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Bibliography of the Salishan languages Pilling, James Constantine, 1846-1895 1893

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Array SALISHAN LANGUAGES 
JAMES  CONSTANTINE  PILLING
,
WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1893  SMITHSONIAN   INSTITUTION
BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIRECTOR
BIBLIOGRAPHY
OF THE
SALISHAN LANGUAGES BY
JAMES  CONSTANTINE  PILLING^
I
WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1893  
LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology. Catalogue of linguistic manuscripts in the library of the Bureau of ethnology. By
James C. Pilling.
In Bureau of ethnology first annual report; half-title as above p. 553, text pp.
555-577, Washington, 1881, royal 8°.
Issued separately with cover title as follows:
Catalogue | of | linguistic manuscripts | in the | library of the Bureau
of ethnology | by | James C. Pilling | (Extracted from the first annual
report of the Bureau | of ethnology) | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1881
Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title as under entry next above p. 553,
text pp. 555-577, royal 8°.    One hundred copies issued.
Smithsonian institution—Bureau of  ethnology | J. W.  Powell director | Proof-sheets | of a | bibliography | of | the languages | of the
| North American Indians | by | James Constantine Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) |
Washington | Government printing office | 1885
Title verso blank 11. notice (signed J. W. Powell) p. iii, preface (November 4,1884)
pp. v-viii, introduction pp. ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii-xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text pp.
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090, index of languages and dialects pp.
1091-1135, plates, 4°. Arranged alphabetically by name of author, translator, or
first word of title. One hundred and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side of
the sheet only.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Eskimo language | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (April 20,1887) pp.iii-v,
text pp. 1-109, chronologic index pp. 111-116, 8 fac-similes, 8°. An edition of 100
copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director | Bibliography | of the | Siouan languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette] I
Washington | Government printing office | 1887
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1 preface (September 1, 1887)
pp. iii-v, text pp. 1-82, chronologic index pp. 83-87, 8°. An edition of 100 copies
was issued in royal 8°,
III
I
ft
\ 
IV     LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY.
Smithsonian inst i t ution   Bureau of et 111 lology: J. W. Powell, director
I Bibliography I of the I Iron uoian languages I by I James Constantine
O XT       xJ JL O O O
Pilling I TYignettel
CD ^D
Washington | Government printing office I 1888
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (December 15,1888) pp.
iii—vi, text pp. 1—180, addenda pp. 181—189, chronologic index pp. 191—208,9 fac-similes,
8°.   An edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology: |. W. Powell, director
| Bibliography | of the | Muskhogean languages | by | James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette]
Washington I Government printing office I 1889
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (May 15,1889) pp. iii-v,
text pp. 1-103, chronologic index pp. 105-114,8°. An edition of 100 copies was issued
in royal 8°.
Bibliographic notes | on | Eliot's Indian bible | and | on his other
translations and works in the | Indian language of Massachusetts |
Extract from a "Bibliography of the Algonquian languages" | [Vignette] | >)    4
Washington I Government printing office I 1890
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. text pp. 1-58, 21 fac-similes,
royal 8°. ITorms pp. 127-184 of the Bibliography of the Algonquian languages, t itle
%of which follows.   Two hundred and fifty copies issued.
Smithsonian institution   Bureau of ethnology: J. W.Powell, director
I Bibliography I of the I Algonquian languages I by I James Oonstan-
tine Pilling | [Vignette] |
Washington | Government printing office | 1891
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 11. preface (June 1,1891) pp. iii-iv,
introduction p. v, index of languages pp. vii-viii. list of facsimiles pp. ix-x, text
pp. 1-549, addenda pp. 551-575, chronologic index pp. 577—614, 82 facsimiles, 8°. An
edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institution   Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director
Bibliography I of the I Athapascan languages I by I James Constantine Pilling | [Vignette]
Washington I Government printing office I 1892
Cover title as above, litle as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii—iv, preface (June 15, 1892) pp.
v—vii, introduction p. ix, index of languages pp. xi—xii. list of facsimiles p. xiii, text
pp. 1—112, addenda pp. 113-115, chronologic index pp. 117—125,4 facsimiles, 8°. An
edition of 100 copies was issued in royal 8°.
