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Twentieth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1922

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Array  1
THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA (77T
ffltetttetlr
^mttal ^Report
FOR THE
^twc ^rcbmg ^tttmhtx 31st-, 1922
PUBLISHED   BY   THE
CITY   OF  VANCOUVER MEMMKaM
rrj
^s@(£iL''inaiBiM^ TEACHERS FROM OTHER PARTS OF THE EMPIRE.
Eack Row—Miss A. Bricknell, London, Eng.; Miss A.  E. Clogg, London. Eng.;
Miss   I.   M.   Penny,   Glasgow,   Scotland.
Front  Row—Miss  D.   H.   McKenzie,   Hamilton,  N.Z.;   Miss  D.  Jameson,  Christ-
church,   N.Z.;   Miss  L.   m.   McKenzie,   Hamilton,   N.Z. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES,  1922.
EXECUTIVE BOARD
1922.
Chairman E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc.
Chairman, School Management Committee Dr. F. J. Nicholson
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee J. W. Prescott
Chairman, Finance Committee .J. W. Prescott
STANDING   COMMITTEES.
School Management. Buildings and Grounds.
Dr. F. J. Nicholson, Chairman J. W. Prescott, Chairman
Mrs. D. Macaulay Jas. Blackwood
A. L. McWilliams Angus Maclnnis
mance.
J. W. Prescott, Chairman
Dr. F. J. Nicholson E. G. Matheson, B.A.Sc.
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member  of all Committees.
ATTENDANCE OF TRUSTEES AT BOARD AND
§t| COMMITTEE   MEETINGS—1922.
Board       Management     Building       Finance
Meetings.    Committee.    Committee. Committee, Totals.
Number of meetings  22 22 14 12 70
Matheson, E. G. (Chair.) 22 19 10 10 61
Macaulay, Mrs. D   15 19 9 9 52
Prescott, J. W  21 22 14 12 69
Blackwood, J  22 22 14 12 70
Nicholson, F. J   19 21 11 8 59.
McWilliams, A. L  21 22 14 12 69
Maclnnis, A  22 21 14 11 68 BOARD   OF   SCHOOL  TRUSTEES,   1923.
Retire December 31st, 1923.
Mrs. D. Macaulay, Jas. Blackwood, A. L. McWilliams, Angus Maclnnis
Retire December 31st, 1924.
Mrs. F. E. Hopkins Dr. F. J. Nicholson J. W. Prescott
EXECUTIVE BOARD
1923.
Chairman Dr. F. J. Nicholson
Chairman, School Management Committee Jas. Blackwood
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee A. L. McWilliams
Chairman, Finance Committee A. L. McWilliams
| STANDING COMMITTEES.
School Management. Building and Grounds.
Jas. Blackwood, Chairman A. L. McWilliams, Chairman
Mrs. D. Macaulay J. W.  Prescott
Angus Maclnnis Mrs. F. E. Hopkins
Finance.
A. L. McWilliams, Chairman
Dr. F. J. Nicholson Jas. Blackwood
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE OF MEETINGS.
Board Third Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Management Committee.... Second Monday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding Third Monday, at 8 p.m.
Finance Committee Monday before Board meetings, at 8 p.m.
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the
School Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets;
and all correspondence to officials should be addressed to the same
building.
■SP- ff: OFFICIALS
1923.     [
Municipal Inspector of Schools  J. S. Gordon, B.A.
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools T. A. Brough, B.A.
Stenographers Miss W. P. Cairns, Miss L. Judge, Miss M. Gait
Secretary Major B. G. Wolfe-Merton, M.C.
Accountant  H. Rhodes
Assistant and Orders Clerk j P. H. North
Stenographers  Miss M. E. Mackey, Miss S. A. McCully
Mimeograph Miss M. F. St. John
Telephone Exchange  Miss E. C. Prescott
Building and Grounds Superintendent and Architect F. A. A. Barrs
Assistant and Costs Clerk E. F. Bullen
Stenographer  Miss R. Seymour
Storekeeper  F.  Colbourne NAMES  OF TRUSTEES.
SHOWING YEARS OF SERVICE—FROM 1886 TO 1922, INCLUSIVE.
Names of Trustees.                                                                 Years of  Service.
Angus, Mrs. E. A 1920—March, 1921
Baldwin, G. F  1887-1892
Banfield, J. J  1900-1903
Beckingsale, Dr. D. B  1886-1887
Black, Dr. J. E  1918-1919
Blackwood, James    1920-1922
Breeze, J. D  1909-1911
Brown, William  1887-1892; 1898-1899
Browning, J. M  1890-1891
Brydone-Jack, Dr. W. D 1895-1900; 1902-1903; 1908-1913
Charleson, D. B   1886-1887
Clubb, Wm --  1904-1914
Collins, Henry   1890-1893
Devine, John    1887-1889
Donaldson, D   1903-1904
Dougan, J. J 1904-1905;  1907-1914
Duke, Thomas   1901-1914
Dyke, George   1910-1913
Eldridge, C. C  1894-1898
Ferguson, J. B  1905-1906
Flumerfelt, W. E  1908-1913
Foreman, C. F  1895-1896
Gordon, G. R 1893-1896; 1900-1902
Greggor, R. H   1918-1919
Hall, Dr. T. P  1918-1919
Harper, A. M  1915-1916
Henderson, J.  B  1886-1887
Hope, Charles   1907-1909
Johnson, A. G  1887-1888
Lamb, T. A   1919-1920
Lang, Dr. W. H  1916-1918
Logan, J. J 1897; 1900-1901
Long, G. Roy  1917-1918
McAllister, John   1894
Macaulay, Mrs. D   1919-1922
Macgowan, A. H. B  1888-1896
McGuigan, Dr. W. J 1887-1888;  1897-1904
Mac Inn is, Angus ^  1922
McKechnie, Dr. W. B  1904-1906
McKim, H. C. N  1916-1917 Names of Trustees. Years of  Service.
McLennan, R. P   1905-1907
McNaughton,  Mrs.  P -   1912-1915
McTavish, Dr. F. C.  1915
McWilliams, A. L .  1922
Matheson, E.  G., B.A.Sc  1921-1922
Mathews,   Thomas    .   1917-1918
Moody, Mrs. I. H     1916-1920
Murray,   C.   W 1888-1892; 1894-1902
Nicholson, Dr. F. J -   1921-1922
Odium, Victor  . .   1906-1907
Prescott, J. W   1919-1922
Ramsay, James  I     1898-1907
Reid, Mrs. C   1898-1899
Sangster, Charles  1915
Seymour, J. R   1914-1917
Simpson, J. H  1920; April, 1921
Springer, B.   1891-1892
Stewart, Allan C 1911;  1914-1916
Templeton, William :. 1892-1897
Welsh, F. W  1914-1917
Whetham, Charles  1889-1890
Wilson, G. I  1887-1893 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
\
|     I CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS.
Vancouver, B. C,
I -!^^^^    1    I    ' December lith, 1922.
Mrs. Macaulay and Gentlemen:
To-night our official duties as members of the Vancouver
School Board for 1922 terminate, and, in accordance with a time-
honoured custom, I am expected to review briefly the Board's
activities for the year.
The year's work has been carried on, as usual, under the
supervision of three committees—the Management, the Building
and Grounds Committee, and the Finance Committee. The Chairman of the first and second of these will deal with the outstanding
activities of their committees, while the Secretary, in his financial
statement, will deal in a general way with the Board's receipts and
expenditures. It will not be necessary, therefore, for me to enter
into details that will be dealt with by others. I shall content myself with references to only a few outstanding points, making such
comments on them as may seem best.
Looking back over the Board's administrative work for two
years, I am convinced that it would not be an easy matter to make
a better arrangement for the despatch of business than the present
one of having three standing committees, each with its own specific
work to do. The only valid objection that may be urged against
this system is that under it a trustee may be conversant only or
mainly with the work of his own committee, whereas he should
really be conversant with all Board work, as he is responsible for all.
During the year now under review, it was proposed to have
every trustee a member of each committee. The proposal did not
carry, I presume, because the majority of our members, while prepared to specialize on their own committee work, did not care to
bind themselves and become equally responsible, with other members, for all Board work. Notwithstanding this, however, it was
very gratifying to note that practically all trustees attended all
committee meetings during the year, whether members or not. This,
no doubt, contributed very materially to the more expeditious despatch of business in all Board meetings. When each trustee has
heard every item of Board business discussed in committee, he is
in a much better position to vote intelligently and promptly at
Board meetings. The experience of the past two years suggests the
following recommendations: BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
(1) That, should you still adhere to the present organization
of three standing committees of three members each, you pass a
regulation providing that any trustee attending the meeting of a
committee of which he is not a member shall sit as a regular member and enjoy all the privileges of one. This arrangement will not
put a trustee under obligation to attend all committee meetings
but will give him the status he deserves for attending.
(2) That to expedite the business of committee meetings,
you place more responsibility on the expert adviser of each. These
men should come to meetings of their respective committees with
carefully prepared agenda, and with clear-cut views as to the
action that should be taken on every point of business to be considered. If they do, and if they understand their specialties as
they ought, committees will save much time and run less chance of
making mistakes, by being guided largely by them.
The main functions of a School Board, as I conceive them,
are executive, legislative and inspectional. The duties demanded
under each of these heads in a large city school system, are so
many that no board need hope to discharge all of them directly.
The best that a board can do is to delegate its powers to various
officials, specially trained for the work assigned them; and, after
laying down broad, general principles for the guidance of these,
leave them to work out the various details of their departments.
A Board's chief function then, in the final analysis, is to see that its
officials are capable and that they are discharging properly the
duties assigned them.
What I have just said regarding the delegation of school board
functions to officials must not be construed into an advocacy of a
Board becoming a nonentity. The general education policy in a
well regulated city school system must be the School Board's policy,
determined upon, it may be, in consultation with its chief executive
—still the Board's policy. Furthermore a Board must never rest
content until it is satisfied that its policy is being carried out. This
being so, we naturally ask, 'What has been the policy of the Vancouver School Board for 1922, and to what extent has it been
followed?" ffgf
Our policy may be considered under two heads:—(1) The
operation of the school plant we found ready to hand at the beginning of the year. (2) The enlarging of the school plant to
provide for the increasing demands of an increasing school population.
In regard to the first, I may say it has been our policy to
operate our schools in such a way as to make them as near as 10 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
possible 100% efficient for the children. In the main, this policy
has been closely'adhered to throughout the year. Teachers were
carefully selected, well paid, for the most part well housed, and
otherwise required to work under favourable conditions. Classes
were, generally speaking, not large, and pupils requiring special
attention were grouped in small classes where they could receive it.
Special instructors, supervisors and inspectors were also employed
to insure better service for the children, and medical and dental
work was provided to safeguard their physical well-being. It was
with regret that we had to curtail the medical and dental work
somewhat during the year owing to lack of funds. This step was
not an indication of our underestimating the value of such work. It
was forced upon us by a consideration of the fact that we had
to choose between it and adequate class-room accommodation for
children. We decided that class-rooms were the greatest, need, and
we had to provide these out of funds saved out of revenue.
Undoubtedly the most important step taken during the past
year, as part of our policy to do the best possible for all children,
was the opening of the Junior High School. This school offers
educational facilities of great value to an important group of
boys and girls for whom no provision has hitherto been made. May
I bespeak for it your heartiest support for the years to come.
Turning now to the second heading under School Board policy
-the enlarging of the school plant—one may freely confess, "We
had almost no policy, or a policy of compulsion rather than of
choice." The defeat of the school money by-law in January left
us with no money to enlarge the school plant save the meagre sums
we might take, by the grace of the City Council, out of money needed
for revenue expenditure. With these small sums, we provided a
number of the cheapest possible class-rooms to house the additional
children who sought admission. Under the circumstances, this was
the best we could do; but we do not wish to be regarded as following
this course as a seriously thought out policy. Nor do we recommend
this as a policy for future boards.
Despite the financial difficulties of the past year, a very important initial step has been taken to secure another school site in
the West End, where it is much needed; and the attention of citizens
is being called to the urgent need of more school playground space
in the Grandview section of the city.
From my own knowledge of school requirements in this City,
based on two years of close study, I strongly urge our successors in office to follow and, if finances will permit, to improve
upon our policy for school operations year after year.    I also urge BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 11
that they do not rest content until they have a policy for school
extension that is worthy of our city. If the necessary funds for
the carrying out of this policy cannot be secured by the submission
of by-laws, legislation should be sought that will make it possible
for school boards to discharge the first duty required of them—
the providing of adequate school accommodation.
With school accommodation as it is today in Vancouver, our
city runs too great a risk of finding its school affairs in a terrible
muddle should another era of prosperity occur, as is quite possible.
Unless a building programme is begun at an early date that will
provide several hundred additional class-rooms in a few years,
the next wave of prosperity in this city will find us with children
without class-rooms, part time and overcrowded classes and all their
evil accompaniments. In school work, the building programme
should precede, not follow, increases in school population.
I have for some time been studying the inspectional work of
our schools, as carried on by Mr. Gordon and his staff. This work
is of a high character indeed; but the numbers of this staff are too
few to cope adequately with a work of such magnitude and one so
vital to the progress we all so greatly desire.
I, therefore, recommend that at least another Municipal Inspector be appointed at the earliest moment possible to assist in
this work.
The growth of our school system has been quite rapid. No
provision has been made to meet it by new appointment. There
is no outlay in my opinion which will produce such a satisfactory
return.
In closing, I wish to express my appreciation of your splendid
co-operation throughout the year, in ,the interests of our schools.
I also wish to express the hope that all of you will continue your
good work next year, and to assssure you that, even when no longer
a member of the Board, I shall follow with interest the needs of the
schools and do my best as a citizen to help meet them as they should
be met.
Respectfully submitted,
E. G. MATHESON,f
Chairman, School Board. 12
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
■p    REPORT  OF   MANAGEMENT   COMMITTEE.
Vancouver, B. C,
||PIB^^B|^^^^^^p^^^^ December 11th, 1922.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Macaulay and Gentlemen:—
I beg to submit the following report on the work of the Management Committee for the year 1922.
When honoured with the Chairmanship at the beginning of the
year, I was pleased to have associated with me Mrs. D. Macaulay
and Mr. A. L. McWilliams. Their unfailing fidelity, as members
of the Committee throughout the year, has made the solution of
many problems a comparatively easy matter. The regular
attendance at our Committee meetings of the other members of the
Board, and their keen interest in the work of the Committee at all
times has also been much appreciated.
The year has been a busy one. Twenty-two meetings—ten
regular and twelve special—were held, each with   a   full   agenda.
Estimates for the Year.
The first business for the year was the preparing of the estimates, which amounted to $1,171,876.40—$1,089,436.40 for salaries.
and $82,440 for supplies.
In determining the salaries for teachers the schedule for 1921
was, in the main, followed. Changes were made, however, in a
few instances where the experiences of the previous year indicated
the necessity for such. The remuneration of High School Domestic
Science teachers was changed from a minimum of $1,250 in the
first year and $1,850 in the seventh to a minimum of $1,470 in the
first year and $2,310 in the seventh. The maximum for vice-
principals with first-class certificates was advanced from $2,280
after four years of satisfactory service to $2,400 after five years.
The minimum for public school principals was also advanced from
$2,280 to $2,400 in small schools and from $2,400 to $2,520 in large
school-. For the first time, the principals of high schools have
been placed on a regular schedule—$3,300 for the first year's service
and an annual increase of $140 till the maximum of $4,000 is reached
in the sixth year. With these changes, Vancouver may be regarded
as treating it- teaching staff well. The fact that the teachers were
paid in January according to the estimates prepared by your Com- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 13
mittee at the opening of the year, and that practically no dissatisfaction was voiced by any group of them, is in itself an indication that
the salary schedule for 1922 is an equitable one.
In passing, permit me to offer a suggestion in regard to our
salary schedule. In the matter of engaging new teachers to take
the places of experienced teachers retiring, it seems to me, we should
have some definite regulation whereby the initial salarv may be de-
termined. If our teaching staff is not to be constantly weakened by
the retirement of experienced teachers, we must be prepared to
engage a large number of experienced teachers. To do so we need
to offer an initial salary that will attract well-trained teachers with
good teaching records.
Organization for February.
Following the preparation of the estimates and equally important was the making of plans for the expected increase of school
population.   This too was completed in January.
At the opening of the year, the ordinary classes of the public
schools had an average enrolment of forty, which I consider should
be the maximum. We were expecting an additional enrolment of
1,133 Receiving Class pupils in February, but could appoint only
fourteen extra teachers owing to a shortage of class-room accommodation. Fortunately only 973 additional Receiving Class pupils
entered. The organization consequently proved fairly satisfactory.
There were no part time classes for the term and very few classes
were overcrowded.
Proposed Extension for September.
As the Education Department announced in January their intention of raising the standard for High School entrance, we considered the number that would enter high school in midsummer
would likely be smaller than usual. This would leave a large number of pupils, who had completed the public school course, to repeat
their final year or drop out of school if over fifteen years of age.
Knowing that many parents object to having their children repeat
the final year in the public schools, and believing that a more satisfactory course could be provided, we approached the Department
with the request that we be permitted to offer a practical two-year
course for students. Our request was granted; and in September
we opened our Junior High School with an enrolment of eighty-one
pupils and three teachers. Many more students sought admission
but had to be refused owing to the limited class-room accommodation. 14 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The new course, in which one-half of the student's time is
spent on academic subjects and the remaining half on practical work,
is filling a long-felt need of many boys and girls from fourteen to
sixteen years of age. It is to be hoped that next year's Board will
very materially extend this work that has made such a very satisfactory beginning. A separate, well-equipped Junior High School
should be provided if possible next year.
The year just closed has also witnessed the creation in Vancouver of a new public school area—the first in nine years. This
extension was made in response to a petition largely signed by residents in the eastern portion of the city. As all neighboring schools
were overcrowded and many young children had to walk too
great a distance, your Committee decided to open a junior grade
school on September 5th at the corner of Lillooet and Kitchener
Streets, with three teachers in charge. This little school serves the
two-fold purpose of relieving congestion in neighboring schools and
placing school facilities within easy reach of over eighty children
under ten years of age.
Besides the expansion referred to above, it was found necessary, on account of a further increase of school population, to
make a further net increase of six in the teaching staffs of the
public and high schools in September—three in each. We thus
close the year with a total of 535 teachers—93 in high schools and
442 in public schools—and an enrolment of 19,485 pupils.
The Transference of the School for the Blind.
After the successful operation of the School for the Blind for
six years, it was transferred to the Provincial Government in
September last. We feel that this occasion calls for an expression
of our appreciation of the splendid work the teacher, Mrs. Thos.
Burke, did during the years the school was operated by the Vancouver School Board.
The public closing exercises of this school, held in the Aberdeen auditorium on June 27th, reflected great credit on both the
teacher and the pupils. Our best wishes follow them to their new
government home in Point Grey.
Departmental Examination.
Your committee studied with intense interest the Departmental
Examination returns for both the public and the high schools. The
former showed only 65 per cent, of the students writing as successful compared with 85 per cent, passed on the recommendation BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
15
--•i
CHAMPION  FOOTBALL TEAM,  KITSILANO  HIGH SCHOOL.
of principals a year ago; this decrease was doubtless due in a
measure to the higher standard demanded—a 60 per cent, average
instead of 50 per cent, as formerly. It is deserving of note that
among those who failed, 195 made an average of between 50 per
cent, and 60 per cent. From this number the Junior High School
drew largely.
The high school returns were very encouraging. Judged by
them our schools compared most favourably with other schools
and a number of them made a much better showing than they did
the previous year.
With a more careful selection of students for the high schools,
these institutions should do much better work in the future, and
the necessity for such work as we have begun in the Junior High
School will become widespread and more imperative.
Various School Activities.
Your Committee followed closely the work in the various
departments throughout the year as set forth in the monthly reports
by departmental heads. All suggested improvements were carefully
considered  and,  if   deemed  necessary,  and   found  possible,   were 16
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CHAMPION   GRASS   HOCKEY  TEAM,   BRITANNIA   HIGH   SCHOOL.
acted upon. Full details of the careful, painstaking work done
you will find in the annual reports of supervisors which will be as
usual printed in the Trustees' Annual Report.
School Sports.
It is with the greatest pleasure that I note the increased activities in all school sports, and the greater number of children taking
part in them. This branch of our regime is worthy of our hearty
encouragement; and it is to be hoped that development may take
place to give every child an opportunity to enlist in some branch of
sport or organized play.
In addition to the physical development, increased mental
activity, self-reliance and discipline which are stimulated, the school
sports make for a better school morale and a greater enthusiasm
for "Alma Mater."
Anyone who has ever witnessed our Annual High School Field
Sports or our rugby and basketball games, must come back with an
increased pride in our school children.
Curtailment of Departments.
It was with great regret that we   found   it   necessary   and
expedient to curtail and reorganize certain of our departments dur- ing the year. This was forced upon us by the general lack of funds
required to conduct them properly; and we hope that it is only a
temporary expedient. Given the necessary funds, we would rather
extend than curtail our school work.
Suggested Forward Step.
While pleased that, in the face of financial difficulties, we have
been able to make the definite progress already referred to in this
report, we feel that we have not done all we could have wished. We
would, therefore, strongly urge upon our successors in office the
necessity of laying definite plans for the establishment, as soon as
possible, of a Girls' Technical School, offering courses leading to
industrial, domestic and professional life. As our present Technical
School for boys grew out of the technical department of our King
Edward High School, so we should endeavour, as soon as funds are
available, to expand the present Household Arts departments of our
high schools into an up-to-date technical school for young ladies.
In order that the expansion of technical work may proceed
along proper lines, however, in our province and city, it seems to me
highly desirable that a careful survey of technical requirements
should be made. To secure such, the Vancouver School Board might
well take the initial step in the near future, as, they have been pioneers
U the many lines of educational progress in the past.
General Observations.
In closing this outline of your Committee's activities for the
year, I wish to express my appreciation of the keen interest taken
in the management of the schools not only by the other members of
the Committee but by each member of the Board. I also wish to
record our appreciation of the faithful and efficient services of
the officials with whom our work brought us in contact.
To the devotion to duty and untiring zeal of our Municipal
Inspector, Mr. J. S. Gordon, is due, in no small measure, the success of our work during the past year. His counsel, based on wide
experience, has been invaluable to us in the consideration of many
perplexing problems. We have also found in our Secretary, Major
B. G. Wolfe-Merton, a conscientious and capable administrator, and
in Inspectors McKenzie and Brough two cultured gentlemen who
formed a most happy connecting link between the teachers and
the Board.
Our relations with teachers and parents, throughout the year,
have also been invariably so cordial that we can look back upon the
year's work with much pleasure.
Respectfully submitted,
F. J. NICHOLSON,
Chairman, Management Committee. 18 BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE.
Vancouver, B. C,
Bpl^ December 11th, 1922.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Macaulay and Gentlemen:—
As Chairman of the Building Committee, it is my pleasure to
submit my annual report dealing with the work done in connection
with this Department during the year 1922.
At the commencement of the year, we submitted estimates to
the City Council under the heading of Repairs and Renewals and
Maintenance amounting to $225,525.00. These estimates were for
the purpose of covering repairs to buildings and general maintenance of same, also repairs to steam and hot air plants, plumbing,
electricity, repairing of certain buildings, general maintenance of
grounds, drains and sewers, but unfortunately the City Council were
unable to provide us with this amount of money and the Department was only credited with $96,025.00 upon which to carry on
the work throughout the year as before mentioned. This reduction
in your estimates caused curtailment of a great deal of anticipated
work and consequently did not tend to raise the standard of
efficiency in so far as necessary improvements were concerned.
Although we found ourselves in somewhat financial difficulties,
I take pleasure in drawing your attention to the fact that the Department has carried out a great deal of work during the year, as
at December 31st there will have been some 1,500 jobs undertaken
and completed. These jobs range anywhere from $5.00 to
$15,000.00, consquently you will see there is a great amount of
attention necessary, because most of them are of an urgent nature,
such as plumbing, electric light, heat and the like.
