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BC Historical Books

Ninteenth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1921

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Array  HP
THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA    !	
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
1921.
EXECUTIVE   BOARD
1921.
Chairman J. W. Prescott
Chairman, School Management Committee... Mrs. D. Macaulay
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee Jas. Blackwood
Chairman, Finance Committee Jas. Blackwood
STANDING COMMITTEES.
School  Management.
Mrs.   D.   Macaulay,   Chairman.
E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc.
Mrs. E. Angus.
Buildings and Grounds.
Jas. Blackwood, Chairman.
Dr. F. J. Nicholson.
J. H. Simpson.
i-mance.
Jas. Blackwood, Chairman.
:T. W. Prescott.
Mrs. D. Macaulay.
The Chairman of the. Board is ex-oificio member of all Committees.
ATTENDANCE OF TRUSTEES AT  BOARD AND COMMITTEE.
MEETINGS—1921.
Board Management Building Finance
Meetings Committee Committee Committee Total
Number of meetings held....    20             . 33               16 13 82
Prescott, J. W     20                31                15 13 79
Macaulay, Mrs. D     20               32               13 12 77
Angus, Mrs. E. A       2                  3                  2 18
(Resigned 19/2/21)
Simpson, J. H       4                 9                 4 2 19
(Resigned 6/4/21)
Blackwood,   J     20                32                15 12 79
Matheson, E  G     1~>                29                 9 2 55
Nicholson, Dr. F. J     19                27                14 1 61 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
1922.
Retire December 31st, 1922
E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc. Dr. F. J. Nicholson J. W. Prescott
Retire December 31st, 1923.
Mrs. D. Macaulay, Jas.  Blackwood, A. L. M-cWilliams, Angus Maclnnis.
EXECUTIVE  BOARD
1922.
Chairman E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc.
Chairman, School-Management Committee Dr. F. J. Nicholson
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee J. W. Prescott
.Chairman, Finance Committee J. W. Prescott
STANDING  COMMITTEES
School   Management Buildings and Grounds
Dr^ F.  J.  Nicholson,  Chairman. J. W. Prescott, Chairman.
Mrs.  D.  Macaulay. Jas. Blackwood.
A. L. McWilliams. Angus Maclnnis.
Finance.
J. W. Prescott, Chairman.
Dr. F. J. Nicholson E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc.
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE  OF  MEETINGS.
Board , Third Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Management Committee Second Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding Third Monday, at 8 p.m.
Finance Committee Monday before Board meetings, at 8 p.m.
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the
School Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets;
and all correspondence to officials should be addressed to the same
building.
OFFICIALS.
1922.
Municipal Inspector of  Schools J.  S.  Gordon,  B.A.
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools Jan.—Aug. N. R. McKenzie
iSept— Dec. T. A. Brough, B.A.
•Stenographers Miss W. P. Cairns, Miss L. Judge, Miss M. Gait
Secretary.. Major B.  G. Wolfe-Merton, M.C.
Accountant _.H. Rhodes
Stenographers   Miss M. E. Mackey, Miss S. A. McCully
Mimeograph Miss M. F. St. John
Telephone Exchange Miss V.  F.  McConaghy
Building and Grounds Superintendent and Architect F. A. A. Barrs
assistant and Costs Clerk E. F. Bullen
Stenographer Miss  R.   Seymour
torekeeper I F. Colbourne NAMES OF TRUSTEES
SHOWING   YEARS   OF   SERVICE—FROM   1886   TO   1921,   INCLUSIVE.
Name of Trustees. Years of Service.
Gilson, G.  1  1887-1893
Angus, Mrs. E. A.  . 1920—March. 1921
Baldwin, G. F  1887-1892
Banfield,  J.  J  1900-1903
Reckmgsale, Dr. D. B 1  1886-1887
Black, Dr. J. E  1918-1919
Blackwood, James   1920-1921
Breeze, J.  D  1909-1911
Brown,   William   1887-1892; 1898-1899
Browning, J. M  1890-1891
Brydone-Jack, Dr. W. D 1895-1900; 1902-1903; 1908 1913
Charleson, D. B  1886-1887
Hubb, Wm  1904-1914
Collins, Henry  1890-1893
Devine, John   1887-1889
Donaldson,   D  1903-1904
Dougan,  J.  J 1904-1905; 1907-1914
Duke,   Thos  1901-1914
Dyke, George   1910-1913
Eldridge, C. C , 1  1894-1898
Ferguson, J. B  1905-1906
Flumerfelt, W. E  1908-1913
Foreman, C. F „  1895-1896
Gordon, G. R 1893-1896; 1900-1902
Greggor, R. H  1918-1919
Hall, Dr. T. P  1918-1919
ilarper,  A.  M  1915-1916
Henderson, J. B  1886-1887
Hope, Charles  1907-1909
Johnson, A. G  1887-1888
Lamb, T. A  1919-1920
Lang, Dr. W. H  1916-1918
Logan, J. J 1897; 1900-1901
Long, G. Roy  1917-1918
McAllister, John   1894
Macaulay, Mrs. D  1919-1921
Macgowan. A. H. B  1888-1896
McGuigan, Dr. W. J 1887-1888; 1897-1904
McKechnie, Dr. W. B  1904-1906
McKim,   H.   C.  N  1916-1917
McLennan, R. P  1906-1907
McNaughton, Mrs  F  1912-1915
McTavish.  Dr. F.  C  1915 Years of Ser
Name of Trustee.
Matheson,  E.  G.,  B.A.Sc	
Mathews,  Thomas	
Moody, Mrs. I. H	
Murray,   C.  W 1888-1892;    1894
Nicholson, Dr.  F\ J	
Odium, Victor	
Prescott.   J.   W	
Ramsay, James	
Reid, Mrs.  c	
Sangster, Charles	
Seymour, J. R	
Simpson, J. F 1920;    April.
Springer,  B     1891
Stewart, Allan C 1911;    1914
Templeton, William        1892
Welsh, F. W     1914
Whetham,  Charles     1S89
Wilson, G. 1     1887
1917
1916
1906
1919
1898
1898
1914
vice*
1921
1918
•1920
1902
1921
1907
1921
1907
1899
1915
1917
1921
1892
1916
1897
1917
1890
1893 -"*
8
BOaUI)  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS.
Vancouver, B. C,
January 11th, 1922.
To the Trustees:-
It asrain becomes my dutv to present to vou the Annual Re^
pori of the activities of this Board, at the close of a useful year's
work, and in doing so allow me to thank the trustees for the able
and sympathetic co-operation and assistance accorded me during
':he past year.
The all-important question during the year was that of ac-
commodation. As the school population continues to grow, the
necessity for more schoolroom accommodation is the source of
deep anxiety to those whose duty it is to provide it.
Owing to the defeat of the By-laws and the reduction of the
estimates by the City Council, this Board was compelled to be
economical, not only in the management of its affairs, but also in
the provision of schoolrooms. However, the difficulty was overcome by the erection of cottage schools, of frame construction,
suitable in size, well ventilated, well lighted and comfortably
heated. This class of building has proved satisfactory in every
wav. and ii' sufficient land was available, this class of building
would be useful for a number of years. The only objection that
bas been raised to th mi is that they occupy land which might be
used as play-ground.
l.u a number of the large school buildings, considerable improvement has been made in the ventilating and heating systems,
and by degrees all these systems will be improved.
The Technical School was opened for studies on March 1st, under the direction of jlr. J. G. Lister, the principal. On April 4th,
the Honorable the Minister of Education, Dr. J. D. McLean formally declared the school open. It is now filled to capacity and
more space will be needed for future development in the work.
Amongst the important subjects in the curriculum of this school is
that of printing which should prove an attractive and certainly
ver\ useful study. It was commenced during the year and is
proving popular among the students.
The members of the hoard have continued to show the keenest interest In the work of the Teaching Staff for the purpose of
keeping up its high standard of efficiency.   The results of the vari- BOARD   OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
9
ous high school examinations have been carefully scrutinized and
the methods adopted by the various principals have been the subject of close examination and criticism when necessary.
During the year an exchange of Inspectors was made, in sending Mr. T. A. Brough. the Assistant Municipal Inspector, to New
Zealand for one year, and Mr. N. R. McKenzie, one of the foremost
inspectors of New Zealand is now filling the position of Assistant
Municipal Inspector in the City of Vancouver with many beneficial results.
A matter of considerable satisfaction to the Board has been
the harmonious co-operation in the work of the schools between
the trustees and the members of the permanent staff, and the
thanks of this Board are due to Mr. J. S. Gordon, the M|unicipal
Inspector of Schools, and Major B. G- Wolfe-Merton, Secretary
of the School Board, for their unfailing attention to the needs of
this great school svstem, and also to Mr. F. A. A. Barrs, architect
of the Board, for the constant care he has taken in the mainien-
auce of the buildings.
In closing, allow me to thank you for your valuable assistance
as members of the Vancouver School Board, and to express the
pleasure it has given me to work for the welfare of the children
of Vancouver with such an able body of public, .spirited citizens.
J. Hf PRESCOTT,
Chairman of theBoard.
ARDDtBtC ■tatto—«atMW I mi w ■
10
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
REPORT OF MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE.
Vancouver, B. O,
January 11th. 1922.
Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen :—
I. have much pleasure in submitting the following report on
the work of the Management Committee of the Vancouver School
Board for the year 1921.
Perhaps at no time in the history of the Vancouver School
Board has the work of the Management Committee been so difficult as it has been this vear owing to the repeated defeat of money
by-laws since 1918 and the consequent difficulty of providing
proper accommodation for our school children, the ever increasing
administrative work for a grow ing population and the lack of the
proper number of members.
When you honored me with the chairmanship of the Management Committee associated with me were Prof. E. G. Matheson
oiid-Mr. J. II. Simpson; but owing to ill health Mrs. Angus and
Mr. Simpson resigned early in the year, leaving both the Board
and Committees short handed. The other members, however,
came to our help and were regular attendants taking a keen
interest in all our activities. I might say indeed that all Board
members practically attended all Committee meetings, so that our
Committee meetings were really Committees of the whole. This
was particularly good for our Management work, as all members could see the difficulties of administration and were the more
ready to assist us whole heartedly. For the splendid support
given by other members through the year our Committee is most
grateful and especially for our pleasant relations. It has indeed
been a pleasure to work \\ ith the other members of the Board
this year, though the work has been very arduous, lor though the
Committee has worked sometimes until after 1 a.m. it has been
necessary to hold thirty-three .Management Committee meetings
during the year.
.Our greatest difficulty has been organization. In 1920 an
experiment had been made with thirty-four part time classes.
This method was found to be inefficient, expensive and wasteful,
especially of children s lives. It was consequently decided to
increase the numbers in classes So over 100 classes began the
year with about 50 pupils each. Over 1000 additional were expected to cute the schools in Febraury with only six unused
rdass room^ available and with no mone\ to provide for others,
as our by-laws for amounts totalling $241,000 had been defeated r
BOARD   OF   SCHOOL  TRUSTEES 11
in January. The actual number of young chiuldren who entered
school in Febrauary was 1077. Only six class rooms could be
found for these. The rest had therefore to be cut on part time.
Thus we find that thirty-four teachers (primary) with about
1400 children were working part time in addition to having many
•lasses overcrowded. It was under such circumstances that we
determined not to admit six-year old pupils to the schools in Sep1-
tembe1' unless money was provided to secure additional class.
rooms. Funds were secured and forty more class rooms were made
available for September.
This made it possible for us to organize the schools for the
closing term of the year on a fairly satisfactory basis. The appended table will show the average enrolment for October, when
our maximum for the year was reached. It also gives an estimate
of conditions for the coming year.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Enrolment Teachers
in Oct.
In        Expected
Special    Increase      Total
Nam; of Sckool Total Classes    in Feb,      in   Feb,    Total    Specia
Aberdeen   440      32 472 11
Alexandra.  619      35 654 16
Bayview  386      30 416 10
Beaconsfteid    373      25 398 9
Blind, School fcr   7 7 0 7 1
Cecil  Rhodes    434 11 33 467 12
Central   766 30 40 806 20
Charles  Dickens  423      30 463 11
Dawson    944 38 55 999 26
Fairview     533 38 32 565 14
F.   Nightingale  716 26 40 756 19
Franklin     319      25 344 8
General Gordon  i 475      3>5 510 12
Grandview   548      35 581 14
Grenfell    136 15 7 143 4
Hastings     641      40 681 15
Henry Hudson   607 22 48 655 17
Kitsilano    470 ...... 25 495 12
Laura Secord   478 22 30 508 13
Livingstone  397      30 427 10
Macdonald   543 12 35 578 14
Model   542      30 572 13
Mt. Pleasant  764 15 65 829 19
Nelson     720      40 760' 17
Roberts     930      80 1010 24
Seymour     852 13 70 922 20
Simon Fraser   633 12 35 668 16
Strathcona     1051 27 100 1151 27
Tennyson   616      40 656 15
Totals    16363    288    1,122    17,485      419
s
Average
per
Class
Oct.
Feb.
ial
1921
1522
40
43
39
41
39
42
41
44
1
7
7
1
38
41
2
41
43
39
42
2
38
40
2
41
44
2
41
43
..
40
43
..
40
42.5
..
39
42
1
40
43
	
43
45
2
39
42
..
39
41
o
41
44
..
40
43
1
41
44
..
42
44
1
42
45
..
42
45
..
39
42
1
44
48
1
41
44
2
41
45
--
41
44
1
40
43 12
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
HIGH   SCHOOLS.
Name of School. Enrolment. No. c«f Classes. Average per Class.
Britannia    598                      16 37.3
High   Schcol   o.f Comni3i\:e 292                         7 41.7
King George   460                      13 35.4
King Edward  597                      17 35.1
Kitsilano  358                      10 35.8
Technical   385                       13 29.6
Totals        2,690 76 35.4
The ahove table clearly shows that an additional teacher
should be appointed for every school in February and in only four
of these is there one unused room, so you can see how very urgent
is the need of additional accommodation if the school work is to
be carried on with anything approaching satisfactory results.
The above table must be taken as showing only averages. A
school may show an. average of 45 in all classes, but some are
slightly smaller, while others are very much larger. A good
many of the younger classes have over 5.0 and some very nearly
60 pupils.
Anyone with any educational ideas or any knowledge of
school, work must see the danger to which we are drifting. If we
go on this way the teachers will be policing our schools instead of
teaching. School will be kept instead of taught, for no teacher
having such a large number of young pupils can give the personal
attention that is necessary to insure a good foundation on which
to build a future education. The bright ones may go on but the
slow pupils will lag behind, the result- being that pupils will be
either kept behind or sent on inadequately prepared and with a
likelihood of this condition accompanying them throughout their
school life.   In either case the results will be disastrous.
If pupils are sent ahead unprepared many will be discouraged
and fall by the wayside: and there is nothing like discouragement for destroying the morale of human beings. It means
more pupils for our industrial schools, detention homes and prisons, misery instead of happiness for the home, less production in
industrial life and more expense to the state in taking care of
criminals. For. let me say, that every discouraged child is one
more centre of moral leprosy. On the other hand, if pupils are
kept behind, the element of discouragement is still present but in
a lesser degree. The main consequences will be that more pupils
being kept in school more rooms will be needed, and more teachers necessary. Consequently overhead expenses will be greater
while the pupil will be kept from industrial life longer. Let us
look these things squarely in the face before it is too late. BOARD   OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES 13
Salaries.
Second only in difficulty and perhaps in importance to organization is the question of teachers' salaries affecting as it
does the public purse directly and the teachers' marole indirectly,
and through that the whole system. Believing that a teaspoon
of understanding and co-operation is worth more than a barrel of
discontent and antagonism, your Committee agreed on a schedule giving a slight increase all along the line, but giving The
largest increases to the lowest salaried teachers. We don't think
this schedule is quite perfect but the teachers agreed and I can't
speak too highly of the spirit of loyalty and co-operation manifested by our staff of teachers. We feel that we are gradually
accumulating a staff that is second to none in the Dominion. It
is to be hoped that with a few minor alterations we may have a
workable schedule for years to come so that the annual recurrence of amending a schedule, which is pleasant to neither teachers nor trustees, may be ended.
Reports of Departments.
Your committee took a keen interest in the reports of principals, supervisors, inspectors and heads of departments, which
were supplied from time to time by our chief executive, Municipal Inspector Mr. Gordon. The reports show that notwithstanding great difficulties the year's work has been characterized by
enthusiastic, harmonious effort in every department with the best
of relations existing between all of these, so that the whole educational work has gone on most agreeably. It speaks well for
the work of Mr. Gordon that in only three cases did appeals from
his decision come before us, and in each case he has been upheld.
I must say that the work with Mr. Gordon has been most pleasant. The agenda has always been clear and up to date, any information required has been at hand or very easily procured and
his counsels freely given have invariably been wise.
I would like to say a word here about Mr. McKenzie, who
exchanged with our Assistant Municipal Inspector. These two
fine men in the interests of education have exchanged work for
one year, Mr. McKenzie coming from New Zealand and Mr.
Brough going there, each paying his own expenses. Mr. McKenzie has been able to give us many valuable hints. New Zealand is far ahead of us in some respects, especially in its willingness to spend money on its young. So let us hope Mr. McKenzie's
stay with us may be pleasant for him and profitable for us. He is
winning a place among the teachers by his geniality and pleasant
constructive criticism.    Such exchans.es will make for the better 14
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
understanding and the binding together of members of the British
Empire, so that in education and loyalty we shall work as
1)i*others.
Technical School.
•Through the long continued and persistent efforts of our
genial chairman and the co-operation of theEducatioiiDepartment
we have at last secured a Technical School on a rental basis, the
government buying the building and renting it to the School
Board. Mr. Lister, wiio was head of the Technical department in
the King Edward High School, was very happy to move into his
new quarters and we are* glad to note the fine esprit de corps
among his boys. The pity is that the school is already too small.
A question might be asked here as to whether we are doing the
best work with the funds expended or should we have fewer
classes and more courses.
Night Schools.
Our Xighfc Schools have continued to improve and are supplementing the technical work we are able to do. This year there
are no less than fifty four courses organized, the attendance keeping up very satisfactorily. The fees paid by students supplement
ed by a government grant of two-fifths of 'the teachers' salaries,
provides for all salaries. These classes are organized for students
over school age and are a wonderful help. The great pity is that
we cannot provide all these courses for our children under school
age and thus fit them for a more useful life. We hope the time
'will soon <ome when we shall be able to provide a course suited
to the needs of every class of pupil attending our schools. The
success of these classes is due in no small measure to our genial
Night School organizer, Mr.Beech, who it heart and soul in his
work and gets the very best co-operation from his large staff.
Sub-Normal or Special Classes.
These classes, so well presided over by Miss Dauphinee and
Mis? Kerr, are doing a work 1 hat will be of unitold benefit to 1 hose
concerned unfortunately these classes are very expensive, as a
teacher and room is required for not more than fifteen pupils. As
there are now nineteen of such < lasses, no small extra expense is
entailed. The expense, however, is most thoroughly worth while, as
tin se children are fitted for life as well as it is possible to fit them.
These classes arc really doing preliminary technical work and it
seems to me that the state should provide for them on the same basis as for technical students. Too much praise cannot be given
to this department for the work they are doing in training and
social service.
Physical Training.
Miss Cotsworth, who was appointed to the Avork of physical
dev3lopment among our high school.girls, has taken hold of that
work in a most convincing manner winning her way into the
hearts and confidence of the girls.
Captain Bundy has done particularly good work this year
throughout the school system. The physical training of our
pupils is of no less importance than the mental.
Domestic Science.
This department is still handicapped by the fact that no
course is provided by the University for the continuation of their
.studies and no real normal course for their training in this work
at the Normal School, The usual good vrork is being done, however, though we are sorry to say that the Board has had no funds
to provide the usual course at the Kitsilano High School. It is to
be hoped that this defect can soon be remedied so that the girls
may be taught to use their hands and trained to be homemakers
in the future.
Dental Department.
The Dental Department has taken a step forward this year in
eliminating waste time so that the work is more up-to-date and
loss of time to pupils reduced to a minimum. Dr. Fallen deserves
praise for his management of this department.
Medical Department.
Dr. Wightman and his staff are doing a work that cannot
be estimated by treating incipient troubles and so keeping the
children in school. Hundreds of pupils have been saved a loss of
time in this way and incidentally the Board saved an additional
expenditure. That there has been no epidemic in our schools is
-due to the watchfulness and efficiency of this department. This
work has been ably carried on through our staff of nurses, of
whose unselfish service too much cannot be said.
In closing this report I want to again thank the members of
the Board for their unvarying courtesy and help throughout the
year, Mr. Gordon for his kindly counsel and efficient management,
-and our Secretary, Major Wolfe-Merton, for his thoroughly busi- 16
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ness like methods in attending to our supplies, which contributes
in no small degree to the success of the work of our schools.
With the heartiest good wishes to the Board members and
staf? for the coming vear.
R esn ec.t fullv submitt ed,
Yours sincerely,
Dora Macaulay.
Chairman, Management Committee BOARD   OF  SCHOOL   TRUSTEES 17
REPORT OP BUILDING COMMITTEE.
Vancouver, B. O,
January 11th, 1922.
.Air. Chairman, Mrs, Macaulay and Gentlemen:
It has been my pleasure during 1921 to occupy the position
of Chairman of the Building Committee and in accordance with
the duties of that office, I take pleasure in laying before you this
annual report covering a considerable part of the work done by
the Department during the year.
In opening my remarks I would first point out that the Building Department estimated the requirement for 1921 expenditure
at .+199,735.00. In view of the urgent necessity for reducing expenditure the actual appropriation was considerably reduiced
and the amount spent for the year just closed is but slightly over
$105,000.00. This, of course, at once interfered with the arrangements set down in the estimates and therefore we have not
been able to make certain improvements which were anticipated
When the estimates were compiled. However, I beg to give you
herewith a resume of what has been done.
During the vear we have built schools containing 27 class
rooms in all, at the following centres: Macdonald, 2 rooms; Franklin, 2 rooms; Hastings, 2 rooms; Dawson, 2 rooms; Mt. Pleasant,
2 rooms; Kitsilano High, 2 rooms; General Gordon, 1 room and
an open air school; Xelson, 1 room; Aberdeen, 1 room; Grand-
view, 1 room; Nightingale, 1 room: Bayview, 1 room; Strathcona,
8 rooms.
