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Public Archives of Canada Report 1959-1969 Public Archives of Canada 1971

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Array   PUBLIC
ARCHIVES
OF
CANADA
REPORT
1959-1969 THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Information Canada
Ottawa, 1971
Cat. No. SA1-1959/1969 CONTENTS
Introduction 1
Records Management Branch
9
Accessions and Reference Division
10
Regional Records Centres Division
14
Advisory Services Division
Historical Branch
15
23
Manuscript Division
23
Public Archives Library
48
Map Division
53
Picture Division
63
Publications Service
Administration and Technical Services Branch
75
79
Administration Division
79
Personnel Division
80
Technical Services Division
82
Displays and Publicity Service  INTRODUCTION
THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES OF CANADA, 1959-1969
Since this is the first report of the PubUc Archives since 1958 it affords a rare opportunity
to review its functions and activities in the perspective of more than a decade.
It has been a period of remarkable growth and development. The staff increased
from 107 to 263, the budget from $542,870 to $2,267,000. One of the factors which
caused this increase was the amazing growth of archival functions. For example, the
annual registered attendance of researchers in the Manuscript Division alone increased by
520%: from 480 in 1959 to 2,501 in 1969; whUe the acquisitions of pubUc and private
records during the period equalled the total volume of accessions since 1872. In addition,
functions which had been initiated hi the preceding decade continued to develop and new
responsibilities were acquired, adding important new dimensions to the role of the Public
Archives. It has been transformed to a complex organization, combining important
records management and technical services to the government of Canada with the conventional archival functions related to preservation and research. The increasing need
for co-ordination, direction and planning in several distinct functional areas has led to
the creation of three branches, the Records Management Branch, the Historical Branch,
and the Administration and Technical Services Branch.
RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH—The most significant development
in the last decade has been the extension of PubUc Archives responsibilities in the field
of records management. The development of the present system has passed through three
major stages. The first stage commenced with the establishment of the PubUc Archives
Records Centre in 1956. Its purpose, as explained in the Archives Report for 1955-1958,
was to provide economic storage for dormant records of government departments, combined with a quick reference service. This service has been extended with the establishment of regional centres in Toronto and Montreal. In December, 1969, the records
centres were handling 1,000 reference requests every day on 480,000 cubic feet of
records, representing a saving for departments of nearly $1,700,000 in space, equipment
and staff.
The second stage was the development of methods for planned disposal of obsolete
records, and the preparation and approval of records schedules. In 1960 a separate
Disposal and Scheduling Section was established at the Ottawa Records Centre. It
assisted departments in preparing schedules and prepared for pubUcation by the PubUc
Archives in 1963 the General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada.
MeanwhUe, in 1961, the Dominion Archivist was appointed Chairman of the PubUc
Records Committee with a secretariat from the Records Centre. Schedules and microfilm proposals were reviewed from archival, records management and technical points of
view by staff of the PubUc Archives. Recommendations were made to the Public Records
Committee and by it to the Treasury Board.
The third stage was the development of a comprehensive records management program for the Government of Canada. It was brought about graduaUy as the system itself
grew and demonstrated that its principles were sound. In 1959 a PubUc Records Survey
revealed that records management was "the biggest and most neglected of the five main
administrative services of the Federal Government." The Royal Commission on Government Organization investigated carefuUy records management practices in Canada and
1 2 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-19»
other countries. It recognized the essential unity of records management including the I
care of active and dormant records, the control of destruction and microfUming, and the
selection and transfer to the PubUc Archives of records judged worthy of permanent
retention. It endorsed the work of the Public Archives in aU those areas and concluded \
that:
In this process of selective disposal the responsibflity of the PubUc Archives must be i
paramount. B is fundamentally an archival and not a managerial responsibitity, and has
to be effectual at all points in the process.
The PubUc Records Order (P.C. 1749-1966) estabUshed the framework of the present!
system of records management for the Federal Government. While recognizing the!
general responsibUity of the Treasury Board for records management, and of departmental
for the proper care of theb records, it assigned to the Dominion Archivist responsibilities!
which include the provision of advisory services, staff training, the establishment of
standards and production of guides, the promotion of the use of records centres, complete i
control over destruction and transfer of public records, and technical responsibiUties in
regard to microfilm, in addition to the traditional archival responsibilities for preservatiom
and research facilities. The annual report of the Dominion Archivist to the Treasury'!
Board is a survey of the current state of the management of records of the federal govern-L
ment An important feature of the Public Records Order is the provision for an Advisor*
Council on PubUc Records under the Chairmanship of the Dominion Archivist. It pro- j
vides a forum for discussion by records managers and representatives of the Treasuryl
Board, Privy Council Office and organizations which are concerned with research. The !
secretariat is provided by the Records Management Branch.
In 1939 a distinguished European archivist envisaged an ideal situation in which
"gradually archivists will become the national experts who must be consulted in all
questions of pubUc recordmaking and recordkeeping and likewise become the trustees who 1
will safeguard the written monuments of the past and of the present day." That situation
exists in Canada today.
HISTORICAL BRANCH—The purpose of the Historical Branch is to acquire!
and preserve a comprehensive coUection of documentary materials of aU kinds as a recordjl
of our heritage, a coUective national memory.  The last decade has been marked by!
growth in every measurable category combined with an increase in the diversity of
functions.  The annual increase in registered researchers, which exceeded 25% during
the period, was matched by corresponding increases in aU reference services: cbculatioal
of material, written inquiries, intertibrary loans of microfilm and photodupbcation of i
archival material. Increases in the volume of accessions during the period were equally
impressive. Annual accessions for the Manuscript Division increased 2500% and equivaJI
lent increases in holdings were recorded by the Picture and Map Divisions.  Only the
Library reported a net decline, since its acquisitions were more than offset by the transfer
of thousands of books, periodicals and newspapers to the National Library.
There has been a remarkable increase in the diversity of functions during the last
decade. For the Manuscript Division the increased concern with pubUc records has
assumed major proportions. Improved procedures for the selection and transfer of
records to the PubUc Archives has multipUed the volume of acqxusitions, whUe a new i
government poUcy concerning access to pubhc records has given urgency to the tasks of
selection, arrangement and mformation retrieval. The introduction of a system of inter-1
Ubrary loans of microfUm has added a new dimension to reference services, while a INTRODUCTION 3
systematic acquisition program for private papers and special projects, such as the Union
List of Manuscripts and the Register of Dissertations in Progress, have added to the
diversity of professional work while providing important new services to scholars.
The Map Division has been transformed by the acquisition of the large collection of
150,000 foreign topographical maps which was taken over from the Geographical Branch
of the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources in 1965. The aim is to have for
official and public use a suitable topographical map of every part of the earth's surface.
The Division is now the custodian of a comprehensive national map coUection and in
collaboration with the new Association of Map Librarians, is engaged in co-operative efforts
to arrange for exchanges, to standardize procedures and to produce union lists of maps.
For the Picture Division there has been a massive influx of photographs, from both
government and private sources. One example is the transfer from the Department of
National Defence of the coUection of photographs of the two World Wars and the
Korean War, estimated at 1,000,000 items. The Picture Division also established units to
develop archival programs in relatively new media: sound recordings, heraldry and
motion-picture film. Developments in the field of audio-visual records are certain to be-
very significant in the future.
The Library provides a specialized reference service in the fields of Canadian
history, archives administration, records management and microfilm technology for
researchers and members of the staff. The great increase in reference requirements
has not permitted adequate attention to cataloguing, but a concerted effort is being
made to overcome the existing backlog.
Closely associated with the Historical Branch is the work of the London and Paris
Offices. Since the major complete series of official records relating to Canada have been
microfilmed, the PubUc Archives' camera was transferred in 1968 from the PubUc
Records Office to the London Office, where it is used constantly for copying private
papers which have been borrowed for the purpose; for example, the records of the
Rhodes Scholarship Trust from Oxford University. In the Paris Office increasing attention
is given to the location of significant archival material relating to Canada which is in
regional or local repositories outside Paris.
ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH—
In the area of Administration the increased volume of activity is directly related to the
expansion of the staff and functions of the two departments which are served by the
Branch, the PubUc Archives and the National Library. It was increased further by the
introduction of such important features as collective bargaining and by the delegation to
departments of responsibilities for staffing, financial management and training. Additional
responsibilities in regard to security, accommodation and maintenance are associated with
the new building and its extensive use by the public.
There have been major changes m technical functions in addition to the greatly
increased demands for microfilm and photographic services. The increased urgency of
providing for the conservation of archival material resulted in the establishment of a
picture conservation unit in 1966 and the installation in 1967 of the most modern equipment for the lamination of documents accompanied by a de-acidification process. New
equipment has also increased the scope and efficiency of photographic services.
Recent developments in microfilm technology and records management have resulted
in the development of micrographie advisory services in addition to the functions of the
Central Microfilm Unit. Its transfer from the Department of PubUc Printing and
Stationery to the PubUc Archives m 1956 was a recognition of the close relationship 4 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19|S|
existing between microfilming and records management. It was felt that there was a need
for advice and guidance to departments regarding the feasibitity of projects, the most
suitable techniques and equipment, as weU as quatity control, and that this could bej
provided best by experts who were associated with a large operational unit which could!
also ensure savings by avoiding dupbcation and providing niterofihning service at costj
OriginaUy used exclusively to save space or provide security copies, microfilm is being
used increasingly in a variety of ways in regard to active records. The Technical Division
has undertaken an active program of promotion and instruction which has resulted in
greatly increased activity in areas where microfilm appUcations can achieve more efficj
iency. It also provides a degree of objectivity which cannot be expected from commercial
companies. Its staff keeps abreast of technological advances in Canada and other coun-|
tries and maintains contacts with international associations and manufacturers. It has
been active on behalf of government departments in promoting the use of such recent
developments as microfiche and computer output microfilm (COM). Departmental pro-)
posais for microfilm projects or equipment were reviewed for the PubUc Records Com-i
mittee until 1966, when this assessment function was transferred to the Dominion!
Archivist as part of a system which provides for the cc-ordination of technical, historical!
and records management requbements concerning pubUc records.
A Publicity and Displays Service was established in 1968 to develop and administer
an exhibitions program. For the PubUc Archives the chief emphasis is on the public!
display of significant items in its collections which otherwise would be limited to a
relatively few researchers. Display and publicity functions are a joint service for the
PubUc Archives and National Library. Other responsibilities for the service are the
maintenance of the national medal coUection and of Laurier House. The conditions of
Mr. King's whT reqube the preservation of a large portion of Laurier House substantiaUy
as it was during his lifetime. However, a Laurier Room was opened in 1958 and, with
recent accessions of furniture and other items belonging to Sb Wilfrid and Lady Laurier,
the budding adequately represents the two former Prime Ministers who resided there.
PUBLICATIONS—The reorganization of the PubUcations Service m 1963 marked
the resumption of a more active and varied publications program after a period during
which attention had been confined to the publication of inventories. PubUcations since
1967 have included the first volume of the Papers of the Prime Ministers series, The
Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald 1836-1857, Nouveaux Documents sur Champlain et
son Spoque and the Canadian Directory of Parliament, 1867-1967 (biographical sketches}
of more than 3,000 Senators and Members of Parliament), which was completed as a
Centennial project, whUe the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories was
the product of an important co-operative effort. Useful guides have been prepared to
assist the many Canadians who are interested in tracing theb ancestors and several guides
and manuals related to records management have been issued.
THE NEW BUILDING—An important event for both the PubUc Archives and
the National Library was the move to the new budding at 395 Wellington Street in 1967.
The task of moving in midwinter, at the rate of 17 vanloads a day for nearly three
months, was impressive, and the integration for the fbst time of documents and books
from several different locations in Ottawa requbed a great deal of planning, but it was
accompUshed smoothly and services to the pubUc were continued throughout the movl
The building was opened officiaUy on June 20, 1967, by the Prime Minister, the Right
Honourable Lester B. Pearson. INTRODUCTION 5
The floor area of the budding is approximately 13 acres on 7 stories and 15 stack
levels, one of them housing mechanical equipment. The dimensions are 200 by 300 feet
and the total cost was $13,000,000. The architects' plan is based on the provision of
direct access to the stacks from all reading and work areas which surround a central core
of stack areas containing more than 80 miles of steel shelving with room for expansion to
100 miles. The building includes unusual artistic features, notably the four large murals
(35 feet by 9 feet) by Charles Comfort and Alfred PeUan which are on the second floor,
and the glass etchings on the first three floors by John Hutton of England.
The building provides a vast improvement in faculties. The ab conditioning with
temperature and humidity control is important for the preservation of documentary
materials, photographs, paintings, microfilm, tapes, and motion picture film. The greatly
increased stack space permits all archival material to be concentrated under one roof,
while book lifts and an intercom system connecting stacks with service desks facilitate the
circulation of records. The larger research areas provide badly needed additional space
for the increasing number of researchers who must come to the Public Archives for serious
research in Canadian history since unique records cannot leave the building. There is
accommodation for 117 researchers in the search rooms, microfUm room and individual
study rooms. The new, speciaUy designed areas for restoration, reprography and microfilming permit a notable improvement in the technical functions of the Department. The
exhibition areas permit a variety of simultaneous displays. The 400-seat auditorium with
equipment for the projection of films and for simultaneous translation is m constant use
by the PubUc Archives, the National Library, other departments and non-profit organizations, as are the two meeting rooms and the boardroom.
STAFF—It is appropriate to acknowledge briefly the contributions of several members
of the staff who left the PubUc Archives during the last decade. Miss Norah Story, who
retired in 1960, earned the gratitude of innumerable researchers for her guidance and
unique knowledge of sources whUe directing the Manuscript Division for many years.
Mr. William Ormsby, who succeeded her as Chief of the Manuscript Division, left La
1964 to accept a position as professor of history at Brock University. His contributions
to archival development included the introduction of the record and manuscript group
system and the standardization of procedures. Mr. Abraham Willms, the first Chief of
the Public Archives Records Centre, was an important promoter of records management
in Canada. He left in 1963 to accept a position at Carleton University. Mr. Pierre Brunet
retired as Assistant Dominion Archivist in 1965 after 33 years service in the Department.
Mr. Louis Forest, Head of the Bindery, retired in 1968. The products of his superb craftsmanship were presented by the government on many ceremonial occasions.
The most significant retirement was that of Dr. W. Kaye Lamb in November, 1968,
after a distinguished career of almost exactly twenty years as Dominion Archivist. During
most of this period he was also the first National Librarian. The glowing tributes which
were published at that time in many professional journals need not be repeated here, but
it should be pointed out that the developments and achievements which are recorded hi
this report are the product of the last half of his term of office. It was under his leadership and dbection that the PubUc Archives became an efficient modern archives, that the
volume and scope of accessions multipUed, a large microfUming program was developed
in the London and Paris Offices, the present system of records management was developed and archival science was developed as a distinct profession in Canada. Dr.
Lamb's abiUty and contributions as archivist, Ubrarian and scholar were widely recognized as is indicated by bis presidency of aU the national professional associations of 6 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19&Ï
which he was a member and no fewer than eleven honorary degrees in addition to special)
awards. His influence was not confined to Canada. In one year he was President of the j
Society of American Archivists, the British Society of Archivists, Vice-President of the]
International Council on Archives and of the British Records Association, as weU as i
President of the Royal Society of Canada. Upon the retirement of Dr. Lamb, the Assistant Dominion Archivist, Dr. Wilfred I. Smith, became Acting Dominion Archivist.»
PLANS AND PROSPECTS—Contrary to popular belief, the field of archives i
and records management is dynamic, challenging and changing daUy because of improvements in methodology and technology and shifts in emphasis. Plans for the immediate future are based largely on recent initiatives, several of which should be
mentioned.
A poUcy of the Government which was designed to liberalize access to pubticA
records was announced by the Prime Minister on May 1, 1969. The general principles
were explained but detailed policies and procedures for transfer and access were to be
developed in consultation with the Dominion Archivist. A preliminary draft was prepared within 48 hours, approved in principle at a special meeting of the Advisory CouncU
on PubUc Records and revised by a sub-committee of the CouncU. Any practical arrangements concerning the transfer of and access to pubUc records wiU require close cooperation between the PubUc Archives and the originating departments. The position of
the PubUc Archives is that of an impartial arbitrator, familiar with research requbements
and committed to the promotion of the most liberal access which is consultent with the
national interests and the protection of the rights of individual privacy. Familiarization
courses are being conducted for records managers of all departments.
Preliminary study has commenced on legislation concerning pubUc records and
archives with a view to combining the desbable features of the existing PubUc Archives
Act and Orders-in-Council with new features which would improve effectiveness in this
field. Such legislation was recommended by the Glassco Commission.
The completion of the program for a network of regional records centres has been
delayed. It is hoped, however, that in the next five years centres will be established in
Vancouver, Winnipeg and Halifax. A standard plan for regional centres is being designed
in co-operation with the Department of PubUc Works, and recent surveys have established
the extent of regional requbements for the centres.
Plans in the field of technical development involve increased attention to document
restoration and the provision of advice and training for other archival repositories.
Studies are being undertaken in co-operation with the Canadian Historical Association
and the Canadian Government Standards Committee with a view to determining the
feasibility of using "permanent" paper for archival documents. The Technical Division
will continue to be involved in the extended use of microfiche, COM and other developments in regard to microfibn. Efforts must be made to ensure that records in machina
readable form are brought within the scope of archival review.
The use of electronic data processes (EDP) to produce indexes to the papers of
Prime Ministers was studied in 1965 and a program was developed in co-operation with
the Department of National Revenue's Data Centre. In 1969 the first complete index
was produced. A study is now being undertaken to examine the feasibility of the use of
automation on a broader scale to improve information retrieval, particularly for public
records.
Emphasis has been placed recently on the acquisition of private records by appeaUng
to living persons in an attempt to prevent the destruction of papers which has left so many INTRODUCTION 7
gaps in our history, and on the acquisition of records covering the entbe scope of Canadian life — economic, social, scientific, religious and cultural. The response has been
very encouraging. A new element in acquisition which whl be developed in the future is
co-operative arrangements with interested persons. An example is the national architectural coUection which was established in co-operation with the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Other fields in which co-operative arrangements are being explored are
labour, science, art, medicine and sports.
The establishment of a national film coUection is one of the most important of recent
developments. ResponsibiUty for such a coUection was assumed at the end of 1968 with
the co-operation of the National Film Board. In the last year more than 6,000,000 feet
of film were acquired and arrangements made for the examination of an additional
23,500,000 feet of film relating to Canada. A study is being undertaken with a view to
developing a comprehensive poUcy and program in regard to the preservation and use of
film to be integrated with a national film policy. The study is being financed jointly by
die PubUc Archives, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the National Film Board.
An archives of recorded sound has made considerable progress in the last year with
one staff member assigned to it It was involved in efforts to co-ordinate oral history
throughout Canada and an arrangement with the Clerk of the House of Commons resulted
in the deposit of taped debates for selection. Much remains to be done bt the field of oral
history and close co-operation with universities, radio networks and individual interviewers wiH be essential.
The national map coUection is now firmly established with its new component of
foreign maps and co-operative projects with other map libraries. An attempt wiU be made
with the assistance of the Departments of External Affairs, Energy, Mines and Resources
and National Defence, to negotiate effective exchange agreements with as many countries
as possible.
It is a primary responsibuity of an archival repository to let the public know what
materials it has in its custody. In the last twenty years the major effort of the PubUc
Archives in this respect has been the publication of a series of inventories of Record
and Manuscript Groups, many of which are now out of date. It would be desbable to
publish in a single volume a guide to aU the holdings of the PubUc Archives. This is not
possible but an attempt wiH be made in the next three years to produce a comprehensive
guide to documentary holdings in three or four volumes. Similar guides will be prepared
for maps, photographs, medals and other holdings.
The exhibition program has been greatly expanded and methods of extending the
scope of exhibitions are being developed. The PubUc Archives has participated in a
number of exhibitions in Canada and the United States by lending items in co-operation
with the National Gallery. Arrangements are being made for sending a complete exhibition to Winnipeg as part of Manitoba's centennial celebrations, and the feasibiUty of
preparing portable exhibits and arranging an exhibition circuit in Canada is being studied.
The much wider public use of the holdings of the PubUc Archives should be promoted. A program designed to project the PubUc Archives, its functions and treasures, is
being developed in co-operation with the National FUm Board. The product wUl be sets
of slides for loan or showing in "VistaseUs". Also it is proposed to provide for the distribution of copies of significant documents, paintings, photographs and maps. Although
the chief function of the PubUc Archives is to provide a central resource coUection of
historical materials, its much broader use, through exhibitions, television, film and other
media, should be promoted. Visual records such as still photographs and film are particularly useful for this purpose. 8 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969 I
Several co-operative projects with other departments and archival repositories have J
been mentioned and this trend can be expected to continue. An important event in
March 1970 will be the first meeting of provincial archivists at the PubUc Archives. It is
expected that future meetings wUl be held annuaUy to discuss mutual problems and cooperative measures. It is hoped that arrangements can be made to rationalize acquisitions i
to avoid competition, particularly between government archives and university Ubrariesil
The PubUc Archives is involved in various types of training, co-operating with Carleton
University in giving courses in archives administration, and giving courses for the Govern-1
ment of Canada in records management and microfilm technology, to which persons from
Canadian provinces or sometimes other countries attend. The international role of the I
PubUc Archives of Canada is becoming more important. Recent examples of the nature ji
of this role are the Archives seminar for representatives of fifteen Latin American countries which was held in November, 1968 and membership m the Pan-American Institute
on Geography and History, the provision of training in archives and records management ji
for representatives from many different countries in recent years and negotiations fori
cultural exchanges with France. The Canadian records management archives system is
becoming recognized as a desbable model for developing countries and contacts with i
them are expected to increase.
In 1972 the PubUc Archives wtil celebrate its 100th bbthday.   A committee is
actively planning a suitable recognition of the Archives' centenary.
The projects and on-going programs which I have enumerated indicate a major]
development of the PubUc Archives in the past few years which should continue in the
years to come. The pages which foUow wUl give a more detaUed and precise account of J
the activities of the Archives during the years 1959-1969.
Before concluding, I would like to extend my thanks to the staff for their active
interest and sustained work in furthering the aims of the Archives. My thanks also go to
the many individuals and institutions, government departments and officials, who have j
assisted the Archives in many different ways. To the hundreds of donors of archival 1
material, only a few of whom could be mentioned in this report, I wish to express my
gratitude and the gratitude of aU those Canadians in the present or future generations
whose knowledge of our history wUl be enriched by theb co-operation m the important
work to which the PubUc Archives is dedicated.
Wilfred I. Smith
31 December 1969 Acting Dominion Archivist RECORDS
MANAGEMENT
BRANCH
The Records Management Branch,
as such, came into being on September
15, 1966. The Branch evolved from
the first PubUc Archives Records
Centre, which was established in
Ottawa in 1956 as a division of the
PubUc Archives of Canada with Mr.
A.M. Wilbns as Chief. In 1959 the
Records Centre consisted of two sections: the Accessions and Disposal Section (Head,
Mr. W.W. BUsland) and the Reference Section (Head, Mr. D.T.W. Shadd). In the foUow-
ing year, 1960, because of a requbement that the Records Centre assist departments and
agencies with scheduling theb records, the Centre was reorganized to form three sections:
an Accessions Section (Mr. T.L. Croteau), a Reference Section (Mr. Shadd) and the new
Disposal and Scheduling Section (Mr. BUsland). In August, 1963, Mr. Wtilms left the
Records Centre to join the staff of the QvU Service Commission. Mr. Shadd succeeded
him as the Chief of the Centre, and Mr. J.H. Logan became Head of the Reference-
Section.
This structure continued until 1964 when, because of the need for a greater flexibihty
of staff and the continuity of interest between material accessioned and serviced, the
Accession Section and the Reference Section were combined under one Head, Mr. Logan.
At that time the new office of Staff Archivist was created to meet the requbements for
planning and statistical and technical details involving the Records Centre, the Tax Data
Centre basement, the Records Centre Annex and the preparation for regional records
centres. Mr. Croteau was appointed to that position.
On September 15, 1965, foUowmg recommendations of the Royal Commission on
Government Organization (Glassco Report, Vol. 1, pp. 568-571) that records centres
should be established in the major areas of Canada to service the federal agencies there,
the first of a series of regional records centres was opened in Toronto.
1966 was a key year in the development of pubUc records improvement throughout
Canada. The promulgation of the PubUc Records Order (P.C. 1966-1749) on September
9, to take effect on October 1, introduced and authorized a whole new program. Among
other provisions, the Order assigned to the Dominion Archivist complete authority over
the scheduling, destruction and transfer of pubUc records; as weU as responsibilities for
reviewing and assessing the adequacy of records management practices throughout the
Federal Government, assessing proposals for microfilming and establishing standards and
guides in the field of records management. It was to be expected that the bulk of these
responsibilities, and the extended program following from them, would be delegated to
the cadre of records management specialists already based at the Ottawa Records Centre.
It was to carry out fuUy the requbements of the impending PubUc Records Order and
to provide for the growth of the records centres complex—since a second regional records
centre was scheduled to open in Montreal in November — that the Records Management
Branch was formed in September, 1966, with David Shadd as Dbector. Under the new
organization the two growing former sections acquired new or expanded functions and
became divisions, and a third division was created. The three divisions, each with distinct
but mutuaHy-supporting functions, are: Accessions and Reference (Chief: Mr. J.H.
Logan), Advisory Services (Chief and Assistant Branch Dbector: Mr. W.W. BUsland)
and Regional Records Centres (Chief: Mr. T.L. Croteau). Within the last-mentioned
division, each regional records centre constitutes a section.
Although several changes in structure and organization occurred during the eleven
years between 1959 and 1969, it is considered more satisfactory to describe the work of
the Branch in terms of the 1969 divisional organization. 10 report for the years 1959-19«jl
Arr,17««iTil\rc ACCESSIONS SECTION—One of the most
ANJtT important   tasks   of   the   PubUc   ArcbiveJ
AINU Records Centre when it was established was
REFERENCE DIVISION that of promotion: to demonstrate to goven*j
ment departments and agencies the advantages
of efficiency and economy which could be realized by transferring dormant records to
the Records Centre. OriginaUy stringency of space was an important factor in the decision
to transfer. In many cases leases were terminated and rented storage areas throughout the
Ottawa area were released. By 1959, records of 32 departments and agencies were being
stored and serviced, 148,130 cubic feet of records had been accessioned and 18,103 cubic
feet had been destroyed.
A great deal of the original accessions were in fact dead records and as late as 196S
only 15 to 20% of the records in the Centre were scheduled. This prevented the desirable J
flow of records which can only be achieved when precise periods of records* usefulness
are identified and useless records are promptly destroyed. The result was an increasing
state of "paper indigestion", which was aUeviated when scheduling became normal and
planned disposal could take place. In 1964 two significant events occurred which had an
important impact on subsequent operations.
The issue of PARC cbcular No. 15 which announced that we would no longer accept,
unscheduled records has proven to be of immense value in checking the trend towards
"indigestion". It has also provided an important incentive to departments to adopt a
realistic approach to the evaluation of records. Many records which had been designated
for "indefinite" retention were scheduled with definite and often fairly short retention
periods.
Similarly the issue of the General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of
Canada has had an important effect on accession and disposal activities. It has prevented
routine records which have short retention periods (i.e., less than two years) from being
processed and sent to the Records Centre. It has also eliminated many of the submissions:
to the PubUc Records Committee which had been prepared for departments by the staff
of the Records Centre and has assisted in the regular review of records at the Centre by
permitting the identification of records which are eligible for destruction. The General,
Schedules provided an authority for the destruction of a great mass of routine records..,
For many departments they were an introduction to scheduling, providing ready-made
schedules during a period when the development of comprehensive schedules was proceeding slowly.
In 1963 we began to accession the first records from agencies based outside Ottawa
(e.g. the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority at CornwaU). The number of departments and
agencies serviced had reached 44. The continued high volume of accessions combine»
with the occupancy of a large portion of the Ottawa Centre by the National Library had
created a space problem. 34,000 square feet of much needed space were gamed in the
basement of the National Revenue Tax Data Centre opposite the Records Centre and con
nected to it by a tunnel. Although only half the space was shelved in 1963 it was useful
for the storage of heavy, outsized records which did not fit or put an abnormal strain upon
standard shelving elsewhere. In the same year for the storage of essential records we
acquired 6,300 square feet of floor space at an out-of-town security site.
In 1964 a major relocation of records took place. Both Accessions and Referencl
staff were engaged, with the assistance of staff from the Department of PubUc Works, in
relocating approximately 75,000 feet of records in a series of moves in the three tunnel-
connected buildings in which we store records at Tunne/s Pasture: the Records Centre RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH 11
proper, the Income Tax Data Centre and the Records Centre Annex. As a result of these
carefully planned moves various accessions were brought together by department and
the new Records Centre Annex became primarily an Armed Forces Records Centre, containing most of the records relating to the armed forces. In 1965 an additional 12,000
feet of military records were transferred from the Records Centre to the Annex. In 1966,
incidentally, we made our first formal accession of magnetic tape, comprising the trackings of Alouette I from its launching to 1965.
In addition to official government records, the Ottawa Centre has, since 1958, provided security storage for the papers of Prime Ministers, Cabinet Ministers and other
party leaders.
A high volume of accessions can be expected to continue until the large backlog of dormant records (identified by a survey) which are still held on departmental
premises has been absorbed. The long term projection envisages a state of equilibrium
where the volume of disposals will approximate the volume of accessions. It appears,
however, that this stage will be delayed for some time yet.
REFERENCE SECTION—One of the chief advantages of the transfer of dormant records
to a records centre is that in addition to the economies achieved in storage facilities, an
efficient and economical reference service is provided. It is estimated that one clerk in a
records centre can provide reference services on approximately 10,000 cubic feet of
records, while the average volume for clerks in the originating departments is only 2,000
cubic feet From the beginning a high priority has been given to a quick and efficient
reference service. Reference requests have averaged nearly 500 each day. Often a file
can be delivered from the Centre to the desk of the person who requires it more quickly
man it could be obtained from a departmental storage room. The Ottawa Centre provides
a three-hour delivery service from the time a file is requested until the fUe is delivered
to the requesting department
An important aspect of reference service is that related to personnel fUes, both
civilian and military. In 1957 the Federal Government after a series of discussions
between representatives of the Treasury Board, the Civil Service Commission, personnel
administrators of various departments, the PubUc Records Committee and the Public
Archives, instituted what .is now called the Civilian Personnel File Scheme. Under this
program the files of pubUc servants who leave the PubUc Service are transferred to the
Public Archives Records Centre for storage and servicing until the individuals concerned
either re-enter the PubUc Service or reach their seventieth birthday. Between 1959 and
1969 the PubUc Archives has accessioned, indexed and provided reference service on
some 43,070 cubic feet of files, and has disposed of some 3,367 cubic feet of obsolete
files, either through outright destruction or through transfer of historically valuable
files to the Historical Branch of the PubUc Archives.
Another large segment of the reference activity of the Records Management
Branch is that involving the Military Personnel File Scheme. Although the Public
Archives Records Centre, prior to 1961, was storing and servicing some records of
former military personnel, it was in that year that the major origins of our Military
Personnel FUe Scheme (Milpers) really appeared, with the transfer of some 13,000 cubic
feet of World War I servicemen's records from the War Service Records Division of
the Department of Veterans' Affairs to the PubUc Archives Records Centre. Staff had
to be trained in letter-writing and special research techniques, and new forms and form
letters had to be devised to service these records. In 1963 preliminary work was begun
on the integration of files of former servicemen which were coming from two sources,
the Department of National Defence which maintained the records numerically by 12 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-19691
service number, and the Department of Veterans' Affabs which maintained the records j
alphabeticaUy by name. In 1964 the new Records Centre Annex building became primarily our Armed Forces Records Centre. In the same year aU records of Armed |
Forces Personnel released in 1961 were completely integrated, documented and indexedJ
In 1965 an additional 12,000 cubic feet of mUitary records were transferred to the Annex i
budding from the main Records Centre. By the aid of 1965 the personnel file and!
documents of aU post-World War Two Regular Army and Navy personnel releases had!
been integrated, as weU as approximately one-thbd of the corresponding Royal Canadian!
Ab Force material for the same period. By the end of 1965 the Annex budding con- j
tamed approximately 62,000 cubic feet of service records, totaUing about 11V^ nuiegl
of shelving. In 1966, 1967 and 1968 staff shortages seriously curtailed the MUpers
Scheme. A large backlog, some 5,200 cubic feet of service personnel files, had developed i
by 1967, particularly those of former members of the Royal Canadian Ab Force andi
the Royal Canadian Navy released from 1946 to 1960. In addition, a backlog of MUitial
personnel records dating from 1904 was beginning to come from the Department of I
National Defence which was closing out many of its Reserve Force and Militia establishments. These backlogs posed then, and still pose now, a great hardship from a servicjl
ing viewpoint since several sources, not merely one, must be checked to ensure that all
essential documentation on one individual is avaUable to users.
Because of the high priority that is given for reference services, other operations
are reduced if necessary hi order to maintain reference standards. The same staff is i
concerned with acquisition, interfiling, reference and disposal. If the number remains]
constant while the volume of accessions and reference increases, fewer staff will bel
avaUable for interfiling and disposal. This, however, must be a temporary expedient!
since proper interfiling is essential in the long run to an efficient reference service. This]
has been demonstrated in the last few years.
In 1966 and 1967 it was necessary to transfer five positions from the Accessions
and Reference Division to the Advisory Services Division in order to comply with the 1
requbements of the Public Records Order. It was intended to be a temporary measure I
but the freeze on staff in the pubUc service of February, 1967, prevented replacement j
at a time when both accessions and reference requests were increasing rapidly. The
result was the documentation of personnel files had to be reduced. Interfiles dropped j
drasticaUy from 70,603 in 1966 to 43,545 in 1967. The 1965 Persfiles received during 1
the year could not be processed and a backlog of 2,100 feet had built up by the year's end.
The effect of large unprocessed masses of records was felt in several ways. Inevitably it affected the efficiency of the service on the records since the lack of integration ]
and indexing made it necessary to search in several places. Also, since the same staff J
is required for disposal, much of the material indicated and segregated for physical}
disposal remained on the shelves due to the lack of staff to handle it wtule the advaiil
tages of destruction of useless records, including the revenue for waste paper, had to be ]
foregone.
It is hoped that additional staff can be obtained to restore a balanced level of
operations, based on the formula of one clerk for each 10,000 cubic feet of records, and I
that the backlog of interfiling and disposal can be removed in order to assure the fufll
benefits of an operation which has demonstrated its abitity to contribute to the economic
and efficient conduct of records management by the federal government.
By December 31, 1969, the Ottawa Records Centre had a total holding of some
338,883 cubic feet of records. The table gives the statistical story of the Ottawa Records
Centre's achievement between 1959 and 1969 in the two areas of accessions and reference. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
1
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| |  | | § | |  |  5  | |  | 14 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-196M
REGIONAL The ReP°rt of the R*^81 Commission on Gov-1
DITADDC ernment Organization (Glassco Report, vol. 1, p.
KrAOUKLia 494^ SUggested the establishment in major Cana-
CENTRES DIVISION dian centres of a series of federal records centre!
under the jurisdiction of the Dominion ArchiviM
To implement this recommendation regional records centres were estabUshed in Toronto!
(1965) and Montreal (1966). A separate Division, the Regional Records Centres Divisions
was created in 1966 to administer these centres. In 1967 an additional records survejl
was conducted in the Vancouver area, and once again the practicaUty of the establishment of a records centre was proven. As yet however, financial considerations have!
prevented the estabUshment of a Vancouver Centre. Further centres are planned for
the Winnipeg area to service the Prairie Region and for Halifax, to service the Atlantic
Provinces.
The regional records centres have proven theb value to the federal government in
staff, space and equipment savings. In addition they help to pinpoint valuable records,
and segregate useless records for destruction. Finally, they assist departments with theba
records management problems in the regions.
TORONTO REGIONAL RECORDS CENTRE — In November, 1963, an exploratorj
survey in the Toronto metropolitan area confirmed the Glassco Commission's recom-l
mendations; a records centre was both needed and economically feasible in Toronto.
In 1964 plans were developed for the proposed Toronto Centre (site, floor space,
shelving, staff), and on 15 September, 1965, the Toronto Regional Records Centre was
informally opened in the Federal Building (the former Canadian Arsenals Building),
651 Warden Avenue, Scarborough.
The Toronto Records Centre was estabUshed to serve all federal offices in the
metropolitan Toronto area and southern Ontario, in the region south or south-west of
an imaginary line drawn from BeUeviUe to Gravenhurst, including both those centres.!
The area in Ontario north of that imaginary line is serviced by the Ottawa Records |
Centre. Toronto, therefore, services such areas as London, Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo and St. Catharines.
Although the Toronto Records Centre's organization, procedures, equipment and
physical plant were based on the original Ottawa Records Centre, nevertheless some j
modifications had to be made to suit the needs of departmental regional offices. Such
modifications made the Toronto Centre a pUot project for future regional centres. As
any pilot project, the Toronto Centre had growing pains. However, it has provided
valuable lessons for the estabUshment and development of other regional records centres!
revealing procedural and operational problems requiring adjustments and changes frarn|
the original plans.
In 1967, the fbst site of the Records Centre was sold to the Ontario GovernmenjB
The Toronto Centre was relocated, at 220 LesmUl Road, Don MiUs. The new building
was constructed to meet records centre specifications, with some 33,000 additional
square feet of floor space. During the year the task of relocating the existing holdings,
shelving, staff and equipment took place. There was understandably some disruption but
by the end of the year total holdings and reference requests had risen considerably.   1
In 1968 and 1969 the Toronto Centre made steady progress and by the end of 1969
was storing and servicing the records of fourteen departments, with a total holding off
almost 85,000 cubic feet. One interesting feature of the Toronto Centre's activities is RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
15
the disposal of waste paper. From the time of the opening of the Centre in September
1965 to the end of 1969, some 248 tons of waste paper were sold by Crown Assets
Disposal Corporation, at a total price of some $7,700.00 recovered for the Government
of Canada.