One of the most serious troubles the Department has is mending
broken glass in the various school windows. We can fully appreciate a reasonable amount of trouble to take place by the boys and
girls playing games around the buildings, but a great deal of this
trouble occurs after school and late in the evening, and while the
Department has endeavoured in conjunction with the teaching
staff, janitors and city police, to reduce this trouble, it is regrettable
to think that the citizens have to pay approximately $5,000.00 to
$6,000.00 for broken glass in the windows of the schools.
Your Committee decided during the summer to install an additional heating plant at the Strathcona School which would have
sufficient steam generating surface to take care of the three Strath- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 19
cona buildings against all climatic conditions. This work has been
carried out and has proved beyond all doubt to be a most satisfactory
and efficient plant, not only from a heating aspect but from that of
ventilation and health. The three buildings are now heated from a
central plant and by so doing we reduce fuel consumption, fire
hazard and janitor service, as well as reducing the cost in maintenance of buildings by reason of introducing clean, pure air into all
rooms as against the old system of heating air over furnaces.
Our Building Superintendent and Architect visited Eastern
Canadian and United States cities last November, and during a
conference with engineers it was brought to his notice that the most
modern system when oil is used for fuel was to employ the Ray
burner. This device undoubtedly produces the highest standard of
combustion, hence the greatest efficiency with least loss. I may say
your Committee decided to install four of these devices, three
already being in use and the fourth to be installed.
A further improvement at this school was the re-arrangement
of the toilets. Our Building Superintendent and Architect got out
plans and submitted them, which your Committee passed, and the
work has been carried out. This not only makes the building perfectly sanitary but it provides a means for the boys and girls to get
spacious play space in the basement.
I have taken up with the Board's Building Superintendent and
Architect the matter of placing a central heating plant at the Lord
Roberts School, also at the Seymour School. At the present time
we have the old type of furnace over which the air is forced and
heated. These buildings being of wood are very inflammable, and
by placing a modern steam plant in a suitable position, we should
greatly eliminate the fire hazard, raise the standard of efficiency,
bring down maintenance cost and reduce the fuel bill, and I would
recommend to the Board the advisability of centralizing the heat on
modern principles at these two schools ^during the coming year.
Now that we have a plantiful supply of fuel oil at reasonable
prices, I would recommend the changing of several plants from
coal-burning to oil, as I am satisfied great economy can be achieved
by such change. When making the change at eight-roomed schools,
1 would recommend that sufficient storage provision be provided so
as to take care of sixteen and eighteen-roomed buildings, because
the time cannot be far away when the Board will have to build the
further units at several of the buildings. It would, therefore, be
in the Board's best interest to make the necessary provision when
making this change. I have considered this with the Board's Building Superintendent and Architect and have requested him to place
in the estimates for 1923 the necessary sum for the work.
) 20 BOARD OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In addition to this, I would recommend that more efficient and
modern plumbing be installed at some of the schools where older
types exist.   This also will be taken care of in the estimates for 1923.
A recommendation was made by the City Fire Department that
certain fire equipment be purchased and placed in the schools,
but owing to scarcity of funds this could not be carried out, but I
have instructed the Building Superintendent and Architect to place
a sum of money in the estimates to take care of the Department's
wishes in this regard, and, considering we are responsible for the
citizens' children during the time they are on the Board's premises,
I respectfully recommend to the incoming Board that they look
favorably upon this recommendation.
In addition to the alterations at the Strathcona School, your
Committee have changed from high pressure to low pressure two
steam plants, one at the Britannia High School and the other at the
Dawson School. These plants are operating most satisfactorily and
they will not only provide means for saving fuel but will lead to
reduction in the maintenance staff, and I am led to believe that the
Board of 1923 will have laid before them certain information with
a view to re-arranging these staffs along more economical lines.
Quite a large amount of painting has been carried out during
the year, several buildings have been painted inside and out.
In addition to the general maintenance and other work as before mentioned, the Department has manufactured and supplied all
fixtures and furniture for the entire system, such work having been
carried out in the Board's workshop.
During the year the Department has erected nineteen cottage
schools in various parts of the city to meet the requirements. These
buildings, although of temporary character, have proved a success
so far as they go, but it is to be hoped the Board will soon be able
to improve its policy and erect modern, economical, fireproof
buildings.
In closing my remarks, I take pleasure in extending my appreciation to Mr. Barrs and his staff for the way they have executed
the work of the Department, which has beeen along progressive
and efficient lines; also to Major B. G. Wolfe-Merton, Secretary of
the Board, and Mr. J. S. Gordon, Municipal Inspector of Schools,
for it is pleasing to see the Departments working in harmony.
As Chairman of the Building and Finance Committees, I take
pleasure in thanking each member of these committees, also the
Chairman of the Board, for their support during the past year.
I have the honour to remain,
Yours very truly,
J. W. PRESCOTT,
Chairman, Building: Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
21
REPORT OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B. O,
January 15th, 1923.
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen :-
I beg to submit the following report on the Vancouver Schools
for the year 1922:
School Accommodation.
For the year just closed the Vancouver School Board, for the
first time in three years, has provided full time tuition for every
child attending school. It has also succeeded in keeping the average
enrolment of ordinary classes at about forty each and its special
classes at about fifteen. In this respect Vancouver ranks high—in
fact, along with the best—among large, progressive American cities.
When one finds that the shortage in accommodation, hitherto
necessitating part time tuition and overcrowded classes, has been 22 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
remedied, and accommodation for an increase of 432 in school population has been provided at a cost of only $22,259.15, he realizes
that every dollar spent was spent to the best advantage. The accommodation provided was in the cheapest possible, wooden structures,
three containing three rooms each and ten one room each. With the
prospect of having no considerable sum to spend on the erection of
schools during the coming year, you cannot do other than continue
the building policy of 1922. It should be clearly recognized, however, that, while this policy may be the only possible one for the
present, it should not be thought of as a permanent one.
Definite plans should be formulated at once for the beginning
of a permanent building programme in 1924. By that time you will
have as many of the small wooden schools occupying several of the
playgrounds as you should; and no more should be built. Just what
permanent building programme a progressive city should undertake
is becoming a much debated question. The answer to this question
must largely depend on a city's financial condition and on its earlier
building programme. Vancouver's school building programme for
a few years at least, it seems to me, should, if financial conditions
will permit, be determined to conform definitely to the architecture
of many of its partially constructed schools. May I, therefore,
respectfully urge that steps be taken at once to ascertain what it will
cost to complete the Hastings, General Gordon, Laura Secord,
Charles Dickens, Bayview, Livingstone, Beacohsfield, Strathcona and
Dawson Schools. If you find the cost, in your opinion, within the
city's means, the next step would be to conduct, during the coming
year, an educational campaign in the city that would ensure the passing of school money by-laws for sufficient funds to carry out your
prolamine.
School Organization.
No great change has been made in the general organization
during the year. The public school staff was increased from 402
to 422; the high school staff from 87 to 90, while the number of
special classes remained as before—nineteen. These changes leave
the classes, for the most part, of moderate size, in which children
should do good work.
As I pointed out in my report for 1921, there were many children who were not fitting well into any of the prescribed courses at
that time. They had outgrown the public school without becoming
eligible for work in any of our four different high school courses.
The decision of the Education Department to raise the standard for
High School Entrance last year increased this class and made the
provision of a new course for them imperative. I was much
pleased, therefore, when you decided, with Departmental approval, BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
23
to open a Junior High School last September. This school has made
a most promising beginning. The anticipations of its most ardent
advocates have been fully realized, for it now has an enrolment of
eighty enthusiastic students, whose parents are highly pleased with
what is being done for them. I would suggest that plans be
made for an enrolment of at least 160 in this school next September.
Public and High School Leaving Examinations.
The following tables set forth the results of the Public and High
School Leaving Examinations of Vancouver schools as compared
with the total results for the province:
High School Entrance Examinations.
Province ..
Vancouver
No. Passed on Promoted on    Total No.
No Writing   Written Test Recommendation    Passed
4231       2170 1417       3587
676        213 665        878
High School Leaving Examinations.
Candidates      Passed
Province including
Vancouver     1561
Province not including Vancouver   1241
Vancouver   (Totals)   | 320
Britannia    59
King   Edward     94
King  George    108
Kitsilano     45
Technical—
Matric  14
General     22
Comm.         35
King Edward—
Home Economics  % 13
820-66%
238-74%
50-85%
73-78%
82-76%
29^-66%
4-29%
15-68%
31-89%
11-85%
With
Supplementals
Failed
1058-68%       309-20%       194-12%
251-16%
58-18%
6-10%
14-15%
20-18%
14-31%
4-29
of
170
24
3
7
6
2
6
7
4
-14%
'.Of.
8Vo
- 5%
7V2%
- 5i,
- 3
6%
of„
42%
-32%
-11%
2-15%
The number of candidates in Vancouver successful on the
written test for High School Entrance was very small. This was
due to the fact that the impression had got abroad that the standard
for entrance was not materially raised. The principals, accordingly,
with possibly one exception, recommended as fit for high school
such students as were formerly recommended.
'The medalists for the year were Miss D. G. McKay of King
Edward High School, Miss B. K. Mandell of King George High r
24
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
School, and Master Howard Nicholson of Lord Roberts Public
School. The two former won the Governor-General's Silver Medal
for the district with 871 and 882 marks respectively out of a possible
1,000. Master Nicholson ranked first among High School Entrance
students, making 429 marks out of a possible 500, and winning the
Governor-General's Bronze Medal.
Supervisors and Heads of Departments.
Reports have recently come to hand from all supervisors and
heads of departments. These, which will be printed in your annual
report, are deserving of closest study. They clearly indicate, not
only the interest of those reporting in their work, but the interest
of all with whom they work. In fact, were I asked what I regard
as the outstanding feature of departmental work for 1922, I would
say it has been the splendid co-operation of all workers. The supervisors and departmental heads are becoming, as they should, more
and more teachers of teachers.
Inspectors' Reports.
During the year provincial inspectors reported on each division
of each school. Inspectors McKenzie and Brough also reported
chiefly, though not exclusively, on recentlyrappointed teachers. The
latter's annual report, which will also appear in vour report for
1922, gives a very interesting survey of educational conditions in
New Zealand as well as his opinions on local school matters. It will
repay careful study.
Community Activities.
The year 1922 brought to the schools the usual number of opportunities—some might call them temptations—for children and
teachers to turn aside from the usual routine work of the classroom to interest themselves in civic matters. The experiences of
former years have indicated that only on rare occasions and for the
best of reasons are we warranted in interfering with ordinary
school work. Consequently during the past year, our schools cooperated with only seven organizations out of the many who sought
their co-operation.
Early in the year a systematic educational campaign in the
interests of international goodwill was carried on in all our schools.
Many thousands of children, realizing what peace for one hundred
years with our neighbors has meant and inspired to hope for its
continuance, became members of the Juvenile Peace League and
contributed their share to make a proper Canadian setting for
the International Peace Portal at Blaine. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
25
M^D.G.M^Kay
Kin£u Edward Hi(^h School
!   M^B.K.MandeU
|Kin<^ George Hi^ School
Medalists  for  1922. 26
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Later nearly one hundred of our teachers with twelve hundred
children responded to an invitation of the Gyro Club to assist them
in their two-fold endeavor to renew the former enthusiasm for
Dominion Day and to raise funds for children's playgrounds. The
thousands who heard these ^children sing their patriotic songs at
Brockton Point on June 30th, feel they played their part well.
In July a chorus of boys and girls of about three hundred
rallied, on an invitation from the Parent Teacher Associations of the
city, to sing their welcome to Lord and Lady Byng, both of whom
expressed their appreciation of the part taken by the children.
Since the summer holidays the schools have given valuable
assistance to the Kiwanis Club in their work for underprivileged
children and to the Great War Veterans on behalf of the children
of their fallen comrades. They also contributed to the fitting observances of Trafalgar Day and Armistice Day in response to invitations from the Vancouver Branch of the Army and Navy League
of Canada and from the Provincial Chapter of the Imperial Order
Daughters of the Empire.
His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada designated
the week commencing October 2nd, 1922, as Fire Prevention Week,
and it was fittingly observed in your schools. Lessons were given
on the subject by teachers; and compositions (6313 in all) were
written by Intermediate and Senior Grade children. To encourage
this important work the fire insurance men of the city presented
two medals—one to Jack Middleton, a Senior Grade student of the
Livingstone School, and one to Donald McTavish, an Intermediate
Grade student of Cecil Rhodes School—for essays of unusual merit.
Such activities as those outlined above call for considerable
additional work by both teachers and pupils; but they are, for the
most part, worth while. They bring teachers into closer touch
with their fellow citizens and develop, if properly performed, a
civic pride and a sense of civic responsibility in the children. As
school workers too we have to remember that "with'what measure
we mete to the public it shall be measured to us again."
ufc>"
The Community Room.
Perhaps nothing in connection with your school system augurs
Detter things tor its future than the Community Room opened and
operated in this building for over a year by your teachers. Attempts
had been made on at least two former occasions to open and operate
such a room, but to no purpose. The times were not ripe then for
the venture—the teachers were not sufficiently convinced of the
needs a community room would serve—hence the failure. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 27
Now, all is changed; the teachers have in their comfortable
Community. Room 250 volumes dealing with all phases of modern
educational thought and over 40 educational magazines. Such a
centre of enlightenment and inspiration cannot but exert a most
salutary influence on the teaching forces of this city. The financial
assistance you gave last year for this new movement was much
appreciated.
Exchange of Teachers.
The exchange of teachers, begun two years ago and followed
last year by the exchange of an inspector with New Zealand, has
been continued on a wider scale this year. You have at present Miss
J. E. R. Fisher and Miss E. S. Brinton of your Model School exchanging with Miss D. Jameson of Christchurch, New Zealand, and
Miss I. M. Penny of Glasgow, Scotland; while Miss B. Bigney of
Dawson School has exchanged with Miss A. Bricknell of London,
England.
Besides these Miss G. D. Burris, of King Edward High School,
is serving with the London County Council, while you are employing Miss A. E. Clogg in Fairview School. This is not exactly an
exchange. Negotiations for the exchange of Miss I. J. Herd, one
of your special class teachers, for a teacher from Glasgow failed
at the last moment, the teacher from Glasgow not being able to
come. The Glasgow Board, however, have given Miss Herd a
position for the year
b"VV ^VU1U>        -LiWVVV.V^X,        i±«.VV.        &J.V^i.L        XYJ-iOO        1J-V-1U        (X
In the main arrangements for exchange and visiting teachers
have been satisfactory, and the system of exchanging is considered
worthy of continuance. The need, however, of an absolutely definite understanding on the part of all those going to other parts of
the Empire as to the conditions of exchange is imperative if unpleasantnesses are to be avoided.
School Surveys.
We hear so much these days of the desirability of having a
school or educational survey that no educationist can afford to be
indifferent in regard to the proposal. Many are proclaiming their
views on it; and it seems to me commendable that so many can be
found not only willing but anxious to have the system in which
they work subjected to the most searching investigation by experts to ascertain the truth (whether pleasant or otherwise) regarding it.
In thinking of school surveys, it will tend to clarity of thinking
to remember that, in the last analysis, they are simply diagnoses
of educational conditions whether on a small or a large scale.    A 28
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
principal is conducting a survey of his school, or should be, continually. His business is to discover defects, if there be any, in
the organization, instruction, discipline, etc., in his school, and
have the necessary remedies applied. Supervisors and inspectors,
in like manner, are surveyors of a wider field; but with similar
functions. It is for them to stimulate to greater effort along right
lines and to apply remedies where things are found wrong, if a
remedy is within their power. If a remedy is not within their
power, it is their duty to urge that it be provided by the authorities
within whose power it lies.
We thus see school surveys of a kind are no new thing. They
are as old as our schools. Their value too, cannot be called in question especially if the surveyors are capable and are supported, as
they should be, by school authorities when they have reached their
own limits.
The surveys, however, that are being advocated to-day are
somewhat different. They differ in extent rather than in kind.
They are not examinations of a school system by those within the
system, but by those without. The examination, too, if properly
conducted, will take cognizance of all connected with the system
-all employees, all property, all curricula, all children, all patrons,
school finances, governing bodies, etc. To secure such a survey for
our province or even for our own city would necessitate the employment of a considerable staff of experts for a long time. It
would cost a large sum of money and one naturally asks, "Is it
worth while?
My reply is, "It is worth while if the people will supply the
funds to carry out the many improvements which the surveyors will
undoubtedly recommend.    But it is of little value otherwise."
Personally, I should welcome a thorough provincial survey at
once were I convinced the people would provide the additional
funds that would undoubtedly be asked for as a result of it. I may
say the same, too, in regard to a survey of our own city system.
In reference to a local survey, it is quite possible the surveyor or surveyors might make recommendations that I cannot
foresee. I feel certain, however, that the following would find a
place in their list:
(1) Release from teaching duties at least ten more of your
principals, giving them time for better organization and supervision
of their schools.
(2) Appoint two more expert drawing supervisors.
(3) Appoint a supervisor of writing. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 29
(4) Appoint at least two more physical instructresses for
high school girls."
(5) Appoint an expert to plan for supervised play in all
schools and to train teachers for supervising play.
(6) Appoint a vocational guidance officer to organize and
conduct a juvenile employment bureau.
(7) Open a technical school for girls.
(8) Open a trade school to carry on work for special class
pupils over fifteen years of age.
(9) Extend Junior High School work.
(10) Carry out the building programme suggested earlier in
this report.
(11) Make definite plans to secure fully twice the number of
school sites you now have.
I mention the above not exactly in anticipation of immediate
action on all or even most of the matters referred to, but that
it may be understood that non-expansion, or little expansion, in our
school system is not that the needs are not recognized. It is rather
that the funds are not available for improvements that we ourselves regard as desirable.
In closing I wish to thank you for making the past year one
of the most pleasant for me in a long period of school work. The
conditions under which I have labored have been ideal, and your
unfailing courtesy and kindly consideration at all times call forth
gratitude which no words of mine can adequately express.
Respectfully submitted,
J. S. GORDON,
Municipal*Inspector of Schools.
J 30
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
^^^^^^P^BOF SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B.C.,
1 flflHBilK' ' December 30, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Sir:—In submitting my report at the close of the present year
I beg to thank very heartily the Board of Trustees and you for the
consideration shown in permitting me to spend a twelvemonth in
looking into educational conditions in New Zealand. I need not
here stress the personal benefit that should be derived from a season's
change of environment, change of working conditions and change
of work. But in a professional way my visit to New Zealand meant
much more. It was the fulfilment of a desire I had cherished for
years to observe in actual operation a completely centralized system
of national education.    For and against such a system much may BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 31
be said, but a full discussion of the subject would be out of place
in this report. New Zealand friends sometimes expressed surprise that all the schools in Canada were not controlled by an education department of the Dominion Government. In reply I called
attention to the immense area of our country, its diversity in physical conditions and population, to the fact that, by the British North
America Act constituting the Dominion, education was one of the
matters relegated to provincial control, and to the further fact, most
important of all, that insistence on Dominion control would have
rendered confederation impossible.
Centralized systems might be adopted by the Canadian provinces individually, but not one has seen fit to do so. Under a centralized system in British Columbia the entire educational expense
would be borne by the Provincial Government. There would be no
local taxation for school purposes. But the ratepayers' burden
would not be lessened: there would be a change simply in the
collecting and distributing agency.
The changes in financial management would involve changes
in control and administration. Auckland is the largest city in New
Zealand. With suburbs it has a population of a hundred and sixty
thousand. Instead of one board of trustees with a staff of officials
laboring to correlate and unify the educational forces of the city
so that their influence will contribute most effectively to the development of a worthy civic spirit and life, there are a number of
school committees elected by popular vote, each acting for a small
group of schools, having general oversight of school property, arranging for janitor service, and attending to other matters of a like
nature. These committees have no legal voice in the appointment,
payment or dismissal of teachers. The central authority, through
the elective board of education, the inspectors and other officials, in
each of the nine educational districts into which the Dominion of
New Zealand is divided, possesses the sole power in these very important respects, consulting the local committees only if it chooses
to do so.
In British Columbia a centralized system might operate to the
advantage of some schools in rural districts. But, on the whole,
for a city like Vancouver, I feel that our present system, involving
support of schools by local taxation supplemented by a government
grant, and control by a board of trustees elected to represent the
whole city, and administering the schools through officials of its
own, recognized by the provincial education department and conforming to regulations laid down by it, is likely to give greater satisfaction to parents and citizens generally than any other system
yet devised. 32
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The employment of pupil teachers is a noticeable feature of the
New Zealand schools. This practice obtained for many years in
Great Britain, but exists there no longer. I fancy that New Zealand
will also dispense with it at no distant date.
Another interesting matter is the grading of the teachers. This
attempt to give every individual of the thousands of teachers of
the whole country the exact ranking his personality and work merits,
and consequently the salary and position he is deserving of, is very
helpful, perhaps indispensable, in a centralized system, but its introduction into Vancouver under present conditions would, I think,
be inadvisable.
Vancouver, like Auckland, is fortunate in commanding the
services of able principals assisted by well-trained and successful
teachers zealously co-operating for the common good. But one
feels that in Auckland the profession of teaching is characterized
by greater permanency than under present conditions obtains, or
is likely to obtain, in Vancouver. Besides the men in the positions
of principal and vice-principal, an Auckland school of a dozen
classes will probably have on its staff several other men of ability
and promise. These men have adopted teaching as their life work.
Vancouver schools are weak in this respect. Parents and the
public generally have reason to acknowledge with gratitude the unselfish and untiring devotion of the women teachers of the city.
In addition to carrying out their obvious duties in teaching and
training the young they exert a silent influence of immeasurable
value. But is it well that the teaching and training of boys and
girls should be intrusted almost entirely to women, even the best
of women? Whether men make better teachers than women is beside the question. The element no clear thinker will for a moment
lose sight of is that in the nature of things man's influence is
different from woman's influence, and that no child, girl or boy,
should be permitted to pass through our schools without full
appreciation of its strength and virility.
It is no part of our duty in administering the schools to find
places for men simply because they are men. If they contribute
nothing to the well-being of our pupils that women cannot contribute with equal success, no censure need attach to any one should
we see the last man vanish from our class-rooms. But if our pupils,
boys and girls, do need for their proper development the virile influence of men teachers, it is surely our duty to see that the supply
is sufficient. If any theory stands in the way of securing desirable
results, theory should be made to stand aside for the time being,
and actual conditions should be looked in the face. For a long
series of  years experience has proved that  our  primary  school BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 33
salary scales have failed to attract many men to whom we cannot at
once offer principalships or vice-principalships. I therefore feel
strongly that the salary scale for men teachers in the grades should
be rendered adequate. When we find that grade positions in our
schools are attracting a sufficient number of men teachers of promise
we shall realize that a satisfactory salary level has been reached.
In New Zealand the supervising principal is much more in
evidence than with ourselves. In this respect I believe that we
might copy from our neighbour with very great advantage. It
seems to me that with the increase in the number of classes in our
larger schools the necessity for the employment of supervising principals becomes more and more insistent. To be responsible for the
efficiency of perhaps the most important class in school, and at
the same time to supervise all the remaining classes and perform
the many other duties of an efficient principal, is to attempt a task
for which few have either the fitness or the strength. All credit
is due to the enthusiasm and patient energy of the principals now
bearing the burden and heat of the day. But for them I would respectfully bespeak relief at the earliest possible date. Any relief for
them means additional assistance to the boys and girls.
