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BC Historical Books

Thirteenth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1915

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  THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA Styittottttj
Annual j S&jrort
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j TRAPES ifoiffi COUNCIL j
THE   STANDARD   PRINTERS
426    HOMER   STREET,   VANCOUVER,   B. C.  1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EXECUTIVE  BOARD.
Chairman    Fred W.  Welsh
Chairman, School Management Committee A.  C. Stewart
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee J. R. Seymour
Chairman, Finance Committee A.  C. Stewart
STANDING  COMMITTEES.
School Management.
A. C. Stewart, Chairman.
Mrs.   P.   McNaughton.
Dr.   F.  C.  McTavish.
Building   and   Grounds.
J.  R.  Seymour,  Chairman.
A.   M.   Harper.
C.   Sangster
Finance.
A.   C.   Stewart,   Chairman.
J.   R.   Seymour.
Fred W. Welsh.
The  Chairman  of the Board is  ex-officio member of all  Committees.
ATTENDANCE OF TRUSTEES AT BOARD AND COMMITTEE MEETINGS.
1915.
Board        Management        Building Finance
Trustees.                               Meetings.      Committee.       Committee. Committee.      Totals.
26                     15                         33 15                   89
Fred W. Welsh      26      '   ■';'"  9     ' • r; '^  32 ^       15    ;.    .    82
A.C.Stewart      24                    15                        17 13                  69
J.R.Seymour      25                      3                        33 14                  75
Chas. Sangster'     20.                       5                         26 2                   53
A. M. Harper      24                      6                        33 2                  65
Mrs. P. McNaughton      12                       6                           3 ..21
Dr. F. C. McTavish      14                      9                          4 1                  28 board of school trustees
1916 r
Retira December 31st,  1916.
A. C. Stewart. A. M. Harper. Mrs.   I.   H.   Moody.
Retire December 31st,  1917.
Dr. W. H. Lang. Fred W. Welsh. H. C. N. McKim. J. R. Seymour.
EXECUTIVE BOARD.
1916.
Chairman   J- R- Seymour
Chairman, School Management Committee A. C. Stewart
Chairman,  Building and  Grounds  Committee Fred W.  Welsh
Chairman, Finance Committee Fred W. Welsh
STANDING COMMITTEES.
School  Management. Building   and   Grounds.
A.    C.   Stewart,. Chairman. Fred   W.   Welsh,   Chairman.
Mrs.   I.   H.   Moody. A.   M.   Harper.
Dr. W.  II.  Lang H. C. N. McKim.
Finance.
Fred  W.   Welsh,   Chairman.
A.   C.   Stewart.
J. R. Seymour.
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE OF MEETINGS.
Board Fourth Tuesday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Management Committee Second Tuesday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding the 4th Tuesday, at 8 p.m.
Finance Committee  .Tuesday before Board meeting.
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the School Board
Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets; and all correspondence to
officials should be addressed to the same building.
OFFICIALS.
1916.
Municipal Inspector of Schools J. S. Gordon, B.A.
<-^ , i   Miss  A.   Balfour
^stenographers   / _
& \   Miss  L. Judge
Secretary and Accountant Gerald Upton
Clerk    Harold Hicks
Miss D. Chaffer
Stenographers   J    Miss M. McQuarrie
1     Miss B. Fraser
Building Superintendent    F. J.  Giles
Stenographer Miss R. Weinberg
Grounds Superintendent jf. A. A. Barrs
( James Inglis
Attendance Officers  )   XT   T
 * <   IN. Jensen
(w. Godfrey BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
From  1886 to   1915 inclusive
1886-1887.
Dr.   D.   B.   Beckingsale,   Secretary
J.   B.   Henderson
D.   B.  Charleson
1887-1888.
John    Devine,   Secretary
G.    I.    Wilson
W.   J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
Wm.    Brown
A.   G.   Johnson
G.   F.   Baldwin
1888-1889.
G.   I.   Wilson
John   Devine
C.   W.   Murray
Wm.    Brown
\.   II.   B.  Macgowsn,  Secretary
G.   F.   Baldwin
1889-1890.
G.    I.    Wilson
Chas.   Whetham,   M.A.
C.    W.    Murray
Wm.    Brown
A.   H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary.
G.   F.   Baldwin
1890-1891.
Appointed   by   the   Lieut.-Governor.
J.   M.   Browning
G.    I.    Wilson
Henry   Collins
Appointed  by  the   Council.
Wm.   Brown,   Chairman
A. H. B. Macgowan, Secretary
C.   W.   Murray
G.   F.   Baldwin
1891-1892.
Appointed   by  the   Lieut.-Governor.
B. Springer
G.   I.   Wilson
Henry  Collins
Appointed  by  the   Council.
Wm.    Brown,    Chairman
A.   II.   B.  Macgowan,   Secretary
C. W.   Murray
G.   F.   Baldwin
1892-1893.
Wm.   Brown
A.   H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary
Henry   Collins
G.   I.   Wilson,   Chairman
Wm.   Templeton
G. R. Gordon
1893-1894.
A.   H.   B.   Macgowan,   Chairman.
C.   W.   Murray,  Secretary
John    McAllister
Wm.   Templeton
C.   C.   Eldridge
G. R. Gordon
1894-1895.
Macgowan,  Chairman
A H.
C.   W.   Murray,   Secretary
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
Wm.   Templeton
C.   C.   Eldridge
G. R.  Gordon
C.   F.   Foreman
1895-1896.
Wm.   Templeton,   Chairman
C.   C.   Eldridge
G. R.  Gordon
C.   F.   Foreman
A.   H.   B.   Macgowan
C.  W.  Murray,  Secretary
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
1896-1897.
G.   R
Gordon,   Chairman
Wm.    Templeton
C.   C.   Eldridge
J.   J.   Logan
W.   J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
C.   W.   Murray,   Secretary
1897-1898.
C.   C.   Eldridge,   Chairman
Mrs.   C.   Reid
Wm.   Brown
Jas.   Ramsay
W.   T.   McGuigan,   M.D.
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
C.   W.   Murray,   Secretary
W.
w.
C.
c.
1898-1899.
D.    Brydone-Jack,   M.D.,   Chairman
J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
W.   Murray,
C.   Eldridge
Mrs.   C.   Reid
Wm.   Brown
Jas.   Ramsay
Secretary
1899-
1900.
c.
W
.   Murray,
Chai
rman
G.
R.
Gordon
T.
T.
Banfield
T.
T.
Logan
Ta
3.     I
Ramsay
W
D
.   Brydone
-Tack,
M.D
W
. J.
McGuigan,   M
.D.
1900-1901.
C.   W.   Murray,   Chairman
W.   J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
Thos.   Duke
G. R. Gordon
J.  J.   Banfield
J.   J.   Logan
Jas.   Ramsay BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
From   1886 to   1915 inclusive
1901-1902.
C. W.   Murray,   Chairman
W.  J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
Thos.   Duke
G.  K.  Gordon
I.   I.   Banfield
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D-
James   Ramsay,   Chairman   from   1st   July
1902,   to   31st    December,    1902.
1902-1903.
J.  J.   Banfield,   Chairman
Thos.   Duke
Jas.    Ramsay
W. J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
(i.   R.   Cordon
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
D. Donaldson
1903-1904.
Thos.    Duke,    Chairman
D.    Donaldson
W. J.   McGuigan, M.D.
Jas.    Ramsay
"William    Clubb
T.   J.    Dougan
*W.   B.   McKechnie,   M.D.
1904-1905.
W.   B.   McKechnie,   M.D.,   Chairman
William   Clubb
Jas.   Ramsay
J.   J.   Dougan
Thos.   Duke
R.   P.   McLennan
J.   B.   Ferguson
1905-1906.
Wm.   II.   P.   Clubb,   Chairman
Jas.    Ramsay
W.    B.   McKechnie,   M.D.
Thos.    Duke
R.   P.   McLennan
J.    I*.    I- erguson
Victor   < )(ilum
1906-1907.
R.   P.    McLennan,   Chairman
W.   H.   P.   Clubb
Jas.    Ramsay
W.    B.    McKechnie,   M.D.
Thos.   Duke
7.   J.    I 'ougan
V.   W.   Odium   (Tan.   to   Oct.)
Charles   Hope   (Oct.   to  Dec.)
1907-1908.
Chas.  K. Hope, Chairman
R.    I\    McLennan
W.   H.   P.   Clubb
Ww  E.  Flumcrfelt
Thos.   Duke
I.    I.    Dougan
W.  D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
1908-1909.
I.    D.    Breeze,   Chairman.
Chas.   K.   Hope
W.  H.   P.   Clubb
\V.   F,.   Flumcrfelt
Thos.   Duke
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
J.   J.   Dougan
1909-1910.
W.   E-    flumcrfelt,   Chairmaa
W.  H.   P.  Clubb
Thos.   Duke
W.   D.   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.
J.   J.   Dougan
C.to.  Dyke
J.   D.   Breeze
1911.
W.   I).   Brydone-Jack,   M.D.,  Chairman
W.  E-   Fiumerfelt
W.   II.  P. Clubb
Thomas   Duke
A.  C.  Stewart  (Jan.  to  Aug.)
J. J. Dougan  (Sept. to  Dec.)
Geo.   J.    Dyke
T.   D.   Breeze
W
Tl
).
1912.
irydone-lack,   M.D.,   Chairman
.    Duke
L   J.   Dougan
Mrs.    P.    McNaughton
Wm.  II.   P.  Clubb
Geo.   J.   Dyke
W.   E.   Flumcrfelt
1913.
W.   I).   Brydone-Jack.   M.D.,   Chairman
Thos.   Duke
I.     I.    Dougan
Mrs.   P.   McNaughton
Wm.  H.   P.   Clubb
Geo. J.  Dyke   (Jan.  to May)
\\     !•',.  Flumerfelt
1914.
Wm.    II.    P.    Clubb,    Chairman    (Jan.   to
Xo\.)
Thos.   Duke.   Chairman   (Dec.)
Fred W.   WeLh
A.   C.   Stewart
Mrs.    P.   McNaughton
I     Iv.   Seymour
J.   J.    Dougan
1915.
Fred   W.   Welsh,   Chairman
A.   C.   Stewart
Mrs.   P.    McNaughton
nr.   1".   C.   McTavish
J.   R.   Seymour '
A.   M.   Harper
C.   Sanest< r BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 7
(g|PJpp$   CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS mUSK
Vancouver, B. C, January 12, 1916.
Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen :—
The past year has been one of financial stringency. It has also,
fortunately, been one in which our school population has increased
very little. Consequently no urgent demands for additional school
accommodation, on a large scale, have had to be considered; nor
has there been any considerable increase in our teaching staff. Only
one permanent building has been erected during the year—the new
Strathcona School, full particulars regarding which will be eiven
you by Mr. Seymour in his report on the work of the Building
Committee.
While we close the year with a teaching staff of 354 regular
teachers as compared with 362 at the close of 1.914, I wish to point
out that this decrease has been caused entirely by our having discontinued college work when McGill University College gave place
last October to the University of British Columbia. The names
of fifteen teachers, the salaries of five of whom were paid by us,
were then removed from our pay-roll. Had it not been for the opening of the Provincial University, we should have closed the year
witha regular teaching staff of 369 as compared with 362 for the
previous year. As it was, the regular teaching staff throughout
the year was slightly in excess of that for 1914, while the staff of
supervisors and of special teachers remained unchanged
How to pay this slightly increased staff in 1915 without materially reducing salaries was the question that confronted us at the
beginning of the year. That we managed for the first term not only
to make no reductions in salaries but also to allow the usual salary
increases was due to the fact that teachers and officials, some time
previously, had undertaken to contribute an average of ten per cent
of their earnings into a fund to be used in the interest of needy
families with children attending school. The amount thus contributed was quite as large as that by which salaries could reasonably have
been reduced; and it was being administered in a way that was quite
satisfactory to the Board. The leaving in force, therefore, of the
salary schedule was acceptable to both the School Board and the
teachers.
The work carried on also by the teachers through their organization exerted a most wholesome influence upon our schools.   Teach- 8
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ers and parents were brought into sympathetic touch with each
other; school attendance improved and better work naturally resulted.
Nor were the benefits of this scheme restricted to the work in
the class room alone. They were no less in evidence on the school
grounds, much of the money being spent for labor on school premises. Under the careful management of the Building Committee
and the close supervision of Mr. F. A. A. Barrs, Grounds Superintendent, the school grounds were made not only more attractive but
more suitable for games of various kinds.
With improved grounds, more suitable for play, it was a matter
of regret that we were not able during the year to encourage field
sports even to the extent we did in 1914. Let it be said, however,
to the credit of our men teachers, that never were school sports more
popular in Vancouver than during the past year. May I express
the hope that, with the return of better times, this Board will do
much to encourage clean, healthful sport on our school grounds
by boys and girls, under the proper supervision not only of young
men but also of lady teachers. Organized play is coming to be more
and more recognized as a very important factor in the proper development of boys and girls, intellectually and morally as well as
physically. Those who have made the closest study of this subject
agree that, in organized play, important lessons can be learned that
are seldom, if ever, learned in the class room and only too rarely
learned elsewhere. There is no better place for one to learn how
"to play the game" of life and play it fair than in hard-fought but
honorable struggles for victory on the school campus. The class
room, with the pupil in the individual desk, may develop the child
in isolation for independence; we need just as much, however, to
train him for inter-dependence and social helpfulness. Let the
school playground, therefore, be made the ally of the class room in
producing the highest type of manhood and womanhood for our
city.
We are fortunate in having at the present time sufficient class
room .accommodation. If our high school work continues' to grow,
however, in the next three years as it has in the past three, further
high school accommodation will have to be provided in the southwest and in the south-east portions of our city. We are fortunate
in having a seven-acre high school site well situated in the Kitsilano
district. It will likely be on this ground that our next permanent
high school accommodation will be provided; and even now we
should be forming our plans for it, if our high school work is not
to suffer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES        9
While we have ample accommodation at the Beaconsfield School
in South-East Hastings for the school population of that district,
it is unfortunate that the school is so poorly placed on one side of
the large district to be served. This undesirable condition will,
however, be only temporary, for, during the year, we have been
fortunate in securing 18.43 acres of land, in a single block, centrally
located and in all other respects very suitable for a school site or
school sites. This fine block of land is well situated for public
school purposes; while part of it will make a good high school site
for the south-east portion of the city. It is also well wooded; and,
if properly managed when being laid out, it will make an ideal school
ground, having ample room for sports-fields, gardens and park-like
groves and walks, beautiful and inviting at all seasons.
Our justification for securing this land at a time when money
is scarce and when there is no prospect of our being able to place
permanent buildings upon it for some time, is, as you know, our
having been able to secure it for the small sum of $20,000 on very
easy terms. This is a price considerably below that paid for a three-
acre site, similarly situated, less than three years ago; and, I may say,
a lower price by far than will likely be asked for a poorer site in a
few years when this Board will be forced to buy. We have also been
able to enter into an agreement with the owners to accept a yearly
rental equivalent to six per cent, on the purchase price of the property and to grant us the right to purchase at any time, paying in
full or in part. The Vancouver School Board will doubtless be
credited with a good year's service in 1915 ; but for no single trans-
action will it be more deserving of the citizens' gratitude than for
the securing of the property referred to above.
I am sorry it was impossible during the past year to dispose to
advantage of the more valuable portion of the Grandview School
grounds, and to secure a cheaper, though more suitable, site elsewhere and to provide more satisfactory school accommodation than
we now have in that district. This, however, should be the policy
for the future when changed conditions may make it practicable.
It is not improbable, either, that a similar policy should be pursued
by this Board in the future in connection with the Mount Pleasant
School site.
Last year's Chairman, Mr. Thomas Duke, in his annual address,
advocated the granting of pensions to teachers for long and faithful
service, and urged that this Board use its influence to inaugurate
some such scheme. While approving of the pension idea, I have felt
that the circumstances of the year under review were such as to
make a move in that direction undesirable.    For this, as for many r
10
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
other reforms, we must wait till the present financial depression
has passed.
The most delicate question we have had to deal with during the
year has been the readjustment of salaries. A strong sentiment prevailed in the City Council, from the beginning of the year, that our
employees' salaries should be materially reduced. This view was
also shared by some of our citizens, though many also felt the
teachers and officials, through their organization, were doing all
they should be required to do. For the first half of the year no reduction was made; but in June, when all civic departments felt the
necessity of curtailing and were curtailing expenses, we were constrained to reduce all salaries by ten per cent. After six months
trial of this reduced schedule, a committee of this Board, with the
Municipal Inspector and a representative of the teachers, was asked
to go into the question of salaries for 1916. Much thought has been
given to the whole matter. This Board is anxious, I know, to do the
best it can for its teachers. The best of our teachers, too, I am convinced, realizing that these are not normal times, .are prepared to
sacrifice somewhat as others are doing. I am, therefore, hopeful
that a satisfactory solution of the salary question may be reached
before next year's estimates are prepared.
Not only in regard to salaries have we had to retrench, retrenchment has been our watchword along all lines. Notwithstanding this,
much excellent work has been done in all departments.
When one realizes the scarcity of funds for the past year, the
amount of work done on buildings and grounds, as will be set forth
by Mr. Seymour in his annual report, is surprising. The efficiency
of our schools, too, does not seem to have appreciably suffered, as
will be seen from the report of Mr. Stewart on the work of school
management  for the year.
In conclusion, I wish to express my hearty appreciation of the
intelligent and increasing interest you have each manifested in the
discharge of your official duties throughout the year. The thoroughness as well as the extent of the work of the Building Committee, under the direction of Trustee Seymour, has been to me a
source of great satisfaction. As Chairman of the Board, I consider
I have also been fortunate in having the important business of the
Management Committee attended to by a committee, under the
guidance of Trustee Stewart, an educationist of sound judgment
and wide experience. The faithfulness with which officials and
employees of the Board have discharged their duties has also contributed materially to the success of our school work.    We can BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
11
consequently, close the year feeling that our promises to the electors
have been fully carried out and that our duties have been faithfully
discharged.
Respectfully submitted,
F. W. WrELSH,
Chairman, School Board. 12
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st, 1915.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen:—
I beg to submit the following report on the work of the Management Committee for the year ending December 31st, 1915:—
School Accommodation
Though only nine additional class rooms have been provided
during the year, the school accommodation of Vancouver has never
been more satisfactory than at present. This is attributable chiefly
to the fact that the building operations for the past few years were
carried on on the assumption that the school population would continue to increase in 1915 as it had for a number of years previously.
This anticipated increase, happily, or unhappily, and for reasons
that are too evident to be stated here, did not materialize during
the past year.
The completion of the new Strathcona School, a reinforced
brick and concrete building, with stone trimmings, has provided
better accommodation for the eight classes formerly taught in the
old brick school constructed in 1892. It also affords much needed
domestic science facilities for girls in that portion of the city. The
erection .and completion of a one-room frame school on the Franklin
grounds, at the corner of Albert and Cariboo Streets, in December,
and the placing of a fifth teacher there, will meet the educational
needs of that district for another year at least.
In all other portions of the city there are class rooms sufficient
for the coming year unless there is a very considerable increase in
school population—something not contemplated at present.
The only possible need for increased school accommodation
in 1916 will be in connection with high school work. With another
such large increase in high school pupils as we were forced to make
provision for on very short notice last August, after the results of
the Departmental examinations became known, it will no doubt be
necessary to provide accommodation for at least five or six extra
classes, as our available class rooms are now almost entirely occupied. In this connection it might be advisable for the incoming
Board to ascertain if the old Strathcona School can, with a moderate
and reasonable expenditure, be utilized as a temporary commercial
high school.    It  this be possible, it will prevent congestion in our high schools until more satisfactory arrangements can be made
when funds are more easily obtainable; if it cannot be done, other
accommodation will have to be secured.
At present we are up to requirements in the number of our
domestic science centres, but not in their equipment. The centres
in the Bayview and Beaconsfield Schools should be properly equipped
for work after next August. A manual training centre should
also be equipped in the new Beaconsfield School, to provide the
necessary facilities for the training of the boys in that part of the
city.
Teaching Staff
One year ago, in preparing our salary estimates for the year
1915, we anticipated a considerable increase in our public school
attendance when, on the first of February, classes for receiving
pupils would be formed, and made provision accordingly for an
addition to the staff of grade teachers. These teachers were appointed in January. When schools opened in February, it was with
an increased attendance of 496 pupils over the corresponding month
in 1914. The additional teachers appointed were, therefore, found
to be needed.