MONTREAL REGIONAL RECORDS CENTRE—In 1965 a survey was conducted
in the Montreal metropolitan area to determine the feasibility of a records centre to
serve all federal offices in the Province of Quebec. The survey confirmed the advantages
I of establishing a centre, and plans accordingly were developed. In November 1966 the
Montreal Records Centre opened at 665 Montée de Liesse, ViHe Saint-Laurent The
staff, of course, is completely bilingual. Progress at first was painful. Equipment motor
vehicles and shelving were slow to arrive. The balance of the 1966 calendar year was
spent contacting departmental representatives in the area, arranging for accessions, and
publicizing the Centre's services.
In 1967, because of the known volume of dormant records in the Montreal area,
a decision was made to expand the storage capacity of the Centre. The Centre now has
a storage capability of almost 90,000 cubic feet of records. The Montreal Records
Centre was servicing fifteen departments hi 1969. From its opening the Montreal Centre
I was hampered by staff shortages, and it was only in 1969 that the Centre reaUy began
to operate to full capacity, carrying out its assigned functions.
For statistical details of the activities of the Montreal and Toronto Records Centres,
I please refer to the tables on page 16.
ADVISORY
SERVICES
DIVISION
The Advisory Services Division began in 1956 as the Accessions and Disposal Section of the Records Centre Division of the
PubUc Archives of Canada. In 1960 the disposal aspects were
incorporated into a new Disposal and Scheduling Section. In
1966, with the elevation of the Records Centre Division to
Branch status, the Disposal and Scheduling Section became the Advisory Services
Division whose duty it was to carry out new functions assigned to the Branch under
the Public Records Order.
On December 31, 1969, the authorized estabUshment of the Division was eleven
people.
The major activities of the Division are Usted below topically, not necessarily in
order of importance.
Records Scheduling and Microfilm Submissions — In 1959 Mr. A.M. Willms, Chief of
the Records Centre Division, devoted much time as Chairman of the Records Management Survey Committee, set up with the approval of the Secretary of State to "ascertain
from departments and agencies of government certain data that seem essential for the
long-term planning of a records management program and to make recommendations
thereon to the Public Records Committee. . . ." The Survey Committee's Report, made
in February 1960, served as a valuable guide and statistical base for the paper-management aspect of the later Glassco Commission Report One of its recommendations in
1960 led to the issue of a new Order-in-Council in 1961 which assigned new responsi-
bflities to the Dominion Archivist. This Order-in-CouncU (1961-212, 16 February 1961),
assigned to the PubUc Archives the responsibiUty for providing the Secretariat of the
Public Records Committee. The Secretariat was responsible for the preliminary examination of, and recommendations concerning, all departmental records scheduling and 16
REPORT FOR THE
YEARS  1959-
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disposal proposals, and for presenting these findings and recommendations to the PubUc
Records Committee for scrutiny and approval. Then the PubUc Records Committee would
present its final decisions to Treasury Board for approval and issue as an actual authority
for destruction. In 1966, by the Public Records Order, the Dominion Archivist became
the final arbiter of any departmental submission to dispose of pubUc records. There is
now an Advisory Council on PubUc Records to which the Dominion Archivist may refer
any records management problems, but the PubUc Archives alone now examines and
approves, amends or rejects all records scheduling and disposal proposals.
The Dbector of the Records Management Branch is the Secretary of the Advisory
CouncU on PubUc Records, and the Advisory Services Division provides the Secretariat
staff.
The following table indicates the number of submissions concerning records schedules, records destruction proposals and microfilm submissions from 1961 to 1969
inclusive.
No. of submissions
of records schedules No. of Total number
Calendar                 or destruction Microfilm                        of
Year                        proposals Submissions* Submissions
1961
31
10
41
1962
36
12
48
1963
39
11
50
1964
42
11
53
1965
28
9
37
1966
45
9
54
1967
47
3
50
1968
77
12
89
1969
164
17
181
Totals
509
94
603
♦(Includes also proposals for microfilm equipment, from 1961 to 1966 inclusive.)
There has been a noticeable increase hi the number of scheduling submissions since
the Public Records Order became effective in October 1966.
The PubUc Records Order directed that departments and agencies under Schedules A
and B of the Financial Administration Act should have all theb records scheduled by
May 1, 1969.
The following table indicates to what extent the departments had complied with this
requbement by May 1, 1969.
No. of
Status                                    Departments
Holdings in
cubic feet
Percentage of
total holdings of
2,514,000 cu. ft.
1. Completely scheduled               22
1,423,000
57%
2. Not scheduled                          38
1,091,000
43%
A. Almost scheduled          (10)
504,000
20%
B. Much work to be done (28)
587,000
23%
Totals                             60
2,514,000
100% 18 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19M
Of the twenty-eight departments shown as having much work to be done in 2B on the
preceding page, some seven departments account for 467,682 of the total 587,000 cubidji
feet of unscheduled records.
Records Disposal, Ottawa Records Centre, 1959-1969—The Advisory Services Division
is responsible for the records scheduling activities for the Records Centres' holdings of
dormant departmental records. The f oUowing table tilustrates the total volume of records
disposed of at the Ottawa Records Centre (both general and personnel files) for the
years indicated:
Year
(calendar)
General
files
Personnel
files
Annual total    1
(cu. ft.)
1959
5,790
0
5,790
1960
2,988
153
3,141
1961
16,016
77
16,093
1962
11,395
397
11,792
1963
18,927
176
19,103
1964
20,797
622
21,419
1965
25,266
345
25,611
1966
36,930
533
37,463
1967
47,293
443
47,736
1968
39,380
519
39,899
1969
33,314
102
33,416
Totals
258,096
3,367
261,463
Federal Government Records Inventory—After the PubUc Records Order became effective on October 1, 1966, the Public Archives distributed questionnaires to departments]
and agencies requesting information concerning the total records holdings, both at
headquarters and field offices, the space occupied by the records, total staff engaged
in records activities, total salary costs, and total equipment in use. This information was
gathered, tabulated and digested. The Dominion Archivist stated in his Annual Report
to Treasury Board for the fiscal year ending 31 March 1968 that some 57 departments]
and agencies in the Ottawa area, and 41 departments and agencies, in field offices had!
total  records holdings of approximately  2.514,000 cubic feet,  occupying  2,000,000
square feet of floor space, in $12,610,000 worth of filing equipment. This was serviced \
by some 5,800 people with a total annual salary bill of approximately $26,000,000.    1
This information has proved of great value, and wiH continue to be of value, in
telling the PubUc Archives the volumes of records holdings, theb locations in the various
regions, the logical sites for future regional records centres, and the areas of records
suitable for the preparation of future general records disposal schedules. RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
19
PubUcations and Directives on Records Management—The Public Archives has produced alone, or with some assistance from other departments, numerous publications
and directives on various aspects of records management. A list of the more important
ones f ol I o w :
I. DIRECTIVES
A. Treasury Board, Management Improvement PoUcy Circular entitled Personnel
Records —Transfer, Storage and Destruction (MI-3-68, 8 May 1968, TB.
679645, 2 May 1968), and all previous instructions dating back to 1957 on the
same subject
B. Treasury Board, Management Improvement Cbcular entitled Records Management—Definition of Responsibilities (MI-5-65, 30 March 1965, TB. 636933),
which was superseded by the PubUc Records Order.
C. Privy Council, Public Records Order (P.C. 1966-1749, 9 September 1966.)
D. Treasury Board, Management Improvement Policy Cbcular entitled A Partial
Moratorium on Purchases of Conventional Filing Cabinets (MI-7-67, 15 December 1967, TB. 675296, 14 December 1967.)
E. Treasury Board, Management Improvement Information Bulletin entitled Guidelines on Records Management (1968-2, 8 April 1968).
H. PUBUCATIONS
A. Emergency  Measures  Organization,   Guide to  the  Preservation of Essential
Records for Provincial Governments and Likely Target Areas, 1962.
B. Public Archives, General Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of
Canada, 1st edition, 1963 and 2nd edition, 1968.
C. Emergency Supply Planning Branch, Essential Records for Industry, 1964.
D. Public Archives of Canada, Government of Canada Disposal Arrangements for
Business Records, 1968.
E. Treasury Board, Paperwork Management Series (prepared by staff of the PubUc
Archives and printed by Treasury Board), including:
1. Subject Classification Guide for Housekeeping Records, 1968.
2. Mail Management in Government Departments and Agencies, 1968.
3. Records Scheduling and Disposal, 1968.
4. Records Organization and Operations, 1969.
Training—In co-operation with the CivU Service Commission the PubUc Archives began
a full-scale Records Management Course in 1961, and offered one course each calendar
year from 1961 to 1967. In 1968 the PubUc Service Commission delegated the administrative responsibility for the course to the PubUc Archives. In 1968 there were three
courses and in 1969 there were two more, Courses 11 and 12. In the twelve courses the
enrollment totalled 360 students, from both headquarters and field establishments,
ranging in classification from Clerical and Regulatory Grade 4 to Administrative Services Officer Grade 5. In addition, staff from foreign, provincial and municipal government organizations have attended the Records Management Courses.
As weU as the regular four-week Records Management Courses, the Branch has
contributed resource people to External Aid Training programs, archival courses
sponsored jointly by the PubUc Archives and Carleton University, PubUc Service Com- 20 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-19»
mission courses, Emergency Measures Organization training sessions, and numerous!
"in-house" sessions on records management conducted by various departments, agencies
and other organizations such as provincial governments.
War on Paper—As a result of a series of meetings in late 1966 and early 1967 the
PubUc Archives and the Management Improvement PoUcy Division of the Treasury!
Board embarked on a jouit program to attack the paperwork morass of the Govern-I
ment as a whole. The result described in detaU in appropriate sections elsewhere, was a
concerted attack on the problem by personnel of both organizations.   A series ofl
important directives and pubUcations on various aspects of records management was
issued. Work was begun on a standard fUe jacket ultimately resulting in the Defence!
Production Department producing and stocking the item as a standard for all departments to use for both open-shelf and cabinet filing. In addition, both the concept of
shelf-filing and the advocacy of the use of such open-shelf filing were promoted. The!
so-caUed "War on Paper" or "Records Improvement Program" suffered a sharp blow!
when the Treasury Board reorganized in 1969, resulting in the apparent abolition ofl
the Management Improvement PoUcy Division's participation in the "War on Paper"S
Records Management Personnel—In June 1967 the Public Service Commission established a Records Management Personnel Inventory Board, on which the Public Archives!
had continuous membership, to assess records managers primarily at the Administrative
Services Officer levels, and to ensure that proper appointments of capable people j
were made to records manager vacancies as they occurred.   For approximately two
years this Inventory worked weU before it was absorbed into the general Manpower!
Inventory of the Commission, now known as "Data Stream". In addition, PubUc!
Archives personnel are sitting regularly on Boards, at the request of the Public Service!
Commission or departments, to select the best personnel for new records positions oil
for vacancies as they are created.
Essential Records—In 1959 the Public Archives of Canada was entrusted with the
task of storing and servicing outside of Ottawa departmental records essential to the
continuity of government in the event of a nuclear or natural disaster. The fbst storage
site was chosen and put into use in 1959. In 1962 the Emergency Measures Organization delegated to the Public Archives much more responsibUity for essential records.!
In 1963 the records were relocated in two other sites. By December 1969 the total
volume of such essential records identified, stored and serviced had risen to approxi- ;
mately 9,000 cubic feet.  In 1961 the Public Archives carried out a survey for thel
Emergency Measures Organization and prepared a report which the latter subsequently!
published as the Guide to the Preservation of Essential Records for Provincial Govern-
ments and Likely Target Areas, 1962.
In 1964 the PubUc Archives carried out a similar study for the Emergency Supply
Planning Branch of the Department of Defence Production, resulting in a simUarl
publication, Essential Records for Industry, 1964. The basic aim of both surveys and j
pubUcations was to assist government and industry to identify, select reproduce, stoie
and service essential or vital records so that essential services could be maintained!
if a major disaster, either natural or nuclear, occurred.
Department and Other Projects—Prior to 1966, the Public Archives had been involved
in several special records management projects not normally part of its regular activi- ]
ties. These special projects included, for example: a survey, report and draft publication
for the Emergency Measures Organization on provincial and municipal essential recorésj RECORDS MANAGEMENT BRANCH
21
in 1961-62; a survey of the archival and records scheduling practices of the Department
of External Affairs in 1964; a survey, report and draft publication for the Emergency
Supply Planning Branch on essential records for industry in 1963-64; a survey and
report on the records management and archival practices of the Saskatchewan Government in 1965; and a survey and report on the pubUc records and archives of Manitoba
in 1966.
The Public Records Order of 1966, gave the PubUc Archives broad, additional
responsibilities in the area of pubUc records with a resulting increase in the depth and
frequency of such projects, as is indicated by the following list:
MAJOR ADVISORY SERVICES TO DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES:
Surveys and reports, 23
Preparation of new classification systems, 10
Conversion of existing classification systems to new ones, 3
Revision of existing classification systems, 3
Advising on filing systems, 10
Revised, converted and installed new systems, 6
Mail management assignments, 3
Preparation of new schedules, 27
Application of schedules on records at PARC, 24
Preparation of departmental records manuals, 11
Assistance in records office organization (staff, equipment or space), 11
Other types of assistance in records management, 20
DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SERVICED:
Agriculture, 1966-1968
Air Transport Board, 1967
Atlantic Development Board, 1968
Canada Council, 1968
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 1966
Canadian International Development Agency, 1969
Canadian Radio Television Commission, 1969
Cape Breton Development Corporation, 1969
Chief Electoral Officer, 1967
Communications, 1968-1969
Consumer and Corporate Affabs, 1968
Defence Production and Industry, 1967, 1969
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 1967-1969
Dominion Coal Board, 1968
Energy, Mines and Resources, 1966, 1969
Expo' 67, 1967
Export Credits Insurance Corporation, 1966
External Affabs, 1967-1969
Finance and Treasury Board, 1966, 1968-1969
Immigration Appeal Board, 1969
Indian Affabs and Northern Development, 1966, 1969
Justice, 1969
Manpower and Immigration, 1967-1968
Continued 22 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969 I
DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SERVICED: —Concluded
Municipal Development and Loan Board, 1968
National Defence, 1966-1969
National Health and Welfare, 1969
National'Revenue — Customs and Excise Division, 1966-1969
National Revenue—Taxation Division, 1967-1969
Northern Affairs and National Resources, 1966
Post Office, 1968-1969
Prices and Income Commission, 1969
Public Archives, 1969
Public Works, 1967-1969
Queen's Printer, 1967
Regional Economic Expansion, 1969
Royal Canadian Mounted PoUce, 1969
Royal Commission on Farm Machinery, 1969
Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority, 1969
Science Secretariat of the Privy Council Office, 1969
Secretary of State, 1967
Solicitor General, 1967-1969
Transport, 1966-1969
Treasury Board, see Finance
Unemployment Insurance Commission, 1969
Veterans Affairs, 1967 HISTORICAL
BRANCH
The conventional purpose of a national
archives is to receive records of the national
government considered worthy of permanent
retention and to make them avaUable for
research. From its inception in 1872, however, the PubUc Archives of Canada has had
a much broader mandate. The fbst archivist Douglas Brymner, announced as his
aim the creation of a storehouse of Canadian history. The Public Archives Act of 1912
authorized the Dominion Archivist to acquire historical materials "of every kind,
nature and description." Thus the Public Archives is a coUecting as weU as a receiving
agency, acquiring by gift purchase or copying, records relating to Canada found in
France, Great Britain and elsewhere, private papers of individuals, associations and
corporations, maps and plans, paintings, drawings and photographs, films, printed
materials and medals. While recognizing the jurisdiction of provincial and other
archival repositories, it attempts to provide a collective national memory, recording all
aspects of Canadian life. The preservation of major research sources in one budding
has proved to be of inestimable value to those engaged in research.
The Historical Branch encompasses the administration of all the historical services,
except for the PubUcations Service, and the London and Paris Offices, which remain
under the immediate supervision of the Assistant Dominion Archivist but work closely
with the Branch. The Displays and PubUcity Service relies on the staff of the Historical
Branch for research in connection with historical exhibitions. The Branch was created
in 1965. Its fbst Director, Dr. W. I. Smith, was succeeded in 1967 by Mr. Bernard
WeUbrenner.
MANUSCRIPT
DIVISION
During the eleven year period under review the Manuscript
Division has experienced a phenomenal expansion in all
respects.
Acquisitions have been very extensive, particularly in
die case of public records, as procedures for selection and transfer from the originating
departments were unproved. Also impressive is the number and scope of original
papers of individuals, associations and corporate bodies which have been added to our
coUection. Microfilm copies of material relating to Canada from British and French
sources continue to be obtained through our offices in London and Paris. In the last
eleven years the holdings of the Division have nearly doubled in volume. Total
accessions of 30,000 linear feet of original material and 15,000 reels of microfilm
(approximately 60,000,000 pages) were recorded during the period. The annual volume
of acquisitions increased by 1600% for original material and 900% for microfilm.
In addition, extensive microfilming of our own material enabled the Division to place
in the hands of researchers additional copies of the most frequently used collections
and to extend our interUbrary loan service.
Increases in the demands for reference services were equally impressive. During the
eleven year period the annual number of registered researchers increased by 520%, the
number of written inquiries by 450%, the circulation of originals and microfilm by 500%
and interUbrary loans by 3000%. An increased interest in historical studies was stimulated
by the centennial of Confederation and the resources of the Division both in faculties and
personnel were taxed to the limit. Fortunately, the new budding which was occupied
in February and March   1967 provided adequate  stack space and permitted the
23 24 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969 I
consoUdation of holdings which had been in three scattered locations. The spacious! 1
new quarters on the third floor enabled the Division to provide more modern and I
efficient reference and search room faculties, including dbect access to indexes and II
other finding aids, a large search room, a separate microfilm room, a "quiet" room, II
and a number of individual study rooms for special projects. The new faculties vâmJÊ
accommodate approximately 117 researchers. The reference and cbculation desk I
sendee was extended to include the lunch period whUe the time honoured tradition of j j
permitting accredited searchers access to the search rooms on a twenty-four hours a j
day, seven days a week basis has been maintained. To further assist in historical II
research the Division, at the request of the Canadian Historical Association, undertook to prepare an annual Register of Post-Graduate Dissertations in Progress, in
History and Related Subjects. It was published for the fbst time in 1966.
The pressure of such increased activities m acquisitions and reference made it :
necessary for the Division to reduce greatly description, indexing, and the publication II
of preUminary inventories.  The requirement for published inventories was aUeviated
by an important project which has been of great value to researchers.  It was the   i
preparation and publication in 1968, with the assistance of the Humanities Research
CouncU of Canada, of the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, which i
includes aU the holdings of the Manuscript Division as weU as those of 123 other
Canadian repositories. In addition, automation was used in the preparation of finding
aids, particularly for the control and description of the prime ministers' papers.  The
feasibility of extending automation to other archival functions is being studied.
A table of selected services provided by the Manuscript Division shows development during the last eleven years. Growth has been accomplished by changes in
organization. In 1958, the Division consisted of two sections, Pre-Confederation and]
Post-Confederation. Two more sections have been added: the PubUc Records Section,
which is responsible for records of the federal government since 1867, and the }
Auxiliary Services Section, which provides general services such as accessioning, photo- I
duplication, interUbrary loans, clerical and secretarial work and many special projects.
The activities of the four sections are described below.
During the eleven-year period the Division has been directed successively by Miss
Norah Story to 1960, Mr. W. G. Ormsby to 1964, Dr. W. I. Smith to 1965 and the
present chief, Mr. Robert Gordon.
.PRE-CONFEDERATION SECTION—During the last decade the Pre-ConfederatioJ
Section has developed from a staff of five archivists in 1958 to the present complej
ment of nine.
In addition to the conventional archival tasks of acquisition, arrangement, descrip-  j
tion and reference services for records and manuscripts, the responsibilities of the
Section include the planning and co-ordination of copying programs and investigation» i
carried out by the Paris and London Offices. In order to cope with the ever-increasinï I
volume and complexity of work, three sub-sections were created; the French Archives
Unit, the British Archives Unit and the Canadian Archives Unit. The Pre-Confederation Section is headed by Dr. R. Comeau, who succeeded Mr. Bernard Weilbrenner in
1963.
A great deal of new material has been added to our holdings since 1958 either
in the form of original manuscripts, microfilm or some other type of copy. We have
now nearly completed the copying of most of the major French and British records
series relating to Canada. Our holdings of these series have more than doubled in the HISTORICAL BRANCH
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last decade. A comprehensive review of our long-range plans for the copying of British I
records was undertaken and detailed recommendations were submitted concerning the
records of the Colonbd Office, the Admbalty, the War Office, the Foreign Office, j
the Treasury, the Treasury SoUcbor, the Board of Trade and the Audit Office. Also I
of significance are the papers of several Canadian political, judicial, administrative, j
military and ecclesiastical figures, as weU as the records and papers of some Pre-
Confederation business enterprises and ecclesiastical bodies.
In the near future, we expect to undertake searches for records of Canadian
interest in other countries. Early attention wiH be given to the records of the United
States, the Netherlands, Italy and Spam.
A brief description of the more significant acquisitions follows:
COPIES OF DOCUMENTS IN FRENCH ARCHIVES
Archives des Affaires StrangSres: 15 reels in 1964 and 1968.
Archives des Colonies: Series B38, 1 reel in 1963; Series C11C, 1 reel in 1960; Series
C12, 11 reels in 1960; Series C13B, 1 reel in 1960; Series D2C, 6 reels in 1960;
Series E, 11 reels in 1960-1963, 1966, 1968 and 1969; Series FIA, 1 reel in 1963jj
Series F3, 3 reels in 1959 and 1962; Series Gl, 18 reels in 1960, 1965, 1968 and
1969; Series G2, 44 reels in 1960, 1961, 1965 and 1969; and Series G3, 12 reels
in 1961, 1962 and 1965.
Archives dSpartementales de la Charente-Maritime, La Rochelle: Series E, 4 reels in
1968.
Archives dSpartementales, Rochefort: 4 reels in 1965.
Archives de la Guerre: 38 reels obtained in 1962, 1964, 1967 and 1969.
Archives de la Marine:  11 reels obtained in 1963, 1964, 1967, 1968 and 1969.
Archives nationales: Series ABxix529, 1 reel obtained in 1966; Minutier central des
notabes, 3 reels in 1964, 1966 and 1968; Series Z1M and Series 25AP, 2 reels in
1963 and 1964.
Bibliothèque municipale de la Rochelle: 1 reel in 1961.
Bibliothèque nationale: Fonds français, 2 reels in 1960 and 1961; Fonds américain,
1 reel in 1962.
Registres de Beaubassin (Manuscript Group 6): 1 reel in 1965.
"Relation d'un voyage au Canada" (Manuscript Group 7) : 1 reel in 1963.
Transcripts of documents in French repositories relating to the government of New
France continue to be made. These include transcripts of documents in the
Archives de la Sarthe (Le Mans) in 1964; Archives de la Charente-Maritime, 1962,
1963 and 1968; Archives des Colonies, 1959-1962, 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969;
Archives dSpartementales, 1960, 1963, 1966-1969; Archives de la Guerre, 1967;
Archives de la Marine, 1959-1961 and 1968; Archives municipales de Rochefort,
1965; Archives de la Seine, 1963 and 1965; Archives nationales, 1959-1969:
BibliothSque de La Rochelle, 1960-1961; Bibliothèque de Rouen, 1961; Bibliothèque du SSnat, 1963; MinistSre des Affaires StrangSres, 1968; Tabellionage de
Honfleur, 1963, 1968 and 1969; and Tabellionage de RonchevïUe, 1968; Bibliothèque nationale, 1959-1960, 1962-1966, 1969.
Louisbourg Restoration Project. Microfilm copies of documents were made from
originals in 19 repositories in 1966 and 1967 (160 reels). : Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen (9 reels). Microfilmed
HISTORICAL BRANCH 27
COPIES OF DOCUMENTS IN THE PUBUC RECORD OFFICE, LONDON
Admiralty 1: In Letters of the Secretary's Department 287 reels were obtained between 1967 and 1969; Admiralty 2: Out Letters of the Secretary's Department,
3 reels, in 1966 and 1967; Admiralty 7: Secretary's Department, MisceUanea, 1
reel in 1960; Admiralty 49: Accountant General's Department, MisceUanea, 4 reels
in 1960; Admiralty 50: Admbal's Journals, 5 reels, in 1959 and 1960; Admiralty
51, 52 and 53: Captains' Logs, Masters' and Ships' Logs, filmed in 1959 and 1962
(3 reels); Admiralty 104: (extracts) : Medical Department various registers, 1 reel
in 1966; Admiralty 116: Secretary's Department Cases, 10 reels in 1967; Admiralty
128: Station Records, North America and the West Indies, 54 reels in 1961;
Admiralty 171: Accounting Department, Medal Rolls, 1 reel in 1967.
Audit Office 13: American Loyalist Claims, Series H, 1780-1835, 151 reels were obtained from 1960 to 1962.
Board of Trade i
in 1969.
Colonial Office 5: America and West Indies, papers of the Secretary of State and the
Board of Trade, 24 reels were acquired in 1959, 1960, 1963 and 1964; Colonial
Office 6: British North America, original correspondence, 37 reels, 1964-1965;
Colonial Office 42: Canada, original correspondence. Correspondence and enclosures from the governors, Ueutenant-governors and administrators of Quebec,
Lower Canada, Upper Canada and the United Province of Canada and from the
governors general of the Dominion of Canada. Registers and indexes, 13 reels in
1965 and 1967; correspondence, 140 reels, in 1960, 1963-1967; Colonial Office 43:
Canada, Entry Books, 17 reels, 1965; Colonial Office 47: Canada, MisceUanea,
51 reels in 1962 and 1964; Colonial Office 189: New Brunswick, Entry Books of
Correspondence, 5 reels in 1961; Colonial Office 194: Newfoundland, original
correspondence, 41 reels in 1960, 1964-1967; Colonial Office 217: Nova Scotia
and Cape Breton, original correspondence from the governors, Ueutenant-governors,
administrators, etc., 23 reels in 1961; Colonial Office 221: Nova Scotia and Cape
Breton, miscellanea, 4 reels in 1966; Colonial Office 323: Colonies General Correspondence, 91 reels in 1959, 1960, 1965 and 1967; Colonial Office 324: Colonies
General, Entry Books, Series I, 2 reels in 1966; Colonial Office 381: Colonies
General, Entry Books, Series H, 6 reels in 1966; Colonial Office 537: Supplementary Correspondence, 12 reels, 1966-1967; Colonial Office 880: Confidential Prints,
North America, 5 reels in 1966; Colonial Office 885, 886: Miscellaneous and Confidential Prints, Dominions, 2 reels in 1961.
Foreign Office: Maps, 1 reel in 1963 and MisceUanea Series I, 1 reel in 1963; Foreign
Office 5: General Correspondence, United States of America, despatches from the
British minister in Washington, 51 reels, 1959-1966; Foreign Office 27: General
Correspondence, France, correspondence of British ambassadors in France, 5 reels
in 1960 and 1961; Foreign Office 97: Selected volumes of documents relating to
North America, 2 reels in 1960; Foreign Office 371: General political correspondence, 12 reels in 1962; Foreign Office 414: Confidential Prints, North America,
20 reels in 1959 and 1961.
Treasury 64: Selected papers,
America, 9 reels in 1964.
1680-1834, on a variety of subjects relating to North 28 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
War Office 1: Secretary at War, In Letters, 20 reels in 1965; War Office 13: MusteJ
books and pay lists, MUitia and Volunteers, 1837-1850, 43 reels in 1964-1966; War
Office 28: Headquarters Records, 11 reels in 1963 and 1966; War Office 32: Series j
composed of documents selected for permanent preservation from various series j
of registered papers in the War Office, 1848-1913, 16 reels received from 1964 to
1966; War Office 34: Papers of Jeffrey, Baron Amherst, for the years 1712-17ÉÉ1
148 reels in 1963; Amherst was the commander of the British expedition to Canada
and Commander-in-Chief of the forces 1758, and Governor General of British
North America, 1760-1763. War Office 44: Ordnance Office, In Letters, 7 reels
acquired in 1967; War Office 55: Ordnance MisceUanea, 1740-1863, 43 reels
acquired in 1963, 1965 and 1966; War Office 80: MisceUanea: Sb George MurrjB
Papers, 1804-1854, 1 reel acqubed in 1960; War Office 106: Dbectorate of MiU-
tary Operations and InteUigence, 1896-1910, 1 reel in 1965.
ECCLESIASTICAL BODIES
Church of Scotland Colonial Committee. Microfilm copies of records were obtained in
1965 from originals in the Overseas Department of the Church of Scotland, Edinl
burgh (6 reels).
Compagnie de Jesus, Province de France. Microfilm copies of selected records were ;
acqubed in 1967 (6 reels).
Glasgow Colonial Society, 1821-1843. Papers of this Presbyterian missionary organiza- j
tion were acqubed in 1968 from the Archives of the United Church of Canada
(4 reels).
Labrador Missions of the Moravian Brethren. Microfilm copies of records were obtained i
in 1960 from originals in the Moravian Church House, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
and a complementary copy microfilmed in 1962 from originals in the Headquarters, j
Moravian Church, London, England (77 reels).
Oblats de Marie-Immaculée, British Columbia and Oregon Missions, 1845-1950. Microfilm copies of records were made from originals in the Holy Rosary Scholasticate,
Ottawa, in 1962 (9 reels).
Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, Montreal, 1658-1930. Microfilm copies of originals in the
Seminary Archives made in 1969 (24 reels).
BUSINESS ENTERPRISES
Bell, William and John operated a general store at Perth, Upper Canada, and served as j
commission agents for the sale of potash, lumber, and real estate in Lanark County.
The papers, 1828-1850, were part of the estate of Archibald Campbell, founder
of the Perth Museum, and were received through the courtesy of Group Captain
H. R. Stewart of Ottawa in 1969 (8 biches).
Glyn Mills and Company. Microfilm copies of some records, 1838-1881, were obtained i
from the company in 1962 (7 reels).
Mackenzie, Sir Alexander (1763-1820), a Montreal merchant and explorer. Microfilm !
copies of papers were acqubed in 1968 from the Archives du Séminaire de Québec
(3 reels).
Watkin, Sir Edward W. (1819-1901). Papers largely relating to the Grand Trunk and
Intercolonial Railways were deposited in 1964 by Lady Worsley Taylor (1 foot). r
HISTORIC
HISTORICAL BRANCH 29
Wright, Philemon (1760-1839). Papers of the Wright FamUy and the firm of P. Wright
and Sons, of Hull, Lower Canada, were presented in 1962 by Mrs. Gordon D.
Wright of Ottawa through the courtesy of the National Capital Commission (43
feet 6 niches). A copy of a diary, 1834-1835, was obtained in 1964 from the original in the possession of Mrs. T. G. Mayburry, HuU, Quebec (74 pages).
PRIVATE AND FAMILY PAPERS, including British administrators, miUtary figures,
members of the legislature and the clergy.
Cherrier, Côme-SSraphin was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada,
1834-1837, and an eminent member of the Bar of Quebec. Papers, 1838-1885,
were acquired from Mr. DeVolpi of Montreal in 1960 (1 foot).
Colborne, Sir John was Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, 1828-1836, Commander-
in-Chief of the forces in Canada, 1835-1839 and Administrator and Governor-in-
Chief, 1838-1839. Microfilm copies of papers accumulated by Colborne during his
service in Canada were obtained in 1963, from originals in the possession of Mr.
J. E. Colborne-Macknell, Plymton, Plymouth, England (22 reels).
Dalhousie, George Ramsay, ninth Earl of was Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia,
1816-1819, and Govemor-in-Cbief of Canada, 1819-1828. Microfilm copies of the
Canadian section of his papers were acqubed in 1961 from originals in the Scottish
Record Office, Edinburgh (15 reels).
Duncombe, Dr. Charles was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada,
1834-1837. Papers relating chiefly to his political activities, 1835-1875, ware
presented in 1959 by Dr. Duncombe's great-granddaughter, Mrs. Marjorie Killen
of California (63 pages).
Estcourt, Major-General I. B. B. (1802-1854). Microfilm copies of papers relating to
the Joint British-American Commission on the Northeast Boundary between Canada
and the United States, of which Estcourt was the British Commissioner, were
obtained in 1968 from originals in the County Records Office, Gloucester, England
(3 reels).
Haldimand, Sir Frederick was Commander-in-Chief, 1773-1774, and Governor of
Quebec, 1778-1784. Microfilm copies of originals in the British Museum were
received between 1963 and 1969 (78 reels).
Haultain, Lieutenant Colonel F. W. was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Canada, 1863-1864, 1866-1868. Sixteen letters were presented by Mrs. W. Bovey in
1962.
Hftts, Rt. Rev. George (1816-1895), was the fbst Bishop of the AngUcan Diocese of
Columbia, 1859-1892. Microfilm copies of his papers, 1838-1895, were acqubed
from the AngUcan Theological CoUege, Vancouver, B.C. in 1967 (3 reels).
Inglis, Rt. Rev. Charles (1734-1816), was the fbst AngUcan Bishop of Nova Scotia,
and his son, the Rt. Rev. John Inglis, (1777-1850), the thbd Bishop of Nova Scotia.
Microfilm copies of papers were made from originals in the possession of Vice-
Admbal Sb John Inglis, Abesford, Hampshbe, England and were acquired through
the courtesy of Rev. T. R. Millman, Archivist of the General Synod, AngUcan
Church of Canada (7 reels).
La BruSre Family, 1649-1941. Acqubed from the Boucher de La Bruère famUy (4
inches). 30 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
McNab, James was an EngUsh botanist who toured Canada and the United States in |
1834.   A microfilm copy of the field notes he made during this tour was presented by Dr. WUUam Dore of Ottawa (1 reel).
Murray, Major General James. Journals, 1759-1760, consisting of a "Journal of the;
Expedition Against Quebec", and "Journal commencing from the Surrende^B
Quebec" were presented in 1966 by Mr. R. Reford (198 pages).
Nairne, Lieutenant-Colonel John. Papers relating to the defence of Quebec in 1775-
1776 and the activities of the Royal Highland Emigrants Regiment during ^M
American Revolution, were presented in 1962 by Mrs. J. A. Gray of Montreal
(1 foot 8 inches).
Newcastle, Henry Pelham-Clinton, fifth Duke of was Secretary of State for the Colonie»
1852-1854 and 1859-1864. Microfilm copies of selected papers were obtained from
originals in the Library of the University of Nottingham in 1959 (3 reels).
Sewell, Jonathan. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1766, Sewell moved to Quebec
in 1785, became Solicitor General in 1793, Attorney General in 1795 and Chief
Justice in 1808. Family Papers, 1650-1911, were acquired in 1964 from Mrs. A.
Hubbard of Quebec City (4 feet 9 inches).
Sherbrooke, Sir John Coape was Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, 1811-1816, and
Governor of Lower Canada, 1816-1818. Microfilm copies of his papers were presented in 1968 by Rear Admbal Rt. St. Vincent Sherbrooke of Axton, EnglaiM
(1 reel).
Smith, William (1782-1793), emigrated from New York to Quebec and was Chief
Justice from 1786 until 1793. Family papers were acqubed in 1964 from Mrs. A.
Hubbard of Quebec City (2 feet).
Springer Family. Genealogical material relating to this Loyalist fanuly. These documents
were gathered in the 1920's and 1930's for the purpose of corporately prosecuting
claims to land in the United States and Sweden. The papers were presented, om
behalf of the Canadian branch of the Springer family, by Mr. Gregory Harris of
Ottawa (3 feet 8 inches).
Vaughan, Sir Charles Richard was the British Minister at Washington, 1825-1835.
Microfilm copies were obtained in 1962 from originals in the custody of All Souls
CoUege, Oxford, England (1 reel).
Viger, Denis Benjamin (1774-1861), was a member of the Legislative Assembly of
Lower Canada and of the United Province of Canada, 1808-1843, 1845-1847, and
a member of the Legislative Council, 1848-1858. His papers were acquired in 1960
from Mr. DeVolpi of Montreal (3 feet 8 inches).
Strachan, Rt. Rev. John was the fbst AngUcan Bishop of Toronto, 1839-1867. Microfilm copies of papers were obtained in 1960 from the Ontario Department of Public
Records and Archives (13 reels).
MISCELLANEOUS
Notarial records of the districts of Quebec, 1626-1668, and Three Rivers, 1647-1690
(Microfilm, 7 reels).
Newberry Library Collection, 1649-1894. Copied from originals in the possession of the
Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois (Xerox, 4 inches and microfibn 1 reel).    1 HISTORICAL BRANCH 31
LaBrosse, Jean-Baptiste. Copy of a "Dictionnabe montagnaislatin" begun by him at
Tadoussac in 1766. Copied from the original in the possession of the Congrégation
des Oblats de Marie-Immaculée, Ottawa (microfilm, 1 reel).
Major Projects—The following major units have been indexed: Upper and Lower
Canada Land Petitions; Upper and Lower Canada Marriage Bonds; Shipping Registers;
Baby Collection; Ellis Papers; Wright Papers; Sewell Papers; Grey of Howick Papers;
Clans Papers; Ryland Papers; Neilson Papers; Lafontaine Papers; Colborne Papers;
Sir Edmund Head Papers; Nairne Papers.
Finding aids (Usts, calendars, indexes, guides) were also prepared for the following
papers: Archives des Colonies, Series C11C and D2D; Archives du SSminaire de Saint-
Sulpice; Buchanan; Cherrier; Colonial Office 188 and 323; Duvernay; Gourlay; Howe;
Rev. William King; iMBruSre; Leschassier; LotbiniSre; Alexander Mackenzie; William
I Lyon Mackenzie; McDonald-Stone; Meilleur; Municipal Records for Canada East;
I Nelson; Newcastle; Papineau; Perrault; Rebellion Records; Red River Colony; Tash-
I ereau; Tronson; Viger; Watkin; War Office 44.
Other major projects in progress at the present time include the following: prepara-
I tion of a finding aid for the Upper Canada Sundries Calendar; arrangement of Yukon
I Territory Records; (A project to number, arrange and microfilm the New Brunswick
I Executive Council Records has been completed and the originals returned to the New
I Brunswick Provincial Archives); Canada West Census Records of 1842 are being prepared for microfilming; a Check-List of Church Records in our custody was completed
in 1968; a calendar of the documents m Manuscript Group 6.