The old Strathcona School was pulled down, rebuilt and op-
cued in September. This building contains eight modern class
rooms and is heated from the main building erected in 1914, a
transmission steam service being installed with condensation return service. By this means we have eliminated fully half the
expense incurred in installing an ordinary individual steam plant,
brought down operating expenses by practically half as well as
eliminating all fire risks in the building. The vento rads for
heating the air were taken from other buildings in which too
many had been installed, thus saving further capital expenditure
and at the same time putting to work material which hitherto
had lain dormant.
This system having proved successful, I take pleasure in
drawing the attention of other Trustees to it, feeling that such
systems should he installed not only from an economical stand- 18
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
point but also from the point of view of health and sanitation.
The building was opened on September 1st and while we could
not complete the floor of the basement, we have provided modern
toilets and conveniences for the pupils occupying the building
so as to T)revent their running from school to school, thus eliminating the possibility of children catching cold, as well as wasting
time.
During the year, the Department recommended the removal
of the old furnaces in the King George High School, and that a
steam service, with proper condensation return, be brought from
Dawson School. This recommendation was endorsed bv the
Board after Professor Matheson had, at the Committee's request,
investigated the situation, and reported, favourably on the Department's suggestion: we proceeded with the work, the present
fan being reset, electrical plant re-established, plenum chamber
constructed, and air ducts re-arranged: also a circulating air
svstem for quickly heating the building, and vento rads were
• l %/ CD CD 7
installed. Of the latter 75% were also taken from other buildings
where too many existed. This plant has been in operation since
September 1st, and the further we go the more efficient we find
the service. The svstem will no doubt eliminate at least two-
thirds of the cost of fuel in this building, and, like that at the
Strathcona School, will also reduce fire hazards to a nieglegible
quantity. Another advantage which is gained by the use of this
system is the saving in the maintenance of cleanlines's in the
building. There is no possibility of smoke, gas fumes or dust
being introduced into the rooms, as is the case where heating
furnaces exist.
The Department made a recommendation that the high pressure plant at the King Edward High School be reduced to low
pressure in order to economize in fuel and in other respects.
After an inspection by the members of the Board, the recommendation was endorsed and the change made, and up to date we
find our fuel bill is practically cut in half. This, J. understand,
has been done in many other large schools in Eastern Canada and
the United States, with, results similar to those obtained in this
instance. As soon as funds are available, it will be, in my opinion and that of the head of the department, in the best interests
of all concerned that other plants under the Board's control be
changed on similar lines, so as to increase efficiency and reduce
operating expense.
A report was brought in by the Board's Medical Health
Officer, the Building Superintendent and Architect recommending the installation of an exhaust system at the Aberdeen School,
and after the proposal had been considered by the Board   the BOARD   OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
19
Building Superintendent and Architect was instructed to prepare plans for such installation. Tenders were called for and the
work was carried out with great satisfaction and comfort to the
occupants of the building.
For manv years the sanitary conditions of the Lord Roberts
School have been considered by the Medical and Health Department to be most inadequate and unreliable. After the question
had been duly looked into by the Department, a report was submitted and a recommendation made that four toilet systems,
formerlv on the first and second floors, be entirely removed and
reset up in the boys' and girls basement respectively. Plans and
specifications were prepared by the architect and tenders called
for. The work was carried out and has proved beyond all doubt
most successful, not only from a sanitary standpoint but also
from that of economy of space. The room formerly occupied conjoint ly by the principal, medical officer and waiting room is now
used as a class room, these officers having moved their quarters
into the room vacated when the alterations mentioned above were
completed. By this means another classroom has been made
available in the Roberts School, so that the change has been
beneficial from all standpoints.
The Aberdeen School has been entirely redecorated inside, as
have also the King George High and Mount Pleasant Schools, the
latter being a sixteen roomed building with halls, etc. The Fair-
view School, which has been built many years, was repainted
entirely on the outside, which has. I think, greatly improved the
appearance of this property, to say nothing from a preservation
standpoint.
During the year a great many roofs of buildings have had to
receive temporary repairs, and it will be necessary in making
an appropriation for 1922 that a sum of money be put aside for a
great deal more work of this nature to be carried out at the
various schools, as it is of most vital importance that the roofs of
the buildings be kept in weather-proof condition.
The Department has attended to some 1,500 individual repairs during the year, as well as manufacturing a great deal of
furniture and equipment for the various schools in the form of
tables, benches, cupboards, teachers' desks, manual training
benches and the like, to say nothing of the hundreds of small calls
which have had to be promptly attended to.
The Provincial Government in the fall of 1920 saw fit, at the
reqnest of the School Board, to purchase the Labour Temple, with
8 view to using it as a Technical School. The Government made
certain  necessary repairs to  the sanitary  system,  etc.,  of the
J •:o
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
building, but the Building Department, however, had to install
the greater part of the equipment,, so that it would be possible to
carry on technical education, and as this equipment is very different from that of ordinary school equipment, it entailed a great
deal of time and thought. However, I am sure it is very gratifying to the members of the Board to feel they have the best equipped technical school in the Province, and while the building and
present equipment meet the demands, I feel that in the near
future the Board will have to provide a much larger and more
adequate building, also more modern and up to date equipment;
because after all many hundreds of young men will be taking up
technical work in preference to higher academic subjects, and for
this reason, I would suggest that the Board keep a watchful eye
towards making the necessary provision.
In the interest of expediting the work, Mr. Barrs and Mr.
Kyle, the general foreman, have on many occasions given up
their Saturday afternoons and evenings in order to accompany me
around the various works being undertaken by the Board from
time to time. This I greatly appreciate, as it was very helpful to
me in the execution of the duties of my office, as I in this way
became thoroughly acquainted with conditions as they actually
existed, and for that reason could intelligently discuss means for
speedy execution along economical lines.
I have always advocated discussions with reference to improvements, and was pleased to note that our Building Superintendent and Architect spent his holidays in investigating improvements of heating and ventilating plants. He has always been
keenly interested in this work and during October he visited the
United States, holding conference with some of the most representative engineers of the American continent, gaining information which I am sure will be helpful to us in our endeavours to
improve the plants in the Board's charge. I much appreciate the
attitude of the Chairman of the Board and members who kindlv
granted Mr. Barrs an extension of time, knowing that he had the
interests of all concerned at heart.
In reviewing what to my mind should be done in 1922, I
would recommend that the present system of heating the Lord
Roberts School be abolished, and a steam service installed for
both buildings. This will bring down the cost of fuel and reduce
fire risks; it will also make a reduction in the cost of maintenance of the buildings. I would also suggest the same at the
Seymour School, and that the plants now running as high pressure
be reduced to low. These questions I have taken up- with the
Department and feel satisfied that money should be provided to BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
o
make the necessary changes as before suggested. I would also
recommend that considerable money be placed in the estimates for
grading school grounds where necessary, so that the children at
CD CD C^ t
each centre may be able to get the full value of health giving
sport, which to my mind is a great asset and very necessary in
carrying on their studies. At the time I became a member of the
Board in 1920, I was desirous of having certain portions of our
playgrounds hard surfaced, so that during our numerous wet
winter days,, the little children would have somewhere to play,
and at the same time keep themselves reasonably clean and with
dry feet. At thai time labour was expensive and material high and
we felt we should have to defer to some future date "when conditions had become normal. Therefore, I am now of the opinion and
recommend that at one or two or our schools this year an area
«
should be surfaced with a cement base and cushion wearing surface upon which the children might play and on which, in the
event of their falling down, they would not cut themselves to
pieces. I believe that this would be very beneficial to the health
of the little ones particularly, and would he greatly appreciated by
all concerned. I, therefore, urgently request that funds be included in the estimates for this work to be started.
s A great many of our buildings require not only internal but
CD t/ <~> i *
external painting, and after talking the matter over with the
head of the Department, Mr. Barrs, I would recommend a rami
of money being placed in the estimates to provide for these requirements.
At the request of the Secretary, Major Wolfe-Merton, a portion of the basement of the new Strathcona School was partitioned off and ail building material, school supplies, formerly scattered round the basements of schools are now collected and
stored there; all useless material, such as old iron, etc., will be
sold. The result, so far, shows that many .hundred dollars woitli
of material can be now collected and put in safe keeping, available for school purposes, and can be used from time to time as
required. I think, personally, this is a move in the right direction, and 1 heartily endorse the action of Major Wolfe-Merton in
his general desire to economize and utilize everything which < an
be made to serve useful purposes.
As Chairman of the Building and the Finance Committees,
and also as a member of the Board X take pleasure in thanking
Mr. Barrs. Major Wolfe-Merton and Mr. Gordon and their respective staffs for the courtesy rendered to me during the past vear,
;dso  for the   faithful  wav in   which  th«-v have   discharged  the 22
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
duties of their office, so far as funds would permit. With working
conditions becoming more normal, 1 look for many improvements
to take place, and if re-elected, it will be my pleasure from time
to time to bring them forward for the full consideration and
endorsation of the Board.
I have the honour to remain,
Yours truly,
JAMES BLACKWOOD,
Chairman, Building Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES:
23
REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B.C.,
January 11th, 1922.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Macauley and Gentlemen:
I beg to submit the following report on the Vancouver schools
for the year 1921:
The work of organization for the year, the difficulties exr
perienced in securing adequate classroom accommodation and
how these difficulties were so well met have been clearly set forth
in the reports of the Chairman of the Management and Building
Committees. The forecast, of organization for the coming term
in the former's report also clearly indicates that, for 1922, as
much money will be needed to provide school accommodation as
was spent last year, even should school work continue along present lines, without any expansion. For many reasons, however, it
seems most desirable that a more ambitious educational programme should be followed in future then has been followed in BOA III) OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
**
the past. Before such a programme will be sanctioned by the
people it is all important that you, as their representatives, should
not only believe in it but be anxious to adopt it. May I, therefore,
set forth the main reasons for widening the scope of your educational activities?
With your present school accommodation you cannot possibly comply with the Public Schools Act as amended in 1921. An
amendment of Section 140 raised the maximum compulsory school
age from fourteen to fifteen years. In this connection, we have
to admit frankly this new compulsory clause has been almost a
dead letter, owing to the fact that there were not classrooms
enough in Vancouver to accommodate the fourteen-year-old pupils
who left school last mid-summer. We naturally ask where is the
accommodation t o come from next summer for an equal number
of the same age who should not be allowed to leave school for
another year at least. One may conservatively estimate the
additional fourteen-year-old pupils to be provided for under the
amended act at from 600 to 800, and the rooms required for them
at from fifteen to twenty.
Another large group of students not hitherto cared for in
your system are those dropping out of the high schools during the
ty • ±.    X. CD CD CD
earlier years of their course. These, numbering at least 1,000,
should be encouraged not. to drift out of school prematurely, ill
prepared to fit into either the social or industrial life of the
community. To give them at least two years' training would
necessitate the erection of at least one school as large as 'King
Edward High School.
In the light of the above facts no one need enquire doubtinglv
'"What need is there of the proposed ."Memorial High School"?
P that school could be erected this term, it could be rilled with
s1mhmts next September without vacating a single classroom
now in use. thai is, if (he citizens are prepared to do for all boys
and girls, from fourteen to sixteen yeais of age, what they are
now doing for a comparatively small number. It is undoubtedly
desirable that they should do so; and to do so they should supply
you with approximately $500,000 to provide the necessary plant.
During the past year, the school population increased 1,060
-over 500 in the high, schools alone. To care for this increase
the teaching forces were increased from 508 to 554. Thirty-two
additional teachers were added, to the public school staff and nine
to the high school staff. Two additional manual training instructors, one domestic science instructor and two special teachers
were also appointed. This increase in staff may seem somewhat
large for the increase in school population ; but it was necessitated
by +he overcrowding in the puMie  schools  in  the last term   of 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 25
1920. The average size of regular public school classes at present
is 40 and of high school classes 35.4.
The increase of four in the staff of your special classes during the year keeps Vancouver well in the front rank in Canada or
even among American cities for work of this kind, but leaves
much to be desired. The children in these classes should not
leave school at the age of fourteen or even fifteen to begin their
^ *—>
life's work, for they are not ready for it. You have done much
by organizing special classes for them; and you are very materially assisting them through your social service worker, who not
only secures suitable positions for those now leaving school, but,
by co-operation with their employers and their parents, helps
greatly in. ensuring their success. Many of these young people
are alreadv assets to the community; but thev would be of still
more value if trained for at least two more Aears in a suitable
c
school.
Supervisors and Special Instructors.
The work carried on in the various departments throughout
the vear has been well done. In many instances it was materially
extended. For fuller particulars may I refer to the reports of
the various heads of departments which will be printed in your
Annual Report.
In April you appointed Miss Lena Cotsworth as physical instructress of the girls in Britannia, King Edward and Kitsilano
High Schools She has already abundantly demonstrated the importance of her work, the necessity for its extension and the
need of better facilities for carrying it on. No new step in school
work during the past year has met with more general approval
than this.
In September you supplied a need more and more recognized
for the past five years in appointing a supervisor of sewing for
the public schools. In your appointee, Mrs. Ada C. Huggard,
you have a capable supervisor. Her work from the first has been
systematically and efficiently done. It is hoped that in time all
those teaching sewing in the grades will be qualified for their
work. At present a number are attending Mrs. Huggard's classes.   All are expected to do so ultimately.
Your plans to have Miss E. Berry again devote her full time
to the supervision of Domestic Science work was not realized in
September owing to the impossibility of securing one to take her
place as Home Economics teacher in King Edward High School.
The necessity for such supervision has become more and more imperative since it was discontinued in 19JL6.    The personnel of the 26
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Domestic Science staff has greatly changed; and, as the teachers
come from so many different places and consequently have different ideas and methods, closer supervision is essential to secure
the measure of uniformity desirable in a system where children
move so frequently from district to district. A"ou are fortunate,
'therefore. :n your recent selection of a successor to Miss Berry
in King Edward and in Miss Berry's taking up her supervisory
work entirely this month.
Teaching Staff,
The policy you have followed in making appointments to the
Teaching stall'—-selecting on merit and appointing on probation—
is proving most satisfactory. Most of those so appointed will
likely prove themselves deceiving of a position on the permanent
staff' K||      HH | |jj§    ||
The selectirn of suitable teachers is an important but difficult task. In addition to the initial step of selecting for a position on probation, comes the still more critical work of testing
the probationers. In this testing the best interests of both the
teachers and lite children must be safeguarded. To do this, we
recognize that recent appointees, even ones of intelligence and
honesty--two great essentials in a teacher—may not from the be-
ginning do satisfactory work in their unfamiliar surroundings.
A probation period of one year in such instances is necessary.
Dining this period the work of the probationer is reported on by
provinical and municipal inspectors, by principal and by supervisors. Tn the light of these reports, the Board should be able
to judge of the capabilities of the teachers, appointing to the permanent staff the strong and ejecting the weak. Following this
method last year, the changes were not many.
Public and High School Leaving Examinations.
The following brief summary sets forth the results of the
Public and High School leaving Examinations Las* dune in your
schools BS compared with the total results for the Province:—
PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Entrance to High Schools.
Vancouver
The  Province
Recommended
by Principals.
.....   .    1111
2680
Successful
on Examinat ion.
6  (out  of 80)
1306
Total.
1120
3995 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 2
HIGH SCHOOLS.
Matriculation.
No. of
Vancouver
Candidates.    Passed. Suppl
     308                156
ementals.
114
375
Failed
38
The Provin.ee 	
  1.201                541
375
Third Year Commercial.
Vancouver .
The Province
23                  19    •
.      36                 30
Third Year Technical.
4
6
Vancouver  	
       24                 18
6
Third Year Household Science.
Vancouver   .7 7 '      0
Lawrence John Meredith of the Lord Roberts School won the
Governor-General's bronze medal as the best Entrance pupil of
the city; while Miss Grace Elizabeth Mabel Smith of King George
High School won the silver medal and the Royal Institution
Scholarship of *150 as the best high school student.
Outside Forces Co-operating" with The Schools.
In 1921 a large number of outside forces expressed a desire
to co-operate with the schools in carrying on their work. The
offers of many of these had to be declined. Their good intentions
were fully appreciated, but it was felt that ordinary school duties
should not be set aside for many of the important projects recommended. Too manv individuals and societies seem to under-
estimate the school child's ordinary duties.
In only two instances during the year was work suggested
by outside organizations undertaken: *
In the spring term a Spelling Competition was conducted under the auspices of the Kiwanis Club. This competition was welcomed as a means of discrediting a too common opinion that spelling is not well taught, and also as a means of stirring up more
public interest in the schools.   It did both.
In the preliminary test of all students the high average of
82% was made on different lists of difficult words carefully graded for children of different ages. In the semi-final and final tests,
which were held in public, great interest was manifested by the
citizens and unstinted praise was bestowed on the competitors
for their ability and also for their gracious acceptance of defeat
or their mod est v as victors. 28
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Medals for outstanding ability in spelling were awarded by
the Club to the following pupils:—
Record
Name   of  Pupil. Grade. Name of School, on Tests.
Denis Boyd      Junior       Beaconsfield        100%
Ruth Heighton      Junior       Grandview 100%
Eillecn \verv     Intermediate     Laura Secord.       96%
( oustanee Johnson      Senior        Tennvson
100%
/c
Extra
Words.
69
21
36
18
IAifec in the term an Essay Writing Competition on ''The
Union Jack' was conducted in the Junior, Intermediate and
Senior Grades of the public schools and in the high schools, also a
drawing competition on 'The Union Jack' in the Primary
Crades of the public schools—all under the auspices of the Elks'
Cllib || |        |a
The prize winners who received a gold, silver or bronze medal,
according as they occupied first, second or third rank, were as
follows:—
PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Senior Grade:
Prize No. 1—Central School
2--Fairview School
" 3--Mod"! School
Intermediate Grade:
Prize No. 1- -Roberts School
2—Macdonald School
\Torma  Clark.
Isobel Render.-. >n.
Dorothy Miller.
> ?
Ewen Cather.
Bessie  Thomson Robertson.
3—General Gordon School    Ruth Herbert.
Junior Grade:
Prize No. 1—Tennyson School
2—Hastings School
" 3—Roberts School
Primary Grade:
Prize No, 1-   I lenry Hudson School
2  -Henry 11udson Special
(lass    Willie Scott.
o-  r airview ocnool
HIGH SCHOOLS.
Third Year:
Doris Likely.
Walter Waugh.
Evelyn   McDowell
Ralph  (1ook.
Edwin liodson.
nze No. 1--King George IIS.
King George H.S,
Britannia U.S.
Ian Holt Woodburn.
James II. ( raig.
E. Gordon Miller* BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES M
•
Second Year:
Prize Xo. 1—King George H.S. Bruce McDonald.
" 2- -King George H.S. Agnes King.
|| 3—Britannia U.S. Lorna Barton.
First Year:
Prize No. 1—King Edward II S. Esther McGill.
"I   % 2—King Edward U.S. Mary Sinclair.
-H.S.   of Commerce Kathleen Hicks.
o-
Tn addition to the individual prizes a beautiful silk flag, the
Union Jack, neatly framed, was presented to the Model School
and to King George High School for the best school wrok.
Patriotic Celebration.
The essay competition referred to above was conducted in the
belief that a careful study of our Nation's flag would strengthen
the foundations for a more intelligent patriotism. For the same
reason there was held in Stanley Park on June 23rd, a grand
celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of British Columbia's
Entrance into Confederation. About 6,000 pupils and teachers
assembled to hear appropriate addresses by public men, to illustrate by suitable pageants what it means to British Columbia
to be a member of Confederation, and to sing their national songs
expressing their loyalty and joy as members of our Dominion and
Empire. The speakers, of the day were Hon. J. D. McLean, Minister of Education, G. FL Cowan, K.C., and Prof. E. G. Matheson,
a member of your Board.
Parent-Teacher Associations.
A review of the general school activities for the year calls
for some refence to the work of the Parent-Teacher Associations.
These associations, numbering twenty-one, in all, have continued to
do much good work in their respective districts. In all instances
they have raised the general standard of efficiency in their schools
by holding up higher ideals for both parents and teachers in their
common tasks as trainers of the young. They have also rendered
very material assistance in many instances by providing library
books, musical instruments or pictures to make their schools more
attractive. In the work of administrating the schools of Vancouver, I have found the Parent-Teacher associations a great assistance.
Exchange of School Workers.
The experiment in exchanging school teachers from Vancouver for teachers in New Zealand made in 1920 mav now be re- 30
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ported on with some degree of assurance. Miss E. Roche and
Miss M. M. Harper completed their year 01 service in your schools
last June and returind to New Zealand. The service they rendered here in their classrooms was satisfactory. They also helped
to bring us into closer touch and fuller sympathy with the sister
dominion. Your two visiting teachers to New Zealand, Miss A.
Bigney and Miss E. M. Frame, returned to take up work in September. Their sojourn in the antipodes they appreciated; and,
while they are loud in their praise of the treatment they received,
and work they saw being done in New Zealand, thy return with
V CD 7 t/
*he conviction that conditions for the school teacher in Vancouver
are not bad.
The further exchange of Inspector Brough of your staff for
Inspector McKenzie, thus far has proved highly satisfactory. Mr.
McKenzie brings to us new ideas, new inspiration and abounding'
optimism. He has fitted in to his new sphere remarkably; and
his reports on individual teachers, regarding whom he is not
handicapped by preconceived ideas, are both valuable and interesting. Mr. Brough is having splendid opportunities for observing new methods in Mr. McKenzie's inspectorate, and I trust
he will return to us next year the better for his year's absence.
General Obssrvation.
In closing, I wish to express my sincere appreciation of the
spirit manifested by the Vancouver School Board during the past
year. In the presence of many difficulties, school business has
been well conducted. The spirit of co-operation, ever present in
your deliberations, and the manifestation, at all times, of a set
purpose to be just in your dealings with others have made the
work of your employees a pleasure instead of irksome drudgery.
Never in mv experience, as Municipal Inspector of Schcols, has a
trustee board exerted a more wholesome influence on all its working forces than the Board of 1921.
Respectfully submitted.