While our school population increased slightly during the past
year, we contemplate it will increase so little, if any, in 1916, that
no increase of the teaching staff will be necessary beyond that referred to above. The number of pupils entering high school from
the grade schools will no doubt be considerably in excess of those
graduating, however; and this will necessitate the appointment
in August of additional high school teachers; but will, on the other
hand, probably permit of the staff in the grade schools being reduced by an equal or greater number.
In the month of March we opened»for the first time a class
for deaf and dumb children. This necessitated the appointment
of a teacher for whom we had not made provision in our salary
estimates. We had not overlooked the urgent necessity for such a
class previously; but had never been able to obtain the sanction
and financial support of the Department of Education for such work.
The Department, when it had been approached regarding the opening of such a class in our schools, pointed out that the Provincial
Government was prepared to send all deaf and dumb children from
this city to Winnipeg for their education, free of all expense to their
parents. In 1914, however, the Winnipeg authorities raised the
anuual fees for such pupils from $300 to $500.
We had at this time in the city at least eight deaf and dumb i
14
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Oral Class
children of school age. To educate them in Winnipeg would cost
the Province $4,000 for fees and a considerable sum for travelling
expenses besides. Moreover, the parents were in most cases unwilling to send their children away if it were at all possible to educate
them at home.
Your Committee, convinced that the teaching would be well
done in our schools, again took the matter up with the Department
of Education and received in February permission to proceed with
the work, together with a promise of the usual monthly government
grant of $38.35 for the teacher of this class, thus placing this branch
of school work on the same financial basis as our ordinary day
school work. With the sanction of the Board, your Committee
appointed Miss Mabel Bigney, an experienced, expert oral teacher,
to take charge of this work on the first day of March.
After close observation of the management of this class for
ten months, we are convinced that the Board was fully justified in
opening it, as the progress made by these pupils has been most
satisfactory. The cost of operation has been small—$383.50 paid
by the Provincial Government and $419.75 by the city. In short,
the operation of this class has already effected a saving of over
$2,500.   These figures speak for themselves. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
15
When we came to make our plans for the opening of schools
after the summer holidays, we reckoned we would need only four of
the five additional teachers for high school work whom we had
made provision for in our estimates. High schools opened with
194 more pupils than in August 1914. With only four additional
teachers for so large an increase of students, the classes in our
high schools were larger than formerly, but, we trust, not too large
for efficient work by capable teachers.
In the staffing of the grade schools for the past term a small
saving was also effected. Instead of increasing the staff by one
after the summer holidays, as we had planned when preparing the
estimates, we made no increase, notwithstanding the fact that a
reduction of two had been made in the latter part of the term ending
June 30th.
A further saving was effected in the domestic science, manual
training and prevocational classes by having the supervisors teach
as well as attend to the work of supervision. It was possible for
them to do this because of the fact that they had the work well
planned ahead for ther respective staffs; and their willingness to
undertake the work of actual teaching in the class room as well as
that of supervision is a tribute to the interest taken in their own
particular line of activity. It also manifests a strong desire to lend
a helping hand in time of financial stress. This arrangement has
worked well and may to some extent be carried on for the coming
year; but the constantly increasing number of pupils in these three
departments of school activity may necessitate the appointment of
three additional teachers next August. In fact, another manual
training teacher can be employed for full time as soon as a new
centre in the Beaconsfield School can be equipped.
Public and High School W^ork
We lost several good teachers during'the year. Some joined
the colors; while others were induced by better salaries to teach
elsewhere. The reduction of salaries by ten per cent, from the first
of July made it difficult to obtain the services of experienced
teachers with good records, especially for positions in the various
grades of the public schools. A salary of less than $60 is no inducement to a good public school teacher, and the sooner we recognize this the better for children now attending our schools. The
overloading of our teaching staff with young, inexperienced teachers, however capable, is a dangerous experiment, and is not justifiable even on the score of economy. In order, therefore, to maintain,
and if possible to raise, our present standard of efficiency, it will be
necessary for us to revise our salary schedule upward instead of 1
16       BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
downward, as the modern tendency appears to be; otherwise we
cannot hope to have the present high standard of efficiency maintained in our schools.
Night Schools and Prevocational Work
The work in our night schools has been progressing most satisfactorily during the year. For the term just closed the attendance
has been the highest and the classes the largest since the schools
were first organized. Consequently more work has been done and
at greatly reduced cost.
By the concentration of the work at the Cecil Rhodes and King
Edward Schools, thus making a better classification of the students
possible, much more satisfactory results are now being obtained in
prevocational work.
Supervisors and Supervision
There has been no change in our staff of supervisors during
the year just ended. This has no doubt been to the advantage of the
schools. The work carried on under their supervision has not only
increased but has reached a higher standard than in former years.
Teachers' classes, conducted by supervisors, to better qualify the
teachers for their work, have been well attended; and the interest
taken in these reflects credit upon both supervisors and teachers.
Further particulars regarding the work of these officials will be
found in their respective annual reports for their various departments.
Medical Work
The medical inspection of the schools has been carefully attended to by your medical officer, Dr. F. W. Brydone-Tack, his
assistant, Dr. Wilson, and the four nurses. Despite the fact that
the function of these officials is primarily to detect physical defects
and to urge a remedy being sought from the regular medical practitioner, they have in many cases done far more. Free medical
treatment has been secured by the medical officer for a number of
children who weuld otherwise have been neglected at a very critical
time. The nurses too, by their repeated visits to homes in the interest of children needing some slight medical attention or even
treatment by parents along more hygienic lines, have done incalculable good. By this unostentatious work our school nurses have
become the teachers of many parents, much to the advantage of
the children.
Another new departure by our nurses during the year, undertaken with the sanction of the Management Committee, has been BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 17
the organization and supervision of girls' clubs for the making
of Red Cross articles. The Board, we realize, should not fail to
record and express its appreciation of such commendable activity
on the part of its officials in the interest of the young girls in our
schools. The school nurses have set an example in this regard that
your Committee would unhesitatingly commend to the serious atten-
tion and consideration of our women teachers generally.
School Sports
Your Committee are pleased to be able to report that never
before has greater interest been taken by teachers and pupils in
inter-school sports than during the year now under review. We wish
particularly to commend our teachers and pupils for their activity
along this important line of school life at a time when no financial
assistance could be extended by the School Board.
School Work Generally
The general tone of our schools we have found good throughout
the year. In most of them there has been developed an esprit de
corps that tends to make school life both enjoyable and profitable.
This wholesome community spirit is clearly manifest in school concerts, school sports and other activities taken up by the individual
class or, in many cases, by the entire school. As a School Board
we should lose no opportunity to foster the development of this
spirit of social co-operation at least by expressing our hearty approval of its continued activity in our schools.
The work of relief, begun shortly after the outbreak of the
present war, was systematically carried on until the end of July of
this year, when the ten per cent, of their salaries, voluntarily surrendered by the teachers and officials for this purpose, was cut off
and retained in the civic exchequer. The wisdom or unwisdom of
this enforced cut in salary I shall not discuss at this juncture.
The committee of teachers who had charge of this work of
relief and who organized and systematized its work was presided
over by our Municipal Inspector, Mr. Gordon, to whose genius for
systematic work and effective organization much of its success was
due. While every teacher and nurse connected with that work did
his or her work admirably and well, we wish, especially, to refer
to the services of Miss Burpee of the Provincial Normal School,
the indefatigable secretary of the organization. The secretary's
reports of weekly meetings and her monthly and quarterly reports
were models of system and condensed intelligence and information.
The amount contributed by the teachers and officials was approximately $40,000.    Of this amount there was  a balance of a few f
18
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
thousand dollars on hand when the work was closed down in July,
and this balance is being used still to relieve cases of distress.
It was with much regret that we learned in May last that Mrs.
P. McNaughton, a valued member of the Management Committee
for the past four years, was obliged to sever her connection with
the active work of the Board on account of a change of residence
to the city of Victoria.
Dr. F. C. McTavish, elected a member of this Board at the
Municipal elections in January, 1915, and a member of this Committee, volunteered for service with the British Columbia Base Hospital in July, and your Committee was thus reduced to one of its
original members. The vacancies thus created on this Committee
were acceptably filled by the Chairman of the Board, who appointed
Trustees Sangster and Harper, whose duties, sufficiently arduous
before, as members of the Building Committee, were now considerably increased.
As Chairman of your Management Committee for the past
year, I desire personally to express my appreciation of the unfailing
courtesy and active helpfulness of both the Municipal Inspector and
the Secretary, together with their respective office staffs; and I
wish to add that the same is eminently true of the heads of each and
every department of our school work, including principals and
teachers in every branch of the service.
Respectfully submitted,
A. C. STEWART,
Chairman, Management Committee.
Illlllllll'!i:ili!:||.llllli)lllllllll!llll!liin
>.*.,   C.JTU BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES        19
lf| REPORT OF THE BUILDING COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 12th, 1916.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen :—
I beg to submit the following report of our Building and
Grounds Committee for the year 1915 :—
When the Building Committee had the estimates for repairs,
etc., for the year 1915 submitted to it by its Building Superintendent,
Mr. J. H. Self, they with other members of the Board visited each
school to inspect and verify the proposed work for the year. Keeping in view the financial stringency of the City's Treasury, we went
carefully into each item of expenditure before assenting to any
portion of the report being adopted, with the result that we cut
out fully 50 per cent, of the recommendations thus made, simply
on the score of temporary economy, though we realized that a great
deal more work was required to be done to all the buildings beyond
that recommended by Mr. Self. Our buildings, I am very sorry
to say, are far from being in good repair; and the repeated demands
of our City Council to "retrench and economize" and our efforts
to meet these demands, will prove a very costly system of economy.
Soon after our Committee was struck, the question of economy
in help was considered. As there were no new school buildings to
be erected this year, or probably for some time to come, your Committee considered it a good opportunity to consolidate the two offices
of Building Superintendent and Constructional Superintendent and
so dispense with the services of one highly salaried official and thus
save $2,000.00 per year. Accordingly we let Mr. Self go and retained the services of Mr. F. J. Giles. This change has proved satisfactory as the two departments have not suffered by the combination ; on the contrary, it has proved more beneficial.
The completion of the Strathcona School, which was started
in the fall of 1914, just in time for the opening of our school term
following the summer holidays, was accomplished after a great deal
of difficulty and much worry to your Building Committee and the
Constructional Superintendent, Mr. F. J. Giles. The building was
turned over by the contractor and accepted completed all but the
plumbing which will be finished by the sub-contractor after certain
articles in the toilet line arrive from England, A sufficient sum
of money was retained out of the payment due the contractor to provide for the completion of this work.    In regard to this school, I 20
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
would draw your attention to the fact that another satisfactory
contract has been completed without any heavy bills of extra costs.
The extras on the building itself amounted to $122.15, while those
on the heating plant amounted to $280.99, or a total of $403.14 on
an outlay of over $81,000.00; and there are no law suits or legal
troubles for the old or new Board to settle. Now that this building
is finished and no others are in course of construction or contemplation, Mr. Giles will have more time to devote to the upkeep and
repairs of the other buildings, numbering fifty-six all told.
Owing to the continual pressing demands of our City Council
during the year to retrench in our expenditure, your Committee
were unable to effect the greatly reduced and very much needed
repairs they had contemplated during the year. Still some improvements have been effected, as per list below. We may mention
particularly the underground air ducts in the Lord Nelson, Tennyson, General Gordon, Cecil Rhodes, King Edward High, Livingstone, Florence Nightingale and Laura Secord Schools, which have
been a constant source of trouble and annoyance ever since these
schools were erected. Through the able assistance of our Grounds
Superintendent, Mr. F. A. A. Barrs, we have succeeded in eliminating this great defect; and at last we can report the air ducts in
these schools as being permanently and absolutely dry and sanitary.
We have re-cemented the interior of the ducts and painted them so
that the heated air now being driven into the school rooms is sweet,
fresh and pure.
The following list of schools will show what was accomplished
under the direction of our Grounds Superintendent, Mr. F. A. A.
Barrs.
Aberdeen School
The grounds were fenced entirely on the eastern side, and
partly on the north side. Relief labor was used, the Board finding
material.
Alexandra School
A tennis court was built and fenced in. Labor and materials
were furnished by the Schools Relief Association.
Bayview School
The  playground   was  entirely  surfaced  with  cinders  by  the
Board.
Beaconsfield School
Considerable grading to the upper terrace around the school
was carried out early in the year, and two of the playgrounds have !iiilSIiK;mfiiif
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been surfaced with cinders.    The iron fence around the grounds
has been repaired and painted by the Board.
Cecil Rhodes School
A tennis court has been built, the labor and materials being
supplied by the Schools Relief Association.
Central School
A tennis court was built, the labor and material being supplied
by the Schools Relief Association. These grounds were fenced in
on three sides and gates and drains were provided. The labor for
this work was paid for by the Schools Relief Association, while the
Board provided the material.
Chas. Dickens School
Considerable drainage has been installed on these grounds,
also proper and sanitary sewer connections have been made. A
quantity of plank road has been built for administration and other
purposes in addition to a fence on the east and part of the southern
side of the grounds.
Dawson School
A tennis court has been built and fenced, the same being paid
for by the Schools Relief Association. The fence was cleaned
down and painted. The grounds were planted with shrubs and roses
at the expense of the Board.
Fairview School
A tennis court has been built and fenced in, the same being
done at the expense of the Schools Relief Association.
Florence Nightingale School
A tennis court has been built, the expense of the same being
borne by the Schools Relief Ascociation. Drains around the janitor's house were installed, also along the western and the northern
wall by the Board.
Franklin School
Considerable grading was done on these grounds, the expense
being borne by the Schools Relief Association. We regret this
work could not have been completed as intended owing to the Relief
Association funds being transferred to the City.
General Gordon School
A tennis court was built and fenced in, also the city boulevard
on the west and north side of the grounds was graded'    Both the material and the labor for this work were paid for by the Schools
Relief Association. The necessary sewer connections have been
made as well as other surface drainage work carried out. The playground has been partially surfaced with cinders, but will be completed when additional material can be obtained. The expense was
provided by the Board.
Hastings School
These grounds have been surfaced with cinders by the Board.
:T-'. ?-*■■;:
Henry Hudson School
A tennis court has been built and fenced and other playground
equipments, such as backstops, have been provided. The work on
these grounds and the materials used were all paid for by the Schools
Relief Association.
Kitsilano School
An addition was made to these grounds by adding 3 lots at the
north-west corner which were leased for a term of years. These
lots were all cleared up and drained, and a tennis court was built,
the entire expense being borne by the Schools Relief Association.
One giant's stride and other small amusement equipments have
been furnished by the Board.
Laura Secord School
These grounds have been thoroughly surfaced with cinders by
the Board.
Macdonald School
A tennis court has been built, the expense for labor and material being borne by the Relief Ascociation. The grounds have
been surfaced with cinders and some playground equipments provided by the Board.
Model School
A tennis court has been built and grass plots reconstructed, the
same being carried out at the Relief Association's expense. The
iron fence on the north side has been repaired and painted.
Mount Pleasant School
A tennis court was constructed, the expense of the same beino-
borne by the Schools Relief Association.
Nelson School
The grounds have been surfaced with cinders by the Board. 24
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Roberts School
Backstops were placed at the north side of these grounds, the
expense being borne by the Schools Relief Association.
Seymour School
These grounds have been surfaced with cinders by the Board.
Strathcona School
The new school has been fitted with the necessary administration and other plank roads, and the grounds to seme extent have
been surfaced with cinders. Planting spaces have also been provided around the new school, and fenced by the Board. Nothing
further can lie done towards beautifying these grounds in the heart
of the city until a decision has been reached regarding the reconstruction or removal of the old school building.
/TV
Tennyson School
A tennis court has been built and fenced, the expense being
borne ry the Schools Relief Association.
Britannia High School
The iron fence round this ground has been repaired and painted
by the Board. Some shrubs have been planted and a grass plot
developed on the east side of the building; the drains were repaired
and the defect in the ventilation of the dressing room off the gymnasium was effectively remedied.
LS
King Edward School
Considerable work has been done at this school in the nature
of grading, draining, laying out grounds, building tennis courts,
and concrete sidewalks. The Relief Association paid the wages
bill while the Board supplied the material for this part of the work.
The stone w.all is well under way, and when the whole scheme is
carried out, we have no hesitation in saying it will be one of the
be^t finished schools in this connection . on the North American
( ontinent, such as the citizens will have reason to be proud of in
years to come.
Generally speaking, many hundreds of small items of improvements have been carried out during the year which it would be impossible for us to itemize. These were done by the Maintenance
Staff.
In connection with the above work I would draw your attention to this fact, that, when we consider the great amount of work BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 25
obtained for the Board on school grounds through the Schools Relief Association Funds contributed so willingly by the teachers,
janitors and officials, through their Committee, I feel an expression
of appreciation and an acknowledgment of our gratitude is more
than due to those who have voluntarily given of their salary for
the benefit of their own scholars and the parents of the same. This
fund has been the means of supporting many families throughout
the winter of 1914 and 1915, and the citizens' property has greatly
benefited thereby. Surely something more than a passing remark
of thanks is due them.
We regret we could not continue the good work commenced last
year in connection with our school grounds to properly fence, drain,
regrade, surface, and ornament with trees, shrubbery, and flower
beds. The grounds surrounding many of our schools are still in a
deplorable, unfinished state; and their being so detracts from the
beauty of our buildings which, to strangers who visit our City and
inspect our schools with a view to settling here to educate their
children, are a constant source of criticism.
The Painting Department under Mr. J .Blackwood has made
good use of the money allotted for this work. The Macdonald and
Seymour Schools are a good exhibition of his skill and taste. We
were very sorry we could not continue this work as these two schools
and several others have not been painted for over ten years. Rigid
economy interfered with our plans.
Some of our heating plants have been overhauled and the fire
boxes altered with the view to economy in fuel and greater heat
production. Results are now being noted and if found satisfactory
we would recommend similar alterations being made to the other
plants. The Fess System for feeding oil to the heating plant in
Tennyson and Cecil Rhodes Schools has recently been installed,
together with other changes which we kncVw will produce results
that will eliminate the difficulties found in operating these two
plants.
With a view to acquainting the incoming Board with the true
condition of our school buildings and heating and ventilating plants,
I have requested Air. F. J. Giles and Mr. Leek to go carefully into
these matters in their separate departments, and to make a complete
report covering the two branches, as the time has arrived, in my
opinion, when something should be done to permanently overcome
the defects existing and to put the buildings and the ventilating
systems in thorough repair. Serious deterioration has already set in
and if neglected much longer irreparable damage will result. 26
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Our janitors who are a hard working, steady body of men, are
doing good work in their different schools, and doing their utmost
to work in harmony with your Committee to effect economy wherever possible. They are to be commended for their faithfulness to
their duties and efforts to meet all demands. The salaries paid for
the services rendered are in my opinion inadequate and should be
revised and a more equitable payment adopted.
The question of fire insurance was taken up by your Committee
and a readjustment was made which will effect quite a saving in
premiums and'a more equitable system for the future.
In conclusion, let me express my hearty appreciation to all
officials throughout the various administration departments for their
kindness and thoughtfulness in so many ways, which have helped
to make my year's work so pleasant and interesting. To our Chairman, Mr. F. W. Welsh, and Trustee Harper, I owe much gratitude
for the support they have rendered me; their readiness and willingness at all times to assist me with their good judgment and advice in
matters concerning this department I have greatly appreciated.
Without their loyal help my year's work would not have been so successful. I believe the work of your Building Committee for 1915
will bear the closest scrutiny and we court the keenest inspection.
Respectfully submitted,
'•■''■     J. R. SEYMOUR, ||ij
Chairman, Building Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES   _ 27
REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF
■■P^BSfS   SCHOOLS     "';"'•   -^     ;'•
|^^^^^^Rfe:S-;f?   Vancouver, B. C, January 12th, 1916. r.;;:■;;.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and GentlFmen :—
I beg to submit the following report for the year 1915 :—
The year just closed has been one of special difficulties in the
administration of our schools. Still a good year's work has been
done.
The chief obstacle in the way of the satisfactory management of
school activities was to fill properly vacancies occurring in the
teaching staff from time to time. Several experienced male teachers,
who volunteered for overseas service, left us. Their resignations
were, for the most part, in mid term when their places were most
difficult to fill, the best experienced teachers being then under
engagement which they could not legally terminate till the close of
the term.
Again the reduction of teachers' salaries by 10 per cent, in July
made it possible for other school boards to offer certain of our best
teachers higher salaries than that offered them in Vancouver. This
led to a further impoverishment of the teaching staff by the loss
of capable teachers. It also had another effect, not as noticeable,
it is true, but undoubtedly no less detrimental. Of the many scores
of applicants for positions on the teaching staff last midsummer
the large majority were either young, inexperienced teachers or
teachers whose past records did not warrant their appointment.