Since 1959, inventories for the following Pre-Confederation Manuscript Groups
have been published in new or revised editions:
Manuscript Group 8, Documents relating to the Province of Quebec (1962);
Manuscript Group 9, Provincial, Local and Territorial Records (1962);
Manuscript Group 11, Colonial Office Papers (revised edition 1961);
Manuscript Group 17, Religious Archives (1967); and
Manuscript Group 18, Pre-Conquest Papers (revised edition, 1964).
Inventories to Manuscript Groups 1 to 7, 12 to 16, 19 and 23 are in the process
of being revised.
POST-CONFEDERATION SECTION—This Section is now composed of thirteen archivists and one technical officer. The staff is organized into four projects units each of which
is responsible for accession, selection, arrangement and description of private papers in one
of the foUowing chronological periods: Macdonald, Laurier-Borden, King-Bennett and
Contemporary Manuscripts.
Accessions—Acquisitions are in two categories, those for which ownership has been
transferred to the PubUc Archives and those which have been deposited for security storage.
Those m the latter category are chiefly the political papers of party leaders and cabinet
ministers. Beginning with the resignation of the St-Laurent Cabinet in 1957, the PubUc
Archives has offered retiring ministers of the Crown and others free security storage
facilities and service.  Many have accepted the offer and have deposited theb papers, 32 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
thus ensuing theb preservation. In several cases arrangements were made for the transfer
of ownership and research conditions estabUshed. Papers of the f oUowing political fig»
were placed on deposit in the PubUc Archives:—
Dief enbaker, John George
c.1500 feet
Pearson, Lester Bowles
c.1931-1968
c. 930 feet
Fulton, E. Davie
c.1945-1968
c.    80 feet
Hays, H.W.
1963-1965
58 feet
Balcer, L.
c.1945-1964
68 fed
BeU, Richard A.
1957-1968
c.    97 feet
Chevrier, L.
c.1935-1964
c.    80 feet
Churchill, Gordon
c.1947-1968
c.    79 feet
Claxton, Brooke
c.1938-1960
c. 108 feet
ColdweU, M.J.
c.1931-1966
85 feet
Dinsdale, W.G.
c.1952-1963
49 feet
Drew, G.A.
1908-1957
142 feet
Fleming, D.M.
c. 1945-1963
c. 279 fed
Hamilton, F.A.G.
c.1955-1963
c. 278 feet
Harkness, D.S.
1957-1963
83 feet
Martin, Paul J.J.
c. 1925-1968
c. 241 fed
Monteith, J.W.
1957-1962
13 feet
PickersgUl, J.W.
c.1947-1963
c.    77 feel
Sharp, M.W.
c. 1963-1965
24 fed
St-Laurent, Louis S.
c.1941-1957
c. 200 feel
Vanier, Georges P.
1916-1967
54 feet
Winters, Robert H.
n.d.
70 feet
A brief description of the major permanent accessions during the period under review
follows:
POLITICAL FIGURES
Aikins, Hon. James Cox (1823-1904), held portfoUos in the government of Sb John A.
Macdonald. In 1963, Mrs. Helen Aikins of Toronto presented papers relating to his
office as Minister of Inland Revenue ( 1 foot 6 biches).
Bell, Hon. Richard (b.1913), presented his papers in 1961 and 1966.   He served J
National Dbector of the Progressive Conservative Party from 1943 to 1949, as chair- HISTORICAL BRANCH
33
man of the Progressive Conservative National Convention hi 1956, as chairman of
the National Campaign Committee, 1952-1953. He was elected to the House of Commons in 1957, 1958, 1962 and 1965 and served as Minister of Citizenship and
Immigration, 1962-1963. The papers relate to the National Party Headquarters,
1939-1956, the National Campaign Committee, 1952-1955 and there are personal
papers (3 feet IVi biches).
Bennett, Richard Bedford, Viscount (1870-1947). Microfilm of the poUtical papers of
RB. Bennett. The personal papers are also to be microfilmed. Originals are owned
by the University of New Brunswick (432 reels).
Borden, Sir Robert Laird (1854-1937). Additional documents were presented by
Henry Borden during the 1960's. These include correspondence, 1903-1936, poems,
honours and diplomas and other printed matter, the wUl of John Leard, maternal
grandfather of Borden, and Borden's marriage contract, 1889.
Bracken, Hon. John (1883-1969). In 1968, subject fUes were transferred from the
Office of the Leader of the Opposition in the Centre Block (6Vi feet), and in 1969
a large coUection of personal and political papers was presented by Mrs. John
Bracken of Manotick, Ontario.
Byng of Vimy, Julian Hedworth George Byng, First Viscount, Governor General of
Canada, 1921-1926. Papers relating largely to the Constitutional Issue of 1926 were
obtained from Government House in 1962 (43 pages).
Choquette, Hon. P.A. (1854-1929), lawyer, judge and senator, was a Liberal Member
of Parliament 1882-1898. In 1959, his son, R. Choquette, presented copies of
letters from Sir Wilfrid Laurier to Choquette concerning poUtical matters in Quebec
(100 pages).
Dupré, Hon. Maurice (1881-1941), was Solicitor General, 1930-1935, and chabman
of the Committee on Arbitration and Disarmament at the Imperial Conference of
1930. Papers, 1929-1934, were presented by Jr. J. Stefan Dupré in 1963 (3 feet).
Euler, Hon. WX>. (1875-1961), held three cabinet posts, 1926-1940 and was then
appointed to the Senate. Two fUes on Canadian railways and the Dairy Act were
presented by W. Max Euler of Kitchener, Ontario in 1961.
Gowan, Sir James Robert (1815-1909), judge and senator. Some of his papers and
some papers of bis nephew, Henry H. Ardagh, were lent to us to be microfilmed.
They consist of correspondence, 1835-1915; letterbooks, 1843-1853, a brief diary
and some address books (4 feet).
Graydon, Hon. Gordon (1896-1953). Subject files transferred from the office of
the Leader of the Opposition in 1968 (7 feet 6 biches).
Hanson, Hon. R.B. (1879-1948), was Minister of Trade and Commerce during the last
11 months of R.B. Bennett's administration, and leader of the Conservative Party in
the House of Commons, 1940-1943. Papers were presented in 1965 by Mr. Horace
Hanson of Fredericton, N.B. (34 feet).
Howe, Hon. CD. (1886-1961 ). His papers were presented in 1964 by the Howe estate,
and deal with the administration of government departments in Howe's capacity as
Minister of Munitions and Supply, Reconstruction, Reconstruction and Supply,
Trade and Commerce, and Defence Production (85 feet 6 niches). 34 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959*^M
Lapointe, Hon. Ernest (1876-1941). Papers were presented by Hon. Hughes Lapo^
in 1960 with subsequent additions. The papers relate mainly to the period 1935-^B
and deal with such subjects as External Affabs, Conscription, the Department of
Justice, etc. (25 feet).
Lucas, Louise (1885-1945), held office in the United Farmers of Canada, Saskatchewan
section. Papers were presented by the New Democratic Party in 1962 ( 1 foot).    a
Manion, Hon. R.J. (1881-1943).   An additional body of papers was transferred from
the Office of the Leader of the Opposition in 1968 (6V2 feet).
Murphy, Hon. Edward  (1818-1895), was a Montreal merchant, senator and IrisJ
CathoUc. A small body of papers was presented in 1959 by the Jesuit Fathers»
Toronto (3 inches).
Priestly, Norman F. was the vice-president of the United Farmers of Alberta, C.C.F.
organizer,  and  fbst  national  secretary  of  the  C.C.F.,   1932-1937   (2  inches).
Ralston, Hon. J. L. (1881-1948), was Minister of National Defence, 1926-1930, and
1940-1944, and Minister of Finance, 1930-1940. His papers were received in 1961
from his estate (70 feet).
Riel, Louis (1844-1885). Copies of poems and essays written whUe an inmate of the
Beauport Mental Hospital were presented in 1960 by Lt. Col. J.R. PainchaikM
Ottawa (26 pages).
Sifton, Hon. AX. (1858-1921), was Chief Justice of N.W.T., Premier and Chief
Justice of Alberta, Minister of Customs, Secretary of State and delegate to the Pan
Peace Conference. Papers were presented by Mrs. W.R. Kenny in 1964 (3 feet 8
inches).
Strathcona, (Sir) Donald A. Smith, First Baron (1820-1914). Papers relating principally
to the management of Strathcona's financial affabs in Canada were presented in
1965 by Lord Strathcona (10 feet).
Teillet, Hon. Roger (b. 1912), presented his papers in 1968. Mr. Teillet was Minister
of Veterans' Affabs, 1963-1968, and most of his papers relate to his activities as a
Cabinet Minister (21 feet 6 inches).
Tilley, Sir Samuel Leonard (1818-1896), a Father of Confederation, was Premier and
later Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick, and served in the federal cabinet as
Minister of Customs and later as Minister of Finance. In 1968, ten feet of correspondence (c. 1858-1893) and thirteen letterbooks (1879-1885) were purchase!
from Mr. S. Leonard TiUey of Toronto. Most of the correspondence relates to the
period when TiUey was Provincial Secretary.
Tupper, Sir Charles (1821-1915). Additional papers were presented in 1966 by Misses
Jessie and Frances Tupper. They consist of minutes of the Charlottetown Confer»!
ence, etc., c. 1840-1903 (3 feet).
SCffiNTISTS, ENGINEERS, EXPLORERS AND SURVEYORS
Anderson, R.M. (1876-1961), was a geologist, Arctic explorer and civU servant. His
papers were presented by the estate of Mrs. R.M. Anderson in 1960 and on subsequent occasions (24 feet 2 inches). i HISTORICAL BRANCH
35
; Bell, Robert (1841-1914), was a scientist and explorer, and a professor of chemistry
and natural science at Queen's University from 1863 to 1867. He served in the
Geological Survey of Canada, 1857, became the Assistant Dbector in 1877, Chief
Geologist in 1890, and Acting Dbector from 1901 to 1906. In 1965, Mr. R.B.
Douglas presented the Bell Papers (17 feet).
XCamsell, Charles (1876-1958), was a geologist and public servant. He joined the
Geological Survey in 1904, became Deputy Minister of Mines in 1920. His papers
were presented by Mrs. C. CamseU of RockcUffe, Ontario in 1959 (2 feet 10 biches).
\McLachlan, Duncan W. (1882-1962), was an engineer and a member of the Department of Transport. His papers relate largely to the St. Lawrence Seaway project of
which he was Chief Engineer. Mrs. D.W. McLachlan presented the papers in 1962
(4 feet 4 mches).
Meredith, CP. (1874-1966), an architect. Papers were presented in 1968 by Mrs. A.C.
Garneau. Subjects include Ottawa Improvement Commission and the Petawawa
MUitary Camp (4 feet).
Nares, Captain George S. (1831-1915), joined the Royal Navy in 1846. He served on
tiie Arctic Expedition of 1852, surveyed the northwest Arctic Expedition in 1875
and surveyed the Straits of Magellan in 1878. His papers were presented in 1959
by P. RoUeston of London, England (1 foot 6 inches).
O'Hanly, J.L.P. (1829-1912), was a civU engineer, surveyor and raiboad builder. His
papers were presented in 1959 and 1963 by a daughter, Mrs. Marion E. Rogers of
Ottawa (11 feet).
Steel, William Arthur (1890-1968), served in World War I with the Royal Canadian
Corps of Signals, 1916-1918, and saw action in battles such as Passchendaele. He was
Chief Engineer in the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals hi the 1920's, director of the
Radio Division of the National Research Council, 1931-1933, and Commissioner in
charge of technical operations in the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission,
1933-1936. From 1936 on, he worked as a consulting engineer. Papers consist of
correspondence, memoranda, and dippings concerning his career, 1911-1968, presented by Mrs. V. I. Steel in 1969 (18 feet 8 biches).
Stuart, Hon. WUUam H. was deputy minister of highways and pubUc works in Nova
Scotia. Papers were presented by W.H. Stuart m 1963. Major subjects include the
SAGE Super-Combat centres at North Bay, Ontario, 1959-1960, Ontario highway
contracts in the Fort WiUiam district 1954-1955, Columbia River power project
and contemporary politics, 1918-1963 (9 feet 2 inches).
MILITARY FIGURES
Chapman, Major G.A.E. (1881-1968), served in the South African War and in World
War I. Diaries were presented in 1968 (1 foot).
Currie, Sir Arthur W. (1875-1933). Papers were presented in 1963 by bis son, Major
G.O. Currie of Ottawa. They relate to his mUitary career and to his career as
principal of McGUl University (16 feet 9 inches).
HeUmuth, Captain H.I. Copies of papers concerning his service in World War I were
obtained from Mrs. George Broomfield of CooksvUle, Ontario in 1965 (1 reel). 36 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-191BI
Herbert, Ivor J.C (1851-C.1914), was General Officer Commanding Canadian MUitiJ j
1890-1895. His papers, consisting of correspondence, memoranda, regimental I
papers and pubUcations were purchased from R.G. Booth, Hay-on-Wye, Herefa» I
England, in 1968 (5 feet).
McNaughton, Andrew George Latta (1887-1966). Additional papers, 1908-1966, werll
presented to the Archives by the Dbectorate of History, Canadian Forces Headquarters, and the McNaughton family, 1966-1969. The papers relate to McNaughl
ton's career through World War I, as Chief of General Staff, President of the
National Research CouncU, Commander of the Fbst Canadian Army Overseas!
World War II, Minister of National Defence, Canadian representative on the
United Nations Atomic Energy Commission and to the UN and President of the
Security CouncU, Chairman of Permanent Joint Board of Defence (Canadbw
section), Chairman of the International Joint Commission (Canadian), and finally
his work on the Columbia River Treaty. Access restricted (c. 140 feet).
Otter, Sir William Dillon (1843-1929). Otter served in the Canadian militia in the
Fenian campaign of 1866, the North West campaign of 1885, and the Boer War. He
was chief of the General Staff, 1908-1910, Inspector-General, 1910-1912, i^H
Dbector of Internment Operations, 1914-1917. Additional papers consisting of
correspondence, diaries, memoirs, and clippings were lent for microfilming in 1969
by Mr. L.C.P. Morton of Lachine, Quebec, and a souvenir album of Otter, 1885, was
presented by Mr. Desmond Morton (4 biches, 4 reels).
Parsons, JX.R. Papers containing official reports on operation at Vimy Ridge, Pas-
schendaele, etc., were presented by Mrs. Parsons in 1966 ( 1 foot 4 biches).
Ross, Brigadier A£. (1871-1952). Additional papers were presented in 1965 by Mrs.
Ross and in 1968 by his son, A.E. Ross.
JOURNALISTS, WRITERS AND SCHOLARS
Christie, Loring Cheney (1885-1941), served as legal adviser to the Canadian Department of External Affabs, 1913-1923 and 1935-1939, and as Canadian Ministers
the United States, 1939-1941. Memoranda, reports, correspondence, pamphlets,
dippings and souvenirs, transferred from the Department of External Affabs, 1968
and 1969 (c. 8 feet).
Forsey, Eugene A. (b. 1904), constitutional and labour historian. Papers were presented by him at various times from 1962 to 1967. The chief subject of the correspondence is the Canadian Constitution in general and the office of the Governor
General in particular (1 foot 3 biches).
Hamilton, Charles F. (1869-1933), was a journalist author and Ueutenant-colonel.
Papers were transferred in 1966 by the Royal Canadian Mounted PoUce (1 foot 4
inches).
Hughes, Katherine, (d. 1925), was a journalist and author who took an active interest hi
Indian welfare and missionary work in the Northwest Her papers were présente»
in 1962 by the Oblates of Mary Immaculate. Much of the coUection deals with the
life of Sb WiUiam Van Home ( 1 foot).
Johnson, Emily Pauline (1862-1913), poetess. Manuscript of a short story, "The Toss-
big of a Rose", signed by Pauline Johnson, presented by Mrs. TJH. Loptson dt]
London, Ontario, in 1969. HISTORICAL BRANCH 37
Lemieux, Lucien, the son of Sb F.X. Lemieux, was Librarian in the Parliamentary
Library of Quebec (6 feet). His papers, along with some papers of lbs father were
acqubed in 1964 (6 feet).
Ley marie, A. Léo, publisher and writer, wrote many articles in Canadian and French
pubUcations and amassed documentation on the history of New France. His papers
were acqubed in 1959 (9 feet 8 biches).
Parker, David was the head of the Manuscript Division of the Public Archives of Canada
from 1912 to 1923. His papers were acqubed in 1962 (4 inches).
Parkin, Raleigh (b. 1896). Correspondence, clippings and other material relating to Sb
George Parkin, acqubed from various sources (originals and xerox copies). Ran-
ddph S. Churchill was one of the correspondents. Microfilm copy of transcripts of
correspondence of Sb Samud J. Way with Sb George Parkin, 1898-1905, of which
the originals are in the Public Library of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Presented at various times by Mr. Raleigh Parkin (3 biches, 1 reel).
Stead, RJ.C (1880-1959), was a journalist, author and civU servant. His papers were
presented in 1963 by R.A. Stead of Ottawa (4 feet 4 mches).
CULTURAL, SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Arctic Institute of North America was founded in 1944 as a non-profit organization to
initiate and support the objective study of Arctic conditions and problems. Papers,
1944-1968, include organizational material, correspondence and memoranda, research grant fUes, pubUcations and pubUc relations material. Presented by the Institute in 1968, and a microfilm copy of Board of Governors and Executive Committee
minutes, lent for copying in 1969 (19 feet lOinches, and 2reels).
Canadian Centenary Council. Papers, 1958-1967, including minutes of the Board of
Dbectors, correspondence regarding centennial projects, financial records, and other
material, transferred at various times by the Canadian Centenary CouncU (54 feet 2
mches).
Canadian Federation of Agriculture, 1932-1964, presented by the federation in 1965 (43
feet 4 mches).
Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women, 1929-1966, presented in 1962,
1965 and 1968 by the federation (19 feet 4 mches).
Canadian Foundation for Poliomyelitis, 1948-1951, presented in 1965 by Charles Clay,
former president of the foundation (1 foot 2 inches).
Canadian PoUtical Science Association. Correspondence, minutes and other papers,
1916-1965, presented by the Association in 1969 (7 feet 8 inches).
Canadian Tuberculosis Association, 1900-1965, presented by the association in 1968 (6
feet 8 mches).
The Canadian Authors Foundation was created in 1931 to assist distinguished Canadian
writers in need. Upon becoming incorporated in 1945, it changed its name to the
Canadian Writers' Foundation. Papers of this organiziation, 1931-1962, were presented in 1962 (2 feet 10 biches).
Canadian Youth Commission, presented in 1959 by the Canadian Welfare CouncU (27
feet). 38 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-lSJ^B
Dominion Drama Festival, presented in 1961 and 1966 by officials of the organization»
(25 feet, 1 reel).
Humanities Research Council of Canada, 1943-1966, presented in 1968 (24 feet 8 inches)!
The National Farm Radio Forum was formed in 1941, receiving its impetus from the
economic depression of the 1930's. The unit is divided into 3 sections: Nation™
Farm Radio Forum, Ontario Farm Radio Forum and the Quebec Farm Radio j
Forum. Records were received from the C.B.C. in 1965, the Rural Learning Assod-1
ation in 1967, and the Quebec Farmers' Association in Montreal in 1967 respectiveb/1
(39 feet).
Rhodes Scholarship Trust. Additional correspondence and other papers concerning j
scholarships, 1902-1959, microfilmed in 1968 and 1969 from originals in Rhodes j
House, Oxford, England, by the London Office of the Public Archives (35 reels).     ]
Social Science Research Council records, 1940-1966, were presented in 1968 (32 feet 8 j
inches).
POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation records, 1929-1963, were presented in 1962 and j
1963 by the New Democratic Party.   Major subject headings include:  National
Council, National Conventions, Conferences, Research, Regional Organizations, I
Advertising, PubUcity and Publications, Youth Organizations (117 feet 8 biches). I
Liberal Federation of Canada.  Correspondence, memoranda and other material, 1892- j
1968,  concerning  the National  Secretariat,  general  elections,  conventions,  the
National Federation of Liberal Women, the Young Liberal Federation, and the
Canadian University Liberal Federation, transferred from the Liberal Federation in 1
1967, 1968 and 1969 (204 feet).
Liberal Party, 1944-1968. Newspaper cuttings and cartoons arranged in subject fUes and
relating to the field of party activity and poUtical figures. Transferred from the
party headquarters in 1967. In 1968, posters from the federal dection of that year
were added (61 feet).
The Progressive Conservative Party, 1878, 1925-1958, 1968. Original papers and 48 i
reels of microfilm. Papers relating to various aspects of the Progressive Ckmservatifel
Party, were microfilmed from originals in the possession of the Progressive Con- |
servative Party headquarters in 1967.
Records of the Carleton County Progressive Conservative Association were presented j
by Hon. R.A. BeU in 1966 and 1968.
Verbatim reports of conventions, 1927-1956; Usts of delegates, committee members |
etc., were presented by Hon. R.A. BeU in 1965.
Official records of the National Conservative Convention held at Winnipeg in 194i
were microfilmed in 1964 from originals in the Progressive Conservative Party headquarters (1 reel). Other material relating to finance, conventions and other party |
activity were deposited in 1966.
BUSINESS CO-OPERATIONS
Blake and Redden. This law fbm in London, England, acted on behalf of one of the
parties in a number of Canadian cases heard before the Judicial Committee of the
Privy CouncU. Original papers, 1896-1949, were recdved through the British
Records Association in 1969 (12 feet 4 biches). HISTORICAL BRANCH
39
Branson Company, 1833-1952. The records of lumbering and sawmiU operations as well
as other business enterprises of the Bronson family, were presented in 1966 by the
Bronson Company through the National Capital Commission ( 190 feet 2 mches).
Centre Amusement Company, a motion pfcture theatre in Ottawa, presented by Mrs. M.J.
Leboldus in 1968.
Hughson and Company. Papers of this company of lumber dealers in Albany, New
York, estabUshed by J.C. Hughson, and papers of the Hughson family, 1856-1929.
Presented in 1968 by John Ward Hughson of Ottawa (2 feet 8 inches).
Montreal Turnpike Trust records, 1840-1923, were transferred in 1966 from the Department of Finance (21 feet 4 inches).
Robin, Jones and Whitman, originally a Channel Islands fbm, had its beginnings in the
commercial vacuum left by the defeat of the French in North America. The head
office was moved from Jersey to Halifax at the turn of the century and emerged as
Robin, Jones and Whitman in 1910. Presented by the fbm in 1964 (48 feet).
Major Projects—One of the most important tasks assigned to the Post-Confederation
Section is the care of papers of the Prune Ministers. This includes arrangement numbering, conservation and the preparation of finding aids and indexes.
Papers of Rt. Hon. R. B. Bennett, temporarily in our custody, are being numbered,
microfilmed and indexed. The poUtical correspondence consisting of 873 volumes has
now been numbered and filmed on 432 reels. An index is being prepared, composed
of a Ust of fUe titles and a summary of the contents of each file. By the end of 1968,
211 volumes had been indexed (138,774 pages).
Papers of Rt. Hon. R. L. Borden, consisting of 200,000 pages, were indexed between 1965 and 1968. Index cards are now being transcribed on data sheets for sorting
by the Taxation Data Centre, into author, chronological and subject indexes. In 1968,
60% of these cards had been transcribed.
The Primary Series of the papers of Rt. Hon. W. L. M. King have been microfilmed to 1939 and Memoranda and Notes for the same period are ready to be filmed.
Arranging and boxing of the Primary Series, 1940-1950, has been started and 164
volumes have been boxed. The King papers are completely indexed to the end of 1921.
An author index, containing the subjed of the letter, date and page numbers, for
the papers of Rt. Hon. Sir WUfrid Laurier was completed in 1962.
The papers of Rt. Hon. Sir John A. Macdonald (272,214 pages) have been indexed
in toto; cards prepared for data processing and primary printouts were completed in
1968.
Papers of Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, consisting of 200,000 pages, are being numbered and indexed. Thus far, aU but 66,000 pages have been indexed and aU but 4
volumes in Series 7, sorted and arranged.
Papers of Rt. Hon. Sir J. S. D. Thompson were entirely indexed by 1965.
Papers of Rt. Hon. Sir Charles Tupper, consisting of 10,140 pages, have been
indexed and transferred to data processing sheets. The final results have not yet been
received. 40 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19M
Because of increasing numbers of accessions, a Program of Inventory Revision
was undertaken in 1968. In that year, inventories to the following manuscript groups
were revised:
Manuscript Group 26, Prune Ministers' Papers
Manuscript Group 27, Post-Confederation PoUtical Figures, 1867-1948
Manuscript Group 28, Records of Post-Confederation Corporation Bodies
Manuscript Group 29, Nineteenth Century Post-Confederation Papers
Manuscript Group 30, Twentieth Century Papers, 1900-1950
Inventory entries contain a general description of the particular unit of papers^
inclusive dates of the papers, Unear extent, microfUm reel numbers and finding aid
numbers.
Prior to this revision program, the inventory to Manuscript Group 27 had been
pubUshed in 1960; Manuscript Group 28, in 1960; and Manuscript Group 30, in 196$
Additional manuscript groups have been created:
Manuscript Group 31, Twentieth Century Manuscripts, 1950-
Manuscript Group 32, PoUtical Figures, 1948-
Manuscript Group 35
Manuscript Group 36, Finding Aids to Sources in Other Archival Repositories.
Mechanization of the Manuscript Catalogue—As a result of a preliminary study carried
out in 1964, on the possible use of electronic data processing, the head of the Manuscript Division requested "guidance in the design and implementation of a system to
mechanically sort summaries of historical documents and produce printouts by author,
date and subject sequence respectively".
Subsequently, a source document for keypunch use was designed. Procedures were
developed for the compilation of data on the source document m standard format to
permit machine sorting and processing and to minimize editing problems. A system
was formulated to produce the required catalogue listings from the source data and
negotiations with the Department of National Revenue were made to undertake keypunching of source data and production of catalogue listings.
In mechanizing manuscript catalogues, two factors were given consideration, time
and cost It has been estimated that the production of catalogues to the papers of Sb
John A. Macdonald would occupy one clerk for one hundred and forty months, or
about twelve years. With two clerks this time would be six years; with three derks, four
years, and even with a half dozen clerks working full time on sorting and typing, two
fuU years would elapse before we had three finding aids ready for the use of researchers.
However, by bringing mechanization to bear upon the sorting and printing operation,
it should be possible to produce our three detailed finding aids within two weeks,
instead of two years.
The second factor, cost, has been considered. Our costs for clerical production
can be estimated as one clerk's average monthly salary (about $310) per 1000 lines.
In the mechanized system we have only one constant cost — programming — which in
our case amounts to $2000 irrespective of the sb» of the operation. We have computed
the variables (typing the transcription forms, keypunching and verifying) to be approximately $200 per 1000 Unes.
A graph Ulustrating comparison of costs of producing catalogues for varying sizes
of units, according to the number of lines of data, by clerical and electronic data pt» HISTORICAL BRANCH
41
cessing techniques, indicates that a project œntaining 200,000 lines would cost $62,000
by clerical staff while the same project handled by electronic data processing would
cost $42,000.
Since January 1965, we have been putting into the system data for three units;
Macdonald, Borden and Meighen. Eventually we hope to process aU our Prime Ministers' Papers in this way.
Protective Microfilming—In accordance with our policy of duplicating records and
documents of great national importance, microfilming of the papers of Canada's Prime
Ministers continues.
Meighen Papers. Papers of the Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen are being microfilmed; 35%
of this unit has been completed.
Tupper Papers. Papers of Sb Charles Tupper were microfilmed in 1968 and are contained on 114 reels of fbm.
King Papers.   The Primary Series,  1889-1936; Memoranda and Notes, 1887-1932;
Speeches, 1899-1932, have been filmed.
PUBLIC RECORDS SECTION—On AprU 1, 1965, the Section was created by transferring responsibility for pubUc records from the Post-Confederation Section to the new
unit. It was the result of the gradual improvement in record management procedures
in the federal government and the regulatory role played by the PubUc Archives. The
Order-in-Coundl of 16 February 1961 had dbected aU departments to schedule theb
records for retirement and eventual destruction or long-term retention. Staff from the
Manuscript Division was involved in the review of schedules, assessing the records and
selecting those which warranted preservation. This involvement was increased following
the PubUc Records Order of 1966 which confirmed the control of all destruction by
the Dominion Archivist and put May 1, 1969 as a deadline for the scheduling operation.
The flow of older records from Departments to the PubUc Archives, which had been
authorized by the Public Archives Act of 1912, became a normal and regular procedure.
The role of the PubUc Records Section is to insure that all files which have lost their
administrative usefulness are carefully scrutinized, that useless material is destroyed
whde the files which haVe permanent research value are transferred for permanent
conservation to the Public Archives, and made available to searchers.
WhUe the Orders-in-CouncU are prbnarUy concerned with records of the departments, a growing number of government agencies voluntarily foUow the main provisions
of these Orders and use the services of the PubUc Archives and of its Records Management Branch for a practical solution to theb record keeping problems. Since 1960 it
has been the practice for the Orders-in-CouncU establishing royal commissions of inquiry
to include a clause directing that theb records be transferred to the PubUc Archives
once theb work has been completed.
Another government poUcy will greatly influence the work of the Section. On
May 1, 1969, the Prime Minister announced in the House of Commons that except
for a few exempted classes, government records would not be withheld from research
for more than thirty years, while access to records less than thirty years old was encouraged. The results of the new policy on access whT be to accelerate the transfer of
records to the PubUc Archives, to increase theb use and to necessitate the early preparation of finding aids. Additional pressure on the Section has become apparent and
arrangements are being made to cope more fully with the increasing demands which
will be made on the Sedion hi 1970. 42 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
Accessions—Under the terms of the PubUc Archives Act as interpreted by the Orders-
in-CouncU referred to above, the PubUc Archives receives on a regular and continuinjl
basis accessions of records from departments each year. The holdings of the SectioJ
total about 38,000 linear feet. The Section has been organized into five sub-sectional
each responsible for a relatively homogenous group of records.
While it would not be expedient to bst aU the more than 850 individual accessio»
received during the past eleven years, it would probably be useful to mention briefly
the more significant acquisitions in the public records field.
Privy Council Office, State Books, 1867-1882, and Orders-in-Council (with other related
series), 1867-1949, together with either originals or copies of aU the relevant regifl
ters and indexes for these records.
Treasury Board, including an incomplete series of Treasury Board files, 1871-1903, and
the Treasury Board Minutes, 1911 and 1918-1957.
Registrar General's Office, i.e. records created by the Provincial Secretaries of the
Canadas and the Secretary of State after Confederation, in theb capacity as Reg«J
trar General. Included are registers containing the official copies of commissions,
letters patent, proclamations, land grants, appointments, charters of incorporation,
and other instruments issued under the Great Seal, 1760-1955.
North West Mounted Police, from the founding of the Force in 1873 to 1920, along
with scattered records of the R.C.M.P. after 1920.
Department of Finance, including official correspondence files of Ministers, Deputy
Ministers, and other departmental officers, 1819-1962.
Indian Affairs Branch, especially the Red (Eastern) and Black (Western) Series of
correspondence files, with their indexes and registers, plus letterbooks, 1871-1921.
Department of National Defence, including Army Headquarters files regarding the
Unemployment ReUef Project, 1932-1938; Army, Air Force, and Navy Policy and
operational fUes; and records of Canadian Military Headquarters, London, 1936-
1939.
Canadian National Railways and its predecessor railroads, dating back to the 1830's.
On 28 January 1963 a formal agreement was signed between the PubUc Archives ?
and the Canadian National Railways with a view to having the Archives take
custody of the historic records of that agency. Subsequently a number of transfers
of records have taken place. Continuous staff time has been allotted to the processing of these transfers, in order that any delay between receipt and accessibility
may be as short as possible.
Sessional Papers, 1916-1958. By agreement with the Clerk of the House of Commons,
all the original Sessional Papers for the years 1916-1958 are now deposited in the
PubUc Archives. Deposits wUl occur ten years after the close of each Parliaments
Access to these records, which are "public" in the full sense of the term, is not
restricted.
Wartime Prices and Trade Board, with the records of the four subsidiary corporations:
Commodity Prices Stabilization Corporation Ltd., Wartime Food Corporation Ltd.,
Canadian Wool Board Ltd., and Wartime Salvage Ltd. HISTORICAL BRANCH
43
AU the records of the federal government departments and agencies are classed
and described in Record Groups which are listed below. Those of agencies which preceded the Confederation Act are controlled by the Pre-Confederation Section and are
marked with an asterisk.
Title
Record  Group
Number
Agriculture Department
Ab Canada
Ab Transport Board
Allied War Supplies Corporation
Atomic Energy Control Board
58
61
Board of Gram Commissioners
Board of Transport Commissioners
Boards, Offices, Commissions
♦British Military and Naval Records
Canada CouncU 63
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 41
Canadian Commercial Corporation 65
Canadian Corporation for the 1967 World Exhibition       71
Canadian Government Exhibition Commission 72
Canadian Maritime Commission 49
Canadian National Railways 30
Centennial Commission 69
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 56
Citizenship and Immigration Department 26
Commodity Prices Stabilization Corporation 34
Comptroller of the Treasury 54
Defence Construction (1951) Ltd.
Dominion Bureau of Statistics
Dominion Coal Board
Dominion Observatories
Dominion-Provincial Conferences
83
31
Economic CouncU of Canada
Electoral Boundaries Commission
Emergency Measures Organization
♦Executive CouncU
Export Credits Insurance Corporation
External Affabs Department
External Aid Office
59
57
25
74
Finance Department
Fisheries Branch
Forestry Branch
19
23
Geological Survey
Governor General's Office 44
REPORT
FOR THE YEARS  1959-193
Record Group
Title
Number
Immigration Appeal Board
82
Immigration Branch
76
Indian Affairs Branch
10
Industry Department
62
Insurance Department
m
Interior Department
i5
International Joint Commission
51
Interdepartmental Committees
35
Justice Department
13
Labour Department
27
Marbie Department
42
Militia and Defence Department
9
Mines and Technical Surveys Department
21
Munitions and Supply Department
28
National Capital Commission
34
National Defence Department
24
National Film Board
53
National Health and Welfare Department
29
National Research CouncU
71
National Revenue Department
16
National War Services Department
44
Northern Affabs and National Resources Department          22
Northern Ontario Pipeline Crown Corporation
78
ParUament
14
Post Office Department
3
Privy CouncU Office
2
Provincial Secretary, Canada East
4
Provincial Secretary, Canada West
5
PubUc Archives of Canada
37
PubUc Service Commission
32
PubUc Works Department
11
Railways and Canals Department
43
Registrar General
68
Royal Canadian Mounted PoUce
18
Royal Commissions
33
St. Lawrence Seaway Authority
52
Secretary of State
6
Solicitor General Department
73
Tariff Board
79
Trade and Commerce Department
20
Transport Department
12
Treasury Board
55
Unemployment Insurance Commission
50
Veterans' Affairs Department
38
Wartime Prices and Trade Board
64 HISTORICAL BRANCH 45
AUXILIARY SERVICES SECTION—In 1966, in response to the increasing variety
and complexity of the services of the Manuscript Division, the Dominion Archivist
authorized the creation of a separate unit to be caUed the AuxiUary Services Section.
Initially, the Section assumed the responsibility for several service functions such as
interUbrary loan of microfilm, rental service, photoduplication service, registration of
researchers, circulation of manuscripts and records in the search rooms, and other
related functions.
At the same time the Section was given responsibitity for such continuing projects
as the preparation of the Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories, the Register of Dissertations, the preparation of displays of documents and the training of archiviste. Spedal duties were also entrusted to the Section hi relation to acquisitions and
reference. Mr. Michael Swift was the first head of the Section. The position is presently
vacant.
Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories—For many years Canadian historians and archivists had been discussing the need for a comprehensive list of all
significant manuscripts and records in Canadian archival institutions. The idea was
given impetus in 1958 when the Library of Congress began work on a National Union
Catalog of Manuscript Collections, which was completed four years later. In 1959 the
Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association decided to condud a survey
of selected archival repositories to compile a Ust of manuscript sources of a poUtical
nature. A committee, chabed by Mr. Bernard Weilbrenner, was formed and m May
1961 presented a Survey of Canadian Archives which contained general information on
the repositories, including a Ust of the pubUcations of each, and specific information on
poUtical papers avaUable. This was a most useful catalogue, but the ultimate objedive,
a full list of all archival material held in Canada, remained unachieved.
In September 1961, the Humanities Research CouncU, m co-operation with the
PubUc Archives of Canada, agreed to provide financial assistance for a projed to be
undertaken by the PubUc Archives. Dr. W. Kaye Lamb was the dbector and Mr. R. S.
Gordon the editor. A Ust of all archival repositories in Canada was compiled. Repositories to be included were federal, provincial, and municipal archives, university and
college libraries, legislative libraries, pubUc libraries, diocesan archives, historical
societies, museums, national historic parks, religious congregations and institutions,
business archives, and private collections if open to the pubUc. Repositories which held
material that they would normally be expected to hold (e.g., the archives of a company
which held the records of that company) would not be included, but when such archives
held material not normally expected to be in theb possession (e.g., fur trade journals in
the Diocesan Archives of Montreal), these should be included in the U.L.M.
Repositories were canvassed and personal contacts were estabUshed. Returns were
prepared by each repository and then forwarded to the Public Archives. Here they
were edited to insure uniformity, and the data was then transcribed from the return
forms to the index cards which made up the U.L.M. master catalogue. Cross reference
cards were also prepared.
Entries were arranged alphabeticaUy by unit title. Papers which were primarily
English were described in EngUsh, and those which were primarily French were
described hi French. In a few cases, such as the Laurier Papers, where a unit contained
material in both French and EngUsh, it was described in both languages. For each
entry, details were given regarding the type of papers, inclusive dates, linear extent,
location, ownership of originals, and finding aids avaUable. Descriptions were neces- 46 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969 i
sarily brief, the purpose being to provide the researcher with enough basic data to
enable him to dedde whether a particular source would be useful in his studies and
whether he ought to make inquiries at the repository which held the papers.