J. S. GORDON,
Municipal Inspector of Schools. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
m
T. A. Brough, B.A.,
Assistant, Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Mr. Brough is exchanging for the school year 1921-'22 with Inspector N. R. McKenzie of New Zealand whose report follows. 32
BOARD OK SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF
f SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B.C.,
January 3rd, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.C.
Ib-ar Sir:
I beg to submit a report on my work since I came to Vancouver.
I armed in the city on September 4th, and entered upon my
duties when the schools opened on September 6th.
The first fort nigh* was spent mainly in the office and in the
Lord Roberts School, whore 1 had opportunities of becoming act-
tjuainted with the working of the local education system. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES        33
Since then my time has been devoted chiefly to inspecting
schools, attending me< tings and giving addresses on educational
subjects. Requests for addresses continue to come in, and I am
doing my best +o meet the demand, lt is very gratifying to find
such a keen interest shown in New Zealand and its educational
affairs.
Owing to the shortness of my Canadian experience and to the
peculiar circumstances of my appointment, I do not feel at liberty
to express myself as freely in a general report as I have been in
the habit of doing. There are, however, some remarks which*I
can make without committing a breach of the laws of hospitality
and good taste.
A great maioritv of the teachers whom I have visited are indus-
<D tr */
trious, enthusiastic and capable. Thev are a body of whom any citv
mav iustly feel proud. The meetings for professional studv held
periodically by the principals, the vice- principals and the teachers of special classes are beyond praise. I have found them an
unfailing source of inspiration to myself. It is to be hoped that
these study-circles may not only continue their fine work, but
that their influence may extend to the whole teaching staff.
I have made a thorough survey of the psychological clinic and
of all the special classes in the city. I am deeply impressed with
the ample provision which the school authorities have made for the
education of the handicapped children of the community, and
with the excellent manner in which the training is carried out by
the very able and enthusiastic ladies composing the special staff.
It would be a great boon to the children attending these
classes if they could ultimately be admitted to advanced special
classes in the Technical School, or some similar institution, where
thev could learn part of a trade in circumstances more congenial
* X. CD
and helpful than those commonly existing in ordinary work-shops.
I should like to see a much wider course of silent reading than
the courses usually provided in the schools which I have inspected. The very sound foundation laid in the primer classes should
make silent reading easy and pleasurable. Indeed, experience
proves that children will read with avidity if thev are allowed
access to the right kind of literature. However, books which
interest adults may be, and usually are, quite unsuitable for
evhildren. Again, it does not follow that boys and girls are interested in books of the same kind. All the leading British publishers issue series of inexpensive books graded to suit children of
any age from the infant classes upward.
The better readers might frequently be allowed to read books
of this type silently,  with  proper safe-guards,  while  their less 34
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
talented fellows receive the ordinary reading lesson. Every pupil
should be permitted to read silently at odd moments during
school hours after he has completed any set task such as drawing,
handwork or arithmetic. In my opinion, silent reading is of little
value if the subject matter.be not fresh, interesting and suited to
the mental, capacity of the child.
It is desirable that a library of such books should be formed
not only in every school but in every class, even the primer
classes. The cost is comparatively trifling, and I am sure that
the Parent-Teacher Associations will gladly extend the good work
which they have already begun in this direction.
The oral composition, which is capable of such extensive use
in connection with lessons in nearly every subject, is excellent in
some classes. Those teachers who do not fully appreciate the
possibilities of oral composition should give the matter their
earnest attention.
Much of the time now spent in giving drill in the meanings
of individual words would be more profitably occupied in giving
the children practice in reproducing the author's thought in other
words. If a child sees a Avord used in a variety of contexts he
will learn the meaning almost unconsciously. He should, however, know how to use a dictionary.
I am inclined to think that some teachers attempt to teach
the spelling of too many words. A child's writing vocabulary is
not very extensive. A high authority has proved experimentally
that if a child learns four new words each school day except
Friday, and revises the work each Friday, he will learn all necessary words during his school career. This plan assumes, of course.
that the words selected are those which the pupil will employ in
written] exercises.
In the State of New South Wales, Australia, the spelling
syllabus consists of two hundred words a year from prescribed
lists, together with all the words in which about twenty per cent,
of the pupils make mistakes in their ordinary written exercises.
The plan works well.
The practice of requiring pupils to exchange spelling exercises for correction is open to serious, objections and should be
discontinued.
In the teaching of history, geography and nature study,
greater use might with advantage be made of drawing, handwork
and literature. The excellent methods of correlation adopted in
the primer classes may. with appropriate modifications, be applied
to other classes.   This need not add to the teachers' burden, while 1-
undoubtedly make their work more interesting and effective.    It is difficult to over-estimate the value of   Irawing and
handwork  as teaching aids, while good historical novels or stories
of travel and adventure make a powerful appeal to school children.
A good collection of pictures, charts and diagrams should be
nsidered an essential part, of the equipment for teaching history
co
and geography. Suitable pictures can be obtained from illustrated papers and magazines. The pupils will usually enter heartily
into the work of collecting these.
A.t least one Vancouver school has a fine cinematograph with
which excellent work is done. An extension of this valuable
means of giving instruction is very desirable.
Teachers sometimes forget that nature study is a studv of
nature. A picture is usually not a satisfactory substitute for a
natural object. Not only should the actual object be at hand but,
if possible, it should be in its natural surroundings. This implies
outdoor study in many cases. Some plants should be cultivated
and some animals—such as moths and butterflies--should be
reared so that their life history may be noted. This is done in
some schools.
The poetic aspect of nature study should not be overlooked.
The child is more of a poet than a scientist.
I have been deeply interested in the fine system of medical
and dental inspection established in the city, and in the remedial
work undertaken. The supplying of milk to under-nourished
children cannot fail to have the beneficial effect which always
follows such treatment. The Parent-Teacher Associations deserve
great credit for their activity in this connection.
Most of the buildings, too, are impressive. Although buildings are not the most essential part of an education system, they
form a very necessary part of the equipment. If the unconscious
influence of one's surroundings and experiences is anything like
what modern science suggests, it is difficult to over-estimate the
value of comfortable and artistic school houses.
The Parent-Teacher Associations have extended to me the
privilege of attending and addressing a number of their meetings.
It appears to me that these organizations are a power for good
in the educational life of the city. Many admirable results of
their labour of love may be seen in the schools.
As you are aware, the principal object of my mission here is
to gain first-hand knowledge of the education systems of Canada
and the United States.    Thanks to your kindly advice, instrue- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
tion and assistance during our daily association, and to the opportunities of visiting the United States that you have afforded me,
I have acquired a fund of interesting and useful information which
should prove invaluable when I return to my distant home.
So far I have visited Honolulu, Blaine and Seattle in the
Great Republic, and have received the utmost courtesy from both
officials and teachers. No matter how busy the officials were,
they Sound time to discuss their system with me and to drive me
to schools of every type. The teachers wTere equally ready to
show their methods and the work of their schools.
1 should like, if I were able, to give adequate expression to
my sense of gratitude for all the kindnesses that have been showered upon mi family and mvself in Vancouver—-but words fail
me.
Nothing could be more cordial than the welcome that we have
received from everyone—the School Trustees and officials, the
University Staff, the Provincial inspectors, the principals and
teachers, Parent-Teacher Associations, the Press, the public and
last, but bv no means least, Mrs. Gordon and yourself. You have
made the conditions under which I am working simplv ideal.
CD L        t
I may add that the New Zealand Education Department has
vritttn expressing its high appreciation of the character of the
reception accorded to me.
Yours faithfully,
X. R. McKENZIE,
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
b /
REPORT OF MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B.C.,
fe - January 18th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:
The following is a repent of the work done by the Medical.
Department of the city .schools for the year 1921 :
Number of parents invited to examinations ..'..'.  2,414
Number of parents present at examinations  :.... 1,334
Number of children given physical examinations ...  8,232
Number of children given inspection     4,172
Number of children given inspection by nurses  3,910
-Defective vision, R .   §|  551
Defective vision. La-..    312 90
DO
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Eyestrain    -...
strabismus   - •-
Blepharitis	
Impaired hearing, R. ...	
Impaired hearing.  L .:.....	
Discharging ears, R	
Discharging ear?, L.	
Hardened way, R	
Hardened wax, L |	
Carious permanent teeth	
Oral sepsis	
Maloccl nsion 	
Mouth breathing	
Defective nasal breathing	
Malformation of palate 	
Enlarged tonsils	
Adenoids	
Goitre, simple	
Goitre, toxic	
Enlarged cervical glands	
Anaemia	
Nervous affections  -
Cardiac affections 	
Pulmonary affections, bronchial
Pulmonary affections, tubercular
Deformities of spine, postural ....
Deformities of spine, osseous	
Deformities of extremities	
Deformities of chest	
Flat feet 	
Hernia	
Special examinations 	
Refcf red by nurses	
* 19
70
130
76
77
26
11
115
•'■Jl
2 423
137
150
a! 94
183
oL»
1.617
148
31.1
6
121
110
17
252
74
9
168
19
15
59
m
9
196
Our routine work was similar to that af previous years.
The following is a list of health talks to various Parent-
Teacher a&d other organizations during the year. These dealt
particularly with* the health of the school children ■
January 3rd -Janitor Engineers. Laid ern Lecture on ''School
Hvgiene.'
January 20th —Bayview Parent-Teacher Association, "Nu?
triiion of School Children."
February 16th--Kiwanis Education  Committee
Open Air Schools for Delicate Children."
Value  of BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
' »o
March  8th—Mount   Pleasant   Parent-Teacher   Association,
"School Feeding for Undernourished Children."
March 21st—Fairview Parent-Teacher Association, "Malnutrition, its cause, prevalence, remedy."
March 23rd—General Gordon Parent-Teacher Association,
"Malnutrition, its cause, prevalence, remedy."
March 30th—Attended Conference of School Medical Health
Oflieers in Victoria, B.C.
April 6th—-Simon Fraser Parent-Teacher Association, "Undernourished School Children,"
April 13ill—Kitsilano Parent-Teacher Association, "Undernourished School Children."
Mav 11th—Alexandra Parent-Teacher Association, "Com-
municable Diseases and their Relation to School Children."
November 2nd—Queen Mary Parent-Teacher Association,
"Communicable Diseases and their Relation to School Children.'
Nov. 16—Health Department of Board of Trade, "Health
Work in Our Schools."
Nov. 23rd.—North Vancouver Parent-Teacher Association,
Lantern Lecture on "School Hygiene."
We had eighteen accident cases at the schools in 1921, during
school hours, many of a verv serious nature. Of these, two had
fractured arms; two fractured legs, and one fractured collar
bone. First Aid was rendered, fractures reduced, limbs properly
set, and X-Ray taken to see that everything w^as in proper condition; they were then referred to their own family doctors for
further treatment. Almost all the remaining cases were lacerations of some part of the body, due to injury. Each case received
surgical attention as part of the First Aicl treatment.
During the last two vears, we had been asked by the Provin-
cial and City Health authorities, to give more consideration to
vaccination than had been done in the past. This was necessary
from the fact that smallpox: was becoming more and more prevalent among school children. During the first six months of the
year, fourteen school children were victims of the disease. The
Trustees, therefore, felt this was an urgent matter, and insisted on
the Health Act, with regard to vaccination, being carried out.
AVhen school opened in September the teachers were instructed to
comply with the Act. Vaccination centres were established in
various schools, the Vancouver General Hospital and School Board
Office Building, where children could be vaccinated free of charge. 40
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Many hundreds took advantage of the clinics. In October ihe
foil owing data was secured from the various school Principals,
which gives an accurate account of how many school children
had been vaccinated:
Number enrolled  .-.     18,590
Number vaccinated   10,553,
Number insusceptible        789
Number eonseienlious objectors     5,818
Number net complying with the demand ..-     1,430
In the early part of the term, Mr. Fergusson, Principal of
9/ 1 CD * i.
King Edward High School, was desirous of having a course in
First Aid given to some of the cadets of his school. The Board
of School Trustees granted me permission to give the required
instruction. The first lecture was delivered to October 20th, aijd
each succeeding Thursday till the end of the fall session. As the
course has not been completed, the lectures will continue after
tin4 opening of school in January. This instruction, in my opinion, is of inestimable value to every student in the class, and
woul I be of similar value to all High School students, boys and
girls alike, if it could be made possible for them to have it. We
hope the Trustees may be able to extend this course to more
students in the future.
R espectfully sul\mi11ed,
ROBERT WI.GHTM A %       §
Chief Medical Officer.
!agz3ES^J!agEg^ya9^^K^^yy^^r,^^g 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 41
REPORT OF THE NURSING STAFF
Vancouver, B.C.,
January 18th, 1922.
Dr. R. Wight man,
Chief School Medical Officer, - •   '
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:
i. be^ to submit the following report of the School Nursing
Department for the year 1921:
A similar service to that outlined in our report of last year
has been maintained.
Owing to the natural increase in the school population, it was
found necessary to appoint an additional nurse in September—
the staff now numbers nine. With this addition it was possible
to so arrange our work as to permit of more frequent visits to
schools, the value of which has been already demonstrated. Five
of our largest schools now receive a daily service, and in several
cases where schools were only visited twice a wTeek, we are now
visiting three times. We hope that the coming year will see an
extension of the Nursing Service to the high schools.
The reorganization of the dental clinics, whereby the school
nurses have taken entire charge of arranging appointments, has
been most satisfactory; While causing a great deal of extra work
for the nurses, they have felt amplyr repaid by the more prompt
treatment which is arranged, due to the saving of time by eliminating so many broken appointments. I am told by the Chief School
Dentist, Dr. Pall en, that from the dentists' standpoint also> the
new system is giving satisfaction.
The Little Mothers' classes were attended with fairly good
success. Classes were held in seven centres, with a total attendance of two hundred and sixty-six. Certificates were granted to
one hundred and seventy-nine. We feel very grateful for the
interest taken in these classes by Trustee Mrs. Macaulay, "who, in
addition to visiting and addressing each class, offered a prize to
the class having the best average attendance throughout the
course. This prize was won by the Strathcona School. These
classes were again organized this fall in eight centres, under a 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
slightly different name, and are now known as the Girls' Health
Club.
Our rer>ort of last vear showed that in five schools we were
A. 5f
endeavoring to improve the condition of the underweight children
and the children suffering from malnutrition, by serving milk
twice a day. It is gratifying to report that this service has been
extended and at the present time milk is being served in twenty
schools, approximately twenty-one hundred pints being served
daily. The parents have co-operated most heartily, and wherever
possible liave undertaken the expense connected with it. We wish
to take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation of the
interest, and also of the financial assistance given us by the Municipal Chapter of the I. 0. D. E., the McGill Women Graduates'
Society of Vancouver, and the various Parent-Teacher Associations, which enable us to provide milk for children requiring* it,
and whose parents are unable to do so. The hearty co-operation
and help given us by the teachers has been greatly appreciated,
indeed without their help this service could not be given. We
wish to thank them for so cheerfully and willingly undertaking
%/ CD     t/ CD
a task which has proved of such importance to the children.
A course in Public Health Nursing has been established by
the University of British Columbia, and in compliance with their
request and with the approval of the Board of School Trustees,
this department has assisted in giving the course. In addition to
lectures, practical work in the schools has been given to twenty-
four nurses. The establishment of this course is of great importance to both the City and the Province, as nurses trained in Public
Health work will now be available when vacancies requiring this
type of trained worker occur.    Previously it was necessary to
«/     -I. */ m.
accept nurses without training in this branch, or to bring them
from other parts of the country whore such courses are given. It
is iidw generally recognized that hospital training alone does not
fit nurses for Public Health Nursing, of which School Nursing is
a part.
In addition to lectures to University students, twenty-three
addresses and demonstrations were given to various organizations
hy this department.
Tn concluding this report. I wish to thank the members of
the School Board, the officials, principals and teachers for the
co-operation and assistance accorded the Nursing staff.
The following is the statistical report.—
Number of pupils assisted S. M. 0. in examining.     12,404
Number of pupils Inspected ._     87,529 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
43
Number of pupils excluded	
Number of pupils re-admitted 	
Number of notices sent to parents  ...	
Number of treatments in school climes 	
Number of pupils received treatments for physical defects
Number of pupils treated by family physicians 	
Number of pupils treated by family dentist 	
Number of pupils treated by school dentist  	
Number of pupils referred to clinics at General Hospital
Pediatric   clinic       3S
Ear, nose and throat, clinic ...     122
Skin clinic       10
Number of pupils referred to Rotary clinic	
Number of pupils referred to Eye specialists for free
treatment    :	
Number of pupils referred to school dental clinic 	
Number of pupils referred, to School Medical Officer	
Number of visits to hospitals or specialists 	
Number of visits to schools 	
Number of visits to homes	
Number of Little Mothers' classes held ,	
Number of cultures taken	
Number of cultures reported positive :	
Number of consultations with parents at school  .
Number of pupils supplied with glasses free of charge ....
Number of pupils supplied with glasses partially paid for
690
1.821
11,158
8,126
3,174
567
1,712
643
167
21
75
994
1,068
61
2,605
4.040
140
885
17
186
39
9
Skin Diseases.
Eczema  33
Impetigo  898
Pediculosis  717
'Ringworm  128
Scabies    .*   185
Unclean    .  103
Miscellaneous  3,052
Communicable Diseases.
Disease
Mumps   ...
Chicken pox   	
Whooping Cough
Diphtheria 	
Found
Found
at Home
in School
Total
310
157
467
117
68
185
15
7
22
3
Q
O 44        BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Measles                     30                   4 34
Scarlet fever                     6        -|:       3 9
Conjunctivitis                      1                  33 34
Report on Physical Inspections by Nurses
Number examined  j .-..  3,910
Number referred to S. M. 0  546
Number notices sent   860
Defective speech  15
Blepharitis   j   43
Discharging ears, right  7
Discharging ears, left  :....: : :  §
Carious permanent teeth   77fi
Oral sepsis  44
Malocclusion    a _::;.... ;.: : ;  59
Malnutrition     ...-.  173
Respectfully submitted,
ELIZABETH G. BREEZE, R.N.,
Head Nurse
A ^
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
&
DENTAL DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B.C ,
•| January   19th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:
I beg leave to submit the annual report for the Dental Department for the year 1922.
This Department has been in operation the entire year, with
the exception of the months of July and August. As it was previously arranged to close the Clinic during the summer holidays,
this has been carried out with more or less satisfaction to all
concerned.
This year we closed the travelling clinic and diverted the
equipment to the  Strathcona  School  and set  up  a  permanent BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Clinic in that portion of the city to look after the children in that
district. This clinic is doing excellent work and has sufficient
material to keep it going for the next three years.
During the year we had 3,551 appointments. We gave 653
treatments; we inserted 3,058 fillings; we gave prophylaxis to
559 children, and had 470 pay patients. We completed 1,021
cases.
We have seen many changes in the arrangement of the Dental
Clinic, in that the system of appointments has been entirely chang.
ed. The appointments are now in the hands of the school nurses,
who make all assignments to the different clinics, and J. might
mention here that with the co-operation of Miss Breeze, it has
worked out to a tremendous success. It has practically eliminated
all broken appointments, which was one of the greatest difficulties
we had to contend with in this Department. The school nurse is
assigned certain days at our Clinic, and these days are arranged
so the school nurse is at the particular school and sees to it that
the child leaves in sufficient time to be at whatever Clinic it is
assigned to, so that you can see this has eliminated entirely
waste time.
I regret to report on account of the labour situation, we have
not had as many pay patients as we had hoped to have, many of
the. applications coming from parents who are out of work and
the school nurse feels she is compelled to recommend free treatment. However, in spite of this, the Clinic has collected considerable fees which have more than paid for the material supplied.
In closing I would like to extend my appreciation to the
Medical Department and to the nursing staff for their help and
co-operation, also to all officials of the School Board, principals
and teachers.
Respectfully submitted,
R. L. P ALLEN/
Chief Dental Officer.
j
-l BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 47
PSYCHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B.C.,
January 6th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour of submitting to you the report of the
Psychological Department for the vear 1922.
At the beginning of the vear the Observation Class was re-
C * CD i
established, a step which was invaluable to the work of this department. By means of it we are able to study children under
conditions which we can control, give them as long observation as
we find necessary, and by means of thorough standard examina^
tions determine their real pedagogical standing in the various
subjects. When a child has been studied in this way at the clinic
a full report of his standing in school, his temperament, interests
and abilities or disabilities can be given to his teacher, whether
he is returned to his own grade or placed in a Special Class.
During the year the Social Service Work has been carried
on by Miss Cantelon, who has proved well suited to the work and
extremely interested in it. This work might be divided into two
branches—the school work and the follow-up work. The former
consists in finding suitable work for Special Class pupils leaving
school, keeping in touch with their progress and in general watching to see that no mis-step that might be avoided will undo the
special training which they have had.
Both branches of the work have proved of great importance
and fully justify the appointment of a worker in this field. We
have always felt a pride that our Board saw the value of such
work and made the appointment at a time when other Special
Class systems in Canada, and those with which we were most
familiar in the United States, had no such worker. I may add
that Seattle has now a follow-up worker.
The Special Class system for subnormal children covers the
city as a wdiole quite satisfactorily at the present time. With the
exception of the Beaconsfield district there is a class within reach
of every school and the outlying districts are well served. The
greatest need for more classes is in the congested neighborhoods, BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
such as Mount Pleasant and Lord Roberts. In the former a junior
class is needed. The latter has no class at all, but could probably
fill both a junior and a senior class.
When examining in the schools attention is drawn to many
children to v:hom the general school work is by no means fitted.
These children have successfully learned to read, write and do
mechanical arithmetic, but subjects requiring the higher mental
processes, reasoning and abstract thinking are too difficult, because those processes have failed to fully develop in the child.
The parents of these children may be ambitious to keep them at
school beyond the age of fourteen, and yet they are making no
progress and are capable of making none. By courtesy they may
be placed in an entrance class, but they can never master the
work.
One is loath to recommend a parent to take a .child out of
school earlier than the parent wishes to withdraw him, especially
under present industrial conditions when it is almost impossible
to place a girl or boy in any position where he or she would learn
a trade. The solution for these children is a curriculum composed
of practical, motivated, academic work, with a large amount of
work and domestic arts. Such a curriculum would be found in a
junior technical school. It would relieve the upper grades of
many of tl eir constant repeaters—the pupils who are the most
expense to a school system.