The inevitable happened—our schools opened last term with more
inexperienced teachers than ever before.
Notwithstanding the handicaps mentioned above, the principals,
with commendable earnestness in nearly all cases, have marshalled
their teaching forces in a way that has produced fairly good results.
The school attendance, which ordinarily is a fair indicator of
school conditions, was good throughout the year. The enrolment
for the first eight months was greater than that for the same months
°f 1914. For the last three months, however, there was an apparent
falling off in attendance. This was due to the opening of the University of British Columbia, and the counting in that institution of M
28       BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
students who the previous year were counted in the school population.
The percentage of attendance for the first term of the year
was better month after month than in the first term of 1914. For
the second term it was not so good owing to the prevalence of
measles in several districts.   Still it never dropped below 90 per cent.
While this regularity of attendance may be accounted for in a
measure by the vigilance of attendance officers, it is worthy of note
that extreme measures had to be resorted to in only four cases during the year to compel parents to send children to school. The
vigilance, tact and good work of principals and teachers are the great
factors in keeping children regularly in school.
The year has been one of increasing harmony and good will
between teachers and parents. The war conditions, that were responsible for the difficulties referred to above, brought many of our
teachers into closer touch with the home life of the children and,
in innumerable instances, raised the teachers in the estimation of
the people. In comparatively few cases have parents interfered
in matters of school discipline; in. fewer cases have they appealed
from the ruling of principals to me ; and in only two instances have
they carried their cases to the Management Committee. The result
of these appeals you know.
As the years go by parents and pupils are coming to realize more
fully that the average teacher will make no trouble for the pupil who
respects law and order, and that disrespect for law and order should
bring trouble for the child's benefit. Teachers, on the other hand,
are more conscious today than ever before that the humblest child
has rights that must be respected and that only by respecting these
rights can they hope to be respected themselves.
I understand the University Women's Club of this city have
been and are working for the formation of Parent-Teachers' Associations, in which it is hoped teachers may learn to see school work
more from the parent's view point, while parents learn to see it
more from the teacher's point of view. This movement should receive the hearty endorsation of all school workers.
Not only was the attendance of pupils good during the year,
the .attendance of teachers was never better. I have heard the fear
expressed that teachers might take undue advantage of the Board's
generosity in allowing them sick leave for a number of days on full
pay. I have never shared those fears; and, consequently, when addressing your teachers over a year ago, I urged them to take reasonable advantage of the sick leave regulation.    It is, therefore, most BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
29
gratifying to be able to inform you today that the substitute pay
roll for 1915 has been over 26 per cent, less than that for 1914.
Few changes were made in school boundaries during the year;
and those made were generally acceptable to the people concerned.
Very few have endeavored to send their children across district boundaries to neighboring schools. The citizens are learning that district boundary lines are not the result of caprice, but of sound judgment on the part of the School Board. Consequently the majority
readily acquiesce in this judgment; the small minority are given no
choice in the matter.
Many school activities, apart from ordinary class room routine,
have made the year a busy one. Several exhibits were prepared—
one of a general nature for the Formosan government, one of writing for the Annual Convention of the Coast Teachers' Institute held
in this city in April, one of writing, drawing, manual training and
domestic science for the Vancouver Exhibition in August, and one
of technical work in the Britannia and King Edward High Schools
in April. The interest taken in the preparation of these by supervisors, teachers and pupils is deserving of commendation. Their
value as an educational factor is unmistakable.
Another phase in our school life of last year deserves notice—
the musical competition. By having the competition between individual classes of approximately the same age in the schools of the
four sections into which the city was divided, and finally a competition between the best Primary, Junior, Intermediate and Senior
classes from each of the four sections, a far larger number of teachers and pupils were induced to take part in the competition than
ever before. In short, a greater interest was taken in music generally, without any material interference with other school work,
than when the competitions were between picked choirs. Another
advantage of the new method must not be overlooked—the deficit
of 1914 was changed to a substantial surplus of over $120 last spring.
The winning classes in each section, with the name of the teacher
who trained them, and the trophies won were as follows:—
Trophy
Koenigsburg Cup
T. Eaton & Co. Cup
O. B. Allan Cup
Airs. J. Rogers Cup
Class
Bayview  School,
Div.  IV,  Primary
Aberdeen School,
Div. II, Junior
Dawson School.
Teacher
Miss G. Warner
Miss H. B. Milne
Miss E. A. LeFeuvre
Div. II, Intermediate
Chas. Dickens School, Miss C. M. Sterns
Div. I, Senior r
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The thanks of this Board are due to Messrs. O. B. Allan, T.
Eaton vS: Co., Koenigsberg Jewellry Co., and Mrs. Jonathan Rogers
for the trophies enumerated on the previous page.
The interest taken by our men teachers in athletics outside of
school hours has done considerable to create a healthier tone in the
schools. It is most gratifying to see good clean sports conducted
under the leadership of such men as we have in our public and high
schools today. It contributes to the moral as well as to the intellectual and physical development of the growing boy or girl.
Another outside activity, that has succeeded in a marked degree
for the first time in our city, is the keeping of home gardens by
school children. The City Beautiful Association of the city may be
credited with originating the idea of having such work done. They
deputed the task of having it done, however, to the Local Council of
Women, who, in turn, sought and secured the co-operation of the
city teachers. To state briefly the results: Over 600 gardens, both
ornamental and useful, were cultivated last year as compared with
a few score the previous year.
I am fullv aware that improvements can be made, even on the
successful efforts of the past year. I know, moreover, how they can
be made; and I believe they will be, for this is important work. It
makes for better manhood and womanhood. The boy or girl, who
is thus led to habits of diligence, carefulness, perseverance and a love
of the beautiful, is being wisely led. It is to be hoped, therefore,
that still more of our teachers will take an active interest in this
work in the future. To encourage them to do so the Education
Department is prepared to give a small remuneration to the teacher
who has a certain number of pupils taking up home gardening, just
as it does if they take up school gardening. What we should aim
at for the future is thousands of these home gardens kept joyfully
by children instead of hundreds as at present.
The school garden is important; but 1 rank it second in its
possibilities to the garden at home. The foundations of much that
is best in our national life have been and must continue to be laid in
love ot home; and homes can best be loved when made attractive.
Again, much thought is rightly given to the question of how our
youths are to find work and be prepared for it. The question of
how they are to he prepared to spend their leisure is equally deserving ot careiul consideration. The home garden movement is one
important answer to the question.
Some systematic work in school gardening was successfully
carried out during the year at Children's Home School, under Miss
Janet Sheepy; at Dawson School, under Principal Pollock, Miss A. \
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 31
Middleton, Miss W. J. Creech and Miss L. Laursen; at Grandview
School, under Miss Lulu Brunton; and at Fairview, under Mrs.
Jean Templer. The work done by these teachers and their pupils has
met with the approval of Mr. J. W. Gibson, Director of Elementary
Agricultural Education; you will consequently receive four government grants, totaling approximately $220.
Of the nine prizes for physical training offered by the Strathcona Trust Committee in the inspectorate comprising Vancouver,
Burnaby, Point Grey, Richmond and Delta, eight were won by Vancouver teachers, as follows :—
Teacher School Division Prize
Miss M. E. Archibald Simon Fraser XIII First $35.00
Miss F. M. Currie       Fairview XII Second $25.00
Miss D. Cattell      ,     Model ;;        XI Q Third $15.00
Miss E. L. Roberts     Florence Nightingale VII First $35.00
Miss W. J. E. Creech Dawson X Second $25.00
Miss M. E. Dewis       Mount Pleasant III Third $15.00
Miss A. Rines Nelson VI First $35.00
Miss E. C. Hadden      Seymour   V--v:vV   VI g. Third $15.00
One-third of the prize money won by the teachers and pupils
has been spent on pictures to beautify their class rooms, the remaining two-thirds was received by the teachers themselves.
During the year a prize essay competition was conducted in our
schools under the auspices of the Manufacturers' Ascociation. Four
valuable prizes, one for each grade in the public schools and one for
the high schools, wrere offered for the best essay on "Made in B. C.
Let B. C. Flourish by Her Industries." The best essay written in
each grade of the public schools and. in each high school by a pupil
of a class in which 50 per cent, or more of the pupils competed
was sent in; and a committee of the Manufacturers' Association
selected the best essay in each of the four groups. The successful
competitors were as follows :—
Name of Pupil Name of School
Barnett Harvitz Britannia High School
Miss M. V. Stevens Senior Grade, Lord Roberts School
Miss Bertha Efford Intermed. Grade, Florence Nightingale School
Miss I. McMillan Junior Grade, Fairview School
Probably nothing during the year has. better indicated the
earnesteness of your "teachers than the regularity with which large
numbers of them attended classes in penmanship, drawing and elocution after school hours. The indirect benefit of the work done in
these classes is already being seen in many class rooms. §
32
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The efforts by teachers and school officials to relieve distress
in the city, referred to in my last annual report, have been continued.
During the first six months of 1915, $27,135.43 were contributed
voluntarily by the teachers and officials out of their salaries to assist
families whose breadwinners could not get work. The assistance
given for the most part took the form of work for which a fair wage
was paid. This work was. mainly on school grounds under your supervision. By it a twofold object was served—the grounds were beautified in a measure and many deserving cases were relieved. This
work was carried on till June; after that date assistance was extended
to a number of persons in the form of an advance of transportation
expenses to places where work could be secured.
Since schools opened in August much money has been judiciously spent to provide clothing for needy families that have been
overtaken by misfortune.
There still remains a balance of over $2,500 in the Schools Relief treasury. This sum will be carefully expended during the next
few months to relieve the most urgent cases of need coming under
the notice of teachers, nurses and attendance officers.
While the foregoing outline of various school activities indicates,
in a measure, the value of our teachers as citizens, it must be understood these activities are but some of the side issues of school life.
The great work is that of the class room day by day. The results
of this can never be tabulated. Probably no attempt at tabulation
can give a better idea of the class room work than a brief statement
of the results of the Departmental Examinations of June.
The number of successful candidates for High School Entrance
was 655 out of 796 writing—the largest number in the history of
the city. I should like to point out in this connection that many of
the schools passed nearly 100 per cent, of their classes, and that the
most successful schools, measured by this test, were prominent in
other school activities.
The results of the High School Examinations were not, I regret
to report, uniformly as satisfactory as those of the Entrance classes.
Much good work, however, was done. The new King George
School has made a splendid beginning; the Junior and Matriculation classes of the other two schools and the Commercial classes
made a good showing; only in some of the Preliminary classes were
the results disappointing. The explanation of this is to be found
chiefly in the fact that the year before the teaching staff was weakened by the loss of some of our most capable teachers—better salaries elsewhere; and still people will complain with equal bitterness BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
do
at poor work in school and what they are pleased to call "too high
salaries!"
In closing this report, I wish to thank you for the opportunity
you afforded me during the year of inspecting the schools, school
work and school systems of large cities in the United States and
Canada. I saw much splendid work and gathered many new ideas
and fresh inspiration for the future, but returned to Vancouver no
less proud of what our schools are doing for the city.
The hearty, loyal co-operation of teachers, supervisors and
school officials during the year has made my work, that would otherwise have been at times discouraging, very agreeable. I need not
remind you that the difficulties of the coming year in the administration of our schools may be even greater than those recently experienced. I, therefore, solicit your continued sympathetic and undivided support and go forward relying on the loyalty of my fellow
workers.
Respectfully submitted,
J. S. GORDON,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
jJflRD DE. Dt( "Also, we will make promise.     So long as The Blood endures,
I shall know that your good is mine; ye shall feel that my strength is yours;
In the day of Armageddon, at the last great fight of all.
That Our  House shall stand together and the pillars do not fall." BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 35
HONOR ROLL
The School Board honor roll, a cut of which appears on the
opposite page, is the work of Mr. C. H. Scott, Supervisor of Drawing, who is at present training with the 158th Battalion for overseas
service. As such it is of special interest to Vancouver school
workers, giving as it does his conception of the present world
tragedy.
The artist has made the roll serve a three-fold purpose. We
see at first glance it is a record of names—names of men honored
for their readiness to serve king and country in the great war.
A closer study of his work, however, shows that his aim was not
wholly, or even mainly, to chronicle the past. He clearly depicts
existing world conditions, and forecasts, with equal vividness, the
future as it appears to him.
In the lower portion of his drawing, the world is represented
in a crucible enveloped in flames—a striking symbol of present day
affairs. Out of this world conflagration, Justice arises on the one
hand; on the other Freedom, the inseparable companion of Justice,
stands forth under the Union Jack.
Doubtless Mr. Scott's companions-in-arms shared with him this
glorious vision of the future as they did his appreciation of the fact
that only out of this terrible world conflict can freedom and justice
arise for the world. Their having such a vision and their appreciation of such a truth made it possible for these men, naturally
lovers of peace, to gird on their armor and go forth gladly to battle.
We rejoice that such a vision will be their stay in the trying experiences through which they may have to pass; and our hope and
desire for them is that they may, in the near future, see their vision
become a reality.
For generations, as Britishers, those who have gone before
us and we ourselves have been looking backward and honoring fore-
<-7 O
fathers for heroic deeds in their struggles against the tyranny of
rulers who dared to deny full justice and true liberty to the people.
With equal sincerity today do we honor our fellow-citizens who,
in response to duty's call, have taken up arms rather than permit
a foreign tyrant to rob the world of that freedom and justice
secured at such great cost
V 36       BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
a
a
■.;":;■;.■;. :';■■■?.  medical inspection  ;:-;i|i^KS
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st. 1915,
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City.
Dear Sir:—
I have the honor to submit the Annual Report of the Medical
Department of the Vancouver Board of School Trustees for the
year 1915:—
Report of Physical Examinations
Number examined     11789
vaccinated successfully within 7 years  1474
Defective vision     381
Eyestrain (no defect in vision)     133
Squint  91
Glasses (far sight)    195
Glasses (short sight)    75
Deafness    220
Discharging ears  103
Ears plugged or partially plugged with wax  . 534
Defective nasal breathing    347
Defective speech    32
Cleft  palate     7
Carious permanent teeth    2881
Alveolar   abscess     212
Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids    1111
Enlarged thyroid gland  (goitre)  225
Enlarged cervical glands  188
Anaemia    170
Organic heart disturbances  133
Functional heart disturbances     240 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
37
Pulmonary disease   '.  117
Deformities of spine     101
Deformities of chest  52
Deformities of extremities  63
Defective nutrition    80
Defective mentality    •• • 36
Unclean     79
Impetigo    • • • • 22
Pediculosis  99
Ringworm     16
Scabies   (Itch)      18
Blepharitis  187
Deviation of nasal septum  130
Defective urinary control  24
Trachoma  6
Special Inspections    3785
Number of visits to schools  471
Number of children obtaining treatment as a result of 1914
medical inspection during the year 1915    1701
Report of School Nursing Staff
No. examinations, assisted School Medical Officer with 11789
pupils inspected   \ 64056
pupils  excluded     352
pupils re-admitted    234
notices sent to parents     5842
pupils  received treatment     1970
visits to schools    1667
visits to hospitals or specialists    34
treatments in school clinics  1175
visits to homes    3174
cases sent to hospitals or specialists  15I 38 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
No. home nursing classes	
"     swabs taken     77
Skin Diseases—
Eczema     44
Pediculosis—old     789
Pediculosis—new     187
Ring worm  80
Scabies     35
Unclean     116
Impetigo     270
Miscellaneous    ,  291
Infectious Diseases
Chicken pox
Measles
Mumps
Whooping-cough
Sore throat
Scarlet fever
Diphtheria
Found at
Found at
School
Home
51
-     :     147
121
268
0
16
"      !1
' 78
o ,'■:
1
0
1
1 OTAL
198
389
SI 19
II ■ 89
iff 52
•If    1
1
1
N
o
(<
a
a
a
a
\Ki'ORT OF THE CLINIC AT THE SCHOOL BOARD OFFICE, 4-5 p.m.
Medical Clinic
attending    1794
teachers given certificates     288
children re-admitted to school  426
children   treated  148
children  vaccinated     47
children referred to specialists for free treatment  72 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
6
9
Dental Clinic
(January to July 1915, Temporarily discontinued
No.  appointments     397
I     treatments       648
I     fillings        299
extractions           98
completed cases           71
Time: 2TA hours three times a week.
Report on Infectious Diseases occurring in Children of
School Age
Chicken  pox     360
Diphtheria    :  7
Measles     757
Mumps     25
Scarlet fever     5
Typhoid  3
Whooping-cough     92
It has been our endeavor to carry out the work of medical inspection so that it will harmonize with all the other educational
activities of our schools. The teachers have always assisted us in
the work of medical inspection, but their zeal for the betterment of
the physical condition of the children under their control has been
so marked during the past year that it is deserving of the highest
praise.
As a result of the Annual Examination in 1914, I found that
1701 children had received treatment for various physical defects.
During 1915 the nurses alone have obtained treatment for 1970
children and the medical inspectors during the annual examination
next year will find almost as many more that have obtained treatment during 1915. In the school clinics 1324 treatments were
given for minor diseases such as sores, itch, ringworm, etc., diseases
which are more or less contagious, which get worse if not attended
to, and result in long absences from school. These are diseases for
which the parents will not as a rule go to a doctor. By giving these
treatments the children have been kept in school and much valuable
time and educational money saved. Over 232 children have been
treated free by specialists and by the hospital.    These doctors are 40
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
deserving of the city's warmest thanks for their keen interest and
for the careful, painstaking work they have done to cure the diseases
of these little ones.
Medical inspection loses 75 per cent, of its value if the work
of the examiner is not properly followed up by the school nurse
and if there be no facilities for obtaining treatment for needy children. The figures just given show how untiring and zealous our
school nurses must have been in their work. The figures are very
gratifying, but we are still very far from being satisfied. This applies
particularly to treatment for dental conditions—the most common
defect found. Over 90 per cent, of children have defective teeth.
Among the 11789 children examined there were found 2881 with
large cavities in permanent teeth. The majority of these children
will receive no treatment unless the School Board is able to reorganize the dental clinic which was closed during the summer
vacation.
The following are a few extracts from the 1914 Annual Report
of the Medical Officer of the Board of Education of England and
Wales.
"The past year has witnessed a considerable increase in the
number of local education authorities undertaking dental treatment.
I he number of dental clinics during the past year has risen from
1^0 to 195 exclusive of temporary centres used in rural areas. The
number of dentists employed was approximately 200—arrangements being sufficient to undertake the treatment of over 375,000
children.
Tn Norfolk the parents of children requiring dental attention
are circularized and when consent has been obtained treatment is
carried out. A uniform fee of Is. is charged for all children who
obtain treatment, but this fee may be remitted on the recommendation of the "After-care Committee."
"About 30 per cent, refuse to have treatment carried out at the
dental clinics.
"Between ^ 50 and 65 per cent, of children requiring dental
treatment receive it at the clinics."
250 to 350 pounds a year for a full time dentist in England are
the salaries usually p.aid.
Special Classes
At the present time the Board conducts three special classes.
One  for deaf and dumb children at the Mount Pleasant School BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
41
taught by Mrs. W. H. Mclnnes, a well-trained and capable teacher.
This class is over-crowded and it is to be hoped that in the near
future a second class will be opened.
Two auxiliary classes for mentally backward children are conducted in the Central School by Miss Dauphinee and Miss Kerr.
The success they have had in their work is most gratifying when the
type of children dealt with is considered.   The work calls for much
J XT - .
insight into human nature, great perseverance and a never-ending
enthusiasm. These two classes are always well filled—too well
filled in fact.   A third class would be a welcome addition.
In conducting the physical examinations this year we invited
the parents of the children in the receiving classes to be present.
Between 60 and 80 per cent., according to' the locality,
attended. Their presence was a great encouragement and
proved a mutual help. Many expressed their appreciation of what
was being done by Medical Inspection. These children were fairly
thoroughly examined: heart, lungs, glands, teeth, throat, nose, eyes
and ears, and spine being as carefully tested as the short ten. minutes
per child would allow. Children in classes higher than the receiving
receive a very superficial examination taking three to four minutes
per child. To give every child an annual examination such as that
given to receivers would necessitate three times as large a staff as
we have at present. Even conducting the examination as outlined,
there were some 1500 children who were not examined during 1915.
In no place that I know of, outside of Vancouver, is a medical inspector responsible for the examination of so many children.