An element of the greatest value to the New Zealand schools
is the superannuation system. After teaching for forty and thirty-
five years, respectively, men and women who entered the service
as pupil teachers at the age of sixteen are entitled to an annual retiring allowance amounting in some instances to about fifteen hundred dollars. It may be argued that a scheme of this sort is one
in which school boards and school officials generally need not interest themselves, that it is the concern of teachers and of teachers
alone. But such is not the case, and it is not primarily for their
sakes that I here refer to the question. For the sake of the children
it is a matter of the gravest concern that teachers devoting their
lives to the work should be in a position to perform their daily tasks
with as little distraction and anxiety as possible. Then, too, to an
increasing extent in a city like Vancouver we shall be faced with
the problem of having teachers on the staff who have given invaluable service in the past, but who through age and infirmity have
become incapable of doing justice to the children committed to their
charge. With a superannuation system these can be honorably retired to enjoy a well-earned rest. Without a superannuation system
boards of trustees and administrative officials may shrink from
consigning a faithful teacher to what may be an old age of hardship and want, so the teacher once capable but now inefficient may
be permitted to stay on to the great detriment of the boys and girls
for whose well-being the schools exist. 34 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
In the New Zealand schools both in town and country more attention is given to arithmetic than with us. One justification for
this is the fact that money calculations must be made in pounds,
shillings and pence, instead of in dollars and cents. Since the great
bulk of Australian and New Zealand trade is with the Mother
Country there is likely to be no departure from this practice for
years to come.
In oral and written English the New Zealand schools excel.
This results from the attention given to these subjects throughout
the grades. Even receiving class pupils are trained to express themselves without reserve and at sufficient length on subjects that come
within their comprehension and appeal to their interest. Creditable
provision is made for supplementary reading. The brighter pupils
of any class can get through the tasks assigned for seat work far
more quickly than others. Much of the time they are able to save
may well be spent in reading books not on the prescribed course.
If given nothing to do they may fail to develop the power and
habit of concentration, giving way instead to dawdling, idleness and
mischief. A supply of supplementary reading books in every classroom would be a great boon to both our teachers and our pupils.
I was also favorably impressed by the correlation of plasticene
modelling with other subjects in all the grades, and the deftness and
quickness of pupils in this work.
In every class a quarter of an hour daily is given to physical
instruction and exercises. This work is usually taken out of doors
by all the classes simultaneously, every assistant doing his part carefully under the supervision of the head teacher. In a large school
one of the units will consist of physical defectives selected from all
the grades. This unit is in charge of a member of the staff specially
qualified to meet the particular needs of such pupils. The value of
this provision I shall not stop to emphasize.
Out-of-door teaching is freely employed, the pupils being just
as attentive in the open air as in the classroom. I should like to
see experimentation along this line in a number of our Vancouver
schools. General Gordon teachers under the direction of Major
King have made use of it for some years, and are, I believe, satisfied as to its value. In this connection I may remark that the
teacher of the class in the semi-open-air building on the General
Gordon grounds speaks enthusiastically of her experience in it.
In concluding my remarks on my New Zealand experience I
bear grateful testimony to the kindness I met with on every hand,
and to the generous efforts of officials and teachers to afford me BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
35
the fullest opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge of educational
conditions. I found much to learn, and I left with the conviction
that I had by no means mastered it all, so that my year of work and
observation seemed all too short. I shall always cherish the happiest
recollections of that beautiful land, of the genuine, staunch, substantial character of its people, and of their spontaneous and unmeasured hospitality.
Since my return in September last I have paid a brief visit to
almost every primary class-room in the city. In the great majority
of cases I have found faithful, earnest effort and effective teaching.
There have been many changes, and I find, as before, that no inconsiderable part of my time will have to be given to supervising the
work of young teachers recently appointed. We look to these to
bring an atmosphere of freshness and brightness into our elementary
class-rooms. However, most of them must of necessity be in the
apprenticeship stage for some years, while we must note at the same
time the uninterrupted procession from the school to new homes.
Nor could we wish this otherwise. The strength of the nation is the
strength of its homes, and a few years spent in teaching is an excellent training for home and civic leadership. But to offset this
constant change of personnel in the teaching body we should do our
utmost to secure stability in another direction, by increasing the
proportion of the class that should for the most part give their lives
to the work, namely, the body of men teachers. In the past, as I
have noted before, we have not been successful in securing these in
large numbers. As in other walks of life, if we wish the goods
we must pay the market price.
In my visits I have been struck with the excellence of the
drawing and music in many classes, and for this I pay willing tribute
to the able supervisors in these subjects, and to the loyal
co-operation of the class teachers. * These subjects are not
frills added to the curriculum to please dilettanti faddists.
Widespread taste in art is essential to our industrial progress. The appearance of an article has often almost as much
to do with its saleability as its strictly utilitarian value.
Our manufacturers and mechanics must therefore have something
of the art instinct if they are to keep abreast of the same classes in
other countries. This is apart from the quiet though powerful influence which the art of the pencil and brush has in common with
music, in the development of that inward sense of beauty which
can be made one of the most efficient handmaids to morality, touching the soul to finer issues, and stimulating the growth of all that
o o o
is of highest worth to us. 36
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I notice also a great improvement in penmanship. The success of
the experiment in teaching the MacLean method of muscular movement writing has been amply demonstrated. This has been largely
due to the enthusiasm for the subject caught by many of the teachers attending the night school classes of Mr. MacKenzie, of the
Strathcona School. The appointment of this gentleman as supervisor of penmanship in the city schools would be a paying investment.
In primary class teaching there has been a marked advance.
The employment of projects is bringing about excellent results.
A system enlisting the services of a supervisor possessing the
openness to new ideas, the adaptability, keenness, energy and force
of Miss Emily J. Trembath is indeed fortunate.
The pupils taught by Mr. Henry D. Herd and his assistants in
class-rooms of the King Edward High School have made a most
promising beginning, and I feel assured of the possibility of rapid
development in this department of our work. In its present quarters
this school cannot expand, and a site for its permanent establishment should be secured at once. On a suitable site temporary classrooms might be erected as required, and a start made in assembling
the necessary mechanical equipment, so that all subjects may be
taught in one place. I think it would be economy to acquire
several blocks of land, so that there should be room for a technical
school building. The board must be congratulated on getting the
use of the building on Dunsmuir Street for our present technical
classes. In the very near future, however, the need for much larger'
premises will be imperative.
The providing of additional class-rooms and playgrounds is a
duty that is ever with us. All good citizens are asked to labor for
the growth of the city. The growth of the city means increase in
the school population. Increase of the school population necessitates
additional accommodation. Then, too, the compulsory school age
has been raised from fourteen years to fifteen. The potential development of the new work under Mr. Herd has been touched on.
hvery one must see clearly that in the building and grounds department there can be no standing still.
A three-acre site is not too large for a sixteen-room school.
1 herefore I feel that it is unwise to erect temporary supplementary
structures alongside large permanent buildings in any part of the
city where vacant land is still to be had. It would surely be good
business to effect the sympathetic and active co-operation of the
School Board and City Council, to the end that options on school
sites sufficient to meet all future needs be obtained now, when prices BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
37
have touched bottom and vacant land is still available. On these
sites cottage class-rooms could be placed as needed, leaving the
erection of permanent buildings to a time when the present financial
stringency shall have been eased. If the individual class-rooms on
each school site could be connected by a covered portico not a little
would be added to their educational value.
Social conditions have changed much in the last thirty
years. One need not be considered a pessimist if he is inclined to
view some recent tendencies with grave misgiving. The National
Conference on Character Education in Relation to Canadian Citizenship held in Winnipeg in 1919 was an event unique in our educational and national life. Committees dealing with suggestions for
betterment presented at that meeting have since then been in consultation. Their reports will no doubt be submitted at the next
session of the Conference, to be held in Toronto during Easter
week, 1923. If a feasible scheme for systematic moral teaching
in our schools should be evolved, I am sure the School Board, the
administrative staff and the teachers will gladly work together to
get from it enduring results. The moral leadership of the world is
the. most glorious achievement of the English-speaking race. In
putting forth every effort to maintain sound moral standards our
schools would be doing their best work, and society would owe
them a debt that could never be repaid.
In conclusion I wish once more to express my thanks to the
Board, to you, and to all the members of the educational staff of
the city for uniform kindness and assistance throughout the whole
period of my present appointment.
I have the honour to be, Sir,
Your  obedient  servant,
THOMAS A. BROUGH,    |
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools.
• BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
B9h REPORT OF MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B. C,
:-^:';-:'^^^Hf^S   BH| 1 WK^ December 29th, 1922.'
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit the report of the Medical Department for the year 1922:
Upon my assuming control of this department on September
25th last I was pleased to find the department so well organized.
In my own" efforts to accomplish the necessary work devolving
upon me, I have been greatly assisted by the spirit of co-operation, BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 39
the devotion to duty, and the efficiency of the members of the department.
A change in part of the routine work has become* necessary
owing to there being only one medical officer this year. During
the fall term, besides general supervision of hygienic conditions, I
have been able to make a thorough examination of the Receiving
Classes and to give instructions to the parents who attended; to
examine the high schoool athletes, and most of the new pupils from
out of town. I have also examined the cases continually referred to
me by the nurses for diagnosis and recommendations, as a result of
their physical inspections. I have also attended to the emergency
cases. I hope to be able to complete the examination of pupils from
outside points, before more of these, and more beginners, arrive
on February 1st.
Intermediate A and Senior B classes, and high school pupils
in the junior year, who have received full medical examination in
former years, are having only the physical inspection by the nurses. x
The general health of the school children I have examined is
good.    The most prevalent defects are as follows:
1. Poor posture—shoulders stooped, and one shoulder drooped
below the level of the other. This causes a compression of the
lungs, and favours a depression of all the viscera.
In my opinion this is due to three causes:
(a) The use of desks and seats of improper height.
(b) Careless habits at home.
(c) Want of proper daily corrective exercises.
I should recommend that only adjustable seats and desks be
purchased (for a time) until some such are in each class-room; and
that they be adjusted to conform to the^size of the pupils. I should
suggest that, in the meantime, the sizes of seats and desks in each
room be varied to suit the respective pupils.
2. Poor nutrition. This is not limited to children in the poor
districts, and is due, not only to lack of proper nourishment, but
also to irregular hours and insufficient sleep. We are trying to combat this with advice to parents, and with the maintenance of a system for supplying milk at recess to undernourished children at the
schools.
3. Carious teeth. The number of decayed permanent teeth
found, especially among the new pupils, is very striking. The
Dental Department has this well in hand, and is assisted by the
nursing staff. 40
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
4. Diseased tonsils and adenoids. When necessary these cases
are referred for treatment to their family doctors or to free clinics.
The number of cases of actual heart disease is very small, and
these are marked for further examination at certain intervals. I
have not yet found one case of active tuberculosis of the lungs.
I have found a great deal of overcrowding, and consequent use
of very unsuitable rooms as class-rooms, some classes being held
even in the attics and basements of the schools. These last are
most insanitary places, and very prejudicial to the health of the
children. I trust that this defect will be overcome very soon. The
use of basements for playgrounds in wet weather is not ideal, but
by good ventilation we are trying to minimize the bad results. In
the cases of some schools in outlying districts there are no covered
play-rooms at all. The children are compelled to play in the rain,
or in the schoolroom itself, both of which are very undesirable.
I should recommend that in these cases simple shelters be
erected to serve as open-air play-rooms.
We have been fortunate in having no epidemic this year. This
fully justifies the spending of time and effort in searching out and
excluding mild cases, and in examining contacts for evidence of infection.
I am pleased to find that there is some encouragement of
sports, especially in the high schools. I should like to see the establishment of organized outdoor play in the public schools. In this
way those who need play most would be reached.
There are many more recommendations I would make if it were
not for the widespread stringency in finances.
The usual courses of lectures and demonstrations in school
hygiene and school nursing have been given to nurses taking the
Public Health Course at the University of British Columbia. Talks
to Parent-Teacher associations have also been given.
The following is the statistical report for the whole year:
Number of parents invited 1  2,133
Number of parents present J _  1,282
Number of pupils physically examined  .  6,075
Number of pupils inspected  6,414
Number of pupils with vaccination marks  4,632
Number of pupils referred by nurses  1,025
Defective Vision, R  619
Defective Vision, L  633. Eye-strain   20
Strabismus    53
Blepharitis    126
Conjunctivitis   -  14
Impaired Hearing, R  97
Impaired Hearing, L  82
Discharging Ears, R  21
Discharging Ears, L.  -  25
Hardened Wax, R ■  124
Hardened Wax,  L  98
Carious Permanent Teeth   2,246
Oral  Sepsis    278
Malocclusion   93
Mouth-breathing   54
Defective Nasal Breathing   Ill
Malformation of Palate  -  49
Enlarged Tonsils  1,809
Adenoids             -  153
Goitre—Simple   314
Goitre—Toxic    6
Enlarged  Cervical  Glands  120
Anaemia    110
Nervous Affections   54
Cardiac Affections  174
Pulmonary  Affections—Bronchial     46
Pulmonary Affections—Tubercular   1
Other Tubercular Affections   1
Deformities of Spine—Postural   196
Deformities of Spine—Osseous   7
Deformities of Chest   59
Deformities of Extremities   29
Flat  Feet   \ §   235    i-
Nutrition—Fair   201
Nutrition—Poor  80
Enuresis    2
Hernia   16
Phimosis   35
Skin Diseases   8
Special Examinations   10
Report of Clinic at School Board Office.
Number  attending  611
Number vaccinated   35
Number certificates of vaccination given   32
Number treated   154 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Number referred to family doctor    37
Number readmitted to school  120
Number excluded  - _.  17
Number referred to General Hospital   9
Number referred to eye specialists  2
Number referred to school dentist  1
Number referred to Rotary Clinic   1
Number teachers examined physically    49
Report of Infectious Diseases Occurring Among
Children of School Age.
Scarlet fever   113
Chicken pox      196
Smallpox |  1
Mumps   41
Whooping cough     93
Diphtheria  42
Diphtheria carrier  12
Measles  46
All of which is
Respectfully submitted,
^'»-^^^^»|^^ftp^^   HAROLD WHITE,
School Medical Officer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
43
REPORT OF NURSING STAFF.
Vancouver, B. C,
December 29th, 1922.
Dr. J. H. White,
School Medical Officer,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I have much pleasure in presenting the report of
the school nursing staff for the year ending December 31st, 1922:
No change has been made in the general plan of work, and
the usual service to schools has been maintained. The appointment
of an additional nurse to the staff in September made it possible to
rearrange the districts and give a more frequent service to some
of .the schools. The frequent service to schools is most valuable,
and a daily service much to be desired. By this system a great
-deal can be done to control the loss of school time caused by communicable diseases, as any child showing any sign of disease or
who has been absent, may be referred to the nurse promptly, and
excluded if necessary, thus preventing the spread of disease. We
feel that the more frequent service we have given in the last few
years has been most helpful in this way, and has saved a great deal
of school time. The number of exclusions for uncleanly conditions
has decreased in a most gratifying measure.
Since 1918 the yearly physical inspection of pupils in certain
grades has been made by the school nurses. This plan oif work
has proved so satisfactory that it has been gradually extended, and
the nurses now inspect all pupils excepting the Receivers, pupils
new to the city, and high school pupils entering the sports. All cases
requiring attention are referred to the Medical Officer for diagnosis
and recommendations. We are thus saving a great deal of time
formerly spent by the School Medical Officer in examining normal
children, and in giving routine tests for the special senses, which
is now devoted to pupils requiring more thorough examination. The
success which this method has met with is largely due to the careful, painstaking work of our nursing staff.
In October a nurse was assigned to the high schools and a
regular service established, which, we hope, will prove helpful to
both students and teachers. 44
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The annual survey of the heights and w
shows the following:
School. No. Weighed
Aberdeen  399
Alexandra  623
Bayview   386
Beaconsfield   333
^Mm Cecil  Rhodes    493
HHCentral   580
BBK Charles Dickens   420
ipER Dawson   897» |§
Fairview  472
Florence Nightingale    675
||||E Franklin    260
General Gordon  496
Grandview   532
%1^'WS. Grenfell     § 121
Hastings   662
Henry  Hudson     688
Kitsilano  438
Laura Secord   508
Livingstone     378
Macdonald    491
P^BModel    450
Mount   Pleasant     673
Nelson   729
Roberts   976
Seymour   805
Simon  Fraser    575
Strathcona    881
Tennyson    617
Block  70    85
Total 15,648
^eights of the pupils
Percentage 10%
or more underweight.
19.0%
35.1%
23.8%
29.1%
23.8%
25.8%
%
%
24.5^
32.9
18.8
Of,
26.4%
26.3%
32.5%
28.7%
10.4%
31.1%
25.1%
25.5%
34.2%
25.9%
23.2%
21.0%
27.2%
29.0%
27.0%
20.0%
20.6%
23.3rr
18.6%
35.2%
25.6%
The total percentage of underweight is much larger than
should be, though the results secured in the nutritional work in individual school- are highly satisfactory, and encourage still greater
efforts. The standards used in this survey are those prepared by
Dr. Thomas D. Wood, Professor of Physical Education, Columbia
University, and are endorsed by the Child Health Organization of
America. Milk has been served to underweight children in twenty-
three >chools. We are very grateful to the Municipal Chapter of
the I. O. D. E., the Kiwanis Club, the McGill Women Graduates' Society of Vancouver, and the various Parent-Teacher associations,
whose financial aid has enabled us to supply milk to needy, undernourished children. Of the help and co-operation which we have
received from the teaching staff in the milk service, I cannot speak
too highly; with all their many duties, they have cheerfully undertaken this dailv task.
Girls' Health Clubs were conducted in eight schools. Two
hundred and seventy-nine girls enrolled in the clubs, and certificates
were granted to one hundred and forty-five. Trustee Mrs. Macaulay, whose interest in this work has been so helpful, again offered a
prize to the club showing the best attendance. It was won by the
Alexandra School, with an attendance of 99 per cent. The work
of the Girls' Health Club has now passed the experimental stage,
and has proved its value to the girls of the community. At present,
though its importance is recognized by school officials, principals,
teachers and parents, it is given in a voluntary, after-school class,
and meets with all the difficulties attendant on such a class. The
two greatest objections to conducting this work under the present
conditions are: first, that it is available to a limited number only;
second that it is a voluntary class, and often those who need such instruction most do not attend. An arrangement by which this work
could be given to all Senior or Senior B girls during school hours
would be welcomed by the nursing staff.
We feel particularly grateful for and encouraged by the cooperation we are receiving from the teachers in our efforts to
establish health habits in our children. This work is carried on
mainly in the junior grades, and the teachers are taking it up with
enthusiasm. Health education is not teaching long lists of names
of the bones of the body; it is training in healthful ways of life.
Through our knowledge of hygiene, if made effective in establishing health habits in school children, we could go a long way in
disease prevention. We should like to see inaugurated a programme
of health education that would start the child in habits of healthful
living in the junior grades, and be continued in new and interesting-
forms in successive grades, to firmly establish the health habits
and to give the information needed to develop the child into a useful, healthy citizen. Health and hygiene can be correlated with
other subjects on the curriculum, as it is in some cases. This is a
point that might well be emphasized.
The past year has given us time to test the value of the new
system of making appointments for the Dental Clinic. Late in 1921
this work was given over to the school nurses, and I am pleased
to report that it has proved a very satisfactory arrangement.    We 46
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
find the number of broken appointments in the clinic very much
less, and many more cases completed.
Our thanks are due to the various social service agencies of the
city that have co-operated with us in our work; to the Vancouver
General Hospital, whose outdoor and indoor service is open to us for
our needy cases; to the Rotary Clinic, to whose summer camp we
v/ere able to send many children; to the eye, ear, nose and throat
specialists of the city, who have continued their splendid work of
caring for needy children requiring attention. Through their generosity fifty-seven children have been fitted with glasses, who otherwise would be striving to do their school work handicapped by defective vision.
In response to a request from the University of British
Columbia we again gave lectures and field work to the students
taking the Public Health Nursing Course. Fourteen students were
given two weeks' work each in our schools, under the supervision
of our staff nurses.
We have had few changes in our staff during the year. Miss
Mary Campbell returned after leave of absence spent at Toronto
University in public health work, and resumed her duties with us
in September, filling the vacancy caused by the resignation of Miss
Hodson, who left us to join the Anglican Church Mission in India.
Owing to the re-arrangement of the work of the physical inspection an additional nurse was required to cover the work assigned
to the nursing staff, and Miss Dorothy Shields received the appointment.
The following is the statistical report:
Number of visits to schools   3,188
Number of classes inspected   2,103
Number of pupils  inspected    100,302
Number of pupils assisted S.M.O. in examining   9,622
Number of pupils excluded   837
Number of pupils readmitted  702
Number of pupils referred to S.M.O  1,028
Number of pupils referred to S.D.C  1,551
Number of pupils treated in school clinics   12,914
Number of notices sent to parents   11,998
Number of swabs taken   674
Number of swabs reported positive   19
Number of health clubs held  204
Number of conferences with parents at schools   671
Number of visits to homes   6,690
Number of other visits (hospitals, specialists, etc.)  151 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
47
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
(free) ..
Number of
Clinics  ..
meetings attended 	
pupils referred to Rotary Clinic 	
pupils referred to specialists for free treatment-...
pupils received treatment for physical defects....
pupils received treatment from family doctor 	
pupils received treatment from family dentist ....
pupils received treatment from school dentist ....
pupils received treatment at Van. General Hospital
pupils  received  treatment  from   eye    specialists
pupils referred to Vancouver   General   Hospital
Nose and Throat Clinic     91
Skin Clinic      10
Pediatric  Clinic       28
Emergency Clinic  ..
Orthopedic   Clinic  ..
Surgical Clinic 	
Psychopathic   Clinic
Government  Clinic
2
1
1
2
1
122
gj 26
60
3,865
829
1,829
999
182
26
136
Number of pupils referred by Attendance Department-
Ill
Report of Physical Inspection by Nurses.
Number of inspections    5,812
Number referred to S.M.O  1,025
Number with vaccination  marks   2,494
Number notices sent to parents   919
Blepharitis     80
Conjunctivitis  ^  1
Defective  speech   -  36
Discharging Ears, R  9
Discharging Ears, L  8
Carious Permanent Teeth  937
Oral Sepsis  66
Malocclusion   -  40
Malnutrition     '        732
Ringworm    --  4
Scabies   7
Impetigo -  13
Pediculosis    11
Other skin  diseases   6
Round   shoulders     13 48
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Skin Diseases—
Pediculosis    275
Impetigo   932
Ringworm    1  143
Hg Scabies     254
Unclean   79
Eczema   10
Miscellaneous       1,335
Infectious Diseases—
Disease.                            Found at Home. Found at School. Total.
^H Scarlet fever     f  7                         8 15.
Chicken pox         70                      47 117
Mi Mumps     §22                        4 26
^STonsilitis           6.                    17 23
Conjunctivitis          5                      30 35
WM Diphtheria           1                          1 2
1|B Whooping    Cough         38 |l                 21 59
■li.Measles           19                      12          fe; 31
In closing this report I wish to express my appreciation of
the courtesy and co-operation accorded the nursing staff by school
officials, principals and teachers.
Respectfully submitted,
'l^fliSfl^^fiS^ ELIZABETH G. BREEZE, R. N.,
Head Nurse. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
49
DENTAL DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B. C,
January 8th, 1923.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools, [
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the
Dental Department for the year 1922.
Commencing June 1st, 1922, the clinics at the Strathcona,
Tennyson and Florence Nightingale schools were closed. By closing these three clinics the staff was reduced by one dentist and two
lady attendants, which reduced the cost of the Department considerably. The chairs from the Tennyson and Nightingale schools
were set up and are now operating at the clinic in the School Board
Offices, where we are now operating -four men and two lady
attendants. 50
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
The system of consolidating the clinics at the School Board
Offices has proved not only a saving in the cost of operating the
Department, but has practically eliminated all waste time of the
operator and of the patients, and under the new system, where
the nurses make all appointments of the Dental Clinic and follow
up such appointments to see that the children keep them on time,
the broken appointment list has been reduced to a very small per
centage.