Smithsonian institn t ion   Bureau of ethnology: J. W. Powell, director
Bibliography I of the I Ghinookan languages I (iucludingthe(1hinook
Jargon) j by I James Constantine Pilling I | Vignette] I
Washington | Government printing office I 1893
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliographies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-iv, preface (March 1(>, 1893) pp.
\ -viii, introduction p. ix, index of languages p. xi. list of facsimiles p. xiii, text pp.
1-76, chronologic index pp. 77-81,3 facsimiles, 8°. An edition of 100 copies was issued
in royal 8°. PREFACE.
Of the numerous stocks of Indians fringing the coast of northwest
America few have been as thoroughly studied or their languages so
well recorded as the Salishan. As early as 1801 Mackenzie published
a short vocabulary of each of two dialects of this stock, and a glance
at the chronologic index appended to this catalogue will show that additions or reprints have been made at short intervals ever since. The
more modern efforts of Gibbs, Hale, Eells, Gatschet, Tolmie, Dawson,
and Boas, especially those of the last named, have resulted in the collection of a body of material which has enabled us to differentiate the
dialects of this family of speech to a degree more minute than usual.
The knowledge gained from the studies of these gentlemen, and from
those of others, also, has greatly extended our information concerning
the geographic distribution of these people. Quoting from Major Powell's article on the Linguistic Families of North America in the seventh
annual report of the Bureau of Ethnology:
The extent of the Salish or Flathead family was unknown to Gallatin, as indeed
appears to have been the exact locality of the tribe of which he gives an anonymous
vocabulary from the Duponceau collection. The tribe is stated to have resided
upon one of the branches of the Columbia River, u which must be either the most
southern branch of Clarke's River or the most northern branch of Lewis's River."
The former supposition was correct. As employed by Gallatin the family embraced
only a single tribe, the Flathead tribe proper. The Atnah, a Salishan tribe, were
considered by Gallatin to be distinct, and the name would be eligible as the family
name; preference, however, is given to Salish.       *       *       *
The most southern outpost of the family, the Tillamook and Nestucca, were established on the coast of Oregon, about 50 miles to the south of the Columbia, where
they were quite separated from their kindred to the north by the Chinookan tribes.
Beginning on the north side of Shoalwater Bay, Salishan tribes held the entire northwestern part of Washington, including the whole of thePuget Sound region, except
only the Macaw territory about Cape Flattery, and two insignificant spots, one
near Port Townsend, the other on the Pacific coast to the south of Cape Flattery,
which were occupied by Chimakuan tribes. Eastern Vancouver Island to about
midway of its length was also held by Salishan tribes, while the great bulk of their
territory lay on the mainland opposite and included much of the upper Columbia
On the south they were hemmed in mainly by the Shahaptian tribes. Upon the
east Salishan tribes dwelt to a little beyond the Arrow lakes and their feeder, one
of the extreme north forks of the Columbia. Upon the southeast Salishan tribes
extended into Montana, including the upper drainage of the Columbia. They were
met here in 1804 by Lewis and Clarke. On the northeast Salish territory extended
to about the fifty-third parallel. In the northwest it did not reach the Chilcat
River.
m PREFACE.
Within the territory thus indicated there is considerable diversity of customs and
a greater diversity of language. The language is split into a great number of dialects, many of which are doubtless mutually unintelligible.
The relationship of this family to the Wakashan is a very interesting problem.
Evidences of radical affinity have been discovered by Boas and Gatschet, and the
careful study of their nature and extent now being prosecuted by the former may
result in the union of the two, though until recently they have been considered
quite distinct.