Usually it is regarded that 4000 children is the outside limit that can
be assigned to one Medical Inspector. Dr. Belle Wilson is responsible for about 5000 and I am responsible for 7000 or more. This
leaves me practically no time to supervise my staff, to investigate
infectious diseases and to keep a constant eye on the sanitation,
heating, lighting, and ventilating of our schools, to say nothing of
short talks to classes being examined, on personal hygiene. Everything can not be done, but as things are, I would hesitate to recommend an increase in the staff until the war is over and finances
become easier.
It will be noticed that during the year there have been 757 cases
of measles. Parents, teachers, nurses, attendance officers, city health
inspectors and the school medical inspectors have co-operated and
have done everything possible to keep down infections. It will be
noticed that with the more serious diseases (that is for the school
child) scarlet fever, diphtheria, and smallpox, our efforts have been
very successful, but with chicken pox, and particularly measles, the
figures do not look very good.    This can be explained for measles 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
by stating that this disease is very highly contagious for. two and
sometimes three days before the eruption appears and that if a child
is present in class the day before the measles rash appears, ninety
per cent, of the other members of the class who have not had measles
previously will take the disease between the 10th and 14th day afterwards, no matter what is done by fumigation, disinfection or medicine. Large numbers in the receiving and 1st and 2nd primer
classes had not had measles previously and consequently these children simply took the disease in groups. The same explanation to a
lesser extent holds good for chicken pox, mumps and whooping
cough. Measles and whooping cough are not as a rule dangerous
to the life of the school child, but are responsible for more deaths
in children under 4 years than any of the other diseases.
The ventilation of our schools is by no means perfect, but generally speaking, it is very fair. In the old Mount Pleasant, Strathcona and Central Schools it is not so good as in the more modern
schools like the Bayview and the new Strathcona. In schools like
the Tennyson, Cecil Rhodes, Charles Dickens, David Livingstone,
Lord Nelson, Hastings, Laura Secord, etc., the class rooms are entirely dependent on the large air fan for ventilation, there being no
windows in any of the rooms except one transom or two which can
be opened. Ventilation through one transom is impossible. Sometimes the fan stops and the air in each class room becomes very bad.
For the health of the children the windows in every room should be
made to open..
Respectfully submitted,
I     .• '.     F. W. BRYDONE-JACK, M.D,    pllfl
School Medical Officer.
C,Te~>riM.t   K$KS. 1.    J. S. Gordon, Municipal Inspector.
2. S.  Northrop. Supervisor,  Manual Training. 6. Lieut. Bundy, Supervisor, Physical Culture.
3. Miss  E.   Berry,  Supervisor,   Domestic  Sci-       7. Miss    M.    Creelman,    Supervisor,    Sewing.
ence' ; 8. Miss    E.    Trembath,   Supervisor,    Primary
4. G.  P. Hicks, Supervisor,  Music. Work.
5. C. H. Scott, Dip.G.S.A., Supervisor, Draw- 9. Miss   C.   E.   Butler,   Assistant   Supervisor,
ing. Music. ar^
44 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DRAWING     : -v,^Slllill
Vancouver. B. C, Januarv 3rd, 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City.
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit the following report on Drawing for the year
ending December, 1915:—
Steady and good progress has been made in the various branches
of the subject and this progress, seen in the work of the children,
is but a reflection of the increased interest and knowledge of objective with which the subject is being presented by the teachers.
This knowledge of the objective in Drawing and the ability to
present the subject in such .a way that the objective is not lost, are
not attained without considerable work and it says much for the
Vancouver staff of teachers that over one hundred and twenty
attended special classes in the subject during the fall. Attendance
at these classes was voluntary and the Supervisor feels gratified and
encouraged with the respon'se of the teachers, the attendance
throughout the course being excellent.
A new scheme of work in Drawing was issued in September
and has been worked tentatively for the last five months. I am
pleased to report that, with a few amendments, it gives promise of
being satisfactory.
Commencing from September, Miss Trembath, Supervisor of
Primary Work, agreed to take over the supervision of the Drawing
in the Primary classes. This agreement was reached after consultation with the Municipal Inspector and with the direct object
of allowing the Supervisor of Drawing more time for supervision
in the more senior grades.
The year's retrospect is healthy and gives promise of continued
good work in the future. I take this opportunity of thanking the
Board of Trustees, the Municipal Inspector and other officials and
teachers who have, by their courtesy and sympathy helped me to
enjoy my work during the year 1915.
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES H. SCOTT,
Supervisor of Drawing. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
45
MUSIC -
Vancouver, B. C, January 12th. 1916.
/. £\ Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City.
Dear Sir:—
In presenting this my Tenth Annual Report of the Music. Department, it gives me great pleasure to inform you that very satisfactory progress has been made during the past year. The general
advancement of the work has been more marked than in any year
during my encumbency of the office of Supervisor. This I think
is attributable to three causes, namely, the cessation of that tremendous influx of teachers and children from almost every part of the
world which we had to face for several years, and which we will
have to meet again in the near future, the greater efficiency of the
teachers in teaching music, and the systematizing of our work which
was not possible under former conditions.
Many of our teachers still find music a difficult subject to teach.
I am pleased to say, however, that they are availing themselves of
every means within their reach to obtain greater proficiency.
At no time has there been such a high appreciation of the subject manifested by the teachers as at the present. We are all realizing now that there is a great potential value in music study.
We believe that the great benefit derived from music training in
the schools is not so much better singing but a richer life produced
by the refining influence of music upon character. It is better for
the school in general. It also contributes to the musical life in the
city through the church choir, choral societies and other musical
organizations. We have been much encouraged of late to find our
church choirs are largely recruited from the product of our schools.
This, of course, is as it should be. Vancouver has reason to be
proud of its church choirs and choral societies. For so young a
city they compare most favorably with those of any city I know.
Our schools are the natural training fields for these, and as
time goes on we shall find that through this agency our beautiful
city will be famed, not only for its ideal situation, its magnificent
parks and scenery, its stately and classic buildings, but also for its
schools of art and musical institutions. 46
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Our work, like that of the city, is yet in its infancy. There
is yet much to be done, but with the concentrated efforts of the
teaching staff and the continued encouragement of yourself, Sir,
and our Board of Trustees, we shall reach the goal of our desire
in due time.
It is a matter of regret that we have not been able yet to round
off our work in the high schools. We have endeavored to do a
little, however, to keep the spark aglow. We have a glee club in
each of the three schools and the nucleus of an orchestra in two of
them. These all meet after the regular school session and attendance is purely elective. We hope this work will be extended during
the coming year, particularly the instrumental work. There are
many boys and girls who perhaps will never excell in vocal music,
but may be encouraged to study some musical instrument.
Our night school classes still continue their successful career,
notwithstanding the disturbed conditions which the war and finan-
cial depression have imposed upon us. The classes are well attended and the keenest interest is manifested. The choral and orchestral
classes have been co-operating for the past three years in the production of the great cantatas and oratorios, with credit to themselves
and to the city.
I cannot close this report without reference to our competitive
musical festival, which was held last May, and which reflected in
a striking manner the character and quality of the work done by
the regular teacher in the class room. Almost every school under
the jurisdiction of the Board was represented in the competition.
Some competed in each of the four divisions. In several cases
entire classes entered, while sixty-five per cent, was the minimum
allowed. This speaks volumes for the work of the teachers and the
character of the work they are doing. The excellent singing was a
surprise and delight to all, and indicated a successful future for our
school music.
1 am happy to state that the most cordial relations continue to
exist between the Music Department and the supervisors of other
departments, the principals, and the teaching staff.
In conclusion, I gratefully acknowledge the kind and encouraging council you have given to me during the year, also the many
evidences of support manifested by the trustees.
Respectfully submitted,
GEO. P. HICKS,
Supervisor of Music BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
47
PHYSICAL CULTURE, CADET CORPS AND RIFLE
I^mII* teams Kfflll?|llil?a:i»
Vancouver, B. C, January 3rd, 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
^^^^^    City.      - :^_
Dear Sir:—
I have the honor to submit the following report on Physical
Culture, Cadet Corps and Rifle Teams for the year ending December 31,1915:— I    ;..'■■-;;'-//-"■■". '/;"•■'.."."■"■."■;.
Physical  Culture
In visiting the various schools, teachers and classes during the
past year I have found the Physical Culture, Fire Drill, Assembling,
Dismissing and other daily movements to be receiving the necessary
attention in most instances. In addition to inspecting the Physical
Culture lessons given by the teachers, I was pleased to give object
lessons in cases where seemingly unnecessary time was being used.
It was necessary to make a large number of corrections in the
movements performed by the pupils in the Senior grades. This is
not in all cases the fault of the teachers, as I find that most of them
are doing their best, and are willing to be corrected. The fault
lies in the fact that a good many teachers, in qualifying for certificates in this subject, were only instructed to the end of twelve tables
of exercises. This is seemingly a great mistake, as it leaves the
teachers in doubt, in many cases, as to how the movement or exercise should be performed in the advanced tables. When this course
was first given to our teachers under the conditions of the Strath-
cona Trust, they were obliged to receive instruction in the full
course which consisted of seventy-two tables of exercises, but of
late a portion of this seems to be all that is necessary for qualification. The results, as far as our teachers and pupils are concerned,
are not so beneficial and progressive as they would have been otherwise.'
I regret to report, however, that in more than one instance
I have found Entrance grade pupils are not receiving lessons regularly ; but promises have been made that these will be proceeded
with immediately.
Special attention and assistance were also given to new teachers. 4R
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Cadet Corps
It is very gratifying to report that the efficiency of all cadet
corps continues to be very satisfactory. The only thing to be
regretted at present is the scarcity of uniforms for newly enrolled
cadets and newly organized corps. It is sincerely hoped that something will be done in this connection at the earliest opportunity.
It is almost impossible to give fully the details of routine business that has been conducted during the year, and owing to lack
of space I intend to deal only with the general movements.
On January 22nd, a guard of honor was prepared to receive
the Hon. Major-General Sir Sam Hughes, Minister of Militia, on
his trip to the city. The guard, including the cadet band, numbered
one hundred and eighty of all ranks, and acquitted themselves very
creditably, except for a little incident for which I am unable to
account, and for which no reflection can be made on our instructors
of corps.
On Friday, January 29th, an invitation to all corps to be
present at a hockey match at the Arena was accepted and about
five hundred instructors and cadets enjoyed a very pleasant evening
which was much appreciated.
Several regimental and battalion parades have been held
throughout the year, the first being on March 19th, when a successful parade was made through the city. The total number of
cadets on parade on this occasion, including the cadet band, was
eight hundred, exclusive of officers.
Preparations were proceeded with for a review of the Cadet
Regiment on Empire Day. This review of the 101st Schools Cadet
Regiment was held on Friday, May 21st, at 3 o'clock p.m., on
Cambie Street grounds, and was not only a success but also, I
am given to understand, a surprise to a number of visitors and
spectators.
Mr. H. II. Stevens addressed the Regiment and expressed his
pleasure at the excellent showing the cadets had made:
"My only regret is that Major-General San, Hughes is not
here to see your march-past and manoeuvres, which have been an
excellent testimony to the work your officers have done," observed
Mr. Stevens. "Every hoy anxious to join the cadets should be
equipped with a uniform and if there is anything in my power to
do in this matter 1  shall do it."
Kemuiding them that that was th
e BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
49
Empire Day celebration, Mr. Stevens made the remark quoted
above and concluded: "As far as you are concerned, I ask you to
carry away with you today one thought—the thought that in future
your lives shall be devoted to the Empire. You boys know now,
even if you did not this time last year, what the British Empire
stands for, and what it means to be a subject of that Empire. I am
delighted to witness this splendid turnout of the young citizens of
Vancouver for the purpose of honoring Empire Day." This was
perhaps the most striking note in the speech made by Mr. H. H.
Stevens, M.P., when he inspected nearly one thousand cadets.
As by His Majesty's orders, it had been decided not to hold
any public demonstrations on Monday, May 24th, the local School
Board authorities decided that the inspection should take place on
the above date. Every cadet corps from the public schools of the
city, except the high schools, which were engaged in their annual
sports, turned out and, despite the fact that all were not in uniform,
made a splendid showing under their officers. Mr. Stevens was
accompanied by Major W. H. Belson, O. & I. C. C, Lieutenant-
Colonel McSpadden, wrho inspected the two battalions; Colonel
Worsnop, Major Fowler, Colonel Markham, Major Tait, Major
McTavish, Captain Maxwell of the Irish Fusiliers, Lieutenant Elliott
of the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders, the Rev. A. H. Sovereign, chaplain, and a number of other officers, as well as Air. Welsh, chairman
of the School Board, and Trustee J. R. Seymour. The band of
the King Edward High School was in attendance.
After the cadets had gone through battalion drill and a march-
past—which they accomplished successfully—Lieutenant-Colonel
McSpadden addressed them, telling them that they constituted some
of the best material in the Dominion. 'The best soldiers have not
all gone to the front," he observed. 'We were proud of you as
you inarched past, and we are all pleased to see so much interest
taken in you by your officers. With reference to those of you who
are not in uniform, I hope the School Board will stretch a point
after your showing today and make up for this deficiency."
Enthusiastic cheers were given by the lads for the King, for
Mr. Stevens, and for their officers.
Church  Parade
A combined cadet corps parade of Vancouver and district was
held on Empire Sunday, May 23rd. The companies assembled on
the Cambie Street grounds and marched to Christ Church. Here
the service was held. The Christ Church choir led the singing of
the hymns, in which all the cadets joined most heartily. The sermon
was preached by the chaplain. Rev. A.  H. Sovereign, the theme 50 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
being especially appropriate.    The offertory was given wholly to
Red Cross work, the amount being $23.20.
Annual 1 nspEction oe Cadet Corps
The annual inspection of all cadet corps, by Major W. 11.
Belson, was successfully carried out, the following being the
schedule of dates, times, etc:—
Wednesday, May 26th
Cadet Corps No. 436    Dawson School  9:00 a.m.
"    435    Lord Tennyson    10:30 a.m.
"    439    General   Gordon       1:00 p.m.
"    434   Kitsilano    :   2:15 p.m.
"        "    433    Fairview      3:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 27th
"    446 ' Macdonald School    9:00 a.m.
" '.'     "        "   440   Lord Nelson School 10:30 a.m.
" l 438    Simon Fraser School    1:00 p.m.
■   "        "    445    Model School   2:15 p.m.
"   443    Cecil Rhodes School  3:30 p.m.
Friday, May 28th
"    442    Alexandra School    9:00 a.m.
437    Grandview School  10:30 a.m.
462    Laura Secord School    1:00 p.m.
509    Franklin School    2:15 p.m.
526    Strathcona School    3:30 p.m.
Monday, May 31st
"    522    Charles Dickens School    1:00 p.m.
101    King Edward High School  3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, June  1st
595    I lenry  Hudson  School    1:00 p.m.
The inspection of the latter corps was unofficial, it not having
been gazetted before March  1st,  1915, as required by the cadet
regulations. I
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
51
The following is a statement of the number of cadets present
at each corps inspection:—
School. On
Parade.
Dawson     98
Tennyson    61
Gen. Gordon    42
Fairview     58
Macdonald     42
Nelson     66
Simon Fraser    50
Model     34
Cecil Rhodes   ,. . 26
Alexandra     41
Grandview     37
Laura Secord    34
Franklin    23
Strathcona     44
Charles Dickens     31
King Edward
40
Cadet Band       35
762
Absent with
Without
Total
Leave.
Leave.
Strength
v    4    ;■-•:
•   •
102
■>■;■'    1     a;;'
•   •
■>>o 62
.  2   ;::
1 ■
■ ^ 45
\\.'    1
'     1
■     60
; ;   2 ,-
;    i ;■
U:    45
: 3    •
2  .-
71
•     r
;■:, \   1  .;.'.;
■;■' 5i
•     •
•   •
'"■-.':■' 34
2
:-l':t         2><
30
;:    4    \
*&" :            -J*£*
'■■;.- 45
• •
.      ,
■■"-■■„ ^
l   i.
•      .
*"-y.\ 35
m .
•      •
a;     23
.          8      .
•     •
;   ;:;  52
•  •
•      •
■■'■:'■■;' 31
•   •
.      ,
•. 40
• •
•      •
•■■;.  35
28
8
798
During the inspection of the corps of each battalion, the efficiency cups were competed for, the results being that the General
Gordon Corps, commanded by Lieutenant H. B. King, were adjudged the winners of the McSpadden Cup, while the Lord Nelson
Corps, commanded by Lieutenant F. A. Jewett, were awarded the
Seymour Cup.
The following shows the standing of each corps, as reported
by the Inspecting Officer:
First Battalion—(1) General Gordon School, winners McSpadden Cup; (2) Dawson; (3) Lord Tennyson; (4) Fairview;
(5) Kitsilano, Model; (6) Henry Hudson; (7) Cecil Rhodes.
Second Battalion—(1) Lord Nelson School, winners Seymour
Cup, Franklin School; (2) Grandview; (3) Laura Secord, Macdonald; (4) Simon Fraser, Alexandra; (5) Charles Dickens,
Strathcona.
The King Edward High School corps was not eligible for the
competition. f
u
o
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rt
O
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o
o
oa
o
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55
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O
1-4 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DO
Regulations for Cadet Services, 1915-16.
On April 14th, 1915, the following correspondence was received from the Adjutant-General, Canadian Militia, which explains
why it was not possible to hold a cadet camp during the summer
holidays:—
(Copy.) ^^|a|Ja;:'a /..    ~,   ..
From—The Adjutant-General,
Canadian Militia.
To—The D. C. O. M. D. No. 11,
Victoria, B. C.
Regulations for Cadet
Services, 1915-16.
Sir:— lmM&::':^'^     ' ' ■■
II. Q., 12-1-19.
Ottawa, April 14th, 1915.
I have the honor by direction, to inform you that owing to the
war and the heavy expenses in connection therewith the vote for
Cadet Services, 1915-16, has been reduced to one-quarter of what
it was the last financial year, and it is regretted that Parliament has
not voted any money to pay the $1.00 per cadet, for uniform grant
this year. No funds have been voted for Cadet Camps or Cadet
Instructors' Courses this summer, nor has any money been provided for paying the bonus of 50 cents per hour to school teachers
taking the 30 hours' training course.
i&
Sufficient funds have been provided for paying the Instructional Allowence to Cadet Corps of $1.00 for each cadet who
passes a satisfactory inspection.
I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W^^-&^;-^ ■'■' W' E' H0DGIN^ Brigadier-General, A
A. C. Adjutant-General. v
At the commencement of the fall term, although most of the
corps required considerable reorganization, arrangements, were made
for a cadet guard of honor to welcome the Australian Cadets on
their arrival in the city. The guard assembled on the Central School
grounds at 2 p.m. on Monday, September 6th, and after the organization proceeded to the C. N. R. depot. On leaving the depot
the line of march was as follows: Pender to Main; Main to Hastings ;  Hastings  to  Granville;  Granville  to  Georgia;   Georgia  to >4
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Cambie Street Grounds.    A suitable formation was then adopted
and speeches were made.
The units participating were as folows: Highlanders' Pipe
Band, Highlanders' Cadet Band, Highlanders' Cadet Corps, King
Edward High School Cadet Corps, King Edward High School
Cadet Band, and Public School Cadet Corps.
While the above date was a holiday and the cadet parade was
voluntary, no less than 425 school cadets, including the cadet band,
availed themselves of the opportunity to welcome the Australians.
Presentation oe Prizes
On the evening of September 17th, a full parade of the cadet
regiment was held for the purpose of making the annual presentation of efficiency and shooting prizes to corps and cadets. This
ceremony was simple but appreciated by all present.
Through the kindness of Capt. Milne, D.C.O.R., the parade
was held in the Drill Hall, Beatty Street, and over eight hundred of
all ranks were present.
Organization oe Regiment and Establishment oe Cadet Corps
During October three new corps were organized, as follows:
King  George  High   School—enrolment     41
Roberts School "             70
Hastings School "     35
The establishment of each corps to December 31st is as follows:
Uniformed Un-uniformed Strength
Cadets. Cadets.      of Corps.
Cadet Band Lieut. A. C. Bundy ..;   28 '•'•';    0 :§ 28
K.E.H. School " A. C. Bundy 56 . ■'[    0 S§ 56
K.G.H. School k' J. R. Pollock 0 ~, ;  45 aa   45
Alexandra " W. J. Nesbitt 31 '■'-.''    10 ;'>'' 41
Cecil Rhodes " G.  Bruce       • -     '   32 0 :"■ ,   32
Chas. Dickens " O. J. Thomas     .    ,0 36 :   ■   36
Dawson " I. M. Mullin 68 36 "\    104
Fairview " S. J. Bryant 27 30 57
Franklin " J.  Dunbar 22 ; ;     10 :  ^ 32
Gen. Gordon " D. A.  Moves 49 0 49
Grandview " L. B. Code 33 0 ,33
Hastings " C. C. Chute 0 34 . a 34
Henry  Hudson " II.  M.  Paget 0 • :    55 ...  55 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DO
Uniformed Un-uniformed Strength
Cadets. Cadets.      of Corps.