During the year there were 3,935 appointments made. We
gave 694 treatments (relieved toothache, treatment of abscesses,
sore gums, cases of gingivitis and other cases of similar nature).
We inserted 2,969 fillings, extracted 1,354 teeth, administered 834
local anaesthetics, 16 general anaesthetics with nitrous oxide gas,
and we gave 534 extra prophylaxes in addition to all cases which
were completed.   For the ten months we completed 1,247 cases.
The great majority of the cases have been free cases recommended by the school nurses, due, I presume, more or less to the
period of reconstruction we are passing through, the application
cards bearing the information "Father out of work."
In closing, I would like to extend my appreciation to the office
staff of the School Board, the principals and teachers, medical department and nursing staff for their help and co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
W&    ■    l®^Qtf^^^i   H L- FALLEN,
Chief Dental Officer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 51
PSYCHOLOGICAL   DEPARTMENT.
Vancouver, B.C.,
December 30th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:
I have the honour of submitting the report of the Psychological Department for the year 1922.
The work of the department has consisted chiefly in selecting pupils for the special classes. In addition, assistance has been
given in the study of individual pupils who were problems to their
teachers and in the solution of grading difficulties.
In the selection of pupils for special classes, group tests were
used to a greater extent than previously. They proved very satisfactory for our purpose and were of interest and value to the
teachers in whose rooms they were given. They stimulated the
study of the individual child, and many times brought to the attention of the teacher a clever child hitherto underrated. Several
children were given extra promotions because of unusually high
mental development, all of whom are now doing well in the higher
classes.
The question of the exceptionally bright child is one that I
feel needs very careful study. It is not fair to the child to keep
him at too easy tasks and double promotions soon place him among
children much older than himself. While he is on an equal footing with them intellectually, he is not physically, and trouble in
emotional attitude may develop. There is no doubt, however, that
many over-age children for the grade who have come from other
places while not doing perfect work, would do equally well in the
class above. These children can be found by group testing and
much time be saved for them as well as the extra expense of longer
school attendance.
The average normal children whom we have examined either
because of poor school work or behaviour difficulties have been
cases for the most part of maladjustment to school life due to unhappy home conditions, or to emotional conflict at school. 52
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
We have studied many children who are below average in
ability yet who can work along slowly in the regular grades to
senior grade work, but will probably never reach high school. For
these children a curriculum less academic and abstract, one which
gives greater opportunity for development through wider activities
is very desirable.
Perhaps the best testimony of the suitability of the work in
special classes for the children placed there is the result obtained
with truants. Chronic truants who have been placed in the classes
cease to be truants—not because they find the class a place to avoid
work, but because they find in it an outlet for their energies which
was lacking in the too-bookish regime of the regular class.
The children in the classes progress in academic work at
varying rates according to ability. Sometimes the progress is disappointing, but there is one side on which the results are almost
always gratifying if the child has been in a class any length of
time. This is the development of character. I believe many circumstances contribute to this development. The small class with
consequent greater influence of the teacher, the nature of the curriculum with its great amount of handwork and the comparative
freedom of choice and action. Probably the close contact with
the earnest men and women who comprise the teaching staff is the
greatest factor.
The city system as a whole is now well served by the special
classes, but there are districts in which more accommodation is
needed very acutely. These are the congested parts of the city,
one school district of which has no accommodation at all.
Miss Amos and Miss Cantelon have given details of their
work in their respective reports. Without their conscientious and
able work in their two fields, the Psychological Department's scope
would be very limited indeed. With these two branches we feel
that there is the nucleus of a department which will become of
greater and greater assistance to the city system as time goes on.
% Thanks are gratefully extended to all other branches of the
school organization which have contributed to our success and happiness during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
BS^SI^^^^^^^   RUBY A. KERR,
Director, Psychological Clinic. Observation Class.
Vancouver, B. O,
December 30th, 1.922.
Miss Ruby Kerr,
Director, Psychological Clinic.
Dear Madam:
I have much pleasure in submitting the following report of the
Observation Class.
During the year 110 pupils, 66 boys and 44 girls, have passed
through the class, spending an average of two days.
Upon his arrival at the class, an effort is made to gain the
pupil's confidence. This is usually accomplished through the
medium of toys and picture puzzles. When he is quite at his ease,
he is given standardized tests to discover his scholastic attainment.
Further tests are also given to ascertain his attention, memory,
motor co-ordination and mechanical ability. The games, the puzzles and the toys, which are interspersed with the tests provide a
splendid opportunity for further observation of the reaction of the
child to difficulties and often bring out any special abilities or disabilities he may have in applying himself to his school work.
Previous to coming to the observation class, each child is given
an individual test at his school. This work, with the-re-examination of special class children, has occupied the time between the
holding of observation classes.
In closing may I thank you sincerely for your kind helpfulness in all the work I have undertaken. It has been a great pleasure to be associated with you in this work.
Respectfully  submitted,
MAUDE A. AMOS, :§||j
Teacher, Observation Class. 54
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SOCIAL   SERVICE   WORK.
Vancouver, B. C,
§tjf   December 28th, 1922.
Miss R. Kerr,
Director of Psychological Clinic.
Dear Miss Kerr:
I have much pleasure in submitting to you the report of the
Social Service Department for the year 1922.
The work of the Department may be divided into two parts,
work done in connection with the children in the schools, and
follow-up work, which is done for children who have left our special classes to enter industrial life.
In connection with the first part of the work, homes are visited to find out the family histories of the children, and to get
information concerning their environment. All children who are
placed in Special Classes have a complete history of their cases
written up in a book specially prepared for such information. Institutions have often to be visited in order to obtain certain information necessary in connection with these histories; hospitals,
Community Houses, Mothers' Pensions Bureau, the Juvenile Court,
office of the Children's Aid, etc. Many of the home visits are
made in the evenings, when there is the opportunity of talking over
the problems with the fathers; and as many of the mothers are
forced to be away at work during the day it is necessary also to
pay evening visits to meet them.
There are other handicapped children in the schools and out
of the schools which our Department seeks to help. The parents
of several psych* >pathic children were advised to send them to Es-
sondale, while several other parents were advised to make use of
the Oral School for their children. For children too immature for
school, the kindergarten is sometimes suggested, and all kindergartens in the neighbourhood are looked up so that the necessary
information may be given the parents.
Another part of the Department's duty is the follow-up work,
which is a very interesting and encouraging phase of the work.
\\ hen the children' are ready to leave our classes the parents are
first visited to talk over the plans they may have for their children. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
55
^
In some cases work may have already been found for the boy or
girl who is leaving school. In other cases the parents are very
glad of our co-operation in assisting them to get their boy or girl
established in a line of trade they wish to take up. In this connection visits are then necessary to factories, business houses, etc.,
in order to find any vacancies where our children may find employment. If a girl wishes to follow a certain trade, such as dressmaking or millinery, then visits are made to such establishments to
see if they are willing to take apprentices. The parents and children are in every case very appreciative of such services as we may
be able to give. Then, after these boys and girls have obtained
work, visits are paid to the parents and employers to keep in touch
with their progress and to assist them in every possible way.
During the month of December all the pupils who left our
classes to go to work during the years 1921 and 1922 were looked
up. It was a great pleasure to hear such encouraging reports on
these boys and girls, and to know that nearly all our former pupils
are well placed and doing good, satisfactory work. At this particular time of unsettled conditions and much unemployment it is
very gratifying to feel that our boys and girls can obtain and hold
their positions in the industrial world.
The following is a brief survey of these pupils who have been
at work during 1921 and 1922.
Number at work, 58  (boys 33, girls 25.)
Kinds of Jobs—
Factory  (candy, brush-making, laundry, cigar,  furniture,
bakery, nail, soap, box, shingle)   17
Messengers      5
Farm help  3
Domestics    8
Working in Stores % %   7
At   sea    (1   in    Merchant   Marine,   2   as   messenger
on Empresses)  3
Home helping mothers 1  4
Newsboys (1 also assists in office)   2
Logging camp  1
Out of work  4
Failures to make good (3 in industrial schools)     4
Wages Earned—
Factory workers, per week ....$16, $14, $13, $12, $10, $9 B
Messengers, per week $12, $10, $8 fp
Store Helpers, per week  ...$9.50, $8.50 §§
Logging Camp, $1.20 deducted for board, per day $3.50 56
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Although we know that special class training has been of great
benefit in fitting these children for their work, yet we feel that, if
given a further training in a trade school, they would there serve
an apprenticeship in many lines of trade which would equip them
more fully to make a success of their work. Such a trade school
would complete a well planned course for these children.
I wish to express my thanks to you and Miss Dauphinee for
your kindly help and interest at all times. The work of the Department has been of great interest and pleasure during the year,
and I feel privileged to have a share in doing service to these children and homes needing assistance.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^^^^^^^^M JEAN M. CANTELON,     f
Social Service Worker. SPECIAL   CLASSES
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear  Sir:
I have much pleasure in presenting to you this, the fourth
annual report on the Special Classes of the Public Schools. While
the year 1922 has not been marked by any increase in the number
of classes, the number of pupils handled by each teacher has been
increased to fifteen, and occasionally to sixteen, so that we are
now caring for two hundred and fifty pupils in eighteen classes,
scattered throughout the schools of the city. In addition there is a
class at the Detention Home on Pine Street, which, in the course
of a year, enrolls a large number of sub-normal boys and girls,
with whom our special methods are used.
Because of the need of an extra room at the Simon Fraser
School, the special class there was moved to Cecil Rhodes School
in February, and continued there in September. The Cecil Rhodes
class was moved to a vacant room in a separate building at
Fairview.
At the end of the year the special classes are placed as follows:
Central  L. Elsie Frith
Cecil Rhodes Katjierine E.  Buckerfield
Dawson No. 1  Grace C. MacLean
Dawson No. 2 Agnes Gertrude Russell
Fairview No. 1  Harriet W. Brown
Fairview No. 2  F. Amie Wilkinson
Nightingale No. 1 Mary B. F. Herd
Nightingale No. 2 Annabel Guest
Grenfell  Mary K. Anderson
Henry Hudson No. 1  Evelina J. M. Sutherland
Henry Hudson No. 2  Isabella C. Calbick
Laura Secord No. 1 Ethyl M. Barnard
Laura Secord No. 2  Sarah E. Houston
Mt. Pleasant  Christine A. McKenzie
Macdonald  Marion G. Read 58
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Seymour  - Dorothy Hardwick
Strathcona No. 1 - Edith M. Quigley
Strathcona No. 2  Rita R. Graham
Detention Home Jean P. Leach
In addition we have the services of two Manual Training
instructors on full time.
The average attendance per class for the year was 13.2.
There have been a number of changes in the staff during the
year, and Miss Ella Herd has exchanged to a special class in Glasgow, Scotland, where she has pupils of high grade imbecile type,
in the teaching of whom she is introducing much of our simpler
handwork. A number of the teachers attended University during
summer vacation, and a class in handwork has been carried on
each week for the new teachers, while regular lectures in psychology have been given by Miss Kerr. I can see no diminution
in the enthusiasm of the first teachers, who are in their fourth year
with this work, while those who have entered during the present
year have shown initiative, zeal and courage. The exhibit of work
at the Vancouver Exhibition in August, for which a special Diploma was obtained, and also at the Westminster Fair in September,
was very highly spoken of. Its excellence was due entirely to the
ceaseless energy, originality and interest of the Special Class staff.
In my absence at the University, Mrs. Quigley and Miss Can-
telon took charge of the exhibit. At the close of the year a sale
of the work which the pupils have not desired for themselves,
enables us to make our first payment to the Board in actual cash.
Beside this we have bought two gramophones, with records, four
sewing machines, one weaving loom, dumb-bells, footballs, etc.,
and eighteen boxes of supplementary readers. These last form
the nucleus of a circulating library to which we hope to add from
time to time. There are about thirty books in each box, with, for
the most part, inexpensive linen covers, and there have been two
general changes since April, with a noticeable improvement in rate
and comprehension of reading as proved by the tests and exemplified on pupils' graphs.
The handwork this year has shown a decided improvement
oyer that of previous years. Dewey says "The child who employs
his hands intelligently in the schoolroom is satisfying one of the
most powerful interests within him," and by means of this interest
we trust to develop all the mental and manual ability with which
he is endowed.
We are often gratified by Miss Cantelon's reports as she follows these pupils into  industry, finding that  special  class pupils 0)
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61
who are possessed of stability keep their positions even in these
hard times, and give satisfaction to their employers, holding jobs
bringing in from $6.00 to $22.00 a week, while five only (8%)
have proved their instability by their social reactions, and are,
therefore, now in the simplified environment of reform schools.
At the beginning of the year arrangements were made with
the U. B. C. to have the students in Public Health nursing visit
the special classes, supplementing Miss Kerr's lectures in Subnormal Psychology. Accordingly from January until Easter vacation we had a succession of nurses, who thus obtained a knowledge of the educative methods used in special class, which has
borne fruit wherever these nurses have located.
As our special classes increase we are more and more conscious of the need for a central trade school for older pupils. There
comes a time when these pupils have reached the limit of mental
absorption, yet the impetus of school days and youth could be used
to excellent purpose in providing a knowledge of a means of livelihood. They are still interested-in manual work, but the need of
earning is beginning to- trouble them, and they cannot all do as
one boy did—find himself a job in a brush factory, where he is
now earning ten dollars a week, because brush-making was the one
thing of monetary value he had been taught in school.    With the
coming of
"improved business" we hope this need will be met.
To the heads and staffs of all the departments with which we
work throughout the school year, to the principals of schools which
have special classes, and to yourself and Mr. Brough, we wish to
express sincere appreciation of unvarying kindness, help and sympathy. Profiting by the mistakes of the past, we look forward
hopefully to 1923.
Respectfully submitted,
A. JOSEPHINE DAUPHINEE,
Supervisor, Special Classes. 62
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PHYSICAL TRAINING, CADET CORPS AND
lllSf       HI  RIFLE   TEAMS.
Vancouver, B. C,
December 31st,
1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
City.
Dear Sir:
For the year closing December 31st, 1922, I beg to report on
the subjects in my department as follows:
Physical Training.
I regret to state that owing -to the change of syllabus, issued
in the latter part of 1921, there has been a decided check in the
progress of this subject which to date is not up to the standard as
was the case previous to the change being made.
By this I do not infer that the subject has been neglected by
the teachers, as I have observed that while all have been keen and
anxious to do all that has been desired for the benefit of the pupils,
there has been considerable doubt as to how certain prescribed
exercises could be performed within the confines of the classroom.
I also observed that some teachers hesitated to take the initiative for fear of doing wrong, or taking up too much time, and in
some cases it was thought almost impossible to perform certain
exercises.
During my visits throughout the year, I have endeavoured to
illustrate to teachers how most of these seemingly difficult exercises could be conducted and practised, not perhaps quite as elaborate or formal as when in open spaces, but with the object of
showing how the spirit and requirements of the syllabus can be
adhered to under existing conditions.
While it may be said that all teachers qualified in this subject should have very little difficulty in taking hold of the situation, I do not think this would be correct, as the syllabus, in a great
many instances, is very indefinite.
From the foregoing it will be seen that I touched briefly on
the minor difficulties encountered, and I feel it will be well under- BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 63
stood that most all teachers, now in the Vancouver schools, and
possibly elsewhere, qualified under the former system, and not being fully conversant with all the changes, felt somewhat handicapped at first, but are now becoming better acquainted with the
requirements.
I am, therefore, confident that if all will carry out my lessons
as given, as well as the suggestions offered, there should be good
progress in future, even under the difficulties mentioned. In conclusion of this subject, I may state that the change has not been
popular but is gradually becoming so.
Prize Awards.
For efficiency in physical training, year 1921-1922, the sum
of $15.00 has been awarded by the local committee, Strathcona
Trust, and divided as follows:
Division 6, Lord Roberts School  $3.00
Division 8, Central School $3.00
Division 1,  Lord Tennyson School  $3.00
Division 23, Strathcona School $3.00
Division 6, Hastings School  $3.00
General Movements.
The general movements for pupils of all schools and classes
arranged for the purpose of assisting teachers to move pupils to
and from all places and positions to avoid loss of time, ensure uniformity, including Fire Drill practice, have all received the necessary attention.
Cadet Corps.
Throughout the year it has been necessary for me to devote
a great deal of time to the administration of the No. 101st cadet
regiment. The general requirements as desired by Headquarters
are gradually becoming more exacting and more especially has this
been the case during the period of September to December.
These duties, which are becoming quite numerous, require a
great deal of my time in attending to office details and general
correspondence between Headquarters and instructors of corps, instead of being at schools assisting teachers with general requirements.
mi 64
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Inspection of Corps.
The progress for the year has been seemingly satisfactory to
the I. C. S. M. D. No. 11.      J     |
The annual inspection of all corps was carried through as arranged in May and June and the following report was received in
due course showing the standing of all corps in the province,
points 1000 made up as under:
General Standard, to include appearance, steadiness
and turnout    100
Strength, based on strength on parade at inspection
as against establishment   100
Drill—Battalion, Company, Platoon, Section   200
Manual of Arms  100
Officers  50
K N. C. O's  50
Physical Training   200
:||y Musketry  100
Care of Equipment   25
General work, to include extra training adapted to
stimulate   interest   in   corps    (school   facilities,
location, etc., to be taken into consideration).... 75
Standing Cadet Corps—Military District No. 11, 1922.
<t
n
n
B. C.
School
Technical High School, "E" Company ...
Technical High School, "D" Company ...
King  Edward  High   School	
Britannia High  School	
General Gordon School 	
Boys' Central School   Victoria
Victoria High  School 	
North Ward School	
Mission Cadet Corps    ivussion,
Burnaby Cadet Corps    Burnaby, B.  C
Henry Hudson School    Vancouver
Kitsilano School   "
Lord Tennyson School   "
Lord Nelson School 	
King George High School	
Victoria West  School    Victoria  B
Points
Vancouver, B. C. 858
846
843
836
804
795
792
758
755f
7251
a
a
te
a
((
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((
(<
B. C.
a
(<
B. C. 718
715
712
701
695
690
685t
(i
a
a
C.
Boys' Naval Brigade Cadet Corps    Trail, B. C.
Boys' Naval Brigade Cadet Corps    Vancouver, B. C. 680$ BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 65
School Points
Aberdeen School    Vancouver, B. C. 678
Model School   | j "      677
Margaret Jenkins School     Victoria, B. C.      675
Fairview School    Vancouver 666
Macdonald  School   ..-:  658
Franklin  School    642
Cecil Rhodes School  § |      635
Penticton Cadet Corps  ......   Penticton, B. C.   635
Vernon Cadet Corps     Vernon, B. C.      630
Alexandra School     Vancouver, B. C. 628
Simon Fraser School  : . 625
Chilliwack  Cadet  Corps      Chilliwack, B. C. 615
Enderby Cadet Corps     Enderby, B. C.    615
Merritt Cadet Corps     Merritt, B. C.      605t
Central School     Vancouver, B. C. 600t
Charles  Dickens  School   " "      600
Lord Roberts School     .    " "      585
Grandview  School    574
Nelson Cadet Corps     Nelson, B. C. 560
Boys' Naval Brigade Cadet Corps     Victoria, B. C.      555$
J. T. Trapp Technical School     N. Westminster    5551"
Lord  Selkirk School     So. Vancouver      540
Sir James Douglas School     Victoria, B. C.      530
Laura Secord School     Vancouver, B. C. 530
Strathcona  School    526
Kalso Cadet Corps    Kaslo, B. C. 520
Richard McBride School     So.  Vancouver     518
Boys' Naval Brigade Cadet Corps     Kaslo, B. C. 510$
Connaught High  School     N. Westminster     510
Boys' Naval Brigade Cadet Corps     Maple  Ridge        495$
Dawson School "A" Company     Vancouver, B. C. 492
George Jay School  *    Victoria,  B.  C.    489
South Park School   | "      480
Esquimalt Cadet Corps    Esquimalt 465f
6th Field Co. C. E. Cadet Corps     North Vancouver 465t
Central School Cadet Corps     N. Westminster   462t
Oaklands School    Victoria, B. C.     452
Dawson School "B" Company     Vancouver, B. C. 445
Livingstone   Scfhool     " "      444
Kelowna Cadet Corps     Kelowna, B. C.     440
Tecumseh School Cadet Corps     So. Vancouver     436
Quadra School Cadet Corps     Victoria, B. C.      432
Hastings  School    Vancouver, B. C. 409
Note No.  1—Corps marked $ are Naval Units,  examination
covers only work common to both Naval and Military Units. 66
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Note No. 2—Corps marked t are comparatively new and in
many cases these have not yet had time to cover in their Syllabus
all the work on which the examination was conducted. In view of
this fact, the high standard attained by the following new corps is
especially commendable.
Mission Cadet Corps   Mission, B. C.
Burnaby Cadet Corps   Burnaby,  B.  C.
Central School  '— Vancouver, B. C.
Merritt Superior School   Merritt, B. C.
|^^^^   (Signed)   1 J. M. CUMMING,
l^^ftd^ 1    I   CaPtain> A/I.C.S. M.D. No. 11
As a result of the marks given in the foregoing report the
Cadet Regimental cups were again awarded and presented to corps
as follows:
I.O.D.E. Cup and Irene Moody Cup—Vancouver Technical
High School C. C. Instructor, Capt. F. Fairey. Cadet Coy. Leader,
G. Mark.        I        .    |
Thorn Cup—General Gordon School C.C. Instructor, Major
H. B. King.    Cadet Coy. Leader, C. McLean.
Hudson's Bay Cup—Henry Hudson School C.C. Instructor,
Lt. A. E. Shearman.    Cadet Coy. Leader, R. Howard.
Seymour Cup—Kitsilano School C.C. Instructor, Lt. T. W.
Woodhead.   Cadet Coy. Leader, J. S. Nichol.
Leek Cup—Tennyson School C. C. Instructor, Lt. R.
Straight. Cadet Coy. Leader, W. McKee.
Drill Prizes.
Military drill prizes were also awarded by the Strathcona
Trust to the amount of $207, half of which was presented to fifteen
instructors of corps, in accordance with instructions, the remainder
being placed to the credit of the cadet fund.
Cadet Camp.
I regret to state that it was not found possible to hold a camp
for the cadets of the province during the year 1922.
Organization.
The organization of the cadet regiment as a whole, remains
very much the same as in the previous year, except for a few
changes of instructors to corps and no increase in the number of
corps was made. BOARD OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES 67
Organization and Establishment
No. 101st Schools Cadet Regiment Vancouver, B.C., 1922.
Staff.
Hon. Cadet Colonel—J. S. Gordon, B.A., Municipal Inspector
of Schools; Cadet Regimental Commander, Capt. A. C. Bundy,
C.S.C.I.; Cadet Regimental Adjutant, Capt. R. P. Steeves, I. F. of
C.; Cadet Regimental Instructor of Musketry, Major H. B. King,
I. F. of C.; Cadet Regimental Instructor of Signalling, Capt. S. M.
Moodie, I. F. of C.; Cadet Regimental Medical Officer, Capt. J.
Harold White, C.A.M.C.; Cadet Regimental Chaplain, Rev. A. H.
Sovereign, B.A., B.D.
No. 1  (High School) Battalion.
Cadet Battalion Commander, Captain S. M. Moodie, I.F, of C.
Cadet Second in Command Captain F. Fairey, I.F. of C.
Cadet Adjutant Lieut. L. W. Taylor
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Coy. K. E. H. School  Lt. P. C. Tees  279
BCoy. K.G.H. School  Capt. S. M. Moodie   190
C Coy. Britannia  High   -..Lt. L. W. Taylor   212
D Coy. Technical School  ...Capt.  F.  Fairey   201
E Coy. Technical School  Capt.  F.  Fairey   160
High  School Cadet Band   30
Cadet Total, all ranks   1072
No. 2 Battalion.
Battalion Commander -Lt. W. J. Nesbitt, C.S.C.I.