Of children with special disabilities, the ones most often
found in the schools are cases of aphasia and speech defect, such
as stammering and extreme lisping. No complete survey has been
made for children with speech defects, but from the number
encountered casually. I believe a permanent speech class would
be of benefit to the school system. Such a class would be ungraded and children would remain in it only as long as special methods
of training were necessary. The teacher would have to be trained specially for work of this kind.
Psychological work in schools was begun in connection with
subnormal children, but of recent years interest in the superior
child has more and more increased. With the realization of
extraordinary endowment in a child the need of a richer, broader
course of study for him is recognized. Many schools of pedagogy
have been'working on the problem of how to give these children
work which will best develop their unusual ability. As yet
special treatment for these children is in an experimental stage.
Willi the establishment of a school of experimental education and
psychological   research   in   coniioction   with   the   University   or
-"S BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
49
Normal School, a class of superior children would be of great
value, both to the students and to the children. At the present
time what Ave can do for these children is first to recognize them
and then to make sure that their powers do not rust from lack of
use, and that their work is always difficult enough to hold their
interest.
As a large school system, with countless problems to meet,
the Trustees are necessarily anxious that the money expended on
education should be used to the very best advantage. We all
know that many improvements in methods and curriculum are
possible, and it is my belief that an experimental school could be
established in conection with the city system which would solve
many pedagogical problems. Such a school would be little, if
any, additional expense. As we are so far from schools of this
kind we cannot have their work demonstrated to us; but if we
had in our own citv such work carried on, it would doubtless
vitalize the whole system and establish for Vancouver a leadership in educational matters, not only in British Columbia, but
throughout all the western provinces.
The details regarding the Avork done by Miss Amos and Miss
Cantelon are given in their reports, which I herewith enclose.
Both ha\re given themselves enthusiastically to their Avork and
shown great aptitude in their particular duties.
Respectfully7 submitted,
RUBY A. KERR,
Director, Psychological Department.
£&<Xlu>ir,    <f.MA 50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
OBSERVATION CLASS.
Vancouver, B. C ,
January 6th, 1922.
Miss Ruby Kerr,
Psychological Clinic,
School Board
Dear Madam:
ce.
I beg to submit the folloAving report on the activities of the
Observation Class:'
After being closed for a period of six months, the Observation Class was re-opened in February, 1921. During the year 163
•children—101 boys and 62 girls—have passed through the class,
remaining from one to three days.
During his attendance at the class each child is given tests
in reading, spelling, arithmetic and language to discover his
pedagogical attainment. He is also given further tests to ascertain his attention, memory, motor co-ordination and mechanical
ability. The games and play actiA7ities of the class also offer
opportunity for close observation of the direction of the child's
greatest interest and any specific ability he may have.
In addition to the work of the Observation Class, I have assisted in giving individual and group tests in various schools of
the city.
Respectfully submitted,
!;•   ^^^-- MAUDE A.AMOS,
Teacher, Observation Class. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
51
D
SOCIAL SERVICE WORK.
Vancouver, B.C.,
January 5th, 1922.
Miss R. Kerr,
Director of Psvehological Clinic.
*/ CD
Dear Miss Kerr:
I IiaA^e much pleasure in presenting the report of the Social
Service Department-for the past year.
Man a- homes Avere Arisited to secure information concerning
the heredity and environment of the children placed in Special
Classes. These children, Avho are school problems, Ave usually
find are also home problems. The mothers realize this and are anxious for any co-operation Ave can give, and are most anxious to
talk over the problems. The parents are nearly always very appreciative of the Avork being done in the school to try and place the
children where they can accomplish the work in the way best
adaptable to their needs.
In cases where children Avere not mentally ready for school,
the parents Avere advised to keep them home for a term or send
them to kindergarten. Other parents were advised to take their
•children from school and place them at suitable Avork, when the
children seemed unable to receive any further training in school.
» CD
There are many parents in the city avIio have serious problems in
eonnection Avith their low-grade children—many of them imbeciles.
These parents look to our Department for help in connection with
the transferring of their children to Essondale. We were pleased
to be of service to these parents.
The "folloAV-up' Avork in connection with the boys and girls
who haAre left our Special Classes was most interesting and encouraging. These boys and girls seem to „be making good in the
industrial Avorld. and their parents, in many cases, give great
credit to the Special Class for the extra training in hand-work
7.hey received Avhile there. SeAreral of our former pupils working
on "piece Avork' in factories have been able to advance very
quickly and are making aboAre the usual Avage—one girl making as
high as $22.00 a week. Many others are learning trades in which
there is a good chance for advancement, and both parents and
employers, in most eases, give very encouraging reports of their
progress.   The parents are pleased to think Ave are still interested BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
11 lie welfare of their children, and are anxious to co-operate with
us for tfieir adA^ancement.
Surveys have been made of factories and business houses, and
the employers in charge have shoAvn great interest in our work by
their Avillingness to co-operate with us in the placing of many of
our pupils. If conditions Avere not so unsettled in the business
world, and if factories Avere Avorking at full strength, there are
other lines of Avork our pupils could enter, and in Avhich I am
sure they Avould make good. These openings will be kept in view
so our pupils may benefit Avhen normal times are restored.
It is interesting that the special lines of handwork taken up
in our classes prove their value in the kind of trades for which
our childia n are best suited. Dressmaking, millinery, furniture
making,, carpentry, etc., are lines of Avork in which our children
have become interested in their classes, and in a large number of
cases they are the lines they Avish to folIoAV Avhen they take up
their work. In a very marked degree the education and training
of rhese children in the Special Classes prove a productive expenditure of public funds.
In the interests of the Department to find further information concerning our pupils, visits Avere necessary to many institu-
tions as the Mothers' Pensions Board, the Oeneral Hospital, Orphanages, the Community House,.the Court House, the Children's
Aid, the Juvenile Court, etc.
Through the generosity of the Elks' Relief Committee, Ave
Avere able to Kelp many of our families, especially in obtaining
shoes for i he children. We sincerely thank them for their kind
assistance.
It has been a great pleasure to Avork Avith you and M3iss
Dauphinee in the interests of these children, and I appreciate
very much the opportunity of serving in this connection.
Respectfully submitted,
JEAN M. CANTELON,
Social Service Worker. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Jo
SPECIAL CLASSES.
Vancouver, B. C ,
December 31st, 1921.
J. S. Gordon, Escj.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver. B. C.
Dear Sir:
The year 1921 has been marked by progress in Special Class
work. In .January there Ave re fifteen of these classes in our
schools. After the summer A^acation four more were added,
making nineteen in all and caring for about tAAro hundred and
fifty pupils, exclusive of the Detention Home, which has pupils of
all mental types. It is surprising to find an occasional boy testr
ing several years aboAA age in this class and seems to prove that
exceptionally bright children often get into .mischief and finally
end in Juvenile Court because suitable Avork has not been pro-
Arided in qualitAA and quantitA^ to suit the mental ability with
Avhich nature has so generously endowed them. A special class
of twenty-five such children in one of the larger school units, in
Avhieh each pupil Avas alloAved to progress at his or her own rate
of learning, would proATe its value in our school system. The
nineteen special classes and teachers are scattered throughout
the ehw schools so as to best fill the needs of the several schools of
the neighborhood, the School Board paying transportation Avhere
the distances are long, as between General Gordon and Henry
Hudson, or GrandAdeAV and Laura Secord.
At the beginning of February, it Avas found necessary to
move the Mr. Pleasant Special Class to FahwieAw Avhere there
Avas a vacant room, and thus give Mt. Pleasant an extra class-
room for the incoming pupils. In September, this class Avas
moved back to Mt. Pleasant School.
The classes are situated as foIIoavs :—
Central    Elsie M. Frith
Cecil  Rhodes v ..Amie F. Wilkinson
Dawson   U    Grace Maclean
Dawson 11. Christine Murray
FairvieAAr  Harriet BroAvn
Florence Nightingale I Edith M. Gibbs BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Florence Nightingale II Annabel Guest
**-   ■"- > v CD CD
Grenfell  (Children's Aid)   Margaret Spouse
Henry  Hudson  I  Evelina Sutherland
Henry Hudson II Isabelle Calbick
Laura Second I Ethyl M. Barnard -
Laura Secord II" Mary E. Story
Mount Pleasant  Christine A. McKenzie
Macdonald    - Hazel McNeill    |
Seymour ..Ella J. Herd
Simon Fraser  Katherine E. Buckerfield
Strathcona   .1 "Edith M. Quigley -        '
Strathcona If Rita R. Graham
Detention Home Jean M. Leach
The four new classes were opened at Cecil Rhodes, DaAvson,
Grenfell and Macdonald.
The Observation Class Avas re-opened at the beginning of
February Avith Miss Maude Amos in charge.
Miss Cant el on succeeded Miss Clark in the Social Service
Department. Miss Clark going to the University of California to
L <~ CD */
take advanced work in this line.
As in Special Class Avork Ave lay much emphasis on Manual
work,   we   haA^e   continued  Basketrv.   Toy-making,   Bead-work,
t,    7 t/ O 7 7
Sewing. Knitting, Crocheting, Brush-making and have added two
neAv stvles of brushes, shawl-making, and many new toA^s.    In
t/ CD ? «/ 9-
the Alanual Training classes, the older pupils have made couches,
moM'is chairs, lamps, gramophone stands, humidors, etc. A
great deal of this work the children birv themselves, and in that
« 7
case simply pay for material. But the remainder Avas gathered
from each school and a sale of Avork Avas held in December, realizing eighty-one dollars ($81.00), Avhieh Avill be turned back into
stock. Through the kindness of a local firm, Ave are able to buy
sewing machines at cost, of whieh four have been purchased this
year, also one gramophone, making in all, eight gramophones
bought by Special Classes.
Fov the mental work we have inaugurated a system of tests
in arithn (tic. rate and comprehension of reading, spelling, lan-
guag( and writing to be given three times in the school year0
Tin1 results, tabulated on graphs shoAving progress, lack of progress or retrogression of the pupil, are given to each teacher and
a copy is kept on file in the office.
Miss Cantelon, in the course of her folloAv-up work for
these pupils, has compiled a report of those leaving Special Class
during the a ear, of whom there Avere twenty-one. six girls and
fifteen boys.    The girls are in millinery and cancU^ making, two BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ob
clerks and one helping at home, earning from $7.50 to $12.50 a.
week. The boys are mostlv learning trades, ba'ery, automobile
factory (a very high grade case), broom-making, furniture factory. farm-AVorb, nail factory, which shoAvs their natural 'nent.
Twenty of these cases are so far satisfactory to their employers,
one onh during tin- year has not made good. In my opinion they
are too young to go into the world to learn-a trade, and aaIicu ihe
money is forthcoming would reiterate my appeal for a Trade
School, where they could learn these trades Achile still continuing
their school work. Should the school age be raised to sixteen the
Trade School will be an imperatiAre necessity.
During the year the Thursday class for teachers has been
addressed by Miss Mary Aid McKenzie and Dean Coleman of the
U. B. C, Dr. J. C. MacKay of the Mental Clinic of the General
Hospital, and Miss Kerr, Miss Breeze and Miss Cantelon of our
own staff. One day of each month has been given to the teachers
to demonstrate original wTork and ideas, Avhich they haA^e carried
out successfully for the benefit of the whole group.
Our vi.Mt to the Boys' Industrial School at Point Grey before
its removal to Coquitlam. Avas most enjoyable, and we are grate
ful to Mr. and Mrs. Brankin for their kindly reception.
T'»e Special Classes sent a large and varied exhibit of hand-
Avork to the Vancouver Exhibition in August, the teachers giving
their time each afternoon and evening to explain the nature of
the work to those interested. To the teachers' zeal, interest and
energy the success of the years work is largely due.
To the heads of each Department of our school Avork, I
Avould extend the thanks of the Special Class teachers and myself.
We haA^e received so much kindness and consideration from each
and every one that it would be hard to particularize.
Looking foiward hopefully to the coming year, Ave feel that
the needs of the sub-normal child in our Public Schools are being
CD
well met. With nineteen or at the most twenty Special Classes,
as our school population stands at present, we can give them the
education suited t<> their mental equipment. With tin's class provided for, Ave would urge the Board to study the need for Special
Chnv-es for •xeeptionally bright children, for stammerers and the
physically defective. All who differ from the normal, mentally
or physically^ are Avorthy of eArery consideration and chance at
econo !iic success from the Board of Education.
Respectfully submitted,
A. JOSEPHINE DAUPIIIXEE,
Supervisor, Special (lasses. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PHYSICAL TRAINING, CADET CORPS AND RIFLE TEAMS
Vancouver, B.C.,
December 31st, 1921.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir;
I beg to submit the folloAving report on the marginally noted
subjects for the year ending December 3.1st, 1921.
Physical Training.
I am pleased to state that the past year has been marked by
steady progressive methods of teaching the tables of exercises as
prescribed by the official syllabus of physical training.
This, hoAve\rer, does not mean that there is no further opportunity and necessity for bringing our present system, as outlined,
to greater perfection. From careful observations I have found
all ieachers doing their best for the benefit of the pupils, but have
been somoAvhat retarded in teaching the more advanced move-
jaciits of general actfvhw. OAving to Aveather conditions.      It is
^ • CD
beyond argument that this subject is recognized as of great importance, the conception of physical education has broadened
and the term "school drill" does no longer apply.
Strathcona Trust, 1909.
The Strathcona Trust Syllabus, 1901;. Avhieh has been in use
for several years, and Avhich has proven very satisfaetoiw, Avas a
splendidly arranged and. well thought out system and Avhen properly studied and taught systematically by the teacher, could
not fail to be of great benefit, pro Adding the exercises Avere performed with the proper amount of effort and vigour by the
pupils. This system, was in use up to the last month of the year
when a in w syllabus was authorized for use.
Syllabus—Physical Training, 1919.
While mudi progress has indeed been made during the year,
it must be admitted that the introduction of the new syllabus
caused a check for the folloAving reasons:— BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 57
(a)—Teachers Avere not conversant Avith arrangement of
tables.
(b)—The change of commands for the same results as heretofore.
(c)—That the existing conditions and facilities in our schools
are not so adeouate as one would wish for the carrving out of the
system as now recommended.
Since the recently issued syllabus specializes in. games and
movements of general activity, and is well compiled, it can readily
be understood that floors, footwear, costumes and space are factors Avhich prevent the more specialized and massive exercises
being attempted.
However, bv arrangement, teachers Avere met and instruction
given concerning the construction and general arrangement' of
syllabus, how to proceed with lessons and tables of exercises, together Avith the allotment of lessons for each grade for the balance
of the school term.
Before closing this subject, which could be continued almost
indefinitely, I desire to state that having checked the 1919 syllabus, I am inclined to the belief that the previous issue (1909)
With corrections, as necessary, is still the more suitable one for
our conditions, and more specially as it blends more satisfactorily with the commands used in the cadet drill, Avhich I always
understood was part of the original conditions of the Strathcona
Trust. I am also inclined to think that it may not be long before
the 1919 issue is either revised or replaced.
Prize  Awards
Prizes awarded by the local committee of the Strathcona
Trust for efficiency in plrysieai training during 1920-21 were presented to the following:
1st Prize, Division    2—Aberdeen School, Mr. H. L. Paget.
* CD
2nd Prize, 4—Mt. Pleasant School, Miss Pearson.
3rd Prize, 14—Dawson School, Miss Williams.
1st Prize, 1—Lord Tennyson School, Mr. R. Straight.
2nd Prize, "        2—General Gordon School, Mr. G. P. Young.
1st  Prize, 6—Henry Hudson School, Miss Middlemiss.
3rd Prize, 4—Henry  Hudson   School,   Miss   Suggitt.
Routine Movements.
The usual routine movements as recpiired for the daily handling of classes, such as assembling, dismissing, class arrangements BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
for exercises and fire drill, remain the same as in the past and
have received the necessary attention.
Cadet Corps.
in reviewing the activities of the cadet corps for the year, J,
am pleased to report steady progress;
On March 11th, 1921, a course of signalling for cadets was
commenced a1 the Horse Show Building. One hundred and fifty
applications were received but as not sufficient instructors, were
available only forty-five cadets Avere enrolled^ At the end of six
weeks only twenty-three were attending. This number took the
examination on the termination of the school and twenty were
successful in qualifying, the following report being received in
due course.
11 M.D. 27—6—1
The folloAving cadets from the 101st Cadet R-egiment Vancouver, B. C. have attended a cadet day Signalling Class at the
Horse Show Building, Georgia St, Vancouver from 14-3-21—28-4-
21, have passed the prescribed examinations and have been awarded cadet Semaphore Signalling certificates. Each cadet has been
forwarded a bonus cheque for $5.00 in accordance with M.O. 20
D/12-1-21.
Cadet  R. T. M  Kinney
D. X. McMillan
J. S. Sledding.
H. T. Scott.
H. I). King.
C. O. Campbell.
G. A. Grassie.
W. T. (irier.
A    I).  Russell.
G. Ellis.
D. \v\ Elstead.
j j
Cadet E. W. Hamilton.
E. Dubeau.
R. Xoble.
R. Meredith.
R. Tremblay.
Gillson.
(J. Wooding.
W. B. Grant.
S* Baigent.
> J        m
i j
Captain C.P.S.C.
district Signalling Officer, M.D. 11
On April 4th an application to form a corps at the Livingstone School was received. The necessary documents were completed, forwarded to the Department of Education, and finally io
the I. C. S., M. D.. XTo. 11, for transmission to Headquarters for
official recognition. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
59
Inspection of Corps.
The annual inspection of corps was commenced on Wednesday, May 18th. 1921, and continued to completion according to
schedule arranged. All corps, except that of the Kitsilano School
which was not inspected, passed very creditably.
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Explanations of abbreviations: Appearance, Marching Past,
Company Drill, Platoon Drill, Rifle Exercises, Physical Training.
Attack, Extended Order, Officers and Non Commissioned Officers, 60
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The Cadet Regimental cups were awarded and presented as
is the procedure annually. The Provincial trophy, donated by
the Vancouver Chapter I. 0. D. E., for the most efficient corps in
B. C, was won by the K. E. IT. S. cadets under the able instruction
of Capt. P. Fairey. The Tennyson corps were adjudged the winners of the Thorn Cup. and other corps were presented with the
usual cups according to marks awarded. Military Drill prizes
were also awarded by the Local Committee of the Strathcona
Trust. ' S        . "
Cadet Camp.
A camp for cadets was authorized to be held at Sidney, V. I.,
commencing June 27th and concluding duly 3rd, 1921. Altogether 558 of all ranks of the cadet regiment embarked and returned safely, except for a few minor accidents, which occurred
during play. I believe the camp was very much enjoyed by all
who had the privilege of participating and was considered to be
a reward for the cadet year training at school.
At the commencement of the school term another application
was received for the formation of two corps at the Vancouver
Technical School. On October 3rd the documents were forwarded
through the usual channels and the corps duly gazetted.
Also on December 3rd application was made for the formation of a corps at the Central School to which the necessary atten-
tion was given.
Organization and Establishment
No. 101st Schools Cadet Regiment
Vancouver, B. C, 1921.
Staff .
Hon. Colonel J. S. Gordon, B.A., Municipal Inspector of Schools
Regimental ('omander   Capt. A. C. Bundy, C.S.OI.
Regimental Adjutant  Capt. R. P. Steeves, I.F.  of C.
Regimental Instructor of Musketry .... Major H. B. King, I.F. of C.
Medical Officer, R. Wightman, M.D., Chief School Medical Officer
Chaplain  Rev. A. H. Sovereign
No. 1 (High School) Battalion.
Battalion Commander  Capt. S. M. Moodie, I.F. of C.
Hon. Battalion Commander Capt. A. I). Banting, M.C., R.G.A. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 61
Second in Command Capt. F. Fairey, I.F. of C.
Adjutant Lt. L. W. Taylor, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co.—K. E. H. School Lt. P. C. Tees     209
j> co _K. G. H. School Capt. S. M. Moodie      167
C Co.—Britannia School Lt. L. W. Taylor      217
D Co.—Technical   School   Capt. F. Fairey     241
E Co.—Technical   School   .Capt. F. Fairey      133
Total   (all  ranks)        967
No. 2 Battalion.
Battalion Commander Lt. W. J. Nesbitt, C.S.C.I.
Battalion Adjutant Lt. S. J. Bryant, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co.—Chas Dickens C. C Lt. J. Dunbar  50
B. C—Simon Fraser C. C Lt. C. B. Crowe   87
C. Co.—Model C. C Lt. W. J. Nesbitt  132
D Co.—Cecil Rhodes C. C Lt. G. Bruce   45
E. Co.—Fairview C. C Lt. S. J. Bryant   112
F Co.—Livingstone C. C Lt. F. 'C. Boyes  50
Total   (all ranks)        476
No. 3 Battalion.
Battalion Commander  Mjr. H. B. King, I.F. of C.
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. R. Straight,  C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co.—Tennyson C.C Lt. R. Straight      Ill
B Co.—Gen. Gordon C.C Mjr. H. $. King       80
C Co.—Kitsilano C. C Lt. T. W. Wopdhead ....      65
D Co.—Henry Hudson C. C, -Lt, A. E. Shearman        88
Total (all ranks)       344
No. 4 Battalion
Battalion Commander  Capt. D. P. McCallum, C.S.C.L
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. J. R. Pollock, C.S.C.L 62
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Corps
A Co.—Dawson C.C. ...
J3 Co.—Dawson Jr. C.C.
•C Co.—Roberts C.C ...
j) (/0—Aberdeen C.C. .
E Co.—Central C.C	
Instructors
.Lt. P. MeCreery 	
Lt. I R. Pollock 	
Capt. D. F. McCallum
Lt. H. L. Paget	
Lt. H. D. Herd 	
Establishment
       91
       65
..    280
..      41
88
Total  (all ranks)       565
No. 5 Battalion.
Battalion Commander  Lt. H. B. Fitch, C.S.C.L
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. F. A. Jewett, C.S.C.L
p
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Co.—Lord Nelson 0. C Lt. F. A. Jewett     160
B Co.—Alexandra  C.C Lt. T. V. Clarke      120
C Co.—Grandview C.C Lt. H. B. Fitch        64
D Co.—Laura Secord C.C Lt. J. M. Buckley        60
Total (all ranks)      404
No. 6 Battalion.
