa (est. 1910).
Original, 1 foot 8 inches (50.80 cm.), additional.
Subject files, scrapbooks, correspondence, minute books and pamphlets.
Presented by the Club.
Walker, Roy Fairbaim (1887-1974), Railwayman, Collector.
Original, 6 feet (1.83 m.), c. 1870-1972.
Plans, books and subject files relating to the early history of steam locomotives.
Presented by Mr. Donald Walker of Montreal.
Zolf, Larry, Journalist.
Original, 4 feet 6 inches (1.37 m.).
Correspondence of Arthur Roebuck, newsclippings and Mr. Zolf's notes.
Presented by Mr. Zolf of Toronto.
NATIONAL ETHNIC ARCHIVES SECTION - The National Ethnic Archives Section made many new contacts with major organizations and leading figures
of Canada's ethnic communities with a view to preserving their papers in an
appropriate archival repository. The general response was positive and many 46
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
persons have indicated their intent to donate their personal papers to the Public
Archives. In addition, some have placed material in various provincial archives
and privately maintained repositories.
The Section is also assembling inventories of relevant collections in other
repositories. This will enable the National Ethnic Archives to serve as an information and referral centre. A microfiche publication of the finding aids to collections
is underway and now includes finding aids to the papers of the Trans-Canada
Alliance of German Canadians, the Ukrainian National Youth Association and
the Maltese Canadian Society of Toronto.
The arrangement and description of collections in non-official languages is
done by persons familiar with the language and the community^concerned.
Contract staff is also used in acquisition work. During the year particular attention
was paid to the Italian-Canadian community through the services of John A.
Grohovaz, a journalist, poet and amateur historian.
Acquisitions
Canadian Hungarian News (est. 1924).
Original, 37 feet (11.28 m.).
Papers and records relating to the Hungarian National Association and other
material benefit associations in the 1930s, and editorial and business records
of the Canadian Hungarian News, dating chiefly from 1950.
Presented by Gusztav Nemes of Winnipeg, the newspaper's founder and editor.
Dale, Jack (1900-1970), Entertainer.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.).
Scrapbooks containing fan mail, 1934-1938, clippings from the English and
Ukrainian press, 1934-1962, and other records of Jack Dale (Jackiw Samotilka),
the first Ukrainian Canadian to be heard regularly on a radio program and the
first Western Canadian to have an exclusive contract with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Presented by Mrs. Kathleen Dale.
Di Giulio, Donald, Businessman.
Photocopy, 2 inches (5.08 cm.).
Files compiled by Mr. Di Giulio on the Casa Italia (seized by the RCMP in 1940)
and L 'Ordine Italo-Canadesi. A taped interview was transferred to the Oral History
Archives.
Loaned for copying by Mr. Di Giulio, the founder of an Italian-Canadian insurance
co-operative.
Kaye (Kisilewsky), V. J. (b. 1896), Historian.
Original, 40 feet (12.16 m.).
Diaries, correspondence, research notes, speeches and other papers, 1896-1974.
Presented by Dr. Kaye, the founder of the Department of Slavic Studies at the
University of Ottawa and an active member of the Ukrainian-Canadian community.
Kysilewska, Olena (1869-1956), Leader of Women's Movements.
Original, 21 feet (6.40 m.), 1885-1956.
Correspondence, notes, diaries, articles, speeches and other papers relating HISTORICAL  BRANCH
47
to her career during the inter-war years in Poland as a senator and her activities
in women's organizations.
Minenko, Timofi, Clergyman.
Original and photocopies, 1 foot 10 inches (55.88 cm.), 1943-1974.
Correspondence and copies of records relating to the organization and operation
of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in North America, the Standing Committee
of Canonical Orthodox Bishops and the parish of St. George's Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Grimsby, Ontario.
Missori, Marco (1890-1970), Travel Agent.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), 1926-1970.
Correspondence and memoranda relating to his activities as a founder of the
Circalo Colombo, 1916, and as an executive member of the Fascio Principe
Umberto of Toronto and Grand Secretary of the Order of the Sons of Italy.
Nakayama, Gordon Goichi, Clergyman.
Original, 12 inches (30.48 cm.), 1933-1961.
The Church News, a mimeographed newsletter published by Canon Nakayama,
and other documents and publications relating to his activities.
Fifteen hours of wire recordings were transferred to the Historical Sound Archives
Section.
Presented by Canon Nakayama.
Reaman, George Elmore (1889-1969), Educator.
Original, 20 feet (6.10 m.), 1927-1969.
Correspondence, research notes and manuscripts of articles, monographs and
speeches of Dr. G. E. Reaman, a historian and educator who wrote on the history
of Mennonites, Huguenots, Loyalists and rural Ontario.
Books transferred to the Public Archives Library.
Presented by Mrs. Reaman and her daughter.
Societa Italiana di Mutuo Coccorso "Christoforo Columbo Lodge", Trail, British
Columbia.
Microfilm, 1 reel, 1905-1908.
Minutes of the Society.
Loaned for microfilming by the Society.
Stolarick, Imrich.
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.).
Correspondence, notes and some periodicals pertaining to the Czech
community.
Zuk-Hryskievic, Mrs. Raisa, Medical Doctor.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.).
Correspondence, notes and other records relating to various Belorussian organizations in which Dr. Zuk-Hryskievic is active.
Significant additions were made to other collections:
Orto Estonian Publishing Company Ltd.
Original, 40 feet (12.20 m.), additional.
Manuscripts, business records. Three reels of motion picture film were transferred to the National Film Archives. 48
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Trans-Canada Alliance of German Canadians.
Original, 13 feet (3.96 m.), additional, 1951-1974.
Correspondence, records of meetings and special events and subject files.
Ukrainian Canadian Committee.
Microfilm, 1 reel; Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), additional.
Minutes of meetings and records of the Ukrainian Canadian Servicemen's
Association, 1942-1946 and the Canadian-Ukrainian Relief Bureau, 1947-1949.
Commitments to donate collections were made by the following:
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services, Montreal, Quebec.
The J.I.A.S. has more than 300 feet (91.44 m.) of records, many of them case
files, relating to half a century of service to the Jewish community in Canada.
Kirschbaum, J. M., Businessman.
Dr. Kirschbaum has been president of the Canada Ethnic Press Federation and
was one of the leading figures in the campaign to secure government recognition
of the cultural communities.
Rusza, E., Clergyman.
Rev. Rusza has served as pastor to Hungarian churches in Toronto and Hamilton
for more than 40 years and is writing a history of the Hungarian Canadian
community.
RESEARCH AND INQUIRIES SECTION - The Research and Inquiries Section
coordinates in a central office all research activities undertaken by clerical and
professional staff in response to written inquiries received in the Manuscript
and Public Records Divisions.
The Section replied to approximately 8,400 written inquiries during the year.
While this figure does not represent an appreciable increase over last year it
is interesting to note that the number of genealogical inquiries has risen by
about 10 per cent. This growing interest in genealogy has not only been reflected
in an increase in written inquiries but also in the number of genealogical researchers who visit the Archives. The Research and Inquiries Section has recognized the need for an improved oral reference service by establishing a separate
genealogical reference desk. It is hoped that this desk, which is staffed by
members of the Section's Genealogical Unit, will offer a more personalized and
specialized service to the genealogical researcher.
While improving its service to genealogists the Section has attempted to
maintain a high standard of quality in answering the numerous other inquiries
received from a broad cross-section of the general public; including university
students, professors, project researchers, authors, local historians, editors and
journalists.
Union List of Manuscripts Unit — Preparation of the second edition of the Union
List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, a catalogue of documents available
to the public in archival institutions across Canada, is nearing completion. The
first edition, which was published in 1968, contained approximately 11,000 entries
from 124 repositories. The revised edition will have 27,000 returns from 172
Canadian repositories and is expected to appear by mid-1975. The new edition
is being processed by computer and the printing will be done by Alphatext. HISTORICAL BRANCH 49
Reference Room Unit — This Unit was established last year to supervise the
services provided for the public in the Reference Room of the Manuscript Division
and to coordinate the finding aid diffusion project. The improvement and stan^
dardization of the card indexes and finding aids in the Reference Room are
among the most pressing projects of the Unit and considerable time was devoted
to them.
The General Index was reviewed; 6,000 obsolete cards were removed while
11,000 new references were added. The Second Index, the predecessor of the
General Index, is also under review. In addition to removing obsolete references,
additional information is being added to those that are incomplete.
A number of indexes which provide information concerning births, marriages, deaths and other biographical data have been grouped together as the
Biographical Indexes. The following additional biographical indexes were added:
the St. Eustache parish registers; Halifax Passenger Lists, 1880-1882; and the
Fabien Index, which was prepared by the late Jacques-Henri Fabien and contains
250,000 genealogical references for parishes in the Ottawa-Montreal area.
Existing aids were also reviewed and many redundant or obsolete ones
withdrawn. A standard format was established and is now being used by staff
members. Approximately 90 finding aids which conform to the new standards
were chosen for the microfiche diffusion project.
Technical Services and Diffusion Unit — The Diffusion Program continued in
full operation. The Sir John A. Macdonald microfilms were sent to all provincial
archives. Totalling 276,000 pages on 249 reels of microfilm, the collection is
an indispensable source for research in the Union and Confederation periods
and for the first quarter century of the nation's existence.
More than 600,000 pages of federal government records were filmed and
copies have been or will shortly be sent to provincial archives. All ten provincial
repositories will receive the unpublished House of Commons Sessional Papers
from 1924 to 1939. The three prairie archives received a further 150,000 pages
of Immigration Branch records. British Columbia and the Maritime Provinces
were given copies of the postal inspectors reports from the nineteenth century
and the registers to the Provincial Secretary's correspondence for Canada East,
1839-1867, were filmed for Quebec. In all more than 4,400 reels of microfilm
will be deposited with the provincial archives.
Microfiche has proved an excellent tool for low-cost, small-scale publication.
Two projects of this nature were undertaken. The annual reports of the Public
Archives contain a number of valuable calendars and other finding aids, many
of which have been out of print for several years. To make them available again,
a microfiche edition of the French reports from 1872 to 1949 was produced
to complement the earlier English edition. In addition there are many hundreds
of finding aids which are of considerable interest to researchers. Most of these
will be published in microfiche form in the coming years and sold to interested
institutions. Ninety of them are now on microfiche.
The Division began a comprehensive conservation inventory which should
provide information both for long term planning and operations in this area.
The preliminary survey revealed the immensity of the problem : more than 600,000 50
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
pages of documents were estimated to require restoration. The report concluded
that existing and anticipated techniques could do much to ensure the survival
of the most important parts of collections.
While the quantity of restoration work done was below the necessary level,;
a substantial amount was accomplished. About 25,000 pages were repaired;
50 posters were mounted; 163 volumes were bound.
For the second consecutive year the number of entries in the Register of
Dissertations declined slightly, falling from 2,121 to 2,058. The fact that nearly
half of the entries change annually shows the importance of this publication
in assisting researchers to remain abreast of developments in their field.
Public Records Division
The fiscal year 1974-1975 was one of change and adjustment for the Public
Records Division. In addition to completing a physical move from the third floor
to the seventh floor of the Public Archives Building, the Division relocated half
of its holdings in another building. The staff made further progress in locating
documentation created by the Department of the Interior, in compiling a comprehensive guide to sources on immigration and land settlement since Confederation, and in preparing detailed shelf-lists of holdings. Two new projects began :
the microfilming and indexing of all Indian Affairs records in our custody, and
the publication in a handy, bilingual format of all the inventories of the various
record groups. A start was made at an integrated conservation program, including protective copying, to ensure the long term security of the holdings. As
the year came to a close, the Division began a period of consolidation during
which it plans to reassess and review its goals and procedures.
The Division accessioned about 5,180 feet (1,554 m.) of records and fully
processed (screened, boxed, and listed) almost 4,000 feet (1,200 m.). By the
end of the year, the Historical Branch Diffusion Program had microfilmed the
unprinted House of Commons Sessional Papers to the end of 1939.
During the year considerable progress was made in identifying conservation
as a priority area within the Division. A conservation coordinator was appointed
and served as the divisional representative on a committee assigned the task
of evaluating holdings and establishing priorities for restoration and conservation
in each division. By the end of the year the committee had been given permanent
status and had begun organizing a formal conservation program for the Historical
Branch. The Public Records Division planned a concerted effort to tackle the
large backlog of conservation work. A number of documents were sent to the
Records Conservation Unit for restoration during the year, including a series
of posters from the Department of the Interior.
The holdings of the Division are to be found in 98 record groups, as follows
(a portion of record groups 7 and 14, and all of record groups 1, 4, 5 and 8,
are in the custody of the Manuscript Division): HISTORICAL BRANCH
51
Record
Group
2. Privy Council Office
3. Post Office Department
6. Secretary of State
7. Governor-General's Office
9. Department of Militia and Defence
10. Indian Affairs Branch
11. Department of Public Works
12. Department of Transport
13. Department of Justice
14. Records of Parliament
15. Department of the Interior
16. Department of National Revenue
17. Department of Agriculture
18. Royal Canadian Mounted Police
19. Department of Finance
20. Department of Trade and Commerce
21. Department  of  Mines  and  Technical
Surveys
22. Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources
23. Department of Fisheries
24. Department of National Defence
25. Secretary of State for External Affairs.
26. Department of Citizenship and Immigration
27. Department of Labour
28. Department of Munitions and Supply
29. Department of National Health and Welfare
30. Canadian National Railways
31. Statistics Canada (Dominion Bureau of
Statistics)
32. Public Service Commission
33. Royal Commissions
34. National Capital Commission
35. Interdepartmental Committees
36. Boards, Offices, Commissions (non-continuing)
37. Public Archives of Canada
38. Department of Veterans' Affairs
39. Department of Forestry
40. Department of Insurance
41. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
42. Department of Marine •
43. Department of Railways and Canals
44. Department of National War Services
45. Geological Survey of Canada
46. Canadian Transport Commission
47. Dominion-Provincial Conferences
48. Dominion Observatories
49. Department of Defence Production
50. Unemployment Insurance Commission
51. International Joint Commission
52. St. Lawrence Seaway Authority
Record
Group
53. National Film Board
54. Comptroller of the Treasury
55. Treasury Board
56. Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
57. Emergency Measures Organization
58. Auditor General
59. Electoral Boundaries Commission
60. Atomic Energy Control Board
61. Allied War Supplies Corporation
62. Department of Industry
63. Canada Council
64. Wartime Prices and Trade Board
65. Canadian Commercial Corporation
66. National Harbours Board
67. Export Credit Insurance Corporation
68. Registrar General
69. Centennial Commission
70. Air Canada
71. Canadian  Corporation for the  1967
World Exhibition
72. Canadian Government Exhibition
Commission
73. Department of the Solicitor General
74. External Aid Office
75. Economic Council of Canada
76. Immigration Branch
77. National Research Council
78. Northern Ontario Pipeline Crown Corporation
79. Tariff Board
80. Board of Grain Commissioners
81. Dominion Coal Board
82. Immigration Appeal Board
83. Defence Construction Limited
84. National Parks Branch
85. Northern Administration Branch
86. Mines Branch
87. Mineral Resources Branch
88. Surveys and Mapping Branch
89. Water Resources Branch
90. National Battlefields Commission
91. Yukon Territorial Records
92. Geographical Branch
93. Atmospheric Environment Service
94. Information Canada
95. Corporations Branch
96. Northern Canada Power Commission
97. Department of Communications
98. Department of Supply and Services
99. National Energy Board
100. Canadian Radio-Television Commission
101. Ministry of Science and Technology
Accessions— The Division accessioned 3,605 feet (1,081.5 m.) of records during
1974-1975, compared with 2,235 feet (670.5 m.) in 1973-74 and 7,190 feet
(2,157 m.) during 1972-1973. 52
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
The more important accessions were:
Agriculture.
Original, 1 inch (2.54 cm.), 1880-1883.
A register of assisted immigrants arriving at the Ottawa Immigration Office.
Original, 8 feet 8 inches (2.64 m.), 1904-1967.
Additional records from the Central Experimental Farm.
Air Canada.
Original, photocopy, 8 inches (20.32 cm.).
An historical record of the fare structure of Trans Canada Air Lines and Air
Canada, plus a photocopy of a card file indicating point-to-point passenger tariffs
on domestic and trans-border (Canada-United States) routes from the
commencement of operations to the present.
Auditor General.
Original, 600 feet (182.94 m.), c. 1927-1972.
Correspondence and verification papers from the Office of the Auditor General.
Canadian Maritime Commission.
Original, 196 feet (51.71 m.), 1962-1965.
Ship subsidy files, arranged by names of companies.
Citizenship and Immigration.
Original, 53 feet (16.16 m.), 1924-1966.
Deputy Minister's Office registry files.
Communications.
Original, 27 feet (8.23 m.), 1904-1973.
Registry files covering a wide range of activities. Most of the files were created
by the Departments of Marine and Fisheries, and Transport, later brought forward
into the Communications registry system.
Defence Production.
Original, 219 feet (66.77 m.), 1939-1951.
Central registry files dealing with the renegotiation of Second World War contracts. Also included are some files transferred from the Department of Reconstruction and Supply.
Economic Council of Canada.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), 1964-1968.
Central registry files, including documentation on an economic study of the
construction industry (1964-1968), and reports and files on the Interprovincial
Conference of Ministers of Education (1966).
Export Development Corporation.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), c. 1964-1966.
Expired or cancelled policies on companies' shipments or contracts.
External Affairs.
Original, 77 feet (23.47 m.), 1909-1959.
Confidential briefs, commentaries, reports, and other documents concerning
Canada's foreign policy at intergovernmental conferences and meetings. Finance.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.), 1905-1909.
Deputy Minister's letterbook.
Original, 8 feet (2.44 m.), 1961-1963.
Central Control ledgers of the Government of Canada.
Fisheries Research Board.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm), 1953-1971.
Various records of the Board, including a series of files, draft reports and
conference proceedings covering the executive actions of the Board and the
activities of the Great Lakes Fishing Commission, investigations into the salmon
fishery, minutes of the Federal-Provincial Committee for Ontario Fisheries, and
the proceedings of the 1965 Symposium on the Ecnomic Aspects of Sport Fishing
in Canada.
Governor-General's Office.
Original, 21 feet (6.40 m.), 1859-1966.
Registry file created in the office of the Secretary to the Governor-General.
Information Canada.
Original, 8 feet (2.44 m.), 1968-1969.
Files relating to the work of the Task Force on Government Information.
Interior.
Original, 810 feet (246.97 m), 1890-1950.
Letters patent for land issued by the Land Patents Branch of the Department
of the Interior and its successors.
Original, 38 feet (11.58 m.), c. 1890-1936.
A series of files relating to the Yukon Gold Commission's Office, waterfront leases
in the Yukon, mining lands, petroleum and natural gas leases, and reclamation
services.
Original, 2 inches (5.08 cm.).
Registry files relating to the development of Canada's aerial mapping program.
Justice.
Original, 8 feet (2.44 m.), 1895-1968.
Capital case files.
Original, 16 inches (40.64'cm.), 1962.
Files relating to the Committee on Juvenile Delinquency.
Original, 8 feet (2.44 m), 1958-1960.
Records of the Correctional Planning Committee.
Labour.
Original, 4 feet (1.22 m.), 1952-1972.