With the exception of the Ghinookan family the Salishan dialects
have contributed a greater number of words to the Chinook jargon
than have any other of the languages of the coast—so many indeed
that it was a question whether the literature of the jargon should not
be included herein. This has not been done, however, except in the
case of those books and papers which distinctly mark the Salishan
elements entering into the composition of the jargon; this course being pursued because a list of the jargon literature appears in the Bibliography of the Ghinookan Languages.
This bibliography embraces 320 titular entries, of which 259 relate
to printed books and articles and 61 to manuscripts. Of these, 311
have been seen and collated by the writer (257 prints and 54 manuscripts); titles and descriptions of two of the prints and seven of the
„ manuscripts have been obtained from outside sources.
As far as possible, in the proof-reading of these pages comparison
has been made direct with the works themselves. Much of the material is in the library of the writer, and he has had access for the purpose to the libraries of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, the
Bureau of Ethnology, Georgetown University, as well as several well-
stocked private collections in the city of Washington. Mr. Wilber-
force Eames, whose library is so rich in Americana, has compared the
titles of works contained therein, as also those in the Lenox Library,
of which he now has charge.
Washington, B. C, June 24, 1893. INTRODUCTION
In the compilation of this series of catalogues the aim has been to
include in each bibliography everything, printed or in manuscript, relating to the family of languages to which it is devoted: books, pamph-.
lets, articles in magazines, tracts, serials, etc., and such reviews and
announcements of publications as seemed worthy of notice.
The dictionary plan has been followed to its extreme limit, the subject and tribal indexes, references to libraries, etc., being included in
one alphabetic series. The primary arrangement is alphabetic by
authors, translators of works into the native languages being treated as
authors. Under each author the arrangement is, first, by printed works,
and second, by manuscripts, each group being given chronologically;
and in the case of printed books each work is followed through its
various editions before the next in chronologic order is taken up.
Anonymously printed works are entered under the name of the author,
when known, and under the first word of the title not an article or
preposition when not known. A cross-reference is given from the first
words of anonymous titles when entered under an author, and from the
first words of all titles in the Indian languages, whether anonymous or
not. Manuscripts are entered under the author when known, under
the dialect to which they refer when he is not known.
Each author's name, with his title, etc., is entered in full but once,
i. e., in its alphabetic order. Every other mention of him is by surname and initials only, except in those rare cases when two persons of
the same surname have also the same initials.
All titular matter, including cross-reference thereto, is in brevier; all
collations, descriptions, notes, and index matter in nonpareil.
In detailing contents and in adding notes respecting contents, the
spelling of proper names used in the particular work itself has been
followed, and so far as possible the language of the respective writers
is given. In the index entries of the tribal names the compiler has
adopted that spelling which seemed to him the best.
As a general rule initial capitals have been used in titular matter in
only two cases: first, for proper names; and second, when the word
VII
W
= VIII
INTRODUCTION.
actually appears on the title page with an initial capital and with the
remainder in small capitals or lower-case letters. In giving titles in the
German language the capitals in the case of all substantives have been
respected.
When titles are given of works not seen by the compiler the fact is
stated or the entry is followed by an asterisk within curves, and in
either case the authority is usually given.
=SS INDEX  OF   LANGUAGES
Page.
Atna  1
Belacoola.   See Bilkula.
Bilechula.   See Bilkula.
Bilkula  3
Bilqula.   See Bilkula.
Catoltq.   See Komuk.
Chehalis        14
Chihalis.   See Chehalis.
Clallam.   See Klallam.
Coeur d? Alene.   See Skitsuish.
Colville.   See Skoyelpi.
Comux.   See Komuk.
Cowitchen.   See Kawichen.
Cowlitz.   See Kaulits.
D wamish ,        16
Flathead.   See Salish.
Friendly Village        22
Kalispel        34
Kaulits         34
Kawichen         34
Kilamook.   See Tilamuk.
Klallam   .        35
Komuk         35
Kowelits.   See Kaulits.
Kuwalitsk.   See Kaulits.
Kwantlen        35
Kwinaiutl         35
Liloeet.   See Lilowat.
Lilowat        41
L'kungen.   See Songish.