Kitsilano :||§t§  Lieut. T. W. Woodhead '■■ 20    ;|fS23:||| 43 ||
Laura Secord F. C. Boyes 37 0 37
Lord Nelson   |r'   " '[  F. A.  Jewett      rV 51^^14 ~Mk 65 g
Macdonald |f$      " ;  W. C. Keith '\a;a :;- -38    j||   2 ||: 40 §f
S^SIfife   " r.   E. A. Hemsworth      '   :/'\./l II^Sa 5
Model W^^'^r    " ■   H- B- Fitch ■*/'--34    .'&I 10 '^§ 44#t
Roberts   ;ff!||   Mr. J.  E.  Brown      v .'■ -    0     V;.,-- 75 Agy 75 g
Simon Fraser     Lieut. C. B. Crowe 44 8 52
Strathcona      E|   "-■;   D. P. McCallumA:   0     A^ 60 |{A 60 -g
Tennyson ■ V""      %   R.   Straight  ,"'.;.;'.   17    J-a 35*^|'|52 *|
||j|^^ 587    :•   484      1,070§;
Instructors 21
lllp^^ ' /:; a;aaB Total    i    ^096 - •
Establishment year ending 1914      845
Establishment year ending 1915    1,096
Increase         251
Owing to the increased establishment throughout the year, it
was found advisable to reorganize the whole regiment from two to
five battalions, as follows:—
staff—  '   " ■' - -:::;.' .•' ;■; ■     /;' :7:i ^:)\:y:'::,^.
Honorary Regimental Commander—Lt.-Col. G. McSpadden.
Regimental Commander—Lt. A. C. Bundy, Supervisor of Cadets.
Regimental Surgeon—Lt. F. W. Brydon-Jack, A.M.S.
Regimental Chaplain—Rev. A. H. Sovereign.
Musketry Instructor (qualified)—Lt. I. M. Mullin.
First Battalion—
Battalion Commander—Lt. W. J. Nesbitt.
Adjutant—Lt. C. B. Crowe.
A Company—King Edward High School C. C.
B Simon Fraser C. C.
jSpg;    C   '"';   "   ,       Model  School C.  C.   ■-, ^-h -. -%\^'/>< V-.'-
D        " Cecil Rhodes School C. C. 56
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Second Battalion—
Battalion Commander—Lt. R. Straight.
- v-      Adjutant—Lt. T. W. Woodhead. '   ;    , "7\ Vi/';,vr
A Company—Fairview School C. C.
• B        " ; Lord Tennyson School C. C. ■■.aV^WSIW$,
C        "       '    Kitsilano School C. C. '. >• '-^"-—
D General Gordon School C. C.
Third Battalion—
Battalion Commander—Lt. J. R. Pollock.
Adjutant—Lt. H. L. Paget.
A Company—King George High School C. C.
:.      B '      " ':■ Dawson School C. C.  (a) ■'----<_,
./* c    ."   " ;'■      "       ';•■"      -     (^:f.y:-'::^?0M^%M
D   :    " Lord Roberts School C. C   7c-^^:U'^^
Fourth Battalion—
Battalion Commander—Lt. L. B. Code.
..-.Adjutant—Lt. H. B. Fitch.        :v. ^^^^rl^.'V
A Company—Alexandra School C. C.
B Laura Secord School C. C.
C Grandview School C. C.
•    D        " Charles Dickens School C. C.        ;"':/" -^"l,' "
Fifth Battalion— '      g''/.>; ■' '-    ;y': ■      ^  a'   -
Battalion Commander—Lt. W. C. Keith.
Adjutant—Lt. F. A. Jewett.
A Company—Lord Nelson School C. C.
B        " Macdonald School C. C. -a -A,
C        "    .       Franklin School C. C.        '    /       '. y'    S -a i
D        " Strathcona School C C.        ." :   a   '.-.a
•      E        " Hastings School C. C. "•', ',/■''. a':-.'    /
Recommended: Approved:
I       ;    A. C. BUNDY,     A J. S. GORDON,   "a
Supervisor of Cadets. Municipal Inspector of School:
Strathcona Trust Fund
s
Di
During the year $223.50 were received from the Local Commit
tee of the Strathcona Trust for British Columbia .for the encour- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES   57
agement of military drill, 1914-15. Of this amount $71.40 were
divided evenly among seventeen qualified cadet instructors; $/o.oU
were divided among seventy-two boys for proficiency in rifle-shooting; and $75.60 were placed to the credit of the Cadet Fund.
The sum of $199.92 was also received during the year as prize
money from the committee for proficiency in physical training by
the teachers of eight classes. One-third of this amount was spent
on suitable pictures for the class rooms ; the remainder was given
to the teachers themselves.
Cadet  Fund
As previously stated, the government grant of $1.00 per cadet
for the upkeep of uniforms, which would have amounted to $798,
was not received during the year, nor was the annual grant of
$2,000 received from the School Board, making a total shortage of
$2,798.00. The only allowance credited to the fund during the
year was $75.60.
Statement oe Cadet Funds
Jan. 6th, 1915—Balance in bank $1,050.01
Oct. 4th, 1915—Strathcona Trust allowance        75.60
rlr-^   :    • ■■'('■   a                                                           •    1425.61
Expended during the year .      829.50
Dec. 31st, 1915—Balance in bank $   296.11
The reports on cadet teams' rifle practice as rendered by
Lieut. V. Z. Manning to June, 1915, and by Lieut. I. M. Mullin
from October to December are herewith appended.
In concluding, I desire to express my sincere thanks to you
and the members of the Board for your kind support and assistance
in the cadet movement.    I also desire to take this opportunity to
report all Lieutenant Instructors to be untiring in their efforts to.
make the cadet regiment the success that it now is.
I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
I^a;.- \ ..      A. C. BUNDY,     V   .     .
Supervisor of Cadets. 58
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Macdonald  School  Cadet  Corps   Rifle Team—1915
Vancouver, B. C, June 15th, 1915.
ft. A. C. Bundy,
Supervisor of Cadets,
Board of  School  Trustees,
City.
Peak Sir:—
I have the honor to submit a report on the rifle-shooting competition in our schools for the school-year 1914-15:—
The past year has been a very successful one, and each of the
twenty-two teams receiving instruction did exceedingly well, only
one team dropping out during the year. Owing to the large number
oi cadet corps now in our schools the competition was limited to
cadets only. While this worked hardship "on some of the boys who
were not cadets, it was considered only fair that hoys who sacrificed
some of their play for drilling should receive the advantage of the
shooting. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
59
As the high school cadets were this year admitted to the competition, the league was divided, the sixteen public school cadet corps
forming a junior league, and the four sections of the high school
corps a senior division. Besides these teams the cadet band was
represented by two teams after the Christmas vacation.
The record score of last year was not broken, perhaps owing
to the handicap of having to use old rifles. Next year, however,
the boys will have twelve new cadet Ross rifles for their matches.
The high score for this year was 253 made by No. 3 section of the
high school corps. This falls just five points short of the record
score. The high score of the public school boys was 243, made by
both the Kitsilano and Macdonald corps.
To encourage the boys in this branch of sport, various cups
and medals have been donated by firms and business men of this
city. For the highest aggregate of scores the A. P. Brown challenge shield goes this year to the Macdonald School team, which
leads all others with a grand total of 2626. In second place is the
Dawson corps with 2601, and as a result they will hold the Townley
cup for a year. Next in order comes the Kitsilano corps with
2585, and the Lord Tennyson corps with 2583. They will receive
the "News-Advertiser" cup and the 'Province" cup respectively.
Owing to the excellent showing made by the Franklin boys who
were in the competition for the first time, Mr. O. B. Allan donated
a cup which they will retain for a year.
The honors in the King Edward High School were carried off
by No. 3 Section. They will therefore hold for a year a cup presented by Mr. J. Jones.
The best individual shot among the public school cadets was
L. Vincent of the Lord Tennyson School, who had a total of 427
of the fourteen matches. Ralph Lanning of the Macdonald corps
was a close second with 420. These two boys will receive the silver
and bronze medals presented by the B. C. Rifle Association. For
the best marksman in each school Mr. Sam Scott donated silver
medals.
The standing of the teams at the close of the contest was as
follows:—
H    Macdonald   C.   C  2,626 Va
Dawrson C. C  2,601
Kitsilano C. C  2,585
Lord Tennyson C. C  2,583
Franklin   C.   C  2,522 60
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
General Gordon C. C  2,438
Model C. C  2,379   ||
Simon Fraser C. C  2,353
.    Charles Dickens C. C  2,307  jf|
Fairview  C.   C  2,261
Strathcona C. C  S 2,132    g
Cecil Rhodes C. C  2,074   £;;
Grandview C. C  2,026   ®f
Laura Secord C. C  1,851
I   Alexandra C.  C  1,849
The winners of the Sam Scott medals were: G. Thompson,
387; W. Wheatcroft, 411; L. Scott, 361; L. Vincent, 427; W. Buck-
worth, 405; R. Stevenson, 311; R. Raymond, 389; S. Campbell,
306; H. Frost, 302; R. Cates, 350; N. Powell, 417; J. Crane/405;
R. Lanning, 420; C. Hudson, 397; C. Humphrey, 264.
The best shot in the King Edward High School was Thurston
Hampton, who wins a silver medal presented by J. Jones, of the C.
P. R. Land Department.
Although several possibles were made during the year, it was
impossible to provide prizes for them, as in former years, owing to
the financial stringency.
All cups and medals will be on exhibition at O. B. Allan's and
Sam Scott's beginning Monday, June 14th. The smaller prizes will
be presented to the winners in their own schools before the end of
the term, while the main trophies will not be presented until the
first regimental parade of the cadet corps after the holidays.
Respectfully submitted,
V. Z. MANNING,
Musketry Instructor. Vancouver, B. C, Dec. 22nd, 1915.
Lieut. A. C. Bundy,
Supervisor  of  Cadets,
Board of School Trustees,
fu "?■-'//     City- -
Dear Sir :—
1 have much pleasure in submitting a report on the rifle-shooting competition between the different corps of the 101st Cadet
Regiment of the Vancouver City Schools. As our annual series of
matches does not end until June, 1916, this report covers the work
only from the beginning of the competition in October to the end
of December, 1915.
The competition is divided into two divisions, one for the high
school cadets, and one for the public school cadets.
At the beginning four teams were entered by King Edward
CD CD J o
High School, and seventeen teams by the public schools. But cadet
corps were since formed by the. King George 1 iigh School, the
Lord Roberts School and the Hastings School, and these corps immediately entered teams, thus making five teams in the high school
division, and nineteen teams in the public school division, making a
total of twenty-four teams.   A team consists of nine members.
Five matches have been shot to date and the results have been
very satisfactory. Previous records have been broken. This, 1
think, may be attributed to two causes, first because the boys have
profited greatly by their past experience, and second because of the
introduction of the new Ross rifle, which is a much superior weapon
to that heretofore in use.
\
Eight perfect scores have been made, and with the new year
many more may be expected.
The highest aggregate scores to date are:—
1st—Macdonald School   1236
2nd—Franklin School    1139
;-;    3rd—Cecil Rhodes School  1136
4th—Dawson School   . . .  1132
5th—Lord Tennyson School  1119
6th— Model School   1055 62
BOARD OE SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The individual totals are also of a higher order. M. Wagner
of the Macdonald School leads with 159 points out of the possible
of 175, while H. Jones of the Dawson School comes second with a
total of 157.
Respectfully submitted,
I. M..MULLIN,    ^lllfl^l
Musketry Instructor.
Stg
w.
>MlDUR.t01. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
63
^^^^^^■^^^^^ WORK -       ;   "   '
Vancouver, B. C, December 28th, 1915.
/. vS*. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
SBlf City.:- -        ;■/■■■' ■   ,'.'       ■    ^/:'t:''t-A^;/::;'^^-;^A/^^
Dear Sir:—
The following general report upon Primary Work for the year
ending December, 1915, is herewith submitted:—
There are at present eighty-seven primary classes in operation
with an attendance of almost three thousand children. Most of the
classes have been heavier than last year, though there has been very
little  overcrowding.
The children in the primary classes have suffered greatly during the year from epidemics of infectious diseases. Receiving
classes, of course, have been chiefly affected. Teachers who have
had a large number of children excluded for several weeks have had
much difficulty in preparing them for promotion. Some of them
have made up for lost time by giving these children extra lessons
before and after the regular school hours.
The backward pupil has not been neglected. Early in the year
we had a number of children in the First Primer who were too old
for that grade. By giving them special attention at school and assigning homework in reading and spelling, the teachers were soon
able to promote many of them to the Second Primer class and prepare them for First Reader work by the end of the term.
Although no great changes in our methods have been made, a
general improvement in the charcter of the work has been noticed.
The lessons have been made more interesting for the children, and
we have had better organization and a closer adherence to time-
tables.
I have given considerable attention this year to the teaching of
number. We have experimented with new methods in the Second
Primer classes with good results, especially during the present term.
Some teachers of Second Primer classes, however, are rather inclined to depreciate the work of the previous teacher, and spend
too much time at the beginning of the term in reviewing First
Primer work.
There has been greater correlation of reading and language
than formerly.    More consideration has been given to the assign- 64
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ment of the regular lessons. Ihese lessons nave been more iuiiy
discussed, and teachers have been particular as to the manner in
which the children have expressed their ideas. The reading has
generally been satisfactory. Our success in dealing with this subject has been due in great measure to the large variety of supplementary readers supplied by the Moard. 'These books, especially the
hoik More and Progressive Road series, afford many opportunities
for lessons in reproduction and dramatization. Many children have
little suitable reading matter in their homes, and such children, of
course, should read much in school—not necessarily in class, but
during study periods.
With a few exceptions, the teachers have worked very faithfully and have m.ade the interests of the children their first consideration.
I should like to express my thanks to inspectors, principals and
teachers for their hearty co-operation during the year.
Yours faithfully,
EMILY J. TREMMATli,
Supervisor of Primary Work.
a
^w^W^&B
L_iii
^ JJ BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
6!
MANUAL TRAINING      .
Vancouver, B. C, December 30th, 1915.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
•---;•.!/   City. a;
Dear Sir :—
I have much pleasure in reporting, as in each year since their
commencement in 1901, an increase in the number of pupils attending the manual training classes. The maximum attendance was
reached in October, when 3,069 were present; of these 631 were in
the high schools, and 47 in the prevocational classes. The average
attendance has been over 93 per cent., this being due, partly to the
careful checking of absentees on the part of the instructors.
Although there has been no change in the scheme of woodwork issued by the Department of Education, advantage has been
taken of the freedom of choice of models, and there have been many
praiseworthy efforts put forth to encourage originality in the choice,
structure and design of models containing the specified exercises.
This was clearly demonstrated at the last Vancouver Exhibition,
for some of the exhibits showed distinct individuality. There is,
however, in most of our pupils, a tendency to rush the work and
neglect the finish. This may be due to prevailing conditions in the
West, but it is a regrettable feature, and the instructors are struggling to eradicate it, with more or less success. The diploma given
by the Education Department for completion of 30 models is partly
answerable for the anxiety of the boy to rush through the course, as
it is possible to obtain this with a mediocre standard of finish and
accuracy. It is generally felt among the teachers that the diploma
is not of value under present conditions.
A change has, however, been made irt the drawing requirements
this year in that solid geometry must in future be taught by the
«/ CD J CD v
manual training instructor in the centre. This is a step in the right
direction, and should work for the ultimate good of the boy. The
change has slightly curtailed the time available for bench work,
but as the knowledge of the principles of solid geometry is so important to the future artisan, I feel assured that the loss will not be
detrimental in the grade schools at least. In the high schools, however, the case is different, as in them the drawing takes up more
time, and the short period of two hours per week devoted to bench-
work, turning, tinsmithing and forging is insufficient for advanced
work such as the students wish to attempt.   In view of the fact that 1
66
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
h
such a large percentage of our high school boys do not enter the
university, but engage in occupations and trades in which they must
needs be able to read drawings, and perform operations accurately
and intelligently, I feel that the time should not have been taken
from the manual training department in the high schools.
In obedience to the request of the Finance Committee to economize in every way possible, instructors and pupils have made a
special effort to curtail expenses with the result that current expenditure has been reduced about 40 per cent. This is due to various
causes which cannot be depended upon to recur in the regular order
of things—the instructors have given their own time to repairs
needed in the centres and their equipments, pupils have bought their
own materials in many cases, and repairs and renewals have been
left over where at all possible. It would be impossible to continue a
plan such as this for a protracted period as efficiency would be lost.
This year has also seen a growth in the community spirit
among the boys, for many a piece of apparatus for use in school or
playground has been produced in the manual training room. A
splendid example of this was the large relief map of the Dardanelles, modelled to scale and provided with forts and ships, which
was made by the Seymour School boys. The Britannia boys have
turned bench handles for the grade schools, and the King Edward
boys have made several zinc tanks for umbrella racks which the
King George boys are making for their various class rooms. Work
such as this serves a three-fold purpose—it provides educative employment for the boy, it supplies the need of a second party, thereby
inculcating a spirit of unselfishness, and it reduces general expenditure.
Although there are now fourteen centres for the grades, and
three for the high schools, there are yet a few Third Reader boys
who cannot be accommodated because the time of the present staff
of teachers is fully occupied. The Meaconsfield School is too far
away from the nearest manual training centre, and an equipment
will be needed in that school, as there are several classes which
should be taking the work.
Regarding the prevocational classes, whose shopwork I was
asked to supervise, I may say that the work was being satisfactorily
performed in the little time I could find for my visits, but it seemed
to me that a set course with some definite aim should be worked
through, and that odd jobs should not be allowed to interfere unduly with the progress of the students along those definite lines.
Faithfully yours,
S. NORTHROP, .;■■//
Supervisor of Manual Training. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 67
DOMESTIC SCIENCE P^g^f
Vancouver, B. C, December 31st, 1915.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit herewith my report on the work of the Home
Economics Department of the Public Schools for the year 1915:—
Work in Home Economics is being continued on the lines
planned in previous years, and now, when there is not so much expansion, there is time to systematize and broaden and deepen that
already established. For this reason the course of study was again
revised in the summer of this year, and certain changes, recommended by the teachers and others, were made.
In the Intermediate grades there are now fifty-nine grade
teachers, with the assistance of Miss Minerva Creelman, who give
half a day's time each week (while the boys of the class are away
for their manual training lesson) to the teaching of needlework and
related subjects to the girls. Not every Intermediate grade in the
city is taking the course, but we hope that this will be corrected
soon. The teaching of the mechanical side of the work is being
carefully done, as might be seen at manv creditable exhibits held
by our progressive teachers whenever opportunity occurred. There
has been an improvement in the training in self-reliance, observation, and criticism, to which this work so well adapts itself. Some
good work has been done correlating Needlework with Nature
Study, Geography and Composition, and with the help of more
books, pictures, and other illustrative material, we hope to do more
in the coming year. The cost of carrying on the work has been
brought to a minimum (approximately less than half a cent per
pupil per lesson for supplies). This has been accomplished by the
use of scraps brought by the children for practice work, and by
utilizing left-over material from home in problems whenever possible. Much Red Cross work has been done in the schools, though
in no case was quantity considered before quality, or the educative
side of the work sacrificed. About two thousand pieces have been
sent directly from the class-rooms, though no work was done by
my department before September. Much more work sent privately
by present and past students was made possible by the training o
o
'_>
ca
O
o
ra
o
C/3
O
P BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
69
provided by the School Board during the past five years. Though
knitting is not included in our course, some good work has been
done by pupils, both in and out of the class-rooms.
In the Senior grades the work outlined above is continued, but
only one-half day each month instead of one-half day each week
Laundry,  Strathcona School
can be spared for it, as the remaining half-day each week must be
occupied with the big subject of foods, dietetics, cookery and other
branches suth as Home-nursing, Laundry-work, Cleaning, etc.. a
knowledge of which is so necessary to any homemaker. Even with
only this much regular practice Needlework, an improvement was
seen on entrance to the high school classes this year.
There are seventy Senior Grade classes with an attendance of
1135 pupils in the ten centres now equipped!    These centres are in 70
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
charge of seven special Home Economics teachers, and this is the
first year in which no additions or changes were made in the staff.