Of some 16,500 entries recdved, approximately 11,170 entries from 124 reposi- j
tories were included  in  the pubUshed  U.L.M.   A numerical symbol indicated the
archival mstitution in which each unit was located, and a fold-out page at the back of
the volume served as a key to these symbols.  The U.L.M., which included a cross-
reference index, was printed by photo offset and made its appearance in August j
1968.
By its very nature, this volume wiU require constant updating. At present we are
planning to have a revised edition ready by 1973.
No report on the C7X.M. would be complete without an expression of our very '
sincere thanks to aU the archival institutions whose co-operation and painstaking work
made the project possible.
Register of Dissertations—For some time the PubUc Archives had recognized the need j
for a source of up-to-date information on historical research in Canada. Finally, in
1965, at the urgent request of the Canadian Historical Association, the Manuscript j
Division undertook to compUe such a Ust which became known as the Register of Post- i
Graduate Dissertations in Progress in History and Related Subjects. In 1966 the first j
Ust was compiled and it has been revised annuaUy since that time. Mr. Michael Swift j
is Editor of the Register.
Universities in Canada are contacted each year and are asked to submit returns
containing information relating to post-graduate research being conducted in depart-
ments of history and in other related disciplines. In addition, departments of history '
at foreign universities are asked to submit returns containing information relating to
post-graduate research being conducted in Canadian history. These returns are then
edited in the Manuscript Division and information relating to the theses is maintained
in author, subject and cross reference files.
University offidals have given theb generous co-operation to the project, and
this co-operation is refleded in the growth of the Register during its fbst four years. In
the fbst year 552 entries were Usted and this number has grown to 816 in 1967, 1,131
in 1968 and 1,366 in 1969. This reflects both the improved coverage of the Register and
the increase in the number of research projects which are being undertaken at the postgraduate levd.
The Register has become a useful reference tool in the Manuscript Division. In
addition, through the efforts of the Canadian Historical Assodation which issues
a published version of the Register each year, the information is made available in
printed form to students, professors and other interested individuals both in Canada and
the United States.
Acquisitions Program—In 1965 the Manuscript Division began to examine the various
known programs for acquisition of private manuscripts and pubUc records with the
view to systematizing the searches for these materials. By statutory obligation, departmental poUcy and tradition, we were committed to search for and acqube manuscripts
and records covering the entire spectrum of Canada's poUtical, mUitary, economic,
reUgious, sodal and cultural history. Some of these activities were naturaUy Umited by
the federal nature of our government, and by the existence of provincial and local
archives which have a legitimate sphere of interest. This sphere has been recognized
and has always been an important factor in the PubUc Archives acquisition program. HISTORICAL BRANCH
47
The Division's first duty has always been to acquire and preserve the records of
the Federal Government and its predecessors, the various crown corporations, national
organizations, institutions and business concerns. The Division also collected the papers
of individuals who occupied either elective or appointive positions with the Federal
Government, or its various agencies. In addition efforts were made to gather and
preserve the papers of other national figures who made important contributions in
politics, business, finance, education, the arts and sciences, military and religion,
particularly if these contributions made an impact on the whole country, or on a large
part of it.
By 1967 the staff was directed to begin a systematic identification of persons,
families and national organizations, institutions and business companies, that fitted the
criteria. At the same time many preliminary contacts were made, even though some
of the persons so approached were still in the prime of theb lives. Understandably
theb papers were not as yet avaUable for preservation in the Archives. But the contacts that were estabUshed have yielded results, and several important collections have
been presented to the Division, or placed on deposit. When individuals prefer to retain
papers in theb own custody, we suggest that a provision be made in theb wills for
the ultimate transfer of these collections to the Archives. In such cases we offer advice
on means of arranging and protecting the papers, and filling significant gaps with
recorded recollections.
In the case of corporate bodies that fit the acquisition program criteria, our
effort is to obtain custody of historically-significant portions of records on a scheduled
basis. Naturally there are large portions of records that will not be worth preserving.
Such records should be scheduled for destruction, after a thorough appraisal and
examination by professional archivists.
Reference Services—In order to utilize specialized knowledge, it was found useful
to locate the names of authorities on Canadian history and related fields, and to make
them readily avaUable to archivists and researchers. Special attention is given to areas
requiring much research, about which little is known or has been written. The information contained within reference services files is intended primarily to facilitate the
answering of such written inquiries recdved by the Public Archives of Canada as are
considered to require an undue amount of the archivists' research time. It may also
be used to answer researchers' verbal inquiries for bibliographical information and for
other purposes. The fUes are open only to the archival staff, but relevant information
may be communicated to researchers.
The compilation of subject and author indexes is now in progress. The author
index, containing addresses and qualifications, is assembled from names discovered in
various learned journals, cumulative book indexes, and such sources as the archivists
have found to be particularly informative when pursuing a complex or unusual inquiry.
A fully cross-referenced subject index will lead from specialized fields and topics to the
appropriate authorities. Periodic checks of addresses and other data included in the
index are conducted in order to maintain the accuracy of the files.
Archives Training Courses—The Manuscript Division annually conducts in-service
training courses for new archivists. For approximately two weeks, lectures are given
by senior members of staff on various aspects of archival principles and procedure.
These lectures are complemented by tours of the various Divisions, the Records Centre,
and by practical work.
In the fall of 1968, the Division participated hi the Archives Course given under
the auspices of the Pan American Institute of Geography and History. 48 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19® I
PUBLIC For ihe Library ûie last decade has been a Period ojE assessment,
a T>fnimrw?c of drastic curtaUment in some respects and of remarkable expan- I
ARCHIVEE sioQ fa othere
LIBRARY -pjje creation of the National Library in 1953 limited the
role of the Public Archives Library. Thousands of books,
periodicals and government pubUcations, American, British and even Canadian, we» I
transferred to the National Library. The purchase of new books was kept to a bare
mhiimum, and the staff remained stationary at seven, in spite of signMcant increases
in reference, circulation and reproduction services. There was a distinct possibility that
the Archives Library would be merged in the National Library. It was decided, how- |
ever, that the PubUc Archives should continue to have a specialized reference library
whose holdings and staff would serve the needs of the Archives and those engaged in
research at the Archives. The staff was increased graduaUy to permit it to meet its
obligations.
When the PubUc Archives and the National Library moved to the new building,
the important coUection of newspapers was transferred to the National Library, along
with many books which were not hi frequent use, but the Archives Library remained
a Division of the PubUc Archives. The Library is careful to avoid dupUcation witb
the National Library, and its accessions are restrided to those required to serve its
cUentele which is chiefly composed of researchers in Canadian history.
The Library is under the direction of Miss Jutidte Bourque. It now has a staff of
fourteen and consists of three sections: Reference and Circulation, Cataloguing, Periodicals and Government Documents.
REFERENCE AND CIRCULATION SECTION—In addition to advising researchers
and producing the books requested, the Section answers inquiries by letter or by telephone and provides photocopies. The increase in the work load is very notable. While
only 600 hiqubies were received in 1959, the Section dealt with 2,821 in 1969. While
only 355 researchers were registered in 1959, the number had increased to 1,686 in 196*
No statistics were kept of the number of pages reproduced hi 1959, but it was probably
less than one thousand. In 1969, copies of 51,820 pages were provided.
The Section also prepares detailed indexes to facilitate reference services. These
are extremely useful but work on them can proceed only when there is a respite from
normal duties. Hundreds of references were added to the biographical index, particularly those from the reports of the Ontario Land Surveyors Assodation and the
Canadian Trade Review. A ship index has been commenced and it now contains all
the ships mentioned in the fbst few issues of the periodical Inland Seas. AU ship-wreck
reports in the Sessional Papers from 1873 to 1900 have been coUated. The index to
directories of cities and counties is constantly added to. FinaUy, the research files
receive hundreds of additional items each year, consisting of material of historical or
current interest to Canada.
Despite the transfer of the newspaper coUection to the National Library, the
reference demands on the Archives Library have continued to increase, reaching a
sharp peak during the Centennial year. This increase, like that for the Manuscript
Division, is a result of the increasing numbers of registered researchers. It is also due
to the nature of the coUection, a rich source of published information on the development of Canada, and also, in no smaU measure, to the reputation of the staff far
spedaUzed knowledge concerning the contents as weU as the location of its sources, and HISTORICAL BRANCH
willingness to advise, guide and assist searchers and staff alike in pursuing theb
research. The circulation of books and newspapers during the period is significant for
a reference library without a lending service.
Books
Newspapers
1959
6,752
961
1960
8,603
1,251
1961
9,405
1,341
1962
18,493
1,510
1963
22,015
1,886
1964
28,127
2,736
1965
25,376
2,144
1966
40,496
2,509
1967
59,065
-
1968
48,858
-
1969
49,958
—
CATALOGUING SECTION—This Section is responsible for the cataloguing of books,
pamphlets and microfilms. It also arranges for the binding of new books and the repair
of old ones. It consists of four persons.
While there is still only one full-time professional cataloguer, the Section was able,
in 1969, to obtain the services of a specialist on a part-time basis. In 1968-69, we
were thus able to catalogue the important Dr. R. J. Cyriax coUection of material
relating to Arctic exploration and at the end of 1969, to commence the full cataloguing
of many rare, sometimes -unique pamphlets that, until now, could only be found if the
imprint date was known. In 1969, 2,370 books and pamphlets were catalogued, compared to 870 in 1959.
In addition, the Section undertook the preparation of microfiches of some of its
pamphlets. This project began in 1968, when the University of Guelph requested
microfiche copies of several of our pamphlets, and other universities expressed the
same interest. By the end of 1969, we had reproduced 173 pamphlets on 243 microfiches. The price per fiche was under 75 cents. It is hoped to continue this method of
giving wider use to rare and very useful material.
PERIODICALS AND GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS SECTION—This Section was
created hi 1965 but obtained a fuU-time professional head only in 1969. MeanwhUe, a
great number of items which were not essential to research in Canadian history were
transferred to the National Library. In addition to revising and completing the alphabetical Ust of titles of periodicals, the listing of government pubUcations was commenced.
More ddaUed and accurate lists wUl be prepared in future.
The Library maintains a coUection of 1,928 periodical titles of which 357 are
current and b received, in 1969 alone, 5,049 government documents. 50 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-1969 I
To supplement the Canadian Periodical Index and the Social Science and Humani- r
ties Index, the Section has also begun to compile and index other periodicals equally
useful to the staff and searchers.
The Dbector of the Archives Library also has responsibility for the selection!I
books, and the preparation of the Canadian contribution to the International Biblio- i
graphy of Historical Sciences.
Accessions were numerous, to a considerable degree through gifts from indivi-1
duals, societies and institutions. They averaged 2,500 volumes per year. The present
holding of the library is 100,000 volumes. A brief description of some of the more I
notable acquisitions foUows.
List of British Government Gifts
1968
British Museum. Catalogue of printed maps, charts and plans.  Photolithographic éd..
complete to 1964. London, The Trustees, 1967.
15 v. 36 cm.
Great Britain. Historical Manuscripts Commission. Guide to the reports of the Royal
Commission on Historical Manuscripts, 1911-1957. London, H.M.S.O., 1966.
3 v. 26 cm.
[Monk, Sir James"} 1745-1826. State of the present form of government of the province j
of Quebec.  With a large appendix; containing extracts from the minutes of an
investigation into the past administration of justice in that province, instituted by-
order of Lord Dorchester in 1787, and from other original papers.   London,»
Printed for J. Debrett, 1789.
176 p. 21 cm.
Ragueneau, Paul, s.j., 1608-1680. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé en la Mission des Peres
de la Compagnie de Iesvs, aux Hurôs, & aux païs plus bas de la Nowelle France,
depuis l'Esté de l'année 1649 jusques à l'Esté de l'année 1650. Enuoyée au R. P.
Clavde de Lingendes, Prouincial de la Compagnie de Iesvs en la Prouince de
France. A Paris, Chez Sebastien Cramoisy ... et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1651.
187 p. 17 cm.
List of Selected Acquisitions
1959 -1969
Apianus, Petrus, 1495-1552.  Cosmographia Petri Apiani, per Gemmam Frisivm apudl
Louanienses medicum & mathematicû insignem, iam demum ab omnibus vindicatal
mendis, ac non-nullis quoq; locis aucta.  Add it is eiusdem argument i Ubellis ipsiusl
Gemmae Fristi. Antuerpiae, Vaeneunt sub scuto Basiliensi, Gregorio Bonito, 1545.
66 1. 23 cm.
Catholic Church. Liturgy and ritual. Polyglot manual.   [With the approbation of Rt
Rev. P. Durieu, D.D., O.ML, Bishop of New Westminster.   Kamloops, B.C.,|
1896-97]
183, 30, 33, 31, 32, 63, 153 p. 15 cm.
Etat militaire de France, pour Tannée 1759 . . . Paris, Guillyn [etc.] 1758-93.
400 p. 15 cm. HISTORICAL BRANCH 51
Falconer, Thomas. I. On the nomination of agents formerly appointed to ad in
England for the colonies of North America. II. A brief statement of the dispute
between Sb C. Metcalf and the House of Assembly of the Province of Canada.
[London] Privately printed, 1844.
21 p. 18 cm.
Gibson, James, 16907-1752. A Boston merchant of 1745; or, Incidents in the life of
James Gibson, a gentleman volunteer at the expedition to Louisburg; with a journal
of that siege, never before published in this country.  By one of his descendants.
Boston, Redding, 1847.
102 p. 13 cm.
Great Britain, Ministry of Transport and CivU Aviation. RoU of Honour of the Merchant
Navy and Fishing Fleets, 1939-1945. London [Printed under the authority of Her
Majesty's Stationery Office, n.d.]
3 v. 26 cm.
Hanson, Elizabeth. An account of the captivity of Elizabeth Hanson, late of Kachecky
in New-England, who, with four of her children and servant-maid, was taken captive
by the Indians and carried into Canada. . . . Taken in substance from her own
mouth, by Samuel Bownas. A new ed. London, Printed and sold by James
PhiUips, 1782.
26 p. 17 cm.
Lalemant, Jérôme, s.j., 1593-1673. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé de plvs remarqvable
es Missions des Peres de la Compagnie de Iesvs, en la Nowelle France, svr le grand
flevve de S. Lavrens en l'année 1647. Enuoyée au R. P. Prouincial de la Prouince
de France. Par le Supérieur des Missions de la mesme Compagnie. A Paris, Chez
Sebastien Cramoisy . . . et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1648.
276 p. 17 cm.
Lanman, Charles, 1819-1895. A summer in the wilderness; embracing a canoe voyage
up the Mississippi and around Lake Superior.  New York, D. Appleton; Philadelphia, Geo. S. Appleton, 1847.
208 p. 19 cm.
La Salle, Nicolas de. Relation of the discovery of the Mississippi river, written from
the narrative of Nicolas de La SaUe, otherwise known as the Utile M. de La
SaUe; the translation done by MelvhTe B. Anderson.  Chicago, The Caxton club,
1898.
69 p. 24 cm.
Le leune, Paul, s.j., 1591-1664. Rdation de ce qvi s'est passé de plvs remarqvable avx
Missions des Peres de la Compagnie de Iesvs, en la NoweUe France, es années mil
six cens cinquante six & mil six cens chiquante sept. A Paris, Chez Sebastien
Cramoisy ... et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1658.
211p. 17 cm.
Le Jeune, Paul, s.j., 1591-1664. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé en la NoweUe France en
l'année 1637. Enuoyée au R. Père Provindal de la Copmagnie de Iesvs en la
Prouince de France. Par le P. Paul le leune de la mesme Compagnie, Supérieur
de la Residence de Kebec. A Roven, Chez lean Le BovUenger, 1638.
336, 256 p. 17 cm. 52 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-lfMI
Le Jeune, Paul, s.j., 1591-1664. Relation de ce qvi s'est en la NoweUe France en
l'année 1639.   Enuoyée au R. Père Provincial de la Compagnie de Iesvs en h
Prouince de France. Par le P. Paul Le Ieune, de la mesme Compagnie, Supérieur
de la Residence de Kébec. A Paris, Chez Sebastien Cramoisy, 1640.
116 [i.e. 166] 174 p. 17 cm.
McLeod, Alexander W. The Methodist ministry further defended against the exclusive
daims of high Episcopalians, hi a series of letters addressed to the Rev. Charles J.
Shreve, Rector of Guysboro, in reply to his letters, entitled The divine origin and
unhiterrupted succession of episcopacy maintained.   Pidou, "N.S., Printed by J.
Stiles, 1840.
228 p. 18 cm.
Medina, Pedro da. L'arte del navegar, in laqval si contengono le regole, dechiarationi,
secreti, & auisi, aba bona nauegation necessarij. Composta per rEccel. Dottor M.
Pietro da Medina, & tradotta de lingua Spagnola in volgar ItaUano, à beneficicJH
vtitità de ciascadun nauigante. In Vinetia [Nella stamparia de Auretio Pincio] ad j
instantia di Gioanbattista Pedrezano, 1554.
[12] cxxxvti 1. 22 cm.
Nevins, John Birkbeck, 1818-1903. A narrative of two voyages to Hudson's Bay, with
traditions of the North American Indians.  Published under the direction of the
Committee of General Literature and Education, appointed by the Society for i
Promoting Christian Knowledge. London, Printed for the Sodety for Promo^B
Christian Knowledge, 1847.
156 p. 15 cm.
Ogden, James, 1718-1802. The British Lion rous'd; or, Acts of the British worthies, a
poem in nine books. Manchester, Printed by R. Whitworth, 1762.
223 p. 26 cm.
Ragueneau, Paul, s.j., 1608-1680. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé de plvs remarqvable es
Missions des Peres de la Compagnie de Iesvs, en la NoweUe France, es années
1650 & 1651. Enuoyée au R. P. Prouindal de la Prouince de France. Par le P. Pavl
Ragveneav, Supérieur des Missions de la mesme Compagnie. A Paris, Chez Sebastien
Cramoisy ... et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1652.
146 p. 17 cm.
Rich, Edwin Ernest, 1904.   The history of the Hudson's Bay Company, 1670-1870.
With a foreword by Winston ChurchUl. London, Hudson's Bay Record Society,
1958-59.
2 v. 25 cm.
Annotated copies, limited edition.
Riel, Louis David, 1844-1885.  Pour prouver aux nations sauvages que le peuple de la
Rivière Rouge ne veut pas les laisser maltraiter par le Canada . . . Fort Garry, 1870.
1 f. 21 cm.
Saint Edward's Guild.   S. Edward's Gutid; rules, suggestions, collects.   [Edinburgh,
Printed by St. Giles' Printing Co., 1888?]
9, 8, 15, 30, 11, 67, 74 p. 15 cm.
Saint-Ours, Charles Louis Roch de, 1753-1834.  Au public; defenses de Mr. de Saint-
Ours, adressées au Comité opposé à la Chambre d'Assemblée, tenue chez les
R.R.P J». Recolets, le 30 novembre 1784. [s.l.n.d.]
4 p. 23 cm. HISTORICAL BRANCH 53
Vimont, Barthélémy, s.j., 1594-1667. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé en la NoweUe France
en l'année M. DC. XL. Enuoyée au R. P. Prouincial de la Compagnie de Iesvs
de la Prouince de France. Par le P. Barthélémy Vimont, de la mesme Compagnie,
Supérieur de la Residence de Kébec. A Paris, Chez Sebastien Cramoisy, 1641.
197, 196 p. 18 cm.
Vimont, Barthélémy, s.j., 1594-1667. Relation de ce qvi s'est passé en la NoweUe France
en l'année 1642 & 1643. Enuoyée au R. P. lean FiUeav, Prouincial de la Compagnie
de Iesvs, en la Prouince de France. Par le R. P. Barthélémy Vimont, de la mesme
Compagnie, Supérieur de toute la Mission. A Paris, Chez Sebastien Cramoisy . . .
et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1644.
309 p. 17 cm.
The Winnipeg Daily Sun. RebeUion number. A history of the Saskatchewan uprising.
[Winnipeg] 1885.
26 p. 59 cm.
MAP Since its creation the Map Division has been concerned with the
DIVISION coUection of aU maps, charts, plans, atlases and other cartographic
material that relate to the history of Canada.
In 1959 the staff consisted of two professional archivists and
three clerks. The chief of the Division for the whole period of this report has been
Theo. E. Layng. From 1968 the Division has been organized ha two sections: the
Canadian Section, responsible for all maps relating to the history of Canada, consisting
of two archivists, two social science support staff and three clerks, and the Foreign
Section, responsible for a coUection of world maps other than Canadian, consisting of
two geographers and one clerk.
The Foreign Section had its genesis in 1965, when a coUection of some 150,000
world topographical maps from the map Ubrary of the former Geographical Branch,
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, was transferred to the Map Division.
FoUowing this transfer, in accordance with agreements and conventions that had been
estabUshed with other countries, aU maps which would have been sent to the Geographical Branch were received by the Map Division. Until the end of 1967 the
foreign maps together with accretions to that coUection, were cared for by a map
clerk. The reorganization of the Map Division late m 1967 resulted in the establishment of the Canadian Section under an archivist, Courtney C.J. Bond, and the Foreign
Section under a geographer, Mrs. G. Lochhead, in 1968.
Until 1967 the major part of the Division's coUection was held in the PubUc
Archives building at 330 Sussex Drive. After the opening of the Records Centre at
Tunney's Pasture in 1956, maps and plans not frequently consulted were transported
there and maintained as the "subsidiary coUection". In 1961 a depot for this part of
the coUection was estabUshed in a warehouse closer to the PubUc Archives Building.
In 1967 the whole coUection was moved to the new bunding. Since FaU 1967, the
holdings of the Division were given the designation "National Map CoUection".
The work of both sections of the Map Division comprises four basic functions:
acquisition, classification and cataloguing, reference and research, and conservation.
Maps must be sought therefore an active acquisition program must be carried on.
Once they are part of the coUection retrieval must be possible making classification
and cataloguing necessary, as well as the provision of finding aids. Members of the 54 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-l^B
staff must be able to carry on searches using the established system of finding-aids on
behalf of clients who may be agencies of government students or publishers. The
coUection must be kept under optimum conditions so that deterioration from use or
from physical and chemical environmental conditions is kept at a minimum.
Departments and agencies of the Government of Canada from time to time deposit
coUections of maps, charts and plans no longer in continuous use, or surplus to requirements. Large coUections have been received from the Department of PubUc Works,
the Canadian National RaUways, the Legal Surveys Division of the Surveys and
Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, and the Library of
ParUament Departments depositing maps and plans in this manner have the right to
consult them whenever required.
Both Sections of the Map Division maintain a close relationship with map libraries
in universities and other mstitutions in Canada through the Association of Canadian
Map Libraries. They also cbculate check-lists to these map libraries requesting information about theb holdings. The eventual aim is the pubUcation of a national union
catalogue of maps.
Both Sections have profited by contributions of surplus maps from participating
map libraries. The Foreign Section has redistributed to a number of mstitutions some
thousands of maps surplus to its own collection.
The Canadian Section since 1967 has compiled the annual Canadian contributif
to the Bibliographie cartographique internationale, pubUshed in Paris under the joint
sponsorship of the Comité national français de Géographie, the International Geographical Union and UNESCO.
An exhibition of some one hundred maps and atlases depicting the history of the
nation, entitled Canada in Maps — Le Canada par les Cartes, was prepared and
mounted by the Canadian Section. The exhibition was opened on October 30, 1969
and will run until February 15, 1970. A catalogue compUed and printed in French
and EngUsh has received wide distribution across Canada. The maps displayed were
photographed by the National Film Board for the preparation of a series of diapositives on various themes of Canadian history with accompanying text. An article on
the operations of tins section has been prepared for pubUcation in the periodical Indian
Archives, New Delhi.
Archivists from other nations receiving training in procedures at the Public
Archives have taken courses in the Map Division. Under the auspices of the Pan-
American Institute of Geography and History a group of senior archivists from Latin
America and the Caribbean area in 1968 examined the methodology of Canadian
map Ubraries. In 1969 a smaller group from Africa and the Phitippines received more
intensive training in the Division.
THE CANADIAN SECTION—Acquisitions—At the beginning of 1959 there were
some 139,000 items in the coUection of the Map Division. One major source for the
acquisition of current maps has been the cartographical services of the Government of
Canada. The Surveys and Mapping Branch of the Department of Mines and Technical
Surveys has provided at least three copies of all of its topographical maps and those
which were produced until 1967 by the Army Survey EstabUshment. Hydrographie
charts produced by the Marine Sdences Branch of the above department, maps from
the Geological Survey of Canada, aeronautical charts and other thematic cartography
have contributed to total accessions of some 33,000 items since 1959. Of these, of
course, a good percentage were duplicates. ■—
HISTORICAL BRANCH
55
With increased map production general throughout Canada since the great
technological advances of the last two decades there has been greater decentralization
of map production. Because of this, because of increased economic devdopment
and rapid urban growth, and because of the need to collect all information on
Canadian map production for the Bibliographie, there has been an increased concentration on the acquisition of maps from provincial and municipal sources since
1967. The head of the Section visits map-producing agencies across the country from
time to time.
Père René Baudry, representative of the PubUc Archives m Paris, has since 1961
been securing and forwarding photographs of maps in French archives. Mrs. J. M.
White, representative of the Department in London, forwards maps which are offered
to her from time to time by the PubUc Records Office, has maps copied and forwarded,
and maintains liaison with the curators of great coUections of maps in Britain.
Archivists of the Manuscript Division of the PubUc Archives who discover maps
in theb coUections bring these to the attention of the Map Division, and photographic
copies are made.
A Ust of the most notable accessions is given below.   Many were gifts to the
Public Archives, several of which deserve special mention as outstanding contributions.
In 1967, Mr. H. R. MacMUlan of Vancouver purchased in England and presented to
the Archives, a magnificent chart by James Cook, "A plan of the River St
Lawrence from Green Island to Cape Carrouge", drawn about 1763.
la 1960, on the 500th anniversary of the death of Prince Henry the Navigator, the
Government of Portugal presented to the National Library which transferred to
the Map Division, a six-volume set, Portugaliae Monumenta Cartographica by
Armando Cortesao and AveUno Teixeba da Mota, containing many colour reproductions of the classical works of Portuguese cartography.
In 1967, the British Government presented, on the occasion of the opening of the new
building, several major works: A beautiful restored Ptolemy Geographia, Rome,
1507, the second edition on that year, containing a copy of Johan Ruysch's
world map.
A second Ptolemy Geographia, the 1520 Strassburg version.
Benedetto Bordone, Isolaria, 1547.
Christopher Saxton's County Atlas of England and Wales,  1574-79, a hand-
coloured edition of this early EngUsh atlas.
John Speed, A prospect of the most famous parts of the world, 1662.
Le Sr. Bellin, "Cartes de la NouveUe France . . .", 1752, a group of manuscript
maps gathered in a portfolio.
In 1967, the National Library of Australia presented a work of James Cook, "A sketch
of Harbour Grace and Carbonere in Newfoundland, together with other documents relating to the Survey of Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Gulf of St Lawrence
and adjacent waters, 1758-62."
EARLY MAPS
G. Marcel, Choix dt Cartes et de Mappemondes des XIV et XV SiScles, 1896.
D. Carlos Sanz, Mapas Antiguos del Mundo, Sighs XV-XVI (gift of the Embassy of
Spain to Canada). 56 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
16TH CENTURY MAPS, ATLASES AND GEOGRAPHICAL WORKS
Peter Apian (Apianus), Cosmagraphia, 1545.
Benedetto Bordone, Isolaria, 1547.
Jacopo Gastaldi, Terra de labrador et Nova Francia, 1553.
Pietro de Medina, L'Arte del Navegar, 1554. (This important early book on navigation
contains a full-page woodcut map of the Atlantic showing Europe and the "Mundo
Novo").
Mercator, Gerard, World map, 1569 (facsimUe).
Braun and Hogenberg, Civitates Orbis Terrarum, Vols. I-III, 1572-1618 (facsimile).
Juan Pimentel, map of Caracas, 1578, (presented by the Ambassador of Venezuela).
Bouguereau, M., Le ThSâtre Françoys, 1594 (facsimUe).
Hondius-Kaerius, map of Europe, 1595.
Mercator, Gerard, Atlas, 1595 (facsimUe).
17TH CENTURY MAPS, ATLASES AND GEOGRAPHICAL WORKS
Arnoldo di Arnoldi, Universale Descrittione del Mondo, 1601.
H. Hondius, America Septentrionalis, 1630.
[Hondius or Jansson] Carte de TAmSrique 1646.
[Bressani] Novae Franciae Accurata Delineatio, 1657.
S. Sanson d'AbbeviUe, TAmSrique en Plusieurs Cartes . . . [1662].
J. Blaeu, Extrema Americae Versus Boream, ubi Terra Nova, 1664.
N. Sanson D'AbbeviUe, Introduction à la GSographie, 1692.
18TH CENTURY MAPS, ATLASES AND GEOGRAPHICAL WORKS
N. Blackmore, A Description of the Bay of Fundy, 1711-12.
R. en G. Wetstein, Platte Kaart van de geheele Werelt te Amsterdam, c. 1720.
L. Renard, Septentrionalora Americae, 1739.
38 Plans (photocopies) of new France and British North America, 1745-1763 (from
Royal United Services Institute).
Le Rouge, TAmSrique suivant le R. P. Charlevoix, 1746.
Le Rouge, Mappemonde qui comprend les nouvelles dScouvertes . . . 1748.
M. Seutter, Partie Orientale de la Nouvelle France ou du Canada . . . 1750.
N. Bellin, Partie occidentale de la Nouvelle France, 1755.
Homann hebs, America Septentrionalis a Domino d'Anville in Galliis édita nunc in
Anglia , 1756.
Covens and Mortier, TAmSrique Septentrionale . . . , 1757.
James Turner, Nova Scotia and parts adjacent, 1760.
N. BeUin, Carte RSduite de TOcSan Septentrional . . . , 1766.
J.F.W. DesBarres, View of New York from the North West, c. 1772.
I HISTORICAL BRANCH 57
JF.W. DesBarres, The Atlantic Neptune, (portfolio of 25 facsimUe sheets).
Maurelle Antoine Moithey, Carte Nouvelle des possessions Angloises en Amérique . . . ,
mi.
J. B. d'AnvUle, TAmSrique du Sud, 1775.
W. Faden, Chart of the North West Coast of America and the North East Coast of
Asia explored in 1778 and 1779. (4 editions).
J. Janvier, TAmSrique septentrionale divisée en les principaux Stats, 1782.
Wright Thomas, A New Chart of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 1790.
Frederick Holland, nine of ten sheets of a large manuscript map of Lower Canada and
surrounding regions, 1791. The tenth sheet had been hi the Map Division's collection for some years.
Thomas Backhouse, Port Hood . . . , Cape Breton, 1798.
The Harbour of Canso, 1798.
St. Ann's Bay and Harbour, 1798.
Hendrik de Leth, Plan des Fortifications de la ville de Louisbourg . . . [n.d.].
19TH CENTURY, GENERAL MAPS OF CANADA
A. Arrowsmith, America, 1804.
J. Cary, A new Map of Upper and Lower Canada, 1807.
Joseph Bouchette, Lower Canada, 1815.
David Thompson, re-worked copy of his 1814 map of the North-West, 1843 Map of
the Oregon Territory [1843] (these are photocopies).
[J. Thomson], Canada and Nova Scotia, 1821.
James Wyld, Map of North America . . . , 1827-28.
James Wyld, Upper Canada, 1835.
Joseph Bouchette, The Province of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island, 1846.
Ens. R.W. Webb, manuscript map of Lake Champlain, 1849.
AL. RusseU, Map of the Province of Manitoba, 1871, a manuscript map.
S.J. Dawson, The Red River Route, 1872, a large manuscript map.
E. DeviUe, Map of the Province of Manitoba and part of the North West Territories . .. ,
1883 (manuscript).
H.C. Tunison, Tunison's Map of Ontario, 1899.
TOWNSHIP AND COUNTY MAPS AND ATLASES
Von den Velden, A plan of the Townships of Cox, Paspebiac and Hopetown (Que.)
[1800].
George Tremaine, County of Waterloo, 1861.
W. Chewett, County of Wellington, 1861.
H.F. Waitings, Counties of St. John and Kings, (New Brunswick), 1862.
HE. Waitings, Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Prescott and Russell,
(Ontario), 1862. 58 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
H.R. Page & Co., Illustrated Historical Atlas of the Counties of Lincoln and Welland,
Ontario, 1876.
H. Belden & Co., Illustrated Historical Atlas of Carleton County, Ontario, 1879.
H.R. Page & Co., Illustrated Historical Atlas of County of Haldimand, Ontario, 1879.
H. Belden & Co., Illustrated Atlas of the Dominion of Canada, with supplement on
Lanark County, 1880 (Ontario) and on Renfrew County, 1881 (Ontario).
H. Belden & Co., Illustrated Atlas of the Dominion of Canada, with supplement on
Kent County, 1881 (Ontario).
HamUton Bros. & Low, Ltd., 19th century manuscript maps of timber limits along the
Ottawa and Gatineau rivers, Hawkesbury, Ontario, from the records of the company.
Bronson Co., Ottawa, 28 plans of timber limits adjacent to the Ottawa River from
records of the company.
Southern New Brunswick, 91 plans, surveys of roads and lots.
HYDROGRAPHIC CHARTS
240 photocopies of manuscript charts of Canadian waters, from the Admbalty, London.
Photocopies of W.F. Owens' hydrographie charts of Canadian waters, from the Admbalty.
11 manuscript base charts of the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes, dating from
1823 to 1888, by H.W. Bayfield and Staff Commander MaxweU, received from
Marine Sciences Branch, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys.
Laurie's Chart of the Island and Banks of Newfoundland . . . , 1856.
Smith Sound, Kennedy and Robeson Channels, 1876 (Admiralty chart).
Discoveries in the Arctic Seas up to 1859 (Admiralty chart). 439 blue-prints and other
plans of canals of the St. Lawrence system. 81 manuscript plans and tracings, largely
of the Welland Canal.
PLANS OF CITIES, TOWNS, AND BUILDINGS
John Adams, map of Montreal, 1825 (photocopy).
Map of the Town of St. Catharines . . . , 1852.
Parliament BuUding, Ottawa, 1859 (architect's plan of fbst floor, showing proposed
use of rooms).
Birdseye view of Peterborough, 1875.
Detroit and its environs, 1876.
Chas. E. Goad, Atlas of the City of Montreal, Vols. 1 and 2, 1880.
Dawson Brothers, The Island and City of Montreal, 1881.
340 maps, charts and plans of Fortress Halifax, from superintendent Halifax Citadel.
346 mUitary plans relating to early fortifications of Halifax, from office of Royal Canadian Engineers, Halifax.
6 manuscript maps of Halifax area, period 1897, from Dominion Hydrographer.    I
Map of Greater Winnipeg, 1912. HISTORICAL BRANCH 59
Insurance Plan (Atlas) Carleton Place, Ont, 1919.
A group of plans of the area surrounding London, Ontario, documents relating to an
early use of aerial photography in Canadian mapping, 1920-26.
Manuscript map of the Mennonite community in Yarrow, B.C., c. 1942.
23 maps of the dty and township of Hull and of Pontiac county (Que.).
MISCELLANEOUS MAPS, PLANS AND WRITTEN WORKS
1,034 plans of Indian reserves, from Legal Survey Division, Department of Mines and
Technical Surveys.
Some 1,200 maps and tracings, once the property of Dr. Robert BeU of the Geological
Survey of Canada, left by the estate of the late J.C. Outram, Ottawa.
Dr. Robert Bell's track surveys, from the National Museum of Canada.
3,000 maps and 1,000 aerial photographs relating to Canada's part in Fbst World War,
from Historical Section, G.S., Canadian Army.
A number of archival plans, from Archives, Canadian National Railways.
A number of plans of works and structures erected as projects commemorating the
Centennial of Confederation.
Plans of structures erected for the Government of Canada at Expo 67, Montréal.
Walter AUward, 30 plans of the Canadian memorial at Vimy Ridge, gift of heirs of
Walter AUward.
School of Architecture, University of Toronto
47 plans of historical buildings in Kingston, Ont., 1962.
53 plans of buildings in Kingston, Dundas, Hamilton and Waterdown, 1963.
44 plans of buildings in Brockvtile and Hamilton, 1964.
57 plans of buildings m the Port Hope area, 1965.
63 plans of buildings in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Brockville and Hamilton, 1966.
62 plans of buildings in Brant and Norfolk counties, 1967.
58 plans of buildings in Gudph, Paris, Brant county, etc., 1968.
63 plans of buildings in Perth, Merrickville and Burritt's Rapids, 1969.
School of Architecture, McGill University
32 plans of buddings m old Montreal, 1965.
G.R.F. Prowse, Cartological Material, Vol. I (typescript), Winnipeg, 1936.
Cataloguing—Prior to 1959 the Map Division had developed a unique area code for
the classification of its maps. This code, which was further developed during the period
covered by this report, involves combinations of three digits; the first digit designates
a province or group of provinces, and the last two, of which only some twenty combinations are used, indicate subdivisions of the major area. Since so few combinations
are used, the system is easily memorized, and the finding of maps is facilitated.
In the period 1959-69 a further refinement of the classification system was prepared, by which a letter or letter and numeral are added to the area code to indicate
the type of equipment in which the map is stored. This readUy facilitates search and
re-filing. A catalogue card system, which includes a carefully prepared main catalogue
card and several cross-reference cards, was created during the last decade. 60 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-l^B
In 1959 work was started by Paul-E. Dumas, an archivist with the Map Division,
on a check-Ust of maps relating to Canada, both ha the Map Division's coUection and
elsewhere. This work, entitled Cartes géographiques du XVIIe siScle relatives au Canada,
was completed in 1961. In 1962 M. Dumas completed Cartes gSographiques du XVllh
siScle relatives au Canada. Both have been revised since. They remain in manuscript
form, and are avaUable on microfilm. Several copies have been made for Canadian
libraries.