Battalion Commander  Lt.  C. Logan, C.S.C.I.
Battalion Adjutant Lt. F. C. Boves, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors
A Co.—Franklin C.C Lt. H. T. Gamey
B Co.—Hastings C.C1 Lt. C. Logan	
C Co.—Macdonald C.C :..Lt. F. C. Boyes .
I) Co.—Strathcona   C€ Mr. -I. E. Brown
Establishment
i O
92
56
180
Total (all ranks)      401
Summary of Establishment'
Staff   6  ■
instructors   26
I   Battalions  6
Corps...         28
Bands  1
Cadets   (all   ranks)        3157
Total establishment of Regiment 3224
As the total regimental establishment stood at 2687 for the
year 1920, and 3224 for 1921, an increase of 537 has been made
for that period. 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Public Schools Rifle Team Scores
Corips.
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Prizes won.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
is.
16.
17.
18.
1!).
20.
21.
Henry  Hudson
Alexandra 	
Cecil  Rhodes  ...
Charles Dickens
Lord Nelson	
Fairview	
Simon Fraser ...
Model -	
Laura Secord	
Grandview 	
Hastings	
Tennyson 	
Aberdeen 	
Lord Roberts ...
Dawson B 	
Strathcona	
Macdonald 	
General Gordon
Franklin	
Dawson A 	
Kitsilano   	
6 11587
6
6
6
6
b
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
|
5
A
2
1583
1503
1483
11455
iti§
1443
1440
!1680j264.50!Ch,allenge Shield
i        j |    and Tait Medals
il680J263.83|News Advertiser Cuo
jl680|250.50jWorld Clip    |
!l680|]247.16|Province Cup
!l680J242.50|Townley Cup
!1680!242.50|O. B. Allen Cup
J1680J240.50|
16801240.001
1.37611680
184011680
1275|1680
1228J1680
1195J1400
1064J1400
1053! 1400
104011400
10001400
96211120
940 1100
84511120
3611 560
990 QQ
212.50
212,50
239.00
212.80
210.60
208.00
200.00
240.50
188.00
211.25
180.501 64
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Individual Aggregates.
1. Cadet W. Ballentyne, Alexandra School.   Score: 208, Possible—
210.     Winner   of   the   Silver   Medal   presented   by   the
British Columbia Rifle Association.
2. Cadet T. Currell, Henry Hudson School.   Score: 206, Possible—
210.   Winner of the Bronze Medal, B. C. R. A.
Corps. Shoots.    1st.
Henry Hudson 6 T. Currell, 206
Alexandra
6
W
. Ballentyne, 208
Cecil Rhodes
6
E.
Carson, 198
Chas. Dickens
6
G.
Pearce, 198
Lord Nelson
6
R.
McBean, 201
Fairview
6
J.
Dodge, 183
Simon Fraser
6
H.
Mclntyre, 193
Model
6
H.
Stewart, 191
Laura Seoord
6
J.
Shirlock, 185
Grandview
6
L.
Tellifsen,   182
Hastings
6
S.
Baigent, 168
Lord Tennyson 6
G.
Kelton, 165
Aberdeen
5
R.
Tremblay, 163
Lord Roberts
5
H.
Parislh, 144
Dawson B.
5
S.
Tingley, 144
Strathcona
5
J.
Lidston, 149
Mia-cdonald
5
P.
Williams, 133
Gen. Gordon
4
R.
Howard, 130
Franklin
5
G.
Washington, 148
Dawson A.
4
E.
Quinn, 131
Kitsilano
2
L.
Wallace, 55
2nd.
G. Campbell, 109
E. Bennett, 202
B. Hortin, 202
J. Watson,189
W. Macdonald, 193
G. Park, 188
R. Morrow, 180
E. Bower, 190
G. Inkster, 186
K. Truax, 185
R. Russell, 178
A. Hart, 136
N. Ca&lake, 162
A. Adams, 153
H. Urquhart, 131
W. McMurtril, 138
S. Arikada, 131
T.Jeal, 122
N. Cairns, 129
W. Wolsey, 132
C. Menzies, 95
W. Walker, 51
3rd.
B. Hoffmeister, 195
C. Freeman, 195
F. Saunders, 186
F. MacDermott, 189
■C. Odium, 182
G. Birch, 179
M. Robertson, 170
G. Town, 184
D. Annan, 183
E. Henry, 176
H. Jure, 107
C. Tretheway, 152
G. Levy, 147
L. Warnisher, 129
G. Ray, 91   §
H. Hudson. 128
E. Osmon, 119
Nor. Cairns, 122
T. Smith, 111
R. Brown, 88
G. Harvey, 51
The first named are the winners of the Sam Scott medals donated annually. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
65
OFFICIAL RIFLE TEAMS OF CADET REGIMENT.
Results of Shoots for School Year ending1 1921.
High Schools Team Aggregates.
CD
Team. g      ^ $ Leaders.
mm        <s\
1st. King Edward Hiuh 7 1958 279.71 Cadet J. Britton 245
I     1 I'     ^ 1     G- Mark  2^
1      P. Selwood -.244
2nd. King Edward High 7 1921 274.42      §     E. Lees  ....236
1'    §8 • - f |     L Lane 233
"     L. Graham 209
King George High 7 1802 257.42      '?     J. Oates Ill
1    . Wt I     K. Leckie 234
" L.  Xicholson....231
Britannia Lligh 8 2079 259.99      |     K. Schell ..270
A. Gallaugher 266
1     E. Schmidt 264
The Crehan Shield and Medals have again been won by the
team of the King Edward High School Corps. 66
BOAKD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ANNUAL STATEMENT—CADET FUND
January to December, 1921.
January 1st—Balance in haul' $1,380.35
September 7th— Deposit of cheque re Uniform Allowance
from Militia Department   1,720.00
November 1st—Deposit of cheque (Strathcona Trust).--       90.50
$3,190.85
Expenditure for the year  1,196193
•   T"   . $1,993.87
' Outstandings cheque    2.25
$1,996.12
In conclusion. I may state, that Avhile my duties have gradually increased and extra eifort is required to keep in touch with
all the details of my department, without an assistant, it has
been a great pleasure to me to meet cadet instructors and teachers
who are doing such good work for the benefit of the pupils and
assist them to the best of my ability. I sincerely trust that my
efforts have* been of assistance, and I beg to thank the Trustees,
yourself and teachers for the courtesy and kindness extended to
me throughout the year.
I have the honour to be, Sir.
Your obedient servant,
A. C. BUNDY,
Supervisor, Physical Training and
Cadet Corps. > *T
BOARD  OF-SCHOOL TRUSTEES 67
PRIMARY WORK.
Vancouver, B. C,
December 30th/l921.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Insjpector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir i
I beg to submit the following general report upon Primary
"Work for the vear 1921.
At the beginning of the vear we had a staff of one hundred
cd cn t/
and twelve primary teachers. The number has now increased to
one hundred and seventeen.
After the new pupils were admitted in February we were
again compelled to operate thirty-four classes upon part time
and enrolment in these classes was far too large, some teachers having about fifty pupils. The disadvantages of this part-
time system has already been discussed and it is most unfortun-
ate that during: the first term of every year we have to deal with
this problem of inadequate accommodation. Then, infectious
diseases are most prevalent at that season so that many children
are excluded from school for several weeks, according to the nat-'
ure of the disease and the extent to which other members of their
families are affected. Many children having special ability
attending full-time classes are given an opportunity of completing the work of three terms in a year. Superior children
on part-time have no such advantage as the teachers
find much difficulty in covering the minimum amount of work
•essential to promotion and thev must find means to give extra
j. * CD
time to weak pupils. As before, they have made use of offices,
halls and lunchrooms when weather conditions permitted.
Earlv in the vear at a meeting of the Second Primer teachers.
Miss Brown of the Macdonald School gave an excellent review
lesson in number to her class. This lesson was especially helpful
to young teachers.
The writing lessons given in May by primary teachers in the
Dawson School were exceedingly well presented and were observed with great interest by the teachers. Miss Laursen gave a
blackboard demonstration with her Receiving class. The children worked  rhythmicallv   and  secured   good  letter  formation.
%f */ CD
Miss Coughlin's First Primer Class had a similar lesson but, as
they had had some training during the previous term, they obtained better form and worked with greater speed.    Miss Gosse 68
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
gave the Second Primer class their lesson on paper. Careful
attention was given to position and movement as well as to form.
At the beginning of the fall term the MacLean System of writing was introduced into the schools by the
Education Department. Mr. MacLean very kindly gave a general
outline of this system at a meeting of primary teachers in September. As there had been a printers' strike for several months,
the teachers' manuals of instruction were not ready. Some sheets
of directions distributed by Mr. MacLean at the meeting and a
pupils' compendium are all that the teachers have had to work
with up to the present. In order to comply with the new regulations it was necessary for me to. notify the teachers to, discontinue spelling and transcription exercises at seats and to supervise all written work until the children acquired the sliding
arm movement. Silent reading exercises and the various forms of handwork were substituted for the written
work. .Very little has been accomplished in spelling and
composition this term as habits of linger movement had to be eliminated and rhythm, form and posture taught. As it is impossible
for me to give this subject the necessary supervision without
neglecting other work, I should like to recommend that a supervisor of writing be appointed as soon as possible.
Reading  still  continues  to  be   successfully  taught by  the
CD - t/ CD *J
♦majority of the teachers. Some of them however might have
made greater efforts to secure material for silent reading and
could have made better use of the bulletins issued during the
year. As the principals are anxious to have a large variety of
pleasure readers in their schools, a number of books suitable for
the purpose have been placed in the community room to assist them
in making a selection.
Some excellent group projects correlating reading, language
and nature have been worked out on the sand table this year.
Among the best topics might be mentioned Farm Life, Cave Men,
Indian and Eskimo studies, Mother Goose characters and Thanksgiving and Christmas activities.
During the year Miss Kerr has given a large number of individual mental tests to children who were not making satisfactory progress and she has also experimented with various group
tests.   "We greatly appreciate the help she has given us.
•   I should like to thank inspectors, principals and teachers for
their hearty co-operation during the year.
Yours respectfully,
EMILY J. TREMBATH,
Supervisor of Primary Work. 1  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 39
MANUAL TRAINING.
Vancouver, B. C ,
December, 31st, 1921.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to present the following report on the Manual Training
Schools of the citv for the past vear:
The work generallv has been of a satisfactory nature and the
CD t/ %/
teachers are endeavouring, with good results, to raise the standard
of work both in drawing and woodwork. An attempt has been
made to establish a standard test in drawing, but some time and
effort is yet needed before this can be considered effective. There
is a great need in the manual training schools of this province
for some standard efficiency test such as is in use in writing, by
means of which a teacher can know how his wTork compares with
that of others.
To a certain extent the improvement in our drawing is due
to the provision of a new set of blue prints, and the rel-arrange-
ment of the models. The provision of a certain amount of hardwood has had a beneficial effect on the interest and finish of the
benchwork. The policy of asking pupils attending the public
schools to buy hardwood for their practical work is not to be
commended as it places the poor boy at a disadvantage.
The exhibit of manual training work at Hastings Park in
August showed a general improvement in finish, variety and de-
CJ CD 1 %f
sign in most of the schools. The setting and arrangement was designed by Mr. J. W. McAclam, and was a pronounced success.
During the past year the number of pupils on the roll has
again increased, there being one hundred in the grade schools and
two hundred and thirtv in the high schools over the totals in
December 1920. The maximum attendance was in October when
the totals were 2740 on roll in grades, and 520 in high schools,
making 3260 in all citv schools.   The large increase in high school
^j t CD CD
enrolment in September is due to the re-establishment of manual
training in the King Edward High School, where all students in
the preliminary and junior grades now take the work.    Mr. A. 70
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
J. Michelmore was promoted to take these classes, and Mr. W.
K. Woodcock wras appointed to the consequent vacancy at Strathcona School. The increase in numbers demanded an additional
teacher and Mr. C. H. Kitchen was appointed on probation.
This made possible a re-arrangement of staff so that each teacher
could remain at one centre during the whole week. Sixteen of the
eighteen centres are now fully occupied, one (Henry Hudson) has
only one half dav vacant, and one (Beaconsfield) is too far from
ft *' ^ r
other schools to be available. The King George Centre accommodates three grade classes in addition to nine high school classes.
The Kitsilano High. School is yet unprovided with Manual
Training and Domestic Science Courses.    It will be necessary to
CD */
install a centre on the school grounds as it is almost impossible
to arrange for high school students to travel any distance between
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periods of study.
J. am glad to note two steps which have been taken to enable
teachers to gain greater proficiency, first, the class for manual
training teachers on Saturday mornings in woodwork and metal
work, and second, the opening of the Community room in the
School Board Offices. The first has been taken advantage of by
a majority of m\ staff, and I am assured that the second will be a
means of keeping us in touch with the latest developments in
Educational affairs.
Your faithfully.
" "        - \;;|   " " —V   S. NORTHROP,   I§1|- -■ ■■%,: %
Principal, Alanual Training Schools.
MM
-l DinocA. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
HOME ECONOMICS.
Vancouver, B. C,
^December 21st, 1921,
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector-of Schools,
Vancouver, 1>. C.
Dear Sir:
^
While 1 am not in a position to report upon the efficiency of
the work in its various departments because my time has been
almost fully occupied in teaching, there are certain phases which
inav be respectfully recalled to vour attention.
The number of pupils and the type of work taken at the present time is as follows:
Intermediate Grade, !>., Elementary clothing  1016
Senior Grades A. and B., Elementary foods, housewifery and
clothing  1767
CD
High Schools, General Course, Clothing     578
CD *~D
King Edward Home Economics Course (Course described
below)         88
School for the Deaf,  Clothing,          11
Total  1  3460
Intermediate Grade B.—During vacation the course of study
was reorganized. As well as sewing, it now aims to include some
of the other aspects' of clothing, namely: hygiene, choice of textiles and design, cost in money, time and energy. Mrs. A. C.
Haggard was appointed supervisor of intermediate grade clothing and her report is appended. I have not the slightest doubt
that this will result in promoting the efficiency of the work in
these classes. However, T beg to point out that if the intermediate
grade teachers are expected to teach any subject, in justice to
themselves, the pupils, the ratepayers and the subject itself, they
should be prepared to teach it before they are appointed to the
staff. The method adopted is to bridge a gap but as the staff
is continually changing it provides the training at the Wrong time.
•J * CD Jl CD CD
Senior Grades A. and B.—The policy of combining classes in
order that each pupil may get the work of her grade has1 been
followed successfully again this year.    As reported last Vear 6 72
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
out of 8 teachers resigned from the senior grade staff in 1919, and
in 1920, I regret to say, we have again had 6 resignations. Even
were the newly appointed teachers, as well prepared for their
work as the teachers they supersede, I. need not remind you that
dissatisfaction and continual change in a staff eventually accomplishes the destruction of any class of work. Again may I request your earnest effort to further either the establishment of
adequate courses for teachers of home economics in this province,
or to subsidize promising British Columbia students in schools
of approved standing in other provinces so that the standard of
teachers of home economics in this province may be raised, as is
being done elsewhere.
General interest in the home economics course in King Edward High School has been shown in an increase of students.   It
CD
is not known widely enough that the course requires students of as
high a type as any other high school course, since several of the
fiual examinations are identically the same as those taken bv
matriculation students, and that the home economics subjects,
namely, physiology, hygiene, home sanitation, foods, dietetics,
cookery, clothing and art are taken in place of one foreign
language and geometry, but are of high school standard and are
so examined. If credit for home economics were given at matriculation, undoubtedly there would be a greater number in the
course.    Several of the students are taking it because they de-
CD ft/
sire a knowledge of the subjects offered, but intend trying* to get
up another foreign language and the geometry they have dropped
in order to enter the University of British Columbia. This is a
decided hardship.
U has also been demonstrated that there is a need for courses
to provide for a type of student who is interested only in the
manipulative side of the subjects mentioned above and such will
eventually be established but at present the aims of such courses
do not seem to be sufficiently understood by parents and prospective students.
Another step thai might aid both the work of the medical
department and of the borne economics department is that of
greater co-operation, since the aim of home economics is not
simply to teach ^sewing' and "cooking'" alone but to teach
"right living.' [t is to be hoped thai something of this nature
mav be established in the near future.
Yours respectfully,
ELIZABETH BERRY,
Supervisor. Home Economics Department. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
73
SEWING IN THE GRADES.
Vancouver, B. C ,
December, 17, 1921.
Miss E. Berry,
Principal, Home Economics Department,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Miss Berry:
On the work of the Intermediate B. Sewing Classes for the
term which began September 6th, and ended December 16th, 1921,
1 beg to report as follows:
There are fifty-three classes and 1016 girls, the average number per class being nineteen.   Many of these classes are very heavv
X CD t/ «/ •
and the teachers have been unable to give the close supervision
and individual help so necessary to the successful teaching of
sewing.
Some of the teachers are qualified to properly carry on the
work. Others have had no training in this very important braivdi
of Public School work and experience much difficulty. It is regrettable that the Normal School Course does not include Home
Economics.
Realizing that the progress of the pupils depends upon the
knowledge and ability of the teacher, I held a class for teachers.
F if teen teachers attended this class and it was gratifying to note
an improvement in the work of their pupils.
The majority of the teachers have worked faithfully, and as
the knowledge of the subject grows, the quality of the work will
doubtless improve. {
I am errcatlv indebted to vou for vour very able assistance.
T thank the principals and teachers for their co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
ADA C. IIUGGARD,
Supervisor of Sewing. 74
BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
SCHOOL SPORTS.
Vancouver, B. O,
I January 20th, 1922.
*/
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir •
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of lip
Vancouver Public Schools Athletic Association for the year 1921.
The annual meeting of the Association was held in the School
Board Building in March to consider what form the activities
should take for the term. It was decided to carry on as in previous years with Senior Boys' Baseball, Junior Boys' Baseball and
Girls' Baseball. Leagues for these were formed and a true spirit
of sportsmanship was shown by the teams which took part in the
games.
Trophies emblematic of the championship of the city were
won bv the Strathcona School in the Senior Bovs' Baseball League
ft' ft/ fD
and the Girls' Baseball League, while the Henry Hudson School
won the championship in the Junior Boys' Baseball League.
In September another meeting was held for the purpose of
arranging a programme for the Autumn term. Schedules were
drawn up for Senior Boys' Football, Junior Boys' Football, and
Basketball for both boys and girls. The Henry Hudson School
was successful in winning the trophies for both Basketball
Leagues. After a very spirited contest the Charles Dickens' team
defeated the Central team in1 the final of the Junior Boys' Football League, while the championship of the Senior Boys' Football
League has yet to be decided between the Hastings and Mount
Pleasant Schools.
To create and keep up the interest in our school sports, a new
departure has been made recently. The Kelly Douglas Co. has
kindly consented to donate a cup to be competed for annually by
a representative team of the public schools of the following municipalities:—Vancouver city, North Vancouver city, South Vancouver, Point Grey, Burnaby and New Westminster. This gift
•has been further augmented by the J. A. Flett Co., Ltd., with a BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
A>
set of medals valued at $75 for the winning team. Representatives from the above municipalities met at the School Board
Offices on January 14, 1922, to draw up a schedule, and the first
round is to be played on February 4th, when South Vancouver
will furnish a team to oppose Vancouver City.
I am sure the team representing Vancouver City Schools will
give a good account of itself, and the Association has high hopes
of seeing this fine trophy (the Nabob Cup) resting in the School
Board Offices.
Respectfully submitted,
•5- W. J. NESBITT, President
.     $\ 1 F.   CI   BOYES,  Secretary 76
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DRAWING.
Vancouver, B. O,
December 16 th, 1921.
J. S. Gordon. Esq. '     "    .
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit my report on Drawing for the year 1921.
AVhile a retrospect of the year's work does not show a perfect picture, it can, I think, be truly said that 1921 gave evidence
of greater efficiency in the teaching of the subject and consequently in the results obtained.
There remains much that can still be improved, but the continued growth of classes in the city makes it increasingly difficult
CD «/ CD    .t/
for one man to properly supervise the work. This particular
point I have brought up before, and during the year I made an attempt to remedv matters bv the institution of a scheme whereby
the vice-principals could act as advisers in Drawing in their respective schools.
This scheme was only made possible by the whole-hearted and
enthusiastic effort of these vice-principals, who sacrificed sufficient of their time after school hours in order that they might qualify themselves for this work. This qualification was the result of
a year's attendance at a special drawing class held twice a week
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Twenty-two persons attended these classes, and as a result of
the examination held in .April, these twenty-two persons received
certificates of varying efficiencv from the Department of Educa-
*/ CD • X
tion at Yiel oria.
The scheme has been in operation from September only, but
already I can see progress-and greater efficiency.    I would again
• A CD «/ CD
pay tribute to these vice-principals, who, by their voluntary handling of this work have added considerably to the quality of drawing in their schools.
The increased quality in the drawing throughout the schools
is to be noticed in a better quality of line work, a better sense of BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
/1
tone expressed through light and shade, and better colour harmonies in design work.
The last two qualities were, iu the opinion of those competeix\
to judge, prominently displayed at the schools exhibit in Hastings
Park during Exhibition week. A big exhibit was on view there,
which, coupled with daily drawing contests, was evidence enough
of what Vancouver is doing along the lines of educational drawing.
Incorporated with our exhibit there was a collection of drawings by the school children in Yokohama, which were sent to the
educational authorities here by way of compliment. Vancouver
returned the compliment bv despatching a folio of drawings by
the school children of Vancouver.
During the year there wras an addition to the drawing1 equipment of the schools, in the shape of background boards, which, I
am glad to say, have proved their worth.
By the appointment of Miss Hall to the art teaching staff, the
four high schools are now on a level so far as drawing specialists
are concerned. Miss Hall is on duty at Britannia and King George
High Schools, while Mr. Judge takes over the work at King Edward and Kitsilano High Schools.
Respectfully submitted,
-— CHARLES H. SCOTT,
Supervisor of Drawing. 78
BOARD  OF SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
ATTENDANCE REPORT
Vancouver, B.C.,
December 20th, 1921
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
bir:—
I have the honour to submit the annual report on the work of
the Attendance Department for the year 1921.