This tends to more thorough work. In every way the work being
done is improving. The expense of conducting the lessons (averaging approximately $ .016 per pupil per lesson, or $ .65 per year for
supplies) is summarised and reported to each teacher, and free
discussion is invited upon this at the regular teachers' meetings.
The examinations in theory are now uniform for the city, which
tends to raise the educational standard in many ways. The centres
and equipment are well kept and are a credit to teachers and pupils.
To offset this feeling of satisfaction is the fact that there is no
continued work in the high schools in the subjects other than those
directly related to clothing and shelter. This makes our present
course of study so full, that there is not time for sufficient review,
with the result that the work in theory, which must necessarily be
the foundation for good practice, is often too superficial.    If our
work could begin two grades earlier, or if the whole group of
subjects included under 'Home Economics" could continue in the
high schools, or if more time could be taken in the last two years of
the girls' elementary school life for these subjects, the work would
be more thorough.   Another waste hard to overcome in introducing
&
new subjects, is that occasioned by lack of correlation, but as our
aims become better known to principals and teachers, this may be
overcome.
The teachers are continuing to familiarize themselves with
conditions in our own town and province, by visiting local industries and by hearing addresses from persons prominent in civic and
industrial affairs. As far as possible, goods of British manufacture
have been used in all classes.
A new feature of our department is a teachers' class, after
school, once a week, in which the subject of dress design, draughting
and construction is taught.
t>
In the high schools, as mentioned above, the branch of Home
Economics pursued is that relating to clothing and shelter. The
plain sewing learned in the grades is continually being reviewed,
the machines are learned, plain garments are draughted and made,
and some embroidery is learned in the first year. In the Junior and
Matriculation years the whole educational standard has been raised
by the introduction of the draughting and designing of the costumes
before any construction is begun. Some work is done in textile
study, which could be made of far greater value if time were available for Chemistry in this connection. House Decoration and Millinery are taken up for one term in the Matriculation year. In
Britannia I ligh School the three years are taken by all students, in BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
71
King George High School two years are compulsory, and in King
Edward High School the first year is compulsory, while the last
two years are optional to students. There are forty-one Matriculation, 155 Junior, and 394 Preliminary students, a total of 590 high
school girls continuing this practical work. At Britannia and King
Edward High Schools Red Cross work has been done by the girls
with the assistance of their teachers after hours, while some class
time at King George High School has been given to it.
The attendance has been very satisfactory, the average for the
city being well over 90 per cent., while many classes have had 100
per cent, for some months. The total enrolment for the city is
now 2912.   ^%K;-':,:^;:,.'.;';C:, /H'B
Public exhibits were held in King Edward and Britannia High
Schools, and also in many of the grade class rooms. Luncheons
and teas were given as part of the regular work in table service of
the Senior Grade classes. An exhibit of work was sent to the Vancouver Exhibition.
In conclusion, I beg to thank you for your kindly consideration
and help, and to acknowledge the co-operation of the Board of
School Trustees, the principals and the teachers during the year.
Yours respectfully,
tl&§// A-.;•■•'"'   ;   ELIZABETH BERRY, ///^■ ■ ^ ///"
Supervisor Home Economics.
^ 7(*M«dU. S BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
73
PREVOCATIONAL   AND    NIGHT    CLASSES
Van
couver, B. C, 31st December, 1915.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit herewith my annual report on the work of the
Prevocational and Night Schools.
Prevocational. School.
During the closing month of the school year ending June 30th,
1915, I gave a series of four lectures in different parts of the city, to
which were invited parents and scholars who were interested in Prevocational studies. At these meetings I endeavored to give full information as to the class of work which is being carried on in the
school, and I have reason to believe that the lectures were not without result in securing a better understanding of the idea of the
school.
In order better to co-ordinate the work and to secure a better
tone in the school, it w7as decided to unite the classes in the Cecil
Rhodes School, instead of holding them in different parts of the
city. It was further decided to re-arrange the time-table so that
the students should spend half of their time doing practical work,
and the remaining half in academic studies. This arrangement has
been of very great service in building up the school, and I have
no hesitation in assuring the Board that the school and scholars have
materially benefited therefrom.
In spite of the fact that the boys have been hampered by the
lack of wood-working machines, which are essential to complete
success in the practical courses, the work carried on under Mr.
Parker has been very successful. The boys have gained a knowledge of technical methods which will be of great value to them in
any industry in WThich they may have to work on leaving school.
Miss Rath's work amongst the girls has also been very successful. In order to give the girls an opportunity of doing work of
obvious and immediate value, two Red Cross Clubs were formed, Prevocational Class at Work in Wood-working Shop
Work Done by  Prevocational Class
L BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 75
and the girls made clothes, prepared bandages, gave dinners and
carried on other work from much of which a profit was made, and
the total proceeds were handed over to the Red Cross Society.
The Academic work was carried out by Mr. Young, who
taught the boys, and I myself taught the girls. In regard to the
work of the former I am pleased to say that, considering the variety
of attainments and capabilities of the students enrolled, the work
was of a high quality. As far as the girls are concerned, I have
found the work hampered by the general lack of physical strength
of the pupils, and the attendance at the close of the year suffered
considerably from an unusually high proportion of sick students.
From very close observation of the students in both classes. I
am still of the opinion that the aim of -the school is not yet fully
understood, and I should like to emphasize the point that the school
is not intended for pupils who are unsuited for public school owing
to mental or physical inability. The pupils should be of average
abilities in both respects, but should have an inclination towards the
practical rather than the academic side of school work.
It is with great pleasure that I inform the Board of the work of
the three members of my staff. The enthusiasm for the work and the
interest in the students which have been displayed by them are beyond praise. Mr. Young especially has devoted himself to the
athletic side of the school life, and has given much time, not to mention the expenditui e of money, upon promoting a healthy interest
in physical activities.
Miss Rath also has spent much time in assisting and encouraging the girls in their outside interests, and on three occasions she
assisted me in entertaining the girls at my own home.
Mr. Parker's work needs no commendation, it speaks for itself,
and many visitors have expressed their interest in and astonishment
at the work done under his tuition.
I trust that it will not be necessary for me to devote so much
of my time to actual teaching in the coming year, as the fact of my
■/ CD CD     J J
being tied to one particular class-room for the whole of the teaching
hours, makes supervision and organizing work very difficult to "perform satisfactorily.
Night Schools.
In conformity with the suggestions made in my last report, the
work of the Night Schools was re-organized to a very considerable
extent for the present session. In brief outline, the following
changes were made :— 76
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The Commercial Classes were organized into a school under
the chief direction of Mr. Beech. All the classes were held in the
King Edward 1 i igh School, and the courses were so arranged that
students could cover a range of subjects calculated to qualify them
either for stenographers' or for accountants' positions. Moreover,
as it was found that many students were unable to attend for four
nights per week, the classes were divided so that those students
who wished should be able to take both subjects by attending only
two nights per week. The success of this arrangement is shown
by the fact that some five hundred students enrolled for one or more
branches of the Commercial work.
The Art Classes were placed under the immediate direction of
Mr. Scott, and the students had reference to him before taking any
particular class. They were allotted to the classes best suited to
their needs and abilities, and the Art Classes now form the nucleus
of a successful Art School, with graded courses covering the principal branches of Art work. The School is badly in need of additional casts, however, and I trust the Board will be able to spend
the necessary funds (no very large amount) in the coming" session.
The Domestic Science courses were also very carefully re-
graded, and to judge from the number of students attending, the
result is eminently satisfactory.
Owing to the unsatisfactory condition of the building trades
CD */ CD
in the city and its vicinity, almost all of the building" classes had to
be cancelled for lack of students. One class remains, and this, while
not overcrowded, is doing* very good work under Mr. Mclntvre,
who teaches Building Construction and Drawing".
To the Electrical Classes was added a Third-Year Course,
which is being well attended. Many of the old students are now at
the front, and this has prevented the second year course from being"
as well attended as was expected. Nevertheless, it is a g'ood class,
:\nd promises to supply many students for the third-year course
next session.
Continuation Classes were established at the beginning* of the
session, and now there are four good classes running each with an
enrolment of over fifty students, studying" the various grades of
elementary school studies, including mainly Arithmetic and Composition. In addition to these, upon the request of certain members
of the Most Office staff, a class was formed for the preparation of
students for the Qualifying Examination of the Civil Service. Although the request was signed by only twenty students, the class
almost from the commencement numbered fifty students. The
teaching work is difficult, but is being well performed.
L_. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 77_
The Engineering Courses were under the general supervision
of Captain Williamson, and much more satisfactory work is being
done than formerly. The provision of mathematics and mechanic
classes in connection with the Engineering Courses has met with a
gratifying reception, and the accommodation of the class-room has
been tested seriously.
Air. G. P. Hicks has exercised the position of supervisor in the
Music Classes, and the members of the public who had the privilege
of hearing the rendering of the '"Messiah" by the choir, accompanied by the orchestra, trained at the night classes, will be able to
appreciate the work done by Mr. Hicks' pupils.
The Special Classes for Teachers have been well supported,
especially the classes in Penmanship, taught by Mr. Manuel and
Mr. Sprott, and the pupils in the public schools will reap the benefit
of the additional training which the teachers receive.
It would be invidious to mention any names for special commendation, but I feel that the Board and the students are to be congratulated on the staff of teachers. The general standard of work
is of a very high quality, and the teachers spare no pains to secure
the best.results for their students. For one not acquainted with the
wTorking of Night Classes, it is sometimes difficult to realize the
amount of work which a teacher performs outside of the class-room,
but the results obtained at the night classes would be impossible
were it not for the careful preparation of lessons on the part of the
teacher and much time spent upon the marking of work.
The total number of students enrolled at the Night Schools for
the session of 1915-1916 is 2200, which is a very considerable advance upon any previous year.
The thanks of the Board are due to the Vancouver Gas Company for the loan of a large gas oven for use in Mr. Plant's Baking
Class—one of the most popular and best-attended classes in the
schools.
In conclusion, I wish to thank the Board and you, sir, for the
support you have given me in my work during the past year, and I
trust that next session will see as great an improvement over this as
the work of the present session shows over that of the last.
Yours faithfully,
a>-.-;■;'a/'-: '  '■,■'■■';.,;■"; GRAHAM A. LAING,     ./'    ;    .
Director of Prevocational and Night Classes. 78
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SCHOOL SPORTS
Vancouver, B. C, December 28th, 1915.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City. a;a<:/
Dear Sir:—
I beg to submit the following report on School Sports for the
year 1915:—
A meeting of the Vancouver Public Schools' Athletic Associa-
CD
tion was held in the Central School, September 2nd, 1915. It was
decided to carry on three branches of sport during the fall term,
namely, Boys' Football, Boys' Basketball and Girls' Basketball.
Schools deciding to enter any of these leagues were asked to have
their entries in by September 17th, in order that schedules might be
drawn up and games begun early in the year.
Twenty-one teams entered the Boys' Football League. The
city was accordingly divided into five districts, and a teacher was
placed in charge of each. The districts, with their supervisors,
were as follows :—
District I.—General Gordon, Tennyson, Kitsilano and Henry
Hudson, in charge of Mr. D. Boyes.
District II.—Fairview, Cecil Rhodes, Model and Simon Fraser,
in charge of Mr. H. B. Fitch.
District III.—Mount Pleasant, Florence Nightingale, Alexandra and Laura Secord, in charge of Mr. S. D. Meadows.
District IV.—Grandview, Hastings, Seymour, Lord Nelson
and Macdonald, in charge of Mr. V. Z. Manning.
District V.—Strathcona, Central. Dawson and Lord Roberts,
in charge of Mr. T. R. Pollock.
CD *■'
The Boys' Basketball brought twelve entries and the city was
accordingly divided into four districts, as follows:—
District I.—General Gordon, Tennyson and Henry Hudson,
under Mr. D. Boyes. 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES        79
District II.—Cecil Rhodes, Florence Nightingale and Charles
Dickens, under Mr. S. D. Meadows.
District III.—Grandview, Seymour and Hastings, under Mr.
V. Z. Manning.
District IV.—Fairview, Dawson and Lord Roberts, under Mr.
J. R. Pollock. v. A
There were eleven entries in Girls' Basketball, and the city was
divided into three districts, as follows:—
District I.—General Gordon, Tennyson, Henry Hudson and
Cecil Rhodes, in charge of Mr. D. Boyes.
District II.—Charles Dickens, Grandview, Seymour and Hastings, in charge of Mr. V. Z. Manning.
District III.—Fairview, Dawson and Lord Roberts, in charge
of Mr. J. R. Pollock. ".    .
The winners of the districts in Boys' Football were these: District I., General Gordon; District II., Model; District III., Florence
Nightingale; District IV., Seymour; District V., Dawson.
In the first week of the semi-finals, General Gordon drew the
bye, whereas Model played Dawson, and Florence Nightingale
played Seymour. The games were very closely contested, in each
case a replay being necessary on acocunt of tie scores. Model
finally won from Dawson by a score of 2-0, and Florence Nightingale from Seymour by a score of 3-1. Florence Nightingale was
then called upon to play General Gordon, and defeated them by a
score of 3-0. Model and. Florence Nightingale were thus left in the
finals.
The final game in Boys' Football was played on the Cecil
Rhodes grounds. A football was kindly donated by Mr. Gaskell
of the Thomson Stationery Co. Here again a replay was necessary
on account of a tie score, the score in the first game being Model 1,
Florence Nightingale 1. In the second game, however, the Model
School was victorious, the score being 2-1. This left them champions in Boys' Football.
In Boys' Basketball, the winners of the districts were as follows: District I., Tennyson; District II., Cecil Rhodes; District III.,
Seymour; District IV., Dawson.
In the semi-finals, Tennyson was called upon to play Cecil
Rhodes, and Seymour to play Dawson. Tennyson defeated Cecil
Rhodes in an exciting game by a score of 20-18.   Dawson defeated Seymour by a score of 13-9. This left the final game to be played
between the Tennyson and Dawson Schools.
The final game was played at the Tennyson School. When
time was up the score stood Tennyson 12, Dawson 12. It was accordingly necessary to play ten minutes' overtime, and in this time
Tennyson was successful in getting 6 points, as compared to Dawson's 2. This made the final score: Tennyson 18, Dawson 14; and
as a result, left the Tennyson School champions in Boys' Basketball.
In Girls' Basketball, the winners of the districts were as follows : District I., Tennyson; District II., Seymour; District III.,
Dawson.
In the semi-finals Dawson drew the bye, whereas Tennyson
played Seymour. Tennyson defeated Seymour by a score of 9-1,
and thus won their way into the finals.
The final game in Girls' Basketball was played at the Dawson
School between the Tennyson and Dawson Schools. This game,
though keenly contested, was not quite as exciting as the other final
games. Tennyson was successful in defeating Dawson by a score
of 9-4, the players thus earning the title of champions in Girls'
Basketball.
A great deal of interest was taken in all the games by both the
CD CD J
pupils and the teachers of the different schools. The year 1915
leaves the Tennyson School in possession of two championships,
namely, Boys' and Girls' Basketball, while the Model School holds
one, that of Boys' Football.
Respectfully submitted,
R. STRAIGHT, GRAHAM BRUCE, /a:a/^/::
President. Secretary. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 81
ATTENDANCE REPORT   fi||§
Vancouver, B. C, January 7th, 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.   C.
Dear Sir:—
I have the honor to submit to you my ninth annual report for
the year 1915 :—
There was a total of 4690 cases investigated during the year,
as follows:—
January 464, February 431, March 498, April 431, May 474,
June 341, September 660, October 528, November 542, December
321. These cases were reported from various sources, the schools
supplying the greater portion of them, as the following will show:—
Central     302 Strathcona 422 Seymour   48
Model   173 Cecil Rhodes      84 Fairview 216
Tennyson    181 Kitsilano       77 Hudson 261
Dawson    354 Aberdeen 142 Roberts 125
General Gordon   ...   32 Bayview   .;..*   26 Alexandra    162
Laura Secord   67 Lord Nelson 172 Charles Dickens  ... 93
Livingstone   42 Grandview 162 Macdonald 135
Beaconsfield    50 Mt. Pleasant   246 Simon Fraser   73
Franklin    53 Hastings    83 Nightingale 131
Municipal Inspector.  22 King Edward H. S..    3 King George H. S..    4
Juvenile Court     2 Other Sources      33  South Vancouver ...    5
There were only 131 cases of truancy discovered—a very small
number for a city with a school population of over 13,000. The use
of the telephone by the principals in reporting suspect cases has
done much to prevent truancy.
There were 272 cases investigated of children found on the
streets during school hours. Some of these were from points outside the city and they were reported to the districts from which
J J X-
they came.
The Juvenile Court is attended every Wednesday, if at all possible. There the officer from South Vancouver is met, and with
the assistance rendered by the court officials, we are enabled to keep
in touch with most of the delinquents. There were 228 cases of infectious or suspected infectious disease discovered. These were all promptly reported to the medical
department for their attention.
Sixty-one cases of destitution were investigated, and assistance
given through the Schools Relief Association.
It was necessary to take the parents of four children to the
Police Court. Convictions were secured in every case; in one of
them, being a second conviction, a fine of $10.00 with costs was
imposed.
There were three cases of damage to school property. Court
proceedings were taken against three individuals, resulting in the
damage all being made good to the satisfaction of the Board.
I am still of the opinion that the compulsory age limit for
school attendance should be increased to sixteen for those who are
not regularly employed, or that a standard of proficiency should be
attained before a child leaves school.
An employment bureau might be opened along the lines suggested by Mr. John Kyle in his 1913 report, which would help boys
and girls to stay at school until an opening was found for them at
whatever calling they desired. I feel sure that the employers of
labor would give a bureau of this description their support.
I wish to thank the principals and teachers for co-operating
with the officers of this department, as it is by their so doing we
are enabled to give the best of service and to obtain the best results.
Yours respectfully,
■.-//:•.;._',/;"•;/ ':V;A,:;-A  ' '-■.■   .; ...    -   JAMES INGLIS, —:/ Z< *''*';*
Chief Attendance Officer.
Z CrodcJir.    K.fiH.S.
A  84
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT   AND   AVERAGE   ATTENDANCE
FOR 1915
.'*■
January   .
Eebruary
March    . .
April    . . .
May   	
.June . . . .
August . .
September
October .
November
December
mrol
13
13
13
13
13
12
12
13
13
13
Enrolment
Year.
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901	
for the
month of October
Enrolment.
 2724
 3117
 3393
 3710
1902 4087
1903 4416
1904 4994
1905 5609
1906 6437
foi
ment.
,127
,878
,745
,436
,026
,584
,789
,264
,183
,047
,549
each
Av. Attendance.
12,218.66
12,843.06
12,603.34
12,460.66
11,975.87
11,741.3
12,096.2
12.162.49
11,913.73
11,781.11
11,539.67
since   1897 :
'ercentage.
93.08
92.54
91.69
92.74
91.93
o.o
9
94.58
91.69
90.37
90.29
91.95
year
Year. Enrolmeti
1907 7370
1908 7984
1909 8845
1910 9942
1911 11385
1912 12393
1913 12990
1914 13313
1915 13183
t.
Number
of Teachers on the Vancouver staff
in December for
Males.
December, 1903        29
December, 1904      30
December, 1905  	
December, 1906	
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
29
38
47
58
65
71
72
93
91
102
88
eacn year since
Eemales.
63
71
83
92
103
115
128
155
181
220
246
260
266
oy
Special  Instructors employed
Instructors of Manual Training	
Supervisor of Manual Training	
Instructors of Domestic Science....
Supervisor of Domestic   Science  . . .
Supervisors   of   Music	
Supervisor   of   Primary   Work	
Supervisor. of Drawing	
Supervisor  of  Drill	
Musketry  Instructor   	
Director of Prevocational  and Night
Teachers in Night Classes	
Special  Officers employed by the  Board:
Municipal   Inspector of  Schools	
Medical   11 ealth   Officers '.	
Dentist     	
the Board,   1915
Classes,
>enti
Nurses   	
Attendance Officei
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates; •
University  Graduate  in  Arts  or  Science   	
.Academic    Certificate    	
First-class    Certificate    	
Second-class   Certificate	
Third-class   Certificate    	
Commercial   Specialist	
Drawing   Specialist    	
Oral    ..	
Temporary    	
1902:
Total.
92
101
112
130
150
173
193
226
263
313
337
362
354
16
1
12
./■j:'
2
1
1
1
1
1
39
1
2
1
4
3
108
9
123
104
5
1
1
1 *  ^> -.
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86
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
LIST OF TEACHERS    ;AAaIM
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment.