Work continued on the registration of the main part of the coUection on catalogue
cards. The specific task of cataloguing was assigned to an archivist in 1966. The next
year, increasing demands for historical research in connection with the Centenary of
Confederation put a heavy load on the entire staff of the Map Division, so that cataloguing fell behind. The creation of a catalogubig unit early in 1968 made it possible
for a concentration on this aspect of the work; this was particularly necessary because
of the increased number of maps that were coming in, partly as a result of the active
policy of acquisition.
An additional catalogubig function was also undertaken in that year. The Mag
Division took over from the Geographical Branch of the Department of Energy, Mines
and Resources the compUation of the Canadian portion of the Bibliographie cartographique internationale. This annual bibUography of the map-production of a number of
nations is compiled and sent to Paris for pubUcation. In the fbst compUation by the
Public Archives some 1,370 Canadian maps and atlases published in 1967 were Usted.
In 1969, 3,209 items were catalogued, a considerable increase over the previous year.
The cataloguing unit in 1969 commenced a long-term program of compiling and
distributing check-lists of maps dating from 1600 onward to selected Canadian map
libraries, with a solicitation to these libraries to forward information on their own
holdings. This is expected to lead to the eventual compUation of a national union Ust
or catalogue of maps. The work was greatly facilitated by the collaboration of the Association of Canadian Map Libraries. To make possible the reproduction of the checklists by photoUthography the main catalogue card used by the Map Division was altered
in format. Replacement of the old-style cards by the new type is proceeding as the
check-Ust program advances. The fbst check-Ust included world maps for the period
1600-1700, the second Usted maps of the western hemisphere for the same period and
the thbd Usted atlases of facsimUe maps and facsimile maps. The program has been
weU received and forty-six map Ubraries across Canada are now involved.
Reference and research—Inquiries addressed to the Map Division have shown a steady
increase hi the past eleven years. From 1959 to 1968 the increase was threefold, from
588 to 1,849. The number hi 1969 was 2,187. Totals of photographic reproductions
suppUed during the same period quadrupled, increasing from 1,810 in 1959 to 8,011
in 1969. Most of these reproductions have been photostats of cartographic material
which are suppUed to researchers and the general pubUc at cost. Photographs, which
are usuaUy suppUed hi instances where it is desbed to reproduce a map in a printed
work, increased sixfold, from 85 in 1959 to 520 hi 1969. The introduction of the xerox
copier in 1962 provided a new and inexpensive means for copying small maps and plans,
or excerpts of larger ones. Statistics for each year are shown on the foUowing page. The
very great increase in reference work in 1967, particularly in resped to photographic
reproductions suppUed, is readily apparent. HISTORICAL BRANCH
No. of inquiries
No. of
photographic
reproductions
1959
588
1,810
1960
606
2,554
1961
611
3,922
1962
697
5,082
1963
774
3,413
1964
1,030
5,621
1965
1,262
4,330
1966
1,612
5,856
1967
1,926
12,289
1968
1,849
7,554
1969
2,187
8,011
Conservation—Several years before the beginning of the period covered in this report
the Map Division instituted a program of placing some of its larger more valuable maps
in vertical filing cabinets, where each hangs independently from an attached cloth spine.
Therefore much of the wear caused by friction, which occurs when maps stored horizont-
aUy are withdrawn from or replaced in a drawer, is avoided. Vertical cabinets have been
added to the equipment of the Map Division until today there are nearly 50, each with a
capacity of some 300 maps. Two very large vertical cabinets have a somewhat greater
capacity. A number of smaUer maps and some large maps are still kept in drawers in
horizontal-type storage. Vertical and horizontal storage units are alternated in groups,
the tops of the latter providing a convenient working-space. The more valuable maps
kept in horizontal storage are protected, each being kept either in a polyethylene sleeve or
in a folder of chemically-neutral paper.
Many atlases and coUections of maps have been provided with new bindings, covers
or cases by the bindery in the Records Conservation Section. Maps whose surfaces are
easily damaged by chipping or cracking are protected by the appUcation of a thin transparent membrane of silk textUe. In such instances a photostatic copy of the map is
usuaUy prepared and used for aU but the most detaUed work. Constant vigUance is
requbed on the part of reference officers to ensure that those using the maps exercise
requisite care. The accessions and map control officer is directly responsible for examination of parts of the coUection from time to time to ensure that individual items are
maintained in good condition, that storage units are maintained in the optimum condition, and that a suffident number of storage units are at aU times avaUable.
It has been the practice to have aU archival maps, with the exception of some dupti-
cates, backed with cloth in the bindery of the Records Conservation Section. However,
the large increase in the number of contemporary topographical maps requbing this treatment resulting from a change in format of the 1/50,000 topographical series has put a 62 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
heavy burden on the bindery. These maps are now being mylar-laminated in about 25%
of the time previously requbed for cloth-mounting. Mylar, which cannot be remov^ j
may only be used for work of this type; it could not be used to protect a valuable old j
archival map. Mylar-mounting makes for considerable economies of space and weight
over cloth-mounting; there is no buckling of the map, and it may be readtiy photographed.
The Canadian portion of the National Map CoUection is housed in 360 drawers*
steel cabinets of varying width, in 50 vertical filing cabinets, rolled in approximately» I
cardboard tubes suspended from walls or in tubes in steel cabinets, and folded on shelves
or ha file cabinets. The subsidiary coUection, consisting of dupUcates and items not
regularly consulted, is stored in a basement area in speciaUy designed shallow woo»
boxes, or on shelves. An intensive effort is being made to organize the subsidiary coUection so that it wiU be accessible and to distribute surplus maps through the Association of
Canadian Map Libraries.
THE FOREIGN SECTION—The Foreign Section is planned to be a centre of contemporary cartographical information on the world outside Canada; from the beginning
its operations have been carried out with that in mind. In July, 1968, the staff was
increased by the addition of a second geographer. That year, 15,397 maps, 561 hydM|
graphic charts and 10 atlases were added to the coUection, In 1969 total acquisitions were
25,538, more than a 50% increase over the previous year. A number of duplicate
copies have been extracted and sent to university map libraries hi a program of redistribution.
A classification system for the maps was designed by the assistant geographer and
all maps and atlases in the coUection have been classified and fUed according to that
scheme. The cataloguing of the coUection is still in the preliminary stages and work is
proceeding on the development of a format or style simUar to that used in the Canadian
Section.
In 1969 the Fordgn Section began to collect information on holdings of series maps
hi other map collections in Canada as its initial contribution to a projected national union
catalogue of maps. Replies have been received from 27 map libraries. This information
is to be coUated, published and sent out in the format of a check-list to universities and
curators of other map coUections.
During 1969 the Foreign Section began to reactivate some of the exchange agreements made between the old Geographical Branch and map sources in other countries
which had lapsed since 1965. Negotiations have commenced with the Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources in order to clarifjr^B
positions of that department and the PubUc Archives in the negotiation of exchange
agreements.
It is anticipated that a transfer to the PubUc Archives of the power to negotiate agreements wUl result; the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources will suppiy^B
Canadian maps to carry out the Canadian part of the agreements. In addition, that
department's map Ubrary wUl receive from the National Map Collection certain selected
series maps.
Other exchange agreements which exist with the Department of National Defence,
the British Directorate of MUitary Survey, the U.S. Army Topographic Command àài
several civilian mapping agendes of other nations, wUl result in further additions to '-&&
National Map CoUection. The negotiations between the Department of National Defence HISTORICAL BRANCH 63
and the PubUc Archives to effect these agreements are stiU under way. In return for tins
service the PubUc Archives wUl provide 24-hour reference service to the entire Foreign
Map CoUection on two hours' notice to that department.
A start has been made on exchange agreements. In the latter part of 1969, commitments to exchange maps were received from Bdgium, France and Switzerland. In
addition, the Foreign Section is receiving some maps produced by the United States
Geological Survey. An agreement is under negotiation with the Direccion General de
Geografia y Meteroologia of Mexico.
The Foreign Section provides reference services not only to the Department of
National Defence but to aU other government departments and agencies, to universities
and to the general pubUc. Maps may be loaned.
The coUection is housed in 53 ten-drawer steel cabinets which were received with
the original contribution in 1965, and on 4,238 feet of steel shelving m that part of the
stack area which is reserved to the Map Division. The subsidiary part of the coUection,
consisting for the most part of items designated for redistribution, is kept on steel shelving
in a basement storage area.
PICTURE
DIVISION
The years under review saw fundamental changes in this Division
of which Mr. G. Delisle became Head in 1959. The Division was
organized in October 1964 in two sections, the Paintings, Drawings
and Prints Section and the Historical Photographs Section, each
having its own conservation methods and its own catalogue. A heraldry coUection was
founded in the Paintings Section, while a sound recording unit and a film unit were
created in the Photographs Section. Thus, the Division now has a strong claim to an
all-embracing audio-visual documents coUection. Acquisitions have been considerable and
important progress has been made in conservation, particularly since the creation in 1966
of the Picture Conservation Unit in the Technical Branch with an experienced conservator. Improved methods of cataloguing have been implemented, and the preparation
of a catalogue for pubUcation was started in 1968. Reference services have greatly
increased. A comparison between some 1959 and 1969 statistics is useful here.
Accessions
Enquiries
Reproductions provided
1959
2,180 items
640
2,290 prints
1969
114,203 items
2,543
15,555 prints
Detailed reports on the Sections and on the newer activities in sound recordings and
motion pictures Ulustrate the development of the Division.
PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS AND PRINTS SECTION—When the Section was created
in 1964, an earner reorganization received new impetus. Classification was converted
from a decimal system to a more flexible chronological-subject system, the basic classification being the recognition of artists' coUections. To assist reference and prevent
unnecessary handling, photographic reproductions were made of the paintings and drawings, and a contact print was incorporated into the card catalogue. Physical preservation
was unproved when larger quarters on the first floor of the Sussex Street buUding were
provided. With the move to the new buUding, both working, reference and conservation
space became fuUy adequate. Acid free rag content paper for mounting prints and drawings was obtained early in 1965, and perfectly suited cabinds were obtained soon after- 64 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-lSB
wards. A continuing program of picture conservation and restoration, according to the
standards of the International Institute for Conservation of Historical and Artistic Works,
was under way with the arrival on the Archives staff of an expert restorer and the setting
up of proper faculties in 1966.
The Section now has one of the best coUections of its kind in Canada, comprisÉjM
1,501 paintings, 5,103 drawings, and 70,141 prints. To meet the obvious need for pub-
Ushed catalogues of the holdings, a program of research and description of our drawings
and water-colours was started in 1968 by a trained art historian. It is intended that when
this catalogue is completed, others wtil foUow for paintings and for prints.
In 1965, the compUation of a register of coats of arms used in Canada was initiate»
As part of the program, a survey of cities from coast to coast elicited 108 repUes. The
survey also included coUeges, universities, non-profit organizations, churches, and commercial corporate bodies. Copies of grants of arms were obtained from the Lord Lyon
and the Garter King of Arms in Great Britain. Copies of grants for officers, administration, and leading famities of New France are also being made in France and elsewhere.
Excellent co-operation and assistance has been received. Mention should be made here
of the receipt from the General Secretariat of the Episcopate of the Cathoho Church in
Canada of 94 copies of arms adopted by Catholic Bishops. This program has permitted
the acquisition of a considerable amount of research material on this highly specialized
subject.
The Section, in recent years, participated in several exhibitions through the loan d
some works, including the "Wm. G.R. Hind Exhibition", organized by the Sillistead Art
GaUery of Windsor, "A Pageant of Canada", organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine
Arts and other exhibitions prepared by the PubUc Archives.
It also organized the Alfred Jacob Miller exhibition from its own coUections, presented the "GaUery of Canadian History" of the Confederation Life CoUedion and
"Aspect 150", views of Canadian architecture by Richard WUson in collaboration with
the Bank of Montreal, and "Heraldry m Canada" with the assistance of the Canadian
Heraldry Society.
Important contacts were established with the National Gallery, London, and the
Louvre, Paris, for assistance in identifying portraits and historical scenes of interest to
the Archives.
Numerous transfers of pictorial and heraldic material from other Divisions of the
Archives, and from government departments and agencies were made. Due to budget
limitations, only a small number of items of interest could be purchased, but very close
contacts were maintained with dealers, particularly Sotheby and Co. (Toronto) and
Christies' (Montreal). The foUowing indicates the most significant transfers, purchases
and gifts for the Section in recent years:
PAINTINGS
View of a Custom House on the coast of Newfoundland by Thomas Renouf. OU painting.
Public Archives of Canada, London, England.
Portrait of Right Hon. John Arthur Roebuck by H.W. PickersgiU.  OU painting.  City
of Sheffield, England.
Portrait of Sandford Fleming by J.W.L. Forster.   OU painting.   Government House,
Ottawa. HISTORICAL BRANCH 65
Portrait of J JI. Booth by J.Wi. Forster. OU painting. Government House, Ottawa.
Portrait of John Sandfidd Macdonald by T. Hamel. OU painting.
Portrait of Mrs. John Sandfield Macdonald by T. Hamel. OU pabiting.
Indian VUlage of Lorette near Quebec by F. HoUoway. OU painting.
Portrait of James Alexander Grant by J.C. Forbes. OU painting.
Portrait of Colin Robertson. Artist unknown. OU painting. Gift of F.A. Harman
Estate, Toronto, Ontario.
Portrait of Dr. Charles Duncombe. Artist unknown. OU painting. Gift of Mrs. M.W.
KUlen, South Pasadena, California.
Portrab of D.B. Anna by E. Wyly Grier. Oil pabiting. Gift of J. Andreassen, C.N.R.,
Montreal, P.Q.
Portrait of H.P. Dwight by E. Wyly Grier. OU painting. Gift of Dept. of PubUc Relations, C.N.R., Montreal, P.Q.
Portrait of James Hope by Taggart. OU pabiting. Gift of Mrs. H. MacMUlan, Ottawa,
Ontario.
Twelve floral emblems of Canada's provinces by Walter CoucUl. OU paintings. Gift
of National Trust Company, Toronto, Ontario.
Portrait of John McLean. Artist unknown. OU pabiting. Gift of Mr. R.H. Montgomery,
Maniwaki, P.Q.
A collection of 32 oil paintings and 61 water-colours by Walter Chesterton. Gift of
Miss L.S. Chesterton, Ottawa, Ontario.
Sand River, Nova Scotia. Artist unknown. Oil painting. Gift of Mr. Guy White, BeUe-
vUle, Ontario.
WATER-COLOURS AND DRAWINGS
Album containing 17 pencil sketches by Maurice Ahearn. Photocopy. The National
GaUery of Canada.
Fourteen armorial drawings relating to Canada, the provinces and territories. Secretary
of State.
Fifty chUdren's drawings executed on the occasion of the Centennial of Confederation.
Canadian Government Exhibition Commission.
A group of pencil designs and photostats relating to the Great Seal of Canada. Department of Consumer and Corporate Affabs.
A sketch-book of David Milne. Manuscript Division, PubUc Archives of Canada
(M.G.30, D38, Vol. 7, file 30).
The Wiltiam Denny CoUection of some forty drawings, related to Upper and Lower
Canada, was executed during the period 1827-1860 by Colonel WUliam Denny
( 1804-1886) during his mUitary service and subsequent retirement in Canada.
Scene on the River St. Frands near Sherbrooke by W.H. Bartlett. Water-colour hi
sepia. 66 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-lW
Two sketches of Wilfrid Laurier by H. Julien. Pen and ink.
Two sketches of Robot Borden by H. Julien. Pencil.
Album containing 40 photographs and drawings executed about 1835-1837, one of
which shows the situation of H.M.S. Terror at sunrise July 14, 1837 and is signed
by Lt. O. Stanley.
A coUection 25 sketches, mostly portraits, executed by H. Julien. Pen and ink; pencU.   m
Forty MUe Creek, Klondike, Alaska, by T. H. MuUay. Water-colour.
CoUection of 29 views of Quebec and Montreal ca. 1881 consisting of 13 photographs
and 16 drawings by Arthur Elliott.
Album entitled "Yukon Sketches, 1898-9" consisting of 93 drawings executed by Frederick Gardiner. Pen and ink.
Three sketch-books entitled "BeUevUle", "HamUton", 'Tort Hope", containing 19 views
by E. Whitefield. PencU.
The H.J. Warre CoUection, containing a series of drawings executed during Wane's
regular service in Upper and Lower Canada and his secret reconnaissance trip to
the Oregon Territory (1840-1846), documents the country from Quebec to Oregon
Territory.
Quebec from Point Levy, 1869 by W.M. Prendergast. Water-colour.
The Overlanders of 1862, a sketch-book attributed to Wiltiam G.R. Hind (1833-88),
the brother of Henry Youle Hind, contains over 90 drawings documenting the overland journey to the gold diggings of British Columbia.
A smaller group of William's drawings connected with H.Y. Hind's Labrador
expedition has since been added to the coUection.
CoUection of 11 drawings executed as original sketches for glass etchings of the National
Library and Archives Building.
A series consisting of three water-colours and one pencU drawing of Quebec views
executed by Col. A.C. Mercer.
Water-colour vignette of an officer of the Governor General's Horse Guards (Canada)
by R.M. Barnes.
Fort WilUam, Canada, by W.H.E. Napier. Water-colour.
Two drawings entitled: "Spear fishing by torch Ught" and "Indians spear fishing by
torch light" by R.G.A. Levinge. Water-colour.
Two water-colours of the Reversing Falls of St John, N.B. and the Harbour of St. John,
N.B. ca. 1800. Artist unknown.
Two water-colours of the Thunder Bay area by WUliam Armstrong, CE., A R CA,
1882.
A topographical view of a port on the Gaspé coast. Pen and ink drawing. Artist
unknown.
A water-colour of a "Conestoga wagon crossing a river on a barge". Artist unknown.
"Moose Breaking from the Woods into a Clearing" and 'Two Indian Hunters Killing a
Moose". Water-colours by Sb R.G.A. Levinge. HISTORICAL BRANCH 67
"Long Sault from the Cornwall Canal". Water-colour by JM. Caddy.
A water-colour of a covered wagon drawn by oxen by W.D. Blatchley.
A pencU drawing of a view of the Admiral's house and flagstaff, Halifax, Nova Scotia,
1837. Artist unknown.
An architectural drawing of the Montreal Hunt Club House.
MUitary Camp at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Water-colour and pencil draw-
big by Major General Sb R.W. Rutherford.
St Henri Parish Church, Montreal. Water-cdour. Artist unknown.
Decoration of Commons Chamber in the House of Parliament at Ottawa, Dominion of
Canada, with John Pearson and Mark Jenny and Tyler as Decorators. Water-colour.
The personal album of Lady Dufferin containing a large selection of photographs and
some water-colours relating to the Dufferins' stay in Canada.
"Christmas Morning" by David MUne. Water-colour, gut of Mrs. David Milne through
Miss Blodwen Davies, Markham, Ontario.
Eglise de Sainte-Foy by Sr. St-Aubin. PencU, gift of Mrs. LP. Albert Sévigny, West-
mount, P.Q.
Group Caricature including Sb Wilfrid Laurier by R.G. Mathews. Pendl, gift of Sb
Peter Norton-Griffiths, Quinto do Tornebo, Portugal.
Portrait of Joseph Howe. Artist unknown. Charcoal, gift of Miss Helen Ruth Howe,
Ottawa, Ontario.
Fort Pekisko by Robert Ince ?. Water-colour, gift of Mrs. G.A. Garland, Ottawa,
Ontario.
Album entitled "Canadian WUd Flowers" by F.W. Bayfield. Water-colours, gift of Mrs.
P.B. Freeland, Victoria, B.C.
LITHOGRAPHS
A coUection of printed portraits of Canadian poUtical and literary figures.  Library of
ParUament.
View of the Commencement of the Action between His Majesty's Ship Shannon and the
United States Frigate Chesapeake, off Boston Light House, on the 1st of June, 1813.
Painted by John TheophUus, engraved by Joseph Jeakes, and published by J. Burr
& G. Ballisat, in London, 1815.
A View of the City and Harbour of St John, New Brunswick, N.A. taken from Hills
W.S.W. of Fort Howe. Drawn by Ralph Stennett, engraved by C Turner. Published
about 1851. Lithograph in colours.
A coUection of 18 engraved portraits of poUtical and mUitary officers.
A group of 25 cartoon postcards made during World War II describing the activities of
British ab officers in Canada.
A series of 36 engraved portraits of persons associated with the ecclesiastical and poUtical
history of New France.
A large "View of Saint John, N.B., 1851" with four supplementary views.  Coloured
Uthograph.
A series of 31 engravings relating to the history of Canada. 68 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19® I
OTHERS
The coUection of the original Great Seals used by the Canadian Government since 1867. I
Historical Museum, PubUc Archives of Canada.
The coUection of the original Privy Seals used by the Governors General since 1867. j
Historical Museum, PubUc Archives of Canada.
The Privy Seal of late Governor Vanier.  Registrar General of Canada, Dept. of Con-1
sumer and Corporate Affairs.
The Jean-Joseph Girouard CoUection consisting of 95 portraits and one view out of
which 91 were executed by Girouard while he was imprisoned in the Montreal gaol ]
during the Insurrection of 1837-38.   Photocopies.   Gift of Mrs. LA. Décarie, I
Montreal.
Fifteen drawings of Canada, 1827-33, by E.C. Frome.   Photocopies presented to the j
Government and people of Canada by Central CouncU of the Royal Commonwealth
Society, 1967.
Report concerning Montreal in Kent a Seat of the Right Honorable Lord Amherst, etc.
by H. Repton.   With Ulustrations.   Presented by the British Government to the I
Government of Canada for the Public Archives on the occasion of the Centenary of j
Confederation, 1967.
HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS SECTION—The Section was established in October j
1964. It is directed by Richard Huyda. OriginaUy, the staff consisted of one archivist, j
one technical officer, two clerks and a support staff of four casual employees. The I
Section's 500,000 prints and negatives occupied about 5,000 linear feet of shelving in a
buUding on Besserer Street.
Staff and physical facilities expanded rapidly. In 1969, the Section has three archivists, two technical officers, three clerks, a stenographer and an archives helper. With
the move to the new buUding, the Section acqubed adequate offices and stack areas, !
and could take fuU advantage of the total resources of the Archives.
The holdings of the Section comprise 1,163,687 photonegatives and prints, 14,520'-j
reels of motion pictures, and 1,674 hours of sound recordings. The Section has been
able to carry out its responsibilities and put at the service of searchers those photos
which contain valuable evidence on the economic, social, poUtical, geographical andi
cultural development of the nation, and on the artistic and scientific development oflj
photography in Canada. It has searched for items of potential value from government,
private industry and individuals; large numbers of coUections have been examined. New
acquisitions have increased the holdings of the Section to over a million items. Positiva
steps have been taken to ensure the proper storage and preservation of these holdings. |
One of the most significant developments in the Section has been the estabUshment of
a continuing program for the copying of the most valuable items, in our collection, lm
coUaboration with the Reprography Section of the Archives, 4" x 5" copy negatives
are produced from original glass-plate and celluloid negatives and from prints ranging
in size from 2" x 2" to 14" x 17". A Nu-Arc copy camera model #1824 is used in
combination with Ferrania direct negative-to-negative film, and Kodak Gravure copy
film. Rephotographing serves two major purposes. By producing a copy negative, the
original items are kept out of cbculation and are better preserved. Secondly, by producing a contact print right on the catalogue cards researchers can see a copy of the
original photograph as weU as aU relevant information. This program commenced in
I HISTORICAL BRANCH 69
1965 and some 30,000 originals have been copied since. Major coUections have been
organized and thousands of items identified and evaluated. The Section can provide
increasingly more efficient reference services and greater access to its holdings, and
meet adequately the increasing demands for visual documentation by television and
film producers, publishers, educators, historians and government officials.
Acquisitions—Since its creation the Section has commenced a survey of federal departments and agencies in an effort to locate and determine the extent of Government
photographic records. To date the holdings of many departments and agencies have
been located and contacts have been made with the responsible authorities to ensure
that these records wiH be examined by the Section in the future. The photographic
records of many of these departments and agendes have abeady been transferred to
the Archives through the co-operation of these bodies. The following are of particular
nde:
ACQUISITIONS FROM GOVERNMENT SOURCES
Department of National Defence. World War I, 1916-1919, 4,000 negatives. Unemployment rebef projects, 1930's, 1,900 negatives. MUitary activities, 1939-1953, 250,000
negatives and many prints.
Department of Energy, Mines and Resources. Mineral resources, 1900-1938, 20,000
items. Legal Surveys, 1900-1929, 26,000 items. The Geological Survey of Canada
transferred 6,000 valuable negatives taken by its early surveyors across Canada and
hi the Arctic, 1862-1910. From the International Boundary Commission, came
9,000 negatives taken along the Alaska boundary about 1903.
Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. National Parks, 1908-1950.
J. Benien Expédition, 1910. Confederation Jubilee, 1927. Alaska Highway. Conscientious objectors' camps and Japanese internment camps. Northern British
Columbia and Dawson City, Yukon. Also loan of early photographs of buildings
in the Province of Quebec, 1860-1900.
Department of Transport. Royal Commission on Transportation, 1949-1951. Hudson
Straits Expedition of 1927-1928, 38 albums, HaUfax Ocean Terminals, 1914-1915.
Royal Commission of the Quebec Bridge, 10 albums. Canadian Arctic Expedition,
copper plates. Arctic resupply bases, 1948-1956, 1,500 items. Also railway equipment and faculties, radio stations, bridges in the Yukon and Northwest Territories.
Department of Public Works. Construction, restoration and repair of federal buddings
and pubUc facUities, mostly 1890-1920, several thousands of items.
Canadian Government Travel Bureau. Tourist areas, activities and faculties, 1945-1959,
2,000 items. Also construction of Big Bend Highway in British Columbia and the
Confederation JubUee, 1927.
Canadian Government Exhibition Commission. International fairs and exhibitions, pavi-
Uons and displays, 1890-1967, 2,000 items. Activities, construction and displays
of Canadian Pavilion at Expo '67, 3,100 prints.
National Design Council. Equipment, appliances and furnishings, 1950-1960, 1,700
items.
Museum of Man. Klondike gold rush, 300 rare original negatives.
Canadian National Railways. Construction and maintenance lines, hotels and faciUties,
3,500 items. Sponsored immigration and colonization in Western Canada in the
1930's, 6,000 items. 70 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
Canada Council. Architectural study of the buildings of Quebec and the Maritimes by |
Dr. Eric Arthur. Photos by James Acland, 294 items.
Centennial Commission. Activities, festivities and projects across the nation, 30,000 j
prints, negatives and colour transparencies.
Eldorado Mining and Refining Ltd. Radium City and Port Hope plants, 95 items.
Other government departments and agencies during the past eleven years have j
transferred significant coUections of photographs. Among these have been the St.
Lawrence Seaway Authority, the National Library and the Library of Parliament, the
Departments of External Affairs, Finance, Fisheries, Industry, Trade and Commerce,
Justice, Labour, Manpower and Immigration, National Revenue, Secretary of State,
Veterans' Affabs, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the Public Service Commission,
the Privy CouncU Office, the Senate and House of Commons, Government House, the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the National Film Board, the Royal Canadian |
Mounted Police, the Canadian War Museum and the National Aviation Museum.
ACQUISITIONS FROM NON-GOVERNMENT SOURCES
The Section also accessioned six hundred coUedions from industry, mstitutions, j
societies and private individuals, which amounted to about 100,000 items, dating from
1850 to the present and containing a wealth of information. The following are of particular interest:
Rt. Hon. William Lyon Mackenzie King. 1919-1949, 30,000 items. Perhaps the most
important recent accession, an excellent visual record of Canada's national and
international affabs, and of the career of Prime Minister King.
/. Alex Castonguay. 1902-1960, 75,000 items. Portraits of personalities in and about
the capital, by a distinguished photographer. •
Sir Wilfrid Laurier. An album, presented by Mr. Henri Laurier, containing 500 prints
of Laurier and his family.
Hon. General A.GIa. McNaughton. CoUection showing his life and contributions to the
military, scientific and poUtical development of Canada.
Rt. Hon. Louis St-Laurent. Copies taken from his family album, covering early life,
relatives and assodates.
Of the many other photographs of Canadian personalities several should be mentioned. A coUection of some 350 new members of the House of Commons was acqubed
as part of a continuing program to preserve a complete photographic record of Members
of Parliament.
An album of fifty portraits of Members of the Canadian Legislative Assembly of.
1862 was donated by Mrs. D.I. Cameron of Rockctiffe; an album belonging to Mrs.
Edward Blake containing portraits of her husband, famUy, relatives, and prominent
poUtical figures was donated by Mrs. C.H. Armstrong; photographs of the engineering
and construction staff of the Parliament Buildings and of the Parliamentary Press Gallery correspondents, 1880-1885, were donated by Mr. John Kirwan and Mrs. H.G.
Barker respectively; a series on Henri Bourassa, his family and career was received from
lbs daughter, Miss Anne Bourassa; and photographs of party members and leaders were
received from the National Headquarters of the Progressive Conservative Party. Mrs.
Brooke Claxton donated a number of personal albums covering the career of her husband. Through the assistance of Group Captain H.R. Stewart a series of portraits of HISTORICAL BRANCH 71
the Confederation era politicians was acqubed. Portraits of naval officers came to the
Archives through Admbal H.E. PuUen whUe Mrs. T.R.L. Maclnnies donated photographs of such prominent Uterary figures as W.H. Drummond, Wiltiam Kingsford,
Duncan CampbeU Scott and Archibald Lampman. A number of photographs relating
to Stephen Leacock have also been copied recently. Through the assistance of Dr. V.J.
Kaye photographs of many early Ukrainian pioneers have been copied.
A number of significant coUedions have been acqubed which depid urban and
rural development across Canada during various periods. One of these is a series of
three albums donated by Mr. Gordon McCartney of Ottawa containing some 1,300
views of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan between 1877
and 1907. Another is a coUection donated by the Toronto PubUc Library contabung
some 1,500 negatives by the Albertype Company of Brooklyn, New York showing
interesting views of Canadian cities and towns from 1900 to 1925.
Few photographic coUections relating to the Maritime Provinces have been acqubed recently but of particular note is the acquisition from The Press Library of
Vancouver, B.C. of five excellent panoramic views by W.G. McLaughlin showing the
aftermath of the Halifax Explosion, December, 1917.
Many photographs of dties and towns of Quebec have been received. To be noted
are views of buildings and places in Quebec City and Montreal, 1860-1870, which have
been acqubed through Mr. A.J. Richardson and Mr. Henri Aubin. Also received was
an album containing some twenty excellent whiter and summer views of Montreal
during the late 1880's by Alexander Henderson. The growth and development of Val
d'Or, P.Q. from 1928 to 1941 is weU documented in another coUection while the recent
donation of approximately 6,000 negatives taken by the staff photographers of the
Montreal Gazette marks a significant addition to the Archives' holdings for the period
1936 to 1943.
Ontario's urban and rural life has been weU documented in a number of coUections
acqubed by the Archives. From several individuals have come photographs of Ottawa
and the surrounding area including an interesting series collected by Mr. W. Harmer
showing early lumber operations and transportation and recreation facilities at the turn
of the century. This coUection is supplemented by 350 negatives of the Ottawa-Hull
area for the years 1910-1915 donated by Mr. D.S. Wilson of Toronto. With the assistance of Mr. H.T. Pammett of Ottawa, photographs documenting the growth and development from the 1870's of the Ha!iburton, Kawartha Lakes, Peterborough and Trent
Valley Waterway area have been donated or loaned for copying. These include early
lumbering activities and views of buildings and steam vessels. From the late H.P. Davis
has come a coUection of 150 items depicting the growth of the mining towns of Northern
Ontario while an interesting series of photographs taken by E.P. Park of a tour of members of the Ontario Legislature in 1899 provide further views of Northern Ontario
communities.
Recently acqubed photographs relating to Western Canada include a view of the
arrival of the fbst Mennonite Settlers at Fort Garry in 1874 and a series of copy photographs from Mr. Louis Rosenburg of the Canadian Jewish Congress relating to early
Jewish community life in the Lipton, Edenbridge, Sonnenfeld and Narcisse areas of
Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The D.W. McLachlan coUection contains some excellent
views of the Port Nelson and Fort Churchtil area between 1908 and 1927. From Mr.
Sidney Turk has come an excellent series on Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan during the period
1885-1910. A series of 35mm negatives showing Ufe in the Columbia Dry Belt area of
Saskatchewan during the Depression years 1930-1934 has also been acqubed. From a 72 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
coUection of Mr. E. HoUinshead of Fernie B.C. copies have been made of 133 item»
relating to Fernie B.C. during the early decades of the century. The Western Develop
ment Museum of Saskatchewan loaned an exceUent series of lantern sUdes depicting life
in the West at the turn of the century.
Significant photographs relating to the Yukon and North-West Territories and to
the Canadian Arctic have been acqubed. Among these are three albums from the late
Commissioner S.T. Wood showing scenes in the Yukon at the turn of the century, and
a personal album of photographs taken in 1898 and compiled by Mr. Edward Bruce
while he was prospecting for gold in the Yukon. With the aid of Mrs. I. Warner of
Whitehorse other photographs of the Yukon have been acqubed. A series of excellent
views of posts and trading activities in the North-West Territories taken by CW.
Mathers between 1890 and 1901 is also to be noted as weU as the Dr. Charles Camsell
coUection of views of the Yukon and North-West Territories taken between 1880 and
1914. The Canon Vale coUection of views of Fort Smith, Yeltowknife and Hay River,
show numerous buddings, events, and Eskimo and Indian activities during 1912-1913.
Photographs depicting mineral exploration on Great Bear Lake during the 1930's have
been loaned to the Archives by Mr. Bernard Day of Toronto and a series depicting life
among the Eskimo trappers on Banks Island during the 1930's by Mrs. P. Sydney of
Hay River. Captain C.T. Pedersen of Pacifica, California has loaned a number of
photographs of Arctic vessels taken during the 1920's and 1930's.
Arctic expeditions by J. Bernier in 1904-1911 and by V. Stefansson and R.M.
Anderson in 1908-1912 and 1913-1916 have been excellently documented by photographs acqubed respectively from the estate of J. Bernier and from Mrs. Stanley Smith,
the daughter of R.M. Anderson.
Transportation and communications developments in Canada have been weU
documented through recent acquisitions. Notable coUections relating to railways include
the donation by Mrs. Watson Wemyss of a view of the car built in Brant ford in 1860
for the use of the Prince of Wales between 1870 and 1920, and an excellent series relating
to the CPR survey of 1870-1871 and the construction of the CPR Une through the
Rockies during the 1880's by Mr. Hedor Cimon. From the Canada Atlantic Old Boys'
Association has come a valuable collection showing C.A.R. construction, equipment,
faculties and personnel from the 1890's to the 1930's. Miss A. Wolff of Montreal has
donated a series relating to the Martin Wolff Survey Party of the National Transcontinental line of 1902-1910 while Miss F. Laflamme of Engleside has donated some
200 photographs taken by Mr. Harry Morgan, a construction worker, while he worked
on the construction of the Canadian Northern Railway during 1911-1912. From the
coUection of Mr. C. Heels some 150 photographs of Grand Trunk, CP.R. and Canadian
Northern engines and faculties from the 1870's to the 1920's have been copied. Of the
numerous photographs relating to water transportation mention is to be made of the
albums donated by Mr. Ron Innes of Halifax showing the vessels of the Cunard, Allen
and C.P.R. Steamship Lines, 1900 to 1925, the E.D. Simzer coUection of Great Lakes
and St. Lawrence vessels 1925-1935, the H. Watson coUection of early Rideau Waterway riverboats, the P.J. Kourie collection of early steamers in Western Canada and the
coUection of photographs taken by Mrs. Grace McNabb of Ottawa showing the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway in 1956. Early radio broadcasting operations of
the 1930's are documented in a series of photographs donated by Mr. E.A. Web, a
dbector of Radio CNR from 1929 to 1932, and in a coUection donated by Mrs. WA
Steel containing photographs taken by her husband during his career in the Royal
Canadian Corps of Signals. HISTORICAL BRANCH
73
Photographs relating to the mUitary activities of Canadians during the Boer War
and both World Wars have been acqubed in significant numbers. In addition to the
attnusition of an exceUent series of Boer War stereographs, donations relating to this
War have been received from the Late Major GA.E. Chapman and from Brigadier-
General J.S. Stewart. Photographs of World War I participation have been received
from Mrs. Angus Macdonald, Mr. George Smith, Mrs. AJE. Ross, Mrs. R.A. Riddiford
Carpenter, and Mr. CH. Mitchell. From the late Mr. R.J. Meekren has come an exceU
series of views and activities at the German P.O.W. Camp in Stendal, Germany, 1915-
1918 and from Mr. E. Hollinshead several views of the P.O.W. Camps near Fernie, B.C.
M. Denison has donated a series on Camp Borden in 1917 whtie from Mr. D.S. Wilson
has come a scrapbook entitled "Ships that Pass in the Fight" by a Private Rigby showing
World War I warships and other vessels in Canadian waters, 1914-1919. Also acqubed
have been photographs from the papers of Dr. Wellington M. Carrick showing mUitary
activities at Vladivostock in 1919, plus 83 negatives from A.A. Outram detailing the
activities of the 68th Battery, R.CA, in North Russia, 1919.
Three acquisitions are worthy of special note not only because of theb subject
content but because they are exceUent examples of the development of Canadian photography and of the high quatity work done by early Canadian photographers. The
first of these is a series of superb prints made from photographs taken in the early
1850's by Thomas and John Connon, pioneer photographers in Elora, Ontario. The
second is the magnificent "General Grant Album" of sepia prints taken between 1865
and 1873 containing the exceUent work of Wm. Notinan and his contemporaries. This
album contains views of Quebec, Montreal, Niagara FaUs, Ottawa, Toronto and numerous other places in Quebec and Ontario. The third is a series of sepia prints taken
in the late 1880's by the photographer, Alexander Henderson, showing snowshoeing,
tobogganing, camping and portaging as well as winter and summer scenes in Montreal.
Historical Sound Recordings—Sound recordings had been preserved in the PubUc
Archives for many years when it was decided, m 1960, that this area required a closer
interest. At that time the holdings consisted of a little over 1,000 phonograph discs, dating
from 1927 to 1957, most of which were transferred from the CBC French and EngUsh
networks, and consisted of radio war correspondents' reports. Since then, important
acquisitions have been made, and the holdings have increased to 1,674 listening hours of
discs or tapes.