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. S. J. Bryant, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Coy. Chas. Dickens C. C Lt. J. Dunbar   55
B Coy. Simon Fraser C. C ...Lt. C. B. Crowe   85
C Coy. Model C. C Lt. W. J. Nesbitt   130
D Coy. Cecil Rhodes C. C Lt. H. L. Paget   73
E Coy. Fairview C.  C  .Lt. S. J. Bryant   107
F Coy. Livingstone C. C Lt. F. C. Boyes  65
Cadet Total, all ranks.     515 68
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
No. 3 Battalion.
Battalion Commander Major H. B. King, I. F. of C.
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. R. Straight, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Coy. Tennyson C. C Lt. R. Straight   118
B Coy. Gen. Gordon C. C Major H. B. King   120
C Coy. Kitsilano  C.  C Lt. T. W. Woodhead   48
D Cov. Henrv Hudson C. C Lt. F. C. Wilson  65
Cadet Total, all ranks      351
No. 4 Battalion.
Battalion Commander Capt. D. P. McCallum, C.S.C.I.
Battalion Adjutant  Lt. J. R. Pollock, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Coy. Dawson C.  C Lt. A. E. Shearman  110
B Coy. Dawson Jr. C. C Lt. J. R. Pollock  80
C Coy. Roberts C. C Capt. D. P. McCallum.....  222
D Coy. Aberdeen  C.  C Capt. S.  M.  Moodie   78
E Coy. Central C. C Lt. H. W. Gamev  - 84
Cadet Total, all ranks     574
No. 5 Battalion.
Battalion Commander Lt H. B. Fitch, C.S.C.I.
Battalion Adjutant Lt. F. A. Jewett, C.S.C.I.
Corps Instructors Establishment
A Coy. Lord Nelson C. C Lt. F. A. Jewett   101
B Coy. Alexandra C. C Lt. T. V. Clarke  80
C Coy. Grandview C. C Lt. H. B. Fitch  65
D Coy. Laura Secord C. C Lt. ]. M. Buckley  65
Cadet Total, all ranks
301
No. 6 Battalion.
Battalion Commander
Battalion Adjutant.....
...Lt. C. Logan, C.S.C.I,
Lt. F. C. Boyes, C.S.C.I. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 69
Corps* Instructors Establishment
A Coy. Franklin C. C Capt. R. P. Steeves   53
B Coy. Hastings  C.  C Lt. C. Logan   45
C Coy. Macdonald C. C Lt. F. C. Boyes   50
D Coy. Strathcona C. C Mr.  J.  E.  Brown   100
Cadet Total, all ranks     248
Summary of Establishment.
Staff   7
Instructors   26
Battalions  6
Corps    28
Bands     1
Cadets (all ranks) 3061
Total establishment of regiment  3129
-s
No. 101st Cadet Regiment Rifle League—1921-1922.
High Schools Team Aggregate.
°J™r Corps JJ°- °f Team Totals Aggte
of Merit Shoots
1. Tech. A   Team  8 280-279-277-280-280-280-280-280 2236
2. K.E.H.S. A Team  8 280-278-280-278-279-280-280-280 2235
3. K.E.H.S.  B  Team   8 272-267-276-275-278-279-280-280 2207
4. Britannia    8 263-266-261-260-269-267-265-273 2124
5. Tech.  B Team 5 273-270-277-277-277 |" 1374
6. K. G. H. S 6 194-195-172-242-226-212 ffg|p; 1241
Prizes Awarded—Crehan Shield and Medals to Tech. A Team.
Platoon Cup to K. E. H. S. A Team.
The following details concerning the entry of a team in the
C. R. L. and submitted by the undersigned is deserving of special
mention in this report.
Canadian Rifle League—Miniature Series, 1922.
Vancouver Technical High School.
Team of 12, 4 matches.
Possible score, 1200 for each match.
January   1151 points
February  1153 points
March   1173 points
April    1182 points
Total   4659 points    average 97.06%
b J 70
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Standing—Third place in Canada.
First—Colchester Academy,  Truro,   N.S 97.63%
Second—Central High School, Calgary, Alta 97.33%
Third—Vancouver Technical  '. 97.06 %
50 Teams competing.
F. Fairey, Capt. I. F. of C.
Instructor D. & E. Coy. 101st
A. B. Maggs, Musketry Instructor
The scores of the public school teams were correctly received
and recorded throughout the year. Owing to certain variations
existing on the local ranges, it was decided to enter the ten teams
with highest aggregates in a final competition for the regimental
shooting prizes and resulted as follows:
School Team. Score. Prizes Awarded.
1. Alexandra    264 A. P. Brown Challenge Shield &
J. S. Tait Medals.
2. Dawson  (A Team)   261  News Advertiser Cup
3. Cecil Rhodes ....% 260 World   Cup
4. Henry Hudson   256  Province   Cup
5. Simon  Fraser   252  Townley   Cup
6. General   Gordon   245  0. B. Allan Cup
Remaining four teams.
7. Franklin    231
8. Fairview  1 ...229   ^^^^^^^K:
9. Aberdeen  220
10. Model 210
Individual prizes consisting of cash, awarded by the Strathcona
Trust, and medals donated by Lt. Col. J. S. Tait and Mr. S. M.
Scott were also received, distributed and presented to those successful.
The several amounts received from the local committee of the
Strathcona Trust, as prize awards for the year totalled $302, divided
as follows: Military Drill, $207.00; Rifle Shooting, $81.00; Physical Training, $15.00. There were also 30 medals awarded for
drill and shooting.
The following correspondence having been received from
headquarters, is of special interest as far as it concerns Cadet Services, and is inserted herein for information. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 71
Cadet Service.
Governor-General's Challenge Shield Competition.
The Shield to be awarded annually to the province which can
show on parade at the annual inspection (which must be held on or
before 31st August each year) the greatest number of enrolled
cadets between the ages of twelve and eighteen years in proportion
to the school attendance of the previous school year. The statistics
regarding school attendance to be obtained from the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust, and to be the same as those used by the
Council in dividing its funds for the current school year amongst
the various provinces. The shield to be held by the cadet corps most
proficient in physical and military drill and musketry in the pro-
vince winning  it. ^^ ^ |
His Excellency, the Governor-General, has approved the result
of the above mentioned competition, which shows the province of
Quebec, with a percentage of 8.43 cadets present at the Annual
Inspection, 1922, as compared with the school attendance of the
previous school year, to have won the shield for the current year.
The shield will be held by No. 352 Commercial Academy Cadet
Corps, Quebec, Que., and No. 247 Academie de LaSalle Cadet
Corps, Three Rivers, Que., each for a period of six months, these
Units having attained an equal degree of efficiency in Physical
Training, Military Drill and Musketry. The detailed results of the
competition is as follows:
Cadets 12 to 18 School Percentage
Years   Present Attendance of Cadets to
Province                              at  Annual  In- School Year             School
spection, 1922 1920-21 Attendance
Quebec   = 41,825 495,887 8A2>
Manitoba       8,661 129,015 6.71
British  Columbia    5,660        E       85,960 6.59
Prince Edward Island        885 17,510 5.05
Ontario 28,573 609,449 4.69
Alberta      4,633 124,328 3.73
Nova Scotia     3,204 112,882 2.84
New Brunswick    1,351 73,712 1.83
Saskatchewan      3,293 185,768 1.77
Total  98,085 1,834,501
(H.Q. 331-26)
(H.Q. 86-1-33)
(Signed)        EDWARD MORRISON,
Major-General, Arljutant-General. 72
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Annual Statement Cadet Fund,
January to December, 1922.
Jan.     1—Balance in Bank $1,993.87
June 26—Deposit  of   cheque,   Cadet  uniform   allowance j
from Headquarters   2,417.50
Dec. 11—Deposit of cheque from Strathcona Trust       103.50
BBB        i        I        ^^^^ft $4,514.87
Expenditure for year       388.63
Dec. 31—Balance $4,126.24
In conclusion, I may state that I most sincerely regret the loss,
by death, of Lieut. H. L. Paget, vice-principal of Cecil Rhodes
School, who for so many years, apart from his profession as a
teacher, has been a most efficient instructor in our Schools Cadet
Regiment. He was always an officer and gentleman, an earnest supporter in all that was good for the welfare of the cadets, and a keen
lover of all sports for both boys and girls.
In finally closing this report on another year's work, I again
desire to extend sincere thanks to all who have so kindly supported
and co-operated with me while endeavoring to carry out my various
duties.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^^^^^^^^^^K^^^^-    A. C. BUNDY,    ~
Physical Training and Cadet Corps. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 73
PRIMARY  WORK.
Vancouver, B. C,
|^ December 29th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit the following general report upon
Primary Work for the year 1922:
There are at present one hundred and seventeen primary classes
in the city and for the first time for several years all classes have
been operating on full time. In order to accomplish this it was
necessary during the early part of the year to give large classes to
some of the teachers, but they preferred the larger class to working
with a smaller one upon part time.
Twenty-five new teachers were given primary classes this year.
Eighteen of these were appointed in September and a few others
were then transferred from junior to primary work. The problem
of directing the work of such a large staff generally, and of giving
so many new teachers the extra assistance essential to the formation
of high standards, has become a very difficult one, especially as we
have made many changes in our curriculum this year.
Several special meetings have been held for the various groups
of new teachers as well as general meetings of the Receiving and
Primer teachers. At one of the meetings of the Receiving teachers
Miss Laursen of the Dawson School gave'a lesson to her class demonstrating how printing and drawing upon the blackboard by the
children could be used to help them with their reading and spelling.
This lesson was an inspiration to young teachers and was much
appreciated by all the teachers. We are also greatly indebted to
Miss Laursen for the help she has given to many young teachers
who visited her class.
For several years the teachers have had much difficulty in procuring suitable material for silent reading, as the books found in
the school libraries were generally too far advanced for primary
children. This year, however, it was possible to make an excellent
selection from the specimen readers placed in the community room
for the purpose.    Sets of these readers have been purchased by 74 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
many of the schools with library funds, and the children are reading
them with great delight.
&
A number of good supplementary readers have been authorized
by the Department of Education this year. Certain features are
common to most of these books. The reading matter has distinct
literary value. The type is good, the illustrations are attractive and
the content is arranged with a view to securing good eye movements.
In June the Haggerty Silent Reading tests were given as an
experiment to the Second Primer pupils in the Tennyson and Dawson schools. Many of the Tennyson pupils made remarkably high
scores. Although the children had completed only the first half of
Grade II, many of them had Grade III or Grade IV reading ability.
These children had read a large number of library books and had
much practice in reproduction. In one of the classes at Dawson,
fifteen of the pupils had been accelerated. They had been in school
one year and scored well above age and grade in the test. This class
also obtained the best results in spelling and dictation in the city.
The other Dawson class was composed chiefly of pupils who were
repeating their work. They had had much difficulty with number
work, but were oral readers and spellers, and we were surprised to
find that they did not score higher on the comprehension tests. This
class had been carefully taught. They had been questioned daily
upon the content of the reading lesson and had been encouraged to
read from library books. It is to be hoped that we shall soon be
able to use standardized reading tests in all the primary classes.
Early in the year a committee of principals and primary teachers was appointed to revise the primary course of study. A new
method of teaching reading to beginners was adopted after having
been experimented with by several of our best teachers. According
to the course some of the first lessons are based upon action and
others grow out of conversations upon home and community experiences. The children make their first reading books. Printed
copies of the lessons are given them to mount in their books and
make drawings or select suitable pictures from magazines to illustrate them. After the first month this kind of work is used as incidental reading and the study of the text-book is taken up. This
method was discussed with the Receiving teachers at the beginning
of the term.
At a meeting of the First and Second Primer teachers held on
September 12th, the teachers were asked to consider the following
points in working out the course: ^
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 75
Teaching by project.
Developing initiative in children.
Motivation of work.
Training in free oral expression.
Training in reading for thought.
Greater use of concrete aids in teaching arithmetic.
Dramatization of stories and methods of discussing the most
important reading lesson with the children were outlined, the teachers being urged to prepare their work in advance in order to find
the main points of the story and to avoid haphazard questioning.
Many of the teachers have made attractive number chars from
magazine pictures representing a tea-room or a grocery store, or
have motivated the handwork by having the children make articles
for a toy-shop. Real and toy money was used for buying and selling.
They have also developed many interesting games to motivate the
number drills.
Several good projects have been worked out with posters or
upon the sandtable. The one most widely used was the Autumn
project. An Indian project was generally used in connection with
the Hiawatha reading lessons and greatly helped to develop appreciation of these lessons. Other sandtable studies were as follows:
Mother Goose, A Home, A Farm, Our School, Our City, English
Bay and Stanley Park, The Eskimos, The Tree Dwellers, Bethlehem and Winter. The subjects involved in these projects were
chiefly language, reading, nature, drawing and handwork.
The monthly outlines of work sent in by the teachers indicate
that the majority of them are endeavoring to carry out the new
ideas in the course of study and upon visiting their classes it was
evident that some of them are developing considerable initiative.
Much of the work is at present in the experimental stage, but I
am especially appreciative of the work done by the members of the
committee who assisted in preparing the course of study.
Yours respectfully,
EMILY J. TREMBATH, |l
Supervisor of Primary Work. 76 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MANUAL TRAINING.
Vancouver, B. C,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ December 30th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:—I respectfully submit the following report on the
Manual Training Department for the year 1922:
The attendance reached a higher maximum this year than in
any previous year, namely, 3,329 in October. The percentage of
attendance was also very high, ranging from 92.6 per cent, in March
to 96.5 per cent, in September.
The seventeen members of the staff are working full time, and
it has even been found necessary in six cases to divide the morning
session, giving two classes half each. The Beaconsfield and Simon
Fraser centres are the only ones having any vacant periods. If,
therefore, there is any increase in the school population of any dis-
strict it will become necessary to provide new equipment. There
is no provision for manual training in the Kitsilano High School,
and as this district is rapidly building up, it seems to be the logical
place for the next centre.
The• establishment of a Junior High School at King Edward
has been carried out without interfering with the shopwork of the
rest of the school. This has been possible because of the fact that
there are two separate shops for woodwork and metal work. Both
these are now in constant use by. one school or the other, and any
further increase is therefore impossible. A similar arrangement
could be made at the Britannia High School, but not in the King
George High School, as this school has only one shop, and that is
fully occupied. It was my hope that this year it would be possible
to clean and decorate all the centres, but only two—Dawson and
Strathcona—have been done. Most of the others need attention
and I trust the work will be done during the coming year, as it is
useless to talk of neatness and cleanliness amid such surroundings.
The work of the classes on the whole has been carried on in a
very satisfactory manner, as was demonstrated in the exhibit in
the summer. 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
it
This year has seen the adoption by the Department of Education of a new form of record sheet which attempts to define the
pupils' ability in more detail. Marks are to be given separately for
effort, accuracy, and finish in both drawing and woodwork. At
the end of January and June of each year a report based on this
record will be sent to each parent so that some inkling will be given
of the tendencies of the child, and the best line to adopt for its
future progress. To make this of any avail there must be close cooperation between teacher and parent, and steps will be taken during
the coming term to make this possible.
I have examined the practical work of the Junior High School
during the past term and have found that very satisfactory progress
has been made. Now that a good foundation has been laid a closer
connection with the repair jobs occurring in every-day life will be
made, and the scientific bearing of such will be entered into. This
will afford opportunity for try-out courses so that at the end of
the two years' course a fair idea may be obtained of the possibilities open to each student.
Faithfully yours,
S. NORTHROP,
Supervisor, Manual Training. 78 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
H^M'    HOME  ECONOMICS.
Vancouver, B. C,
1    :^^^^^^;- December 20th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit the following report of the Home
Economics Department for the year 1922:
The number of pupils has increased partly owing to the normal
growth of the schools and is now as follows:
Intermediate Grade B—Elementary clothing....       967
Senior  Grades  A  and  B—Elementary  foods,
housewifery and clothing —     1,953
Junior High School -  40
High Schools—Girls in general or commercial
courses 1        697
Home Economics Course—King Edward High
IgUS     School  90
|||B^   Total     3,747
Home Economics, as well as many subjects more time honoured, is at present going through the very trying stage of fitting itself into the school programme in a way to make it of more practical
value in the lives of the students. It is gratifying to know that it
has won a permanent place in the educational field, not only for its
practical value, but because of its value in general education. For
this reason it is now to be found in the curricula of the old-
established public and high schools of every province, and in that
of most of our Canadian universities, as well as in that of the more
recently established technical schools for sfirls.
In spite of the difficulties experienced by the School Board in
supplying funds for all its work, it is most encouraging to report
that this year some progress has been made in every grade in which
home economics has been established in our own city schools, though
there is still much to be done.
^^M^^^^M   Intermediate Grade "B".
The course arranged in 1921 was followed and a beginning was
1**1
made in getting the work back to a more systematic basis.     Mrs. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 79
A. C. Huggard, as a supervisor, was most energetic and conscientious and not only was the construction very good in many
cases, but other educational features were not forgotten. However,
I regret to report that until we have a more permanent teaching
staff, with a grasp of the subject, satisfactory work cannot be
done. Mrs. Huggard resigned in July, and of the 53 teachers who
were under her supervision, only 26 are doing the work this year.
Special classes after school are to be provided for the teachers who
need a training, but this method of preparing teachers is not popular. As pointed out in previous reports, the only solution is that
if intermediate grade teachers are expected to teach any subject,
in justice to themselves, the pupils, ratepayers and the subject
itself, adequate training should be provided in their Normal School
course. No amount of supervision can supply the deficiencies of an
untrained staff which is continually changing.
Another help to all home economics work in the higher grades
would be the establishment of suitable handwork between the
Primary and Intermediate "B" grades. The lesson period should
also be adapted to the age and attainment of the pupils. If this
were done, the clothing course could be arranged to include very
much interesting work of a more advanced nature, which is utterly
impossible under present circumstances.
Senior Grades "A" and "B". ^^^^^^
The policy of combining part classes in order that each pupil
may cover the entire work of her grade is proving most satisfactory
so far as the efficiency of the work is concerned and is well worth
the trouble of a little effort in organization.
In these two grades the course is undergoing the process of
re-organization. Teachers' meetings are held every two weeks and
each lesson, already taught or proposed, is subjected to criticism for
its content and for its practical application. It is particularly difficult to re-organize a cookery course because almost every change
entails a call for new equipment and a change in dealing, with output
and consequent expense. However, the work of the entire staff is
beginning to be felt in an improvement in general tone. I am
pleased to report that only two changes were necessary in this staff
of ten this year.
Another reason why the work can improve is because conditions necessary to good work are gradually improving. I refer to
the repair and cleaning of certain centres which had very much
run down in the past few years. If the workshop and the equipment is what it should be, work which is a decided drag becomes a
pleasure. 80 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
At present the food and housewifery lesson occupies two hours.
The extra morning hour is devoted to clothing construction, and is
much facilitated by the introduction of sewing machines. The 22
machines provided in September allow two for each centre. I
need not point out that satisfactory work in clothing in ;hese classes
depends largely upon satisfactory work in the grades below.
High Schools—General and Commercial Courses.
Because of difficulties in organization this work varies a little
in the individual school. Until a four-year high school course is
a fact, and until home economics is given matriculation credit in
British Columbia, it is sometimes difficult for some school principals to see its value, especially when arranging a crowded timetable.   The high school work is as follows:
Britannia—General and Commercial Girls—
120 minutes per week for two years.    Clothing.
King Edward—General Course Girls—
100 minutes per week for one year.    Clothing.
100 minutes per week for one year.    Foods.
King George—General Course Girls—
120 minutes per week for two years.    Clothing.
Kitsilano—General Course Girls—
120 minutes per week for one year.    Clothing.
Commercial High School—Offers no home economics.
In the Kitsilano High School home economics was begun in
September of this year and it is expected that girls will continue
clothing work for two years. It need not be pointed out that work
in clothing alone is not a home economics course, but with present
conditions, no more can be attempted.
The exhibits of work in the schools at various times during
the year were very creditable. It has been found to be most difficult
to provide even a representative exhibit for the Vancouver Exhibition because of its place in the school year and because the students
immediately make use of their garments.
King Edward High School, Home Economics Course.
The interest in this course is well sustained during the year.
Due to the efforts of the Parent-Teacher Federation, it has been
arranged to allow students credit for matriculation subjects upon
which they have passed the examinations, but to enter the
University of British Columbia no credit is given for high school
home economics, and a girl must make up the subjects she dropped BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
81
(a foreign language and geometry) from the established matriculation course in order to take it, before she can begin in her home town
the academic work for which she can get credit in other universities
where home economics work has already been established.
The above is the only reason the number in this course does not
increase beyond the present accommodation, but in justice to those
who do want to take up home economics, a determined effort should
be made to correct this condition.
Junior High School.
This type of school is new in our system and was opened in
September. Forty girls are taking home economics one half day
every day of the school year. Since these girls are most interested
in the manipulative side, and because the time devoted to it is longer,
an improvement in technique is soon noticed. This is of the greatest
encouragement to girls who probably were recently struggling with
subjects in which they were incapable of improvement. This feeling
of encouragement reflects for good in the whole demeanor of the
girl. This is one of the strong points I have noticed in this course
so far. With the establishment of a technical school for girls, certain courses can be arranged that will allow continuance and
specialization, for home economics in its elementary stages is the
practical foundation for a student taking certain branches in higher
education, as well as for the workers who must make plans or
carry out the plans of others in commercial life and for the woman
who must take charge of a home.
Thanking you, the office staff, and the School Board, as well
as the principals and teachers for co-operation and help, I am,
Yours respectfully,
ELIZABETH BERRY,
Supervisor of Home Economics. 82 BOARD OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
WggmS§S^^M SEWING   IN   THE   GRADES.
Vancouver, B. C,
I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ft:    ;t      December 18th, 1922.
Miss E. Berry,
Principal, Home Economics Department,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Madam:—In the month of October, 1922, I was appointed
supervisor of sewing, in the public schools of Vancouver and reported for duty on November 7th. Since then I have visited all
the classes'in which sewing is taught.
Sewing is being taught to fifty-two classes. The number of
girls receiving instruction is 967. The average number in a class
is eighteen.
Beginning the first week in January, I purpose holding classes
in sewing for the teachers who are giving instruction in this subject
and for any others who wish to avail themselves of this opportunity
of gaining some knowledge of educational sewing.
Respectfully submitted,
Ill^^MB^^^^^^H^^^^^^^^.    M. G. McEWEN,
Supervisor of Sewing. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 83
SCHOOL   SPORTS.
Vancouver, B. C,
llfllB     ^^BiliSl   December 28, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Vancouver Public Schools Athletic Association for the
year 1922: ■ *|- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M
As outlined in last year's report an Inter-municipal Association
Football League for public schools of the Lower Mainland was
formed. This league created a great amount of interest among the
municipalities concerned, and I believe our object, namely, the
creating of a greater amount of interest in true sport among the
different municipalities, was fully realized. The team representing
the public schools of Vancouver City had the honor of winning
the championship, and besides winning a handsome cup, each boy
was presented with a gold medal.
The heartiest thanks of the association are due to the Parent-
Teacher Federation for the interest taken in the boys, and for its
generosity in providing uniforms, also a splendid banquet, at which
the trophies were presented.
At the annual Spring meeting of the association it was decided
to carry on, as in previous years, with senior boys' baseball, junior
boys' baseball and girls' baseball. The Strathcona School had the
honor of winning both boys' championships, while the girls' championship went to the Henry Hudson School.
In September a second meeting of the association was held to
arrange the programme for the Autumn term. Schedules were
drawn up for senior and junior boys' football, and for boys' and
girls' baseball.
Some excellent games were played in these branches of sport.
Unfortunately the weather for a period prevented the teams from
completing their schedules, so at the time of ^ writing, the championships, with one exception, have not been decided. The Kitsilano
School was fortunate in winning the boys' basketball championship.
In the Senior Football League the following teams have won
first place in their districts, and enter the semi-finals:   Lord Roberts, 84
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Seymour, Fairview, Mount Pleasant, and either Kitsilano or Henry
Hudson. The following teams enter the semi-finals in the Junior
League:   Model, Nightingale, Central and Seymour.