Lummi         44
Nanaimoo.   See Snanaimuk.
Nehelim         48
USTeklakapamuk.   See Netlakapainuk.
Ketlakapamuk        48
Nicoutemuch.   See Mkutamuk.
ix
1 ~l
X
INDEX  OF LANGUAGES.
Page.
Mkutamuk        49
Mskwalli        49
Msqualli. See Mskwalli.
M)oksahk. See Miksahk.
M)osdalum. See Klallam.
Ksietshawus.   See Tilamuk.
Miksahk        49
Kukwalimuk         49
Misdalum.   See Klallam.
Miskiletemh.   See ISTukwalimuk.
Misulph         49
Okinagan ,        50
Pend d'Oreille.   See Kalispel.
Pentlash        50
Piskwau         51
Pisquous.   See Piskwau.
Ponderay.   See Kalispel.
Puyallup        53
Queniult.   See Kwinaiutl.
Salish          55
Samish          56
Schwapmuth.    See Shiwapmuk.
Schwoyelpi.   See Skoyelpi.
Shiwapmuk ,.        60
Shooswap.   See Shuswap.
Shuswap         60
Sicatl         60
Silets         60
Skagit         60
Skitsamish.   See Skitsuish.
Skitsuish         60
Skokomish        61
Skoyelpi         61
Skwaksin        61
Skwale.   See Mskwalli.
Skwallyamish.   See Mskwalli.
Skwamish        61
Skwaxon. See Skwaksin.
Snanaimoo.   See Snanaimuk.
Snanaimuk        65
Snohomish         65
Songish         65
Spokan        65
Squallyamish.   See Mskwalli.
Squoxon.   See Skwaksin.
PHB53j ^st INDEX  OF  LANGUAGES. XI
Paga
Stailakum        66
Stalo        66
Stillacum.   See Stailakum.
Tait .-        67
Talamoh.   See Tilamuk.
Thompson River Indians        67
Tilamuk        67
Tillamook.   See Tilamuk.
Toanhuch        67
Tsihalis.   See Chehalis.
Twana        70
Wakynakane.   See Okinagan.
Winatsha.   See Piskwau.
,.
«■
t
*/ h —
LIST OF FACSIMILES.
Page.
First page of Durieu's Skwamish Prayers •  17
First page of the Kamloops Wawa  38
First page of Le Jeune's Thompson Prayers  40
Title-page of Walker and Eells's Spokan Primer  75
xin
i
•• ^^^^^,
if© BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
By James C. Pilling.
(An asterisk within parentheses indicates that the compiler has seen no copy of the work referred to.)
A.
A ha a skoaiujuts [Ntlakapmoh].    See
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Adelung (Johann Christoph) [and Vater
(J.  S.)].   Mithridates  j oder   | allge-
meine|Sprachenkunde|mit |dem Vater
Unser als Sprachprobe | in bey nahe |
f iinf hundert Sprachenund Mundarten,
| von | Johann Christoph. Adelung, |
Churf iirstl.    Sachsischen Hofrath und
Ober-Bibliothekar. | [Two lines quotation.] | Erster[-Vierter] Theil. |
Berlin, | in der Vossischen Buehhand-
lung, | 1806 [-1817].
4 vols. (vol. 3 in three parts), 8°.
Atnah-Ifitzhugh-Sund, vol. 3, pt. 3, pp. 215-
217, is a general discussion of the language of
these people and includes (p. 216) a vocabulary of
11 words (from Mackenzie) and one of 6 words
of the language spoken at Friendly Village,
from the same source.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames,
Lenox, Trumbull, Watkinson.
Priced by Triibner (1856), no. 503, 13. 16*.
Sold at the Fischer sale, no. 17, for 11.; another
copy, no. 2042, for 16*. At the Field sale, no. 16,
it brought $11.85; at the Squier sale, no. 9, $5.
Leclerc (1378) prices it, no. 2042,50 fr. At the
Pinart sale, no. 1322, it sold for 25 fr. and at the
Murphy sale, no. 24, a half-calf, marble-edged
copy brought $4.