During the year there were 7,183 cases investigated, as folio ws:_January, 870: February, 884; March, 862; April, 860; M,ay
826; June, 495; September, 727; October, 683; November, 614;
December, 362. Of these cases 6,280 were from the following
schools:—
Aberdeen
Alexandra
Bavview .
  182
  203
  24
Beaconsfield  119
Cecil Rhodes   229
Central  305
Kitsilano     70
Laura Secord  87
Livingstone   70
Macdonald  173
Model    307
Mt. Pleasant  317
rharles Dickens      .152     Lord Nelson      168
Dawson     4Q8
Fairview     167
Florence Nightingale   158
Franklin   84
General Gordon  33
Grandview    306
Hastings   162
Henry Hudson   356
Lord Roberts    268
Seymour  1  797
Simon Fraser  160
Strathcona     749
Lord Tennyson  225
Holy Rosary   2
St. Ann's Academy   2
Private Schools  3
There were 896 cases dealt with from other sources. Of
these 270 were visits of a special nature, which took up considerable time, but I feel the results obtained justified the efforts as in
this way troubles at the homes were often smoothed over and
difficulties removed, which expedited the return of children to
school and assisted in lessening much irregular attendance.
Many of the 626 cases discovered on the streets during school
hours were found to be the children of new arrivals in the city
who were unfamiliar with the School Act of this province; in BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
M*
such instances the parents were informed and the children sent
to school. Others were excluded from school due to the existence of infectious diseases at their homes. Quite a number of
these cases were from neighbouring municipalities.
There were 234 cases of truancy discovered, being an increase
of twelve per cent over the previous year. Many cases of recurrent truancy have occurred, varying from twice to eight times
during the month; a number of these truants have been children
who have run awav from home, and it has been days and some-
times weeks before the}" were located.
Considerable time has been given by officers of this department in trying to locate these children, and I regret to report,
that, despite all our care, a great delinquency has occurred among
these truants, and a larger number have appeared before the Juvenile Court.
Poor home conditions, picture shows, and the selling of newspapers on the streets have been responsible for much of this delinquency. 1 believe that truancy and delinquency could be greatly lowered if juveniles were prohibited from selling newspapers,
or if the sale of newspapers by them on the streets was regulate I.
I would again respectfully urge that the Trustees take up this
matter with the Provincial Government, with a view to getting
this much needed reform.
Owing to the irregular attendance of their children many
parents were warned that legal proceedings would be taken to
enforce compliance with the school law, and in consequence sixteen letters of warning were issued by you on my recommendation. These usually had the desired effect of persuading the
parents to have their children attend school more regularly.
The Juvenile Court has been attended regularly during the
year.
In conclusion I wish to thank the school principals, teachers
and the various officers of the Board who have co-operated with us
and assisted us in our work.
Respectfully submitted,
N. JENSEN,
Chief Attendance Officer. 80
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
NIGHT  SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B. O,
January, 10th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
The following is a report of the work in the Department of
Night Schools for the term ending, December 31, 1921:
Evening classes were opened October 5, 1921 in the following
subjects:
At King Edward High School
Penmanship, Shorthand Theory, Shorthand Practice, Business English, Business Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Accounting,
Typewriting, Millinery, Dressmaking, Ladies' Tailoring, Cabinet
Making and Cookery.
At School Board Office Building.
Show Card Writing, Drawing and Design, Drawing From
Life, Basketry, Applied Arts and Crafts, Painting, Continuation
(lasses in Arithmetic and English and English for Foreigners.
At the Technical High School.
|g||Telegraphy, Wireless Telegraphy, Elocution, Public Speak-
Music, French, Spanish, Folk Dancing, Carpentry, Wood-
nng, Machine Construction and Drawing, Machine Shop
:tice, Sheet Metal Work, Technical Drafting, Plumbing, Blow-
Analysis. Wet and Eire Assaying, Navigation, Steam Engin-
ig, Electrical Engineering, (Three years' courses), Gasoline
ine Ignition, Chemistry, Mechanics and Physics, Mathematics,
nistry for Pharmaceutical Students, Economics and Citizen-
and Mathematics for Engineers.
ing,
worl
Prac
pipe
eerir
Engi
Cher
ship
Attendance.
In the following (lasses, the attendance was less than ten
students, and in each case the class was discontinued: Economics and Citizenship, Navigation, Blowpipe Analysis,
Wet and Fire Assaying, Mechanics and Physics, and Chemistry
for Pharmaceutical Students. All other-classes have had a very
satisfactory attendance, during the term, the numbers at each
centre being as follows:
King Edward High School.
Attendance. Average. Percentage.
October     492               345.6. 70.24
November     500               405.4 81.08
December      509               443.6 87.16
School Board Office Building.
Attendance. Average. Percentage.
October     238               214.9   1 90.32
November     218               183.9 84.37
December      227                167,9 73.96
Technical High School.
Attendance. Average. Percentage.
October     809    | . 657.7 § 81.30
November     874 686.5 78.55
December      857 652.3 76.12
Aggregate Attendance in all Centres.
Month.                   Total Attendance. Average. Percentage.
October     1,556 1,316.41 84.60
November     1,592     jj 1,275.89 80.14
December     1,576 1,165.86 73.97
Staff.
With the opening of the Technical School where highly specialized courses are provided, and where much expensive equipment is used, we found it necessary to recommend the appointment of an Evening School Principal for that centre, and the
Board very wisely selected Mr. James G. Sinclair, Vice-Principal
ft/ t/ *■
of the Vancouver Technical School for the position, Mr. Sinclair
is giving excellent service in this work, and the success of the
Evening Work in Technical Subjects is due this year very largely
to his untiring efforts.
In all some 48 instructors and assistants are employed in
evening instruction work, the majority of whom are University
graduates, and specialists in their own Departments.   When it is 82
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
considered that over 1,500 men and women are receiving infraction in the various branches, it must be conceded thiat the
work of the Evening Schools is one of the most important of the
many educational activities carried on by the Vancouver Board
of School Trustees.
Recommendations.
(1) If possible provision should be made for the accommod
ation of a larger number of students in Millinery,
Dressmaking and Ladies' Tailoring; some 150 women
were refused admittance in these classes this year,
owing to a lack of equipment.
(2) With the establishment of the Technical School, comes
the request from many students, that the Evening
Class Session be extended to June 30. With the large
capital expenditure in buildings and equipment, it
would seem that greater returns may be had by utiliz-
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ing this equipment for a great many more hours during the year, than is at present being done. This is
especially true in the Technical and Commercial
Branches; the private commercial school carries on
night school classes during the entire year.
In conclusion, Sir, I wish to express my appreciation for your
interest and kindly advice in the organization of Night School
work, and for the hearty support I have always received from
the other officials of the Board, and from the members of Board
of School Trustees themselves.
Yours resnectfully,
-A- «/   7
W. K. BEECH,
Director of Night Schools.
6C*A *1VWMY BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
83
MUSIC.
Vancouver, B. C-,
| January  30th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
The music department, of the public schools, under the supervision of myself and my assistant, Miss C. Chadwick, for the year
t/ ft* / 7 */
ending December 31st, 1921, has been interestingly active. While
there has been no departure from the course of study to be observed, the schools wre were in contact with realized the importance of
our emphasis on the Avork in which we are engaged. It may safe -
ly be predicted that Music Supervision will be profitable and beyond experiment. Music is a serious study. It is recognized
everywhere, and the dignified place it occupies in our curriculum
owes you a debt, Sir, for the encouragement you have given us
and your staff in general.
i CD
We are growing musically. This was very evident at the
closing exercises of the schools for the Ghristmas holidays of 1921.
Carols, Christmas songs and part songs were the chief items on
the programme.
As schools closed for the summer vacation on June 25th, the
Fiftieth Anniversary of the entrv of British Columbia into Confed-
eration was celebrated by the school children on June 23rd, in
Stanley Park, where a massed choir of about 6,000 children sang
with dignity of expression a number of patriotic songs.
The growth of music, must, of necessity, be steady if it is to
prove successful and lasting, for in the organized course is included not only the study of songs, but also sight reading, ear
training and an appreciation of music. This last and all important branch, |Appreciation of Music,' can only progress through
the use of the phonograph and the possession .of a library of
standard compositions, selected under the advice of the Music
"Supervisor, and owned as part of the school equipment.
I am convinced that those teachers of our public schools who
are treating music as a serious study, are building up a musical
atmosphere for the city, and in this respect are raising the stand- 84        BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ard of school music. It is only necessary to converse with the
principals of the schools to discover this—for after all they are
responsible for the subject matter of time-tables—and it is encouraging to note the consideration they are giving to cultivate
this branch of the students' career. The general expression is,
'I Music is an aid to general study,'' and I am confident the management of school affairs is as interested in the visualizing of
music as in any of the school subjects.
The study of music in the Junior grades of the schools has
been conscientious and on the whole very satisfactory, as will be
seen from the attached "report of my assistant, Miss C. Chadwick,
who, since her apointment to the music department in March, has
worked faithfully and well.
With each succeeding year instrumental teaching will become an important factor in school life. Each school should have
its own orchestra and as soon as circumstances will permit this
will become a very live factor. The public schools are cradles
for embryonic musicians, and as these pass into the high schools,
and from the high schools into the university ,the proper guidance of the public school instrumentalist will vitalize the orchestra and so crown the value of an essential in the students' training.
I am hoping music in the high schools will benefit greatly from
X V- *—' CD %/
the systematic work being clone in our public schools, and it is a
matter of congratulation that the Glee Clubs of our high schools
are earrving on the subject of singing with marked success. Thev
are developing the emotional and intellectual elements which
constitute a balanced appreciation of music.
In (dosing, 1 feel. Sir, the results accomplished warrant every
effort possible, which will afford the students a richer, nobler and
broader education.
Yours faithfullv,
F. W.DYKE,
Supervisor of Music. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Q-
MUSIC
Vancouver, B. O,
January 23rd, 1922.
t/ 7
F. W. Dyke, Esq.,
Supervisor of Musie,
Vancouver City Schools.
De ar Sir \—
I beg to submit the following report on the music in the
Junior grades for the period from March to December, 1921.
During the first term the time was taken up teaching and
testing the classes visited. Each teacher was requested to keep
a list of the monotones and pupils who needed individual attention. The results of this special effort, directed toward the less
gifted child, have proved very encouraging.
The tone throughout the city is not yet good; but, considering the musical traindng of the great majority of the teachers,
the progress on the whole has been fairlv satisfactory.
X CD ft <-
There has been a marked improvement in the reading of
music, and the pupils are taking a keen interest in having credits
given for musie included in their monthly reports.
Yours faithfully,
CLARA CHADWICK,
Assistant Supervisor ol Music.
jLiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriiii
,*/»*.■ ttj 86 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EDUCATION BOARD, AUCKLAND, N. Z.,
December 31, 1921.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Sir:
At the close of 1921, I beg to express my heartfelt thanks to
you and to the Board of School Trustees for the privilege I enjoy of spending a year in the work of school inspection in New
Zealand. I find the experience not only interesting but also of
great value.
Unfortunately I was laid aside from active duty for nearly
ft/ €/ V
two months. My chief regret wTas the interruption to my work,
for the kindness I received from the officials of the Education
Department, teachers, pupils and private citizens was ample compensation for the personal inconvenience I endured.
Under the circumstances, I feel that it would be unsatisfactory fo attempt at this time to report on my work in detail. I
shall be in a much better position to do so on my return to Vancouver. I may, however, be permitted to say that New Zealand
is determined that a sound primary and secondary education,
academic and technical, shall be placed within the reach of all
boys and girls, rich and poor, those brought up in the remotest
districts as well as those living in the most populous centres. Furthermore the government and its Education Department have
striven earnestly to remove every hindrance to the acquisition of
a university education by all voung men and young women who
* * t/ ~ ft/ o
have shown themselves worthy of it. New Zealand claims to
be one of the most democrative countries in the world, affording
as far as possible equal opportunity to every unit of its population, and in no respect has this principle been carried out more
successfully than in the careful building up, during a period of
many years, of its system of public education. This consideration, as well as others, renders a study of the system most helpful
to the educationists of the sister Dominions.
I trust therefore that at a later date E may be enabled to speak
of it at much greater length.
I have the honor to be,
Your obedient servant,
THOMAS A. BROUGH. ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE
FOR 1921.
January   	
February   	
March   	
April  i	
May	
June  	
September  	
October -	
November   	
December 	
Enrolment for
Year.
1004   	
1905   	
1906   	
1907   	
1908  	
1909   	
1910   	
the
Enrolment.
  17,668
  18,742
  18.430
  18,357
  18.165
  17,618
  18,908
  19.053
  18,966
  18,447
month of Octobei
Enrolment.
4,991
5,609
Average
Attendance
16,007.82
U5.M7.90
16,242.7®
16,605.76
16,5615.57
16,592.44
17,812.13
17,654.71
17,5115.69
1/7,471.46
reentat
90.59
89.73
88.13
90.46
91.19
94.17
94. 2
92.66
92.35
94.71
for each
jy.
inrolment.
year since
Year.
1914       13,313
191.5        13,183
  6,437
  7,370
  7.984
  8,845
  9,942
1911  11.385
1(912     12,393
1913     12,990
Numbei
December, 191.3
December, 1914
December, 191.5
December, 1.916
December, 1917
December, 1918
December, 1919
December, 1920
December,
'eachers on the
Vancouve
since
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1.921
1906
r staff
1913.
13,80i5
15,069
15,849
16,9oi5
17,933
19,05-3
6,437
in December
he
Instructors
Instructors
1921   	
Special Instructors employed by t
of   Manual   Training   	
of Domestic  Science  	
Music Instructors	
Cadet, Physical Drill and Musketry Instructor 	
Instructress in Physical Drill	
Supervisor of Primary Work	
Supervisor of Special Classes 	
Social   Service   Worker	
Psychologist 	
Supervisor of Drawing	
Supervisor  of   Sewing	
Teachers  in  Night  School  Classes  	
Special Officers employed by the
Municipal Inspector of Schools  	
Assistant Municipal Irsp^ctor of Schcols	
Director   of   Night   Schools   	
Medical  Health  Officers	
Dentists —
N
Men.
91
102
88
815
89
91
112
108
120
Board,   1921
for each yeai
W
omen.
246
260
266
254
297
33i5-
344
356
390
Board:
uirses
-Sttendance  officers   — -	
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of Certificates,
December 31st,  1921:
University Graduates in   \rts or Science 	
Academic   Certificate   	
First-Class   Certificate	
Second-Class   Certificate   	
Third-Class   Certificate   	
Commercial   Specialist	
Commercial   Assistant   	
Drawing   Specialist   	
l;lin i	
Tem/porary  	
Technical   	
rota Is.
337
362
354
339
386
426
456
464
510
20
14
1
1
1
1
1
1
42
137
15
]23 f
88
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
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•i-i   CD BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
fif)
LIST OF TEACHERS.
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment.
Certificate.
 2nd ...
Name.
Abel.  Jessie  M-   i	
Abercrombie,  Mildred  2nd
Abercrombie,  W.   T B.A
Adam,  Jessie W 1st
Aitchison.   Evelyn   R	
Allardyce,  Catherine M	
Allen,   Maude  A	
Allen,  Muriel  E	
Amos,  Maude A	
Date
A ppointmont.
•Abruaw
 septemoer
 January,
 November,
Temporary   May,
2nd   January,
1st       February,
2nd       September,
2nd Vugust,
2nd       January,
Anderson,  Margaret C '.	
Anderson,  Mary K B.A. . ..Augrust, 190«8, and August,
Anderson,   Mary   L 1st   September,
Annan'd,   Margaret   A 1st    September,
Anstie,   Jane  K 1st    August,
Armstrong,   Mary  D 2nd     September,
Armstrong, W.   G M.A August,
Astle,   Mable   C 2nd  March,
1915
1919
1918
14)1$
1921
1921
1917
1921
1912
1921
L912
1921
19 J 3
1906
1921
1913
1908
Tempora:
Bain,   Nellie   1st
Baird,   Marion   L 2nd
Balkwill.   Alice M 2nd
Bampton,   Louise   1st
Banting,   A.   D ..B.A
Barbour, Reginald C	
Barker,   Amy    2nd   	
Baron,  Mrs.  Edith  .'. 2nd    	
Barnard,  Mrs.  Ethyl M 2nd    	
Beath,   James    ... 2nd    	
Beattie, Hester E B.A	
Beckman.   Elta   M Academic
Beech. W.  K MA	
Bell.   Edna  B M.A.
Bell.   Elizabeth   M	
Bell,   W.   S B.A
Bennett, Illma L 2nid
Bennett,  J.  L 1st
.Se
..August,
ptember,
 August,
 February,
 January,
  March,
 September,
 April,
...April,
 February,
 September,
 August,
 August,
 August,
2nd      * January,
 October,
 October,
 ■ January,
Bermingham, Mrs. S. M B.A January,
Berry. Edith L 2nd
Berry,   Mrs.   Kathleen B.A.
Bettes, Freda G 2nd
Betts,   Doris  J 2nd
Bigney,  Anna   E 1st
Bigney,  Elizabeth M _ 1st ..
Bissett, Vera M.
nd
-1st
\
Blah,   Elizabeth  J 1st
Bodie,   Helena    B.A.
Bodie,   Isabel   A.    B.A.
Boldrick,  Helena   E	
Bollert,   Eillian   G	
Bolton,  Dorothea B	
Bolton,   Grace A B.A ,.,„-
Bossons,   Ellen    ?nd   	
Bower,   Mabel    2nd    	
Boyer,  Ethel M 2nd  	
Boyes, F.  C 1st
Bradbury, Mrs.  Dorothy  2nd    	
.Bragg,   T.   G B.Sc	
Brennan,   Alyce  H 1st 	
Bridgman, Clara M Commercial
Brinton,  Eflie  S : 1st   	
Brock,  ]
Brown,
Brown,
Brown,
Brown,
Browne,
.uey A. M,
2nd
Gertrude   'st
larriet   \V 2nd
 B.A,
,l.  hiimer
W.   H.
Laurie
B. W.
.2nd
.M.A
S<
January. 1898
..November,
April,
February,
...February,
 August,
 January,
..December,"
 \ ugust,
.September,
..August,
..February,
 January,
...February,
...February,
 April,
 \ ugust,
, August,
August,
..February,
, Sept em ber,
September,
 \ ugust,
 August,
|it«-:ii 1 >i r.
January,
..August,
August,
October,
..August,
1908
1919
1911
1917
191G
1921
1920
1913
1918
1913
1918
1911
1912
1909
1 fW '
1919
1918
1920
1934
L918
1921
1921
1919
1909
1933
1916
1911
1919
1914
19-20
i ii i £
1919
L»l i
1920
1914
1917
1914
19.8
1920
1921
1933
1913
1.920
1914
1912
1912
1915
19V1 f
50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
BlUC
Brun
Brun
Brya
Brya
Buch
Buck
Buck
Burk
Burri
Busb
I.
e,  Graham
drett.  Lyla
ton,  Lulu  	
nt,   S.   .1	
nt.  Winnifred 	
anan, Christina ....
erfield, Katherine
ley,   John  M	
E.
.1st    August,
.2nd  February,
.2nd   August,
.1st    ... November,
.2nd  February,
.Academic   August,
.znd    | February,
1st    September,
e.  Mrs.  Thomas   Special   May,
s,  Grace D '. M-A August,
v, Grace E 2nd       .February,
1914
1917
1908
1912
1920
1915-
1917
192i
19 IS
1917
1921
Cahill,  Hattie M 1st
Cain    Florence  M 2nd
Cairns.   Kate 2nd
Cairns.  I .aura 2nd
Cairns, Mabel 2nd
Calbick,  Isabel C 1st
Caldwell,   Sada   St.   Claire .B.A.
Callander,  M.  M.  Grace  2nd
Cameron,   C.   Alice _ M.A
Cameron.   Ella   G B.A
Cameron,   Margaret   M.   B B.A
Cameron,   May   ...-. 2nd
Campbell,  Jessie L 1st
Campbell.   Lila   C 1st
Capon,   Maud    1st
Carruthers,  Bertha  M B.A.
Carter. Edna A 1st
Caspell.   Edmund   1st
Cattell,   Dorothy   1st
Cattell.   Margaret  2nd
Beatrice A  1st
Dorothy   G 2nd
Florence   A 2nd
lorenee B ..B.A.
Kate  L 2nd
,   Kathleen   N 2nd
Chadwick
Chandler,
Chandler,
Chapin,  JB
Chappell,
Chastenej.
Chasteney,  Vera A. ...2nd
Chatterton, Ada L 2nd
Chesley, Mary A B.A.
Chippendale,   Thomas    Man
Chodat,   Henri    M.A.
Christie,   Isabell  S ...2nd
C 1st
gus   1st
CI   ite.  C
(
,r
A
G
.e
iarK,
lark,
larl
lose
1"S.
OD6
Ou€
Cole,
Collier,
Connor
I took,
Coombs,
Copping,
Corbet t.
Corkum,
Coughlin
Coul i er,
< 'i '\van,
Cowan.
Cowi
Cox,   Be?
Crake.  "K
Creelinan
Creelman
Cronkhitc
Crowe, C
Crowe.   I-
Frances W.
 September, 1912.
  September, 1921
 January, 1910
 January, 1913-
 August,  1914
 August,  1917
 September, 1917
  September, 1921
 August, 1909
    September, 1921
 February, 1920
 November, 1920-
 October, 1902
 February, 1919
 September, 1918
 February, 1918
 February, 1917
 August, 1899
 January, 1904
 January, 1911
     March, 1921
 January, 1914
 August,  1913
 January, 1917
 February, 1921
     February, ±921
 May, 1921
     February,    19.18
,   B.S- September, 1918
ual   Training   September,  1912
 September, 1918
 January, 1919
 August, 1909
 AjugusU,  1902
W M. A.
T.    V 1st
Florence  J '. 1st
-.   Laurina        ..1st
nd August, 19:
M.
A.
M.
dick, Elsie
Lome   B.
Josephine
I.ucv  E
C.   F.
va	
Mrs
Marjorie
Jennie N.
C.   H	
Marjorie
Beatrice M
E. Mabel ...
Susie I	
Margaret C.
ssie W	
Edith  F.