The district championships for girls' basketball have not been
decided yet.
The year has been a very successful one from every standpoint,
and on behalf of the associaiton I desire to express its gratitude to
you and the trustees for your hearty support and co-operation.
Respectfully submitted,
?|iP^^^^^^S^^^^^   W. J. NESBITT,
President. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
85
DRAWING.
Vancouver, B. C,
December 28th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I beg to submit my report on drawing for the year
1922.1 " |     |        I § '    H
A retrospect of the year's work while on the whole fairly satisfactory, yet leaves me with a feeling that there is considerable more
to be done before the full capabilities of the children in drawing are
exercised.
It is true that in quality of line, in observation of proportion and
in tone and colour, the work of the year has improved all round,
yet the fact remains that what was the work of one supervisor in
1913 is not, by reason of the increased population, one supervisor's
work today. In this respect I desire to cite my letter of March 17th,
in which I state: "I am becoming increasingly aware of the
necessity for increased supervision in the subject of drawing and
design, and would respectfully suggest that the attention of the
management committee be called to my suggestions and recommendations for meeting this necessity.
"Intelligent supervision demands checking up work, observing,
teaching model lessons, critical surveys and holding of special classes
for weak teachers who desire to still further improve. As matters
stand at present with over 300 teachers to supervise, it is not possible
for the supervisor to adequately check up work, demonstrate new
methods or give sufficient attention to weak teachers.
"Supervising, to be helpful, should be more often, and when
young teachers, fresh from Normal, state that they have taught but
one lesson in the subject during their Normal course, it is evident
how much attention is necessary in their case if the young teacher
is going to learn through the experience of the supervisor and not
entirely through her own.
"Drawing and design in the Vancouver schools have reached a
stage where they may either go forward or backward. I believe a
good foundation has been laid, but more builders are necessary if 86 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Vancouver is going to be first in the Dominion in the teaching of
drawing and design and it is my desire that it should be so.
"In other subjects on the curriculum, such as manual training,
domestic science, sewing, music and special classes, the ratio between
teachers supervised and supervisor is vastly different from the subject of drawing.
"Because of the foregoing reasons, and because I believe we
can make drawing and design in Vancouver schools a worth-while
subject, a subject that will help the pupil mentally, industrially and
morally, I would suggest that two more persons be appointed as
assistant drawing supervisors—one to take drawing and handwork
in the primer grades, and one to help the children of the intermediate
and senior grades.
"Such appointments would make a big diiference in the work
of the city, and I feel sure would be welcomed by the majority of
teachers who are really doing their very best under present circumstances.
"I shall be pleased to meet the management committee and
answer any questions, or give any explanations relative to this
matter."
At the Hastings Park Exhibition the schools again put up a
good show which was a fair reflex of the type of work done in our
schools. Drawing contests for the various grades were staged daily
and attracted numerous entries, and much interest from the visiting
citizens and visitors.
The silver trophy awarded by the Exhibition Association for
the best card of drawings from any school in this province, was
again won by a Vancouver school—Florence Nightingale being the
winning school.
At the request of the New Westminster Exhibition Association
a representative collection of the drawings our schools had at Hastings Park was sent over to Westminster Fair, where it attracted
much favourable comment.
The Saturday morning classes held in the School Board Office
Building for talented senior public school and high school pupils,
continues to be popular. Over forty pupils are attending this session
and the good these children derive from these classes is spread in
their ordinary week-day classes. They act as "carriers" of better
work and become stimuli to their fellow pupils.
Another method of spreading appreciation of good work, but
from a different angle, has been through the showing of lantern BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 87
slides of famous paintings. These little exhibitions, which are held
in the ordinary classrooms with very often the back of a map as a
screen, give much pleasure to the senior classes concerned, and are
supplemented by brief descriptions of the pictures, the periods or
the artists. An endeavor is made to link up the work of art with
the thought and history of the periods in which they were painted.
It thus becomes an adjunct to the appreciation of history and literature and all three are impressed on the mind the more by reason of
this analogy.
The work in our high schools reaches a high level, particularly
I think in the matter of design work, and much credit is due Mr.
Judge and Miss Hall for the manner in which the work in the various
high schools is carried out. Only two of our schools have a room
set apart for the teaching of the subject and as a consequence considerable difficulties have to be met and overcome.
It is to be regretted that second and third-year pupils in our
high schools cannot have their studies in drawing and design carried
further, no matter how keenly they desire it.
This year I have inaugurated a system of written reports in
duplicate on each teacher visited, one of which is handed to the
principal, who notes its contents and hands it over to the teacher
concerned; the other is retained by me and filed for future reference.
By this means it is hoped to secure a better check-up on work done.
In conclusion I wish to thank you, Sir, the principals and the
teachers for the co-operation given me during the year 1922.
Respectfully submitted,
;^^^p|^^   CHARLES H. SCOTT,   gH
Supervisor of Drawing.
I 88
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
HMHiliii    ATTENDANCE   REPORT.
Vancouver, B. O,
December 27th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools.
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—I have the honour to submit the annual report of
the Attendance Department for the year  1922.
During the year 6,463 cases were investigated, as follows:
January, 635; February, 802; March, 1,044; April, 503; May, 606;
June, 469; September, 501; October, 659; November, 667; December, 577. Five thousand eight hundred and twenty-three cases were
dealt with.
Aberdeen   192
Alexandra  131
Bay view   5
Beaconsfield  71
Cecil Rhodes  278
Central  294
JHiffl Charles Dickens   120
Dawson      379
Fairview  160
Florence Nightingale   99
.fe^^ll Franklin   104
General Gordon  17
Grandview  196
Hastings  113
iHHHiBTTpnrv Hudson ....;  281          r;-
^^yjf Kitsilano  100
Laura Secord  35
Livingstone    54
Hn^H Nelson j  94
£HB| Roberts  132
flP|Ma Macdonald   213
i|B&: Mount Pleasant  309
Seymour              701
Simon Fraser  168
Strathcona   804
Tennyson   198
King George High  1 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 89
Besides the above, 332 visits, of a special nature, took up
considerable time, it being sometimes necessary to call upon parents
during the evening; but I feel that the results obtained justified the
extra labor involved, as there has been an improvement in
attendance.
Many of the 40 cases found on the streets during school hours
were new arrivals in the city who were unfamiliar with the school
act of this province. In such instances parents were informed and
the children sent to school. Some were merely visitors and if their
stay was found to be of a short duration they were allowed to remain
out of school. Others were excluded from school for infectious
diseases, and in such cases were told to stay at home until all were
well. In some instances it was discovered that children from neighboring municipalities were attending city schools and such cases were
reported to the proper authorities. There were 126 cases of an infectious nature referred to the School Medical Officer.
Our records show that there were 250 cases of truancy during
the year: this is an increase of seven per cent, over the previous
year. Many of these were beyond parental control and fell into
difficulties which eventually resulted in their commitment to the
Juvenile Detention Home.
Selling of newspapers has proved the greatest cause of this
juvenile delinquency and it is hoped that some regulation regarding
newspaper selling will be enforced in order to check this evil. I
am informed that the Child Welfare Association and the Kiwanis
Club are taking up with the City Council the matter of street trading
and newspaper selling, and I would respectfully suggest the cooperation of the School Board in this matter.
Owing to the irregular attendance of their children many parents
were warned that legal proceedings would be taken to enforce compliance with the school law, and in consequence seventeen letters
of warning were issued by you on my recommendation. These usually had the desired effect of persuading the parents to have their
children attend school more regularly.
The Juvenile Court has been attended regularly during the
year.
In conclusion I wish to thank the school principals, teachers and
the various officers of the Board who have co-operated with us
and assisted us in our work.
Respectfully submitted,
i N.JENSEN,
Chief Attendance Officer. 90 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MtB/mB^^^^^^^ MUSIC.
Vancouver, B. C,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H December 28th, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—For the year ending December, 1922, I beg to submit the following report on music in our schools.
There are a few statements in my last report that are well worth
recalling, and which I feel should be the basis of my remarks on
the work carried on for the year just concluded.
Music is a serious study. Comparatively, I can say with pleasure the subject is being more intelligently recognized. It is a reality,
full of promise, encouraging, and is creating a permanently cultural
atmosphere in the school life of the students.
"We are growing musically." This is a statement one should
be proud to refer to, and for my part I am; I can assure you, Sir, I
say this with deep feeling. There is an increasing development, justifying the attention this subject is given, and while there is an occasional setback, in prospective, your staff is not lacking in support
and earnest endeavour. Had you the time to visit all the schools
at this season I am sure you would endorse what I have said. The
sound of seasonable carols was quite manifest. Very creditable programmes were featured in the closing exercises, and in many instances the standard of work was of a very high order.
a
Appreciation of Music." This is an attempt to provide real
experience and an actual touch in the realm of music. Singing and
instrumental playing is an established fact with us, but to delve into
the beauty of compositions and knowledge of composers is passing
beyond the initial stage. The result arrived at by means of this
important innovation is perhaps one of the features of this year's
work. To hear a group of students on a day when an illustration
of "Appreciation of Music" is in progress, would perhaps be an illuminative surprise.
In conjunction with this, I hope to have some experience next
year with a Music Memory Contest. In this respect we are at present at the beginning of the circle.    Undoubtedly, we have in this a BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 91
really vital project on hand. So much good music is now heard
that a plan to recognize a limited list of great compositions, with a
knowledge of the composers, is a straightforward attempt to meet a
real need. I have prepared lists for the teachers' aid, and as the
gramophones are principally responsible for the production of such
music, the library of records the schools are compiling will increase
the interest and pleasure of the students.
It is always a delight to speak of orchestras in our schools, and
while these are not developing just as rapidly as one could wish,
the possibilities are encouraging, and I am hoping, during the coming
year, to increase the number until we have in every school its own
orchestra.
It would be a remissness of duty if I did not mention the work
that is being carried on in the high schools. At present I visit only
the King Edward and Kitsilano High schools. It is there that
advanced singing is conducted, and I am convinced of the importance of music in the students' life as an influence in character
building and in sowing the seeds of nobler aspirations of life.
I wish to say in closing that Miss Chadwick, my assistant, and I
fully appreciate the interest you have taken in our work, and the
thoroughly whole-hearted support given us by your staff of principals and teachers.
Respectfully submitted,
:'^^^^^H|^|^|'F. W. DYKE,   |j§f|
Supervisor of Music. W/K^^^        I MUSIC   REPORT.  f'
Vancouver, B. C,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^m December 29th, 1922.
F. W. Dyke, Esq.,
Supervisor of Music,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir:—The following is my report on the music of the
junior grades for the year ending December 31st, 1922:
There are 195 teachers in this department. Ten per cent, of
these possess music qualifications, eighty-five per cent, have just
sufficient to carry on the work, while five per cent, exchange classes
with other teachers for the music period.
In nearly every case the work is done conscientiously, and it is
gratifying to notice a gradual improvement, not only in sight reading and ear tests, but in tone as well.
From September 7th to October 13th, classes for the new
teachers and others who desired help, were held twice a week after
school hours, under my direction, at the School Board Office Building. Thirty-five teachers were enrolled. At the last meeting the
following very kindly brought their pupils and demonstrated what
they had accomplished during the first month:
Mrs. D. Bradbury, Receiving Class, Kitsilano School.
Mrs. C. G. Heaslip, First Primer Class, General Gordon School.
Miss E. S. Snider, First Primer Class, Henry Hudson School.
Miss M. F. Pullen, Second Primer Class, Aberdeen School.
Yours respectfully,
^^^^^^^^^^tf CLARA CHADWICK>
Assistant Supervisor of Music. BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
93
NIGHT   SCHOOLS.
Vancouver, B.C.,
December 31st, 1922.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Sir:—The following is a report of the work of the
Department of Night Schools for the year ending December, 31,
1922:— f
Attendance  Analysis.
Subject. Teacher.
Music  1   Mrs.  Knight-Hodge
Music  2    Mrs.  Knight-Hodge
Music  3   F.  W.  Dyke  	
Music  3    F. W.
Elocution    Miss
Public Speaking Miss
Printing  L,. A.
Chemistry    E. M.
Accounting   W. K.
Plumbing    J. G.
Navigation    'Japt.
Engineering    Capt.
Mathematics  g.  L.
Drafting  T. G.
Sheet  Metal   j.
Mach.   Const.   1 L.
Mach.   Const.   2 L.
Elec. Eng.  2 v.
Elec. Eng.  3 |p
Elec.  Eng.  1 W
Ignition    E.
Wireless  J.
Machine   Shop    H.
Carpentry  T.
Continuation Work 1.. J.
Continuation Work 2.. T.
Eng.  for For L.
French    L.
Life Drawing  C. H.
Elementary Drawing..S.   P.
Design
Dyke  	
H. Badgley—
H.   Badgley.-.
Elliott	
White 	
Beech 	
Morgan 	
Williamson-
Williamson.-.
Miller  	
Sinclair 	
Fraser 	
B. George  	
B.  George 	
J. Bartholomew..
J. Bartholomew..
A. Smelser 	
A. Cole	
T. Allan 	
A.   Jones	
Chippendale   	
Lockington   	
Lockington   	
Beddard	
Beddard 	
Scott 	
Judge
Ferguson 	
Simpson  	
IT.  F.  Hall	
E. A. Coleman
Thomas 	
 r\  C.
Elementary Drawing.-F.  J.
Elementary Drawing..Miss
Applied Art  Miss
Show  Card    F.  F.
Cabinet Making  C   Rickard  	
Shorthand  2   Miss D. Browning-
Shorthand  1   T.   Black   —	
Typing   Miss  M.  A.   Shaffer
Penmanship    R. W. McKenzie
Bookkeeping  L.
Bookkeeping  W
Arithmetic  "Q.
English  p;
Millinery   Mrs.
Dressmaking    Mrs.
Welch	
C. Glenesk	
R.   McLean	
R.  McLean.. -
2. M. Jackman
Russell and
Miss   Turville
Ladies' Tailoring  Mrs. K. C. Russell-
Cookery    Mrs. W. H. Squire-
Totals 	
Initial
Final
Class
Student
Enroll.
Enroll.
Hours.
Hours.
14
14
24
276
10
10
24
258
63
73
16.5
588
32
36
15
307.5
14
17
11
148
17
24
11
191
21
21
44
860
10
11
44
438
38
40
44
1,628
9
13
46
512
5
8
44
258
14
14
46
514
12
17
44
572
8
14
44
512
10
16
44
524
13
16
46
676
8
7
44
314
19
20
22
422
11
9
24
202
49
52
44
1,030
25
25
46
566
8
9
46
376
19
20
68
872
17
18
90
684
15
26
44
1,024
27
43
46
1,098
15
22
46
742
24
17
44
742
* 14
15
44
412
12
20
44
782
8
9
44
320
20
22
30
510
20
23
30
592.5
6
5
44
208
10
19
24
350
16
22
46
684
7
19
44
494
26
25
44
964
43
43
88
1,470
34
45
42
672
10
15
44
560
55
67
90
2,500
27
32
46
1,420
19
30
44
938
35
35
46
678
33
33
44
1,382
16
16
46
714
19
19
24
360
957
1,126
2,019.5
3,2374 94 BOARD OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES
New Classes.
The two new classes opened this year are Advanced Accounting
and Printing. Both had an excellent enrollment from the beginning,
and the attendance has been well maintained throughout the term.
The classes outlined above have been held at the following
schools:
Aberdeen School.
Music, Elocution and Public Speaking.
Technical High School.
Printing, Chemistry, Advanced Accounting, Plumbing, Navigation, Engineering, Mathematics, Drafting, Sheet Metal Work,
Machine Construction and Drawing, Electrical Engineering, Ignition, Wireless Telegraphy, Machine Shop Practice, Carpentry and
Woodworking.
School Board  Office Building.
French, English for Foreigners, Continuation Work, Life
Drawing, Design, Elementary Drawing and Show Card Writing,
Applied Art.
King Edward High School.
Cabinet Making, Shorthand, Penmanship, Bookkeeping, Commercial English, Commercial Arithmetic, Millinery, Dressmaking,
Ladies' Tailoring", Cookery.
Advance in Fees.
At the beginning of the term the Board of School Trustees
found it necessary to advance the fees for admittance to several
of the classes and the result has been a falling off in the aggregate
attendance. Several classes, however, have a larger attendance this
year than they have had in previous years, and I am rather inclined
to think that the size and general popularity of the various classes
depend in a greater degree upon the personality and teaching ability
of the instructor than upon a small increase of $5 for six months'
tuition. Where we have been able to secure expert and enthusiastic
teachers, we have had no complaints from students regarding
tuition fees.
r
is BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 95
Recommendations.
If possible more work should be provided along the lines of
Dressmaking, Ladies' Tailoring and Millinery. More than 100
applicants for these courses had to be turned away, because we had
no room for them.
A regular high school course in our evening schools would attract a large number of men and women, who desire to improve
their general education. Such subjects as History, English Literature, English Composition and Short Story Writing would prove
very popular.
In conclusion, I again wish to thank the Members of the Board
of School Trustees, the Secretary of the School Board, the Municipal Inspectors and the large body of City Teachers who have
assisted me in every way possible to make the Evening School a
success.
Yours respectfully,
;^^^^^^^fc. W. K. BEECH,
Director of Night Schools. 96
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE FOR 1922.
Enrolment.
January  18,791
February  19,676
March  19,623
April  19,400
May     -  19,244
June    -  18,678
September    -  19,306
October    19,485
November  19,317
December   ;  18,808
Enrollment for the month of October
Year. Enrolment.
1910         9,942
1911 1    11,385
1912   12,393
1913   12,990
1914   13,313
1915   13,183
1916    .....    13,805
Average
Attendance.
Percentag
17,364.58
92.4
17,892.66
90.42
17,526.57
89.31
17,746.53
91.47
17,892.55
93.07
17,668.60
94.05
18,254.66
94.54
18,188.85
93.34
17,876.54
92.54
17,049.80
90.65
h year since
1910
for each
Year. Enrolment.
1917     15,069
1918     15,849
1919     16,955
1920     17,933
1921  19,053
1922     19,485
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver staff in December for each year
since  1915
December, 1915
December, 1916
December, 1917
December, 1918
Men.
88
85
89
91
December, 1919  112
December, 1920  108
December,  1921   120
1922   129
1922  128
December,
December,
Special  Instructors  employed  by  the  Board,
Instructors  of  Manual  Training  	
Instructors of Domestic Science 	
Music  Instructors  	
Cadet,   Physical  Drill  and Musketry  Instructor  	
Instructress in  Physical Drill  	
Supervisor of Primary Work 	
Special  Classes  	
Worker 	
Women.
266
254
297
335
344
356
390
407
407
1922:
T
Supervisor of
Social Service
Psychologist
Supervisor of
Supervisor of
Supervisor of
Supervisor of
Drawing  	
Manual Training
Sewing  	
Domestic Science
Teachers in Night School Classes
Special Officers Employed by the Board:
Municipal Inspector of Schools  *	
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools 	
Director of Night Schools 	
Medical  Health   Officer  	
Dentists   	
Nurses 	
Attendance   Officers   	
otals.
354
339
386
426
456
464
510
535
535
19
15
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
38
1
1
L
1
4
10
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of Certificates,
December 31st,  1922:
University Graduates in Arts and Science 	
A ni dcMi i r Certificate   	
First-Class  Certifiicate      _'.	
Second-Class Certificate 	
Third-Class  Certificate   	
Commercial Specialist  g	
Commercial  Assistant    :...■...;.....	
Drawing Specialist
Temporary       	
Technical   	
38
17
4
4
3
2
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^^^^^p^^ty^coHpqKr^WMHi-s 98
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
§| LIST  OF  TEACHERS,
Appointed Prior to January 1st, 1922,
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment.
Name.
Aberci
Aberci
Adam,
A1 lard
Allen,
Allen,
Amos,
Anders
Anders
Anders
Annan
Anstie
Armst
Armst
Astle,
Certificate. Date of Appointm
 2nd    September,
 January,
ombie,  Mildred 	
•ombie,   W.   T	
Jessie W	
yce,  Catherine M	
Maude A	
Muriel  E	
Maude  A	
son, Margaret C	
son,  Mary K	
5on, Mary L	
d, Margaret A 1st ..September,
,   Jane  K 1st    August,
rong, Mary D 2nd   September,
rong,   W.  G M.A August,
Mabel C 2nd   March,
.. B.A	
»1st    November,
..2nd    January,
- 1st    February,
-2nd   September,
-2nd   August,
..2nd    January,
-B.A August, 1908, and August,
1st    September,
Bain,  Nellie  1st  August,
Baird, Marion L 2nd   September,
Balkwill.  Alice  M 2nd   August,
Bampton,   Louise    1st    February,
Banting, A. D. B.A January,
Barker,  Amy   2nd September,
Baron.  Mrs. Edith   2nd   April,
Barnard, Mrs. Ethyl M 2nd   April,
Beattie,  Hester E M.A August,
Beech, W. K M.A., B. Paed August,
Bell, Edna B M.A August,
Bell.  W.  S B.A October,
Bennett. Illma L 2nd    October,
Berry,   Edith  L -2nd  November,
Bettes, Freda G 2nd    February,
Betts.   Ooris J -2nd    February,
Bigney, Anna L 1st    August,
Bigney,  Elizabeth  M 1st    ... January,
Bissett,  Vera   M 2nd     December,
Blair, Elizabeth J 1st    August,
Bodie,  Helena    B.A September,
Bodie, Isabel A.  B.A August,
Boldrick Helena E 1st February,
Bollert, Lillian G B.A January,
Bolton, Dorothea B B A February,
Bolton, Grace A B.A February,
Bossons, Ellen  2nd     April,
Bower,   Mabel    2nd   August,
<
Boyer, Ethe
Boyes, F. C
Bradbury,
Bragg, T.
Brennan,
Bridgman
Brinton,
Brock,
Brown,
Brown,
Brown,
Brown,
Browne
Bruce,
Brundr<
M
Mrs
Uyc(
Clara M.
Jffie S.
Lucy A. M.
Gertrude
Harriet W.
i   ttlmer .
W.  H.
, Lauri€
Graham
■w   Lyla
ii
Dorothy
11. ..........
, 2nd   August,
, 1st    ....- August,
.2nd   February,
, B-Sc September,
.1st  September,
Commercial    August,
W
Brunton   i.u iu
Bryant.  S. J.
Bryant, Winnifred
...1st
...2nd
-1st
...2nd
...B.A.
-2nd
.M.A
-1st
-2nd
-2nd
-1st
...2nd
January.
Bu
lianan, Christina Academic
August,
 September,
 January,
 August,
..August,
1898; October,
 August,
 \ugust,
...February,
..August,
 November,
  February,
 August,
ent.
)19
)18
>19
)21
)17
)21
)12
)21
>12
)21
)13
)06
)21
)13
)08
)08
)19
)11
♦ 17
)16
)20
)13
)18
)12
J12
Hi 9
)19
)18
)18
)21
)19
)09
)13
)16
HI
)19
,14
)20
)16
)19
114
)20
Ml
ilT
Ml
)18
)20
)21
)13
)13
| l'ii
Hi
H2
)12
)15
HI
K'S
)12
.20
)15 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
99
Name.
Buckerfield,
Certificate
Date of Appointment.
Katherine E.
nd
orua i'v
Buckley, John M 1st    September. 1921
Burke, Mrs. Thomas  Special    „ May, 1916
Burris, Grace D M.A .: August. 1917
Busby, Grace E 2nd February. 1921
Cahill,  Hattie M 1st   	
Cain, Florence M.  2nd   ■■:. ..t»-:..
Cairns,   Kate    2nd    ~...