Records of the Women's Bureau concerning the establishment of the Bureau,
research, surveys, publications, and contracts with public and private individuals
and agencies in Canada and abroad.
Original, 123 feet (37.50 m.), 1944-1962.
Conciliation and arbitration files relating to disputes, negotiations, and agreements between industrial companies and unions. 54
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), 1968-1973.
Records of the departmental Task Force on Planning, Programming and Budgeting.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), 1931-1969.
General Services and Finance Accounts records including files relating to the
National Film Board, the 1961 Royal Commission on Publishing (O'Leary
Commission), reports and news releases concerning the Women's Bureau, and
the reorganization of the Accounts office.
Original, 21 feet (6.40 m.).
Records of the National War Labour Board during the Second World War.
Marine.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.), 1901-1919.
Two shipping registers for the Port of Toronto.
Photocopy, 1 foot 8 inches (50.80 cm), 1882-1953.
Shipping register of the Port of Owen Sound, Ontario.
Mines and Technical Surveys.
Original, 4 feet (1.22 m.), 1945-1969.
Registry files relating to various functions of the department, including the
operations of the Deputy Minister's office, construction of the Booth Street offices
of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, personnel and organization, the Atomic
Energy Advisory Panel, and the Arctic Institute of North America.
National Defence.
Original, 6 inches (15.24 cm.), 1886-1945.
Army files relating to Fort Chambly (1886-1921), Victoria, B.C., riots of 1915,
and the disposition of land at Esquimalt (1906-1931).
Original, 315 feet (96.04 m.), 1939-1945.
Canadian Army (Overseas). Records of Canadian units as well as copies of
British, American, and German documents selected by Canadian Military Headquarters (MHQ) London and the Army Historical Section, Ottawa.
Original, 323 feet (98.48 m.), 1939-1947.
Canadian Military Headquarters, London, central registry files.
Original, 20 feet (6.10 m.), 1939-1946.
Prisoner of War files.
Transferred from the Directorate of History.
Original, 7 feet 8 inches (2.34 m.), 1947-1974.
Files of the Defence Research Board, containing press releases and newspaper
clippings.
Original, 3 inches (7.62 cm.), 1939-1964.
Register of Warrants authorizing the use of the Blue Ensign on Canadian vessels.
Original, 33 feet 4 inches (10.16 m.), 1937-1974.
Royal Canadian Navy records, including a machinery information book on River
Class frigates, files relating to training and recruitment, general correspondence
and ships' logs. HISTORICAL BRANCH
55
National Harbours Board.
Original, 5 feet (1.52 m.), 1943-1967.
Collective bargaining agreements, by brotherhood or association.
National Health and Welfare.
Original, 78 feet (23.78 m.).
Files relating to child and national health (1936-1974), including the Dionne
Quintuplets, and the functions of the Health Insurance Division (1928-1974).
Northern Administration Branch.
Original, 361 feet (110.07 m.), 1863-1970.
Central registry files concerning various functions of the branch including the
Northern Development Program and activities of the Indian-Eskimo Development Branch and the Northern Coordination and Research Centre, hunting
applications, and some personal files on North West Territory inhabitants.
Parliament.
Original, 298 feet (90.86 m.), 1916-1966.
Sessional Papers, including scrolls and test rolls.
Public Service Commission.
Original, 12 feet 2 inchesX3.71 m.), additional, 1907-1970.
Historical personnel files, as well as subject files relating to classification in
various government departments.
Public Works.
Original, 6 feet (1.83 m.), 1861-1964.
Letterbooks of the Pacific Region, subject reference files, minute books of the
Joint Committee for the Reconstruction of the Parliament Buildings, report by
the Chief Engineer for 1867, and a photograph of the construction of the East
Block in 1861.
Registrar General.
Original, 1 foot (30.48 cm.), 1971-1974.
Proclamations.
Royal Commissions.
Original, 3 feet 4 inches (1.02 m.), 1974.
Exhibits, briefs, submissions and working papers of the Steel Profits Inquiry.
Original, 33 feet (10.06 m), 1972-1974.
Airport Inquiry Commission.
Original, 2 feet (60.96 cm.), 1965-1970.
Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism.
Original, 100 feet (30.49 m.), 1969-1974.
Commission of Inquiry into the Non-medical Use of Drugs.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.), 1966-1971.
Commission on Farm Machinery.
Science and Technology.
Copy, 3 feet 8 inches (1.12 m), 1971-1973.
Correspondence of the Minister. 56
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Secretary of State.
Original, 7 feet (2.13 m.), 1965-1969.
Records concerning a ministerial mission to Latin America (1968) and a special
task force in Europe (1968) plus files of C. A. Lussier, Assistant Deputy Minister
of Citizenship and Immigration (1965-1969) and later ADM (Citizenship), Department of Secretary of State.
Original, 14 feet (4.27 m.), 1967-1970.
Parliamentary Returns.
Original, 3 feet (91.44 cm.).
Files concerning Returning Officers and Electoral Officers (1949-1966), and
records of the National Committee for the Diamond Jubilee of Gorrfederation
(1927).
Original, 4 inches (10.16 cm.), 1951-1961.
Documents of the Canadian Citizenship Branch mainly concerning the proposed
migration of Doukhobours from Canada to Russia.
Solicitor General.
Original, 71 feet (21.64 m.), additional, 1886-1967.
Correspondence files relating to policy and routine operations of federal penal
institutions.
Supply and Services.
Original, 9 feet (2.71 m), 1942-1972.
Administrative and operational files dealing with the operations of Polymer Corporation.
Trade and Commerce.
Original, 7 feet (2.13 m.), 1926-1969.
Records relating to tariffs with Rumania, Poland, Finland, the Belgian Congo,
Belgium and Norway, as well as records of the Canadian Government Exhibition
Commission concerning the Centennial Commission's Train and Caravans in
1967.
Transport.
Original, 165 feet (50.31 m.), 1907-1970.
Registry files on a variety of topics, including the licensing of ships for voyages
under the War Measures Act, telecommunications and broadcasting.
Treasury Board.
Original, 29 feet (8.84 m.), 1970-1971.
Treasury Board minutes for the period from 8 January 1970 to 12 May 1971.
Original, 8 inches (20.32 cm.).
Correspondence with the Department of Justice regarding Treasury Board
Minutes (c. 1883-1922) and a letterbook of the Board (1919-1923).
Unemployment Insurance Commission.
Original, 75 feet (22.86 m.), 1941-1963.
A series of U.I.C. coverage files.
Original, 11 feet (3.35 m.), c. 1942-1967.
Account and allotment registers for regional offices and security ledgers recording investment of the Unemployment Insurance Fund. HISTORICAL BRANCH 57
INVENTORIES AND FINDING AIDS — Typed inventories now exist for almost
all record groups. During the year the publication program of the Division was
started. It is a comprehensive project designed to produce preliminary inventories, checklists, thematic inventories, brochures, and complete guides to collections to make potential users more aware of the sources available in public
records and of the facilities offered by the Division. So far the program has
concentrated on producing preliminary inventories to various groups. Despite
a general lack of manpower, inventories for the Indian Affairs Records (RG 10)
and RCMP Records (RG 18) were completed this year. In addition, considerable
progress was made on the manuscript text for inventories to the records of
the Department of Trade and Commerce (RG 20) and the Wartime Prices and
Trade Board (RG 64). During 1975-1976 the Division hopes to produce inventories
to the records of the Department of Trade and Commerce, Statistics Canada,
Department of Industry, Wartime Prices and Trade Board, Canadian Commercial
Corporation, Privy Council Office, Department of Finance, Export Credits Insurance Corporation, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Dominion Coal
Board, Mines Branch, Mineral Resources Branch, and Water Resources Branch.
In addition, it is hoped that a new checklist of census returns, an annual list
of accessions, and a list of the Division's holdings on microfilm will be produced.
During the year the staff produced typed shelf-lists for RG 76 (Immigration
Branch), RG 29 (National Health and Welfare), and RG 9, Series I and II (Militia
and Defence). Considerable progress was made on the shelf lists for RG 18
(RCMP) and RG 85 (Mines Branch).
INDIAN AFFAIRS PROJECT - In November 1973, the Cabinet and Treasury
Board approved a special submission providing for the microfilming and indexing
of the Indian Affairs records in the custody of the Public Archives. The program
was to commence by 1 April 1974. Unfortunately, the staff was not acquired
until mid-August. This delay, in addition to various difficulties experienced in
obtaining a full complement of camera operators, will mean that the program
will be extended into 1978, and possibly 1979.
The staff working on the project has spent a considerable amount of time
in preparing the records for microfilming, arranging the documents in proper
order, assigning page numbers to some of the series, and improving the lists
of the material so that the computerized finding aids will be more complete
and accurate.
In April 1974, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs made inquiries
regarding the possibility of including in the microfilming program certain records
still in the custody of the Department. Because of the important nature of this
material, including treaty annuity and interest distribution paylists, census return
volumes, and historical reference books, it was decided to have all the material
microfilmed. This project, involving the filming of 787 volumes, was completed
by the end of November 1974. The original records have been transferred
to the Public Archives, and the Department is now in the process of preparing
microjackets for the paylists according to Indian band, a system that will enable
more rapid retrieval. On completion, the master negative microjackets will be
located in the Public Archives.
Regardless of delays in commencing the overall program, considerable
progress was made during the year in microfilming some of the 4,000 feet 58
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
(1,200 m.) of Indian Affairs records in Archives custody. By the end of the fiscal
year, microfilming had been completed on all 85 Trust Fund Ledgers, 890 of
the 1,461 volumes of General Headquarters Letterbooks, and 275 of the 491
volumes of Indian School Files. While the microfilming of Indian Affairs records
presents researchers with certain difficulties since records are withdrawn from
circulation during this period, the long-range benefits of having the material
on microfilm must be considered.
The Indian Affairs File Clearance Team, which began its work in August
1973, made considerable progress during the past year in reviewing restricted
Indian Affairs files. Their objective is to clear as many files as possible for
research access. Since the project began, 20,002 files which .were formerly
closed have been fully opened, and another 1,027 approved for research after
the exclusion of certain sensitive documents (in accordance with Cabinet Directive No. 46).
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND NORTHERN ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
— This year staff of the Resource Records Section spent several months integrating into series files of various accessions of records that largely originated with
the Department of the Interior between 1873 and 1936. These accessions, received by the Archives between 1969 and 1973, comprise 700 ft. (210 m.) of
records. The files have been separated into a number of series, the major ones
being Territorial Mining Lands, 74 ft. (22.2 m.); Office of the Supervisory Mining
Engineer, 4 ft. (1.2 m.); Mining Lands and Yukon Branch, 134 ft. (40.2 m.); Northern Administration and Lands Branch, Mines, 40 ft. (12 m.); Timber, Mines and
Grazing Branch, 77 ft. (23.1 m), and Dominion Lands Branch, 371 ft. (111.3 m.).
Integration into file series was carried out after a careful study of the administrative structure of the Department of the Interior and succeeding departments, and a preliminary survey of the land and other resource records that
were sent to the prairie provinces after the transfer of natural resources in 1930.
The criteria for establishing these series are, however, very much dependent
upon the records themselves: i.e., whether or not the particular branch had
a specific registry system, the inclusive dates of the records, the functions being
performed and the accessibility for research purposes. Except for interfiling,
integration of the new Dominion Lands accession is now complete, with files
already organized in the Department of the Interior group (RG 15). In completing
this job, staff members are carefully considering which series will be placed
in RG 15, which in the Northern Administration Branch group (RG 85), and
whether or not any new groups will have to be created to reflect accurately
the administrative history of the various series. In addition, a list of file titles
now exists for all records except one-third of the Mining Lands and Yukon Branch
files.
Further organization of this material during 1974-1975 will produce a comprehensive listing of federal resource records for the period 1873-1936 that will
complement and expand the range of sources already available in various provincial repositories. It will also provide the basis for new initiatives by the Public
Records Division in collecting, organizing and analyzing post-1936 files relating
to the role of the federal government in natural resource exploration and
development throughout Canada. HISTORICAL  BRANCH
59
■2  §
si
CO Q 60
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
IMMIGRATION AND LAND SETTLEMENT GUIDE - As part of the Division's
contribution to the National Ethnic Archives Program, the Resource Records
Section continued with the preparation of a guide to sources relating to immigration and land settlement. During the year, detailed listings of individual subject
files were completed for over one-quarter of the record groups, covering more
than one-half of the Division's holdings, including records Of the departments
of Justice, Forestry, Post Office, and National Health and Welfare. Most of the
listing is expected to be completed by the end of 1975. Computer input and
processing will begin shortly thereafter, in order to produce subject indexes.
Microfilming of the Immigration Branch records continued during the year.
Over 50 per cent of the 450 ft. (135 m.) of records in Record Group 76 had
been filmed by the end of March 1975.
PUBLIC SERVICE SECTION - The Public Service Section performs a joint
service on behalf of the Public Records Division and the Manuscript Division.
Its operations include the registration of researchers using Archives' facilities,
the retrieval and return of material requested by researchers, the photo-duplication of archival holdings, and the control and interlibrary loan of microfilm.
There were significant increases in the volume of public service over the
past four years. For example, there were almost 4,800 research registrations
during the year. This was 42 per cent over the number in 1971-1972 and 24
per cent more than that for 1973-1974. The proportion of researchers according
to categories of research remains about the same: 35 per cent were university
students and professors, 10 per cent were research officers of the federal
government, 16 per cent were engaged in genealogical research and the remaining 39 per cent were in the general category of local historians, editors, special
project researchers, archivists and journalists.
Circulation of original holdings stood at 68,771 volumes in 1974-1975, compared with 55,836 in 1971-1972, an increase of 23 per cent. Microfilm circulation
in the building was 18,810 reels during the last year. While this is six per cent
lower than the figure four years ago, it is a 19 per cent increase over the
1973-1974 output. Meanwhile, interlibrary loans have increased by 45 per cent
since 1971-1972 and 12 per cent over the last year. The total for 1974-1975 was
4,419 reels. The largest increase was in the area of photoduplication. The Section
provided 168,309 pages of copying by requisitions and 56,238 pages directly
at the Circulation Desk, for a total of 224,547 pages, an increase of 13 per
cent over 1973-1974 and 130 per cent over 1971-1972.
During the year the Section investigated several improvements in public
service. As the result of consultations between divisions, a joint registration
system was ready to be implemented in the new fiscal year. After 1 April 1975,
for researchers wishing to use the facilities of the Public Records Division,
Manuscript Division, and /or Archives Library, registration in any one of the
divisions will be accepted in all three divisions. In addition, plans were being
implemented to create a self-service microfilm operation for in-house research.
It was hoped that by the summer of 1975 researchers would be able to obtain
microfilm directly at all hours of the day in the search rooms on the third floor
of the Archives Building. In collaboration with the Micrographie Advisory Section
in the Technical Division, the Section undertook a study of the positive and HISTORICAL BRANCH 61
negative features of two 35 mm. microfilm readers on the market. Its findings
are to be presented early in 1975-1976. As the year drew to a close the Section
was engaged in a thorough reappraisal of its various functions and procedures,
with a view to improving both efficiency and quality of service to its users.
LONDON OFFICE — During the past year there has been considerable activity
of which part has been concentrated on the recruitment in the U.K. of staff
for the Record and Picture Conservation Sections in Ottawa, acting on the special
instructions of the Director, Administration and Technical Services Branch. As
a result, after a week of interviews in the London Office in the spring, three
candidates were selected for appointments in the Records Conservation Section
and one for the Picture Conservation Section.
The papers (including tapes and transcripts of meetings) of J. P. I. Tyas,
M.Sc, M.I.E.E., P.E., of the Office of Science and Technology, Department of
Industry, Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, were sent to the London Office by his
widow as a gift to the Public Archives. They were sorted and sent to Ottawa
in June 1974. Another consignment of original material consisted of the papers
of Mr. Patrick Anderson, collected from his home in Essex and sent to Ottawa
in August 1974. These papers had been purchased by the Manuscript Division
as were the letters of L.M. Montgomery which were sent in August, followed
by a few other relevant papers in November. In the latter half of February 1975,
a set of papers relating to the appeals to the Privy Council from the Supreme
Court of Canada was given to the Public Archives by the Institute of Advanced
Legal Studies of the University of London. This group of records, supplementary
to those coming from the same source in 1969, was collected and sent to Ottawa
at the end of February 1975.
Among the records copied, perhaps most notable are those of the Hudson's
Bay Company which were made available to the public in recent years. The
filming of these continued up to the eleventh hour when they were returned
to be packed as part of the bulk consignment of all the records sent by the
Hudson's Bay Company from Beaver House in London to Winnipeg in July and
August of 1975.
Accessions — Copies were made of official documents in the Public Records
Office and of documents in other repositories. The series of documents copied
in the Public Records Office were: CO.5, Vols. 785-811 (6 reels) and Adm. 2,
Vols. 1331-1384 (4 reels), mainly extracts selected by the London Office and
CO. 880, Vols. 1-32 (end) (20 reels), the complete volumes from the Public
Records Office film library.
Copies of papers in other repositories included: a catalogue of the Colonial
Office Library, 1860 (sections relating to Canada, 1 reel) and Add. Mss. 29237,
letters to Sir William and Sir John Johnson (repeat as original copy lost in transit,
1 reel) from the British Museum; biographical material on Captain S. G. Cresswell
and letters from" Sir John Franklin to Lt. E. N. Kendall (1 reel) from the National
Maritime Museum; and extracts from the Townshend Papers (1 reel) from the
National Army Museum.
Copies of privately owned documents were made from originals held by:
Hudson's Bay Company (29 reels), Dr. Barnardo (21 reels), the Army Museum
Ogilvy Trust (7 reels) and private individuals (2 reels). 62
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
A total of 93 reels of microfilm was acquired.
The total number of inquiries by telephone, letter or in person was 585.
PARIS OFFICE — The task of tracing documents relating to Canada continued
throughout 1974-1975 in the archives of southwestern France. This has resulted
in the selection of 40,000 pages of documents for microfilming. Microfilming
has already started and 16 reels of film have been produced so far. An extensive
inventory, completed this year, of items of Canadian interest held in the registers
of the Admiralty at Bayonne, will simplify the work of archiviste and researchers.
The list of whaling and cod-fishing boats which came to fish off the shores
of Canada has been enlarged — nearly a thousand of these vessels have now
been identified.
To date, nine reels of microfilm have been made of records in Series FF
("Fisheries") of the Archives municipales de Bayonne and this project should
be completed in 1975. Analysis of Series E of the Archives des Colonies is almost
complete and has so far yielded nine reels of microfilm.
The tracing of documents in French repositories is a huge undertaking and
1974-1975 has proved to be a time for planning this task. A clearly defined
research program has been established and several projects have already been
started, but the full results will not be forthcoming for some years yet.
The Paris Office acquired five photograph albums, a bequest of the late
Mme Georges Menier, the daughter-in-law of Senator Gaston Menier who inherited Anticosti Island from his brother Henri in 1913. These interesting photographs, of a remarkable quality for the period, are a vivid record of the history
of Anticosti during the first quarter of this century.
In April 1974 the Paris Office and the Historical Branch of the Public Archives
mounted an exhibition of documents relating to Msgr. de Laval in the Centre
culturel canadien. The exhibition later opened at Dreux, where it formed part
of the ceremonies marking the 350th anniversary of the birth of Bishop de Laval
and the 300th anniversary of the founding of the diocese of Quebec.