Anderson (Alexander Caulfield). Notes
on the Indian tribes of British North
America, and the northwest coast.
Communicated to Geo. Gibbs, esq. By
Alex. C. Anderson, esq., late of the Hon.
H. B. Co. And read before the New York
Historical Society, November, 1862.
Anderson (A. C.) — Continued.
In Historical Magazine, first series, vol. 7, pp.
73-81, New York and London, 1863, sm. 4°.
(Eames.)
Includes a discussion of the Saeliss or She w-
hapmush language.
Appendix to the Kalispel-English dictionary.    See Giorda (J.)
Astor: This word following a title or Within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
in the Astor Library, New York City.
Atna:
General discussion   See Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
General discussion
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Authorities:
See Dufosse (E.)
Field (T. W.)
Latham (R. G.)
Leclerc (C.)
Ludewig (H. E.)
Pilling (J. C.)
Pott (A. E.)
Sabin (J.)
Steiger (E.)
Triibner & Co.
Trumbull (J. H.)
Vater (J. S.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Adelung (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Howse (J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Daa(L.K.)
Schomburgk(Pv. H.)
**I
SAL-
fTUlr-ij
5JC? sgagfcs:
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
B.
Baker (Theodor).   ttber die Musik | der
j nordamerikanischen Wilden J von J
Theodor Baker. | [Design.] |
Leipzig, | Druck und Verlag von
Breitkopf & Hartel. | 1882.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents 1 1. text
pp. 1-81, table p. 82, plates, 8°.
Songs with music in the Twana and Clallam
languages (from Eells in the A merican Antiquarian), pp. 75-77.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Brinton,
Dorsey, Geological Survey, Pilling.
Some copies have title-page as follows:
 tTber  die   Musik J der | nordamerikanischen Wilden. I Eine Abhandluna:
J zur J Erlangung der Doctorwurde |
an der | Universitat Leipzig j von |
Theodor Baker. |
Leipzig, | Druck von Breitkopf &
Hartel. | 1882.
Title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents and errata 11. text pp. 1-82, vita 11. plates,
8°.
Linguistic conten ts as under title next above.
Copies seen: Lenox.
Bancroft: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Mr. H. H. Bancroft,
San Francisco, Cal.
Bancroft (Hubert Howe).    The J native
races | of | the   Pacific   states | of |
North  America. | By | Hubert   Howe
Bancroft. | Volume I. | Wild tribes[-V.
Primitive history]. |
New York: | D. Appleton and company. | 1874[-1876].
5 vols, maps and plates, 8°. Vol. I. Wild
tribes; II. Civilized nations; III. Myths and
languages; IV. Antiquities; V. Primitive history.
Some copies of vol. 1 are dated 1875. (Eames,
Lenox.)
Classification of the aboriginal languages of
the Pacific states (vol. 3, pp. 562-573) includes
the Salish, p. 565.—Vocabulary (16 words) of
Bellacoola compared with the Chimsyan, p.
607.—The first three of the ten commandments
and the Lord's prayer in the Nanaimo language (furnished by J. H. Carmany), pp. 611-
612.— Comments on the Clallam, Cowichin and
the Indians of Fraser River and Thompson
River, pp. 612-613.—Comments on the Neetlak-
apamuch, conjugation (partial) of the verb to
give, the Lord's prayer with interlinear English
translation (all from Rev. J. B. Good), pp. 613-
615.—The Salish languages (pp. 615-620)
includes a general discussion, p. 616; conjuga-
Bancroft (H. H.) — Continued.
tion (partial) of the verb to be angry, pp. 616-
617; the Lord's prayer with interlinear English translation (all the above from Menga-
rini), p. 617; the Lord's prayer in Pend
d'Oreille with interlinear translations into
English (from De Smet), pp. 617-618.—General
discussion, with examples of the various Salish
languages—Skitsuish, Pisquouse, Nsietshaw,
Niskwallies, Chehalis, Clallam, Lummi, etc.,
pp. 618-620.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Brinton, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames, Powell.