Amelia
Jean
, A. M	
B	
unice 1.
Florence A.
2nd .
.B.Sc
1st
2nd
M.A.
1st
.B.A.
.Acad
2nd .
B.A.
.2nd
 January, 1918
 August, 1917
 August, 1912
........August, 1912
September,  1021
 Vugust, 1910
B.D.
1009
1 00 "1
o
nd
.2nd
2nc
Cunningham, Mary B.
.zna
B.A
.2nd
B.A,
B.A.
2nd
1st
 April, 1911
 February, 1920
 September, 1917
 January, 1910
 January,
emic     February,
  September,
 January,
 January,
 February,
 August,
 August,
 November,
     September,
 September,
 August,
 September,
 October,
 Vugust,
— Septtembefr",
    September,
3921
1919
1920
1920
1911
1908
1914
i<)21
1919
19!0
1919
1911
1913
1920*
1921 BOARD OP SCHOOL TRUSTEES
91
Ce:
F.
■tinAate
 B.Sc.
....1st
.... 2nd
 1st    .
 B.A.
 2nd   .
- -B.A.
...-2nd
 2nd
Name.
Darling,   Gordon  ....
Davidson,  Lucretia
Davis,  Sarah J	
Dawe, Myrtle F	
Dewis,  Martha  E.
Dickinson,   Marie   I
Dobson,  F.  H.	
Domony,  Violet M.
Donaghy,  Florence
Dorer, Mabel I   2nd
Dorman,  Marietta   A.   C 2nd .
Dove,  A.  J B.A.
Downs, Gertrude M 2nd
Draper, Hester E B.A.
Duffus,  Catherine M 1st   .
Duke. Alma M ;nd
Duke, Alzina I -2nd
Dunbar,   John    B.A.
Dunmore, Mary H 2nd
Dunning,   J.   T M.A.
 2nd
Date
iej
.N(
Se]
F
3ei
Duthie,   Ellen   P.   ..
Dyke,   Kathleen  A.
N<
.2nd
^.ppointn
)tem'ber,
.August,
atember,
ebruary,
.August,
)vember,
.August,
ebruary,
January,
April,
ebruary,
January,
ptember,
ebruary,
ebruary,
itemiber,
.August,
October,
.August,
Kvember,
.August.
Eldridge,  Dorothy C 2nd January,
Elliott,   Carrie  I B.A August,
Elliott,  Lewis A Temporary   September,
Elliott.  Kathleen  E 1st    '.    September,
Elliott,    Margaret    2>nd    March,
Elmsly,  Ada  B st    November,
Estabrooke,  Emma D  .B.A January,
Evans, A. R M. A August,
Flvans,   C.   R | jst     November,
Evans,  Eleanor  1st    August,
Evans    Nellie  D 2nd August,
Evans,  W.   E ■ B.A September,
Fairey,  Francis Manual  Training   January,
Fallows,   Marjorie   H Academic    ', September,
Fallows,   Muriel  P 2*nd     August,
Faunt,   Edith    1st    Vugust,
Featherstone,   Gladys  K 2nd            January,
Fee,  Wilfrid J M.A August,
Ferguson,   Mary  J BA August,
Fergusson.   G.   A B.A. August,
Findla?/,  Marjorie  L ist   Seotember,
Fisher,   Anna   S 2nd  Febmar\,
Fisher, Jessie E.  R 2nd     January,
Fitch.  H.  B .M.A., B.Sc August,
Fletcher,   Bruce    2nd
Fletcher.  Elizabeth E 2nd
Flett,   Wm M.A.
Ford.   Luvia    2nd
Forster.   Clara   C 2nd
Se
ptem her,
 .August,
 January.
 January,
September,
Fountain.   Sarah  A	
Frame, Emma M 1st
Francis,   Mrs.   Edith  M 2nd
Fraser,   Annie E .B.A.
Fraser,   John    Tern
iFrith,   Elsie 2nd
Gait, Isabel C 2nd
Gamble,  Ellen  E 2nd
Gamev, H. T    1st
Gamey,  H. W ist   .
George, Elizabeth L 2nd
Gibbs,   Edith   °rd.   .
B.A September,
...A1-'*"  t
 November,
..Alienist,
■>orary   September,
 January,
s
Gordon.  J	
Oosse.' Sarah  G	
Gourlie, Wm.  G	
Graham,   Christina. M.
Graham,  Muriel K	
Graham.   Rita  R	
Grant,   E.   S	
.tf.A.
.2nd
.B.A.
/>nd
And
.S
.1st
PD'ember
Februarv
 .April,
..January
A lTfirnat.
February
ept Amber
...October
August
pr»t«**^»hftr,
February
February,
May
lent.
1921
1910
I!'.'.
1919
1911
1919
1907
1918
r.i A
1921
1937
1920
J92i
1921
1918
192')
19J*
ii, •>
1917
1:)')()
ioir>
1907
1908
J.91C
1921
19 jfl.
l908
1900
1913
1917
1907
1907
193 l
01918
1912
1919
1914
1913
1921
1912
1912
1913
1921
1920
1908
1912
1921
1893
1932
1921
3917
j$12
1937
392.1
1906
1919
1919
1918
101 fl
i *9.c.
3917
1920
1920
1907
1$20>
19.19
1920 92
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name.
Grant,
Grant,
Grant,
Grant.
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
Fanny 1 2nd    December,
Rena  V.   A B.A September,
\\ innifred  A 2nd   August,
Wm.   E B.A September,
Grantham,   Vera   C 2nd  February,
Greggor,   Agnes  A — -B.A February,
Grenfell,  Mary E B.A.    Aug-st
Gross,   Alice   S B.A February,
Guest,  Mrs.   W.   E 2nd     January,
Hall,   J.   H	
Hall,   Unina   F	
Halliday,   Mrs.   Minnie  E.
Harding,  Mrs.  J.  M.   H.  ..
Handwick,   Jean   R	
Hardwick,   Margaret   S.   ..
Harper,   Mary   M	
Harvie,   Janie  A	
 B.    Litt August,
 \rt   September,
 \st    '. October,
 2nd     January,
 1st    February,
 Academic       October,
 Temporary September,
 2nd   August,
Haughton,   Agnes    1st    August,
Haviland,  Ida  1 3rd    ..... Novemiber,
Hawe,  Elsie V 2nd     Vugust,
Heaslip, Mrs. Clara G 2nd        February,
Hemsworth, - E.   A 1st    August,
Henderson,   Rachel  C .'1st     September,
Henderson,   Winnifred   C 2nd     September,
Hemw, A.  O.  Edna   M.A    September,
Herd,   Alice   B.   G 2nd February,
Herd,   Henry  D.    Vcadiemic    January?,
Herd,  Isabella J . 2nd     September,
Herd,  Mary B.  F 2nd       February,
Hewton,   Ina   E 2nd   - February,
Hewton.   Sara    2nd    1898-1900;   August,
Hillis,   Beryl A 2nd  |  January,
Hohson,   F.   W Oiral     January,
Holden,   Catherina J 2nd     January,
Honeyman,   Helen  M 2nd     j November,
Hood,  Lily H 2nd     February,
Hooper, Myra C 2nd     ..August,
Horner,   Bertha   M Temporary     September,
Hotchkiss.   A.   D M.A September,
Houston, Mr«5.  S.  E.  ..., .3rd       December,
Houston,   W.   F 2nd     August,
Howard,  Phoebe M 2nd     January,
F.  Mabel S Vendemic     October,
Lucy  MaoL M.A.      January,
Lucy  M 2nd    September,
Annie 1st     lanuary,
Gladys T 1st       February,
Ellen  C B.A April,
Howard,
Howell,
Hudson,
Hughes,
Hughes,
Hunter,
19C-7
1920
191.5
1918
1920
1918
' • I
1920
1920
19H
1921
1919
1913
1918
1921
1920
191.7
1012
1916
1916
1921
1310
1920
1920
1921
1917
1916
1919
192 J
19..8
1908
3.921
1916
1918
1919
1919
1917
1917
1919
1921
1916
19.16
1916
1915
1920
1912
1921
1920
Tnkman.   Lilias  T.   A.
Innes, Mary W. E. ...
.2nd  February, 1P21
-1st     September,    1921
Jackman,   D.   S M.A September, 1918
Jamieson.   Annie  B B.A January, 1907
Jewett,   F.   Arnold   B.A : August. 1909
Johnson,   Emily May 2nd    October, 1912
Johnston,  Bessie  1st ....March,' 1891
Johnston,  Mrs.   Dorothy   1st     Ap~il,  3.917
Johnston,  D.   B B.A  ....."January', 1902
Johnston, Mrs. Mabel C .. 2nd   1901-1903:  January, 1.916
Johnston,  Margaret  L 2nd     September, 193.8
Johnston,  Marion  F 2nd     February] 1920
Johnston, Marion B 2md    1891-1911:   August, 1914
1913
1^17
1916
1917
1921
1991
.Jones.   Grace  P ist    September,
Jones,  T-Tarry A ^Manual   Training       Ausrust,
Jones,   Mary    Gornmercial  Assistant   September,
Jones,  Nellie M 2nd     December,
Jopling,   Mary A 1st      January,
Joudrey.   Edith L i.st       February,
 Art   ...August,  1917
 2nd     March, 1.911
Judge,   >
Jukes, M
irian BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
93
Name. Certificate.
Keith,  Mrs. Lillian A : 1st   ...
Kelly,  Bertha  M 2nd
Date of Appointment.
.Februaiy, 1919
January, 1914
Kersey, Robert R M.A    September, 1921
King, H. B B.A January, 1904
Kion,   Gertrude   A ...Academic       September,  1921
Laidlaw,   Kathleen    2nd    October,
Laird,   Edna  J 1st   1906-7908;   1909-1911-January'
Lamb, Elvie D B.A .'.February,
Langiej*-, Celia G Academic.     August,
Laursen,   Lili  J 1st Vugust,
PJd'ith M 2nd
November,   1904;   January,
-1st    August,
-2nd       February,
-1st     February,
-1st  February, 1900; April,
-1st     September,
.2nd        September,
Lawrence,
Lawrence,   Frederick
Lawrence,   Ida  V	
Lawrence, Olive B.  ..
Leach,   Mrs.   Jean  P.
Leah,   Constance   M.
Ledingham, Helen I.
Leith,  Mrs.  T Academic     1896-1902;    January
Leslie,  Alexa C 2nd September,
Letson,   Edith  C 1st  ,  April,
Lewis,   Alice  M 2nd     August,
Vera  M Academic  August,
J.   George   Manual Training    October,
Annie   M —2nd     February,
Eleanor W 2nd       April,
D.   C B.A January,
Clement    1st     January,;
Lewis,
Lister,
Litch,
Liteh,
Little,
LogAn,
Loga n,
Loggie,
Mamie
Annie
E.
M.
Lord, Dorothy M 2nd
.1st    February,
.1st    January,
    February,
Louden,   Helen  E.
Lusk, Marion L ; 2nd
.\lst       February,
December,
1915
IfctS
1.920
1906
1904.
1916
193 0
1921
1921
1914
1918
1921
1914
1920
1921 •
190-5
1916
1903
1D20
192i
1916
19-17
1920
1911
1918
19 2 X
1921
Madden,   Gertrude   F 2nd    February,
Maggs,   A.   B ... M.A         Aujgust,
Manning.  V.  Z ,. B.A    January,
Marr,   John M.A    August,
Marriage, F. T 1st         September,
Marshall,  Elsie M 2nd        January,
Martyn,  Anna L .-. 2nd        September,
Matheson,   E.   Corinne 2nd     September,
Maxwell,  Mary E Ill       August,
Mayers,  F. J	
Maynard,   Catherine  E...
Maynard,   Margaret   	
Meadows,  Stanley D	
Mellish, Winnifred E. .
Messinger,   Clarence   R.
Middlemiss,   Edith  	
Millar, Ethel J	
Millar,  Eva	
Miller,   S.   L	
Milley.   Myrtle   E	
Mills,   Sadie	
Mitchell,   M.   W	
Moodie.   S.  F.  M	
Margaret H	
Mrs.  Grace J	
Isabel   	
Verna E	
Morrison,   A.   B	
Morrow,   A.   E	
Moscrop,   Ethel,   	
Munro,  Constance E.  ...
Moody,
Moore,
Moore.
Morris,
..B.A    November,
..B.A     February,
..B.A    February,
..B.A August,   1911;   January,
...1st     January,
...B.A    August,
...2nd       January,
...2nd        February,
..2nd   *    September,
..B.A  August,
..1st       February,
..1st   October,
..2nd September,
..B.A    August,
..B.A    August,
..2nd       191.4-1918;   November,
...2nd  -  September,
...B.A    January,
;..B.A , January,
..B.A    September,
..1st    September,
..1st       October,
Munro,   Elizabeth    2nd       January,
Munro,  Sadie H I B.A    January,
Mnnn,   Emma  M B.A    August,
Murphv,   Eva B 1st      January,
Murray,  Christina P 2nd       February,
Murrav,   Christine   T 1st      August,
1920
1910
1912
1917
1918
1.913
1920
1913
1908
1907
1920
1918
1914
19i7
1909
19'6
1921
1920
1913
1919
1912
1918
1914
1909
1919
1923
1921
1921
1918
1919
1919
3915
1915
1915
i'A3
10? L
19 1 3 94 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name.                                                       Certificate. .                           Date of Appointment.
r\iurray,   Louise    2nd      September, 1921
McAdam,   Guy  J M.A    August,  1911
McAlpme,   Sara   2nd   August, 1900
McArthur, Helen M 2nd      September, 1919
MacBeth.   Mary   S 2nd      September, 1921
Macaulav,  Vida  1 B.A    February,  1918
McCallum,   Daisy  J 2nd    September,  1917
McCarthy,  Mrs.   Nina L 2nd   January, 1920
McCartney,   Verna  A 2nd  Februar, 1917
MeCreery,   Paul  L B.A  August,  1918
MeCrimmon,   Mrs.   Constance   G 2nd       February,  1921
AlcCusker,   Dorothy  V 2nd       February,  1921
AlacDiarmid,   Katie   B.A.    January,  191.2
MacDonald,   Christina    2nd       February,   1911
McDonald,   Edna   C 2nd   August, 1906
McDonald,   Gertrude   E 1st         January, 1913
MacDonald,  H.  Lucretia  1st  .•   September,  1910
McDougall,   Elizabeth    -3rd       August, 1J12
McBwan,    Samuel    M.A   September, 1919
McFarland,   Cora   H i B.A    January, 1911
Macfarlane,   Rachel  M 1st   1894-1909;   February, 1916
MoGillivray,  Marjorie  R 2nd    September,  1921
McGown.   Jessie  H 2nd       September,  1920
McHeffey,   Jessie    .,2nd       February, 1917
Maclntyre,   Beatrice   A 1st         August,  1.912
MacKay,   Geo M.A  August, 1911
McKay,   Minna  G. 2nd  March,  1891; August, 1912
McKay,   M.   Helen    2nd       November,  1917
McKay,   Sadie E 2nd   January, 192.0
Mackechnie.   Flora   -2nd       February, 1920
McKee,  George E B.A    May, 1905
MacKenzie, Christina A 1st       October, 1916
MacKenzie,   G.   W B.A September, 1918
MacKenzie,   Grace   1st   August, 1908
MacKenzie,   Mary  E B.A August,   1908;   September,  19".S
MacKenzie, Olive B : -2nd     September,  191S
MacKenzie,   Rowan W 1st    September, 1921
MacKenzie,   Winewood F B.A    August, 1912
MacKinnon,   Catherine  P -Academic    September, 1921
McKmnon,   Mary    2nd       January, 1897
McLean,   Aledaide   M 2nd      October,  1916
McLean, D. R 2nd      September, 1915
Maclean,   Grace   C 3rd   September, 1919
MeLeish,   Kathleen    i.st    March,   1.913
McLeish,  W.   Y B.Sc  September, 1920
Macleod,   Hazel   E B.A  January,  1912
McLeod,   Margaret  A -And       February, 1.92'
McManus,   Edith M 2nd    September, 1919
McManus,   Glenna H 2nd       January, 1919
MacIUillan,    Mary   R 2nd       August, 1915
Mc.Neely,  Hanna E MA September, 1917
McNeill, Hazel  1st       January, 19 IS
McNiven.   Catherine B.A August,   1914;   September, 1919
McNiven,   Margaret    B.A    January, 1915
Macpherson,   Annie    2nd         September, 1920
Macpherson, Mary  .2nd       August, 1915
MacQueen.   Elizabeth  D B.A   December,  1907
MacQueen,   Emma   H B.A    September, 1921
McQueen,   Kate  H B.A    January, 1911
McTavish.  Janet L.   E '....Academic     January,  1917
McWhinney,   Edna    2nd   January, 1917
McWilliams,   Jean    2nd       February,  1919
Neate,  Winifred  2nd    February, 1921
Neill, Mrs.   B.  B.   Stewart  1st       August, 1908
Neill,   Muriel  Stewart   2nd       August
Nesbitt,   William   J 1st.   August, 19
•7.1 O
1 Q
Nicholson,  Eleanor B *nd       September,  1920
Noble,  Alice L 1st             February,  1920
Noble, Mary K 2nd    September,  1921
Noble,  Maybelle  @ 2nd       February, 1918
Northrop. H B.A    January, 1920
Nowlan, Lena M.  ....• B.A January,  1921 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
0o
Name. Certificate.
O'Connell,  Lillian M 2nd ..
O'Neil,  Margaret A 1st  ...
Ogilvie,   David   M.A.
Olding,   Elizabeth    2nd   .
Ormond,  Agnes  2nd  .
Date of Appointment,
 January, 1921
   September, 1919
    August, 1915
January
1Q
901
September, 1921
Paget,   Harry   L.
Painter,
Palmer,
Parker,
Parkes,
Patrick,
Patrick,
Patterson
Pattison,
Emily    2nd
-1st        October,
    January,
'nd Januar
May L	
Ernest W Manual Training .... August^
Jessie F. B —2nd    _    September,
Georgia H 3rd       February,
Grace A 2nd       January,
Jean  1st      January,
'homas    M.A   September,
Pattison, Mrs. Agnes L 1st    September,
Pearson, Ethel M 2nd  January,
Peck,  Marjorie  G B.A February,
Perkins,   Alice   G 1st    September,
Perkins,  Ella D ...B.A August,  1905;  April,
Pierce;   Margaret E 2nd       February,
Pollock,   James R .1st       August,
Potter,   Agnes 2nd      September,
Potter, Elsie  2nd    December,
Prescott,   Muriel   E 2nd       February,
Pullen,   Mabel   F 2nd  January,
Purdie, A. J.  Grosvenor  B.A    August,
Putnam,  Walter  B.Sc.
Pye,   Annetta   E.
Pyke,  Agnes  M.
August,
•2nd       February,
2nd   May
1912
1909
1921
1911
3.913
191?
1916
1907
1921
1920
191.1
1920
1912
1911
1920
1910
1921
1920
1919
1.921
1912
1917
1920
1920
Quigley,  Mrs.  Edith K 2nd   January, 1920
Ramage,   Wm.   G B.A    August,
Rand,   William   L B.A    August,
Reid, Annie M. 2nd   - December,
Reid,   Elmer W .B.A January,
Rempel,  Mrs.  A.  J B.A January,
Reveley,   Ethel H 2nd      October,
Richards,   A.   E 2nd       May,
Rines,    Alfred    1st       August,
Roberts,   T.   H B.A  August,
Robertson, Hugh M B.A September,
Robinson,   Jean   ...B.A November,
Roche,   Emily   Temporary       September,
Rogers,   Leslie   V B.A January,
Rollston,  Eva J ...B.A    February,
Roots,   Winifred   AI 2nd       April,
Ross,  A.  W M.A    January,
Ross,   Carrie   E 2nd   September,
Ross,   Ellen   D .....1st         February,
Ross,   Lillian  A 2nd       January,
Ross,  Lillian M 1st   A.   August,
Ross,  Willow  C Temporary  September,
Rowan.   Bessie  E 2nd   January,
Roy,   Elsie    2nd        January,
Roy,   Henrietta   1st     September,
Roy,   Jessie   1st   September,
Russell,  Mrs.  Agnes G 2nd        September,
Russell,   Elizabeth  C 1st    February,
Russell,   Isabel   R 2nd       January,
Salter,  Mildred E 2nd       January,
Sanders,   Bernice   C.   A 2nd   January,
Sanderson, J. R M.A...  Ph.D  August,
Saunders,  M   B Academic       August,
S~ott, Irene M 2nd        September,
Selman, G. S B.A    August,
Sewell,   Eunice  A.    1st    September,
Shaneman,   Mrs.   Tsobel D B.A    January,
Sharman.   Tsabelie    2nd   November,
Shearman,   A.   B.    1st       January,
1912
1914
1917
1916
1912
1912
1920
190S
1910
1921
1919
1920
1921
1920
1919
1909
1920
1932
1911
193.1
1921
1918
1917
1.920
1919
1920
1921
1918
1910
1917
1914
1906
1918
3 916
1921
3.920
3.920
1916 36 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
Sheepy,  Janet    -2nd   August, 1911
Sherman,  R.  S 1st       February, 1903
Shine,  Mrs.  Alice  G 9nd       April, 1903
Shook,   Edith   L 2nd    September, 1921
Shore,   Alma   M 2nd.     February, 1921
Simlett, Justina A 1st     March,  1919
Simpson,   Eleanor   M - 2nd       August, 1917
Simpson,   Jean  B 2nd       February, 1918
Sinclair,   Annie  M M.A    September, 1911
Sinclair,  J.   G Academic       August, 1910
Sinclair,  Madge  P 2nd    „    August, 1910
Skelding,  Cecil H 1st   September, 1021
Smelser,   William   A Temporary      October, 1921
Smith,   Annie  M B.A    September, 1921
Smith,  Mrs.  Christina M 1st February, 1021
Smith,   Lillian  L B.A     September, 1920
Snider.   Emma  S 2nd    1904-1909;   August, 1912
Sparling,   R 1st Aug., 1891; Aug., 1893; August, 1900
Spencer,   Agnes    1st     August, 1912
Splan,   Mary  E 3rd   January,  1913
Spouse,   Mrs.   Margaret    1st    September, 1921
Stables,   Nellie   T 2nd       February, 1912
Starratt,  Mary L    B.A February, 3910
Steeves,  R.   P    1st     January, 1913
Stephens,  Emma L -1st     January, 1910
Stern,   Florence    2nd       February, 1918
Sterns,   Clara  M B.A  August, 1911
Stevens,   Gladys   E 1st       August, 1914
Stewart.   Christine  E 1st      August, 1912
Stone, Mabel W 1st     February, 1914
Stonehouse, Gladys M 2nd        September, 1920
Story,  Mary E.    1st       January, 1913
Straight,   R 1st       August, 1907
Stuart,   Dorothy L 1st      September,  1921
Stuart,  James A B.A  January, 1913
Suggitt,   Maizie   A B.A    February, 191S
Suter,   R.   W B.A.,  B.Sc   October, 1902
Sutherland, Alexander  M.A   August,  1916
Sutherland,  Evelina,  J.  M Academic       September, 192-0
Sutherland,  Jeanne ^H 2nd   September, 1020
Tait,  Albert B M.A    August, 3 91A
Tail. Edythe C 2nd   January, 1920
Tanner,   Rebecca   2nd       August, 1900
Taylor, Edsna M B.A    October, 1917
Taylor,  Grace A Academic     August, 1910
Taylor, Helen M 2nd       September, 1920
Taylor, L. W B.A    August, 1913
Taylor,  Marguaretta  M.   S 2nd    September, 1921
Taylor,   Minnie    1st     August, 1914
Templer,   Mrs.   Jean   1st       August, 1911
Tees,  Percy  C B.A September, 1921
Thomas,  C. C 2nd     October, 1919
Thomas, owen J .B.A August, 10.11
Thompson,  Edith   E 2nd    October, 1917
Thompson, Lillian M 1st     August, 1917
Thompson,  Nora   K Academic     February, 1918
Thomson,   Hazel   M 1st      January, 1921
Timberlake.    M Vcademic       September, 1920
Tom,  Gregory 11 .1st    1891-1011;   August, 1915
Townsend, Agnes M 2nd      February, 1918
Trembatl .   Barbara   E 1st     August, 1914
Truswell,   Mary   1st   August, 1899
Tucker, Julia E 1st     January, 1913
Tucker,   Winifred   M 2nd     October, 1917
Turner, Janet C 1st    j    February, 1914
Vining,  A. W M.A., Dr. Univ. of Paris  August, 1917
Walsh, Violet C B.A    January, 19-•
"Ward.   Blanche  E 1st  A.  January   1912
"Warden, R. C Temporary   November, 1919
"Warne,   Feme Academic August, 1917
T ■BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
<Y
Certificate.