Cairns,   Laura    2nd
Cairns,   Mabel   .-;.. 2nd  	
Calbick, Isabel C  .      1st
Caldwell, Sada St. Claire  _'b.A	
Callander,  M.   M.  Grace   —.2nd 	
Cameron, C. Alice  M.A	
Cameron,  Ella G.   B.A	
Cameron,  Margaret M. B B.A	
Cameron,  May  2nd   	
Campbell,  Jessie L 1st          ..October,'
Campbell.  Lila C 1st     February,
Capon,   Maud   1st    September,
Carruthers,   Bertha M B.A,  February,
Caspell,   Edmund    1st    August,
Cattell,  Dorothy  1st  January,
 2nd   January,
.September,
.September,
 January,
 January,
 August,
 August,
.September,
.September,
 August,
.September,
...February,
..November.
Cattell.   Margaret 	
Chadwick, Beatrice A 1st ..March.
Chandler,  Dorothy G 2nd    January,
Chandler, Florence A 2nd   August,
Chapin, Florence B B.A January,
Chappell, Kate L 2nd    February,
Chasteney, Kathleen N 2nd   February,
Chippendale,   Thomas    Manual Training   September,
Chodat,   Henri    M.A September,
Christie, Isabell S 2nd    January,
Chute,  C.  C 1st    August,
Clark, Angus   1st    August,
Clark,   G.  W M.A January,
Clarke,   T.  V 1st.  August,
Close,   Florence   J 1st    August,
Close, L. Laurina - 1st    August,
Code,  Lome B B.Sc August,
Cole,  Josephine A 1st    April,
Collier, Lucy E. M 2nd   February,
Connor, C. F M.A.,   B-T> September,
Cook, Eva 1st.  January,
Coombs, Mrs. Florence A B.A January,
Corbett,  Jennie N 2nd     September,
Corkum, C. H B.A January,
Coughlin,  Marjorie 1 2nd    January,
Coulter,  Beatrice M 2nd    February,
Cowan,  E.  Mabel   2nd    ...> August,
Cowan, Susie 1 2nd   August,
Cowie.  Margaret C 2nd    November,
Cox,  Bessie W 1st   September,
Crake, Edith F 2nd   September,
Creelman,   Amelia    B.A August,
Creelman,  Jean   2nd    September,
Cronkhite,   A.   M B.A October,
Crowe, C. B B.A August,
Crowe,  Eunice   1 2nd   September,
Cunningham, Mary B 1st  September,
Darling,   Gordon   B Sc
Davidson, Lucretia F
Davis, Sarah J	
Dawe, Mvrtle F	
Dew is, Martha E	
Dickinson, Marie E. .
Dobson, F. H	
Donomy, "violet M. ...
Donaghy, Florence I.
Dorer, Mabel 1	
Dorman, Marietta A.
1st ..
2nd
1st
B.A.
2nd
.Sep
"Sep
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
No
"."pi
Fel
tember,
August,
tember,
ibruary,
August,
vember,
August,
jbruary,
anuary,
..April,
>ruary,
1912
1921
1910
1913
1914
1917
1917
1921
1909
1921
1920
1920
1902
1919
1918
1918
1899
1904
1911
1921
1914
1913
1917
1921
1921
1912
1918
1919
1909
1902
1918
1917
1912
1912
1910
1911
1920
1917
1910
1909
1921
1919
1920
1920
1911
1908
1914
1921
1919
1910
l!i lit
1911
1913
1920
1921
1921
1910
1919
1919
1911
1919
1907
1918
1917
1921
1917
1 100
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name.
Dove,   A.   J	
Downs, Gertrude M. .
Duffus,   Catherine   M.
Duke,  Alma M	
Duke, Alzina I	
Dunbar, John 	
Dunmore, Mary H. ...
Dunning, J.  T	
Duthie, Ellen P	
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
Dyke, Kathleen A 2nd
..B.A January,  1920
..2nd    September,  1921
..1st     February,  1918
..2nd   September,  1920
..2nd   August,  1917
-B.A August,  1912
..2nd October,  1917
-M.A, August,   1906
-2nd    November,  1916
 August,  1907
Eldridge, Dorothy C 2nd    January,
Elliott, Lewis A Temporary    September,
Elliott, Kathleen E 1st    September,
Elliott,  Margaret   2nd  March,
Elmsly, Ada B 1st  November,
Estabrooke, Emma D B.A January,
Evans, A. R M.A August,
Evans, C. R 1st  November,
Evans,  Eleanor  .1st     : August,
Evans, Nellie D. 2nd   August,
Evans, W. E B.A September,
Fairey, Francis  Manual  Training    January,
Fallows,   Marjorie  H Academic  September,
Fallows, Muriel P 2nd   August,
Faunt,  Edith    1st    August,
Featherstone, Gladys K 2nd    January,
Fee,  Wilfrid  J M.A August,
Ferguson, Mary J — B.A August,
Fergusson, G. A B.A August,
Findlay, Marjorie L 1st September,
Fisher, Anna S. 2nd   February,
Fisher, Jessie E. R 2nd    January,
Fitch,  H.  B M.A.,  B.Sc August,
Fletcher,   Bruce    2nd September,
Fletcher, Elizabeth E 2nd    August,
Flett,  Wm M.A January,
Ford,  Luvia   2nd    January,
Forster,  Clara C 2nd   September,
Fountain, Sarah A B.A September,
Frame, Emma M 1st August,
Fraser, Annie E B.A August,
Fraser,   John Temporary   September,
Frith,   Elsie    2nd    January,
Gait, Isabel C 2nd   September,
Gamble,  Ellen E 2nd    February,
Gamey, H. T 1st    April,
Gamey,  H. W 1st  January,
Gibbs, Edith  3rd    February,
Gordon,   J	
Gosse, Sarah G	
Gourlie,  Wm.  G.  ...
Graham, Christina
Graham,   Muriel  K
Graham,  Rita  R.   .
Grant, E.  S	
Fanny  I.   ...
Rena V. A.
M.
Grant,
Grant,
Grant,
Grant,
Winnifred A 2nd
.M.A September,
.2nd     October,
.B.A August,
.2nd    September,
.2nd    February,
.2nd    February,
.1st    May,
.2nd  December,
.B.A September,
August,
Wm.   E	
Grantham, Vera C	
Greggor,   Agnes  A	
Grenfell, Mary E	
Gross,  Alice  S B.A.  February,
Guest, Mrs. W. E 2nd    January,
.B.A September,
.2nd   February,
B.A February,
B.A August,
Hall.   J.  H	
Hall,   Unina  F	
Halliday,  Mrs. Minnie E.
Harding,  Mrs.   J.  M.  H.
Hardwick, Margaret S. ~
•B.  Litt August,
.Art September,
-1st   October,
-2nd    January,
.Academic  October,
1908
1921
1921
1908
1900
1913
1917
1907
1907
1914
1918
1912
1919
1914
1913
1921
1912
1912
1913
1921
1920
1908
1912
1921
1893
1912
1912
1921
1917
1909
1917
1921
1906
1919
1919
1918
1918
1917
1920
1920
1907
1920
1920
1919
1920
1907
1920
1915
1918
1920
1918
1909
1920
1920
1911
1921
1919
1913
1921 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
101
Name.
Harvie, Janie A	
Haughton,  Agnes ..
Haviland, Ida I	
Heaslip, Mrs. Clara
Hemsworth, E. A	
Henderson, Rachel C
Henderson,   Winnifred
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
G.
C.
. md   August
.1st August
3rd  - November
.2nd    February
.1st    August
.1st    September
2nd   September
Henry, A. O. Edna  M.A September
Herd, Alice B .G.
Herd. Henry D.
Herd, Isabella J.
Herd, Mary B. F.
Hewton, Ina E. ..
Hewton. Sara ..—
Hillis, Beryl A 2nd
Holden, Catherina J.
Honeyman,   Helen  M.
Hood,   Lily H	
Hooper, Myra C	
.2nd    February
Academic    January
2nd   September
2nd .February
2nd   February
2nd    .1898-1900;   August
.January
Horner, Bertha M Temporary
2nd   January
2nd    November
Ind   February
2nd  August
Hotchkiss, A
Houston, Mrs
Houston,
Howard,
Howard,
Howell,
Hudson,
Hughes,
Hughes,
Hunter,
D.
S. E. ..
Mrs. W. F...
Phoebe M. .
F.  Mabel  S.
.September
.M.A September
3rd   December
1st    .August
2nd    January
Academic  October
Lucy MacL M.A January
Lucy M 2nd September
Annie    1st    January
Gladys T 1st    February
Ellen C B.A April
Inkman,  Lilias
Innes, Mary W.
I. A.
E.  ...
?nd    February
1st September
Jackman, D.  S M.A .....September
Jamieson, Annie B B.A January
Jewett,   F.  Arnold    B.A August
Johnson, Emily May
Johnston,
Johnston,
Johnston,
Johnston,
Johnston,
Johnston,
Bessie    1st
Mrs. Dorothy  1st
2nd  October
D. B.
Mrs. Mabel C 2nd
.March
.April
B.A January
.1901-1903:   January
2nd   : September
2nd February
.2nd  1891-1911; August
1st September
Margaret L	
Marion  F	
Johnstone,  Marion B	
Jones,   Grace  F	
Jones,  Harry A Manual  Training         August
Jones, Mary  Commercial Assistant ....September
Jones, Nellie M 2nd December
Jopling,   Mary A , 1st    v.. January
Judge,  S. P   - Art -...August
Jukes,  Marian E 2nd March
Keith, Mrs. Lillian A.
Kelly,  Bertha  M.   ..."....
Kersey. Robert R	
King, H. B	
 1st  ^ February
 2nd January
 M.A September
 B.A January
Kioh, Gertrude A.  Academic    September
Laird,   Edna  J lst—1906-1908; 1909-1911; January
Lamb, Elvie D  B.A - February
Langley, Celia G Academic  August
Laursen, Lili J 1st    August
 2nd  November, 1904; January
 .....1st    - August
 2nd    - February
.. .1st  February
 1st  February, 1900; April
 1st    September
Ledingham, Helen 1 2nd    September
Leith,  Mrs. T Academic    1896-1902;   January
Lewis, Alice M 2nd   August
Lewis, Vera M Academic    August
Lawrence, Edith M	
Lawrence, Frederick J.
Lawrence, Ida V	
Lawrence,  Olive  B	
Leach, Mrs. Jean P	
Leah, Constance M	
1917
1912
1916
1921
1910
1920
1920
1921
1917
1916
1919
1921
1918
1908
1921
1918
1919
1919
1917
1917
1919
1921
1916
1916
1916
1915
1920
1912
1921
1920
1921
1921
1918
1907
1909
1912
1891
1917
1902
1916
1918
1920
1914
1913
1917
1916
1917
1921
1917
1911
1919
1914
1921
1904
1921
1913
1920
1906
1905
1916
1910
1921
1921
1914
1918
1921
1914
1905
1916 102
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name.
Lister,
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
M.
J.   George  Manual   Training October
 2nd        February
 B.A — ...January
 1st I January
  1st  January
 1st  - February
  :.. 2nd - December
Litch,  Annie
Little, D. C	
Logan,   Clement
Loggie, Annie M.
Louden, Helen E.
Lusk, Marion L.
Maggs, A.  B — M.A - August
Marr,  John  MA August
1st - September
2nd    - January
2nd   - September
2nd   — - September
Marriage, F. T	
Marshall, Elsie M	
Martyn,  Anna  L	
Matheson, E.  Corinne 	
Maxwell, Mary E 1st      — August
Mayers, F. J S. B.A November
Maynard, Catherine E B.A February
Maynard,  Margaret 17. .1 B.A - February
 B.A August,   1911;   January
 1st January
 — B.A - August
 2nd    - January
  2nd  -   September
 B.A August
 1st - February
Mills,   Sadie   1st    October
Meadows, Stanley D. ..
Mellish, Winnifred E. I
Messinger,   Clarence   R.
Middlemiss,   Edith	
Millar, Eva 	
Miller,  S. L ]	
Milley, Myrtle E	
Mitchell, M. "Vv
Moodie,   S.   F.   M.   ....
Moody,  Margaret H.
Moore, Mrs. Grace J
Moore, Isabel 	
Morris,  Verna E.   ...
Morrison, A. B	
Morrow, A. E	
Moscrop,  Ethel 1st
Munro,  Elizabeth 2nd
Murphy,  Eva B.
Murray, Christine T.
McAdam, Guy J.
McAlpine,
McArthur,
MacBeth,
Macaulay,
McCallum,
McCarthy,
2nd   September
B.A August
B.A August
2nd   1914-1918; November
2nd September
B.A January
B.A January
B.A    September
September
....January
Sara     2nd
.  Helen  M	
Mary  S	
Vida  I J	
Daisy J	
Mrs. Nina L	
McCartney, Verna A	
McCreery,   Paul   L	
McCrimmon,   Mrs.   Constance  G	
McCusker,  Dorothy V	
MacDiarmid,   Katie    B.A
MacDonald,  Christina 2nd
1st     ..January
1st    August
M.A August
.August
2nd   September
2nd   September
B.A February
2nd   September
2nd    January
2nd February
B.A August
2nd    February
2nd February
 January
 February
McDonald,  Edna C 2nd   August
McDonald. Gertrude E ^ 1st     January
MacDonald, H. Lucretia  1st    September
McFarland, Cora H.  B.A January
Macfarlane, Rachel M 1st   1894-1909;  February
McGillivray, Marjorie R 2nd    September
McGown,  Jessie  H 2nd   .September
McHeffey. Jessie  2nd   February
Maclntyre,   Beatrice
MacKay,   Geo	
McKay, Minna G	
McKay,  M. Helen ....
McKay, Sadie E	
Mackechnie,  Flora  ..
McKee,  George  E.
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie,
MacKenzie.
A  1st    August
 M.A August
 2nd  March,  1891; August
 2nd November
 2nd    ...January
 2nd    February
 B.A May
Christina A 1st   October
G.  W	
Grace   	
Mary E	
Olive  B.  	
Rowan W	
B.A September
1st August
.B.A August. 1908; September
. 2nd   September
.1st  September
1903
1920
1906
1917
1911
1921
1921
1910
1917
1918
1913
1920
1913
1908
1907
1920
1918
1914
1917
1909
1916
1920
1913
1919
1912
1918
1914
1909
1919
1921
1921
1921
1918
1919
1915
1913
1913
1911
1900
1919
1921
1918
1917
1920
1917
1916
1921
1921
1912
1911
1906
1913
1910
1911
1916
1921
1920
1917
1912
1911
1912
1917
1920
1920
1905
1916
1918
1908
1918
1918
1921 BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 103
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
MacKenzie,  Winewood  F B.A ...August, 1912
MacKinnon, Catherine P Academic September,  1921
McKinnon, Mary  2nd    ... January,  1897
McLean,   Adelaide M 2nd October,  1916
McLean, D. R 2nd September,  1915
Maclean,  Grace  C 3rd    September,  1919
McLeish, Kathleen  1st March,  1913
McLeish, W.   Y B.Sc September,  1920
Macleod, Hazel E B.A January,  1912
McLeod,  Margaret A 2nd    February,  1921
McManus, Edith M 2nd   September,  1919
McManus,   Glenna  H 2nd    January,  1919
MacMillan,  Mary R 2nd August,  1915
McNeely, Hanna E M.A.      September,  1917
McNeill, Hazel  1st January,  1918
McNiven, Catherine  B.A August.   1914;   September,  1919
McNiven,  Margaret   B.A.  January,  1915
Macpherson, Annie 2nd   September, 1920
Macpherson,  Mary 2nd    August,  1915
MacQueen, Elizabeth D B.A December, 1907
MacQueen, Emma H.  - B.A September,  1921
McQueen, Kate H B.A   January,  1911
McTavish,   Janet  L.  E Academic     January,  1917
McWilliams, Jean  2nd    February,  1919
Neate,  Winifred   2nd   February, 1921
Neill,  Mrs. E.  B.  Stewart  1st August, 1908
Neill, Muriel  Stewart  2nd   August, 1915
Nesbitt, William  J 1st  | August, 1913
Nicholson, Eleanor B 2nd   September, 1920
Noble,  Alice L 1st  February, 1920
Noble, Mary K 2nd   September, 1921
Noble, Maybelle C 2nd    February, 1918
Northrop,   H - B.A January, 1920
Nowlan,  Lena M  B.A.     January, 1921
O'Connell,   Lillian  M 2nd    January,  1921
O'Neil,   Margaret  A. 1st September,  1919
Ogilvie,  David M.A August,  1915
Olding,  Elizabeth  2nd    January,  1902
Ormond,  Agnes  2nd   September,  1921
Paget,  Harry L 1st    October,  1912
Painter,   Emily    2nd    January,1909
Palmer, May L 2nd    January, 1921
Parker, Ernest W Manual  Training August,  1911
Parkes,  Jessie F.  B 2nd   September, 1918
Patrick, Georgia H 3rd    February,  1917
Patrick, Grace A 2nd     - January,  1916
Patterson. Jean  .M 1st    ..> - January,1907
Pattison, Thomas    M.A September,  1921
Pearson,  Ethel M 2nd    ...January,  1911
Perkins,  Alice G 1  1st  September,  1912
Perkins, Ella D -B.A August, 1905: April, 1911
Pollock,  James  R 1st   — August, 1910
Potter,   Agnes 2nd    September,  1921
Potter,   Elsie    2nd     December,  1920
Prescott.  Muriel E  2nd   February, 1919
Pullen, Mabel F  2nd    January,  1921
Purdie, A. J. Grosvenor          B.A August,   1912
Putnam,  Walter  . B.Sc - August,  1917
Pye, Annetta E  2nd    - February,  1920
Pyke,   Agnes  M 2nd  - May,  1920
Quigley,   Mrs.  Edith K. 2nd    January,  1920
Ramage,  Wm.   G  B.A August,   1912
Rand, William L B.A .....August,  1914
Reid, Annie M 2nd     December,  1917
Reid,   Elmer  W        .   ...B.A January,  1916
Revelev, Ethel H. 2nd     October,  1912
Richards, A. E 2nd  May,  1920
Rines, Alfred  1st    - August, 1908
Wm 104
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointn
Roberts,   T.   H B.A August,
Robertson, Hugh M B.A September^
Rollston, Eva J B.A February,
Ross, A. W M.A.    January,
Ross, Carrie E 2nd    September,
Ross, Ellen D 1st    February,
Ross, Lillian A 2nd    January,
Ross, Lillian M 1st    August,
Ross, Willow C Temporary     September,
Rowan, Bessie E 2nd    January,
Roy,   Elsie    2nd    January,
Roy,   Henrietta   1st    September,
Roy, Jessie  1st    September,
Russell,  Mrs. Agnes G 2nd     September.
Russell,  Isabel  R 2nd   January,
Stonehouse. Gladys M.
Straigh
St uart,
Stuart,
Suggitt
Suter,  R.
Sut hcrlanc
Sutherlan<
;,  R.
Dorothy ]
James A.
Maizie
I. W	
Alexander
Evelina J.
A.
Sutherland,  Jeanne   11
Tait, Albert
Tait. Edytlu
Tanner
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Temple
B	
• (j	
Rebecca 	
Edna M	
Grace A.
Helen M	
L.   W.
Mar gua r e t ta
Minnie	
. Mrs. Jean
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
.2nd
Salter,  Mildred E 2nd
Sanders, Bernice C. A 2nd
Sanderson, J. R M.A.,
Saunders, M B Acad
Scott.  Irene M 2nd
Selman, G.  S B.A.
Sewell,  Eunice  A 1st
Shaneman, Mrs. Isobel D  B.A.
Sharman,   Isabelle   	
Shearman, A. E	
Sheepy,   Janet  	
Sherman,  R.  S	
Shine, Mrs. Alice G	
Shook.   Edith  L.	
Shore,  Alma  M	
Simpson, Eleanor M 2nd
Simpson, Jean B 2nd
Sinclair, Annie M M.A.
Sinclair, J. Q Acad
Sinclair,  Madge P 2nd
Skelding, Cecil H 1st ..
Smith, Annie M B.A.
Smith.   Lillian  L.   B.A.
Snider, Emma S 2nd
Sparling, R 1st....
Spencer, Agnes  1st
Splan,  Mary E 3rd
Spouse, Mrs. Margaret  1st
Stables, N< Hie T 2nd
Starratt,   Mary  L B.A.
Steeves, R. P 1st
Stephens, Emma L 1st ~
Sterns, Clara M B.A.
Stevens, Gladys, E 1st
Stone.   Mabel  W.  1st
 2nd
 1st
 1st
 B.A.
 B.A.
 B.A.,
 M.A.
M Acad
 2nd
 January,
 January,
,   Ph.D August,
emic    August,
 September,
 August,
 September,
 January,
 November,
 January,
 August,
 February,
 April,
 September,
 February,
 August,
 February,
 September,
emic    August,
 August,
 September,
 September,
 September,
 1904-1909;   August,
Aug., 1891; Aug., 1893; August,
 August,
 January,
 September,
 February,
 February,
 January,
 January,
 August,
 August,
 February,
 September,
 August,
 September,
 January,
 February,
B.Sc October,
 August,
emic    September,
 September,
M
s
-M.A August,
.. 2nd     January,
..2nd      August,
.. B.A.     October,
..Academic    August,
..2nd     ^.^. September,
..B.A August,
..2nd    September,
..1st    August,
..1st    August,
ent.
110
21
120
)09
920
912
ill
til
)21
,18
117
)20
119
120
918
910
)17
)14
(06
)18
)16
)21
)20
>20
)16
til
)03
903
)21
)21
117
tl8
til
110
110
)21
921
)20
)12
100
)12
113
)21
>12
19
[t
)13
)10
HI
ill
)14
)20
)07
)21
)13
118
)02
)16
)20
)20
915
920
900
917
910
920
913
921
ill 4
911 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
105
Name.
Tees,  Percy  C	
Thomas,  C.  C	
Thomas,  Owen J	
Thompson.  Edith E.   .
Thompson, Lillian M.
Thompson, Nora K. ...
Thomson,  Hazel M.  ...
Tom,   Gregory H	
Townsend, Agnes M. .
Certificate.
Date of Appointment.
.B.A September
.2nd    October
.B.A August
.2nd October
.1st    August
Academic    February
1st     January
.1st  1891-1911; August
.2nd    February
Truswell, Mary  1st    August
Tucker, Julia E ..1st     January
Tucker
Turner,
Winifred
Janet  C.
M.
,2nd    October
.1st    February
Vining, A. W M.A., Dr. Univ. of Paris August
Warne,   Feme    Academic    August
Warner, Gertrude  1st     February
Warner, Mabel A 2nd August
Weismiller,  Ethel M 2nd     April
Whelan,  A. E. Lyle  Commercial   Specialist   —February
White, Edward M B.Sc September
Whitworth,   Marjorie    2nd   January
Wickett,  Evelyn    B.A January
Wilkinson, Amie F.  ...
Williams, Florence E.
Williams, Maude A 1st
.1st    August
2nd   September
 November
Williamson, Dorothy K	
Williamson, Jessie E. M	
Willson,  Ruth  T	
Wilson,   F.   C —
Wilson,   Janet    2nd
Wilson, M.  Rosalind  1st
2nd September
2nd     August
2nd February
B.A   January
March
January
Wood,  Berton J	
Wood, Grace B	
Woodhead,   Thomas
W.
Yeo,  Emsley
Young,  G.  P.
L.
.B.A.,   B.Sc October
. 2nd     September
Academic August
B.A September
1st    - January
1921
1919
1911
1917
1917
1918
1921
1915
1918
1899
1913
1917
1914
1917
1917
1914
1912
1920
1921
1921
1917
1997
1917
1920
1918
1919
1914
1920
1908
1916
1913
1906
1919
1908
1921
1913
DOMESTIC SCIENCE.