Name.                                                       Certificate.                                  Date of Appointi
Alexander.    T.    B B.Sc October,
Amos, Maude A 2nd    August,
nent.
1915
1909
1915
1912
1912
1913
1912
1906
1912
1913
1908
1908
1906
1911
1909
1913
1913
1903
1914
1911
1912
1909
1912
1912
1910
1914
1909
1913
1915
1914
1911
1914
1914
1910
1914
1911
1914
1913
1913
1915
1904
1915
1914
1912
1912
1913
1915
1914
1914
1908
1911
1912
1915
1915
1903
1915
1912
1910
1913
1914
1914
1909
1914
Anstie,  Jane  K 1st    August,
Armstrong,   W.   G M.A August,
Astle, Mabel C          . 2nd   March,
Balkwill,   Alice   M 2nd    August,
Baron, Mrs. Edith 2nd    April,
Beech,   W.   K B.A t August,
Bell,   Edna   B M.A August,
Beiatlev,   Nora  M B.A August,
Bodie,   Isabel   A B.A August,
Bower,   Mabel  2nd August,
Brockwell,    Muriel    A B.A August,
Brough,   Thos.   A B.A August,
Browne, Laurie B. W M.A August,
Brunton,   Lulu    2nd    August,
Bryant,   Ethel   D 2nd November, 1907, and August,
Bunting,   Winnifred    .....' B.A August,
Cahill,   Hattie   M st September
Cairns,  Kate    2nd January,
Cameron,   C.   Alice M.A August,
\:   :    (, BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
87
1st   October,
1st   November,
2nd    August,
2nd August,
1st   August,
Campbell, Jessie L	
Cantelon,   Jean   M	
Carruthers,   Irene   F ,
Carter,   Hilda   M ,'. [
Caspell,  Edmund   	
Caspell,   Violet   1 2nd November,
Cattell,   Dorothy    1st    January,
Cattell,   Margaret     2nd January,
Cave-Brown-Cave,   Beatrice    1st August,
Chadwick, Clara 1st   August,
Chandler, Dorothy G 2nd    January,
Chandler,   Florence  A 2nd    August,
Chipman,   Alice   R    B.A January,
Chodat,   Henri    M.A August,
Chute,   Clyde   C 1st   August,
Clark,   Angus    1st   August,
Clark,   Edna   A 2nd    August,
Clark,   Ethel   G 1st September,
Clarke,  Margaret    1 st   August,
Clements,  Mary  (on leave) 1st    August,
Close,  Florence J 1st    August,
Close, L. Laurina 1st   August,
Code,   Lome   B B.Sc August,
Coldwell,  Ross   F B.Sc November,
Cole,   Josephine   A 1st    August,
Collis, R. E: B.A Vugust,
Colter, Jennie J B.A August,
Cook,  Eva    1st   January,
Coombs, Mrs.  Florence A B.A January,
Corbett,   Grace  G 2nd     Vugust,
Cousins,  Olive J B.A August,
Cowan, E- Mabel   2nd    August,
Cowan,   Susie   1 2nd    August,
Cowie, Margaret C 2nd November,
Cowperthwaite, Dorothy 2nd    August,
Cowperthwaite, F. M B.A 1890-1897, and
Cox.   Bertha   C 1st   January,
Creech,  Mary M 3rd    1899-1906, March,
Creech, Winifred J. E 2nd    April,
Creelman,    Amelia     B.A August,
Crombie,   Hilda    1st   August,
Crombie, I M.A August,
Cronkhite, A. M B.A October,
Crowe, C. B B.A August,
Currie,   Blanche    1st    January,
Currie,    Katherine    B 1st    April,
Currie, Flora M 2nd   1897-1902;   1904-1910;
1902
1907
1912
1903
1899
1912
1904
1911
1914
1908
1914
1913
1913
1906
1908
1902
1914
1907
1910
1909
1912
1912
1910
1910
1911
1913
1911
1910
1909
1913
1914
1911
1908
1914
1914
1902
1910
1914
1902
1910
1913
1908
1911
1913
1911
1910
1913
Dauphinee. A. Josephine 1st    January,   1910
Davidson,    Jessie   A 1 st   September,  1910
Davidson,  J.   G B.A.,   Ph.D ,..September,   1907
Davidson,    Lucretia   F 1st    Augsut,
Dempsey,  Violet  H 2nd March,
Dewis,  Martha  E B.A August,
Dickey,   Alberta   F Academic January,
Dixon,
Dobson,
Dougan,
Dunbar,
1 st %. August,
1910
1914
1911
1907
1912
Ellis    B	
F.   H B.A August, 1907
Wilson     Academic    August,   1914
John     1st    August
Dunning, J. T.. . .
Dutcher, H. K.. . .
Dyke,   Kathleen  A.
M.A August,
M.Sc September,
2nd    August,
Eaton, Alice A B.A October,
Elderkin, Anita M B.A • February,
Eldridge,   Dorothy  C 2nd    January,
Elliott,   Margaret    2nd   March,
Elmsley,   Ada   B 1st   November,
Estabrooke,   Emma   D    B.A January,
Evans,   C.   R 1st November,
Evans,- Eleanor   -st August,
Evans,    Nellie   D 2nd August,
1912
1906
1907
1907
1912
1915
1908
1908
1900
1913
1907
1907
1914
Fallows,   M uriel   P 2nd
Faulkner, M. Jean 1st
August,   1914
January, 1914 88
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
'aunt,  Edith   ....
?aunt,  Tessie   ...
?ee,   Wilged  J	
erguson. Mary J.
ergusson,   George
essant,   Emma   ....
ierheller,    Ina    . . . .
"inlayson,  Alexander
V.
1st     August.
1st    August,
B.A August,
B.A August,
B.A August,
2nd August,
2nd October,
1st August,
isher, Anna M 1st
isher, Jessie E. R  2nd
itch,   H
leming,
leming,
letcher,
Wm.   R..
Elizabeth
ett, William . .
ower, Ethel M
Esther    .
loya,
ord,
rame
rame
rank,
.M.A.
.M.A.
. 1st,.
.2nd
.M.A.
1st   .
2nd .
I.
uvia     2nc
Emma' M 1st
rlazel    2nc
auline st
vr£drickson, Gertrude M	
rith, Elsie 2nd    January
ullerton, Florence L 1st    August
... August.
. .January,
. . ; August,
September,
.. .August,
 June,
. .January,
. . October,
. February,
. .January,
. . . August.
. February,
November,
1913
1913
1912
1912
1913
1914
1911
1912
1915
1908
1912
1915
1915
1893
1912
1913
1915
1912
1909
1914
1911
1907
1906
1909
George, Elizabeth L 2nd 	
Gillanders, Hilda C 1st	
Gourlie, Wm. G B.A	
Grant,   Fannie   1 2nd   	
Grant,    Mabel    L 1st	
Grant,   Winnifred    A 2nd	
Gray,   Susie   W B.A	
Greggs,   Gladys   E JJ.A	
Greggs,  R.   Luella B.A	
Grenfell.   Mary  E.   (on  leave)	
Griffiths,   Amy    	
B.A.
B.A.
 August,
 March,
 August,
 December,
 September,
 \ugust,
 January,
 November,
 Vugust, 1914, August,
 August,
 February.
1898
1911
1907
1907
1911
1915
1912
1912
1915
1909
1915
Hadden,   Edith   C 1st
Hall,   J.   II B.Litt.
Hamilton,    Margaret    P   2nd . . .
Harding, Mrs.  J.  M.  H 2nd   . .
Harper,   Lulu   F    1 st
Harvey,   D.   C B.A.   ..
Haughton, .Agnes       1st
Hearns,    Edna    M    2nd  . . .
Hemsworth,   E.   A	
Henderson,  James   	
Henry,   J.   K	
Hewton.    Sara    	
I lodgins,    Lena    B	
Hooley,   Elizabeth   	
Hornby,    Dorothy   M	
Howard,    Edith    	
August,
August,
August,
ianuary
August,
August,
anuary
1914
1911
1910
1913
1910
1914
1st August,
M.A ». January,
B.A August,
2nd   1898-1900; August,
2nd   August,
2nd    August,
2nd   August,
1st	
Howard,   F.   Mabel   S 15.A.
Howell, Lucy MacLellan M.A
Huggard,   Mrs.   Ada   C 1st
Hughes,  Annie    1st
k
1912
1915
1910
1902
1893
1908
1911
1914
1912
i .April, 1913
Vugust, 1912
anuary, 1915
1906
1912
nuiarv
j anuary,
rune
i*»
•},,,]
Ai
;t
Jacks, M.  Gert
Jamieson, Annie  B B.A
Jamieson,   G.   W 1st August
Jewett,   F.  Arnold B.A Vugust'
Johnson,   Emily   M~y    2nd  October
Johnston,   Bessie    1st    March
Johnston,  D.   B B.A  .. . .January'
Johnstone,   Marion    1! 2nd    1891-1911;   August
Jones,  Grace F 1st    September'
Jordan,   E._  E   M.A October,
Jukes, Marian  E 2nd March
Keenlevside,   .Mice   M	
Keith.    Walter    C	
Kelly, Bertha M	
Kemp, Wm. N 15.A.
B.A.
B.A.
M
. .January,
December,
1909
1907
1890
1909
1912
1891
1902
1914
1913
1912
1911
1915
1912
1914
1915
I BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
89
Kendall, George R B.Sc.
Kerr,   Ruby    2nd .
Killam, L    B.A.,
King, H. B B.A.
Kingston,   Emily   G.
 November,
 January,
,Sc September,
 January,
 August,
Laidlaw,   Kathleen 2nd    October,
Laird,  Edna J    1st 1906-1908;  1909-1911; January,
Langley,   Celia   G Academic August,
Laursen,   Lili   J 1st    August,
Lawrence,   Frederick  J 1st    *. August,
Leach,   Mrs.   Jean   P	
Lee, Mrs. Mary N.   (nee Holloway) 2nd August,
LeFeuvre, Eva A 1st August,
Leith,   Mrs.   T Academic 1896-1902; January,
Lewis,   Alice   M 2nd    August,
Little,    D.    C B.A January,
Logan,   H.  T B.A September,
Loggie," Annie   M 1st    January,
Long,   L.   Pea. 1 1st    October,
Lord,    A.    R     B.A Vugust,
Loree, Edith 1st August,
1907
1910
1913
1904
1909
1915
1913
1906
1905
1910
t April, 1914
1904
1903
1914
1905
1906
1913
1911
1912
1914
1914
Loughead, Ma
Lovering, J. 7
Luscombe, E-
ry
Tie
en
1st    September,   1912
M.A August,  1915
1st    September,  1911
D.
Machum,  Vetura   .
Maggs,   A.    B	
Manning,    Dorot'.iv
Manning,  Viril  Z
Marshall,   Elsie  M.	
Matheson,   E.   Corinne
Matheson,   E-   G	
Mathews,   Stanley   W M.A.
E.
Maxwell,    Mary
Mayers,    F.    J	
Meadows, Stanley D.. .
Messinger, Clarence R.
Middleton,   Alberti   .   ;
1st
.B.A.
.B.A.
B.A.
2nd
August,
1st    August,
M.A August,
B.A September,
B.A January,
2nd    January,
2nd    September,
B.Sc January,
 Vpril,
 August,
. . . November,
1911; January,
 August,
 January,
^ller, S.  L B.A August,
Mills, Sadie 1st    October,
■Mine,   Helen   B 1st    October,
Moodie,    S.    F B.A August,
Moody,   Margaret   H - B.A August,
Morgan, Clovis B B.A January,
Morrison,    Mabel    1 2nd    September,
Morrow, W. H M.A August,
Mullin,   Isadore   M 1st October,
Munro,   Elizabeth     2nd    January,
Munro,  Sadie  H B.A. January,
Mitnn,   Emma   M : • • B.A .'August,
Murphy,   Eva   B 1st    January,
Murray,   Christine T 1st    s August,
Mutch,  Ethel J  • 2nd   August,
McAdam,    Guy    T M.A August,
McAlpine,  Sara 2nd , August,
M cCallum,   Ada   F,.., 2nd    . .. A August,
Macdiarmid,   Kate       • B.A January,
Macdonald, Agnes    2nd August,
Macdonald,   Christina    2nd February,
McDonald,  C.   -May.      1st   August,
McDonald,  Edna  C • 2nd August,
MacDonald,    Gertrude     1 st    January,
MacDonald,   H.   Lucretia    1st    September,
McDonagh,   William    1st    February,
vIcDougall.   Elizabeth     3rd    August,
McEwen,  Agnes  E 1st August,
McEwen,   Florence   E 1st    September,
McFarland,   Cora   H B.A January,
Macfarlane,   Edith   J 3rd    March,   1914;  .August,
McGregor,   Grace   H 2nd August,
Maclnnes,  Isabel    M.A January,
Maclnnes,  Mrs. W.  H Oral October,
Macintosh,   Grace   J 2nd    January,
Maclntyre,   Beatrice  A 1st    August,
1914
1910
1911
1912
1913
1913
1915
1902
1908
1907
1914
1909
1914
1913
1912
1905
1914
1909
1915
1912
1913
1911
1915
1915
1915
1913
1913
1914
1911
1900
1895
1912
1910
1911
1908
1906
1913
1910
1903
1912
1905
1906
1911
1915
1915
1910
1915
1914
1912 90
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
McKay, George M.A August,   1911
McKay, Minna G 2nd    March,   1891
McKee,   George  E B.A May,  1905
MacKenzie,   Grace    1st    August,  1908
MacKenzie,  Jessie    1st October, 1913
MacKenzie,   Mary  L B.A August,   1908
Mackenzie, Winewood F B.A August,  1912
McKinnon,   Mary    2nd January, 1897
McLatchy,  Herman J B.A August, 1915
Maclean,   Alice     B.A August, 1910
Maclean,  Donald    1st August, 1913
McLean,    D.    R ;. . .Temporary September, 1915
McLeish, Kathleen   1st    March,  1913
McLenaghen,. Myrtle  V B.A January, 1914
Macleod,   Hazel   E B.A January, 1912
MacMillan,   Mary   R 2nd August, 1915
McMurray, J. Ethel 1st    August,  1914
Macnaghten, Russell E ..M.A January, 1910
McNiven,   Catherine    B.A August,   1914
McNiven, Margaret   B.A January, 1915
McPherson, Annie R 1st August, 1910
Macpherson, Mary  . .x 2nd    August,  1915
MacQueen,   Elizabeth  D B.A December, 1907
McQueen,    Kate    H B.A January, 1911
McRae,   Lottie   S 1st February,  1914
Neil, Mrs. E. B. Stewart 1st    August, 1908
Neil,   Muriel   Stewart 2nd   August, 1915
Nesbitt,   William   J 1st    August,   1913
Newby, Myrtle E 2nd August, 1912
Ogilvie,   David    M.A August,  1915
Olding, Elizabeth   2nd January, 1902
Paget,    Harry    L 1st October,
Painter, Emily 2nd    January,
Patterson, Jean   1st    January,
Pattison, Thomas   M.A February,
Pearson,   Ethel   M *.. .2nd    January,
Perkins, Alice G 1st September,
Perkins,   Ella   D B.A August, 1905 ; April,
 .August,
Pen-
Florence   G 1st
Pickering, Walter 1st » August,
Pollock, James  R    ..1st  August,
Preston,   Bessie     2nd   January,
Purdie, A. J.   Grosvenor B.A August,
Ramage,   Wm.   G    . . B.A August,
Rand, WihAm L B.A August,
Reid, Alice T. G 2nd August,
Reveley,   Ethel  H 2nd   October,
Rines, Alfred 1st August,
Rines,   Alice   R 1st   August,
Roberts,   Elen   Lloyd 1 st   T anuary,
Roberts,   T.   H B.A August,
Robertson,    Lemuel    F M.A August,
Robinson, Cecil A. A 2nd August,
Robinson, Geo. E B.A August,
Rogers,  Gladys  E B.A J anuary,
Rogers,    Olive    M 2nd January,
Ross, A. W  M.A January,
Ross,    Ellen    D 1st February,
Ross,   Lillian   A 2nd    January,
 August,
Ro
ss,
Lillian    M 1st
Salter,  Mildred  E   2nd January,
Sanderson,   J.   R M.A.,   Ph.D August,
Saunders,   M.   B Academic August,
Sheepy,   Janet     3rd    August,
Sherman,   R.   S >:... 1st    February,
Sherrin,    Alice    M 1st    January,
Shine,   Mrs.  Alice   G 2nd , April,
Shine.    Isabella    M 2nd    November,
 January,
.Si
impson,  J_ina
M.
1st
Sinclair, Annie M M.A beptember
1912
1909
1907
1901
1911
1912
1911
1911
1912
1910
1910
1912
1912
1914
1912
1912
1908
1912
1913
1910
1901
1915
1893
1915
1913
1909
1912
1911
1911
1910
1913
1906
1911
1903
1909
1903
1912
1913
1911 ^^p
a
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
91
 Art   August,
 2nd   August,
 2nd January,
, 2nd 1904-1909 ; August,
 1st Aug., 1891 ; Aug., 1893; Aug.,
 1st   August,
 3rd January,
 2nd February,
 1st    January,
S.   R B.A 1906-1911; August,
Emma   L 1st    January,
Sinclair,   J.   G	
Sinclair, Madge P	
Smith,  Edith T	
Snider,   Emma   S	
Sparling,   R	
Spencer,   Agnes    	
Splan,  Marv  E	
Stables,    Nellie    T 	
Steeves,  R.  P.   (on active service)
Stephens,
Stephens,
Sterns,   Clara   M	
Stevens, Gladys E- •
Stewart, Christine E.
Stewart, Edith L. • .
Stone,    Mabel   W.. . .
Story, Mary E	
Straight,    R	
Struthers,   R	
rust,
.gust,
B.A Aui
1st    Auj
1st    August,
1st August,
1st February,
1st    January,
1st    August,
.M.A November,
Stuart,   Jas.   A B.A January,
Suter, R. W B.A.,   B.Sc October,
Tait,   Albert   B M.A August,
Tanner, Rebecca 2nd  .August,
Taylor,   Grace   A Academic August,
Taylor,    L.    W B.A August,
Taylor,  Minnie    1st August,
Templer,   Mrs.   Jean 1st August,
Thomas, David   B.A August,
Thomas,   Owen   J B.A August,
Tom, Gregory H 1st    1891-1911;  August,
Trembath,   Barbara E 1st August
Truswell,    Grace    F 2nd February,
Truswell, Mary   1st    August,
Tucker, Julia E 1st    January,
Turner,   Janet   C 1st   February,
Van Blaricom, Ida M B.A January,
Van Wart, Elsie V B.A January,
Ward, Blanche E 1st January,
Ward, Edith M 2nd    November,
Ward, Gladys 1 1st    August,
Warner,    Gertrude      1st    February,
Warner, Mabel A 2nd    August,
Warwick, Ellen M 3rd    August,
Watson,   J.   L B.A August,
Watson,   Kathleen   E 2nd January,
Watson,   Marguerite   E 2nd    August,
Wenborn, Myrle S 2nd    January,
Wickett, Evelyn   B.A January,
Willett,    Jane    T B.A February,
Williamson, Jessie E- M 2nd   August,
Wilson,  F.   C B.A January,
Wilson,   Rosalind     1st     January,
Wood,   Berton  J M.A.,  B.Sc October,
Woodhead,  Thomas  W Academic* August,
Woods, William    B.A August,
Wright,    C.    W	
B.A September,
910
910
910
912
900
912
913
912
913
914
910
911
914
912
910
914
913
907
914
913
902
915
900
910
913
914
911
914
911
915
914
915
899
913
914
907
911
912
912
914
914
912
914
914
909
913
912
907
912
914
908
913
906
908
910
914
Young, George P 1st  January, 1913
DOMESTIC SCIENCE.
Bell, Adna • August, 1912
Cooke, Eva January,  1914
Creelman, Minerva        August
Fonda, Ethel   ..." 1 ' '. .August,'
Marlatt, Mary Norah    # August
Mutch,   Susie  L August'
MacKay, Ida F  Tannarv
AV "A     ,     •  January,
Oliverj r redenca  < August
Rath, Martha     A no-net'
melhe,  Ella    February,
Sterntt, Agnes August,
Elsie   • •. August,
Steven,
1909
1909
1913
1913
1913
1914
1910
1913
1914
1911 92
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MANUAL TRAINING.