Gertrude    1st
Mabel A 2nd
Jessie    3rd   ..
Evelyn   H 2nd
Ethel M	
Date
of Appointm
.. February,
    August,
February,
August,
 2nd       April,
Lyle  Commercial Specialist   February,
.Name.
WArner,
Warner,
Watson,
Webber,
AVeismiller,
Whelan,  A.   E.
White,   Edward  M B.Sc       September,
vVhitworth,   Marjorie   2nd     January
AVickett,   Evelyn  B.A
Wilkinson,   Amie  F 1st
Williams,  Florence E 2nd           September,
Williams,  Maude A 1st.       November!
Williamson.   Dorothy K 2nd   September!
E.   M 2nd    August!
 2nd       February,
m-   C B.A    January,
Janet    2nd       March,
Rosalind    1st      January,
Berton  J B.A.,   B.Sc   October,
January,
August,
Williamson,   Jessie
Willson,   Ruth   T.
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wrood,
'Wood,   Grace  B	
Woodhead.   Thomas W	
Woods,   William    B.A.
2nd      September,
Academic      August,
  August,
"Yeo,  Emsley
Young, G. P.
L.
-B.A    September,
.1st      January,
ent.
1914
1912
1917
1916
1920
1921
1921
1917
1907
1917
1920
1918
W9
1914
1920
1908
1916
1913
1906
1919
1908
win
1913
DOMESTIC   SCIENCE
Abel.   Mrs.   I. January, 1917
Allen,   Mabel  D ] September, 1919
Bell, Adna M August,  1.912
Berry,   Elizabeth    August, 1905
Canty,   Sara   W September, 1921
Day,   Marjorie ; September, 1921
Dickinson,   Bessie   S September,  1920
Fullerton,   Florence  L September, 1918
Hope.   Mrs.   Edith   { October, 1921
Lee,  Phyllis,  J September,  1921
"Malcolm,    Etta    September, 1921
Murray,   Dona    September, 1920
Mutch,   Susie  L August, 1913
McEwen, Agnes  E:   February. 1917
Oliver,  Frederica August, 1.914
Parker,   Emily   ?>r November, 1920
Rhoads,   Etta   B ■ August,  1917
"Simpson,  Edith F September, 1920
Steven,   Elsie   September, 1920
"i_ nderhill,   Lucy    . September, 1920
MANUAL    TRAINING
■Cameron, C.   A September,
•Campbell,   A September,
Oantell,  A January,  1910;  September,
Crabb,  Charles  Februairy,
Cross, N. Y October, 1915; August,
Gardner, N. H January,
Harris, F. J   October,
Hill,  William  A , September,
Jones,  A. W : August,
Kitchen,   Charles  H October,
Michelmore,   A.   J September,
McAdam,   Josiah' W January,
MdCallum,  D.  P August,
McKeown,  William A August,
Northrop,   S August,
Templer,   F.   W August,
Tingley, A. P August,
Williams,   A August,
"Wilson,   Wm September,
AYoodcock,  William  K ! :.September,
1918
191S
1919
1920
1917
1908
1917
1910
1917
1921
1918
1912
1913
1.903
1903
1913
1914
19141
1918
1921 98
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SUPERVISORS  AND  SPECIAL   INSTRUCTORS
Bundy, A. C Physical Culture, Cadets and Musketry
Butler, Constance E. ..., Assistant Supervisor of Music
Cantelon, Jean M Social Service Worker
Chadwick, Clara  (March to December)  Assistant Supervisor of Music
Cotsworth,  Lena  K Physical  Culture
Dauphinee, A.  Josephine   Supervisor of Special Classes
Dyke,  F.   W Supervisor   of Music
Huggard,  Mrs.  Ada  C. Supervisor of  Sewing
Kerr,  Ruby  A Psychologist
Trembath,  Emily J Supervisor of Primary Work
Scott,  Charles H Supervisor of Drawing
SCHOOL   MEDICAL  AND   DENTAL  STAFF
Wightman,
Wilson, Bel
Hogg.  Marj
Fallen,   R.
R., M.D School Medical Officer
le H.. M.D Assistant School Medical Officer
raret P..  M.B.,   Ch.B Assistant  School Medical Officer
L.,   D.M.D School  Dentist
Scott,   N.  H..
Loveridsre,   VV
Bezeau, F.  J., D
Sproule, W.   K.,
Bellamy.   Airs.  D
Breeze,  Elizabetl
Campbell. Mary
 Assistant
D.D.S Assistant
).S ." Assistant
>.M.D Assistant
School
School
School
School
D.M.I i Assistant   School  Dentist
A., D.D.S.  Assistant  School Dentist
Dentist
Dentist
 Nurse
G Head Nurse
 Nurse
Cruickshank,   Mamie   K Nurse
Ewart, I. May  Nurse
Hodson,   Elaine   Nurse
Jukes,   Harriet Nurse
McLellan,  Aletha Nurse
Schultz, Mrs. M. D Nurse
•Smith, Isabell
Stevens, Vera
Alderson, Mrs.
Brydon e-Jack,
McDonagh, D.
Worley/Mrs.
 - Nurse
B Nurse
G.  C Dental Attendant
Audrey   Dental  Attendant
N Dental   Attendant
V r Dental Attendant
ATTENDANCE   OFFICERS
Jensen,  N.
Mulholland,
Borland.  A.
 Chief Attendance  Officer
A.  S Assistant Attendance  Officer
 Vssistant Attendance  Officer BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
99
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
Vancouver, B. C. 1921
Year
First  	
Second .
Third ...
Fourth .
Fifth ..
Sixth ...
Seventh
Eighth .
Ninth ...
Tenth   ...
Salary Schedule.
PUBLIC SCHOOL  SALARIES
Grades.
in
03 g
ti                                   tJ   ^   P ri
w                 ^              ° o s cr1
g £ £M ed g
$1,320        $1,140        $1,140 $1,800
1,380          1,200          1,260 1,920
1,440          1,260          1,320 2,040
1,500          A320          1,380 2,160
1,560          1/3S0,          1,440 2,280
1,620 1,440 1,500 	
1,680 1,500 1,560 	
1,740 1,560 1,620 	
1,800 1,620 1,680 	
  1,680        *1,740 	
(* For Miss Breeze.)
Ofl
Principals.
Manual
Train in
03
03
$1,620
$2,280
$2,400
1,760
2,400
2*520
1,900
2,520
2,640
2,040
2,640
2,760
2,180
2,760
2,880
2,320
2,880
3,000
3,120
3,210
3,360
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020
for the first year, and $l,0i8O for the second year of successful teaching; men
teachers with First Class Certificates, without experience, if employed, will be
paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the. first and second years of satisfactory
service.
Salary Schedule.
HIGH    SCHOOL   SALARIES
Ass
istants.
g
o
'■£ 03
bo
Year.
&
SS v
CO .i-i
r^
r~
P C
i
03
o
§m
G "g
1
(^*-
DZ   O
>'' <5fH
First    ........
$2,030
$1,7150
$1,250
$1,750
Second
2,170
1,890
1,350
1,890
Third   	
2,310
2,030
1,450
2,030
Fourth	
2/450
2,170
1,550
2,170
Fifth  	
2,590
2,310
1,650
2,310
Sixth 	
2,7130
2,450
1,750
2,450
Seventh   ..
2,870
2,590
1,850
2,590
Eighth   ....
3,010
2,730
' 1,900
Principals.
Kitsilano 	
Cecil   Rhodes   High   School   of
Commerce   	
King George 	
Britannia   	
King Edward 	
Technical School 	
(Special salary)
$'3,300
*,300
1,400
5,400
J, 705
10
One-tenth of the annual salary is paid at the close of each teaching month.
No  schedule  increase  will  go into  effect  without  the  same  being  recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any   teacher may be  fixed  at  a sum   not  indicated  in  the
schedule by special resolution of the Board.
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the  Board up  to 20  teaching days
(ten for each term) in cases of illness of teachers; also for 3 days in cases of
bereavement in a teacher's family and for compulsory quarantine. 100
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
-    Vancouver, B. C. 1922.
Salary Schedule.
PUBLIC SCHOOL SALARIES.
Year
G
d
03
<i
rades.
d
03
2
o
fci)
2*2
C"""'
TO   til
ferl ,
Domestic
Science and
Nurses.
Vice-
Principals.
Principal
03
«5 °
fa o
UiUl
Large
Schools.
First  	
Second 	
     1,320
       1,380
$1,140
1,200
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,'500
1,560
1.620
1,680
$1,620
1,760
1,900
2,040
2,180
2,320
$1,200
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,500
1,560
1,620
1.680
1,740
$1,800
1,920
2.040
2,160
2,280
*2,400
(held
$2,400
2.520
2,640
2,760
2,880
nurse)
$2,520
2 640
Third         	
       1,440
2,760
Fourth  	
Fifth
1,500
       1,560
2,880
3,000
Sixth   	
       1,620
3,120
Seventh      	
       1,680
3,240
Eighth
       1,740
3,360
Ninth   	
       1,800
Tenth  	
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020
for the first year, and $1,080 for the second j ear of successful teaching; men
teachers with First Class Certificates, without experience, if employed, will be
paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the first and second years of satisfactory
service.
( * )   For   teacher  holding  First   Class   or  Academic certificates.
Salary Schedule.
HIGH   SCHOOL   SALARIES
Assistants. Manual Domestic
Year. Men.       Women. Training. Science.    Principals.
First     $2,030 $1,750 $1,750 $1,470 $3,300
Second    2,170 1,890 1,890 1,610 3,440
Third     2,310 2,030 2,030 1,750 3,580
Fourth     2,450 2,170 2,170 1,890 3,720
Fifth     2,590 2,310 2,310 2,030 3,860
Sixth    2,730 2,450 2,450 2,170 4,000
Seventh      2,870 2,500 2,590 2,310                  	
Eighth     3,010    c 2,730 2,730                                         	
One-tenth of the annual salary is paid at the close of each teaching month.
No schedule increase will go into effect without the same being recommended
by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the
(schedule by special resolution of the Board.
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the Board up to 20 teaching days (ten
for each term) in oases of illness of loachers; also for 3 days in cases of bereavement in a teacher's family and for compulsory quarantine. BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
101.
Vancouver, B. O,
22nd February, 1922.
The Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B. C.
Mr. Chairman,  Air's. Macaulay and Gentlemen:
I have the honor to hand you herewith Financial and Statistical Statements for the year ending 31st December, 1921.
In consideration of the Trustees agreeing to reduce their
total Revenue and Capital Estimates for the year 1921 by the
sum of $155,000.00, the City Council kindly consented to the sum
of $89,661.23, part of the balance of the 1921 Estimates, being
used by the Trustees for Capital Expenditure.
The above concessions enabled the Trustees to complete and
equip the new eight-roomed addition to the Strathcona School, 102
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
and also to erc-l and equip nineteen additional one-room cottage
schools, thus providing accommodation to meet the increased
school population, and avoiding the necessity of refusing admission to the schools of some 1000 new pupils.
Bv careful administration the Trustees closed the vear 1921
with an unexpended balance of $14,327.14, of Avhich $4,438.06
was Revenue and $-1889.08 Capital. This latter sum will more
than cover the cost of building and equipping the five new one-
room cottage schools authorized by the Trustees last December.
Although there was a considerable increase in expenditure on
Repairs and Renewals for 1()21, yet, more should have been spent
on this account to avoid undue depreciation in the school properly, which is showing the effect of many years' curtailment in
expenses.
% have the honor to be,
Sirs and Madam,
Your obedient servant,
B. G. WOLKI^MERTOX,
Secretarv. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
KM
STOCK STATEMENT FOR the YEAR ENDING
J     31st DECEMBER, 1921.
School Supplies.
Stock on hand 31st December, 1920 .$18,205.51
Purchased during 1921...  $26,874.75
Less Paid for 1920 Stock...      1,079 72       I
mt.      .J ' l|t  25,795.03
I 44,000.57
Issued during 1921   30,785.15
I 13,215.42
Stock Paid for in 1922.        240.49
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921    13,455.91
Janitors' Supplies.
Stock on hand 31st December. 1920     1.482.42
Purchased during 1921 ....._ 10 238.66
% 11,721.08
Issued during 1921       8,298.63
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921 -.    3,422.45
Repairs and Renewals.
Stock on hand 31st December, 1920 $     659.91
Purchased during 1921       8,738.89
• 9,398.83
Issued during 1921 8,591.49
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921 $     807.34 r
104
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EXPENDITURE ON REVENUE ACCOUNT TO
31st DECEMBER, 1921. f|
Salaries—
Municipal    Inspector    and
Assistants  $ 8,715.00
Assistant Municipal Inspector..    3,600.00
I        $ 12,315.00
Secretary  and Assistants..  10,435.00
Building Superintendent  and Assistants 9,000.00
Medical Department   19,020.30
Dental Department   9,972.50
Attendance Officers   4,920.00
Xight Classes—Director  720.00
Storekeeper   1,800.00
Chauffeurs  3,126.24
Telephone Operator  r... 815.00
Retiring Allowan» e   48 00
-$      72,172.04
Salaries—Schools.
Teachers  :  ..$37ii,6-l-1.58
Teachers, Substitutes        9.94^.50 ;a
 886,590.08
Supervisors       18,530.28
Manual Training       42,865.22
Domestic Science     1(),614.80
Janitors
967,600.38
83,299.56
Supplies—General School.
Seh oo
Ls      59,720.84
Domestic ^Science
Manual Training
Technical
Medical 	
Dental 	
Janitors  	
2 J92 54
: 5,897.30
14,146.36
1.370.27
598.31
11,538.79
94.064.41
Carried Forvar(
.$1,217,136.39 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
105
Miscellaneous
Brought Forward  -. $1,217,136.39
Fuel  40,612.00       '3;      '.: ■  :
Elec. Light. Power and (las  8,188.33
Water a ||  1,955.80
Insurance  16,057.70
Advertising  965.92
Printing    651 88
Telephone -.-. 3,130.17
Auto Expense and Trading   8,061.80
Scavenging
646.31
Car Fares ...v_  1,870.25
Auditor and Le^al Expenses     784.96
Office Expenses |  4,986.79
Renting and Leasing  12,118.80
Contingent  453.01
Repairs and Renewals
New School Sites  £11,054.05
_New   School  Buildings     56,573.62
Furniture and Equipment   _ 12,144.48
100,483.72
1  105,518.13
$1,423,138.24
79,772 15
Less Pavments for Non-resident Punils.
«/ J.
and  sundrv  credits  ...	
Sinking and Interest Fund
1,502,910.39
11,539.68
1,491,370.71
213,432.52
1,704,803.23
I certify that the above Statement is in accordance with the
Citv Hall Books, as well as the School Board Records.*
JOHN KENDALL, F.CA.
Auditor.
Vancouver, B. C. 22nd. Februarv, 1922.
7 *      7
J. AY. PRESCOTT, Chairman.
IS. G. WOLFE-MER^OX, Secretary. oo
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BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
LIGHT, POWER, GAS, WATER, AND FUEL ANALYSIS FOR
1921.
schools.
Light
and
Power
Gas.
Water
Coal
and
"Wood.
Oil.
Total.
King  Edward    576.69
Central      171.63
Dawson      378.21
Strathcona      2-22.28
Mt.  Pleasant   403.81
Fairview     116.88
Roberts      279.S6
Seymour     254.67
Model     140.75
Kitsilano      100.66
Grandview     114.15
Macdonald     69.76
Simon Fraser   222.04
Aberdeen     244.40
Britannia  High     495.15
Alexandra     314.56
Tennyson     185.04
Nelson     133.95
Cecil   Rhodes     224.44
Beaconsfield   ....'  201.82
Hastings     103.44
Grenfell     4.44
F.    Nightingale     131.76
General Gordon   135.91
Henry   Hudson     261.48
Livingstone     82.47
Laura  Secord    86.62
Charles   Dickens     76.32
Franklin      22.91
Bayview     34.12
King  George High.... 238.66
Office      404.45
Kitsilano   High     40.04
Technical   School   .... 511.76
260.47
61.11
9.33
37.45
4.01
2.75
51.03
12.43
75.31
9.78
7.37
40.62
64.28
43.84
69.64
59.33
49.14
138.03
7.65
66.57
56.34
10.87
41.29
11.74
13.92
105.00
84.00
42.00
149.10
58.80
63.00
92.40
84.00
58.80
46.20
50.40
42.00
42.00
42.00
63.00
42.00
42.00
67.20
42.00
25.20
117.60
50.40
50.40
67.20
50.40
42.00
42.00
42.00
42.00
33.60
21.00
156.10
2,659.58
892.45
768.90
863.79
1,187.93
369.82
1,365.68
832.97
1,238.2*6
372.05
636.10
497.62
1,118.04
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1,628.44
1,264.2,7
775.68
690.62
989.86
283.71
1,366.56
223.17
988.23
1,830.84
378.95
1445.09
804.55
423.69
1107.95
449.60
14.17
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829.53
814.44
648.43
1,137.30
956.52
545.07
892.20
741.72
388.81
397.2\7
884.46
311.96
392.26
632.19
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1,654.55
552.45
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1,513.12
528.69
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609.38
1,422.70
1,201.00
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1,690.47
1,866.60
1,364.60
2,364.26
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1,601.77
227.61
2,211.97
1,129.43
1,867.21
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1,074.84
609.98
1,412.47
991.25
1,188.67
957.24
1,706.23
50,756.13 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
111
INDEX
Attendance
Average  (School
CD \
Attendance of Trustees at Meetings
Board of School Trustees:—
List of, 1S86-.1921	
List of, vear 1021... .	
List of, Year 1922...	
Chairman's Address	
Page.
It 8T
4
Committees (Standing) :-
§Year  1921	
Year 1922	
Dental Staff 	
Enrolment
Year, 1921 ...
Years 1903 to 192.1 in October
6
4
5
8
4
5
98
87
87
78
22
Light, Power, Gas, Water, Fuel, Analysis for 1921     110
Medical  Staff       98
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees         5
Officials,   1922 5   and      98
Principals, names and Telephone Numbers       88
Reports:—
Attendance  	
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools	
.     Auditor  :.... 104 and    105
Building Committee        17
Dental Department        45
Dra"wrng 	
Home Economics Department	
Management   Committee	
Manual Training Department	
Medical Inspection of Schools	
Municipal Inspector of Schools       23
Music 83 and     85
76
71
10
69
37 112
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL  TRUSTEES
Page.
80
50
56
67
47
41
74
101
Night Schools	
Observation  Class	
Physical Training, Cadets and Rifle Teams	
Primary "Work	
Psychological Department.	
%/ CD I
School Nursing Staff	
School Sports —	
Secretary	
Sewing -	
Social Service Work	
Special Classes	
Revenue Account, 1921.	
Revenue Expenditure. Analysed	
Revenue Expenditure, Showing Cost per Capita....108 and
Salary Schedule, 192L. --
Salary Schedule, 1922 .... ...
Schools—Name, Location, Number of Divisions	
Stock Statement 	
Supervisors and Special  Instructors, List of	
Teachers:—
Their Certificates and Dates of Appointment	
Number Each Year Since 1912	
Number of Special Teachers	
Number Holding  Different Grades of Certificates	
Domestic. Science and Manual Training	
\ralue of School Property	
| LIST  OF  ILLUSTRATIONS.
Trustees	
Vancouver Technical School	
Gordon, J. S :	
Brough,  T. A	
McKenzie, N. R	
Wightman. Dr. R	
Pallen, Dr. R. L	
Wolfe-Merton, Major B. G     101
Manual Training Exhibit... Insert.
~\
n
51
53
104
106
109
99
100
88
103
98
89
87
87
87
97
107
Q
O
9'*
-•)
31
32
37
45  

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