There is great potential use of sound recordings. Very often sound recordings are
the only documents which have recorded, word for word, the statements made by prominent individuals during conferences, discussions, debates, speeches, and interviews. But
even where complete written or typed texts exist for particular statements, the sound
recording may clear ambiguities in the text or provide supplementary information through
tone and voice inflections which reveal meaning not conveyed by the words alone.
Sound recordings also provide Ulustrative evidence. For instance, sound recordings serve
as proof of the oratorical abilities of individuals; they reveal the reaction of the audience
to particular speeches; and they indicate the atmosphere of a given event, be it one of
joy, sorrow, hostiUty, or friendliness. Because of the Ulustrative evidence which they
contain, sound recordings can be used to re-create certain significant statements and
events. Therefore, radio, television, and film producers are interested in archival sound
recordings when they are preparing documentaries on Canadian history. In addition,
sound recOTdings may be integrated as part of an oral history program particularly
through interviews of witnesses of important events. 74 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-l^B
It was only in 1968, however, that a special unit was created and attached to the
Photographs Section. A suite of rooms was put at its disposal, and proper equipment was
installed in a room made acoustically suitable.
AU recordings have been arranged and descriptive bating has begun. This wiU be
foUowed by a detailed index. The re-recording on tape of archival quality, and further
search for sound recordings is in progress. An important step was made in 1969 when,
with the permission of the Speaker of the House of Commons, the recordings of speeches
of members were registered for the Archives and the fbst 51 tapes covering the period 3
March to 22 October 1969 were transferred. In conjunction with the Canadian Historical
Association some research was made into oral history and the best means of using sound
recording for historical documentation. A list of notable acquisitions follows:
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 45 discs or tapes on such subjects as J.W. Dafoe,
war correspondent Sb Wilfrid Laurier, Sb Wfltiam Van Home, Henri Bourassa,
Lionel Groulx, R.S. McLaughlin, Wiltiam Aberhart, MitcheU Hepburn, FarE^
Mowat Centennial of Confederation; also 800 discs of the debates of the Newfoundland National Convention, 1946-1948.
Canadian National Railways. 22 discs, 1947-1957, on the Montreal and Lachine Road,
and the Museum Train.
Citizenship and Immigration. 8 discs, 1947, consisting of speeches at citizenship ceremonies.
Secretary of State. Tape recordings of General DeGauUe's state visit in 1967.
House of Commons. Copies of 2 tapes of the bomb explosion in the House on May 18,
1966.
National Research Council. 59 discs of lectures delivered during NRC 50th anniversary
ceremonies, September 1966.
Privy CouncU Office. 31 tapes of the proceedings of the Constitutional Conference of
February 1969. This is part of a continuous transfer.
Public Archives. Speeches by Dr. Lamb and others, Ed Manning, and a speech by Prune
Minister Trudeau, 1968.
From other sources, we received the following:
Rt.Hon. William Lyon Mackenzie King. 171 phono discs, 1925-1950. They concern the
career of King and include the fbst recording made in Canada from a radio receiver
in 1925.
Progressive Conservative Party. 130 discs, 530 reels of tape, and 200 roUs of magnetic
sound track, 1939-1964. Includes speeches of leaders and proceedings of meetings.
Liberal Party. 125 discs and 500 tapes, 1945-1967. Includes speeches of leaders, proceedings of conventions, election campaigns.
Hon. C. Wilson, album of 14 discs on the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 1941.
Speeches, songs and music.
Life and Time Inc. "Sounds of History", to 1774. Includes documents, songs and music.
Winston Churchill. Album of 12 discs, includes speeches made in Canada in 1941 and
1943. Presented by the Royal Trust Co. HISTORICAL BRANCH
75
Official Ceremonies.   1932-1969, 12 tapes.  Copies of speeches at various official ceremonies.
Rt. Hon. Lester B. Pearson. 18 discs and 271 tapes, on his career and the Liberal Party.
Finally, we received or copied a number of interviews conducted as oral history or
for use in radio programs: they include the foUowing:
MJ. ColdweU on the CCF party; CA. Bowman; Graham Spry; Lt Col. W. Steel
and Major G.V. Odium on early broadcasting in Canada; AJ. Hfll on the CNR; WA
Schlader and W.R. Menzies on pioneer fishing in the Northwest Territories. Reminiscences of Laura B. Berton, Arthur Lower, Tommy Tweed and Pierre Berton on every
day life, 1890-1940. Interviews of Professor Frank Underhfll made by Professor D.W.
Meflde.
National Film Collection—The PubUc Archives of Canada has been coUecting motion
picture film on a limited scale for thirty years. However, during the last two years it has
been realized that more definitive measures had to be taken to ensure the coUection and
conservation of aU motion picture footage of historical value to Canada. As a fbst step,
it was decided to concentrate on assembling the production of the period 1894-1950, as
much of it is on unstable nitrate base film requiring immediate attention if it is to be saved
at au.
The program started in February, 1969, with the loan to the PubUc Archives of the
services of Mr. WiUiam GaUaway by the National Film Board.
Mr. GaUaway has travelled from the Maritimes to British Columbia and into the
United States during the past ten months in search of valuable motion picture footage
relating to Canada. Approximately 6 million fed of film have been examined and 3.9
million feet acqubed (in 14,400 reels). Of this, one million feet represent closely evaluated footage of historical significance. A more detailed examination is still to be made
of the remainder. Abeady some of the valuable nitrate base film has been converted to
safety stock, but since this is an expensive task, it will be some time before all the holdings
are converted. In the meantime, the remaining nitrate stock is kept in special storage
vaults at Rockcliffe and Shirley's Bay, and only the safety stock is stored in the PubUc
Archives buUding. The material abeady acqubed constitutes a coUection invaluable in
its representation of the physical and social evolution of the country.
Negotiations will soon be under way with the National Film Board for the transfer
of theb stock shot Ubrary (21,000,000 feet) and with the CBC for the transfer of older
films in its hddings. Once the initial acquisition stage is completed and the footage
properly evaluated, a general catalogue of our hddings will be prepared. It is expected
that it wfll take several months before the National Film CoUection wUl be accessible to
researchers and the interested public. Then viewing faculties wfll be readily available to
researchers and film producers and copies wfll be made for them.
EventuaUy, the PubUc Archives hopes to serve as the central depository for older
films of aU government departments and agendes. To these films will be added other
non-government footage and foreign films relating to Canada, and will constitute the
National Film CoUection.
PUBLICATIONS
SERVICE
During the past eleven years numerous pubUcations
have been issued from the various Branches, Divisions
and Sections within the PubUc Archives. In addition a
pubUcation prepared in the Privy Council Office has been pubUshed by the Archives. 76 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-19|É|
The PubUcations Service was reorganized early in 1964 and Mr. J.K. Johnson was j
appointed Editor-Historbm.  This reorganization came mainly to initiate a pubUcations I
program which was independent of the other Branches, Divisions and Sections.   Mr.
Johnson resigned in 1968, and the sendee is now headed by Mrs. Carole Stelmack.
The fbst major project assigned to the service was the pubUcation of the papers d j
the Prime Ministers of Canada. Work commenced on Canada's fbst Prime Minister, Sb j
John A. Macdonald, in 1964, and after four years of searching, analysing, writing and
editing, most of his pre-confederation letters had been coUected and rough drafts of the
manuscripts for the fbst three volumes were prepared. The fbst volume of the series,
The Letters of Sir John A. Macdonald 1836-1857, was published in 1968.
Two major pubUcations were issued in 1967 and 1968. As a result of the collaboration of M. Robert Le Blant, distinguished French jurist and historian, and Father René
Baudry, C.S.C, representative of the PubUc Archives in Paris, Nouveaux Documents sur
Champlain et son époque, Vol. I, 1560-1622 was pubUshed in 1967. This publication
brings to Ught many documents which were not previously avaUable and adds a great deal
to our knowledge of Champlain and his contemporaries. This volume marks the revival
of the numbered series of pubUcations issued by the Public Archives between the years
1909 and 1930, and is an appropriate sequel to the three volumes devoted to Jacques
Cartier. A second volume on Champlain wfll be pubUshed at a later date.
A special project to commemorate Canada's centennial was initiated in 1965. Mrs.
Carole Vaughan was transferred from the Manuscript Division to work on this project.
The pubUcation, The Canadian Directory of Parliament, 1867-1967, Was issued in 1968.
This publication contains a biography of every Canadian Member of Parliament and
Senator during Canada's fbst 100 years. A French edition wUl follow soon and supplements in both languages wfll foUow at intervals.
The Manuscript Division has continued to prepare Preliminary Inventories of the
Manuscript and Records Groups within the Archives as finding aids for researchers.
Concentration has been mainly on the Manuscript Groups as the great volume of public
records which have entered the Archives during the period would render published
PreUminary Inventories of the Record Groups virtually obsolete upon publication. Those
which have been published during the period are:
Manuscript Group 8: Documents relatifs à la province de Québec (1961)
Manuscript Group 9: Provincial, Local and Territorial Records (1961)
Manuscript Group 11: Colonial Office Papers (revised edition, 1961)
Manuscript Group 17: Religious Archives (1967)
Manuscript Group 18: Pre-Conquest Papers (revised edition, 1964)
Fonds des manuscrits 18: Documents antérieurs à la cession (édition revisée, 1966)
Manuscript Group 26: Prime Ministers' Papers (1961)
Manuscript Group 27: Political Figures, 1867-1948 (1960)
Manuscript Group 28: Records of Post-Confederation Corporate Bodies (1960)
Manuscript Group 29: Nineteenth Century Post-Confederation Manuscripts, 180-
1900 (1962)
Manuscript Group 30: Twentieth Century Manuscripts (1966)
Record Group 2: Privy Council Office (1960)
Record Group 3: Post Office Department (1960)
Other pubUcations of a more specific character were issued. HISTORICAL BRANCH 77
Another Preliminary Inventory, CoUections of the Lennox and Addington Historical
Society, was pubUshed by the Archives in 1959 in co-operation with the Lennox and
Addington Historical Society. The papers themselves were microfilmed and the reels
are avaUable to researchers in the Manuscript Division.
Two pubUcations dealing with records management were issued: the General
Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada (1963, revised 1968) and
Government of Canada Disposal Arrangements for Business Records (1968).
During 1963, three check-Usts of census returns were pubUshed. These are Checklist of Ontario census returns, 1842-1871, Répertoire des recensements du QuSbec,
1825-1871 and Check-Ust of census returns, New Brunswick, 1851-1871, Nova Scotia
1871.
In 1966, the Archives pubUshed a Supplement in both EngUsh and French to the
Guide to Canadian Ministries. The Supplement covers the period from January 1, 1957
to August 1, 1965 and was compUed in the Privy CouncU Office by Messrs. J. L. Cross
and A. Millar. Currently, a complete revision of the Guide and a continuation to the.
present is being prepared by the PubUcations Section of the PubUc Archives and
the Privy CouncU Office.
To aid genealogists in theb research, a pamphtet Tracing Your Ancestors in
Canada and its French counterpart A la piste de nos ancêtres au Canada, were published in 1966. Due to the large demand for this pamphlet, it was revised in 1967
and reprinted in 1968. A complement to this pubUcation, the Check-Ust of Parish
Registers — Répertoire des Registres Paroissiaux, compiled by Miss Marielle Campeau
was pubUshed in 1969.
To give a more complete listing of the pubUcations hi which the staff of the
Archives was directly involved, mention should be made here of the following: The
Union List of Manuscripts in Canadian Repositories — Catalogue collectif des manuscrits des Archives Canadiennes, pubUshed in 1968 as a joint project of the PubUc
Archives and the Humanities Research Council; The Register of post-graduate dissertations in progress in history and related subjects — RSpertoire des thèses en cours
portant sur les sujets d'histoire et autres sujets connexes, compUed annually since 1966
by the staff of the PubUc Archives and pubUshed by the Canadian Historical Association.
The foUowing manuals were prepared by the staff of the Records Management
Branch of the PubUc Archives and pubUshed by the Treasury Board in its Paperwork
Management Series:
Subject Classification Guide for Housekeeping Records (1968)
Mail Management in Government Departments and Agencies (1968)
Records Scheduling and Disposal (1968)
Records Organization and Operations (1969)  r
ADMINISTRATION
AND TECHNICAL
SERVICES BRANCH
This Branch was estabUshed in 1966 with Mr.
A. C Taylor as Dbector.
It provides a wide range
of operational and staff
services for both the
PubUc Archives and the
National Library. When
the National library was estabUshed it was considered inadvisable to duplicate services
which already existed in the PubUc Archives. From the point of view of economy
the advantages of joint services for two departments in the same building are obvious.
It has also worked weU hi practice, to the satisfaction of both departments, which
benefit impartially from the joint services of the Branch.
The administrative functions, particularly personnel and financial management,
have increased in extent at a rate corresponding to the combined increase in the staff
and budgets of both departments. These functions have become increasingly complex
with the delegation to both departments of responsibUities for staffing, training and
financial management. CoUective bargaining, the requbements for language and
other courses and the introduction of a new budgetary system have added to the pressure
in the administrative area which is reflected in changes in organization.
The Technical Division is responsible for the conservation of records and paintings,
for a range of photographic services and the provision of microfibn advisory and
operational services for all government departments. Since the Central Microfilm Unit
operates on a revolving fund, services to the Public Archives and the National Library
are provided on the same basis as for other departments.
A Publicity and Displays Service was formed in 1968. In the short period of its
operation it has added a new dimension to the departments which it serves. The operation of Laurier House as a residence of former Prime Ministers is included in the
responsibUities of this Service.
ADMINISTRATION
DIVISION
The Administration Division is responsible for coordinating and analyzing program forecasts and
estimates and supplying management and financial
services for the PubUc Archives and the National
Library. The Division facilitates the implementation of essential PubUc Archives and
National Library programs by submissions to and liaison with the Treasury Board. It
is also responsible for general administrative services and the Central Records Office.
The present organization became effective in 1969.
FINANCE AND PROCUREMENT SECTION—This Section provides the necessary
financial reporting, bookkeeping, accounting and procurement services in conjunction
with the programs of the PubUc Archives and National Library which had budgets
of $2,267,000 and $2,009,000 respectively in 1969/70 (compared to $542,870 and
$228,279 in 1959/60) as well as the Central Microfibn Unit's revolving fund. During
the last year the departments assumed total responsibility for commitment and cost
control and financial accounting and the Section was required to prepare the necessary
data for PubUc Accounts reports. 80 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-|^B
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES SECTION—This Section supplies general administrative services for the two departments in such areas as accommodation, communication, buUding maintenance, forms management, specifications writing, Suggestion
Award Program, parking faculties, auditorium and boardroom faculties, co-ordinating j
departmental campaigns, provision of labour and carpentry services for exhibits and
other services. The most significant task in recent years was the co-ordination of the
move to the new building foUowed by liaison with the Department of PubUc Works
during the period of settling in with the many minor changes and adjustments in
accommodation that it involved. In the last fiscal year the Section has arranged for
a complete intercom system from the stack areas to the pubUc service areas, re-arranged
space, had private offices buUt for senior personnel and redesigned the control desk for
the Manuscript Division. It also co-ordinated the provision of space on the outskirts of
Ottawa to house nitrate film coUections for the Picture Division. Equivalent projects
were arranged for the National Library.
THE CENTRAL RECORDS OFFICE—The Central Records Office provides mail room,
classification, reference and distribution functions for departmental records, as well as
maintaining a stationery store and a vehicle pool. In the last year a new mail room has
been constructed to meet the increasing volume of incoming and outgoing mail. A
station wagon was purchased for special trips, pick-ups and for staff use when it is
appropriate. The first use of the station wagon was in the coUection from all across the
country of thousands of reels of motion picture film, much of it on a nitrate base and
not acceptable by common carriers. It is also useful for picking up archival material
from donors. There has been a complete revision of the records system accompanied
by the compUation of a file classification manual, the introduction of office procedures
in the areas of mad and messenger services, the conversion to modular shelving with a
saving hi cost and space and other improvements.
PERSONNEL
DIVISION
The need for a separate Division, staffed by specialists m fflB
various disciplines of personnel administration was recognized
by senior management in 1968. Today the Divisional
organized into three functional sections: staffing and general
services, classification and staff relations, and training and development Five years
ago there were three employees serving the personnel needs of the PubUc Archives and
the National Library. The Division now has 15 employees. The increase is a dbed
result of the growth and increasing complexity of the two departments, the increasing
complexity of the legislation governing pubUc servants, and the delegation of more
responsibility in this area to the two Departments served by the Division.
STAFFING AND GENERAL SERVICES—This Section provides personnel services
for the employees of the PubUc Archives and National Library hi the executive, professional, admbiistrative and foreign service, technical, administrative support and
operational categories. It is responsible for recruiting, selecting and placing employees
in both Departments. In December, 1958 the staff of the PubUc Archives was 107,
that of the National Library 39. In 1969 the staff of the Public Archives was 263 (an
increase of 246%), that of the National Library 215 (an increase of 551%).
In December, 1968 delegation was accepted for staffing from the Public Servi&i
Commission in two categories: administrative support (clerical and regulatory) and ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 81
operational (general labour and general service). The effect of this delegation has been
a considerable increase in the work load of the Section.
The Section includes the personnel services unit which provides services in pay,
leave, attendance, superannuation, insurance benefits and the preparation and maintenance of personnel records for each employee. The introduction of coUective agreements and classification conversions necessitated a reorganization in the unit which now
has an office manager and five clerks. The Section prepares reports for the Public
Archives, the National Library and the Treasury Board and processes Parliamentary
inquiries relating to the employees of both departments.
[CLASSIFICATION AND STAFF RELATIONS SECTION—This Section has the
responsibility for evaluating aU positions in the PubUc Archives and National Library.
In May 1969 the Treasury Board granted authority to the two departments to classify
aU positions in all groups in the administrative support category. For other positions
where authority to classify has not been granted a proposed evaluation for each position
is submitted to the Classification Division of Treasury Board. During the last fiscal year
126 positions were evaluated for the PubUc Archives and 159 for the National Library.
The head of the Section is responsible for the administration of 15 coUective agreements
covering employees in the PubUc Archives, including the administration of grievance
procedures.
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT SECTION—This function had never been provided for on a professional full-time basis until 1969. The responsibility of the Section
is to provide for out-service training through the Central Agency and other departments; to develop employee performance appraisal forms and provide for review
committees; to develop in-house courses to fulfill departmental needs in areas such
as supervisory skUls and on the job training; to further career development of employees
by counselUng and investigating the availability of evening and correspondence courses;
and to assist the Departmental Education Committee in developing policies and procedures concerning educational leave, course reimbursement and related activities in the
training area.
In 1969 the Training and Development Section obtained for the Public Archives
delegated authority for training. The Department can provide for the cost of training
and identify training needs one year in advance, thus making it unnecessary to obtain
permission from the Treasury Board for each individual training activity. A new
employee performance appraisal form was developed for the PubUc Archives. Many
employees were placed on language courses, other PubUc Services Commission courses
and courses offered by outside agencies. Some taken to improve the level of knowledge
and ability of the employees were given after working hours.
This Section has been assigned responsibiUty for special studies, such as determining
the need for and the utilization of translation services and programs for recognition
of long-service employees. Data Stream, a computerized device to facilitate selection,
was implemented in the two Departments served by the Section, which is also responsible for research and implementation connected with the PubUc Service Commission's
language poUcy. It is hoped that in the future more on-the-job training courses wtil be
developed through consultation with departmental management and that more in-house
courses wUl fulfill identified training needs. 82 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-1969
TECHNICAL The Tecbjaical Services Division provides technical advisory j
WRVÏPF<5 services to  government  departments  and  agencies  where ;
MLKVll^E/0 microfilm applications are involved and a microfilm service j
DIVISION to such departments and agendes, as well as records coif
servation, photo reproduction and copying, and picture
conservation services for the Public Archives and the National Library.
The oldest elements in the present division are the Records Conservation Section
(formerly the Bindery) and the Reprography Section (formerly the Photographic Section). Even these functions have changed greatly hi the last eleven years because of
increasing demands, technological advances and changing emphasis. During that
period, and particularly since the move to the new buUding m 1967, increasing attention has been devoted to restoration and preservation.
Both the Records Conservation Section and the Picture Conservation Sectiofll
which was established hi 1966, are concerned with improving methods to prevent the
deterioration of millions of priceless items, most of them unique, which are in the
custody of the PubUc Archives. Studies continue in all aspects of paper preservation.
In reprography the major developments in recent years include the increasing use of
Xerox, the introduction of colour photography and the production of copy negatives. JM
When the Central Microfibn Unit was estabUshed at the Public Archives in 1956
it was recognized that "microfibn cannot be dissociated from the whole question of
records management". The microfibn needs of the PubUc Archives would require a
large microfibn unit in any case. The microfilming requbements of other departments
can be handled simply by the addition of more cameras and operators as requbed,
avoiding duplication of facilities and ensuring financial savings and the maintenance of
acceptable standards. Since it is records that are microfilmed and since the Dominion
Archivist is responsible for ensuring that historically important records are preserved,
all microfilm applications must be reviewed from archival and records management
points of view as well as that of technical feasibility. The increasing need for microfilm
studies as well as promotion and training led to the establishment of the Micrographie
Advisory Section in 1968.
As microfibn advisors to the Government of Canada, the Division must keep
abreast of the latest technological changes. The Division Chief, Mr. W. D. Wheeler, is
Canada's representative on the International CouncU on Reprography and the Canadian Micrographie Society.
CENTRAL MICROFILM UNIT—The Central Microfilm Unit, of which Mr. Kenneth
Foster is Head, services to government departments at cost, tests microfilms and microfibn equipment, prepares samples and test runs on request for proposed programs,
and investigates new systems and techniques. The advantages of having advisory
services associated with an operational microfilm unit are demonstrated daUy.
Since 1958 there has been a marked increase in the use of microfilm as a valuable
tool in the area of working records. OriginaUy used exclusively as a security and space-
saving device, technological and methodological developments have now made it
possible to use microfilm in an increasing number of ways to increase operational
efficiency. One example is its use in connection with engineering drawings. In 1968
the plans and drawings of Expo '67 were sent from Montreal, and microfilmed. The
microfilm was then returned to Expo as the most efficient working copy while the
original drawings were deposited in the Public Archives Records Centre in Ottawa. ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 83
The expanded faculties in the new buUding have permitted the Unit to handle the
increasing requbements of government departments. The number of basic microfilm
| cameras and the processing faculties have been increased to accommodate the demand.
I Since the Unit operates on a revolving fund its cost is recovered by charges for its
I services.
Training facilities have been incorporated into the Unit's program to train supervisory and operating personnel in aU facets of microfibn technology, both in-house and
in those departments which have set up theb own microfilm operations under the
guidance of the Unit. A continuing liaison is maintained with these units to ensure
the maintenance of standards and to provide flexibility in the case of equipment
failures or production plans.
The popularity of microfiche has developed an increasing requirement within
the government services for a unitized microfilm record. The Central Microfibn Unit
has set up facilities to offer microfiche in several formats to comply with international
standards.
A computer output microfilmer (COM) is also in demand and its application has.
been studied on behalf of interested departments. It provides advantages in the
retrieval of information from the computer and as a means of reducing the large
quantities of printouts on paper. The Unit is at present appraising the Compuscan
system, which is a method of using microfibn as an input medium to the computer,
known as MOC (microfilm onto computer).
The foUowing figures show the growth of the operations of the Unit during the
last eleven years:
Camera Work
Number of images photographed
(mUlions)
1958-59
5
1969/70
8
Microfiche and Acetate Jackets
(thousands)
—
15
Aperture Cards and Duplications
(thousands)
—
70
Developing
(millions of feet)
.8
2.5
Film Printing; Silver, Kalvar and Diazo
(millions of feet)
.2
2.5
Computer Output Microfilm
(millions of nuages)
—
2
MICROGRAPHIC ADVISORY SECTION—The Micrographie Advisory Section grew
out of the expanding functions of the Central Microfilm Unit, the increasing use of
microfilm by government departments and the need to be cognizant of technological
changes and equipment and to inform and advise those responsible for the initiation
of microfilm projects in government departments. It was estabUshed in 1967 with
Charles Poole as Head.
The work of the Section falls into three categories: studies, education and projeds.
The studies are carried out at the request of government departments and concern the
application of microfibn in any asped of records management including automated 84 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19®
processes, as well as the development of microfUming techniques. An active program
of promotion and instruction of departmental representatives has resulted in greatly
increased activity in areas where microfibn appUcations can achieve more efficiency.
In 1969, 25 studies were undertaken. The Section keeps abreast of technological
changes hi other countries as well as m Canada and maintains close contacts with
international associations and manufacturers. Examination of increasing numbers of
equipment requisitions and the hiflux of new equipment in the microfUm industry has
resulted in the need for an evaluation program which wfll provide detaUed, practical
information concerning microfUm equipment, and particularly its application. Fifty-
seven requisitions for new equipment were processed in 1969.
This Section is responsible for analyzing microfUm proposals from other departments submitted to the Dominion Archivist for assessment to ensure that all techmcal
criteria have been met. Seventeen such submissions were reviewed in 1969 usually in
conjunction with representatives of the Historical and Records Management Branches.
The annual ten-day Microrecording Technology Course, introduced in 1968, is
conducted by the staff of the Section and provides training for approximately 35 persons
from all government departments and agencies in microfUm techniques and appUcations. AppUcations for this course have increased to such a degree that it was necessary
to have two courses in 1969.
RECORDS CONSERVATION SECTION—The recent change hi the designation of the
Section from Bindery to Records Conservation indicates the shifting emphasis and the
increasing attention paid to the restoration and preservation of the paper upon which
most historic records are inscribed. For many years the primary task of the Section was
to bind or rebind books for the PubUc Archives Library and the National Library. In
addition, maps were backed with linen to permit safe handling and storage, and a
limited number of documents were repaired manually with silk, Japanese tissue or other
materials. Binding rare books is still an important function of the Section. In 1968-
1969 5,000 books were bound for the two libraries served by the Section, an increase of
250% from 1958-1959. This volume is expected to decline as standard binding requbements are met by contracts with commercial firms while the efforts of the specialized
staff in the Section can be most effectively concentrated on the important task of
restoring rare books and preventing the deterioration of archival material.
In 1966 a study was made of the most advanced methods and equipment for the
preservation of paper which contains varying amounts of add, the seeds of its own
destruction. As a result the Section estabUshed a process of deacidification and lamination by machine, using ceUulose acetate and transparent tissue. The fbst laminating
machine hi Canada was installed in June 1968 and a program was commenced for the
restoration of documents on a priority basis. Because of the large and increasing backlog only material which is particularly significant or which is in advanced stages of
deterioration has been treated so far.
One of the major projects recently undertaken for the Manuscript Division is
unbinding and restoring manuscripts from approximately 450 volumes of Lower Canada
"S" Series, consisting of approximately 135,000 pages. A simUar project for "C"
Series, British MUitary Records m Canada, has been completed. Fifty-five rare atlases
and three thousand maps were restored for the Map Division in the last year.
Due to the great difficulty in finding qualified staff in tins field it may be necessary
to develop an apprenticeship program. ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
85
PICTURE CONSERVATION SECTION—For many years the conservation of the
large coUection of water-colours and oU paintings at the PubUc Archives had been a
subject of grave concern. Despite the willingness of the National GaUery to provide
[expert restoration treatment in urgent cases it became apparent that there was a continuing requbement for a picture restoration unit at the PubUc Archives. In 1966 such
a unit was estabUshed. Its first task was to supervise the packing of the paintings and
art objects for the move to the new building. The move took place in mid-winter,
requiring special care and temperature control precautions. After some delays in obtaining equipment for the laboratory, the Section was fuUy operational by the end of 1967.
The purpose of the Picture Conservation Section is to provide for the application
of adequate conservation techniques to paintings, documents and other archival materials.
One of the characteristics of this specialized work is that individual treatment is requbed
in most cases. Restoration procedures include preUminary examinations, tests and reports
followed by the necessary treatment, photographic record of the results, and a treatment
report. The examination and analysis prior to restoration may include infra-red, ultra
violet and x-ray photography.
While the primary task of the Section is restoration work for the Picture Division,
there is a similar responsibiUty for manuscripts, maps, books and other archival material
which reqube special treatment, and there is continual attention to paper restoration, a
serious problem for the PubUc Archives. In addition, the section assists in organizing
art exhibits in the buUding and provides technical assistance to curatorial and display
personnel. The Head of the Section is Roger Roche.
FoUowing is a production report for 1969:
OU paintings
16
Water-colours and prints
587
Books, maps, manuscripts and parchments
48
Photographs
64
Examinations, exhibitions
6
Special projects
2
REPROGRAPHY SECTION—The Reprography Section, headed by Mr. John Howard,
provides an extensive copying service which has increased in volume and variety in the
last eleven years. It now provides a full range of photographs, photostats, eledrostatic
copying, microfibn enlargements, colour photographs and sUdes. The rise in production
is dbectly related to the increased demands by researchers and the programs of the
PubUc Archives and National Library.
A copying service is provided at cost for those engaged hi research in the building
or those requesting copies of photographs, manuscripts or maps by mail. The orders
for Xerox copies of documents are particularly large and would be much larger if a
limit were not imposed on each requisition.
A continuing program for the production of copy negatives of photographic collections has been instituted. Abeady approximately 37,000 negatives have been processed. In 1965 a new camera was acqubed to cope with the problem of glass plates,
which are heavy, difficult to store, easily broken and unsatisfadory to copy. The
Topley collection alone consists of many thousands of glass plates which can be 86 REPORT FOR THE YEARS 1959-19©
converted by the new camera to film, which is a safer and more convenient medium
and can give a better print than the original since it wfll copy details that the glass plate
wUl no longer print The extensive rise of exhibitions in the building has created a
new requbement for photographs. In addition to the photographs which constitute
a large portion of exhibitions, others are produced as a part of an expanding public
relations function.
The move to the new building with its improved equipment laboratory and studio
faculties, saw the mtroduction of colour photography for which there is an increasing
demand. Colour photographs of a wide range of subjects, including maps, charts,
photographs, paintings, dupUcate colour sUdes and enlarged colour prints are requbed
for a variety of purposes. Ultra violet, infra-red and other specialized photography
is also provided.
The production figures for the last fiscal year indicate the volume and scope of the
activities of the Section:
Photo negatives
5,200
Photostats
16,550
Microfilm enlargements
3,500
Xerox
245,000
Negative file cards
5,700
Photo prints (8 x 10)
7,600
Colour negatives
180
Colour positives (8 x 10)
185
DISPLAYS Displays and Publicity is the newest Service of
ATVD the  PubUc  Archives.  The  display  function
.^      tmninrin originated   in   the   activities   of   the   former
PUBLICITY SERVICE Archives Museum.  Formed in 1907 it occu
pied for many years the ground floor of the
"new" wing of the Archives building on Sussex Drive. Several generations of tourists,
Ottawans and school classes from Ontario and Quebec were familiar with the many
objects which illustrated Canadian history—the Quebec model, the currency and
medal coUections, artifacts, pictures and documents relating to historical figures and
events.
Primarily a permanent exhibition, it was supplemented from time to time by
spedal displays to mark significant anniversaries or acquisitions. For example, a major
exhibition in 1959 commemorated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of the Plains
of Abraham. Smaller displays related to exploration, Indian and Eskimo crafts,
chivalric orders, Sb John A. Macdonald and the selection of Ottawa as Canada's
capital.
In 1965 the whig occupied by the Museum was requbed for the Library and i|jf
Pidure Division and temporary exhibition space was obtained in the Daly BuUding near
the Chateau Laurier.
In 1966 an agreement between the Public Archives and the National Museum
provided for the transfer of aU "three-dimensional" objects in the Archives Museum to
the new Museum of Man.  This transfer became effective in 1967 when the PubUc ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH
87
Archives moved to the new building on WeUington Street The buUding on Sussex
Street was occupied by the War Museum and many of the familiar mUitary objects
continue to be displayed there. Already, in 1965, the currency coUection had been
transferred to the Bank of Canada, leaving only the medal coUection in the custody of
the PubUc Archives.
It was decided that the exhibition rooms in the new buUding would be devoted
to appropriate, changing displays of material drawn from the holdings of the PubUc
Archives or the National Library or similar material on loan illustrating topical themes.
The purpose was to share with the general public the wealth of historical material in the
PubUc Archives used most frequently for historical research.
The fbst exhibitions commemorated the centennial of Confederation. The fbst
entitled "The Road to Confederation", was formed from material drawn from all
divisions hi the Historical Branch. Preparations began hi 1966 and a team of archivists
contributed by locating and selecting appropriate material. Research was co-ordinated
by Jay Atherton of the Manuscript Division and the exhibition was designed and
mounted by the Canadian Government Exhibition Commission. It was on view to the
pubUc from the time of the opening of the new building in July 1967 untU February
1968.
A second centennial exhibition was entitled, "Canadian Life at Confederation".
Organized from material in the Picture Division and in the medal coUection, it was on
view from October 1967 to February 1968.
These early experiences demonstrated the need for the co-ordination of all aspects
of display and public relations. In January 1968 the Displays and Publicity Service
was formed with Mr. Robert Rosewarne as its Head. Its responsibUities were to initiate
and develop an exhibition program, to ad as a clearing house for information to the
press, to arrange tours and to administer the national medal collection and Laurier
House. The aim of the exhibition program is to project Canadian history to the
general public and to assist hi its teaching in schools. Hitherto exhibitions have been
held only hi the Archives buUding but it is hoped that hi future they can be sent across
the country so that the historical treasures of the nation can be shared by all Canadians.
A brief description foUows of the exhibitions that have been arranged by the Service
for the PubUc Archives.
THE NATIONAL TRUST GIFT       February and June 1968
The National Trust as a centennial project commissioned Walter Couctil to paint the
provincial and territorial floral emblems in theb natural settings. The 12 paintings were
displayed when the Vice-President of the National Trust presented them to the
Dominion Archivist Dr. W. Kaye Lamb. The paintings were loaned to the National
Library in June of the same year for inclusion with theb Regional Canadian Writers
Exhibit.
ALFRED JACOB MILLER        May 1968-July 1968
The rare coUection of water-colours painted by A. J. MiUer (1810-1874), from sketches
made on a trip through the West in 1837 were the subject of an exhibit organized by
the Picture Division. The paintings had not been on public view since 1951.
ELECTION POSTERS       June 1968-July 1968
In keeping with the federal election fever of June 1968, D. Lee McDonald of the
Manuscript Division organized a small exhibition of posters used hi past elections.
All the posters were from the Archives coUection. 88 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-1969
IMAGES OF A CENTURY        July 1968 - January 1969
The exhibition was the work of M. Swift of the Manuscript Division and was designed
by Norman Finch of the Canadian Government Exhibition Commission. The theme
of the exhibition was the 100 years of Canadian history following Confederation.     I
HENRI BOURASSA       September 1968 - November 1968
The politidan, Henri Bourassa (1868-1952), was honoured by an exhibition of docu-
ments and photographs on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Miss
Anne Bourassa assisted the Archives by the loan of material for exhibit. The exhibition
was the work of Miss Judi Lambert of the Manuscript Division.
GALLERY OF CANADIAN HISTORY        September 1968-January 1969
A coUection of Canadian historical paintings assembled by Confederation Life were
displayed. Arrangements for this exhibit were made by the Picture Division.
ASPECTS-150        February 1969-May 1969
An exhibit organized by the Picture Division in collaboration with the Bank of
Montreal consisted of 41 drawings of typical Canadian architecture produced by
Richard Wilson to mark the 150fh anniversary of the Bank of Montreal.
SIR WILFRID LAURIER        March 1969 - May 1969
In memory of the death of Sir WUfrid Laurier (1841-1919), the PubUc Archives
organized a display of documents, photographs and maps illustrating the main events
of his life. Organized by Miss Judi Lambert of the Manuscript Division and designed
by Bob Smith of the Canadian Government Exhibition Commission, the exhibition was
opened by the Right Honourable Lester Pearson, in the presence of the Honourable
Gérard PeUetier, Secretary of State, the Right Honourable John Diefenbaker and Mr.
Henri Laurier, a grand-nephew of Sir Wilfrid.
CANADA AND THE I.L.O.        May 1969 - September 1969
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the International Labour
Organization, the exhibit was organized by Brian H. HaUett with the assistance of the
Department of Labour and designed by Duncan de Kergommeaux of the Canadian
Government Exhibition Commission. It was opened by the Honourable B. S. Mackasey,
Minister of Labour.
THE PERFORMING ARTS IN CANADA May 1969 - September 1969
The PubUc Archives joined the National Library to help the National Arts Centre
celebrate its opening by assembling an exhibition for the occasion. Books, manuscripts
and photographs Ulustrated the growth of the theatre in Canada from the early French
Period to the present day. The Departments were assisted in this project by the
MetropoUtan Toronto Libraries Theatre Section, the CBC, the Royal Winnipeg BaUet,
the Canadian Opera Company, the Stratford Shakespearian Festival, and the Theatre
Foundation. The exhibition was opened by Mr. Gérard PeUetier, the Secretary of State
assisted by Mr. HamUton Southam.
CANADA IN MAPS       October 1969 - March 1970
Mr. C. C. J. Bond of the Map Division selected an exhibit from their coUection of
maps, plans and drawings. The exhibition was opened by Dr. W. I. Smith, Acting Dominion Archivist, assisted by Mr. T. E. Layng, Chief of the Map Division. [ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 89
HERALDRY IN CANADA November 1969 - March 1970
The PubUc Archives, with the assistance of the Heraldry Society of Canada, assembled
an exhibition of Canadian Heraldry. Selection for the display and the writing of its
accompanying catalogue was done by Mr. A. Vachon of the Picture Division. It was
opened by His ExceUency, the Right Honourable Roland Michener, Governor-General
of Canada, assisted by Mr. PhUip TUT, Chairman of the Heraldry Society.