National Map Collection
Expansion and extension of the activities of the National Map Collection
were very evident during the year 1974-1975. Results of the diffusion program
were realized with the publication of a number of catalogues and listings.
Publications which became available during the year are: Ottawa in Maps
by Thomas Nagy, Winnipeg in Maps by Alan Artibise and Edward Dahl, French
Atlases in the Rare Atlas Collection by Lou Seboek, Telecommunications: The
Canadian Experience — An Annotated List of Maps by James Knight, Township
plans of the Canadian West by Guy Poulin and Francine Cadieux, List of Map
series in the Foreign Section by Vivien Cartmell (Volume III Antartica, Asia,
Australia and New Zealand; Volume IV America, ocean islands and the world);
and List of Gazeteers in the Foreign Section (revised edition) by Vivien Cartmell. HISTORICAL  BRANCH
63
Recent publications from the National Map Collection.
The National Map Collection, in cooperation with the City of Ottawa, mounted
a travelling exhibit of full-size photographs of historical maps of Ottawa. The
display which officially opened at the Ottawa City Hall on 10 January 1975 was
exhibited in various commercial establishments, educational and other institutions in Ottawa and area. Ottawa's "twin" city, Georgetown, Guyana, was officially presented with a full-size colour reproduction of one of the items from
this display, the 1895 birds-eye view of Ottawa, in addition to several copies
of the catalogue, Ottawa in Maps.
The Division used the fourth floor lobby for two interesting exhibitions of
historical maps during 1974-1975: an exhibition of maps of Prince Edward Island
and Ottawa in Maps.
The National Map Collection also cooperated with other Divisions within
the Historical Branch in the preparation of the major exhibition Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience in which maps were prominently displayed.
The vacant divisional chief position was filled in November 1974. Betty Kidd,
previously Head of the Canadian Section, was appointed to the position.
The Registry of Canadian Map Resources project made significant progress
during 1974-1975. The cataloguing guidelines for the independently published
or single thematic map were almost completed. Work was undertaken to provide 64
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
standardized geographical area names as headings for catalogue entries; a
bilingual draft of area names for Africa was compiled and circulated to committee
and working group members of the National Union Catalogue of Maps Committee. Further research continued in connection with the Universal Decimal Classification. Hugo Strobe was appointed chairman of an International Federation
of Library Associations (IFLA) Work Group for an International Standard Bibliographic Description for Maps.
Acquisitions, Inquiries and Loans
Canadian
Foreign
Section
Section
Total
Acquisitions 	
          38,963
7,193
46,156
Loans	
              —
486 (68)
486(68)
Inquiries
Telephone	
719
132
851
Written	
                952
38
990
Researchers and Tours	
             1,597
92
1,689
Total Inquiries	
3,268
262
3,530
Conservation and Control — During 1974-1975, the Division purchased non-
acidic folders for two size groupings of maps. When these were received, a
major redistribution of maps in the horizontal storage cabinets took place.
The inventory of rolled maps was resumed and preliminary entries prepared
for uncatalogued maps. This project will be completed in 1975-1976.
Experimental use of 105 mm. microfilm for maps and plans has been very
successful. The National Map Collection hopes that it will soon be possible to
move into a program using this microfilm.
Work Done by the Records Conservation Section, 1974-1975
Maps Mounted with Dovercastle-Nylon  2
Maps Mounted with Linen-Lamatec-Nylon   8
Maps Mounted with Linen-Lamatec  580
Maps Mounted with Permalife-Lamatec  32
Maps Mounted with Linen   89
Maps Mounted with Nylon   9
National Topographic Series Maps Laminated with Mylar 1,130
Atlases and Books Bound   5
Atlases Labelled  6
Extensions Added  14
Bands Removed  8
Binders and Portfolios   10
Repairs (not including those involved in the other categories)   1
"   Total 1,894
CANADIAN SECTION — Acquisitions and Accessions — During 1974-1975, the
Canadian Section acquired 38,963 maps, plans and atlases, compared to 27,
440 in the previous fiscal year. This number reflects only those items accessioned. Several recent large acquisitions will not be processed until 1975-1976. The increase is partially explained by several large transfers from government
departments or agencies. For example, approximately 750 items dealing with
the Rideau Canal were transferred from the Rideau Canal Office, Parks Canada
(Ontario Region), Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. Plans drawn by
John By, John Burrows and other early surveyors are part of this acquisition.
The Plan Room of the Canadian National Railway transferred about 1,000
maps, plans and atlases. This material varies from architectural plans of all types
of railway buildings, to plans of rights-of-way through towns, to depictions of
railway accidents.
Architectural plans of buildings constructed by the Department of the Interior
for native people, for example agents' houses, industrial schools and council
buildings, dating from the 1880s were transferred from the Department of Indian
and Northern Affairs.
Approximately 800 plans of airports and related facilities from the 1920s
to the present were acquired from Transport Canada.
The Department of the Environment transferred their "posterity" Canadian
Hydrographie charts, some 8,500 in number. 66
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
à^hï
^ i-
fflPilMflH
ll™
ï
 I _
a C3 I
Architectural plan of a railway station building.
The National Map Collection was able to fill a number of significant gaps
in the Collection by purchases and donations. Original maps by Theodore de
Bry, Herman Moll, Edward Weller, J. H. Johnson and Thomas Conder belong
in this category of early maps. The facsimile edition of the famous Blathwayt
Atlas was acquired from the John Carter Brown Library. The original collection
was brought together c. 1685 for the use of the Lords of Trade and Plantations
by its secretary, William Blathwayt and related-to the British Overseas Empire.
Several important nineteenth century items were also acquired: a copy of the
rare Illustrated Historical Atlas of Lincoln and Welland 1876 was purchased.
A donation by J. C Hanson included the Atlas of York County, N.B. 1878 and
the Atlas of the Maritime Provinces 1878. A map of Waterloo County (1861)
indicating landowners' names and an early (c. 1898) map of the village of Preston
were also added to the collection.
Breakdown of Acquisition Sources
Federal Agencies	
Provincial Agencies	
Municipalities	
Donations	
Map/Book Dealers, Commercial Companies .
Universities	
Other Divisions (PAC)	
Another 	
.31,525
1,626
94
125
387
162
.   5,022
82 HISTORICAL BRANCH 67
The number of surplus items from university collections shows a marked
decrease from previous years. This reflects a new policy of only accessioning
material of which copies are needed for the collection. The duplicate material
is not accessioned and will be redistributed to other collections at a later date.
The method of accessioning material was changed late in 1974-1975. The
new triplicate forms give additional information and provide that copies may
be filed by accession number, source and classification.
Reference — The number of inquiries received in 1974-1975 remained fairly
constant with that of 1973-1974. However, an increasing number of books, articles
and reports are being published, profusely illustrated with maps and architectural
plans from the Collection. For example, the Spring 1974 issue of Artscanada
is entitled "On Maps and Mapping" and includes many reproductions of maps
held by the Public Archives. Many interesting research problems are presented
to our reference staff each year; in 1974-1975, several major research areas
were the preparation of an historical atlas of Ontario, a study of the mapping
of the Great Lakes in the seventeenth century and research into land ownership
of the Toronto waterfront area.
Photoduplications Prepared
Photostats  4,702
Photographs  1,278
Xerox  3,449
Microfilm  30
Transparencies  337
New Photostat Negatives  1,649
New Photograph Negatives  734
Total 11,179
The project of revising the references on contact print cards continued.
A photocopy of the card relating to the map is enclosed with each photographic
copy supplied by the Collection, thus ensuring that the researcher received
complete and correct information.
The diminishing amount of space available in the Division has created
difficulties in providing tours to university classes and other groups. Slide presentations in a board room, combined with a tour of the Division has proven very
satisfactory with some groups recently.
Cataloguing — During 1974-1975 the Cataloguing Unit was involved in a number
of time-consuming projects. The Diffusion Program and the Exhibition Program
were major activities of the Unit.
Work continued on the Coverdale Collection catalogue. Listings for divisional
use were prepared for ship and airport plans from Transport Canada, and for
the acquisition of Rideau Canal material. A listing of atlases was prepared in
connection with space relocations. A large portion of the area cross reference
cards was verified and corrected. The subject index has been revised, based
on a new subject authority list, to make it a more valuable reference tool.
The diversity of the projects in which the cataloguing staff were involved
resulted in a decrease in catalogue entries — a total of 2,701 compared to 3,520 68
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
in 1973-1974. Of these, 413 were pre-1850 maps, 888 in the 1851-1950 period,
and 1,400 maps after 1951.
The signing of a contract in 1974-1975 with G. K. Hall & Co., Boston, to
reproduce the card catalogue of the Canadian Section in book form with the
actual production to take place in 1975-1976 has necessitated a number of
projects in the Cataloguing Unit. Most of the resources of the Unit in 1975-1976
will be employed to ensure that the catalogue is acceptable.
Once again, the Canadian Section prepared Canada's annual contribution
to the Bibliographie cartographique internationale; the 1974 contribution contains
224 entries describing 2,924 cartographical items in 88 pages.
The number of catalogue cards handled by the cataloguing clerks was
133,413 during 1974-1975 compared to 98,224 the previous year.
FOREIGN SECTION — In 1974-1975 the activities of the Foreign Section were
somewhat limited due to lack of personnel. These staff difficulties have affected
all aspects of work in the Section.
Acquisitions — The acquisitions of the Foreign Section numbered 7,193 items
which is considerably less than the figure 17,777 recorded for 1973-1974. Of
those 7,193 items accessioned, 5,239 or 73 per cent were added to the main
inventory.
The majority of maps and charts continues to come from countries where
exchange agreements are in effect, notably Australia, Belgium, France, Japan,
New Zealand, the Republic of South Africa, the United Kingdom and the U.S.A.
Quantities of maps are also sporadically obtained from the Department of National Defence.
Reference — As with acquisitions, the total number of inquiries has shown a
decline from the 1973-1974 statistics.
Number of inquiries: Oral «   92
Written   38
Telephone 132
Total  .262
The Foreign Section recorded 68 loans with a total of 486 items loaned
during the past year.
Redistribution — The redistribution program continued to play an important role
in the activities of the Foreign Section. During the past year several thousand
map sheets were received from the Department of National Defence as well
as some surplus material from a few of the participating universities. The program
has been updated during the course of the year and the Section now has a
more comprehensive listing and collection of map indexes from participating
universities. The number of institutions taking part in the program has increased
and now totals 24. Among the newly-established university collections that have
joined in the redistribution are the University of Saskatchewan and St. Mary's
University in Nova Scotia. HISTORICAL  BRANCH
69
Picture Division
In many respects this has been a year of consolidation for the Division
although statistical data shows steady growth. Special emphasis was placed
on conservation and reference services within budgetary and space limitations.
Two new exhibitions were successfully assembled to be circulated by the Department across Canada. Research concerning publications is progressing satisfactorily as the first two titles for the National History Project were released
by the National Film Board of Canada to the provincial archives and similar
institutions.
Total Holdings
1972-73
1973-74
1974-75
Paintings	
Drawings	
Prints & Engravings 	
Photo Negatives & Prints .
2,205
12,736
78,173
2,742,052
2,505
12,841
81,812
3,313,435
2,529
12,944
82,481
3,678,434
Service to the Public
Persons Registered	
Inquiries 	
Reproductions Supplied..
1,038
2,652
25,217
1,254
6,700
31,477
2,048
7,224
34,700
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS AND PRINTS SECTION - National History Project -
This significant aspect of the Section's Diffusion Program completed its first
full year of operation in 1973-1974. An agreement was concluded at the end
of 1973 between the Historical Branch and the National Film Board to produce
and distribute historically-important visual documentation in the form of slide
sets accompanied by a teacher's manual, for use mainly in Canadian schools.
Published under the subtitle Archives Canada Series, two sets of slides with
accompanying manuals were produced during 1974-1975.
A. J. Miller's West, comprising 40 colour slides of original water-colours
with descriptive texts by the artist himself, presents a vivid picture of the great
buffalo hunts and colourful scenes of Plains Indian life which Alfred Jacob Miller
experienced on an expedition to the Rocky Mountains in 1837.
Image of Canada records in colour slides complemented by descriptive texts
of the period, a selection of 40 works of art drawn from the 1972 Public Archives
exhibition of the same name. This exhibition presented a wide range of mostly
topographical views of early Canada from coast to coast.
These first two titles were distributed upon completion to provincial archives
and related institutions in Europe, producing a most enthusiastic and appreciative response. The third set of 40 black-and-white slides narrates the 1881
expedition of the Marquis of Lome to the Canadian Northwest as recorded for
the London Graphic by the artist-journalist, Sydney Prior Hall. Each pencil sketch
is accompanied by an appropriate text from the Graphic or other contemporary
newspapers. Finally, the recent acquisition of the Joanna S. Wilson collection
of water-colours of Northwest Coast Indian subjects formed a set of 20 colour
slides, The Kwakiutl of Alert Bay 1919-1923. With an introduction and explanatory
notes by Douglas Schoenherr, this portfolio documents in word and image a
critical period in the history of the Kwakiutl Indians of Alert Bay. 70
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Twin Thunderbird Poles, Alert Bay, by Joanna S. Wilson
(1896-   ). Water-colour, 161/2 x 221/4 in.: 41.91 x 56.52~cm.
The program will continue in 1975-1976 with four more sets of slides on
the following subjects: views of Quebec and its environs c. 1830 by James
Pattison Cockburn; the Oregon Territory Expedition of 1845-1846 as depicted
in the water-colours and coloured lithographs of Sir Henry James Warre; the
visual record of a Moose Hunt on the St. Maurice River (March, 1842) from
the entertaining manuscript journal of Sir Henry James Warre; and an account
of the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898 illustrated by the drawings of Frederick
Gardiner, Jr. and the water-colours of Alfred E. Boultbee, Jr.
Microfiche Project — Because of technical difficulties in achieving a microfiche
of sufficiently high quality to justify such an important and extensive diffusion
project, further experimentation was conducted by the Central Microfilm Unit.
The entire A. J. Miller collection and 52 items in the S. P. Hall exhibition were
photographed, but because of the high reduction ratio, much of the detail was
lost and the contrast was strong. When diazo duplicates were made from the
positives, further losses in quality occurred. Another test was conducted, using
a selection of 10 water-colours and drawings representative of the various media
and colour ranges in the collections. Because of the use of a more sensitive
diazo, better quality duplication was achieved, but again the results were not
wholly satisfactory.
Recent improvements in colour duplicating films for micropublishing at
Kodak's Rochester plant have given a new direction and hope to the Microfiche
Project. Four by five inch (101.6 x 127 mm.) colour transparencies, which are HISTORICAL  BRANCH
71
already being prepared for other programs within the Section, could be reused
as input for colour microfiches, thus avoiding the additional expense and extra
handling involved in rephotographing the originals especially for microfiches,
as was the case in the past. This process is capable of reproducing up to 45
works of art with considerable colour fidelity and sharpness of detail on a
standard 4" x 6" (101.6 x 152.4 mm.) fiche. A trial run of this new colour process
is currently underway.
During the year a distinctive heading for the microfiche jackets was designed,
and the text to accompany the A. J. Miller collection on microfiches was produced and printed.
The curatorial staff consider the organization of exhibitions, loans of material
and publications on our collections a vital function of the Section.
Exhibitions — Quebec and its Environs, an exhibition of 31 water-colours and
drawings by James Pattison Cockburn (1779-1847), presents a documentary,
graphic record of that city c. 1830 as depicted by an English officer and amateur
artist. Commander of the Royal Artillery in Canada from 1826 to 1832, Cockburn
was one of many British officers who, having received courses in draughtsmanship as part of his military training at Woolwich, England, continued to
practice this skill in his leisure moments. A prolific artist with an aim to publish
his work, Cockburn travelled widely in Lower and Upper Canada in the course
of his duties, all the time sketching his surroundings. By concentrating on
Quebec and its environs, the exhibit gives a small sampling of his techniques
and interests. It is comprised of selected water-colours and drawings from the
permanent collection and the recently acquired W. H. Coverdale Collection of
Canadiana. The show is scheduled to travel to several Canadian centres including the Musée du Québec, Quebec City, and the Centre Culturel de Trois Rivières.
Scheduled to open at the Public Archives in 1977, an exhibit of water-colours
and drawings by another officer-artist, Henry James Warre (1819-1898), has been
prepared to document Warre s secret mission on behalf of the British government
to the Oregon Territory in 1845-1846 regarding the boundary dispute with the
United States.
Loans — In honour of Captain James Cook and his three Pacific voyages, the
Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, organized a major exhibition to
which museums in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, Italy, New Zealand, the
U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. contributed. The Public Archives took pleasure in lending
the G. B. Cipriani drawing "The Landing at Erramanga, One of the New Hebrides" after William Hodges. It is reproduced in the exhibition catalogue Captain
Cook, R.N., the Resolute Mariner.
The Public Archives also contributed works to two bicentennial exhibitions
organized by the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution in Washington,
D.C, namely, In the Hearts and Minds of the People: Prologue to Revolution
1760-1774 and The Die is Now Cast: The Road to American Independence.
Two pencil drawings of Digby Nova Scotia by George F. Bosworth were
loaned for the Artists' Media show at Mountain Saint Vincent University, Halifax. 72 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Publications in Preparation — The research and preparation of the W. H. Cover-
dale Collection of Canadiana catalogue is progressing on a gradual basis despite
the inevitable interruptions due to staff shortages and evolving priorities. Research trips to Great Britain and the United States with respect to the collection
proved most beneficial. A catalogue of paintings, water-colours and drawings,
comprising approximately 20 per cent of the collection, is scheduled to be
published and may be followed by a catalogue of prints.
Reference Services — While maintaining its regular research program and reference services, the Reference Unit has been planning and developing new ways
of providing a more comprehensive and expedient response to requests for
information or for photographic reproductions.
A great deal of thought was given to the development of mechanisms for
the filing of 4" x 5" (101.6 x 152.4 mm.) colour transparencies and their loan
to the public. Loan forms were revised several times as the needs of borrowers
became more clearly defined.
In the absence of a cataloguer for the Section, staff of the Unit established
a simplified system whereby important pictorial collections could be made available to the public shortly after being accessioned. The researcher is provided
with a finding aid where titles of pictorial documents are listed under logical
categories and accompanied by their corresponding negative number. The
illustrated catalogue cards, which are normally used in this Section for cataloguing pictures, are then arranged in numerical sequence according to
their negative numbers. By using the finding aid to locate the catalogue card, it
becomes possible for researchers to have easy access to a photographic illustration of any of the pictorial items described in the finding aid. This means of
making collections of documentary art rapidly accessible for research is regarded
as a temporary measure and will be replaced by more traditional systems of
cataloguing when a full-time cataloguer is hired for the Section.
The Reference Unit is also studying systems for the filing and retrieval of
information compiled while doing research on important topics in reply to inquiries. As many requests for information are repetitive, such a system, when fully
operative, will facilitate and expedite the reference work of the Unit.