Bennett, J. W February,   1915
Chippendale, Thos September, 1912
Cross, N. Y October, 1915
Fairey, Francis    January,   1912
Gardner, N. H January,  1908
Hill,  William A September,   1910
Jones,  Harry A August,   1914
Lister, J. George October,  1903
Mitchell, Wm. C August, 1914
McAdam, Tosiah A* January, 1912
McCallum, D.  P August,  1913
McKeown, William A August,  1903
Parker. A. W January,  1909
Parker, E- W ; January,  1911
Templer, F. W August,  1913
Tingley, A.  P August,   1913
Williams, A August, 1914
SUPERVISORS.
Berry, Elizabeth Supervisor of Domestic Science
Bundy, Albert C Supervisor of Physical Culture
Butler, Constance Assistant Supervisor of Music
Hicks,    George P Supervisor of Music
Laing, Graham A Director of Prevocational and Night Classes
Northrop, S Supervisor of Manual Training
Scott, Chas. II Supervisor of Drawing
Trembath, Emily J Supervisor of Primary Classes
SCHOOL  MEDICAL  STAFF
Brydone-Jack, F. W    .M.D., CM.  (McGill), M.R.San.I School Medical Officer
Wilson, Belle H., MJ) Assistant School Medical Officer
Bamford   R.  C.   D.D.S School  Dentist
Breeze   Elizabeth Head Nurse
McLellan,  Aletha     7Nl1irc<*
Jeffers, Adelaide { ...; '.    £""*
Ewart, I. May  at
J    iNurse
Inglis, Jas.
ATTENDANCE  OFFICERS.
Jensen, Nels.
Godf
rey,
W
in.
ft{*A '"ll//»«*Y BOARD Ot SCHOOL TRUSTEES
93
SALARY SCHEDULE
Grade Teachers.
January, 1915.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.   Succeeding yrs.
$60 $65 $70        $75 $80 $85 $90 $95
Senior  Grade Teachers.
(Maximum $100.)
Teachers having had two years' successful experience in graded
schools, minimum salary, $65.
Salaries of substitutes to be paid by the Board in cases of illness of
teachers up to 20 teaching days in the year, subject to Medical Certificate
from doctor in attendance, or School Medical Officer.
1st yr.
$110
1st yr.
$140
1st yr.
$150
2nd yr.
$120
Vice-Principals.
3rd yr.
$130
4th and  Succeeding  vrs.
$140
2nd yr.
$150
Principals—SmalL School.
3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th and Succeeding yrs,
$160 $170 $180
Principals—Large School.
2nd yr.      3rd yr.      4th yr.       5th yr.      6th yr.
$160 $170 $180 $190 $200
7th and
Succeeding yrs.
$210
High School—Male Teachers.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.   Succeeding yrs.
$200
$130
$140'
$150       $160       $170       $180       $190
High School—Female Teachers.
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.
$110       $120       $130       $140       $150       $160       $170
Manual Training Instructors.
3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr.
$120 $130 $140
Domestic Science Instructors.
1st yr.
$100
1st yr.
$70
2nd yr.
$110
2nd yr.
3rd
vr.
4tl
i vr.
$80
5th yr.
)5
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
$180
6th and
Succeeding yrs.
$150
6th and
Succeeding yrs.
$100 e
Schedule based on twelve monthly payments each year.
No schedule increase to go into effect -without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the
schedule by special resolution of the Board. r
94 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
	
■        TEMPORARY SALARY SCHEDULE    :^;
•    For 1916. > "\"'"a€aa
Grade Teachers.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd vr.   3rd yr.   4th vr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.    Succeeding yrs.
$57 $61 $65 $69 $73 %77       $81.50 $86
Senior  Grade  Teachers.
Maximum $90.50.
Vice-Principals.
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th and Succeeding yrs.
$99 $108 $117 $126
Principals—Small School.
1st yr 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th and Succeeding yrs.
$126* $135 $144 $153 $162
Principals—Large School.
7th and
1st yr.      2nd yr.       3rd yr.      4th yr.       5th vr.      6th yr.     Succeeding yrs.
$135 $144 $153 $162 $171 $180 $189
High School—Male Teachers.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.    Succeeding yrs.
$117       $126       $135       $144       $153       $162       $171 $180^
High School—Female Teachers.
ttth and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.    7th vr.    Succeeding yrs.
$99        $108       $117       $126       $135       $144       $153 $162
Manual Training Instructors.
6th and
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr.       Succeeding yrs.
$90 $99 $108 $117 $126 $135
Domestic Science Instructors and Nurses.
6th and
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th vr. Succeeding yrs.
$65 $73 %77 $81.50 $86 $90.50
Increases in  salaries will not be allowed for the last five months of
the year; and teachers already receiving their maximum will  have  their
salaries reduced $4 or $2 per month for the year according as their salary
under   the   regular   schedule,   was   over   $110   per   month   or   below   that
amount.
The entire salary of each teacher for the year will be paid in twelve
equal monthly instalments.
In determining the salaries of officials and teachers not provided for
in the above schedule similar reductions are made.
V BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
95
SECRETARY'S STATEMENT
G.   UPTON, Secretary
Vancouver, British Columbia, February 11th, 1916.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. McNaughton and Gentlemen :-
I beg to hand you herewith financial and statistical statements
for the vear ending- December 31st, 1915.
Capital Account
Comparatively little, compared with previous years, has
been charged to your By-law accounts. The principal item
being the completion of your new Strathcona School, By-law
No. 998, and you will note with pleasure that you again have a miscellaneous balance to carry forward to your credit for expenditure
during the year 1916. Although small, it may meet requirements
for the coming- year.
The Government have fulfilled their agreement made in 1914
that they would provide $5,000.00 towards your Prevocational
Class equipment; cheque being received and passed to the credit of
By-law No. 997. Another item I might mention is the sum of
$4,824.92, credited to the same By-law, which was made up of the
proceeds of unreturned fees on Night Class Account. The crediting
to a By-law with this would appear incorrect, but it is not so; in
previous years this Board had expended certain sums on account of
Night Class equipment, and it was anticipated when so doing that
a certain amount of fees would be available from this source. Therefore, although no By-law had been passed for this purpose, the
Board at that time felt justified in spending this amount when they
realized it would eventually be recovered. 96 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
In the latter part of 1914, when the then Board were discussing
Estimates and By-laws with the City Council, a request was made
by them to place before the public the question of making the specific
amounts set out in By-law No. 998 for King Edward High School
Gymnasium, and the Model School Heating Plant, a General Purpose By-law, eliminating the specific purpose under which this was
controlled. It was unfortunate that this was not accomplished. The
Board will seriously feel this tying up of funds perhaps before the
coming year is completed. This question cannot now be considered
until the early part of 1917.
Revenue Account
The Revenue Account during the year has been very carefully scrutinized by the Trustees, and when the Board discussed
these questions with the City Council, they mutually agreed
to deduct $25,000.00 from the original estimated amount necessary
for 1915 operations. Again in the month of July they further agreed
to reduce another $35,000.00 if it was possible so to do. Therefore,
after having: entered into such a stringent economical agreement,
CD CD CD
many of your departments were cut down to a minimum, which you
will find may be impossible to duplicate during 1916.
In the Fuel Account for the year there was a considerable reduction over the previous year, probably to be accounted for by the
closer supervision of your plants, together with the milder weather
that Vancouver has fortunately been having during this period under
discussion. The Light, Power and Gas Account seems to be increasing" yearly, which may be natural: at the same time, it was
CD       J J   ? J
contemplated by the 1915 Board to look more closely into this question, and the possibilities are that this .amount may be reduced by
the end of 1916,
Although the Board were not enabled to save the full amount of
$35,000.00 referred to above, it must be gratifying to the Trustees
to realize that they did reduce expenditure to the extent of some
827,000.00 odd.
Estimated Value of School Property Statement
At the suggestion of the City Assessor, under whom the valuing
of your school property comes, the amounts for the value of the buildings have been reduced for the first time in the history of the Board
by between 2]/z per cent, and 3 per cent. On comparing the statement
with last year, you will note that the amount of the total value of estimated buildings has increased. That is accounted for by the fact that
for the construction of the new Strathcona School, the sum of $87.- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 97
500.00 has been added, whereas the percentage reduction referred to
amounts to some $71,000.00. The other figures on this statement-
are practically the same as previous years.
Cost per Capita Statement
I am including in this year's reports a Per Capita Cost
Schedule based on the actual disbursements of the Board on
account of Revenue for the year 1915. On glancing over
these figures, I think the comparison is a very fair one as
regards school by school; This being the first appearance of such
a statement in any of the Board's Annual Reports, its value will not
be entirely appreciated this year, but it will be a very valuable acquisition to your various statements from now on for comparative
purposes. The frequent statements made by the general public,
who do not naturally know the absolute facts, that educational
charges of the City of Vancouver are exorbitant, will prove to be
unfounded when one peruses the figures as set out. I have not
added to any of the totals of the per capita column, the amount of
Sinking and Interest Fund, for the simple reason that although this
is part and parcel of the total tax levy raised in the City of Vancouver, it is to a certain extent offset by the Capital assets of the Board.
In my opinion, it is better to set out the cost per capita for actual
running expenses, which is for Public Schools $40.80, High Schools
$74.82, and making quite a distinction of the Sinking and Interest
Fund charge per capita, which is $17.13.
The general routine of my department during 1915 has been
very satisfactory. Xo complaints having been made by any of the
firms or people doing business through this department of the
Board, either as to their treatment or the settlement of their accounts.
On behalf of my staff and myself, I wish to thank you, Mrs.
** -•    mr J
McNaughton and Gentlemen, as Trustees, for your many kind
actions and advice that has been received by us, and if we may judge
by results, we feel that our efforts have been fully appreciated.
Respectfully submitted,
GERALD UPTON
/
Secretary 98
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1915
Vancouver, British Columbia, March 1st, 1916.
To the Chairman and Members,
Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B.C.
I have examined the attached Statement, with the Books and
Disbursement Vouchers relating thereto, and certify that the Statement is correctly drawn up so as to set forth the Board of School
Trustees' Expenditures on Capital Account for the year 1915, as
disclosed by the records presented for my inspection. I have received all the information and explanations I have required.
Yours faithfully,
:.   , :  ;. .      ;:;:! j JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A., |ft|
Auditor.
■■••.'■■;■'■'■''    -   BY-LAW NO. 997   '"■       \;;;-a||I|
To Completion of 1914 Contract—
,". Beaconsfield School  (Block 6 Hastings)    $    4,843.38
" Desks, Furniture and Sundry Equipment—
Desks and Furniture   $    2,704.35
Prevocational and Night Class Equipment          3,740.83     j:aa^';^
Manual     Training     and     Domestic
Science Equipment        1,563.05
■y.-'v'/A.''-'.-:-.. . ■      8,008.23
" Miscellaneous—
Legal Fees in Matheson & Ramsay,
contracts now concluded $   4,497.65
Additions to Heating and Ventilating
Systems           1,931.52
Grounds, Retaining Walls, Grading,
Cement Sidewalks, Surface Draining and  Fencing         15,295.73
Sundry   Small   Capital   Expenditures
I over all Schools (30)          1.113.90
    22,838.80
Balance     35,660.52
$71,350.93
L BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
99
1915.
Jan. |
By Balance $ 60,198.82
  12.70
i -
Add Transfer from By-Law No. 998	
Cheque received from the Government on
account of Prevocational Equipment ....
Cheque received from W. N. O'Neil for
slate purchased from the Board	
Cheque received from the Relief Association, being Contra Accounts   	
Sundry Contra Accounts with the City Hall
Cheque received from Port Moody School
Board on account of desks	
Cheque received for slate blackboard supplied to B. C. Granitoid Co	
Transfer of Night Class fees to March 31st,
1915, offsetting previous Capital Expenditure for Equipment	
Grant made by the Relief Association for
King Edward High School Retaining
Wall   	
5,000.00
78.95
219.94
55.45
107.75
351.40
4.825.92
500.00
$71,350.93
By Balance down, being Credit to the Board on Account
of By-Law No. 997   $35,660.52
1915
Tan. 1
BY-LAW NO. 998
-By Balance on Hand  $122,023.47
Less Transfer to By-Law 997  12.70
/-r\
Io Completion 1914 Contract—
Strathcona School $ 52,662.68
Balance      69,348.09
:Jr::'y■ -v'<-wa{\>'/JZ-:':;i■■.''■ ■-'•/ , $122,010.77 $122,010.77
By Balance down, being Credit to the Board on
Account of By-Law No. 998   $ 69,348.09 w
100 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
CAPITAL   FUNDS   AVAILABLE   AS   AT  fl§
DECEMBER 31st, 1915 .s1:W^i$W§.
v •    '    By-Law No. 997 $ 35,660.52 a^W^aa
By-Law No. 998     69,348.09
■-.-•;<..■ "■:• '    -    $105,008.61
N.B.—Specific Amounts set out in By-Law No. 998, of which
thereof balances remaining unexpended are as follows, and
can only be used for such construction:—
King Edward Pligh School Gymnasium. . .$ 49.790.90
Model  School  Heatine Plant         10,000.00
REVENUE ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR 1915
Vancouver, British Columbia, March 1st, 1916.
To the Chairman and Members,
Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B. C.
I have made a continuous examination of the Books and Records of the Board of School Trustees from January 1st to December
31st, 1915, and certify that in my opinion the attached Statement is
drawn so as to fairly disclose the Revenue Expenditure for the period
under notice, and that this Expenditure is in agreement with the
Records of the Corporation of the City of Vancouver.
Yours faithfully,
;'      ,   -:    JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A.,        :^>
Auditor.
Salaries—
Superintendent and Assistants $    4.902.00
Secretary and Assistants        6,201.00
Building Superintendent and Assistants.      3,256.47
Medical Department       8,293.98
Attendance Officers ,      3,192.00
Night Schools       12.356.50
Chauffeurs        1,536.90
 $ 39,738.85
School Educational Salaries—
Teachers   425,348.65        ; V    ^"
Teachers' Substitutes       2,991.50
Supervisors      14,059.50
Manual Training     23,571.00
Domestic Science      12,057.40
 478,028.05
Carried forward    $517,766.90 BOARD ()P SCHOOL TRUSTEES
101
Brought  forward   .... . § $517,766.90
J a x i tors and Extras  -.. .. -. 46,654,70
General School Supplies—
Schools   ...  12,821.43''      "    V;
Domestic Science  ,  T,880.67
Manral Training  ...... -2,158.36
Medical Department  -542.69
~r\ v Night Class  , . . ..  .7()7.73 ""*A .' - > ~M
#pv Tanitors '  5,694.69 ::C/-;-;A. aaa
'Playgrounds -. 15.00
H": ■•     ~ ""'   ' '.-.. -X- "" '*;"..■—- ■—  2JM0.57
Miscellaneous—
Fuel                                    * 3514 451 8^
Light, Power and Gas  7,048.15
*V?-': Water     1,719.90     ;''.-r%
Insurance .  2,701.70
Advertising    ...  84.05
Cartage  6.75
%;':. Telephone  1,860.61  '■ ;0 /■■ '
Auto   Expense  992.61
Scavenging  1,601.25
.. a Gar Fares  800.20     i;A;.-":■:■&
Solicitors  and Auditor  650.00
Engineer  600.00
Office Expense  1,480.60
*t% Contingent     1,303.30
'^XIX ;-:.^'/';''',^H"'"-:-^" ~ 35,305.94
Repairs and Renewals ..     27,652.85
i
$651,290.96
Sinking Fund and Interest >. ,, ,.. 213,459.87
$864,750.83 102 BO A RT) OF" SCHOOL TRI ~STEEg	
REVENUE   REQUIREMENTS   ESTIMATED   FOR
m    THE YEAR 1915, AS EXHIBITED BY THE B
' a3|, ;      '■>■. MINUTES OF THE BOARD I^^^S
By Balance from the year 1914 . ... ... I  I $■   2,001.14
Estimated Amount required February 1st, 1915    507,356.00*
Estimated Government Grant towards Teachers^ Salaries    192,603.00*
" Estimated Royal Institute Rebate cm Salaries paid to
[.''.'■ J     Teachers   by  the  Board    214,540.00
** Estimated Amount required for Sinking Fund and
Interest as computed by the City Council 213,932.52
To Reduction of Estimated Requirements as
at February 1st, 1915, mutually
agreed to as between this Board and
A /;;    the City Council    $ 25,000.00
*' Difference between Estimated Government Grant as at February 1st, 1915)
and the actual amount received....      4,964.15
" Difference between Estimated Royal
Institute Rebate as at February lstr
1915, and the actual amount received     5,863.66
" Amount actually expended for Sinking
Ftind and Interest for the year.... 213,459.87
" Amount actually expended for Revenue
purposes for the year   651,290.96
" Balance carried down ■ • 29,854.02 Mf^^^^$.
a:   ■■;'..       .:   a   -;.        V^/a-    . : : "    $930,432.66 $930,432.66
By Balance down, being Surplus carried forward to the
vear 1916' $ 29,854.02 >ta
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BOARD ()F SCHOOL TRUSTEES
STOCK STATEMENT FCR THE YEAR ENDING
*" AAAa'-  DECEMBER 31st, 1915    ''liltitll
SCHOOC  SuPPCXES:
Stock oil hand December 31st, 1914 $"   £,633.43:
Stock- purchased during; 1915
Less Distribution as per Analysis Sheet
I? Q?1 AX.
$" 21,454.86-
i6,079.04
Stock Carried Forward to- the Year 1916. ....
.$    5,375.82
Janitors' Supplies
Stock on" Hand December 31st, 1914 ......
Stock Purchased during 1915
r> ....'$      441.88:
5,694.69
! ■       ; ' -" . $   6,136.57
Less Distribution as per Analysis Sheet . , .,,,.,.«-.',,.      3,745.85
Stock Carried forward to the Year 1916 $   2,390.72
REPAIRS AND R^N^WAIyS
Sundry Purchases made latter part of December carried
forward as St<ick ,.>**<.......**......  $
248.3C
Distribution as per Analysis Sheet .<,..,..     27,404.55
Total Expenditure during the Year 191(>  $ 27,652,85 cu
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Z BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
107
INDEX
Attendance :—
Average (School)  .....
List of Officers	
Of Trustees  	
Board oe School, Trustees I'll    List of, 1886—1915 	
f§f    Year 1915 .	
Year 1916	
* *•   • **
**■■-»     •    ■*      ■    **    "•    V     ■    s    •»
*»     S     ^     •»     V     ^    V
■»   *»    •   ■»   v    •   ■••**
Capital Expenditure Account, 1915  .......,,>...,.
Chairman's Address  	
Committees (Standing)
Year 1915	
Enrolment :—
Year 1915  	
*  >>••>■•  >»
"k      >      \       »      V       •      \      •     %
■*      \       -m       1      1       *      V
\       ■»        *        *
Years 1897 to 1915 in October
Honor Roll ....*,,
>  »   * \  *  \  *
Medical Staff	
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees
Officials,  1916 ;
Principals, Names and Telephone Numbers
v
Reports :—
Attendance   	
Auditor	
Building and Grounds Committee
Management Committee	
Medical Inspection	
Municipal Inspector of Schools . .
Prevocational and Nieht Classes .
School Sports	
Secretary  	
Page
V 92
-3
A
&6
2&3
98
7
3
4
84
84
35
92
4
4
85
81
98
19
12
36
27
73
78
95 Page
Supervisors, Domestic Science ^ 67
Drawing;   ,....,,  44
Manual  Training   |  65
■Hre! I St  Alusic •- i  3   "!5
Physical Culture, Cadets and Rifle Teams 47
Primary Work  63-
Revenue Account, 1915 . ~ 103
Revenue Expenditure, Analysed  103
Revenue Expenditure, Showing Cost per Capita  105
Salary Schedules, 1915 and 1916 |  93 & 94
Schools-—Names, Location, Number of Divisions  85
Stock Statement  104
Supervisors, List of  92
TeSlcherS :—
Their Certificates and Dates of Appointment  86
Number each year since 1902  84
Number of Special Teachers  84
Number Holding Different Grades of Certificates  ... 84
' Domestic Science and Alanual Training  91 & 92
CD
Value of School Property   106
^|'^;:';vr.Af;;   LIST OE ILLUSTRATIONS   Z'W^^^m
Cadet Corps, Lord Nelson School  52
Domestic Science Room, Strathcona School    68
Dressmaking Class, King Edward High School  72
Honor Roll  ||| 34
Laundry, Strathcona School    69
Matriculation Class, King Edward High School  83
Municipal Inspector  fiflp
Oral   Class     §f§ 14
Prevocational Class and Their Work   74
Rifle Team, Macdonald School  08
Secretary   95
Strathcona School, Erected 1915    21
Supervisors  43
Trustees, 1915     2
i Pi /
.

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