In addition to the displays installed in the exhibit rooms, a number of smaU displays have been assembled in the public areas on the thbd floor. The first display was
assembled in 1967 to mark the anniversary of Champlain and the pubUcation by the
Public Archives of Nouveaux Documents sur Champlain et son Spoque. This was
replaced by an exhibit drawn from the records of the Canadian National RaUways,
foUowed by one from the Mackenzie King Papers. A display of land petitions and one
j on Indian Treaties has also been shown.
The new buUding on Wellington Street has a complex of three board rooms, an
j auditorium and an exhibition area. This accommodation is used by the PubUc Archives
I and other governmental agendes for meetings, conferences and displays. When the
rooms are not reserved for official use, the Archives makes this space avaUable as a
pubUc service to non-profit cultural groups. Film societies, foreign embassies and civic
and ethnic groups have used the areas for theb activities, which include exhibitions in
the foyer of the auditorium.
PubUcity—In August 1969 a pubUcity officer was taken on staff and a promotional
program was estabUshed and undertaken. A general press release is sent out to aU
media weU hi advance of each exhibit. This release is foUowed up by a pre-exbibit
'exclusive' for each of the local papers and a fourth aspect is explored and sent to
Canadian Press for its exclusive distribution. These 'exclusives' are aimed at the feature
writers and specialty reporters for potential use in the Saturday pages which receive
widest circulation. A second press release, aimed at the News Desks, is sent out to
aU media regarding opening ceremonies for each exhibit and highlighting special
features planned for these official openings. The working press is included on the
invitation lists which helps maintain good press relations and good wUl towards the
Department.
FoUowing the official opening of each exhibition, an attempt is made to maintain
or re-stimulate pubUc interest in the displays during theb run by releasing news of
any important developments related to the exhibit (i.e., important visitors to the
exhibitions, contributors or public figures and news of any important acquisitions
gained as a result of the displays).
The results of this program have been concrete. The pubUcity received for exhibitions prior to the hiring of a publicity officer was minimal because there was no officer
to solicit press or media attention. The publicity resulting from subsequent PubUc
Archives exhibits has had an advertising value averaging $2,000 each, based on the
advertising rates of the local press. Canadian Press and the Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation's coverage of the exhibitions and PubUc Archives events has been constant
and they have received national attention, particularly in the instance of the 'Heraldry'
opening which, because the Governor General officiated, received wide TV coverage
from both networks.
Tours—When the Archives Museum was on Sussex Drive the average monthly attendance was 3,870 persons, a figure that was partly due to the proximity of the Mbit
and the War Museum making the location a focal point for organized tours. When the 90 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-1969
Museum moved to the Daly BuUding, the average attendance dropped to 1,993 per
month. Since the move to Wellington Street the attendance of visitors has averaged
more than 4,500 per month in addition to organized tours which are conducted by
Mr, A. E. H. Pétrie. During the 1969-1970 fiscal year more than eighty school
tours were arranged, some groups having as many as 200 youngsters. 120 adult tours
were arranged. These groups ranged from those of clubs and organizations to small
groups of visiting dignitaries. More than 10,000 persons toured the buUding on I
formally arranged tours during the fiscal year.
Medal Collection—The numismatic coUection of the Archives Museum contained
some 22,000 items. When, in 1965, the monetary portion of the coUection numbering
approximately 16,000 items was turned over to the Bank of Canada, some 6,000
mUitary, commemorative and ecclesiastical medals and tokens were retained by the
PubUc Archives in the charge of the curator, Mr. A. E. H. Pétrie. At present the
coUection is being transferred to new medal cabinds and a survey of the coUection is in
progress.
Since 1958 a total of 557 new additions have been made to the coUedion. The
following Ust outlines the more important gifts or purchases.
1959:
Ninety-five civilian medals and badges; presented by Lord Strathcona. These were all
the personal effects of Donald Smith, the fbst Lord Strathcona.
Twelve civflian medals; presented by Mrs. Charles CamseU, Ottawa, Ontario.
One Deaball Crimea Medal, 1854, with 4 clasps; a gift of Mrs. Lucy Deyos, Haney, B.C.
Seventeen military and civilian medals; presented by Mrs. Margaret Heeney, Ottawa,
Ont.
Two bronze Vimy Memorial dedication medals, 1936; presented by Group Captain
H. R. Stewart, Ottawa, Ont
1960:
Eight mUitary medals, decorations and miniatures of Colonel J. S. Dennis; from the
Estate of Ins widow, through the Royal Trust Company, Victoria, B.C.
One Canadian General Service Medal (C.G.S.M.) with 1866 Fenian Raid Bar; presented by Mr. E. H. SheUey, Sydney, Australia.
Ten medals and medallic objects; from the Estate of the Hon. C. D. Howe, Montreal
Que.
1961:
Ten civilian medals associated with the Saunders family, presented by Dr. Fred Landon,
London, Ont
One Canada CouncU medal and 2 Inco-Thompson medals;  received  through the
courtesy of Mrs. Dora de Pédery Hunt, Toronto, Ont.
One gold and enamel coUar and badge of a Knight of the Most Honourable Order of
the Bath, given to Jeffrey, Lord Amherst; presented to the Canadian Government
by Mr. H. R. MacmUlan, Vancouver, B.C.
1962:
Thirteen mUitary and civUian medals and badges; presented by Mrs. J. B. Cunliffe, ADMINISTRATION AND TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 91
Seven mflitary and civilian medals and decorations, and miniatures; from the Estate of
Senator Cabine WUson, Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ont
1963:
Three gtit Vanier PubUc Administration medals; specimens provided for display purposes by the Master, Royal Canadian Mbit, Ottawa, Ont
1964:
Five Canadian civUian medals; from the Estate of F.C.C. Lynch, Ottawa, Ont
One International Co-operation Year medal; presented by Dr. J. Roby Kidd, Ottawa,
Ont
One silver medal bearing the new coat-of-arms of Carleton University; presented by
the artist Mr. Art Price, Ottawa, Ont
Saskatchewan Diamond JubUee medal, 1965, presented by Mrs. C. M. Force, Regina,
Sask.
Thomas D'Arcy McGee's brass name plate; obtained through the courtesy of Group
Captain H. R. Stewart, Ottawa, Ont
1966:
One Queen's South Africa medal, with 4 clasps and 5 miniature medals; presented by
Air Vice Marshal J. G. Bryans, Ottawa, Ont.
Sixty-one bronze historical medals, of British and French origin; obtained from Mrs.
F. S. Mathewson, Ottawa, Ont.
One bronze Antarctic medal, 1907-1909, with clasp and ribbon, and two Fbst World
War medals awarded to Dr. W. A. R. MicheU, surgeon with Sb Ernest Shackleton's
vessel, Nimrod, during the Second Expedition to penetrate the Antarctic Continent,
presented by Mrs. W. A. R. MicheU, Ottawa, Ont
1967:
Four Canadian civilian medals; obtained from Miss M. G. Rogers, Ottawa, Ont.
One Fbst World War Mflitary medal, awarded to Pte. G. L. Porter; presented by the
officers and men of the Centennial Medal Projed, Canadian Forces Base, Winnipeg,
Man.
Eighteen-inch diameter bronze "Olympic Shield", or Shield of the Athletes, by Dr.
Robert Tait McKenzie; purchased from the MedaUic Art Company, New York,
N.Y.
1968:
Thirteen civUian medals; presented by Jerry Parker Ltd., Ottawa, Ont.
Seventy-four Centennial medals; presented by the Royal Trust Company, Montreal,
Que.
Thirty-six dvtiian medals and badges of Sb Robert Borden; received from the Estate
of Sb Robert Borden.
One Imperial Service Order with its miniature and scroU of award to Wiltiam C. Bowles,
1913; presented by Dr. Eugene Forsey, Ottawa, Ont 92 REPORT FOR THE YEARS  1959-1969
1969:
Three civUian medals or awards; presented by Mr. H. R. Jackman, Toronto, Ont.
One Centennial art medal; designed and presented by Mrs. Dora de Pédery Hunt,
Toronto, Ont.
Seventy-five civiUan medals and awards of General G. P. Vanier; obtained from Madame
Georges P. Vanier, Montreal, Que.
Three specimen medals struck from the 1967 dies for Governor General Vanier's  '
awards, in gold, sUver and bronze; presented to the PubUc Archives by Madame
Georges P. Vanier.
One gilt portrait medal of Prime Minister P. E. Trudeau, designed by Mrs. Dora de
Pédery Hunt; presented by Toronto and District Liberal Association.
One Ontario Education medal, designed and cast by Mrs. Dora de Pédery Hunt; presented by Dr. J. Roby Kidd, Toronto, Ont.
Three mUitary medals of Colonel H. M. Daly from his Estate; obtained through the
courtesy of Mrs. R. A. BeU, Ottawa, Ont
Laurier House is maintained by the Public Archives in accordance with the terms of the
wiH of Rt. Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King and the Laurier House Act. The purpose is to
ensure that the house is retained substantially as it was during the period of its occupation by Mr. King. This has been done in the rooms designated in Mr. King's wiU but
space on the second floor has been used to commemorate Sb Wilfrid Laurier who
resided there while he was Prime Minister. Offices in the building were occupied
for several years by official biographers of Mr. King. The present curator, Miss Helen
M. Brown, has made arrangements for some significant acquisitions and has supervised
recent renovation and redecoration.
Interest in Laurier House is sustained. Tours of the building are conducted daily,
including Sundays, and arrangements are made for visits by groups. In the last two
years several rooms have been redecorated and the house exterior was repainted. Other
improvements were the replacement of rugs, drapes, upholstery, and tight fixtures. A
complete inventory of the contents of Laurier House was completed in 1969.
Recent accessions relate chiefly to Sb Wilfrid Laurier. Many of them were gifts
from M. Henri Laurier of Montreal, who was born in Laurier House, Madame Gabrielle
Phillippe, daughter of Mr. Joseph Mailhot, a former Confidential Messenger to Sir
Wilfrid, and the Liberal Party of Canada. The PubUc Archives has also purchased
several personal items which formerly belonged to Sb Wilfrid or Lady Laurier. ^ vm   CANADA
CHIVES PUBLIQUES
1959-1969
J  LES
ARCHIVES
PUBLIQUES
DU
CANADA
RAPPORT
1959-1969 Information Canada
Ottawa, 1971
No de cat SA1-1959/1969 SOMMAIRE
Introduction
Page
1
Direction de la gestion des documents
11
Acquisitions et référence
12
Dépôts régionaux d'archives
16
Services consultatifs
18
Direction des archives historiques
27
i   Division des manuscrits
27
r    Bibliothèque des archives publiques
52
Division des cartes
57
Division des gravures et photos
66
Section des pubUcations
79
Direction de l'administration et des services techniques
82
|    Division de l'administration
82
i    Division du personnel
83
F   Division des services techniques
85
Expositions et publicité
90  INTRODUCTION
LES ARCHIVES PUBLIQUES DU CANADA, 1959-1969
Ce rapport, le premier depuis 1958, permet de passer en revue les fonctions et l'activité
des Archives pubUques du Canada depuis plus de 10 ans.
M Ce fut une période de croissance et de développement remarquables. L'effectif de
l'organisme est passé de 107 à 263 employés, les dépenses budgétabes de $542,870 à
$2,267,000. Cette augmentation résulte, entre autres, de la croissance étonnante de l'activité d'archivage. Par exemple, le nombre de chercheurs inscrits annueUement est passé
de 480 en 1959 à 2,501 en 1969, soit une augmentation de 520 p. 100. Les Archives ont
acquis, pendant cette même période, autant de documents pubUcs et privés qu'elles en
avaient accumulés depuis 1870. De plus, certains secteurs d'activité mis sur pied au
cours de la décennie précédente se sont développés et de nouvelles responsabUités se sont
rajoutées, conférant ainsi une nouveUe importance au rôle des Archives pubUques. C'est
devenu un organisme complexe qui fournit d'importants services techniques et de gestion
des dossiers au gouvernement du Canada tout en remplissant son rôle traditionnel de
conservation et de recherche. Le besoin croissant de coordination, de direction et de
planification dans plusieurs secteurs distincts a entraîné la création de trois directions: la
Direction de la gestion des dossiers, la Direction des archives historiques et la Direction
de l'administration et des services techniques.
LA DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOSSIERS-Uune des plus
importantes innovations, au cours des dix dernières années, a été l'accroissement des
responsabUités des Archives pubUques dans le domaine de la gestion des dossiers. La
mise sur pied du système aduel s'est faite en trois étapes principales. Il y a d'abord eu, en
1956, la création du Dépôt des archives pubUques. Comme l'expliquent les Archives
publiques dans leur rapport de 1955-1958, ce centre était destiné à entreposer les
dossiers non-courants des ministères de l'Etat et à offrir un service de consultation
rapide. Ce service s'est accru et compte actueUement des dépôts régionaux à Toronto
et à Montréal. En décembre 1969, les dépôts d'archives, qui abritaient 480,000 pieds
cubes de dossiers, ont répondu quotidiennement à 1,000 demandes de renseignements.
Ces dépôts représentaient pour les ministères, une économie de près de $1,700,000 au
point de vue espace, équipement et personnel.
m U y a eu ensuite la mise sur pied de méthodes d'élimination des dossiers périmés,
l'élaboration et l'approbation de programmes de conservation. En 1960, on a étabU au
Dépôt des archives d'Ottawa une division distincte de la conservation et de la disposition
des dossiers. Cette division a aidé les ministères à dresser des Ustes de conservation des
documents et a partidpé, en 1963, à la pubUcation d'un ouvrage des Archives pubUques
intitulé: Programmes de disposition des dossiers du gouvernement du Canada. En 1961,
l'archiviste fédéral a été nommé président du Comité des documents pubUcs dont le
secrétariat se compose d'employés du Dépôt des archives. Le personnel des Archives
publiques a étudié, tant au point de vue de rarchivistique et de la gestion des dossiers
qu'au point de vue technique, les projets de disposition et de microfilmage des documents. Des recommandations étaient faites au Comité des documents pubUcs qui en
faisait part au Conseil du trésor.
I On a, en troisième Ueu, élaboré un programme global de gestion des dossiers à
l'fintention du gouvernement du Canada. Le programme est entré en vigueur au fur et à
mesure que le système se développait et démontrait son bien-fondé. Selon une étude des
mmr 2 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
documents pubbcs menée en 1959, la gestion des dossiers était "te plus considérable el
le plus négUgé des cinq services administratifs du gouvernement fédéral". La Commission
royale d'enquête sur l'organisation du gouvernement a attentivement étudié les méthodes |
de gestion des dossiers au Canada et dans d'autres pays. EUe a reconnu combien U
importe que relève d'un seul organisme la gestion des dossiers, notamment le traitement
des dossiers actifs et non-actifs, le contrôle de l'élimination des documents et le microfilmage, la sélection et le transfert aux Archives pubUques des dossiers qui méritent
d'être conservés en permanence. Elle a appuyé le travaU des Archives pubUques dans
tous ces secteurs pour conclure que les Archives pubUques doivent jouer un rôle de I
premier plan dans ce processus de tri et d'élhnination. C'est une responsabilité qui
incombe aux Archives pubUques plutôt qu'à la direction, et U importe que toutes les
étapes de cette opération soient bien réussies. Le décrd sur les documents pubUcs (C.P.
1966-1749) a dressé à l'intention du gouvernement fédéral les structures du système
actuel de gestion des dossiers. Tout en reconnaissant les responsabUités générales du
Conseil du trésor en matière de gestion des dossiers et la responsabilité des ministères en
ce qui concerne leurs propres documents, le décret impose de nombreuses tâches à !
l'archiviste fédéral qui doit offrir des services consultatifs, former le personnel, fixer des
normes et donner des dbectives, encourager les ministères à utiliser les dépôts d'archives,
contrôler la destruction et le transfert des documents pubUcs, et s'acquitter de certaines
responsabUités d'ordre technique en ce qui a trait au microfilmage, en plus des fonctions
traditionnelles des archives touchant la conservation et la recherche. Le rapport annuel
de l'archiviste fédéral au ConseU du trésor est une revue de l'état actuel de la gestion des
dossiers du gouvernement fédéral. L'un des points importants du décret est la création
d'un conseU consultatif des documents pubUcs présidé par l'archiviste fédéral. Ce con-
seil permet aux gestionnaires des dossiers et aux représentants du ConseU du trésor, du
Bureau du ConseU privé et d'organismes intéressés à la recherche de discuter de certains
problèmes. Le secrétariat du ConseU consultatif est assuré par la Dbection de la gestion !
des dossiers.
En 1939, un eminent archiviste européen a imaginé une situation idéale ob "graduelle- I
ment, les archivistes feraient figure d'experts à consulter sur toutes les questions relatives
à la création et à la conservation des documents publics et assureraient la garde des
écrits du passé et du présent." Cette situation existe maintenant au Canada.
LA DIRECTION DES ARCHIVES HISTORIQUES—La Dbection des
archives historiques est chargée de réunir et de conserver une vaste coUection de documents de tous genres, témoins de notre histobe, sorte de mémoire coUective de la nation. !
Au cours des dix dernières années, l'activité de chaque sedeur a augmenté sensiblement
et les fonctions se sont multipUées. L'augmentation annueUe des chercheurs inscrits, de
plus de 25 p. 100 au cours de cette période, s'est accompagnée d'une augmentation
correspondante de tous les services de référence: cbculation des documents, demandes
écrites, prêts de microfibns entre bibUofhèques et photocopie d'archives. L'augmentation \
des aaniisitions au corns de cette période est aussi digne d'intérêt Les acquisitions de la I
Division des manuscrits ont augmenté annueUement de 2,500 p. 100; la Division des
gravures et photos et la Division des cartes et plans ont enregistré des hausses semblables, j
Seul le fonds de la bibliothèque a subi une baisse, par suite du transfert de milliers de
volumes, périodiques et journaux à la Bibliothèque nationale.
Les fonctions des Archives pubUques ont sensiblement augmenté depuis deux ans.
A cause de l'importance qu'on accorde maintenant aux documents pubUcs, la Division
des manuscrits s'est accrue considérablement. Des méthodes améUorées de sélection et INTRODUCTION 3
de transfert des dossiers aux Archives pubUques ont eu pour effet de multiplier le
volume des acquistions, et une nouvelle ligne de conduite gouvernementale en ce qui
concerne l'accès aux documents pubUcs a conféré une certaine urgence aux travaux de
sélection et de disposition des dossiers et à la préparation d'instrument de recherche. La
mise au point d'un système de prêts de microfilms entre les bibliothèques a ajouté un
élément nouveau aux services de référence, et un programme d'acquisition systématique
de documents privés et d'ouvrages spéciaux, comme le catalogue collectif des manuscrits
et le répertoire des thèses en cours, a ajouté à la diversité des travaux professionnels tout
^^fournissant aux chercheurs un nouveau service important
La Division des cartes et plans a été entièrement transformée à la suite de l'acquisition, en 1965, d'une vaste coUection de 150,000 cartes topographiques étrangères
provenant de la Direction géographique du ministère de l'Energie, des Mines et des
Ressources. On entend mettre à la disposition des fonctionnaires et du grand public des
cartes topographiques de chaque partie de la surface terrestre. La division est aussi
chargée de la garde d'une vaste coUection de cartes canadiennes et, en collaboration
avec la nouvelle Association des cartothécaires, eUe fait des échanges, uniformise les
méthodes et dresse un catalogue collectif des cartes.
ÉRt La Division des gravures et photos a obtenue une forte quantité de photographies du
gouvernement et des particutiers. On a, par exemple, transféré du ministère de la
Défense nationale la coUection de photographies des deux guerres mondiales et de la
guerre de Corée, collection qui comprend à peu près 1,000,000 de photographies. Cette
division a aussi créé des sections chargées de mettre au point des programmes d'archives
dans des domaines relativement nouveaux: les archives sonores, la science héraldique et
le film. Il y aura sans doute, dans l'avenir, d'importants progrès en ce qui concerne les
archives audio-visuelles.
La Bibliothèque md un service spécialisé de référence en matière d'histoire du
Canada, d'administration des archives, de gestion des dossiers et de la technique de microfilmage à la disposition des chercheurs et du personnel. Le travaU de référence toujours
croissant a empêché d'accorder au catalogage toute l'attention voulue; on s'efforce
cependant de surmonter ces difficultés.
jp' Les bureaux de Londres et de Paris sont en relations étroites avec la Dbection des
archives historiques. Depuis qu'on a microfilmé les séries les plus importantes de documents officiels sur le Canada, les appareils photographiques des Archives pubUques ont
été transférés, en 1968, du Bureau des documents pubUcs au bureau de Londres où l'on
s'en sert constamment pour photocopier des documents privés empruntés à cette fin, par
exemple les dossiers du Rhodes Scholarship Trust de l'université d'Oxford. À Paris, on
cherche à repérer d'importants documents sur le Canada dans des dépôts régionaux ou
communaux à l'extérieur de Paris.
LA DIRECTION DE L'ADMINISTRATION ET DES SERVICES
TECHNIQUES —L'activité accrue du secteur de l'administration dépend dbectement
de l'expansion du personnel et des fonctions des deux organismes desservis par la Dbection: les Archives pubUques et la BibUothèque nationale. La négociation coUective et la
délégation aux ministères de responsabiUtés en matière de dotation en personnel, de
gestion financière et de formation n'ont fait qu'accroître la tâche de la Dbection de
l'administration. Cette dbection est aussi chargée de la sécurité, des locaux et de
l'entretien du nouvel immeuble dont le pubUc fait grand usage.
I En plus de la demande accrue de microfihns et de services photographiques, il y a eu
d'importants changements d'ordre technique. Comme U fallait sans délai assurer la con-
mzmmmm^mM 4 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNEES 1959 À 1969
servation des archives, on a créé, en 1966, la section de la restauration des peintures et
estampes, et instaUé l'année suivante l'équipment le plus moderne de laminage et de
désaddification des documents. De nouveaux appareils ont eu pour effet d'accroître
l'étendue et d'augmenter l'efficacité des services photographiques.
Les progrès de la technique du microfUmage et de la gestion des dossiers ont
entraîné la mise sur pied d'une section d'experts-conseUs en micrographie, chargée de
prêter main forte au Service central du microfibn qui, en 1956, est passé du Département
des impressions pubUques et de la papeterie aux Archives pubUques à cause du Uen étrdt
qu'U y a entre le microfUmage et la gestion des dossiers. Il semblait nécessaire de fournir
conseUs et directives aux ministères sur les possibUités de réalisation des projets, sur les
meilleures techniques et le meilleur matériel à utiliser ainsi que sur le contrôle de la
quatité; la meUleure méthode semblait être d'associer ces experts à un important service
chargé, entre autres, d'assurer des économies en veillant à ce qu'U n'y ait pas de double
emploi et en offrant un service de microfUmage au prix coûtant. Le microfUm qui
n'était utilisé au départ que pour économiser de l'espace ou pour fournb des copies de
sécurité, est de plus en plus utilisé quand U s'agit des dossiers actifs. La Division technique a lancé un programme de publicité et de renseignements qui a entraîné une forte
hausse d'activité dans des domaines où le microfibn se révèle plus utile. Cette division
fait preuve d'une objectivité qu'on ne peut attendre des maisons d'affabes. Son personnel
est au courant des plus récents progrès techniques au Canada et dans d'autres pays et
entretient des relations avec les associations et fabricants internationaux. Cette division
s'est attachée, au nom des ministères de l'État, à promouvob l'utilisation d'installations
nouvelles comme le système de microfiches et récriture électronique sur microfibn
(COM). Jusqu'en 1966, le Comité des documents pubUcs était chargé de l'étude des
propositions des ministères en matière de microfibn ou d'équipment; cette tâche a été par
la suite confiée à l'archiviste fédéral et fait maintenant partie intégrante d'un système de
coordination des besoins techniques, historiques et de gestion des documents pubUcs.
En 1968, on a formé la Section de la publicité et des expositions, chargée de mettre
au point et d'administrer un programme d'expositions. Cette section a d'abord monté,
pour les Archives pubUques, une exposition de certaines pièces importantes, autrement
réservées à un nombre relativement restreint de chercheurs. La Section des expositions et
de la pubUcité fournit ses services aux Archives pubUques et à la Bibliothèque nationale.
Elle vetile aussi à l'entretien de la coUection nationale de médaUles et de la maison
Laurier. Dans son testament, M. King a demandé de garder une bonne partie de la
maison Laurier comme elle était pendant sa vie. En 1958, on a toutefois ouvert au pubUc
une pièce de la maison Laurier, redécorée avec des meubles et d'autres objets ayant
appartenus à sb Wilfrid et à lady Laurier. La maison représente bien les deux premiers
ministres qui l'ont habitée.
PUBLICATIONS —En 1963, la réorganisation de la Section des pubUcations a
marqué la reprise, après une période pendant laqueUe on s'était attaché à la pubUcation
d'inventabes, d'un programme de pubUcations plus actif et plus varié. Parmi les pubUcations parues depuis 1967, on compte Les papiers Macdonald, 1836-1857 (premier
volume d'une série de documents des premiers ministres), les Nouveaux documents sur
Champlain et son époque, le Canadian Directory of Parliament, 1867-1967 (notes
biographiques sur plus de 3,000 sénateurs et députés), projd du Centenaire, ainsi que le
Catalogue collectif des manuscrits des dépôts canadiens, produit d'efforts conjugés. On
a rédigé des guides pour aider les nombreux Canadiens désireux de retracer leurs ancêtres,
et publié plusieurs guides et manuds traitant de la gestion des dossiers. INTRODUCTION 5
LE NOUVEL IMMEUBLE—L'un des événements importants de 1967 pointes Archives pubUques et pour la Bibliothèque nationale a été l'emménagement dans le
nouvel immeuble situé au 395, rue Wellington, Le déménagement s'est effectué au
mUieu de l'hiver, au rythme de 17 voyages quotidiens pendant près de trois mois.
C'était une tâche d'envergure et l'intégration, pour la première fois, de documents et de
Uvres provenant de divers dépôts d'Ottawa a exigé une préparation soigneuse. Tout
s'est bien passé et sans interruption des services au pubUc. L'immeuble a été inauguré
officiellement le 20 juin 1967 par le premier ministre, le très honorable Lester B. Pearson.
I Sa superficie d'envbon 13 acres est répartie sur 7 étages et 1 niveau de magasins
plus 1 niveau pour l'équipement mécanique. L'immeuble, dont les dimensions sont de
200 pieds sur 300, a coûté 13 millions de dollars. Les architectes ont cherché à donner
aux salles de lecture et de travati un accès dbect aux magasins situés au centre, et dont
tes rayons d'acier s'étendent sur plus de 80 miUes et pourront atteindre 100 milles.
L'immeuble est décoré d'oeuvres d'art originales, notamment 4 grands panneaux (36
pieds sur 9 pieds) de Charles Comfort et d'Alfred PeUan, au deuxième étage, et d'eaux
fortes sur verre, signées John Hutton d'Angleterre aux premier, deuxième et troisième
étages.
&. On compte de nombreuses innovations. Le système de climatisation permet de
régler la température et l'humidité, éléments importants de la préservation des documents, des photographies, des peintures, des microfilms, des enregistrements et des
films. Grâce à l'espace de rangement accru, il est maintenant possible de réunir toutes
les archives sous un seul toit, tandis qu'un monte-livres et un interphone reliant les
secteurs de rangement aux bureaux facilitent la circulation des documents. Les locaux
beaucoup plus vastes qui permettent de recevob les chercheurs, qui viennent en nombre
toujours croissant comptent sur place les documents originaux sur le développement
du Canada. Les saUes de lecture, la saUe du microfibn et les salles d'étude particulières
logent 117 personnes. Grâce aux pièces conçues spécialement pour la restauration, la
reproduction photographique et le microfilmage, les tâches d'ordre technique de
l'organisme ont été sensiblement facUitées. Les saUes d'expositions permettent de
montrer simultanément plusieurs expositions. Les Archives pubUques, la Bibliothèque
nationale, d'autres ministères et des organismes sans but lucratif utiUsent constamment
l'auditorium (400 places), muni des installations nécessabes à la projection de films et à
la traduction simultanée, ainsi que les deux salles de réunion et la salle du conseil.
LE PERSONNEL—H convient de mentionner la contribution de plusieurs membres du personnel qui ont quitté les Archives pubUques au cours des 10 dernières
années. Mlle Norah Story, qui a pris sa retraite en 1960, a mérité la gratitude d'un
grand nombre de chercheurs pendant les nombreuses années où eUe a été chef de la
Division des manuscrits, pour les conseils qu'elle leur a donnés et pour sa connaissance
approfondie des sources. M. WilUam Ormsby, son successeur, a quitté la Division en
1964 pour accepter un poste de professeur d'histobe à l'université Brock. M. Ormsby
a mis sur pied le système de groupement des documents et des manuscrits et uniformisé
les procédures. M. Abraham Willms, premier chef du Dépôt des Archives pubUques, a
joué un grand rôle en ce qui a trait à la gestion des dossiers au Canada. En 1963, U
acceptait un poste à l'université Carleton. M. Pierre Brunei, archiviste fédéral adjoint,
a pris sa retraite en 1965 après 33 ans de service au sein de l'organisme. M. Louis
Forest, chef de la Section de la reliure, a pris sa retraite en 1968. A maintes occasions,
le gouvernement a présenté à des dignitabes de superbes volumes reUés par M. Forest. 6 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
En novembre 1968, M. W. Kaye Lamb se retirait après avob occupé pendant 20
ans le poste d'archiviste fédéral. Il fut aussi, durant la majeure partie de ces années,
le premier bibhothécabe national. Il est mutile de répéter id tous les éloges qu'on mi
a adressés à l'époque dans bon nombre de revues spécialisées, mais il convient cependant
de faire remarquer que les progrès et réalisations mentionnés dans le présent rapport
s'inscrivent dans la dernière moitié de son service. Sous sa direction, les Archives
pubUques se sont modernisées, les acquisitions se sont multipliées, les bureaux de Londres
et de Paris ont mis en oeuvre un important programme de microfUmage, le système
actuel de gestion des dossiers a été mis au point et l'archivistique est devenue au Canada,
une profession distincte. La compétence de M. Lamb et son apport à titre d'archiviste,
de bibliothécaire et de savant furent partout connus; U a en effet été président de toutes
les associations professionneUes nationales dont U était membre et a reçu pas moins de
11 grades honorifiques et beaucoup d'autres distinctions. Son influence ne s'est pas
limitée au Canada. Une seule et même année, U fut président de la Society of American
Archivists, de la British Society of Archivists, vice-président du Conseil international
des archives et de la British Records Association et aussi président de la Société royale du
Canada. À la retraite de M. Lamb, l'archiviste fédéral adjoint, M. Wilfred I. Smith, a
pris la relève et est devenu archiviste fédéral par intérim.
PROJETS ET PROGRAMMES —Contrairement à la croyance populaire, kl
archives et la gestion des dossiers sont un domaine dynamique, plein de défis, d qui ne
cesse d'évoluer en raison de l'amélioration de méthodes et des techniques et de la
nouveUe importance que prennent certains secteurs. Les programmes à court terme
s'inspirent en grande partie des travaux entrepris récemment, qu'U convient d'émunérer
ici.
AccSs aux documents publics. La politique du gouvernement destinée à étendre
l'accès aux documents pubUcs a été annoncée le 1er mai 1969 par le premier ministre.
Il en a exposé les grands principes, mais U restait à élaborer les détails et les modaUtés
de transfert et d'accessibilité, en consultation avec l'archiviste fédéral. En moins de
deux jours, on a établi un projet qui fut approuvé en principe à une réunion spéciale du
ConseU consultatif des documents pubUcs et révisé par un sous-comité du ConseU
Tout arrangement relatif au transfert et à l'accès aux documents pubUcs exige la
collaboration étroite des Archives pubUques et des ministères intéressés. Les Archives
pubUques rempUssent les fonctions d'un arbitre impartial connaissant bien les exigences
de la recherche et favorisant les modaUtés d'accès les plus libérales, compte tenu de
l'intérêt national et de la protection des droits à la vie privée.
Mesures ISgislatives. On a entrepris l'étude préliminaire d'un projd de loi concernant les documents pubUcs et les archives, avec l'intention d'ajouter à la loi et aux
décrets actuels de nouveUes dispositions destinées à améUorer l'efficacité dans le secteur
des archives. C'était là une recommandation de la commission Glassco.
Dépôts régionaux. On a dû retarder le programme pour l'établissement d'un réseau
de dépôts régionaux. On espère toutefois établir des centres à Vancouver, Winnipeg
et Halifax au cours des cinq prochaines années. Les Archives publiques, en collaboration avec le ministère des Travaux pubUcs, étudient actuellement des plans en vue de la
construction de ces centres, et des enquêtes menées récemment ont permis de préciser
les besoins des régions.
ProgrSs techniques. Dans ce domaine, on se propose d'apporter une attention plus
grande à la restauration des documents, d'offrir des conseils et des cours de formation
au personnel d'autres dépôts d'archives. La Société historique du Canada, de concert INTRODUCTION 7
avec le Comité des normes du gouvernement canadien, étudie la possibilité d'utiliser un
papier "permanent" pour les documents des archives. La Division des services techniques
continuera de s'intéresser à l'usage accru des microfiches, de récriture électronique sur
microfilm (COM) d d'autres perfectionnements dans le domaine du microfilm. Il faudra
de plus s'assurer que les sorties d'ordinateurs soient traitées comme tous les autres
documents officiels.
Automatisation. L'utilisation de l'hiformatique pour la compUation d'index des
papiers des premiers ministres a été étudiée en 1965; depuis lors, les travaux ont
progressé avec la collaboration du Centre d'informatique du ministère du Revenu
national. En 1969, les Archives ont produit le premier index complet. On étudie
actuellement la possibilité d'utiliser l'hiformatique sur une plus grande échelle pom
faciliter l'extraction des données, particulièrement en ce qui a trait aux documents
pubUcs.
Acquisition de documents personnels. On est entré en communication avec un
grand nombre de personnes détenant des papiers d'intérêt national pour prévenu la
destruction de ces papiers, perte qui a été cause de tant de lacunes dans notre histobe.
Les Archives s'attachent également à obtenu des documents embrassant toute l'étendue
de la vie canadienne, dans les domaines économique, social, scientifique, culturel, etc.
Les réactions ont été très encourageantes. On mettra bientôt sur pied une nouveUe
méthode d'acquisition qui prendra la forme d'arrangements coopératifs avec les personnes intéressées. À titre d'exemple, citons les Archives nationales de l'architecture,
établies en collaboration avec l'Institut royal d'architecture du Canada. On envisage
également de prendre des arrangements semblables dans des domaines comme le
travail, la science, l'art, la médecine et les sports.
La création d'Archives nationales du film compte parmi les plus importantes
réalisations récentes. Les archives ont été créées à la fui de 1968 par les Archives
publiques, avec la collaboration de l'Office national du film. L'année dernière, les
Archives nationales du film ont acquis plus de 6 millions de pieds de film et eUes se
proposent d'examiner encore 23 millions et demi de pieds de film se rapportant au
Canada. On cherche actuellement à mettre au point une politique globable et un programme de conservation et d'utilisation du film, appelés à être intégrés dans une politique
nationale du film. Cette étude est financée par les Archives pubUques, la Société Radio-
Canada et l'Office national du film.
Im phonothèque a réaUsé l'année dernière des progrès considérables, même si un
seul employé y était affecté. EUe s'est attachée à coordonner Fhistobe orale au Canada
et a conclu une entente avec le greffier de la Chambre des communes portant sur
l'acquisition, en vue d'un tri, des débats enregistrés. Il reste encore beaucoup à faire
dans le domaine de l'histobe orale et U faudra collaborer étroitement avec les universités,
les réseaux radiophoniques et les interviewers.
•£.La collection nationale de cartes est actuellement bien étabUe et l'une de ses sections
se consacre aux échanges de cartes étrangères avec d'autres cartothèques. Avec l'aide
«ministères des Affabes extérieures, de l'Energie, des Mines et des Ressources et de
b Défense nationale, on s'efforcera de négocier des échanges avec le plus grand nombre
Possible de pays.
Guides et autres pubUcations. Un dépôt d'archives a pour première tâche de faire
lÉjuiître au public les documents qu'U possède. C'est pourquoi, au cours des vingt
dernières années, les Archives pubUques se sont occupés à pubUer une série d'inventabes
des groupes de dossiers et de manuscrits dont bon nombre sont maintenant désuets. Il 8 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
serait souhaitable de réunb en un seul volume un répertobe de tous les documents des
Archives pubUques. Cela n'est cependant pas possible, mais on s'attachera au cours
des trois prochaines années à produire un répertobe complet en trois ou quatre volumes,
des fonds de manuscrits. On fera de même pour les cartes, les photographies, les
médaiUes et autres documents.
Le programme d'expositions a été fortement élargi et des techniques nouveUes ont
été mises au point. En collaboration avec la Galerie nationale, les Archives pubUques ont
prêté des pièces à plusieurs expositions au Canada et aux Etats-Unis, et des dispositions
ont été prises pour envoyer une exposition complète à Winnipeg dans le cadre des
cérémonies du centenaire du Manitoba. Les Archives étudient de plus la possibUité de
construire des étalages démontables et d'organiser au pays un circuit d'expositions itinérantes.
Il faut encourager une plus grande diffusion des documents des Archives publiques.
Un projet visant à fabe connaître les Archives pubUques, ses fonctions et ses richesses
est en voie de réalisation en collaboration avec l'Office national du film. À cette fin, on
prêtera des diapositives ou bien on les montrera dans des "vistaseUs". On se propose
aussi de distribuer des reproductions d'importants documents, de tableaux, de photographies et de cartes. Même si le premier but des Archives pubUques est de réunb une
coUection de documents historiques, U faut encourager l'utilisation de ses ressources par
des expositions, des émissions télévisées, des films et d'autres moyens. A cette fin, les
documents visuels, tels que les photographies et les films, sont particulièrement utUes.
Coopération nationale et internationale. On a cité plusieurs travaux réalisés en
collaboration avec d'autres ministères et d'autres dépôts d'archives et U y a tout Ueu de
crobe que cette tendance se poursuivra. Fait d'importance, en mars 1970, les archivistes
provinciaux se sont rencontrés aux Archives pubUques. On compte qu'il y aura d'autres
réunions annuelles pour discuter des problèmes communs et des mesures de collaboration.