Custody — There is a continuous need for order, control and storage of iconographie archival material preserved in the Division. The collection is growing
at a rapid pace, as are requests for loans, exhibitions and reproductions for
the diffusion program. To satisfy these needs the creation of a Custodial Unit
in the Paintings, Drawings and Prints Section under the supervision of Gilbert
Gignac took place during the fiscal year.
A location index (one card per item) is already being compiled for retrieval
and relocation of works: this in effect is an inventory of the collections which
will also serve other purposes. The Section will concentrate on registering in
one adequate system the existing locations of the entire collection.
Storage facilities were re-examined from the conservation standard point
of view in order to house adequately our collection for the Costume Docu- H
HISTORICAL BRANCH
73
mentation Center and also for the Coverdale and First and Second World War
poster collections.
Sixty-five water-colours, prints and drawings were treated for travelling
exhibitions and 143 other works of art were sent for conservation treatment.
Accessions — New accessions continue to be acquired through transfers from
within the Public Archives and from government institutions and agencies.
Several works have been purchased from art dealers and at art auctions and
many works have been donated by private individuals. The following list of new
accessions highlights several of these donations and purchases.
PORTRAITS
Bowell, Sir Mackenzie and Lady Bowell.
Two oil portraits by William Sawyer (1820-1889). 1875.
Mackenzie Bowell, Prime Minister (1894-1896) and his wife Harriet Louise (née
Moore).
Gift of Mrs. Doreen E. Crompton.
Cathcart, Alan Frederick, Lord Greenock.
Water-colour portrait executed in Canada by an unknown artist. 1847. Lord
Greenock was Aide-de-Camp to his father, Earl Cathcart, Governor-General of
British North America in 1846-1847.
Purchased.
Copway, George, Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh (1818-1869).
Charcoal portrait by Samuel Howell (1785-1876). 1850.
George Copway was a noted Ojibway Indian chief who travelled and lectured
in Canada, the United States and Europe. The portrait was executed during
his visit to England in 1850.
Gift of the Hamly family.
Keefer, Thomas Coltrin (1821-1915).
Oil portrait by George E. Fosberry (1874-1960).
Keefer was a prominent civil engineer who was employed on the Erie, Welland,
Ottawa and St. Lawrence canals.
Gift from the estate of G. B. Nicholson.
Neumann, Ernst (1907-1955).
Self-portrait, 1947.
The artist came to Canada in 1912 from Budapest and studied at the Ecole
des Beaux-Arts, Montreal, and at one time was associated with Goodridge
Roberts.
Purchased.
Spratt, m      Rideau Canal Engineer.
Charcoal portrait by an anonymous artist.
Gift of Mrs. D. Miller.
Turcot, Marie-Rose (b. 1887).
Oil portrait by Raymonde Gravel (b. 1913).
Marie-Rose Turcot is a noted Canadian writer and journalist.
Purchased. 74
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1974-1975
Alan Frederick Cathcart, Lord Greenock, 1847, by unknown artist.
Water-colour, 1314 x 8V4 in.: 33.34 x 20.96 cm. HISTORICAL BRANCH
75
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PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Willis-O'Connor Family Portraits.
Five oil paintings, including:
Portraits of Daniel O'Connor, one of Ottawa's early pioneers, and his mother,
Isa O'Connor by anonymous artists.
Posthumous portrait, (taken) from a photograph, of Catherine Charletta Willis,
wife of Daniel-O'Connor, dated 1940 and a portrait of Mrs. Henry O'Connor
dated 1938, both by George E. Fosberry (1874-1960).
Portrait of Colonel Henry O'Connor by Fred A. Precht dated 1922.
Purchased.
ARTISTS COLLECTIONS
Bonny, Charles H. (active 1872).
Water-colour.
Tobogganing on the Cone, Montmorency Falls.
Purchased.
Bowen, M. E. (19th Century).
Water-colour.
Horseshoe Falls.
Purchased.
Water-colour.
Lake St. Charles Near Quebec.
Purchased.
Cooking in the Woods, by W. G. R. Hind (1833-1889).
Pencil, 7x10 in.: 17.78 x 25.4 cm. HISTORICAL BRANCH
Road Between New Westminster and Hastings, Burrard Inlet, British Columbia, 1882, by
the Marquis of Lome (1833-1914).
Pen and ink with wash, 8Vfe x 5% in.: 21.59 x 14.29 cm. 78
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Cobum, F. S. (1871-1960).
Crayon.
On Penfold's Farm.
Purchased.
Dixon, Francis Fitz Roy (1856-1914).
Water-colour.
Two Men Paddling a Canoe.
Purchased.
Hind, William G. R. (1833-1889).
Three water-colours and one pencil drawing related to an expedition to Labrador
on which Hind accompanied his brother, Henry Youle Hind; also^ included is
a water-colour of Long Point, Nova Scotia.
Purchased.
Louise, H. R. H. Princess (1848-1939).
Sixty-five water-colours and sepia sketches pertaining to her stay in Canada
(1879-1882), as well as European views (1863-1865). The Princess was the wife
of the Marquis of Lome, Governor-General (1878-1883), and the fourth
daughter of Queen Victoria.
Purchased.
Mercer, Alexander C (1783-1868).
Water-colour.
Three Mile House and Bedford Basin, Nova Scotia.
Purchased.
Napier, W. H. E. (1829-1894).
Two sketchbooks containing Canadian views dating between 1864 and 1867;
also included are eight water-colours of scenes in Quebec and a water-colour
view of Fort William executed in 1857 while Napier was employed by the Canadian
Government Exploring Expédition.
Purchased.
Whitefield, Edwin (1816-1892)
Eight views of Canadian cities, including Montreal, Quebec and Ottawa dating
from the early 1850s.
Purchased.
Wilson, Joanna S. (b. 1896).
Twenty-four water-colours depicting the ceremonies, architecture and totem
poles of the Kwakiutl Indians in Alert Bay, B.C.; also included are several portraits
of important members of the tribe.
The water-colours date between 1919 and 1923, the period when Mrs. Wilson
was living in Alert Bay with her husband, a medical doctor.
Purchased.
HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS SECTION - This has been another year of
consolidation. The objectives of the Section have been to promote and maintain
the National Photography Collection and to provide archival and curatorial
services for Canada's national photographic heritage. HISTORICAL BRANCH
79
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PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Surveys and Negotiations — The Section continued in the past year to be very
active in conducting surveys to locate Canadian historical photographs and in
negotiating with individuals and groups for the acquisition of new collections.
Surveys branched out to the international level. Andrew Birrell visited the
Library of Congress, the National Archives and the Smithsonian Institution in
the United States to détermine how much Canadian photography is held in
their collections. In connection with the exhibition Into the Silent Land he made
numerous contacts in England including the Royal Photographic Society, the
Institution of Royal Engineers and the Victoria and Albert Museum. It is planned
to increase this work in the new year. Richard Huyda examined the historical
collection of Burton Holmes Travelogues of Hollywood and began preliminary
negotiations for portraits of Canadians by Blackstone and Shelburne of New
York City. Claude Minotto received some interesting Canadian material from
J. F. Caldwell of Belfast and Henry Dibden of Chester, England.
This was the first full year of cooperation with the Professional Photographers of Canada, Inc. The National Print Show was mounted, circulated and
is now stored permanently at the Public Archives. Claude Minotto manned a
booth at the annual convention of the Association des photographes profes-
sionels de la Province de Québec and was asked to address the major members
about the work of the Section. Through Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame, many
of Canada's early aviation personnel were contacted as well as major bodies
such as Pacific Western Airlines. Surveys of the collections of the Newfoundland
Archives, Toronto Harbour Commission, Canadian Tribune, United Electrical and
Radio Workers of America and the Dominion Bridge Company were completed
and in most cases transfers arranged for protective copying of the important
parts of the most important items.
The Section continued its work contacting ethnic photographers. Martha
Phemister examined the work of a number of photographers from the Italian
community of Toronto while Andrew Birrell visited a number of ethnic photographers in western Canada and Claude Minotto concentrated his attention on
those of Quebec. Claude Minotto also carried out extensive negotiations with
Quebec film producer Michel Brault to attempt to arrange for permanent care
in the Archives nationales du Québec of the historical negatives amassed by
Brault for his various film projects. Contact was also made with the Grenfell
Mission of Labrador regarding their photographic records.
The Section helped the Archives of the Canadian Rockies by packing and
shipping from Pennsylvania the important Vaux family photographs of the Rocky
Mountains made around the turn of the century.
As the last full scale survey of the total photographic holdings of the federal
government was undertaken some twelve years ago by the National Film Board,
it is felt that a further updating survey is necessary for the Public Archives to
have an accurate view of the extent, content and potential transfer of photographic records being held and generated by departments and agencies. In
preparation for such a survey, the parameters and resource requirements were
investigated and preliminary work completed to begin the survey during 1975-
1976.
Acquisitions — Acquisitions recorded during the 1974-1975 fiscal year numbered HISTORICAL BRANCH
81
472 collections which represent a total of 350,000 photographs. The collections
came from both government and private sources. Those from government
sources were acquired either by direct transfer from the originating department
or indirectly via the Public Records and Manuscript Divisions of the Public
Archives. Collections from private sources were obtained through donation, loan
or purchase; some were located and requested by the Section's archivists and
others were offered to the Archives by individuals who had learned of the
existence of the National Photography Collection.
ACQUISITIONS FROM GOVERNMENT SOURCES - This year the major source
of government photographic records was the Department of National Defence,
which turned over original negatives dating from 1956 to 1959.
The Geological Survey of Canada transferred albums of photographs which
are considered relatively rare. One of these albums, the work of T. C. Weston,
comprises views of Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador during the years 1873-
1879. A second, prepared by A. P. Low, contains photographs of Rupert's Land
taken in 1884-1885.
The Vancouver offices of the Department of Transport transferred photograph albums illustrating road construction in B.C. during the 1950s and 1960s.
These albums contain several series of photographs of the western section of
the Trans-Canada Highway.
Near the end of the 1974-1975 fiscal year, the Public Archives received a
collection of prints and slides from the Office of Design of the Department of
Industry, Trade and Commerce. These recent photographs (1965-1970) were
taken during "Design Canada" exhibitions in Montreal and Toronto.
The founding meeting of the Italian-Canadian Congress at Ottawa, 23-24 February 1974. 82
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
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John Joseph Kelso, founder of the Children's Aid Society, and some of the
children, c. 1900.
Within the Public Archives, procedures for the transfer to the Historical
Photographs Section of photographic documents have improved, and transfers
now occur on a more rapid and regular basis.
The most numerous and varied items transferred have come from private
holdings in the care of the Manuscript Division. In the area of the arts, this
Division transferred photographs of the Milne family and other families which
produced Canadian artists. There was also a transfer of a photo-report on the
production of Alfred Hitchcock's film / Confess, part of which was shot in Quebec
(c. 1951). The records of Montreal impresario Louis-Honoré Bourdon furnished
an interesting collection of portraits of the performers he knew during his career
(1910-1947).
Other holdings acquired by the Manuscript Division provided several noteworthy series of photographs. The John Joseph Kelso collection contained
portraits of the children of Toronto's poor at the beginning of the twentieth
century. The Historical Photographs Section reproduced a series of photographs
from the W. L. M. King holdings depicting the unfortunate events arising from
the anti-Asian demonstrations of 7 September 1907 in Vancouver. The Hazen
Sise holdings yielded a fine collection of negatives and prints, some of which
date from the Spanish Civil War, in which Sise and Dr. Norman Bethune served
together in 1936-1937.
On 23-24 February 1974 a representative of the National Ethnic Archives
participated in the founding meeting in Ottawa, of the Italian-Canadian Congress.
As a result, the Public Archives obtained a complete photo-report of this event. HISTORICAL   BRANCH
83
Finally, the Public Records Division transferred an interesting file taken from
the Solicitor General's holdings. The photographs illustrating this file depict the
activities and buildings of the Canadian penitentiary system.
ACQUISITIONS FROM PRIVATE SOURCES - Research for the telecommunications exhibition led to new acquisitions from sources which continue to provide
related documents. Similarly, joint efforts by the Historical Photographs Section
and the Aviation Hall of Fame have resulted in the acquisition of photographs
of Canadian aviators and the Canadian aviation industry.
Some of the more voluminous private photographic records acquired this
year could be called holdings rather than collections. This is the case for the
photographic records of the Dominion Bridge Company Ltd. and Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation; it also applies to the records of the Horsdal Studio
(portraits 1956-1965) and the Studio Impact (photo-reports 1970-1973), both in
Ottawa.
It was a particularly good year for the acquisition of industrial records. Other
than those previously mentioned, there were contributions from Imperial Oil
illustrating Canada's petrochemical industry.
As in previous years, Canadian newspapers such as The Toronto Star, The
Windsor Star and The Globe and Matt contributed several series of original
negatives from their photo-files.
The Quebec bridge on the north side of the river, Quebec City, Quebec, 13 October 1915. 84
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Photographer Henri Paul, Montreal, Quebec, 1973. Photo by Sam Tata. HISTORICAL BRANCH
85
The prestige of the National Photography Collection was enhanced this year
by the acquisition of a collection of original prints executed by Yousuf Karsh,
the internationally known Canadian portraitist. Other talented Canadian photographers have enriched the Collection with their works. Ken Bell of Toronto
donated new prints which were developed from his negatives of the Second
World War period. Photographer Neil Newton vigourously applied archival
conservation methods to the series of photographs which he entrusted to the
Collection. The ever-increasing collaboration of Canadian professional photographers has revealed a need which the National Photography Collection must
satisfy and, at the same time, shows that the Canadian public may benefit from
such an undertaking.
The acquisition program that is directed towards Canadian photographers
of ethnic extraction continues to bring in excellent photo-print collections. Under
this program, the following photographers have been contacted this year: Sam
Tata, Gabor Szilasi, Walter Petrigo, Chris Bruun, Anthony Attanyi, Ed Spiteri,
Vincenzo Pietro Paolo and Vic Lovello. The contents of these collections vary
greatly according to the photographer's area of specialization.
Through the Paris Office of the Public Archives of Canada, the executor
of the estate of Mme Georges Menier gave the National Photography Collection
several photograph albums illustrating the life and development of Anticosti
Island between the years 1903 and 1926. The Menier family owned the island
from 1895 to 1926 and it is evident, from the good condition and quality of
the albums, that they took great care to preserve photographic records. A
Henri Menier (foreground) owner of Anticosti Island, Quebec, c. 1903. 86
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
collection of 55 glass plate negatives was obtained from Mr. John F. Caldwell
through the Canadian Consulate in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Mr. Caldwell was
employed by the Hudson's Bay Company in the Ungava Bay region, and his
photographs are of the areas around the trading posts in that region between
1913 and 1917.
Several small private collections merit distinction for the rare items^which
they contain and the new material which they provide for research into the history
of Canadian photography. Among them is a daguerreotype of Louis-Joseph
Amédée Papineau and Mary Eleanor Westcott (the son and daughter-in-law of
Louis-Joseph Papineau), a few ambrotypes from the collection of the Canadian
collector and photographer Ralph Greenhill, a large ambrotype of exceptional
quality taken in front of Niagara Falls, and finally, a few photographs of Montreal,
St. John's (Newfoundland) and Ottawa dating from the nineteenth century.
As the number and volume of collections acquired through loans has grown,
the Historical Photographs Section has taken steps to employ its equipment
and personnel with maximum efficiency. The selection of documents for copying
has thus become more rigorous.
Custodial Service — To ensure proper custody of documentation files on photograph collections, the updating of accession files and their conversion to acid-
free paper stock was undertaken. The accession files and caption card files
were microfilmed for protective purposes. New forms were designed to ensure
full control of all custodial tasks. There were nine major collections which underwent organization, indexing and identification during the year.-Some 200 accessions were evaluated and rephotographed for preservation and reference purposes. Greater demands were made of the Department's conservation services,
particularly in the preparation of the exhibition on surveying photography in
Western Canada. The Section contributed to the work of the Historical Branch
committee on conservation policy.
Cataloguing Services — More than 217 collections, consisting of over 16,222
photographs have been catalogued. However, a shortage of typing resources
has resulted in the accumulation of a backlog of some 22,000 catalogued but
untyped cards which remain virtually unavailable to researchers. In order to
eliminate this problem and in anticipation of even greater demands on cataloguing and accessibility in the future, more serious consideration was made of
various electronic data processing systems for information retrieval.
Reference Services — The physical rearrangement of the Department meant
the relocation of the Section's reference and research facilities. Although these
facilities now occupy less space, there appears to be no physical inconvenience
to researchers. The increased distance between stack and reference areas has
meant more limited access to original holdings. Despite restrictions, reference
and research services continued at a high level during the year. There were
significant requests for reproductions from some 50 Canadian and foreign publishing houses, periodicals and newspapers. The faculties and students of some
40 Canadian and foreign universities, colleges, primary and secondary schools,
educational agencies and boards ordered large numbers of reproductions. There
were requests from over 30 museums, corporations, ethnic organizations and HISTORICAL   BRANCH
87 88 PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
historical associations throughout Canada. Some 20 Canadian and foreign film
production agencies and television networks made major requests for reproductions. There were requests from 40 departments and agencies of the federal,
provincial and municipal governments of Canada. The Section's clientele came
from all parts of Canada, as well as from 13 foreign countries as far afield as
Qatar and New Zealand.
Diffusion and Dissemination — The Section's major input into the Department's
diffusion and dissemination program was the preparatory research, selection
and writing for the 1975-1976 photo exhibition Into the Silent Land: Survey
Photography in Western Canada 1858-1900.
Two other photo exhibitions sponsored by the Section travelled across
Canada during the year. The Section's exhibition Relentless Verity: Canadian
Military Photographs since 1885 circulated continuously to numerous military
and civilian venues under the auspices of the Department of National Defence.
The National Print Show of the Professional Photographers of Canada Inc.
(P.P.O.C) was put together and circulated by the Department following arrangements successfully negotiated between the Section and the P.P.O.C Exhibition
Services of the Department successfully arranged for this exhibition to be hosted
in 12 Canadian Pacific Hotels across Canada.
The Section was also involved in a number of other exhibitions. A selection
of Edward Curtis Indian photographs were exhibited by the Section at the annual
convention of the Association des photographes professionnels de la provice
de Québec. The Section contributed extensively to the exhibition of the Canadian
Aviation Hall of Fame and Andrew Birrell was a guest of honour at the opening
ceremonies in Edmonton. Peter Robertson assisted in the research and preparation of the Department's major exhibition, Telecommunications: The Canadian
Experience.
Publications prepared by the Section were limited to issuing the first two
of what is intended to be a series of posters incorporating first-quality facsimiles
of selected photos in our collection accompanied by a brief text. These posters
are mainly promotional items and have been distributed to professional photographers and prospective donors.
Publicity — Publicity for the National Photography Collection and for the objectives and work of the Section continued to be generated successfully both
internally and externally. The exhibitions and the poster series created diversified
cross-Canada exposure throughout the year. The Section's presence once again
at the Annual Trade Shows of the Professional Photographers of Canada Inc.
and the Association des photographes professionels de la province de Québec
reinforced the Archives image. Peter Robertson's monograph Relentless Verity
continued to be reviewed both nationally and internationally. Reporters from
two national periodicals, Arts Canada and Canadian Photography, have reviewed
the work of the Section. Bill Coulthard of Canadian Press prepared a wireservice
article on the Section. Distributed across Canada, this article has so far been
printed by a dozen local newspapers and has brought several favourable responses in terms of donations and new contacts. HISTORICAL  BRANCH
Further publicity continued to come from the use and acknowledgement
of the Section's holdings in major television and film productions, and in many
national and international scholarly and popular publications, exhibitions,
audio-visual presentations and commercial advertising.