Allen, Mabel D September, 1919
Bell,   Adna   M August, 1912
Berry,   Elizabeth   August, 1905
Canty,   Sara W —- September, 1921
Day, Marjorie September, 1921
Dickinson,   Bessie  S.   .. September, 1920
Hope,  Mrs. Edith  _ October, 1921
Lee, Phyllis J }....—- September, 1921
Malcolm,   Etta    September, 1921
Murray, Donna —- September, 1920
McEwen, Agnes E - February, 1917
Rhoads, Etta B August, 1917
MANUAL TRAINING.
Cameron,   C   A September, 1918
Campbell,   A — September. 1918
Cantell, A January,  1910;  September. 1919
Crabb, Charles ... ii February, 1920
Cross,  N.  Y October,   1915;  August, 1917
Gardner, N. H January, 1908
Harris,  F.   J October, 1917
Kill,  William A : - September, 1910
Jones, A. W August, 1917
Kitchen, Charles H October. 1921
Michelmore,   A.   J September, 1918
McAdam, Josiah W January, 1912
McCallum,  D. P August, 1913
McKeown, William A August, 1903
Northrop,    S August, 1903 106
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Tcmpler,  F. W August, 1913
Tingley, A.   P August, 1914
Williams, A  August, 1914
Wilson,   Wm September, 1918
Woodcock, William  K September, 1921
SUPERVISORS AND  SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS.
Bundy, A. C Physical Culture, Cadets and Musketry
Cfi,ntelon,  Jean M Social   Service Worker
Chadwick, Clara  Assistant Supervisor of Music
Cotsworth, Lena K.        (January to June)  Physical Culture
Dauphinee, A. Josephine  Supervisor of Special Classes
Dyke, F. W Supervisor of Music
Huggard, Mrs. Ada C Supervisor of Sewing
Kerr,  Ruby A .. Psychologist
Trembath, Emily J Supervisor  of Primary Work
Scott,  Charles H Supervisor  of Drawing
SCHOOL MEDICAL AND  DENTAL STAFF.
Wightman, R., M.D (January to  September)   School Medical Officer
Wilson,  Belle H.,  M.D Assistant School Medical Officer
Hogg, Margaret P., M.B.,  Ch.B Assistant School Medical Officer
Fallen, R. L., D.M.D School Dentist
Scott,  N. H..  D.M.D Assistant School Dentist
Loveridge, W. A., D.D.S. .Assistant School Dentist
Bezeau, F.
Sproule, W
Breeze,  Elizabeth  G.  ...   ..Head Nurse
Bellamy, Mrs.  D Nurse
Campbell.   Mary  P Nurse
Ci uickshank, Mamie K Nurse
Hodson,  Elaine   Nurse
Jukes, Harriet  Nurse
McLellan.  Aletha Nurse
Schultz. Mrs. M. D Nurse
D.D.S Assitant School Dentist
C,  D.M.D — Assistant School Dentist
G.
Smith, Isabell
Stevens, Vera
Alderson, Mrs.
1 • i ydone-Jack,
McDonagh, D.
Worley. Mrs.
 Nurse
B Nursi
G. C Dental Attendant
Audrey    -— Dental Attendant
N Dental Attendant
A. ....Dental Attendant
ATTENDANCE  OFFICERS.
Jensen, N	
Mulholland. A. S.
..Chief Attendance Officer
Assistant Attendance Officer
Borland, A Assistant Attendance Officer BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 107
LIST OF TEACHERS
Appointed or Reappointed in 1922.
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
1. Adams, Dorothy I B.A  September,  1922
2. Alexander,   Wilhelmina   0 2nd     September,  1922
3. Baird,   Margaret 1 2nd    September,  1922
4. Baynes, Thomas S 1st   February,  1922
5. Beaton,   Sylvia 1st  September,  1922
6. Bell, Margaret S 2nd     February,  1922
7. Bennett,  F.  N B.A.,  B.Sc    September,  1922
8. Brenchley, Dorothy A. B B.A    September,  1922
9. Bricknell,   Ada   — Temporary    September,  1922
10. Brown, L. B B.  Sc  January,  1922
11. Brundrett, Mary E 2nd   January,  1922
12. Buckerfield, Jessie M 2nd     September,  1922
13. Bunn,  Beth M 2nd   September,  1922
14. Carscadden, Ruth A 2nd    September,  1922
15. Carson, Miriam B B.A  February,  1922
16. Caspell, Edmund V 1st   September,  1922
17. Clarke, N. M 1st   September,  1922
18. Clement, Elsie B B.A    September,  1922
19. Clogg, Alice E Temporary    September,  1922
20. Coombs,   Marjorie   L 1st   September,  1922
21. Cornell, Dorothy E 2nd   April,  1922
22. Cox,   Stafford A B.A May,  1922
23. Curtis,   Isobel   2nd    September,  1922
24. Davis,  Ivy G 2nd    September,  1922
25. Dixon,   Caroline    2nd ■   April,  1922
26. Doriot, Yvonne  Modern Language  Specialist-Sept.,  1922
27. Duke,  Edna L 2nd    September,  1922
28. Edwards, Sadie  B.A  February,  1922
29. Ewan,   Mary   2nd   February,  1922
30. Fordyce,  Stuart  1st   February,  1922
31. Fournier,   Eugenie  I B.A .    January,  1922
32. Gerhart, Annie E 1st   September,  1922
33. Gow,  Lillian H 2nd    September,  1922
34. Hanna,  Evelvn C Academic   January,  1922
35. Hardwick,  Dorothy W.  G 2nd    September,  1922
36. Harper, Kathleen E 1st   September,  1922
37. Hazlitt,  Nellie M 2nd   May,  1922
38. Healy, Agnes C B.A    January,  1922
39. Heaslip,  Leonard W B.A   May,  1922
40. Herd, Elizabeth B. G 1st   September,  1922
41. Hewett. Glenna M. M 2nd      January,  1922
42. Hobson,   Lillian B B.A    January,  1922
43. Howey, Elsie M 2nd    September,  1922
44. Hurst, Flora E - 1st   September,  1922
45. Hutcherson,  Winifred  E 2nd    February,  1922
46. Irvine, Florence A B.A    February,  1922
47. Jameson,   Doris    Temporary    September,  1922
48. Johnston,  Henrietta E 1st   September,  1922
49. Knowlton, Kathleen B 1st   September,  1922
50. Langridge, Marion H 1st   September,  1922
51. Lineham, Helen M 2nd     September,  1922
52. Livingstone,  Edward R 1st   May, 1922
53. Lockhart, William L Academic      September,  1.922 1C8 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
54. Martin, Harold  1st   September,  1922
55. Mathers,   Nina    B.A i    February,  1922
56. Matheson, Marjorie C. B.A    January,  1922
57. Matheson, Mary E 2nd   September,  1922
58. Mason,   Carol 2nd   February,  1922
59. Miller, Elinor S 2nd   -   February,  1922
60. Moore. Ellen V 1st   September,  1922
61. Morgan, William  B.A    September,  1922
62. Munro.  Muriel  R B.A    January,  1922
63. McAfee, Irene B.A    September,  1922
64. MacBeth,  Jessie A .. B.A    January,  1922
65. McClay,   Adeline   F. 1st   September,  1922
66. Macdonald, Genevieve M 2nd   April,  1922
67. McDonald,  Greta V 2nd  ..   September,  1922
68. McDowall, Jessie  ..B.A.    September,  1922:
69. McKee, Greta Hope  B.A    September,  1922
70. McKenzie, Leila M 1st   September,  1922
71. McLean ,Erma V 2nd  —   February,  1922
72. McLeod, Mrs. Alice C 2nd    September,  1922
73. Nicholson,   Angus  A 1st   September,  1922
74. Northrop,   Harold    B.A  1920-1921;  September,  1922
75. Partington, Margery E. ...1st   February,  1922
76. Penny,  Isabella  M Temporary    September,  1922
77. Read, Marion G Temporary     February,  1922
78. Sibley,  Harbel M 1st       September,  1922
79. Sillers,   Myrtle  A.  E B.A    February,  1922
80. Simpson,   Margaret  S 1st  January,  1922
81. Smith, Ella M -2nd   September,  1922
82. Smith, Zella B 1st  September,  1922
83. Standen,   Alice  E 1st  September,  1922
84. Stewart,   Clara    Temporary     February,  1922
85. Stewart, Isabel P 1st   September,  1922
86. Stirk,   Louie B.A    January,  1922
87. Ware,  Deighton R 1st   September,  1922
88. Wiegand, Elsa M 2nd     February,  1922
89. Wilkinson, Reginald E B.A    January,  1922
90. White, Vera V 1st       September,  1922
DOMESTIC   SCIENCE.
1. Black,   Rae,  M January,  1922
2. Duncan, Victoria M September,  1922
3. Grant, Mary  — January,  1922
4. Maynard, Margaret E 1918-1921;  September,  1922
5. McKenzie,   Doris   H January,  1922
6. Pope,  Marion A.  B September,  1922
7. Rath,   Martha    —- May,  1922
8. Smith, Isabel C September,  1922
MANUAL  TRAINING-.
1.    Wishart,  A September,  1922
SUPERVISORS   AND   SPECIAL   INSTRUCTORS.
1.    McEwen, Mary G Supervisor of Sewing
Wright, Hilda M Physical Instructress
O
n
6,
SCHOOL  MEDICAL   AND  DENTAL  STAFF.
White. J. Harold, M.D School Medical Officer
Shields, Dorothea M Nurse N.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
100
BOARD OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
Vancouver,  B.  C,  192
OO
Salary Schedule.
PUBLIC SCHOOL SALARIES.
Grades.
Year.
s
o
bo
CO -rH
rH"-1
O
PI
<» 02
<P    r*
m
Sh
Principals.
02
U -rH rH  A
•-"'     rH CO
h>Ps WW
$1,800 $2,400
1,920 2,520
2,040 2,640
2,160 2,760
22,80 2,880
*2,400 	
(head nurse)
02
bo o
rH    r\
TO  O
First       $1,320
Second         1,380
Third         1,440
Fourth          1,500
Fifth          1,560
Sixth      1,620
Seventh        1,680
Eighth        1,740
Ninth        1,800
Tenth   	
$1,140       $1,620       $1,200
1,200
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,500
1,560
1,620
1,680
1,760
1,900
2,040
2,180
2,320
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,500
1,560
1,620
1,680
1,740
$2,520
2,640
2,760
2,880
3,000
3,120
3,240
3,360
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020
for the first year, and $1,080 for the second year of successful teaching; men
teachers with First Class Certificates, without experience, if employed, will be
paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the first and second years of satisfactory service.
( * )   For teachers holding First Class or Academic Certificates.
Salary Schedule.
HIGH  SCHOOL   SALARIES.
Year.
Assistants.
Men. Women.
Manual
Training.
Domestic
Science.
Principals.
First      $2,030
Second     2,170
Third     2,310
Fourth     2,450
Fifth      2,590
Sixth      2,730
Seventh     2,870
Eighth     3,010
1,750
$1,750
$1,470
$3,300
1,890
1,890
1,610
3,440
2,030
2,030
1,750
3,580
2,170
2,170
1,890
3,720
2,310
2,310
2,030
3,860
2,450
2,450
2,170
4,000
2,590
2,590
2,730
2,310
2,730
One-tenth of the annual salary is paid at the close of each teaching
month. No schedule increase will go into effect without the same being
recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher  may be fixed at
schedule by special resolution of the Board.
a  sum not indicated in the
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the Board up to 20 teaching days
(ten for each term) in cases of illness of teachers; also for 3 days in cases
of bereavement in a teacher's family and for compulsory quarantine. 110
BOARD  OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
BOARD  OF  SCHOOL TRUSTEES.
Vancouver,  B.  C,  1923.
Salary Schedule.
PUBLIC  SCHOOL   SALARIES.
Year.
Grades.
i
i        s
First      $1,320
Second        1,380
Third   ..     1,440
Fourth        1,500
Fifth        1560
Sixth         1,620
Seventh -     1,680
Eighth        1,740
Ninth        1,800
Tenth   	
1,200
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,500
1,560
1,620
1,680
bo
a 5
r3     C
U
H
1,760
1,900
2,040
2,180
2,320
•3
o
o
H    rH
S &
>Z 'rH
O o
02
<V
m
u
3
Principals.
$1,140  $1,620  $1,200
1,260
1,320
1,380
1,440
1,500
1,560
1.620
1,680
1,860
02
ft »
O "rH Cl r*H
rt   ^ S     0
$1,800 $2,400
1,920 2,520
2,040 2,640
2,160 2,760
2,280 2,880
*2,400	
(head nurse)
02
o'o
bO o
U rfl
H^W
$2,520
2,640
2,760
2,880
3,000
3,120
3,240
,360
Lady grade teachers without experience, if employed, will be given $1,020
for the first year, and $1,080 for the second year of successful teaching; men
teachers with First Class Certificates, without experience, if employed, will be
paid $1,200 and $1,260 respectively for the first and second years of satisfactory service.
( * )   For teachers holding First Class or Academic Certificates.
Salary Schedule.
HIGH  SCHOOL  SALARIES.
Assistants.
Year. Men. Women.
First      $2,030 $1,750
Second     2,170 1,890
Third  2,310 2,030
Fourth     2,450 2,170
Fifth      2,590 2,310
Sixth      2,730 2,450
Seventh     2,870 2,590
Eighth     3,010 2,730
Manual
Training.
Domestic
Science.
Principals.
$1,750
1,890
2,030
2,170
2,310
2,450
2,590
2,730
$1,470
1,610
1,750
1,890
2,030
2,170
2,310
$3
,300
O
O,
440
580
o
O
720
O
860
4,000
One-tenth
month.     No
of
teaching
the  annual  salary  is  paid  at  the  close  of  each
schedule   increase   will  go  into   effect  without   the   same  being
recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
- The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a  sum not indicated in the
schedule by special resolution of the Board.
Salaries of substitutes will be paid by the Board up to 10 teachin
(five for each term)  in cases of illness of teachers; also
of bereavement in a teacher's family and for compulsory
Teachers may
sick leave, but not
for all or part of
serious  illness.
accumulate  50% of the days allowed
days
for 3 days in cases
quarantine.
them  each year for
used, up to thirty teaching days; an dextended sick leave
the accumulated period will be allowed them  in case of BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
111
Vancouver, B.C.,
1st March, 1923.
The Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B.C.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Macaulay and Gentlemen:—
1. I have the honour to hand you herewith Financial and
Statistical Statements for the year ending 31st December, 1922.
2. (a) The City Council, in view of the Trustees reducing
the Revenue Estimates for the year 1922, approved of the following
appropriations for Capital purposes:
$15,000.00- - New School Sites
$30,000.00 New School Buildings
$22,500.00 Furniture and Equipment
(b) Out of the above appropriations the new school site
bounded by Denman, Barclay, and Bidwell Streets and the lane, was 112
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
purchased by Agreement of Sale, the first instalment of $10,000.00
(of the total price of $40,000.00) being paid.
(c) Nineteen new temporary class rooms were erected and
necessary furniture and equipment purchased. After making due
allowance for completion of buildings started in 1922, and for the
equipment of same, it is expected that the sum of approximately
$25,000.00 will be available for 1923 Capital Account. This saving
is due to the increase in school population being smaller than was
estimated.
3. (a) Revenue Expenditure shows a satisfactory decrease
on the principal items of supply, in spite of the increase in school
population and the number of buildings operated.
(b) Although the amount spent on Repairs and Renewals
for 1922 shows an increase on the amount spent in 1921, the money
is well spent in maintaining the value of School Board property.
(c) It is satisfactory to state that the total expenditure on
Revenue Account for the year 1922 shows a considerable saving
on estimates.
4. It is hoped that the passing of the School By-law for $25,-
000.00 for the purchase of school sites in the Grandview District
is an indication that the ratepayers are beginning to realize the ill
effects resulting to Vancouver by their neglect of educational facilities for the past ten years.
I have the honour to be, Sirs and Madam,
Your obedient servant,
B. G. WOLFE-MERTON,
Secretary. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 113
STOCK   STATEMENT   FOR   YEAR   ENDING
31st  DECEMBER,   1922.     J|
School Supplies.
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921  ..$13,455.91
Purchased during 1922  $17,737.68
Less paid for 1921 Stock        240.49
 17,497.19
$30,953.10
Issued during 1922  19,440.94
Stock on hand 31st December, 1922 $11,512.16
Janitors' Supplies.
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921  ......$ 3,422.45
Purchased during 1922  \     9,171.21
|l                                                                   .   $12,593.66
Issued during 1922   10,800.40
Stock on hand 31st December, 1922  $ 1,793.26
Repairs and Renewals.
Stock on hand 31st December, 1921  $     807.34
Purchased during 1922     4,235.01
$ 5 042 35
Issued during 1922     3^61028
Stock on hand, 31st December, 1922  $ 1,432.07 114 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
EXPENDITURE ON   REVENUE  ACCOUNT  TO
31st   DECEMBER,   1922.
Salaries—
Municipal Inspector and Assistants    $   8,520.00
Assistant Municipal Inspector..      3,600.00
?B          >                                  $ 12,120.00
Secretary and Assistants   10,920.00
Building Departmen  9,000.00
Medical Department  18,568.20
Dental Department   9,075.00
Attendance Officers  4,920.00
Night  Classes--Director  720.00
Storekeeper  1,800.00
Chauffeurs  2,980.00
Telephone Operator   797.25
t  $    70,900.45
Salaries—Schools-
Teachers $927,130.60
Teachers, Substitutes      11,487.00
55 #  938,617.60
Supervisors        22,315.40
Manual Training     45,576.40
Domestic Science      20,884.00
1   1,027,393.40
Janitors    $ 80,230.81
Janitors, Substitute        2,833.90
83,064.71
Auditor   699.96
Supplies—General School—
Schools    $ 54,55.2.96
Domestic Science       3,120.38
Manual   Training        1,464.14
Medical Department        1,604.82
Dental Department          799.72
61,542.02
Carried I orward   $1,243,600.54 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 115
Brought Forward   $1,243,600.54
Miscellaneous—
Janitors    -.$    9,827.46
Fuel     29,883.06
Electric Light, Power and Gas     10,736.29
Water       2,138.50   -
Insurance         1,851.25
Advertising  182.56
Printing  518.35
Telephone       2,888.61
Auto Expense       5,320.85
Scavenging   563.34
Car Fares       2,026.80
Office Expenses       4,307.85
Renting and Leasing      11,262.50
Contingent    566.65
1 |    H            82,074.07
Repairs and Renewals      114,767.45
$1,440,442.06
Less Sundry Credits and Non-resident Pupils' Fees....       12,352.55
$1,428,089.51
Special Revenue—
New School Sites  $ 10,044.00
New School Buildings      22,391.58
Furniture and Equipment      10,145.12
    . -|    42,580.70
"!'"'- $1,470,670.21
Sinking Fund and Interest       213,432.52
§ $1,684,102.73
I certify that the above Statement is in accordance with the
City Hall Books, as well as the School Board Records.
JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A.
Auditor.
E. G. MATHESON, Chairman.
B. G. WOLFE-MERTON, Secretary.
Vancouver, B.C., 6th February, 1923. en
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i 122
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
LIGHT,  POWER, GAS,  WATER AND  FUEL
ANALYSIS FOR 1922.
Schools.
Light and
Power.
Gai=s.
Water
Coal and
Wood.
Oi
Total.
King  Edward   .- 884.82 437.59
Central     223.97 97.51
Dawson | 419.76 12.06
Strathcona    338.78 50.24
Mt. Pleasant   455.14 6.50
Fairview   140.55 3.00
Roberts    302.77 67.68
Seymour    391.30 27.96
Model   136.29 105.85
Kitsilano   133.01 10.28
Grandview  104.88 7.62
Macdonald     95.40
Simon  Fraser  .... 306.81 56.37
Aberdeen     272.39 95.87
Britannia     572.85 53.24
Alexandra   354.32 115.96
Tennyson     203.29 41.40
Nelson    220.68 67.36
Cecil   Rhodes   .... 241.33 —
Beaconsfield     213.29 —
Hastings   130.95 —
Grenfell      — —
F. Nightingale  197.68 153.18
General   Gordon.. 177.72 16.15
Henry  Hudson  .. 334.62 156.46
Livingstone    95.27
Laura   Secord  .... 114.74 —
Charles Dickens.. 91.01
Franklin      51.73 —
Bayview     53.00 56.77
King  George    241.14 15.03
Office   431.90 21.77
Kitsilano High .. 67.23 13.22
Technical     937.72 105.36
Block 70    5.52 —
112.50
90.00
45.00
171.00
63.00
67.50
99.00
90.00
63.00
54.00
49.50
45.00
45.00
45.00
72.00
45.00
1 45.00
72.00
45.00
60.90
96.60
54.00
54.00
67.50
54.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
24.00
21.00
36.00
45.00
172.00
63.31
831.37
87.80
232.43
1,119.09
276.48
1,076.07
873.54
927.97
453.98
497.82
329.52
954.46
1,976.48
2,182.80
1,165.86
668.25
200.83
1,139.75
39.18
144.44
25.97
653.41
213.10
281.46
695.50
Id i . I •>
362.61
464.05
623.89
305.14
07 r/r
6 i. to
O t. 16
559.30
83.81
35.94
2,055.30
1,164.84
830.28
1,145.46
782.12
1,024.08
935.34
771.12
402.44
933.24
3,474.70
1,242.85
2,747.42
1,958.31
1.643.73
487.53
1,545.52
1,382.80
1,233.11
651.27
659.82
469.92
1,362.64
1,081.51
2,954.22
1,655.03
1,493.71
1,334.76
1,431.79
1,082.28
880.96
213.10
1,710.40
943.37
1,631.67
511.88
623.79
759.90
401.87
942.64
277.17
949.84
684.75
2,232.13
101.46
8,941.86
1,794.43  2,138.50  14,513.70
15.369.36
42,757.85 N*.
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 123
INDEX.
Attendance:— H Page.
Average  (School)       96
Attendance of Trustees at Meetings   4
Board of School Trustees :—
List of, 1886-1922  6
List of, year 1922  4
'     List of, Year 1923  -- \  5
Chairman's Address  %  8
Committees (Standing) :—
Year 1922     4
Year 1923  j |  5
Dental  Staff  106
Enrolment:—
M   Year,   1922  96
Years 1912 to 1922 in October   96
Light, Power, Gas, Water, Fuel, Analysis for 1922  122
Medical Staff   106
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees   5
Officials, 1923 5 and 106
Principals, names and Telephone Numbers  97
Reports:—
Attendance  88
Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools   30
Auditor , ....114  and 115
Building Committee   18
Dental  Department   |  49
Drawing     85
Home Economics Department    78
Management Committee  12
Manual Training Department  76
Medical Inspection of Schools  38
Municipal Inspector of Schools  21
Music  | 1  90
Night Schools  93
Nursing Staff \  43
Observation Class  53
Physical Training, Cadets and Rifle Teams    62
Primary Work  73 124 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Page.
Psychological  Department    51
School Sports   83
Secretary  -  HI
Sewing  82
Social Service Work   54
Special Classes  57
Revenue Account,  1922   114
Revenue Expenditure, Analyzed, for 1913 to 1922   116
Revenue Expenditure, Analyzed, for 1922   118
Revenue Expenditure, Showing Cost per Capita   120
Salary Schedule, 1922  | \  109
Salary Schedule, 1923  110
Schools—Name, Location, Number of Divisions   97
Stock Statement   -   - 113
Supervisors and Special Instructors, List of   106
Teachers:—
Their Certificates and Dates of Appointment  98
Number Each Year Since 1915   96
Number of Special Teachers and Officers  96
Number Holding Different Grades of Certificates   96
Domestic Science and Manual Training   105
Appointed in 1922  107
Value of School Property  119
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
Trustees      2
Teachers from Other Parts of the Empire  3
Champion Football Team   15
Champion Grass Hockey Team   16
Gordon, J. S  21
Medalists for 1922  25
Brough, T. A  30
White, Dr. Harold  38
Pallen, Dr. R. L  49
Work of Special Class Pupils  57 and 59
Wolfe-Merton, Major B. G  Ill  I \liM
it
"J.
t<J>A 

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