On espère aussi pouvob prendre des dispositions pour rationaliser les acquisitions et
éviter aussi la concurrence, particuUèrement entre les Archives du gouvernement et les
bibliothèques des universités. Les Archives publiques s'intéressent à divers types de
formation et collaborent avec l'université Carleton en offrant des cours d'administration
d'archives et, à l'intention du gouvernement du Canada, des cours de gestion des dossiers
et de technique de microfUmage, cours que suivent des Canadiens de toutes les provinces
et même des personnes d'autres pays. Le rôle international des Archives pubUques du
Canada ne cesse de croître. Citons le séminaire organisé par les Archives en novembre
1968 pour les représentants de quinze pays sud-américains et l'adhésion du Canada à
l'Institut panaméricain de géographie et d'histobe, ainsi que la mise sur pied, ces dernières
années, de stages de formation dans le domaine des archives et de la gestion des dossiers
à l'intention des représentants de divers pays et la négociation d'échanges culturels avec
la France. De phis en plus, le système canadien de gestion des dossiers sert de modèle
aux pays en voie de développement et les contacts avec ces pays sont appelés à augmenter.
En 1972, les Archives pubUques célébreront leur 100e anniversaire. Un comité
travaUle activement à préparer un programme pour fêter comme U convient cet événement.
Les travaux et les programmes permanents dont j'ai fait état montrent bien te
progrès important réalisé par les Archives pubUques ces dernières années, progrès qui
est appelé à se poursuivre dans les années à venb. Les pages qui suivent donneront un
aperçu plus précis et plus détatilé des activités des Archives pubUques de 1959 à 1969.
Avant de terminer, permettez-moi d'exprimer ma reconnaissance aux membres du
personnel pour leur coUaboration et leurs efforts soutenus en vue d'atteindre les objectifs INTRODUCTION 9
dés Archives. Je remercie également toutes les personnes, mstitutions, ministères et
cadres qui ont aidé les Archives de mille et une façons.
Aux centaines de donateurs de documents archivistiques, dont quelques noms seulement paraissent dans ce rapport, j'exprime toute ma gratitude et celle de tous les Canadiens
des générations actuelles et futures dont les connaissances historiques se trouvent enrichies
par cette collaboration à notre importante mission.
Wilfred I. Smith
31 décembre 1969 Archiviste fédéral par intérim
UUtUllUJUIlJIJIMlJ^  LA DIRECTION
DE LA GESTION
DES DOCUMENTS
La dbection de la gestion
des documents, en tant que
teUe, a vu le jour le 15
septembre 1966. La nou-
veUe dbection tirait son
origine du premier dépôt
des archives pubUques qui
était lui-même une division
des Archives pubUques du Canada, et avait été créé en 1956, avec, à sa tête, M. A.M.
Willms. Jusqu'en 1959, le dépôt des archives pubUques était formé de deux sections: la
section des acquisitions et de la destruction (chef: M. W.W. BUsland) et la section de la
référence (chef: M. D.T.W. Shadd). L'année suivante, en 1960, comme on avait
demandé que le dépôt des archives aide les ministères et les agences à étabUr le calendrier
des délais de conservation de leurs documents, le dépôt fut réorganisé en trois sections:
une section des acquisitions (M. T.L. Croteau), une section de la référence (M. Shadd) et
une nouveUe section des délais de conservation et des éliminations (M. BUsland). En
août 1963, M. Willms quitta le dépôt des archives pour se joindre au personnel de la
Commission de la fonction publique. M. Shadd lui succéda au poste de chef du dépôt et
M. J.H. Logan fut nommé à la tête de la section de la référence.
Cette structure fut maintenue jusqu'en 1964, date à laquelle la section des acquisitions et la section de la référence furent réunies sous une seule dbection (celle de M.
Logan), pour une plus grande souplesse dans l'utilisation du personnel et à cause du
rapport étroit existant entre les acquisitions et les services de la référence. En même
temps, le poste d'archiviste en titre fut créé, pour veiller à la planification et au contrôle
des services statistique et techniques du dépôt principal des archives, du sous-sol du
Centre des données fiscales et de l'annexe du dépôt des archives, ainsi que pour préparer
Fimplanation de dépôts régionaux. M. Croteau fut nommé à ce poste.
Le 15 septembre 1965, conformément aux recommandations de la Commission
royale sur l'organisation du gouvernement (Glassco, vol. 1, p. 568-571) selon lesqueUes
des dépôts devraient être établis dans d'autres régions du Canada pour servb les agences
fédérales locales, le premier d'une série de dépôts régionaux fut ouvert à Toronto.
L'année 1966 fut une année clé qui permit l'amélioration rapide des services
d'archives pubUques à travers tout le Canada. Le décret sur les archives pubUques (P.C.
1966-1749), promulgué le 9 septembre et entrant en vigueur le 1er octobre, introduisit et
autorisa un tout nouveau programme. Entre autres dispositions, le décret attribuait à
l'archiviste fédéral toute autorité sur les calendriers de délais de conservation, l'élimination et le versement des archives pubUques, de même que la responsabilité d'examiner
et d'évaluer l'efficacité des modes de gestion des documents dans l'ensemble de l'administration du gouvernement fédéral, d'estimer les projets de microfUmage et d'établir des
normes et des guides dans le domaine de la gestion des documents pubUcs. Il était à
prévoir que la majorité de ces responsabUités et du programme étendu qui en résultait
seraient confiés au noyau de spécialistes de la gestion des documents publics déjà en
place au dépôt des archives pubUques d'Ottawa.
Afin d'être en mesure de mettre entièrement à exécution les dispositions du futur
décret sur les archives pubUques, et pour permettre l'accroissement des dépôts d'archives
—un deuxième dépôt régional devait en effet ouvrir à Montréal en novembre—la
Direction de la gestion des documents fut formée en septembre 1966, et M. David Shadd
en fut nommé directeur. Dans la nouveUe organisation, les deux anciennes sections
acquirent de nouvelles fondions ou des fonctions plus étendues; eUes devinrent des
11 12 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
divisions, et une nouveUe division fut créée. Les trois divisions, dont les fonctions sont
distinctes, mais se soutiennent rédproquement sont la Division des acquisitions et de la
référence (chef: M. J.H. Logan), ceUe des services consultatifs (chef et directeur adjoint
de la Direction de la gestion des documents: M. W.W. BUsland) et ceUe des dépôts
régionaux (chd: M. T.L. Croteau). Dans cette dernière division, chaque dépôt régional
constitue une section.
Bien que plusieurs changements de structure et d'organisation se soient produits
pendant les onze années s'étendant de 1959 à 1969, U semble plus satisfaisant de décrire
les travaux de la Dbection de la gestion des documents en suivant les structures actueUes.
ACQUISITIONS ACQUISITIONS — L'une   des   principales   tâches  du
ET
dépôt des archives, à sa création, était de démontrer aux
ministères et agences gouvernementales les avantages de
REFERENCE bon fonctionnement et d'économie dont ils pourraient
bénificier en versant un dépôt des archives les documents dont Us ne se servaient plus. À l'origine, ce fut souvent l'exiguïté de leurs locaux
qui porta les administrations à verser leurs documents aux Archives pubUques. Dans de
nombreux cas, des baux ne furent pas renouvelés et les entrepôts loués dans la région
d'Ottawa furent ainsi libérés. Jusqu'en 1959, les documents de 32 ministères et agences
avaient été entreposés et le dépôt en avait assuré le service; 148,130 pieds cubes d'archives
avaient été reçus et 18,103 pieds cubes avaient été détruits.
Un grand nombre des versements, au début étaient constitués d'archives mortes et
même en 1964, le programme de délais de conservation n'avait été étabU que pour 15 à
20 pour cent des documents du dépôt. Ceci empêchait l'acheminement des archives au
rythme désiré qu'U est possible d'obtenir en déterminant les périodes précises d'ultilisation
des documents et en détruisant sans délai les archives mutiles. Le résultat était un état
"d'indigestion de papier" qui s'aggravait sans cesse et qui ne fut soulagé que lorsque
l'établissement des calendriers de délais de conservation devint régulier et on planifia j
l'élimination des archives inutiles. En 1964, deux événements importants se produisirent
et eurent un effet marquant sur les opérations qui suivirent.
La pubUcation de la circulaire no 15 du dépôt des archives pubUques, annonçant
que nous n'accepterions plus désormais les documents dont les délais de conservation ne
seraient pas établis, s'est révélée d'un immense secours pour enrayer l'évolution vers
"l'indigestion". EUe a également encouragé les ministères à adopter une attitude réaliste
dans l'évaluation des documents. Pour de nombreuses archives, que l'on destinait
auparavant à être "conservées indéfiniment", un calendrier de délais de conservation fut
établi, indiquant une période de conservation précise, souvent assez courte.
De même, la pubUcation des Programmes généraux d'élimination des documents du
Gouvernement du Canada eut un effet salutaire sur les versements et les éliminations des
documents. EUe a évité le versement au dépôt des documents courants ayant une courte
période de conservation (c'est-à-dbe moins de deux ans). EUe élimina la nécessité de
soumettre au Comité des archives pubUques un grand nombre de requêtes préparées par i
le personnel du dépôt des archives pour les ministères, et eUe a facilité la révision
régulière des documents conservés au dépôt en permettant l'identification des documents
éUminables. Les "Programmes généraux" autorisaient la destruction d'un grand nombre
de documents routiniers. Pour beaucoup de ministères, Us constituèrent une introduction
à l'étabUssement des programmes de délais de conservation en fournissant des programmes tout faits, à une période ob le développement des programmes d'ensemble ne
progressait que lentement. LA DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
13
En 1963, les premières archives d'agences situées en dehors d'Ottawa (par exemple,
l'Administration de ht voie maritime du Saint-Laurent à Cornwall) nous parvinrent. Pas
moins de 44 ministères et agences utilisaient maintenant nos services de conservation et
de référence. Le volume sans cesse plus élevé des versements et l'occupation d'une grande
partie du dépôt d'Ottawa par la Bibliothèque nationale avaient créé un problème d'espace.
On obtint 34,000 pieds carrés de l'espace dont on avait tant besoin au sous-sol du
Centre de données fiscales du ministère du Revenu national, situé en face du dépôt des
archives, et relié à celui-ci par un passage souterrain. Comme seulement la moitié de la
surface disponible était garnie de rayons, en 1963, eUe servit fort utilement à l'entreposage d'archives lourdes, de dimensions hors série, qui ne s'adaptaient pas aux rayons
ordinaires ou leur fait supporter une charge anormale. Le même année, on mit à notre
disposition 6,300 pieds carrés de surface de plancher pour l'entreposage des archives
essentielles, dans un emplacement de sécurité, en dehors de la ville.
En 1964, un événement majeur fut la redistribution des archives. Le personnel des
sections des acquisitions et de la référence fut mobilisé pour reloger, avec l'aide de personnel venant du ministère des Travaux pubUcs, près de 75,000 pieds cubes d'archives,
dans une série de déménagements dans les trois édifices reliés par des passages souterrains, où nous conservons les archives, au Parc Tunney: le dépôt des archives lui-même,
le centre de données fiscales et l'annexe du dépôt des archives. Le résultat de ces
déménagements soigneusement planifiés fut du regrouper les diverses acquisitions, par
ministère d'origine. L'annexe du dépôt des archives fut consacré à la conservation des
documents concernant les forces armées. En 1965, 12,000 pieds cubes supplémentabes
d'archives militaires furent transférés du dépôt des archives à l'annexe. En 1966 nous
fîmes, signalons-le en passant, notre première acquisition en règle de ruban magnétique,
comprenant les mises en place du satellite Alouette I depuis son lancement jusqu'en
1965.
En plus d'assurer la conservation des archives officielles du gouvernement le dépôt
d'Ottawa a, depuis 1958, fourni un entreposage de sécurité pour les documents des
premiers ministres, des ministres d'Etat et des chefs de partis.
On peut prévoir qu'un volume sans cesse accru d'acquisitions continuera d'affluer
jusqu'à ce que le fort arriéré d'archives inactives (identifiées par une enquête), qui occupe
encore les locaux des ministères, se soit résorbé. Selon nos prévisions à long terme, nous
espérons atteindre un état d'équilibre, alors que le volume des documents éliminés sera
à peu près égal à celui des documents acquis. Il semble, cependant, qu'U faudra attendre
quelques années pour en arriver à ce stade.
RÉFÉRENCE — L'un des principaux avantages du versement des documents inactifs
dans un dépôt d'archives est la possibilité non seulement de réaUser des économies en
installations d'entreposage, mais aussi d'obtenir un service de référence économique et
efficace. On estime qu'un commis, dans un dépôt d'archives, peut fournir les services de
référence relatifs à 10,000 pieds cubes envbon de documents, tandis que le volume
moyen pour un commis du ministère d'origine est seulement de 2,000 pieds cubes. Dès
la création du dépôt d'Ottawa, la priorité a été donnée à un service de référence rapide et
efficace. Les demandes de référence ont atteint une moyenne de 500 par jour, envbon.
Souvent, un dossier peut être tivré du dépôt au pupitre du demandeur plus rapidement
qu'U ne pourrait être obtenu d'une saUe d'entreposage du ministère concerné. Le dépôt
d'Ottawa assure un service de livraison de trois heures à compter du moment où le
dossier est demandé à l'heure où U est livré au ministère demandeur.
H Un aspect important du service de référence est celui qui concerne les dossiers du
personnel civil et militaire. Après une série de discussions entre des représentants du 14
RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
ConseU du trésor, de la Commission de la fonction publique, des administrateurs du personnel de divers ministères, du Comité des archives pubUques et des Archives pubUques,
le gouvernement fédéral institua en 1957, ce que l'on appelle maintenant le "plan des
dossiers du personnel civil". D'après ce programme, les dossiers des fonctionnaires qui
quittent la fonction pubUque sont transférés au dépôt des archives pour conservation et
référence jusqu'à ce que les personnes concernées réintègrent la fonction pubUque ou
atteignent l'âge de soixante-dix ans. Entre 1959 et 1969, les Archives pubUques ont
acquis et répertorié quelque 43,070 pieds cubes de dossiers sur lesquels eUes ont fourni
un service de référence; elles ont éliminé envbon 3,367 pieds cubes de dossiers qui ne
servaient plus, soit en les détruisant soit en versant à la Dbection des archives historiques
des Archives pubUques les dossiers présentant une valeur historique.
Une autre partie importante de l'activité de référence de la Dbection de la gestion
des documents concerne le "plan des dossiers du personnel miUtabe". Le dépôt des
archives avait bien, avant 1961, quelques dossiers d'anciens membres du personnel des
forces armées, pour conservation et référence, mais c'est cette année-là que le "plan des
dossiers du personnel miUtabe" débuta réellement avec le versement au dépôt des
Archives pubUques d'environ 13,000 pieds cubes de dossiers de soldats de la Première
guerre mondiale provenant de la Division des archives des services de guerre du ministère
des Affaires des anciens combattants. Le personnel dut apprendre à rédiger des lettres et
être formé dans des techniques spéciales de recherche; de nouvdles formules et del
nouveaux modèles de lettres durent être inventés afin de pouvoir assurer les services de
référence. En 1963, les travaux prélhninabes commencèrent pour l'intégration des|
dossiers d'anciens soldats. Ces dossiers provenaient de deux sources différentes: lej
ministère de la Défense nationale qui classait les dossiers d'après le numéro matricule, et j
le ministère des Affaires des anciens combattants qui gardait les dossiers dans l'ordre
alphabétique. En 1964, le nouvel édifice de l'annexe du dépôt des archives fut pratique- j
ment consacré aux archives des forces armées, et on y réunit la plupart des dossiers de
service mUitaire, détenus par les Archives. La même année, tous les dossiers du personnel des forces armées qui avait été mis en disponibilité en 1961 furent entièrement
intégrés, répertoriés et complétés. En 1965,12,000 pieds cubes supplémentaires d'archives
mititabes furent transférés du dépôt principal des archives à l'annexe. À la fin de 1965,
les dossiers et les documents de tout le personnel de l'armée régulière et de la marine,
mis en disponibilité après la Seconde guerre mondiale, avaient été intégrés, de même
qu'un tiers envbon des documents correspondants de l'aviation royale canadienne, pour
la même période. A la fin de 1965, l'édifice de l'annexe contenait envbon 62,000 pieds
cubes de dossiers de service totaUsant à peu près 11V4 milles de rayons. En 1966, 1967
et 1968, une pénurie de personnd restreignit sérieusement le plan des dossiers du personnel miUtabe. Jusqu'en 1967, un arriéré d'envbon 5,200 pieds cubes de dossiers du
personnel mUitabe s'était accumulé, concernant en particulier les anciens membres de
l'aviation royale canadienne et de la marine royale canadienne qui avaient été mis en dis-
ponibUité entre 1946 et 1960. De plus, un arriéré de documents relatifs au personnel de
la miUce, remontant jusqu'en 1904, commençait à arriver du ministère de la Défense
nationale qui fermait alors plusieurs de ses établissements de la réserve et de la milice.
Ces arriérés présentent toujours de sérieux inconvénients du point de vue du service, car
plusieurs sources, et non une seule, doivent être vérifiées pour assurer que toute la
documentation essentieUe se rapportant à un mdividu est mise à la disposition des
usagers.
A cause de la priorité accordée aux services de référence, les autres opérations sont
réduites, si nécessabe, afin de maintenir la qualité du service de référence. Le même I DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
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RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
personnel doit s'occuper des acquisitions, des insertions de la référence et de rélimination
des documents. Si l'effectif de la division reste le même tandis que le volume des acquisitions et de la référence augmente, un personnel réduit sera disponible pour les insertions
et réUmination des archives. Toutefois, ceci ne doit être qu'un expédient provisoire, car
l'intégration des additions est essentieUe pour fournb un service de référence efficace.
Ces dernières années nous l'ont démontré.
En 1966 et 1967, U fut nécessaire de transférer cinq postes de la Division des acquisitions et de la référence à la Division des services consultatifs, afin de pouvob répondre
aux exigences du décret sur les archives pubUques. Ced était prévu comme une mesure
temporaire, mais le blocage des augmentations de personnel dans la fonction pubUque,
en février 1967, empêcha le remplacement de ce personnel à un moment où les acquisitions augmentaient rapidement tout comme les demandes de référence. En conséquence, on fut obUgé de rédube le service de la documentation des dossiers du personnel. L'intégration d'additions tomba brusquement de 70,603 en 1966 à 43,545 en 1967.
Les dossiers du personnel reçus en 1965 ne purent être intégrés et constituèrent un arriéré
de 2,100 pieds à la fin de l'année.
Les conséquences de cette accumulation de dossiers laissés pour compte se firent
sentir de plusieurs manières. Inévitablement l'efficacité du service de référence en souffrit, car le défaut d'intégration et le manque de répertobe obligeaient à chercher les
documents à plusieurs endroits. De plus, puisque le même personnel s'occupe aussi de
l'éUmination des archives, une grande partie des papiers destinés à être éliminés, marqués
et déjà séparés du reste des dossiers demeura sur les rayons, faute de bras pour le manipuler, et U fallut renoncer aux avantages de la destruction des archives mutiles, y compris
le revenu provenant de la vente des papiers de rebut.
Il est à souhaiter qu'un personnel supplémentaire sera obtenu afin de rétablir un
niveau normal de fonctionnement qui exige la présence d'un commis pour 10,000 pieds
cubes d'archives, et que l'arriéré des insertions et des éliminations puisse être supprimé
de façon à tirer pleinement profit d'une opération qui a démontré qu'eUe pouvait contribuer à la gestion économique et efficace des archives par le gouvernement fédéral.
TABLEAUX—Au 31 décembre 1969, le dépôt des archives pubUques d'Ottawa conservait quelque 338,883 pieds cubes d'archives. Les tableaux qui précèdent donnent la
statistique des réalisations du dépôt des archives pubUques d'Ottawa, de 1959 à 1969.
dans les domaines des acquisitions et de la référence.
DÉPÔTS GÉNÉRALITÉS —Le rapport de la Commission royale
RÉCIOlVATrX" d'enquête   sur  l'organisation   du   gouvernement   (rapport
IV A'Dr'ïJTA/irc Glassco, vol. 1, p. 494) suggérait la création, dans les princi-
D ARCHIVES paux centres du Canada, d'une série de dépôts fédéraux
d'archives, placés sous la compétence de rarchiviste fédéral.
Pour mettre cette recommandation à exécution, des dépôts régionaux d'archives furent
étabUs à Toronto, en 1965 et à Montréal, en 1966. Une division bidépendante, la
Division des dépôts régionaux, fut créée en 1966 pour administrer ces dépôts. En 1967,
une enquête sur les archives effectuée dans la région de Vancouver montra une fois de
plus le caractère pratique de l'étabUssement d'un dépôt d'archives. Toute-fois, jusqu'à
présent, des considérations financières ont empêché la création d'un dépôt à Vancouver.
D'autres dépôts sont prévus pour la région de Winnipeg afin d'assurer le service pour la
région des prairies, et à Halifax pour assurer le service des provinces atlantiques.
Les dépôts régionaux ont démontré leur valeur par les économies qu'Us procurent au
gouvernement fédéral en matière de personnel, d'espace et de matériel.  De plus, Us LA DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS 17
aident à identifier avec précision les archives présentant un grand intérêt et à mettre de
côté les archives mutiles, destinées à la destruction. Enfin, Us aident les ministères à
résoudre les problèmes de gestion des documents dans leur région.
DÉPÔT RÉGIONAL DE TORONTO — En novembre 1963, une enquête menée dans
la région métropolitaine de Toronto confirma les recommandations de la Commission
royale d'enquête sur l'organisation du gouvernement en concluant qu'un dépôt d'archives
était une nécessité et qu'U était économiquement réalisable à Toronto. En 1964, des
plans furent étabtis pour le futur dépôt de Toronto (emplacement surface de plancher,
rayons, personnel, etc.) et le 15 septembre 1965, le dépôt régional d'archives de Toronto
commença à fonctionner dans l'édifice fédéral (l'ancien édifice des arsenaux canadiens),
sïh 651 de l'avenue Warden, à Scarborough.
m:- Le dépôt régional d'archives de Toronto fut créé pour assurer ses services à tous les
bureaux fédéraux de la région métropolitaine de Toronto et du sud de l'Ontario, dans la
région située au sud ou au sud-ouest d'une ligne imaginaire tracée entre Belleville et
Gravenhurst et comprenant ces deux villes. Le service de la région située au nord de cette
ligne imaginaire est assuré par le dépôt d'archives d'Ottawa. Les principaux centres desservis par Toronto sont London, Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo et St. Catharines.
H Même si l'organisation, les méthodes, l'équipement, l'installation matérielle, etc.
s'inspiraient du dépôt d'Ottawa, quelques modifications durent être apportées pour satisfaire aux besoins des bureaux régionaux des ministères. Ces modifications ont fait du
dépôt de Toronto un projet pUote pour les futurs dépôts régionaux. Comme tout projd
pilote, le dépôt de Toronto a eu ses difficultés de croissance. Cependant, U a fourni de
précieuses leçons pour Pétabtissement et le développement d'autres dépôts régionaux en
révélant les problèmes de méthodes et ceux de fonctionnement qui nécessitent une adaptation et des changements par rapport aux plans d'origine.
M En 1967, le premier emplacement du dépôt d'archives fut vendu au gouvernement
de l'Ontario. Le dépôt de Toronto dut se reloger, cette fois, au 220, chemin Lesmtil,
Don MiUs. Le nouvel édifice fut construit pour répondre aux besoins du dépôt avec
envbon 33,000 pieds carrés de surface de plancher supplémentaire. Pendant l'année, la
tâche principale fut de reloger les documents, les rayons, le matériel et le personnel. Il
y eut évidemment un peu de flottement, mais, en dépit de cela, l'avob en documents et
les demandes de référence augmentèrent considérablement jusqu'à la fin de l'année.
I En 1968 et en 1969, le dépôt de Toronto fit des progrès constants et à la fin de
1969, il entreposait et assurait le service des archives de 14 ministères; son avob total
s'élevait à 85,000 pieds cubes d'archives envbon. (Les détails statistiques des activités des
dépôts d'archives de Toronto et de Montréal figment dans les tableaux ci-dessous). Il est
intéressant de signaler l'élimination des vieux documents au dépôt de Toronto. Depuis
l'ouverture du dépôt en septembre 1965, jusqu'à la fin de 1969, 248 tonnes de vieux
papiers furent vendues par le dépôt par l'intermédiabe de la Corporation de disposition
des biens de la Couronne, à un prix total de 7,700 dollars, versés au gouvernement du
Canada.
DÉPÔT RÉGIONAL DE MONTRÉAL —En 1965, une enquête fut effectuée dans la
région métropoUtaine de Montréal pour déterminer dans queUe mesure un dépôt
d'archives était réalisable pour assurer le service des archives de tous les bureaux fédéraux de la province de Québec. L'enquête confirma les avantages qu'U y aurait à créer un
tel dépôt et des plans correspondants furent établis. En novembre 1966 le dépôt
d'archives de Montréal fut ouvert au 665, montée de Liesse, vUle Saint-Laurent.
Le personnel est, bien sûr, entièrement bilingue. La mise en route fut pénible. Il y eut
des retards dans la Uvraison du matériel, des voitures automobiles et des rayons.  Le 18
RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
reste de l'année dvUe 1966 se passa principalement à prendre contad avec les représentants des ministères de la région, à prendre des dispositions pour les versements, à
fabe connaître les services que le dépôt pouvait offrir, etc. Le dépôt fut réellement en
état de fonctionner en janvier 1967.
En 1967, à cause du volume connu d'archives peu actives dans la région de Montréal, la décision fut prise d'augmenter la capacité de stockage du dépôt Le dépôt peut
maintenant entreposer à peu près 90,000 pieds cubes d'archives. En 1969, le dépôt
d'archives de Montréal assurait un service à 15 ministères. Depuis son ouverture, le
dépôt de Montréal à été gêné par des pénuries de personnel, et c'est seulement en 1969
que le dépôt commença vraiment à fonctionner à plein rendement, s'acquittant des fonctions qui lui sont assignées. (Les détails statistiques des activités des dépôts d'archives de
Toronto et de Montréal figurent dans les tableaux ci-dessous).
SERVICES
CONSULTATIFS
Organisation—La Division des services consultatifs
commença en 1956, en tant que Section des acquisitions
et de la destruction de la Division du dépôt des Archives
pubUques du Canada. En 1960, la responsabilité de
l'élimination des archives fut confiée à une nouveUe Section des délais de conservation et
des éliminations. En 1966, lorsque la Division du dépôt des archives fut élevée au rang
de dbection, sous le titre de Dbection de la gestion des documents, la Section des délais
de conservation et des éliminations devint la Division des services consultatifs, et fut
chargée de s'acquitter de nouveUes fonctions qui lui avaient été attribuées par le décret
sur les archives pubUques.
Au 31 décembre 1969, le personnel autorisé de la division était de onze personnes.
Les principales activités de la division sont décrites ci-dessous, par matières et non
nécessairement dans l'ordre d'importance.
Etablissement des programmes de délais de conservation des documents et projet de
microfilmage — En 1959, M. A.M. Willms, chef de la Division du dépôt des archives,
consacra beaucoup de son temps à ses fonctions de président du Comité d'étude sur la
gestion des documents, créé par le secrétariat d'Etat pour "s'informer auprès des ministères et agences gouvernementales de certains données qui semblent essentielles à la
planification à long terme d'un programme de gestion des documents, et pour présenter
des recommandations à ce sujet au Comité des Archives pubUques . . .". Le rapport du
comité d'étude, présenté en février 1960, fut un guide précieux et servit de base statistique à la Section sur la gestion des documents dans le rapport ultérieur de la Commission Glassco. L'une de ces recommandations faites en 1960 conduisit à la promulgation, en 1961, d'un décrd du ConseU qui attribuait des responsabUités accrues à
rarchiviste fédéral. Ce décret du ConseU (1961-212, 16 février 1961) demandait aux
Archives pubUques de fournir le secrétariat du Comité des archives pubUques. Le secrétariat était responsable de l'examen préliminaire de toutes les propositions d'élimination
et d'établissement d'un programme de délais de conservation des documents des ministères, ainsi que des recommandations les concernant; U devait présenter ses conclusions
et ses recommandations au Comité des archives pubUques qui devait les examiner
minutieusement, pour décision. Le Comité des archives pubUques devait présenter ses
décisions au ConseU du trésor pour approbation et pubUcation en tant qu'autorisation
officieUe de la destruction des documents. En 1966, en vertu d'un nouveau décret sur
les archives pubUques, l'archiviste fédéral devient seul juge de toute proposition d'élimination de documents pubUcs venant des ministères.   Il existe maintenant un Comité LA DDtECïTON DB LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS
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RAPPORT POUR LES ANNEES 1959 À 1969
consultatif sur les archives pubUques auquel rarchiviste fédéral peut soumettre toutes
questions relatives à la gestion de documents; mais, à l'heure actueUe, les Archives
pubUques seules examinent et approuvent amendent ou rejettent toutes les propositions
de programmes de délais de conservation et d'éUmination des documents.
Le dbecteur de la gestion des documents est le secrétaire du Comité consultatif sur
les archives pubUques, et la Division des services consultatifs fournit le personnel du
secrétariat.
Le tableau suivant indique le nombre de propositions concernant les programmes de
délais de conservation, les propositions de destruction et les projets de microfUmage
présentées de 1961 à 1969 inclusivement.
Le nombre de propositions de programmes de délais de conservation des documents s'est accru de façon sensible depuis l'entrée en vigueur du décret sur les archives
pubUques, en octobre 1966.
Année
civUe
Nombre de
propositions
pour délais
et éliminations
Nombre de
projets de
microfUmage*
Nombre total
de
propositions
1961
31
10
41
1962
36
12
48
1963
39
11
50
1964
42
11
53
1965
28
9
37
1966
45
9
54
1967
47
3
50
1968
77
12
89
1969
164
17
181
Totaux
509
94
603
'Comprend aussi les propositions d'équipement pour le microfilm, de 1961 à 1966 inclusivement.
Le décret sur les archives pubUques ordonnait que les ministères et les agences
figurant dans les annexes A et B de la loi sur l'administration financière établissent les
délais de conservation de tous leurs documents pour le 1er mai 1969.
Le tableau ci-dessous indique dans quelle mesure les ministères satisfaisaient à
cette exigence, au 1er mai 1969.
État
Nombre de
ministères
Documents en
pieds cubes
Pourcentage de
l'avob total de
2,514,000 en
pieds cubes
1.   Délais entièrement
établis
22
1,423,000
57%
2.  Délais non-établis
38
1,091,000
43%
A. Délais presque
établis
(10)
504,000
20%
B. Encore beaucoup
de travail à faire
(28)
587,000
23%
Totaux
60
2,514,000
100% LA DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS 21
m- Parmi les vingt-huit ministères indiqués dans le tableau précédent, en 2.B., comme
gyant encore beaucoup de travaU à fabe, sept ministères sont responsables de 467,682
Bris cubes sur un total de 587,000 pieds cubes de documents dont les délais de conservation n'ont pas été établis.
Elimination des documents, dépôt des archives d'Ottawa, 1959-1969 — La Division des
services consultatifs est responsable de l'application des délais de conservation des documents ministériels dormants conservés dans les dépôts des Archives pubUques. Le
tableau qui suit indique le volume total de documents éliminés au dépôt des archives
(fOttawa (dossiers généraux ou dossiers du personnel) pendant la période 1959-1969.
Année
civile
Dossiers
généraux
Dossiers
du personnel
Total annuel
en pieds cubes
1959
5,790
0
5,790
1960
2,988
153
3,141
1961
16,016
77
16,093
1962
11,395
397
11,792
1963
18,927
176
19,103
1964
20,797
622
21,419
1965
25,266
345
25,611
1966
36,930
533
37,463
1967
47,293
443
47,736
1968
39,380
519
39,899
1969
33,314
102
33,416
Totaux
258,096
3,367
261,463
Inventaire des archives du gouvernement fédéral—Après l'entrée en vigueur du décret
sur les archives publiques, le 1er October 1966, les Archives pubUques distribuèrent des
questionnaires aux ministères et agences, demandant des renseignements concernant le
total des documents qu'Us possédaient dans les bureaux centraux comme dans les bureaux
régionaux, la surface occupée par les documents, le personnel total engagé dans les
writes relatives aux archives, le montant global des salaires, le total du matériel utilisé,
etc. Ces renseignements furent réunis, classifies et résumés. L'archiviste fédéral fit
connaître dans son rapport annuel au ConseU du trésor, pour l'année fiscale se terminant
ll|31 mars 1968, que 57 ministères et agences de la région d'Ottawa et 41 ministères et
agences dans les bureaux extérieurs possédaient en tout envbon 2,514,000 pieds cubes
d'archives occupant une surface totale de plancher de 2,000,000 pieds carrés, et un
material de classement d'une valeur de 12,610,000 dollars. Les opérations effectuées sur
ces archives occupaient envbon 5,800 personnes qui touchaient des salaires d'un montant
global de 26,000,000 de doUars.
Ces renseignements se sont révélés d'une grande valeur, et continueront à présenter
w-grand intérêt en indiquant aux Archives pubUques le volume de documents détenus,
les endroits où Us se trouvent dans les diverses régions, l'emplacement logique des futurs 22 RAPPORT POUR LES ANNÉES 1959 À 1969
dépôts régionaux d'archives et le genre de documents pour lesquels U conviendrait de
préparer des programmes généraux de délais d'élimination des documents.
Publications et directives sur la gestion des documents — Les Archives pubUques ont
produit seules ou en coUaboration avec d'autres ministères, de nombreuses pubUcations
et directives sur les différents aspects de la gestion des documents. La liste qui suit
mentionne les plus importantes.
L DIRECTIVES
A. ConseU du trésor, circulaire concernant la réforme administrative intitulée Documents relatifs au personnel—Transmission, entreposage et distribution (MI-3-
68, 8 mai 1968, TB. 679645, 2 mai 1968), et toutes les instructions précédentes
sur le même sujet remontant jusqu'en 1957.
B. ConseU du trésor, circulaire concernant la réforme administrative intitulée Gestion
des archives — Définition des attributions (MI-5-65, 30 mars 1965, TB. 636933);
elle fut annulée par le décret sur les archives pubUques.
C. ConseU privé, Décret sur les archives pubUques (PubUc Records Order, P.C.
1966-1749, 9 septembre 1966).
D. ConseU du trésor, circulaire concernant la réforme administrative intitulée
Suspension partielle des achats de classeurs de type courant (MI-7-67, 15 décembre 1967, TB. 675296,14 décembre 1967).
E. ConseU du trésor, bulletin d'information sur la réforme administrative intitulé
Principes directeurs sur la gestion des dossiers (1968-2, 8 avril 1968).
H. PUBLICATIONS
A. Organisation des mesures d'urgence, Guide pour la préservation des archives
essentielles pour les gouvernements provinciaux et les lieux susceptibles d'attaque,
1962 (Guide to the Preservation of Essential Records for Provincial Governments and Likely Target Areas, 1962).
B. Archives pubUques, Programmes gSnSraux d'élimination des documents du
Gouvernement du Canada, 1ère édition en 1963 et 2e édition en 1968 (General
Records Disposal Schedules of the Government of Canada).
C. Dbection de la planification relative à l'approvisionnement d'urgence, Archives
essentielles pour l'industrie, 1964 (Essential Records for Industry).
D. Archives pubUques du Canada, Dispositions prises par le Gouvernement du Canada pour l'élimination des documents d'affaires, 1968 (Government of Canada
Disposai Arrangements for Business Records, 1968).
E. ConseU du trésor, Série de la gestion des écritures (préparée par le personnel
des Archives pubUques et imprimée par le ConseU du Trésor. EUe comprend:
1. Guide de classement idéologique des dossiers administratifs, 1968.
2. Gestion du courrier dans les ministères et agences gouvernementales, 1968
(Mail Management in Government Departments and Agencies).
3. Programmes de délais de conservation et élimination des documents, 1968
(Records Scheduling and Disposai).
4. Organisation des documents et opérations qui s'y rapportent, 1969 (Records
Organization and Operations). LA DIRECTION DE LA GESTION DES DOCUMENTS 23
Formation — En collaboration avec la Commission de la fonction pubUque, les Archives
pubUques donnèrent chaque année, de 1961 à 1967, un cours compld de gestion des
documents. En 1968, la Commission de la fonction pubUque délégua la responsabilité
administrative du cours aux Archives pubUques. En 1968, il y eut trois cours, et en
1969, U y en eut encore deux. Les douze cours ont totalisé 360 inscriptions de function-
nabes venant des administrations centrales et des établissements extérieurs, se classant,
dans la hiérarchie, du grade 4 des commis aux écritures et aux règlements au grade 5 des
agents des services administratifs, selon la terminologie de 1969. De plus, des employés
de gouvernements provinciaux et municipaux et d'organisme divers ont assisté aux cours
de gestion des documents.
Bj|j, En plus des cours ordinaires de gestion des documents, qui durent quatre semaines,
la division a prêté de son personnel pour d'autres programmes de formation comprenant
les cours sur les archives parrainés conjointement par les Archives pubUques et l'université
Carleton, les cours de la Commission de la fonction pubUque, des sessions de formation
deJ'Organisation des mesures d'urgence et de nombreuses séances d'études sur la gestion
des documents, organisées par divers ministères ou agences, ou par les gouvernements
provinciaux ou autres organismes.
La guerre contre la paperasserie — À la suite d'une série de réunions tenues à la fin de
1966 et au début de 1967, les Archives pubUques et la Division de la politique de la
réforme administrative du ConseU du trésor s'unirent dans un programme commun pour
attaquer le bourbier de papiers du gouvernement. Le résultat qui est décrit en détail
sous les rubriques appropriées, fut une attaque concertée du problème par le personnel
des deux organisations. Une série d'importantes directives et de pubUcations sur les
aspects variés de la gestion des documents fut pubUée. Une étude sur la normalisation
des chemises pour dossiers aboutit finalement à la fabrication et à l'entreposage d'une
chemise standard par le ministère de la Production de défense; cette chemise de dossier,
que l'on peut utiliser à la fois pour le classement sur rayons ouverts et le classement en
meuble de rangeme