Lectures, Research and Advisory Services — Delivering lectures and participating in and conducting courses and tours relating to Canada's photographic
heritage continued as an important Section activity. Richard Huyda, Andrew
Birrell and Claude Minotto have given lectures and study sessions to groups
of professional photographers, archivists, curators, photo and history students,
and to numerous other interested groups. Claude Minotto conducted several
sessions of the Public Archives courses in Archival Administration, and several
sessions of the Archival Courses offered at Cap Rouge, Quebec. He delivered
lectures to students at McGill and participated actively in sessions of the Franco-American Institute. Andrew Birrell was a participant in one of the workshops
at the Annual Convention of the Society of American Archivists. He gave illustrated presentations to numerous other groups including the Maritime Professional Photographers, the Canadian Museums Association and the Canadian
Photographic Historical Society. Richard Huyda served as co-ordinator of the
Canadian Museums Association Symposium on the Care and Maintenance of
Photograph Collections and delivered one of the major lectures during the
Symposium.
Again the Section was called upon frequently to provide advisory services
on the archival handling of photographic records. Requests for assistance and
information have come from at least four provincial archives. Numerous government departments and agencies have received guidance and reports from our
staff, as have museums, other photo repositories, organizations and individuals
across Canada. In addition, there has been a growing exchange of ideas and
experience with archives and repositories in other countries.
Staff Notes — Richard Huyda remained as Section Head and Curator of the
National Photography Collection, and Andrew Birrell, Peter Robertson, Winifred
Ewers and Beatrice LaRose as heads of the four units of acquisition/research,
custodial services, cataloguing and reference services. Unavoidablestaffing
problems meant that the 19 permanent positions allotted to the Section were
not fully staffed throughout the year, necessitating the temporary utilization of
term and contract personnel.
Staff training and development are considered essential prerequisites for
Section effectiveness. Kathy McLean and Martha Phemister participated in the
department's course in Archival Administration. Mary Psutka and Joy Williams
attended a seminar on Cataloguing/Indexing Techniques, while Richard Huyda
participated in a workshop on Computers for Museums. Kathy McLean was
placed on full-time language training in November and other staff members have
attended cyclical language training sessions and various seminars, lectures and
workshops.
Public Archives Library
The Public Archives Library was restructured during 1974-1975. The trend
towards increased integration and participation in various programs initiated PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
by the Divisions of the Historical Branch, is still growing and has had repercussions on the activities of the Library. This meant that the Library was no longer
a separate unit as "demands now cross divisional bounds in the Historical
Branch ".
In order to provide better service, operations have been grouped according
to their related functions. For instance the Internal Services Section takes care
of the acquisition and conservation of books and periodicals as well as their
descriptive cataloguing. The External Services Section is responsible for Reference and Research operations, circulation of material and satellite library units
organization within the Public Archives.
The Library experienced a notable turnover of staff during the year due
to competitions arising out of bilingual programs, transfers and promotions
elsewhere. Several positions remained vacant and this prevented some programs
from being realized this year. This was reflected in the microfiche project which
had been accelerated at the end of the previous year. On the other hand preparation of the revised catalogue of pamphlets was maintained at the same level.
The period from 1900 to 1916 has been covered for the 20th century while several
pamphlets of the early 18th century have been added to the collection.
A revised edition of Archives courses; a selective bibliography was compiled
by Gisèle D. Beauvais and Normand St-Pierre, for the use of participants and
professionals interested in the archives' field. The Public Archives Library participated actively in the 1974 archives course for both English and French sessions.
An added contribution was a paper on genealogy presented in both French
and English by Normand St-Pierre.
The Library sent its annual contribution to the International Bibliography
of Historical Sciences by listing, editing and classifying significant Canadian
historical articles and books of historical nature printed in Canada.
Among several bibliographies compiled for researchers, the Library located,
reproduced and gathered periodical articles on the functions and tenure of office
of the Governors-General of Canada.
During the year the Library contributed actively or through loans to several
exhibitions held either in the Public Archives of Canada or the National Library.
One must mention specifically the exhibition of International Archives Publications prepared for the International Round Table on Archives and Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience.
EXTERNAL SERVICES SECTION — This Section comprises the Reference and
Research Unit and the Circulation and Extension Services.
Reference and Research Unit — The Unit was unable to pursue its objectives
because staff turnover due to resignation or illness in the Circulation Section
of External Services resulted in a considerable number of days, indeed weeks,
being provided to that Section. It is expected that by 1 April 1975 these vacant
positions will be filled, and that day-to-day business operations will resume.
In spite of this the staff conducted 3,128 researches by telephone,
correspondence and personal inquiries. The Unit was fortunate to acquire the HISTORICAL   BRANCH
91
services of a history major who is verifying all entries to the Biographical Index.
This long-term project involves up-dating information as well as identifying and
eliminating all duplication. Additions are to be made when warranted. Also under
contract is a Spanish-speaking employee who is currently classifying Spanish-
language publications dealing with various aspects of archival science, as well
as various reports from Spanish-speaking countries concerning archives. This
is part of the overall Collaboration of participating countries in the Pan-American
Institute of Geography and History.
More than 20 groups visited the Public Archives Library during the fiscal
year. These groups were made up primarily of students of History, Archives
and Library Science from various Quebec and Ontario universities.
Circulation and Extension Unit — During the year 11,539 researchers used 45,829
documents in the collection. An increase in the interlibrary loan service (358
requests were handled this year) will have to be further analysed.
INTERNAL SERVICES SECTION - This Section was created during 1974-1975
and is made up of two units: the Cataloguing Unit and the Acquisitions and
Conservation Unit. The creation of this Section involved a complete reorganization of the services and reconstruction of the framework. There were changes
to 75 per cent of staff positions. The activities of each unit were re-oriented
in order to conform to new technological trends; procedures have been adapted,
simplified or abolished, ensuring the maximum use of resources. The Anglo-
American Cataloguing Rules and the new FC Classification for Canadian History
have now been adopted. A manual of procedures has been written covering
the activities of both units.
The Section Head participated as a consultant to set up a classification
system for costumes and photos of the R. L. Regor Collection in the Picture
and Drawings Division. He is presently participating in the writing of cataloguing
rules for magnetic tapes and related documentation in the Machine Readable
Archives Division.
Cataloguing Unit — In addition to cataloguing current acquisitions in the Library,
as well as those from other Divisions in the Public Archives, the Cataloguing
Unit has completed the following projects: classifying and cataloguing unpublished documents (177 titles) from the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and
Biculturalism. Archival publications exhibited at the XVth International Round
Table on Archives sponsored by the International Council on Archives (266 titles)
were also classified and catalogued in the language in which they were published. The cataloguing of the Paris Office Library has been started.
In the periodical collection, titles running from letter A to letter M inclusive
were catalogued.. This entailed up-dating the Visi-Record and Kardex for each
title, the preparation of bibliographical entries for an author and title catalogue
and the preparation of a geographical catalogue by decade.
Acquisitions and Conservation Unit — Because of an ever-increasing backlog,
only material considered to be historically important was sent to the Records
Conservation Section. 92
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1974-1975
Important acquisitions received by the Library included an extensive collection of official Canadian publications. Following are statistics of the Library's
activities during the fiscal year.
Cataloguing
Books, Pamphlets, Broadsides and Microfilms Prepared   7,545
Preparation and Filing of Library Catalogued Cards  35,486
Titles of Books, Pamphlets and Broadsides Catalogued   2,983
Titles of Microfilms Catalogued        23
Titles of Periodicals and Government Publications Catalogued ..  1,926
Acquisitions
Books and Pamphlets   3,961
Gifts 20,143
Microfilms (Reels)        27
Periodicals and Government Publications   5,445
Preparation and Filing of Temporary Cards 11,000
Volumes, Pamphlets, Rare Books Bound and
Broadsides Mounted    2,479
Important Acquisitions
Bas-Canada. Bureau du grand voyer.
Lettre circulaire aux inspecteurs des chemins. Quebec, 1810. 1p.
Canadian royal mail ocean steam packet service, under contract with Her Majesty's Provincial Government, between Montreal, Quebetrand Liverpool.
Printed at the Farmer's Journal Office, Montreal, 1853. Broadside.
Great Britain. Commissioners for Auditing the Public Accounts.
Whereas divers persons, to whom money has been issued for public services,
have neglected to deliver into this office the vouchers for the expenditure
thereof... London, 1800. 2p.
Great Britain. Treasury.
Copy of a letter from J. Stewart, one of thesecretaries to the Lands Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury, dated 5 October 1830, respecting duties
payable to the officers of customs in the colonies. London, 1830. Broadside.
Lower Canada. Executive Council.
Temporary regulations, made by a committee of His Majesty's Executive
Council, at Montreal ... respecting alien American subjects, who may be
desirous to come into the district of Montreal, and remain for a limited time.
Montreal, Gray printer, 23 July 1812. Broadside.
Lower Canada. Lieutenant Governor, 1796-1797 (Prescott).
By His Excellency Robert Prescott... A proclamation, Whereas His Most
Gracious Majesty has been pleased to grant his royal leave of absence to
His Excellency... by Lord Dorchester... in consequence of whose departure, the command of the said province devolves upon me ... Quebec,
Printed by J. Neilson, 1796. 2 books.
Montreal, District of. Managers of a Lottery to Build a Prison.
Lottery for building a prison for the town and district of Montreal.
. Lotterie SM
HISTORICAL BRANCH
93
pour bâtir des prisons pour la ville et district de Montréal.
2 books.
Montreal, 1783.
Panet, Mgr Bernard-Claude (1753-1833).
Circulaire au clergé du diocèse de Québec à Voccasion de la mort du Roi.
Quebec, 1820. 1 p.
Plessis, Mgr Joseph-Octave (1763-1825).
Mandement pour des actions des graces publiques. Québec, 1814. 3 p.
Probus(pseudonym)
Aux électeurs du Bas Canada, et à ceux du comté et des villes de Quebec
en particulier. Quebec, Imprimé par Samuel Neilson, 1792. 2 p.
Quebec, Province of. Legislative Council.
Rules and regulations for the conduct of the Land Office Department. Règlements pour la conduite du Département du bureau des terres. Quebec,
Printed by Wm. Brown, 1789. 2 p.
Quebec, Province of. Governor, 1786-1791 (Dorchester).
Culture of hemp. Quebec, 1791. 2 books.
St. John's River Society.
Whereas it has been thought expedient, for the information of the proprietors
of sundry tracts of land, situate in the province of Nova-Scotia, or Acadia,
to make known the tenor of the several grants under which the said lands
are held... Quebec, Printed by Brown & Gilmore, 1766.1 p.
Upper Canada. Executive Council.
To His Honor Peter Russell, esquire, president of the province of Upper
Canada. York, 1797. 7 p.
Upper Canada. Lieutenant Governor, 1791-1796 (Simcoe).
Speech ... upon proroguing the Fifth Session of the Provincial Parliament
of Upper Canada. 1796. Broadside.
Upper Canada. Lieutenant Governor, 1806-1817 (Gore).
500 dollars reward! Upper Canada. Proclamation. York, 1816. Broadside.
Printed Material From Archival Collections Transferred to the Library
Boivin (famille) (MG 24, D 86)
Canada. Department of
Communications
Canada. Steel Profit Inquiry
Canadian Figure Skating Association
(MG 28, 1 209)
Canadian National Railways
Daly, Harold (MG 27, III F 9)
Harrison, Edward (MG 29, F 19)
Hawkins, T. Hartley
Labour Management Documentation
Centre. Cornell University
Liberal Party of Canada (MG 28, IV 3)
Massey Papers (MG 32, A 1)
Measures, Howard (MG 30, E 68)
Milne, David (MG 30, D 38)
Munro, George Reid (MG 30, A 16)
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church,
Ottawa (MG 9, D 735)
St. Laurent, Prime Minister L.
(MG 26, L)
Stevens, H. H. (MG 27, III B 9)
Vachon, Roméo et Georgette (MG 31,
A 5)
Vancouver. Department of Public
Works
Willis-O'Connor (MG 30, E 23)
Woodside (MG 30, I 11) 94
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Donors to the Public Archives Library for the Year 1974-1975
Anglican Church of Canada
Appleton, T. E.
Archambault, Jacques
Baker, R. P.
Beaudin, François
Bossy, W. J.
Brientani, Mario von
Brunet, Aline
Bush, Barbara
Canada. Ministry of Justice
Carefoot, R.
Chartrand, René
City of Vancouver Archives
Coderre, John E.
Colburn & Tegg
Colin, Armand
Côté, Jean
Dekay, George P.
Duboscq, Guy
Elliot, B. R.
Environment Canada
Federal Archives & Record Center,
Chicago
Ferguson, Chas. W.
Fodchuk, D.
Fronval, George
Geddes, S. P.
Gervais, Gaétan
Gillies Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Glasier, Kenneth
Goldenberg, Y.
Gottseling, Leonard J.
Graham, H. W.
Granger, M.
Guay, M. G.
Hartley, Earl
Hinchley, Harry
Ives, Alan
Jo ku bait is, S.
Kapacinskas, Joseph
Kennedy Manley, Jean
Kosikowsky, O.
Laçasse, Maurice
Lakhanpal, S. P.
Lambert, A. F.
Lamirande, André E.
Lamonde, Yvan
Lapointe, Pierre Louis
Leblanc, Philippe
Maclean, S. T.
Meachem, J. Robert
Missisquoi County Historical Society
Mon cri eft, Reverend W. M.
Morden, Hilda E.
Morry, Lanny
Morton, Elizabeth H.
Muirhead, A. G.
Museum of Indian Archeology
National Parks Centennial
Commission
Noble, N. F.
Nova Scotia Legislative Library
Oliver, A. D.
Ontario. Department of Education
Peel, Bruce
Peister, Fred J.
Phillips, G. G. (Mrs.)
Président du Conseil. Archives
nationales, Alger
Québec. Ministère de l'Éducation.
Centre de documentation
Radio-Canada
Remesoff, P.
Ring, Noel
Roberge, G.
Romme, Jules
Royal, H. F. (Mrs.)
Roza, Gustova da
Saskatchewan Wheat Pool
Soper, J. E.
Soublière, Berthe
Spicer, Elizabeth
Stafford, J. C.
Stewart, Alice R.
Switzer, B. W.
Thomas, W. N.
Throop, Walter & Berryl
University of Guelph. Department of
Geography.
Wilson, lan E.
Woods, H. Frank
Yeo, H. Evelyn HISTORICAL  BRANCH
95
The following countries sent copies of their archival publications for the
International Archival Publication Exhibition held at the Conference Centre,
Ottawa, Ontario, 7-10 October 1974:
Algeria
Antilles
Argentina
Australia
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Canada
Czechoslovakia
Democratic Republic
of Germany
Federal Republic
of Germany
Finland
Greece
Hungary
India
Israel
Italy
Ivory Coast
Malaysia
Netherlands
New Zealand
Poland
Rhodesia
Romania
Singapore
Spain
Switzerland
United Kingdom
U.S.S.R.
Vatican
National Film Archives Division
The fiscal year 1974-1975 was a period of both consolidation and expansion
for the National Film Archives. It was also a period marked by almost continuous
negotiations with government departments and agencies and producing organizations in the private sector. Many of these will have their full effect only in the
coming year. The most significant events of the year were the signing of deposit
agreements with the Canadian Film Institute and the Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation; the establishment of a new Acquisitions and Cataloguing Section
Alan Turner, Archivist for the province of British Columbia, addressing the closing banquet
of the first Canadian Oral History Conference, Simon Fraser University,
18-19 October 1974. 96
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
for the film and videotape collections; the organization of the first Canadian
Aural/Oral History Conference and the creation of the Canadian Aural/Oral
History Association; and the move to the Hunter Building in an effort to organize
the film and videotape collections, to secure adequate working space for the
staff and to initiate public information services. Ironically, the move, a temporary
arrangement, could not incorporate the Historic Sound Section which was moved
to expanded quarters in the West Memorial Building previously occupied by
the rest of the staff of the National Film Archives.
SOUND ARCHIVES SECTION - During 1974-1975 the main efforts of the Sound
Archives Section were directed towards acquiring an increased number of collections, dissemination of information about its holdings in order to encourage
greater public use and equipping its technical services with improved facilities
for the re-recording of material acquired on loan, as well as items requested
by researchers. This was done at the expense of reducing the output of preservation re-recordings, cataloguing and indexing.
General Statistics
1973-1974
Number of Acquisitions 	
Number of Hours of Recordings Accessioned
Number of Hours of Recordings Re-recorded
for Preservation	
Number of Hours of Recordings Catalogued ..
Number of Hours of Recordings Indexed 	
Number of Hours of Recordings Transcribed ...
Number of Written and Oral Inquiries
Received	
140
126
3,205
3,339
570
936
523
537
151
585
74
36.5
Staff — Two historical research officers were hired mid-way through the fiscal
year bringing the total strength of the Sound Archives Section to seven full-time
employees.
Accommodation — The new research officers were located in temporary offices
in the West Memorial Building. This had the advantage of placing them in proximity to the storage vault and recording studio in the same building. At the end
of the year Room 252 of the West Memorial Building was vacated allowing the
Sound Archives to relocate into one area. During the year, new audio equipment
was added to the recording studio in Room 242 of the West Memorial Building
allowing the Sound Archives to make high-quality re-recordings not only of
current forms of sound recordings, but also of obsolete forms such as steel
wire recordings and dictation discs and cylinders. Special equalizing and filtering
equipment has been added to make good quality copies from poor quality
originals. A high-speed duplicating system was installed in February 1975 to
increase production of preservation and reference copies. Studio facilities for
the live recording of oral history interviews were also improved during the year.
Acquisitions — During 1974-1975 the Section made 140 separate acquisitions
for a total of 3,205 hours of recordings on discs, tapes and steel wire. The HISTORICAL  BRANCH
97
Sound recording equipment is operated and maintained by qualified technicians in the
Sound Archives Section's studio.
largest collection of recordings consists of 1,150 hours of the debates of the
House of Commons and its committees, recorded from 27 February to 8 May
1974 and 30 September to 20 December 1974. These acquisitions result from
the agreement between the House of Commons and the Public Archives of
Canada for the regular and continuous recording of the debates which began
in March 1969. Several major collections were acquired from the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation including 1,400 tapes of the sound tracks of television
programs such as This Hour Has Seven Days, Compass, Document, Close-Up
and The Way It Is, broadcast between October 1964 and December 1967, as
well as 450 tapes of the radio series Ideas broadcast during the period October
1968 to November 1974. The acquisition of 284 tapes from the John Drainie
estate consisting of his daily readings of Canadian short stories broadcast by
the CBC from 1964 to 1967, several broadcasts of his readings of the work of
Stephen Leacock, and various radio dramas in which he performed, including
some recordings of Jake and the Kid, represents a major entry into the field
of original and unique literary recordings of historical value. In an effort to ensure
the recording of historical events as they happen, with the permission of the
Press Gallery, a telephone line has been installed from the theatre of the National
Press Building to our recording studio in the West Memorial Building. Thus all
major press conferences held in the National Press Building since July 1974
have been recorded. Among the major acquisitions of oral history interviews
are interviews of various personalities prominent in Canada's political and social
history recorded in 1974 and 1975 by A. M. Nicholson, former MP, Saskatchewan
M LA and Saskatchewan Minister of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. 98
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Conservation — Since several original recordings were made available to us
on loan only, these have been re-recorded on archival quality tape for the
Collection's holdings. In addition, a number of the Collection's original recordings had to be re-recorded because of their advanced state of deterioration.
Finally, some recordings on obsolete format such as wire recordings, dictation
discs and cylinders were re-recorded onto magnetic tape in order to make them
available for auditioning by research officers. A total of 750 hours of original
discs, wire recordings and tapes were re-recorded for proper preservation.
Detailed cataloguing was completed for several collections, totalling 523 hours
of recordings, making these more readily available to researchers. The remainder
of the interviews conducted by Peter Stursberg on the Diefenbaker era, 74 hours
in all, were transcribed and the transcripts are being turned over to the Manuscript Division.
Diffusion — The Section received a total of 662 inquiries by letter, telephone
and personal visit. The inquiries, which include requests for information about
sound archives and oral history, as well as requests for copies of items from
the Archives' holdings, represent a rise over the number of inquiries received
in previous years. By far the greatest number of requests for copies of recordings
came from the CBC and from small private radio stations such as Radio Carleton
in Ottawa and Radio Centreville in Montreal.
Publications — Léo LaClare prepared a 24-page description of the Section's
work entitled "Historical Sound Recordings in the Public Archives of Canada"
in July 1974. LaClare also revised his guide "Oral History Techniques for the
Archivist" and prepared a new introduction to the field, "Sound Archives", for
the 1974 English-language Archives Course given by the Public Archives and
the Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association. A French language
version, "Méthodes et Techniques d'histoire orale pour les chercheurs" has
been mimeographed and distributed at various meetings.
Documentaries and Exhibitions — The Section produced two sound documentaries, Canada ... The Sounds of Time, Official ceremonies, speeches, and
other memorable events, 1888 to 1972 and Le Canada à l'écoute du temps,
cérémonies et discours officiels, et autres événements mémorables, 1888 à 1972.
FILM AND VIDEOTAPE COLLECTIONS - The key event in 1974-1975 was the
formation of an Acquisitions and Cataloguing Section with the appointment of
Kenneth Larose as Head, Micheline Morisset, Alex Grant and D. John Turner
as Acquisition Officers, and Jean Guenette as Cataloguer. Coupled with the
move to the Hunter Building and the securing of additional storage space in
the Bentley Building, the addition of personnel allowed for the first time
adequate physical displacement of the collections and the initiation of accession
inventory controls and descriptive cataloguing. Work is now under way to bring
all the films and videotapes and related documentation under sufficient control
to readily facilitate public access by title and collection. The move to the Hunter
Building also permitted the establishment of a separate viewing room for film
and videotape. While this is limited in accommodation, it at least allows research
viewings of film and videotape to take place without disturbing normal operations. HISTORICAL BRANCH 99
Additional storage capacity for film and videotape also permitted the implementation of agreements with the Canadian Film Institute and the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation. The agreement with the Canadian Film Institute,
signed on 11 October 1974, and to take effect 1 May 1975, arranged for the
deposit of the entire resources of the Institute's archives division, the Canadian
Film Archives, which include over 5,000 films, a library of 7,000 books and 800
periodical titles, 120,000 stills, 5,000 posters and approximately 80,000 reference
files together with a general title index containing over 150,000 cards. The film
collection will be integrated with the holdings of the National Film Archives.
The library and related resources will be housed in the Hunter Building and
will form the nucleus of the National Film Archives' documentation and information services. Under the National Film Archives/Canadian Film Institute Agreement, all existing services of the Canadian Film Archives will be continued and
expanded. All existing agreements between the Canadian Film Archives and
depositors will be honoured by the National Film Archives.
The Dominion Archivist and Laurent Picard, President of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation, exchanged letters of agreement on the deposit of
CBC program material in the National Film Archives on 25 February 1975. Under
this arrangement, programs are under way to inventory and select film and
videotapes from the major corporate production libraries in Toronto and Montreal; to inventory and select film and videotapes from the production resources
of CBOT in Ottawa as a pilot project for regional production centres; and to
explore the feasibility of pre-selecting broadcasts, in radio and television, to
be taped as they are broadcast for reference purposes and in order to monitor
current production for archival selection.
Through the Canadian Film Development Corporation, contact was made
with all the producer and distributor organizations in Canada to explain the
National Film Archives' feature film deposit program. The CFDC has agreed
to add a clause in their contracts with producers stipulating that the National
Film Archives be allowed to purchase a print of the production within thirty
days of release. However, the program embraces all feature films produced in
Canada whether or not there has been CFDC participation.
The success of this program, and of many of the programs established
this past year depends heavily on the level of support the National Film Archives
will receive. A Memorandum to Cabinet establishing the mandate of the National
Film Archives in conservation and diffusion and requesting appropriate support
was prepared and forwarded to the Secretary of State. It is hoped that Cabinet
approval and Treasury Board authorization will allow these and related programs
to be fully implemented early in the 1975-1976 fiscal year.
Reference, Cataloguing and Conservation Services—The number and complexity of the enquiries received rose sharply in 1974-1975. Some 800 postal, telephone and personal inquiries were recorded. The average time required to field
each inquiry rose as well due to the rapid growth of the collections. Staff were
heavily involved in servicing requests from producing organizations such as the
CBC and the Ontario Educational Communications Authority. Reference
demands frequently involve action to prepare viewing copies or to conserve
unique copies before they can be damaged by public viewings. The use of %-inch
(19.05 mm.) videotape in an in-house facility has greatly eased this problem. 100
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
Up-grading this equipment and thus improving the quality of service (including
the addition of a 35 mm. as well as the present 16 mm. film transfer capability)
will be a high priority in 1975-1976.
Since the establishment of the cataloguing operation in October 1974, 907
titles have been processed, representing 1,677,529 feet (511,310.8 m.) of film,
and generating roughly 5,000 catalogue entries.
In 1974-1975 over 300,000 feet (91,440 m.)of 35 mm. nitrate stock and 16 mm.
substandard safety film were transferred and conserved. The program of nitrate
stock conversion is at present barely keeping pace with the rate of decomposition
among nitrate films in storage.
Acquisitions — Over seven million feet (2,133,600 m.) of 35 mm. and 16 mm.
film was acquired in 1974-1975 including:
Aluminum Company of Canada (Alcan) Collection.
Generator 4.
3,600 feet (1,097.3 m.)
The installation of a generator in a power generating station at a Northern British
Columbia power dam.
From the Alcan Collection; deposited by Crawley Films, January 1975.
Canadian Crusade.
1,000 feet (304.8 m.)
Cancer research and preventive measures.
From the Alcan Collection; deposited by Lew Parry Productions, January 1975.
Canadian Film Development Corporation.
Réjeanne Padovani.
8,434 feet (2,570.7 m.), 5 reels, 35 mm. composite colour print with English
sub-titles, 1973.
A feature film by Cinak Cie Cinématographique and directed by Denys Arcand.
Deposited by the Canadian Film Development Corporation, 8 January 1975.
La Mort d'un bûcheron.
10,300 feet (3,139.4 m.), 35 mm. composite print, 1972.
A feature film directed by Gilles Carle. It was Canada's official entry in the 1973
Cannes Film Festival.
Deposited by the Canadian Film Development Corporation, 8 January 1975.
The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz.
10,870 feet (3,313.2 m.), 35 mm. composite colour print, 1974.
A feature film directed by Ted Kotcheff. This film won the Golden Bear in Berlin
in 1974.
Deposited by the Canadian Film Development Corporation, 13 January 1975.
Central Mortgage and Housing (CMHC) Collection.
Facets of a Prairie City.
550 feet (167.6 m.), 16 mm. colour composite print.
Deposited by CMHC, 17 January 1975. HISTORICAL BRANCH 101
Imprints on the Landscape.
600 feet (182.9 m.), 16 mm. colour composite print.
Deposited by CMHC, 17 January 1975.
Moving On.
550 feet (167.6 m.), 16 mm. colour composite print.
Deposited by CMHC, 17 January 1975.
Neighbourhoods.
600 feet (182.9 m.), 16 mm. colour composite print.
Deposited by CMHC, 17 January 1975.
Settling the Shield.
600 feet (182.9 m.), 1&mm. colour composite print.
Deposited by CMHC, 17 January 1976.
John S. Gaisford Motion Pictures Collection.
Take Her by Surprise.
7,200 feet (2,194.6 m.), 35 mm. black-and-white composite print.
Directed by Rudy Dorn.
Deposited by John S. Gaisford Motion Pictures.
International Grenfell Collection.
Grenfell.
998 feet (304.2 m.), 16 mm. silent, black-and-white and colour.
Panoramic views of St. Anthony on the Labrador coast; mission activities, 1928-
1931.
Deposited by Dr. Linwood L. Brown of International Grenfell, February 1975.
Peerless Collection.
The Emperor Jones.
6,528 feet (1,989.7 m), 35 mm. black-and-white composite print, 1933.
A feature film based on the play by Eugene O'Neill and starring Paul Robeson.
Deposited by Peerless, 11 February 1975.
Canadian Pacific Railway Collection.
We Are Young.
12,000 feet (3,657.6 m.), 35 mm. Eastman colour prints, 6 reels for multi-screen
projection.
A film about Canada which makes use of innovative multi-camera techniques.
First shown at the Canadian Pacific Pavilion at Expo 67.
Deposited by Mr, Arnold Harrington, 27 February 1975.
Canadian Armed Forces Collection.
Royal Canadian Air Force 50th Anniversary Reunion.
250 feet (76.2 m.), 16 mm. colour composite print.
Documents the reunion held on 1 April 1974. 102
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Norman Gunn Collection.
The Norman Gunn Family.
Documents family life.
Deposited by Norman Gunn.
Alan Rogers Collection.
Norman McLeod Rogers at a Canadian Legion War Services Campaign; Prime
Minister Mackenzie King.
161 feet (49 m.), 1940.
Haycock Collection.
Lawren Harris in the Arctic.
1,300 feet (396.2 m.), 16 mm., silent, black-and-white, 1930.
Documents Dr. Haycock's travels with Lawren Harris in the Canadian Arctic
and Greenland.
Deposited by Dr. Maurice Haycock.
Air Canada Collection.
1,000 feet (304.8 m.), 16 mm. colour film, 1937.
Films of the earliest Trans Canada Airlines (TCA) passenger planes (Lockheed
Lodestar and Lockheed 14).
Bel levue Pathé Collection.
5,000,000 feet (1,524,000 m).
Production elements relating to such feature films as The Apprenticeship of
Duddy Kravitz, Alien Thunder, The Neptune Factor, Wedding in White and Les
Mâles.
Canadian Pacific Collection.
25,000 feet (7,620 m.), 1928-1960.
Twenty-one short films produced by Canadian Pacific on their flight operations,
including records of inaugural flights.
C. Castravelli Collection.
2,500 feet. (76.2 m).
Original 16 mm. printing materials for the feature film Anomie.
Emergency Measures Organization Collection.
50,000 feet (15,240 m), 16 mm., 1950-1960.
Twenty-eight short films dealing with preventive measures and the after-effects
of atomic warfare.
A. V. Roe/Orenda Collection.
700,000 feet (213,360 m), 16 mm.
Documents the development of the CF-100 and CF-105 fighter planes and the
contribution of the A. V. Roe Company to Canadian Aviation. The Orenda HISTORICAL BRANCH 103
collection complements the A. V. Roe footage in documenting the technical and
industrial development of the Orenda jet engine, 1946-1964.
Henderson/Keane Collection.
6,000 feet (1,828.8 m.), 16 mm. silent black-and-white, 1925-1940.
Documents missionary activities and native life on the northern coast of British
Columbia.
Roffman/Betts Collection.
5,000 feet (1,524 m.), 16 mm. silent black-and-white, 1922-1934.
Documents life in the northwest and western Arctic.
Newfoundland Department of Education Collection.
5,000 feet (1,524 m.), 1910-1919.
Documents life in St. John's and the outports.
Deposited by the School Broadcast Division.
Larry Kent Collection.
120,000 feet (36,576 m.) 16 mm., black-and-white and colour.
Approximately 100 reels of film elements relating to three films produced and
directed by Larry Kent: The Bitter Ash, Sweet Substitute and When Tomorrow
Dies.
St. Laurent Collection.
1,800 feet (548.6 m.), 16 mm. composite black-and-white.
Two interviews with Louis St. Laurent: St. Laurent: The Man and His Country
and An Interview With Louis St. Laurent.
National Physical Fitness League Collection.
50,000 feet (15,240 m), 16 mm. composite black-and-white, 1950-1955.
/Fifty short films on sports; produced by the League.
Machine Readable Archives Division
Since the establishment of the Machine Readable Archives Division in September 1973 the first priority has been the creation of a viable organization to
support its objectives. This activity continued during 1974-1975 and will continue
for the greater part of 1975-1976.
During 1974-1975 policies were defined, long and short term goals agreed
to, staffing carried out, new staff trained, studies commissioned, reports written,
procedures prepared, and work measures determined. Until August 1974 the
Division had a staff of 4; by January 1975 the total was 8 and by March 1975,
17. The initially small staff has had to hurdle many obstacles associated with
the creation of a new division. Many of these difficulties were resolved, and
by the end of 1974-1975 the basic elements of a new organization were well
on their way to being established. 104
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Program Review — In February 1975 the first program review was produced
for the Machine Readable Archives Division since the program was accepted
by Treasury Board in September 1973. The review demonstrated that the initial
assumptions made had to be revised considerably. The short term goal originally
called for the Division to be fully operational to perform its responsibilities for
machine readable records produced by the federal government by 1 April 1975.
As a result of the review this goal had to be revised to a 1 April 1976 target
date. The review also estimated that by 1979-1980 there would be an accumulated
total of 3,750 files of long term value. If this estimate proves to be accurate,
considerable additional resources will be required to handle the archival files
properly. The inventory of EDP records which is being undertaken will be valuable
in identifying more precisely the volume of potential acquisitions. Experience
in accession and reference will provide useful information on the nature of
research requirements. More precise information then will be used to justify
requests for additional resources as they are required.
A limited long-term goal will inevitably result in destruction of large numbers
of files of long-term value. There can be no ordering of priorities, strategies
or tactics, no programs which can replace the commitment of resources which
this function requires to minimize the loss of files of long term value. Efforts
will be made in 1975-1976 to define a program to remove at least some of the
restraints under which the Division will be working. It is hoped that a proposal
can be prepared for the 1977-1978 Program Forecasts.
Machine Readable Archiving System — The most significant report presented
during the year was prepared by outside consultants who were commissioned
to investigate the Division's requirements for cataloguing, storing and retrieving
machine readable records, and to make appropriate recommendations for the
handling and processing of these files. A report was completed in early January
and presented to senior management for their approval. Its main recommendation
was the implementation of an integrated archiving system for machine readable
records. This proposal was accepted, and it is hoped that Treasury Board will
approve it to allow its implementation during 1975-1976.
The first element of this system is the use of the magnetic tape as the medium
of retention. A study had been previously commissioned to find an alternative
medium to tape that was less vulnerable to destruction, machine readable and,
if possible, less machine-dependent than tape. The conclusion reached was
that computer input microfilm (CIM) was a possible alternative. However, no
companies could provide the product at relatively inexpensive rates. Consequently, magnetic tape was chosen as the medium of storage for at least the
next five years. To minimize the inherent problems of this medium, two copies
of any file are stored in separate physical locations and a computer output
microfilm (COM) copy of the file is made. Thus, if problems arise with one file,
there is a backup; if these problems are duplicated on the backup files, there
is the COM backup, and the lost data can be input manually.
Secondly, magnetic tape is handled and stored under ideal conditions to
maximize the possibility of data retention. To achieve this in the Division and
in other government agencies, the Canadian Government Specifications Board
was commissioned to develop standards for the care, handling and storage of
magnetic tape. This standard will be finalized in 1975. HISTORICAL BRANCH 105
The third element of this system calls for the Department to acquire its
own computer facility to ensure the proper handling and processing of files.
The only alternative was to use commercial or government service bureaus.
However, because of the stringent quality control procedures required to ensure
that data is not lost, it was felt that the needs of the Machine Readable Archives
could not be met by a service bureau geared to normal data processing operations. The study concluded that, with the projected average annual volume of
190 machine readable files, costs would be lower with an in-house facility.
The fourth element of this system is to convert all incoming files to one
standard archives format. This approach will reduce costs, make the files relatively hardware and software independent, facilitate the conversion of the Division's entire holdings within ten years and allow the files to remain current with
technological developments, thus maximizing the possibility that they can be
used.
This system offers no guarantee that 100 per cent of the data will be retained
over a ten year period. However, it will minimize the possibility of losing data
permanently and maximize the possibility of recovery should loss of data occur.
The proposals in the report have been discussed with experts both inside and
outside the federal government and the nature and stages of implementation
will be determined early in the next fiscal year.
Acquisition — Since most available staff time has been used in organizational
development, acquisition has suffered. To date, the Division has acquired 40
machine readable files. Most of these are surveys conducted to support social
science studies, usually under the auspices of a Royal Commission. Towards
the end of the year it was possible to place a greater emphasis on the acquisition
function. It was decided that the first priority would be files generated by the
federal government. Contacts were made in seven selected departments and
the response received in all cases was very favourable. Negotiations were carried
out with these agencies for the transfer of files in 1975-1976.
Cataloguing — The consultants who prepared the report on the machine readable archiving system, recommended that, to have control over the incoming
machine readable files, the Division had to establish cataloguing rules for description and standardize formats for presentation. This recommendation was
accepted and a task force was created in March 1975 to produce a cataloguing
system for machine readable archives. This system is to be designed and implemented to allow for easy conversion to an automated system at some future
date. These cataloguing rules and standard formats will be drafted during 1975-
1976.
During the year staff worked with other organizations in support of the efforts
of the Social Science Research Council's Data Clearing House to define a
reporting format for machine readable data files. The format that was generally
agreed upon is to be used by the Data Clearing House in 1975 to survey those
machine readable files which exist in private and some government sectors.
Experience gained by the Division's staff in the Data Clearing House project
will be invaluable in the creation of the cataloguing system.
Publications — During September M. E. Carroll presented two papers to a 106
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
conference jointly sponsored by the International Council on Archives and
UNESCO at the University of Sussex, England. The first paper, titled "The Public
Archives of Canada's Experience in Establishing a Machine Readable Archives"
was printed in the Proceedings of the Conference. The paper was modified
and updated for the Annual Conference of Senior Archivists in Quebec City.
The latter version appeared in the Spring issue of the Canadian Archivist. The
second paper presented at Sussex was titled "The Applications of HDP to
Records Management Operations in the Canadian Federal Government". This
was published in the Proceedings and presented again to the Ottawa Chapter
of the American Records Management Association in January. Mr. Carroll also
prepared an article on the "Public Archives of Canada Survey of EDP Installations" for the International Council on Archives bulletin ADPA. Administration and
Technical Services
Branch
A myriad of services ranging from advanced microfilming techniques to
picture restoration are essential to ensure the efficient operation of a modern
archives. These services are provided by the Administration and Technical
Services Branch and encompass administrative, financial, personnel, technical
and exhibition services. These services are used by both the Public Archives
as well as the National Library. The Branch provides central management, publications and public relations services for the Archives and is responsible for
implementing bilingualism. The Branch also makes available to other government
departments and agencies operational and technical advisory microfilm services.
Office of Program Development
The increasing scope of archival and management activities and concepts
bas resulted in the need to study future operations. The Office of Program
Development was established in 1974 to coordinate the development of policies
and long-range planning and to provide liaison with Treasury Board on matters
relating to future expansion. Consideration was given to the formulation of a
comprehensive acquisition policy. Guidance and advice were provided to the
Historical Branch through a survey of archival holdings and conservation requirements and this will serve as a base for future planning decisions. The senior
officer acts as secretary of the Senior Management Committee and serves as
a member of other committees.
Office of Technological Studies
In carrying out the functions of the Public Archives, the technologies of
conservation and micrography are important subjects. Policies regarding
conservation must be determined, together with the organizational planning
necessary to realize departmental objectives; also, the Public Archives must
actively participate in organizations both nationally and internationally which
are endeavouring to develop the flourishing field of micrographics.
The Senior Advisor of the Office of Technological Studies monitors the
advancement of these technologies and relates them to the functions of the
Department. In addition, he reflects the interests and needs of government by
attempting to bring about improvements in specific areas in those fields. This
107 108
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
is accomplished by active participation in organizations and associations and
by maintaining close collaboration with colleagues in other institutions or by
instigating action in areas of particular concern.
Within the Department a broad study on micrographics was conducted
during the past year to help improve many of the microfilming services provided
by the Public Archives to government departments. The study will also form
the basis for departmental long-range planning. Fundamental policies and
operational decisions regarding conservation have evolved from a series of
meetings with management based on studies previously completed within the
Department. This represents a major step in the continuing program to preserve
the extensive collections of the Public Archives.
With the Senior Advisor as Chairman, the Canadian Government Specification Board Committee on Microfilming has been reorganized to incorporate
representatives from both government and industry with a view to developing
national standards from those that it now creates for the federal government.
He represented the micrographie interests of Canada at the meeting of Technical
Committee 46 of the International Standards Organization (ISO) which met in
Helsinki in May.
To improve the relations between international organizations concerned with
reprography, the Senior Advisor convened a meeting in Paris at UNESCO headquarters in September. This successful conference has generated additional
meetings and a better understanding of each other's functions and activities
is expected to result in closer collaboration in the future. He also attended the
annual conference of the Microfilming Committee of the International Micrographie Congress in Sao Paulo, Brazil. At the latter he addressed the General
Assembly on the subject "The Paris Reprography Colloquium", and presented
a paper at the archives session entitled "Commentary on the Status of Microfilm
in Canadian Archives". As Program Chairman of the International Council for
Reprography he participated on the executive committee of that organization
and assisted in the compilation of a Glossary of Reprographic Terms which
will be published in four languages.
As a member of the Committee on standards for Public Records, a joint
committee of the National Microfilm Association and Society of American Archivists, the Senior Advisor assisted in the development of two forms designed
to meet certain specific legal requirements in microfilming public records. Intended to replace the certification forms previously used, it is anticipated that
the "Declarations" for the Records Custodian and the Camera Operator will
find universal acceptance in the near future.
Nationally, the Office of Technological Studies officer chaired the legality
session of the Canadian Micrographie Society's annual conference in Ottawa.
Liaison is maintained with this organization by the Senior Advisor acting as
the international representative for the Board of Directors. In the library field,
partly as the result of his efforts, the Microfilm Committee of the Canadian Library
Associations is being revitalized, and from now on the technical aspects of
microfilming for the Canadian library field will be its major concern. ADMINISTRATION  AND  TECHNICAL  SERVICES  BRANCH 109
Official Languages Division
The Identification of Positions program has had major repercussions for
both the management and employees of the Public Archives. Approximately
49 per cent of positions have been identified as bilingual and 16 per cent as
unilingual, while 35 per cent will be classified as either French or English. This
program has resulted in extensive changes in the operations of the Bilingualism
and Biculturalism Office. The Bilingualism Unit has become a highly specialized
and technical one, forming part of the operations of the Personnel Division but
directly controlled by Treasury Board and the Public Service Commission. This
Kiiit has now been designated as the Official Languages Division, and at present
consists of two Sections: the Identification and Designation of Positions Section
and the Language Training and Testing Section.
The Identification and Designation of Positions Section is responsible for
identifying all classified positions and for determining the language level required
for each bilingual position. Once this procedure is completed, all information
relating to the position and its incumbent is fed into the computerized Official
Languages Information System (OLIS). Managers are still not very familiar with
OLIS since the distribution of the computer printouts has yet to begin; the system,
however, will be in operation this year.
The Language Training and Testing Section has been in operation for a
longer period and consequently is more familiar to employees. As its name
indicates, it is responsible for language assessment of candidates in bilingual
positions. When candidates do not meet the standard required for their positions,
they are sent on training courses.
In addition to continuous training courses, the Language Training and
Testing Section provides several other language training programs: "in-house"
courses, held one day each week; cyclical courses, given in private schools
and consisting of three three-week periods per year; and finally, a monitoring
service for those who have completed their courses and wish to retain their
second-language skills.
This Division continues to conduct an investigation each time an employee
or a person outside the Department submits a complaint regarding the application
of the Official Languages Act. This year the Division received only two complaints,
both of which were of a minor nature. The successful introduction of the various
official languages programs is largely due to the open-mindedness and cooperation displayed by all employees of the Public Archives.
Administrative Services Division
The Administrative Services Division provides a support service for the Public
Archives and National Library Departments. Fields involved are records management, materiel management, property management, communications, accommodations, safety, fire prevention, security and parking. It also coordinates use
of the Department's auditorium and meeting rooms, Departmental campaigns
and the Suggestion Award Program. 110
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
RECORDS SERVICES SECTION — This section plans, organizes, coordinates
and controls the Public Archives Records Management Program. The program
involves the creation, implementation, revision and maintenance of filing systems,
scheduling and disposal of records, indexing and retrieval of information, and
Mail and Messenger Services.
During the past year Records Services was actively involved in all of these
areas. The Records Services Section controls some 3,700 active subject files.
The volume of incoming correspondence increased from 44,000 to 60,000 pieces.
There were 1,300 new files and volumes created during the past year and over
54,000 pieces of corespondence were placed in files.
Among the Records Program achievements during the past year were the
creation and implementation of the records of the Information Services and
Machine Readable Archives Divisions, the completion of Finance Records File
System, the conversion of Management Improvement Forms, Management
Records and Program Planning and Budgeting; the completion of the Historical
Branch File Classification System, and the complete revision of Central Records
Office housekeeping files.
Other major changes involved the adoption of Linedex for Central Control,
the new format and retyping of subject cards, establishment of individual file
classification manuals for each Records Office, implementation of a contact card
index, and adoption of a new routing plan for the Historical Branch.
There were 72 cubic feet (2.04 cum.) of records destroyed and over 65
cubic feet (1.84 cum.) of files transferred to semi-active storage^
There were two one-week training courses held by the Records Services
Section in which a total of 11 persons participated. Two one-month Records
Management Courses, in which three persons participated were also held. Three
tours of government departments were arranged.
In the Mail and Messenger Services vehicle reservations increased from
400 to 500; 206,000 pieces of outgoing mail were processed, 29,000 more than
the previous year. External messenger trips increased from 10,500 to 14,600.
Four new vehicles were purchased and a shuttle service to eight buildings in
the Ottawa-Hull area was provided. Thirty records and mail surveys were conducted during the past year.
BUILDING SERVICES SECTION — This section is responsible for the provision
of communications, building maintenance, parking and fire prevention services.
The Section has had an active year. Staff coordinated and supervised 714
projects involving outside contractors and the Department of Public Works. Some
572 projects were handled by the staff and an additional 104 requests through
shop staff.
Major Projects
1. Approximately 40 per cent of the workshop's time was directly involved
in the manufacture and assembly of exhibitions (13 this year) involving many
different facets of work. ■■MHfc
ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 111
2. Staff dismantled, relocated and reassembled 35,000 linear feet of shelving
from the West Memorial and National Library-Public Archives Buildings to
other areas within Ottawa. Staffs of the Personnel, Public Records and
several other divisions were relocated within the headquarters buildings.
3. Coordinated such projects as: designing and installing the new Lester B.
Pearson Library in Laurier House; installing a vacudine fumigator for the
Records Conservation Section; renovating Rockcliffe vaults to provide for
a film inspection room; renovating PARC, Toronto to facilitate the opening
of a Central Microfilm Unit for that area; renovating the Hunter Building
to relocate the National Film Archives.
In addition about 125 requests were received for telecommunications
services, many of these were major changes to existing systems. Other requests
in this area involved arranging for data communication services.
MATERIEL MANAGEMENT SECTION — This section plans, organizes and controls the provision of materiel support for the Department. To 15 February 1975
a total of 2,666 procurement requests were handled in this section. A breakdown
of requisitions shows: 1,908 requisitions to Department of Supply and Services,
requisitions against standing offer agreements and local purchase orders for
all branches not including the Central Microfilm Unit, the estimated expenditure
being $1,653,924.88; 314 requisitions to Department of Supply and Services,
requisitions against standing offer agreements and local purchase orders for
the Central Microfilm Unit, the estimated expenditure being $845,562; 444 requisitions for printing to various Department of Supply and Services units, estimated
expenditure being $70,000. In addition, 254 requisitions for printing to DSS Units
were raised by the Forms Management Section. This was the first time another
area has raised printing requisitions and it was generally successful.
More than 161 tons (163.6 metric tons) of material were received and some
16 tons (16.26 metric tons) were shipped during the past year. Sales of stationery
rose to $63,570 from $51,098 last year.
Accommodations and Planning — During the course of the year the following
additional accommodation was obtained:
1. Uniform Building, Ottawa, 33,000 square feet (3,065.7 sq.m.). To house a
carpentry shop and Exhibition Services Division as well as provide additional
storage for historical material and books.
2. Canadian Building, 27,656 square feet (2,569.2 sq.m.) of office accommodation to house the Personnel, Management Services, Information Services
and the Official Languages Divisions of the Department.
3. Public Archives Records Centre, Montreal, 16,200 square feet (1,505 sq.m.)
of storage space for federal records.
4. Hunter Building, 9,000 square feet (836.1 sq.m.) to house the National Film
Archives.
Negotiations are underway for expansion at the Public Archives Records
Centres in Toronto and Vancouver and a new Records Centre in Edmonton,
Alberta. 112
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT 1974-1975
Audio Visual Services — This was a busy year for Audio Visual Services. The
auditorium and boardrooms were used to 80 per cent capacity. The Archives
slide series continued. An additional Renox A77 tape recorder was purchased
and modifications were made to improve recording facilities. Services were
provided for many exhibit openings and equipment was installed in some exhibits,
the most notable being the Telecommunications exhibit for which approximately
$10,000 of audio visual equipment was installed. With the increased activity of
the National Film Archives many more screening sessions are being held. In
addition to our regular monthly videotape program for Cablevision we are also
now doing one in French.
Transcribing Unit — This unit was organized to service the Administration and
Technical Services Branch. Flexibility is required by the small staff whose varied
duties stem from the general administrative, technical, personnel and financial
activities. Some 23,941 typing jobs were performed by this unit during 1974-1975.
The introduction of word processing equipment to this unit has sharply increased
production.
New Public Archives Building — Planning continued at a moderate pace during
the first half of the year. The approved version of the Accommodations Information
Sheets was completed in January in preparation for the issue of the first draft
of the clients brief in February. Amendments and revisions to this draft were
incorporated, reviewed, approved by the Senior Management Committee and
forwarded to the Department of Public Works for inclusion in the final draft
version. This was received in June and, with minor changes and revisions, was
approved by the Senior Management Committee and returned to the Department
of Public Works for printing. The final version was received and distributed in
August.
During the working-up period for the final version of the brief a number
of meetings were held by the Senior Management Committee to discuss, recommend and approve amendments and revisions, and with the Department of Public
Works, Treasury Board and the consultant architects to discuss problems arising
from this phase of planning.
A submission to Treasury Board has been delayed because of discussions
with the Department of Public Works and the National Capital Commission
concerning the selection of a new site which will be integrated into the plans
for the development of the western portion of Wellington Street. It is hoped
that action will be taken early in the next fiscal year.
Management Services Division
The Division is responsible for coordinating and analyzing program forecasts
and estimates and for providing financial bookkeeping and management
improvement services.
The increasing volume and diversity of operations in the Department, larger
budgets, additional demands for improved management systems and procedures, the delegation of more responsibility and accountability to departments
by Treasury Board, and the preparation of data for the Public Accounts reports
contributed to the increasing activity in the Management Services Division. The
Division is comprised of the Program Planning and Budget Section, the Manage- ADMINISTRATION  AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
ment Improvement Section, the Finance Section and the Management Systems
Implementation Section.
PROGRAM PLANNING AND BUDGET SECTION - This Section prepares the
annual program forecasts and estimates of the Department. These forecasts
and estimates, which reflect expenditures of the level of nine activities, are submitted annually for Parliamentary approval. The expenditure pattern for departmental budgets is reviewed monthly and cash flow forecasts are prepared for
responsibility centres. This section is also responsible for providing advice to
departmental management on financial matters.
MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT SECTION - This Section provides an internal
consulting service for the Public Archives. It is responsible for providing a
management improvement advisory service to managers and officials of the
Department by conducting organization, methods and systems studies. This
section also provides an EDP advisory service and coordinates and reports the
EDP activities of the Department. It is also responsible for forms management
and information systems, and the directives management program for the
dissemination of information on departmental policies, systems and procedures.
FINANCE SECTION — This Section provides financial services for the Public
Archives whose 1974-1975 budget totalled $10,012,845. These services also
include the maintenance of a variety of trust funds as well as maintenance and
control of the Central Microfilm Unit Revolving Fund.
MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION SECTION - This section is responsible for developing, assessing and directing the implementation of effective
management planning and reporting systems. Such systems include Planning,
Programming and Budgeting Systems, Management Information Systems and
Operational Performance Measurement Systems. These systems are designed
to relate findings to the plans of future operations for management in order
to monitor the use of resources and their progress in the achievement of departmental objectives. In addition, this section advises senior management on the
development of departmental forecasting and budgeting techniques and
assesses proposals related to the creation, expansion or modification of its
programs.
Personnel Division
On 1 April 1974 the Personnel Division, with an authorized man-year allotment of 23, had 27 established positions, although all were not filled. On 31
March 1975, the number of positions had been increased to 30. Of the present
staff of 28, 17 are bilingual, 10 unilingual English and one unilingual French.
With the move of the Division in October 1974 to new accommodations
the Program Development Officer and the clerk were seconded to the Management Services Division to improve and develop departmental management information and management audit systems. This secondment will be made a permanent move effective 1 April 1975.
A major reorganization was carried out to use staff resources more effectively, to accent planned improvement of the utilization of human resources, 114
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
and to provide a more coordinated and simplified service to line managers. In
the fall of 1974 a new Manpower Resources Section was formed from the two
former Staffing and Manpower Planning Sections and the Training and Development Section.
The Classification, Compensation and Staff Relations Section was renamed
the "Compensation and Staff Relations Section" to conform with Treasury Board
practice.
MANPOWER RESOURCES SECTION - This section has four officers and three
support staff and provides regular staffing services. It also attempts, by direct
consultation, to encourage a greater awareness of the need for assessing present
staff resources. This section identifies future requirements and promotes
employee career development by training and development courses and
seminars, job enrichment and internal mobility.
"In-House" courses and seminars presented in 1974-1975 covered such
subjects as financial management training, supervisory sessions, staffing and
interviewing, training for trainers and pre-retirement.
Staffing actions in the Public Archives continued at a surprisingly high level
although indications are that authorized departmental man-years will not be as
fully utilized as might have been wished.
COMPENSATION AND STAFF RELATIONS SECTION - This section now consists of six officers and seven support staff. Services provided include the evaluation (classification) of positions, pay and benefits and all aspects of staff relations.
The workload in all units of this section was heavy this year, as is shown
by the accompanying statistics. The volume of work in the Pay and Benefits
Unit was the result of numerous hirings, high turnover of term employees, a
fairly high departmental turnover rate and complex pay and benefits regulations.
The Staff Relations Officer was not only called upon for advice in numerous
cases but was heavily involved in several contract negotiations with the Treasury
Board, flexible working hours and several grievances.
Indeterminate Positions Classified	
434
Term Positions Classified	
356
Total	
790
Statistics Outlining Activities of the Personnel Division,
1 April 1974 to 31 March 1975
ssified	
Grievances Processed                       4
"In-House" Courses/Seminars Presented   27
Man-days Expended on Training 1,240
New Employees Hired   349
Employees Released   185
Total Departmental Appointments Made  593
Total Public Service Commission Appointments Made
for the Department  116
Internal Promotions   240
Appeals Entered  2 ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 115
Technical Division
The Technical Division offers operational and advisory microfilm services
to all federal government departments and agencies. It also provides the Public
Archives with services involving reprography, photography and the conservation
of records and pictures. The Division's responsibilities include the operation
of the Central Microfilm Unit, Micrographie Advisory Section, Micrographie
Evaluation and Development Unit, Picture Conservation Section, Records
Conservation Section and Reprography Section. A Computer Services Section
will be established within the Division to support Public Archives EDP Records
Management Programs.
CENTRAL MICROFILM UNIT — The Unit offers a wide range of microfilm services
to all federal government departments and agencies including the Public Archives. Financed by a working capital advance, the Unit operates on a cost-
recovery basis.
User acceptance of microfilm combined with a shortage of paper and storage
space have increased the demand for microfilm services. A Regional Microfilm
Unit was opened in Toronto during the year and offers services similar to those
available in Ottawa, with the exception of Computer Output Microfilm (COM).
In the Ottawa Unit COM has proven to be the micrographie medium with the
greatest growth potential. Organizational and operational changes have occurred
and will continue. Additional equipment to be acquired in the coming year will
enable the Unit to improve internal quality control.
Archival material microfilmed for the Public Archives during the year included: Indian Affairs Departmental Letterbooks, Paylist Treaty and School Files;
Sessional Papers; Index of the Quebec Gazette; Upper Canada Sundries; Bennett
Papers; King Papers; Montreal Board of Trade Minute Books.
Projects undertaken for other federal government departments included:
Canadian Theses for the National Library; colour microfilming of labels for the
Department of Agriculture; the Register of Physicians for the Medical Association;
Minutes of Privy Council; NATO Equipment Catalogue, Department of National
Defence; EDP Historic Files, National Revenue.
Micrographie Evaluation and Development Unit — The Unit is designed to be
an impartial source of information on the merit of all types of microfilm equipment,
supplies and commercial services. This information, compiled for the betterment
of micrographie services in the federal government is provided to the Micrographie Advisory Section as a basis for their systems recommendations, to the
Central Microfilm Unit as a guide for their annual tendering for supplies, and
to micrographers in general as an aid to their selection of equipment.
The Unit is currently formulating new programs to determine priorities of
what should be evaluated, to develop more precise testing methods for making
these evaluations, to properly document test results and to disseminate these
results to areas where they can be of benefit.
MICROGRAPHIC ADVISORY SECTION — This section is responsible for the
following activities in the field of micrographics for the federal government: 116
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
developing and promoting new micrographie techniques; providing consultative
and advisory services; recommending systems for approval and conducting
training courses.
At the request of government departments, the Section directs the application of micrographics as an active information retrieval tool 'for public records,
library holdings, engineering, architectural and archival systems.
A Toronto Regional Office was established during the year and a one-day
seminar entitled "Introduction to Micrographics" was presented to 60 federal
government representatives from the Toronto region.
The annual Microrecording Technology Course was presented in Ottawa
to 31 representatives from 24 government departments, and a COM Seminar
was presented to over 300 persons at the Canadian Government Demonstration
Centre, Ottawa.
Technical assistance was provided to the National Research Council and
to the Department of Supply and Services in the examination of the technical
aspects of a system designed to incorporate computer and microfiche as a
retrieval mechanism.
A special project undertaken during the year was a feasibility study conducted in New York for the microfilming of United Nations' records. Working
in conjunction with the evaluation unit, the Section plans to complete the project
in the coming year.
Projects completed during the year include an on-site inspection of Haitian
hydrological data and the provision of technical assistance to CIDA in their efforts
to restore and reproduce material borrowed from the Haitian Government.
PICTURE CONSERVATION SECTION — Conservation services provided to the
Public Archives and the National Library by this Section include the handling
of irreplaceable works of art. This requires knowledge of organic and inorganic
chemistry; instrumental methods of analysis; microchemistry; photography, including photomacrography, photomicrography and darkroom work; radiography;
art history; studio art (oils, water-colours and graphics).
Two assistant conservators have been recruited and are serving an internship
in the Section's laboratory. Their training will be supplemented by observing
and participating in conservation work being conducted in other institutions.
Collections handled by the Section included: Image of Canada; James
Pattison Cockburn; S. P. Hall; and the RCMP Souris River Photo Collection which
was completed during the year.
The Section plans to install a fume cabinet to expand facilities to accommodate increased demands for conservation.
RECORDS CONSERVATION SECTION — The Section is responsible for restoring
rare books and for conserving manuscripts, maps, atlases and other archival
materials for the Public Archives.
Two special projects undertaken were the unbinding and preparing of 439
volumes of Indian Treaty Pay Lists for microfilm and the provision of technical
assistance to CIDA in the reproduction of Haitian hydrological data. On-site ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 117
inspection revealed the extremely poor physical condition of the material and
the necessity of restoration before attempting to microfilm. The Haitian Government released the documents to the Public Archives, where restoration and
reproduction was completed in February 1975.
A fumigator with a vacuum drying system designed to fumigate books with
ethylene oxide and a fume cabinet, which will permit the use of non-aqueous
spray de-acidification, have been installed.
A pilot project for de-acidification of whole books will be undertaken by
the Section in the coming year. The magnesium methoxide system designed
by Dr. R. D. Smith eliminates the need to unbind books and permits treatment
of approximately 250 books per day. This method will help to solve the critical
problem of deterioration which faces libraries and institutions.
In June the Head of the Section participated in the annual conference of
the Association of Canadian Map Libraries in Toronto where he presented a
paper which will appear in the Annual Proceedings of the Association of
Canadian Map Libraries. A special booklet describing methods of restoration,
materials and sources of supply was prepared and distributed to delegates at
the annual convention of the Society of American Archivists.
REPROGRAPHY SECTION — Specialized photography involving historic paintings and manuscripts, photographic preservation and centralized duplicating
services are the functions of this section. Demand for these services is directly
related to programs prepared by the Public Archives and to requests from such
patrons of the Department as libraries, universities, researchers, private individuals and companies, and provincial and municipal government departments and
agencies.
A photo conservation chemist, who will conduct research and offer advice
on restoring and conserving the photographic and negative collections of the
Public Archives, has been hired and will commence work in the Section shortly.
The Section acquired additional space and purchased two enlargers which
improved black and white photographic processes. An automated film processor,
modified to meet reprography requirements, has been tested and will be installed
in the coming year. The processor is designed to meet archival requirements
and will aid the Section in reducing the time required to process black and
white film.
The colour photography program will have to expand to meet the growing
demand by researchers for 35 mm. slides and slide duplication of archival
material. Investigations into the archival keeping-quality of CIBA colour film are
being conducted by the Division.
The Section Head attended Photokina at Cologne, West Germany, to study
the latest processes and equipment being used internationally.
Exhibition Services Division
For most of 1974-1975 the responsibility for providing exhibition and publicity
services as well as for the administration of Laurier House and the National 118
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
Jean Chrétien, left, Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs, H. Hjorth-Nielsen, Ambassador
of Denmark, Mrs. Hjorth-Nielsen, and Dominion Archivist Dr. W. I. Smith admire a display
at the Arctic Denmark exhibition.
Medal Collection lay with the Displays and Publicity Division. In January 1975,
the publicity function was removed from this division and linked with the Publications Division. The combined services of publications and publicity became the
responsibility of a new division — Information Services.
Other services provided by the former Displays and Publicity Division, i.e.
exhibitions, administration of Laurier House and the National Medal Collection,
remained together under a renamed division — Exhibition Services.
Exhibitions — This was an active year for Public Archives exhibitions. Exhibitions
by the Department were in such great demand across Canada that the operations
of the Division had to be re-examined: design, production and support staff
had to be increased to meet this demand; more space for production and storage
of exhibitions and their components had to be provided; the mobility of all
personnel had to be increased to handle the transporting, setting up and
dismantling of exhibitions.
Frontier College — The year began with the production of two identical exhibitions and a small display on the third floor on Frontier College. The exhibitions,
using photographs, letters and other archival documents, depicted the story
of how Frontier College's students worked and taught in remote mining and
railway camps from its founding in 1899 to the present. One copy of the exhibition ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
119
was turned over to Frontier College and the other retained by Public Archives.
Both exhibitions were shown in 22 venues across Canada.
Arctic Denmark — This exhibition was sponsored by the Department of Indian
and Northern Affairs and the Danish Embassy in space provided by the Public
Archives and National Library. The exhibition, containing audio-visual material,
maps and documents covering the history and development of Greenland, was
prepared and produced in Denmark and was shown here as part of a travelling
circuit in North America.
Kreighoff: Scenes in Canada — The exhibition of works by this painter of mid-
nineteenth century Quebec, Cornelius Kreighoff, was presented by the McCord
Museum in Montreal in 1972 to mark the 100th Anniversary of the artist's death.
It was then shown in Paris, France, and London, England, before its showing
at the Public Archives.
Professional Photographers of Canada: National Print Show — As a result of
negotiations between the Historical Photographs Section of the Public Archives
and the Professional Photographers Association of Canada, the award-winning
prints of professional photographers from across Canada will, in future, be
housed in the Public Archives. As a first step in cementing this relationship,
the Public Archives prepared an exhibition using these award-winning prints.
With this exhibition, the Division embarked on a unique venture with Canadian
Pacific Hotels. Canadian Pacific agreed to provide space for the Print Show
Part of the Quebec and its Environs exhibition. 120
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
in 13 hotel lobbies across Canada. Using Canadian Pacific container equipment
the show travelled from July 1974 to February 1975 by train, truck and ferry.
Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience — The most elaborate exhibition
ever produced by the Public Archives, this exhibition used a mix of sound, films,
records, manuscripts, maps and artifacts to depict the history and development
of telecommunications in Canada. The exhibition was opened by the Minister
of Communications, the Hon. Gérard PeUetier, on 7 October 1974. After its
showing in the Public Archives Building it was shown at the Museum of Science
and Technology.
Archival Publications and Behind the Scenes at the Public Archives — These
two exhibitions were prepared in conjunction with the XlVth International Round
Table on Archives Conference. The Archival Publications exhibit displayed a
selection of publications published by archives in countries around the world.
Behind the Scenes at the Public Archives showed the staff of the Public Archives
performing a variety of operations.
Quebec and Its Environs — This exhibition, drawn from the holdings of the
Paintings, Drawings and Prints Section, using water-colours by the British
officer-artist, James Pattison Cockburn, depicted Quebec and its environs in
the nineteenth century. After its showing at the Public Archives Building it is
scheduled to tour ten galleries and museums in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes.
Other exhibitions, prepared in fiscal 1972-1973 and 1973-1974 continued
to travel across Canada:
The W. H. Coverdale Collection of Canadiana was shown in 7 venues;
Image of Canada in 4 venues;
Western Odyssey in 6 venues;
Relentless Verity in 5 venues;
Pictured Opinions in 7 venues.
The Division prepared three booths for use at various conferences. Special cases
were built for displaying medals, and the medals exhibit was changed twice
during the year. The showcase in the third floor lobby was changed four times
during the year and the National Map Collection display in the fourth floor lobby
was changed three times. The Division also prepared a small exhibition entitled
Ottawa in Maps illustrating the growth of Ottawa over the years. This is being
circulated by the City of Ottawa in shopping centres and other popular venues.
Laurier House — Many changes took place at Laurier House during 1974-1975.
Major interior renovation work was carried out because of the installation of
the Lester B. Pearson Study. This acquisition greatly increased the exhibition
area of the House and therefore required an additional full-time Commissionaire
(bringing the total to three) for security and tours, and another "on-call" tour
guide. At the beginning of November the new Curator assumed her duties, after
completing the French language training program.
The Lester B. Pearson Study was officially opened by Mrs. Maryon Pearson
on 15 July 1974. Laurier House acquired the contents of Mr. Pearson's study
under an agreement between the former Prime Minister and the Public Archives.
Accommodation of the Study on the second floor necessitated the removal of ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 121
the walls between the two bedrooms and bathroom in the back (north) wing
of the house; an ante-chamber and the study itself were then installed. The
study contains furniture, books, photographs, honourary degrees, and other
memorabilia of Mr. Pearson's life and career and has proven popular with the
public.
The past year also saw the celebration of the centennial of William Lyon
I Mackenzie King's birth, on 17 December 1874. This created a great deal of
interest in Laurier House. A number of television programs were taped in the
library on the third floor. Filming was also carried out for inclusion in various
news features concerning the centennial and the opening of the King diaries.
An air-conditioning system for Laurier House was approved and plans drawn
up. A cataloguing system for the collection has been initiated and cards are
being printed. The ceiling in the Laurier Room, damaged a year ago by water,
was repaired and refinished. The number of visitors increased in the past year
to over 27,000, compared to 20,000 in 1973-1974. Once again they came from
all over the world.
National Medal Collection and Tours — The total of medallic objects received,
purchased or on order for the fiscal year was 800 items.
Notable among these acquisitions are the 146 medallic specimens, along
with 85 engraving tools, acquired during the summer of 1974 from Mr. Thomas
Shingles, who for many years was Chief Engraver of the Royal Canadian Mint.
From the Mint of Paris, France, the National Medal Collection has acquired
a splendid cross-section, in 150 bronze specimens, of that country's historic
and art medals.
Important additions to the Collection of the Personal Award Medals of
Canada's Governors General now provide an example of these in silver or bronze
for each viceroy since such honours commenced with Lord Dufferin in 1873.
Further specimens of them in silver are being secured to complete that series
because of its special importance for research.
Athletic awards and badges associated with a wide variety of Canadian sports
activities constitute another important area being extended and developed for
its documentary significance.
Information Services Division
It was during the 1974-1975 fiscal year that the Publications Division experienced an organizational change. As of 1 January 1975 it became known officially
as the Information Services Division and encompassed two sections: the Publications Section and the Media Relations Section. The latter function was transferred from the former Displays and Publicity Division, now the Exhibition
Services Division.
This structural reorganization has better centralized the flow of archival
information, both internally and externally. Possibly the most significant internal
achievement of the Division was the creation of the Department's first official
newsletter, The Archivist. Aimed at improving communications and stimulating 122
PUBLIC ARCHIVES REPORT  1974-1975
interest within the Public Archives, this bimonthly publication first appeared in
July 1974. As of March 1975 a total of five issues had been published. The
editors remain constantly on the search for interesting and informative material
to include in subsequent issues.
It seems quite apparent that the role of the Informatkyp Services Division
will expand tremendously in the near future as the Public Archives publication
and public relations mandates increase.
PUBLICATIONS SECTION — In addition to The Archivist, there were many other
important publications produced during the year.
Published for the International Council on Archives was the publication
International Archival Development Fund. This was the Public Archives contribution to the Fund and aimed at stimulating responsible archival action throughout
the world.
It was an active year for the publishing of Records Management Branch
publications. Several publications were translated into French and printed under
separate cover. These included Plans généraux d'élimination des documents
du gouvernement du Canada, La gestion du courrier au sein des ministères
et organismes gouvernementaux, Organisation et opérations relatives à la gestion des documents and Plan de conservation et d'élimination des documents.
Revised reprints were published for the following two publications: Records
Organization and Operations and Records Scheduling and Disposal. A final
publication, Subject Classification Guide, is presently being printed and should
be available early in the next fiscal year.
For the National Map Collection three major publications were produced.
The first volume of an inventory listing French atlases housed in the National
Map Collection was printed under the title French Atlases in the Rare Atlas
Collection. The other two publications, Ottawa in Maps and Winnipeg in Maps,
are fully illustrated and are accompanied by historical notes regarding the
development of these two Canadian cities.
A series of publications of special interest to scholars and researchers is
the General Inventory: Manuscripts prepared by the Manuscript Division.
Volume 3: MG 17 — MG 21 and Volume 7: MG 29 were made available to the
public.
Again, as in past years, exhibition publications occupied much of the Section's activities. The major exhibition of the year, Telecommunications: The
Canadian Experience, resulted in the production of both a poster catalogue
and a research catalogue. Other publications relating to exhibitions included
the poster catalogue Quebec and its Environs, the brochure Norman McLaren
and the catalogue XVth International Round Table on Archives.
Turning to publications of a general nature we find many that would appeal
to those interested in the Public Archives itself and more specifically in Canadian
history. During the year the Annual Report 1972-1973 was published and the
editing for the Annual Report 1973-1974 was completed. Another publication
relating to annual reports, Guide to the Reports of the Public Archives of Canada
1872-1972, is near completion and should be available early in the coming fiscal
year. Guide des sources d'archives sur le Canada français, au Canada is another ROUND TABLE ON ARCHIVES 123
publication near completion. For the first time a comprehensive list of Public
Archives publications was printed under the title List of Publications of the Public
Archives of Canada. Three informational brochures describing various activities
of the Archives were also produced: Public Archives of Canada, Public Records
Division and, in collaboration with Laurier House, the brochure Lester B. Pearson.
The Section was also responsible for the creation of two cover designs;
one for the Machine Readable Archives Series and the other for the Public
Records Division's Records Group Inventory Series.
MEDIA RELATIONS SECTION — Continuing past trends, the Division's efforts
were again concentrated on publicizing and advertising the travelling and local
exhibitions. In Ottawa the support of the local media was actively pursued to
cover archival events such as the International Round Table on Archives Confer-
ence. Information was also distributed to media across Canada on some of the
major acquisitions obtained during the year including the Fessenden Papers
from the State Archives of North Carolina and the film library of the Canadian
Film Institute. To support the travelling exhibits, editorial material and photographs were regularly sent to borrowing institutions for distribution to the press
in their respective cities.
Media relations officers produced a monthly 15-minute program for an
Ottawa cable television station featuring material in archival collections. In
February 1975 an agreement was concluded with a second station to receive
a program in French. These television programs made on video-tape were
produced totally "in-house" with the collaboration of the Archives audio-visual
unit. Press inquiries increased appreciably during the year as journalists turned
increasingly towards archival material to illustrate their stories. The event which
elicited the widest publicity for the Archives during the year was the release
of the William Lyon Mackenzie King diaries. Every major daily carried at least
one article on the diaries.
Since the merger of the media relations function with publications in January,
Information Services Division is now exploring the use of more advanced
communication techniques such as radio tapes and video-tape recordings to
inform a wider public about the collections of the Public Archives.
Fifteenth International Conference
of the Round Table on Archives
Established twenty years ago by Charles Braibant, at that time Director
General of the Archives of France, the Round Table was envisaged as a means
of bringing the heads of national records centres together on a yearly basis
between congresses of the International Council on Archives.
Since then, the Round Table has expanded and become a formal organization. The fifteenth meeting, held in Ottawa and hosted by the Public Archives
of Canada, brought together five international agencies and more than 70 archivists from 39 countries representing all continents. It marked the first time that 124
PUBLIC ARCHIVES  REPORT  1974-1975
the Round Table had met in the Americas. Meetings were held in the federal
government's Conference Centre from 7-10 October 1974.
Members of the official Canadian delegation were Dr. Wilfred I. Smith, the
Dominion Archivist, Louis Garon, representing the Archives nationales du
Québec, and Robert Garon of the Association des archivistes du Québec, representing Canadian archivists. Attending as observers were Bruce Fergusson,
Director of the Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Dr. W. Kaye Lamb, former Dominion Archivist, Alan Ridge, Director of the Archives of Alberta and Bernard Weil-
brenner, Assistant Dominion Archivist and conference organizer. L. F. MacRae,
Associate National Librarian, represented the International Federation for Documentation.
Discussions dealt with publicity and public relations, publications, exhibitions
and educational services. A report on these topics, based on questionnaire
replies received from 45 countries, was distributed prior to the meeting.
M. F. Biljan, President of the Round Table is received by her Excellency
Madame Jules Léger, wife of the Governor-General. rafe
ROUND TABLE ON ARCHIVES 125
The main speakers were: Dr. W. I. Smith, on publicity and public relations;
i Frank Evans (USA), on publications; D. Mannsaker (Norway), on exhibitions and
Claudio Pavone (Italy), on educational services.
During the session on administrative matters, chaired by the President of
the Round Table, Franjo Biljan (Yugoslavia), the following items were discussed:
the Secretary's report and the financial report, the location of future meetings,
the election of advisors on the selection of topics for these meetings, the amending of the regulations of the Round Table and the budgets of archival institutions.
| Various activities were organized for the participants. Prior to a short tour
of the city and the surrounding area, delegates were welcomed by the Mayor
of Ottawa, Pierre Benoit.
Participants were invited to the official opening by the Minister of Communi-
I cations, the Honourable Gérard PeUetier of the Public Archives exhibition Telecommunications: The Canadian Experience. Mr. PeUetier was thanked by the
President of the International Council on Archives, F. K. Dolguikh. Following
a reception at the residence of the Governor General, where they were received
by Her Excellency Mme Jules Léger, participants were guests at a dinner given
by the Secretary of State, the Honourable J. Hugh Faulkner.
Address by the Honourable J. Hugh Faulkner
Mr. Chairman, Ladies.and Gentlemen:
It is both an honour and a pleasure for me to welcome you on
behalf of the Canadian government. We are of course delighted that
Canada was selected to host this important meeting. I have looked
forward with keen interest to meeting this evening with distinguished
archivists who have assembled from all corners of the globe to discuss
matters of mutual interest in a spirit of friendship and cooperation. May
I thank you for the opportunity afforded me to share in the work of
your fifteenth International Round Table and to contribute in some small
way to it.
Until very recenty, in the field of archives, Canada has had to rely
on other countries, in particular