Issued also with title-pages as follows:
 The | native races | of | the Pacific
states | of | North America. | By | Hubert Howe Bancroft. | Volume I. | Wild
tribes [-V. Primitive history]. |
Author's Copy. | San Francisco. 1874
[-1876]. |      H
5 vols. 8°.   One hundred copies issued.
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum, Congress, Lenox.
In addition to the above the work has been
issued with the imprint of Longmans, London;
Maisonneuve, Paris; and Brockhaus, Leipzig;
none of which have I seen.
Issued also with title-pages as follows:
 The works I of I Hubert Howe Ban
croft. | Volume I[-V]. | The native
races. | Vol. I. Wild tribes[-V. Primitive history]. J
San Francisco: | A. L. Bancroft &
company, publishers. | 1882.
5 vols. 8°. This series will include the History of Central America, History of Mexico,
etc., each with its own system of numbering
and also numbered consecutively in the series.
Of these works there have been published
. vols. 1-39. The opening paragraph of vol. 39
gives the following information: '' This volume
closes the narrative portion of my historical
series; there yet remains to be completed the
biographical section."
Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress.
Bates (Henry Walton). Stanford's | compendium of geography and travel |
based on Hellwald's 'Die Erde und ihre
Volker' | Central America | the West Indies | and | South America J Edited and
extended | By H. W. Bates, | assistant-
secretary of the Royal geographical
society; | author of 'The naturalist on
the river Amazons' | With | ethnological appendix by A. H. Keane; B, A. I
Maps and illustrations ■mm
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
Bates (H. W.) —Continued.
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1878
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Keane (A. H.), Ethnography and Philology
of America, pp. 443-561.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Eames, Geological Survey, National Museum.
 Stanford's | Compendium of geography and travel | based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | the West Indies (and | South
America | Edited and extended | By H.
W. Bates, | Author of [&c. two lines]
j With | ethnological appendix by A.
H. Keane, M. A. J. | Maps and illustrations | Second and revised edition. |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1882..
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: British Museum, Harvard.
 Stanford's | Compendium of geography and travel | based on Hellwald's
'Die Erde und ihre Volker' | Central
America | the West Indies | and South
America | Edited and extended j ByH.
W. Bates, | assistant-secretary [&c. two
lines] | With | ethnological appendix by
A. H. Keane, M. A. I. | Maps and illustrations | Third edition |
London | Edward Stanford, 55, Charing cross, S. W. | 1885
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix,
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp.
563-571, maps, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles next above.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
Beach (William Wallace). The | Indian
miscellany; | containing | Papers on the
History, Antiquities, Arts, Languages, |
Religions, Traditions and Superstitions
| of | the American aborigines; | with j
Descriptions of their Domestic Life,
Manners, Customs, | Traits, Amusements
and Exploits; | travels and adventures
in the Indian country; [ Incidents of
Border Warfare j Missionary Relations,
etc, | Edited by Wf W, ge$cji,
Reach (W. W.)—Continued.
Albany: | J. Munsell, 82 State street.
| 1877.
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank
11. advertisements verso blank 11. contents pp.
vii-viii, text pp. 9-477, errata 1 p. index pp. 479-
490, 8°.
Gatschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the
Pacific states and territories, pp. 416-447.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, British Museum,
Congress, Eames, Geological Survey, Massachusetts Historical Society, Pilling, Wisconsin
Historical Society.
Priced by Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2663,20
fr.; the Murphy copy, no. 197, brought $1.25;
priced by Clarke & co. 1886 catalogue, no. 6271,
$3.50, and by Littlefield, Nov. 1887, no. 50, $1.
Belacoola.    See Bilkula.
Berghaus {Dr. Heinrich). Allgemeiner
| ethnographischer Atlas 1 oder | Atlas
der Volker-Kunde. j Eine Sammlung |
von neiinzehn Karten, | auf denen die,
umdie Mitte desneiinzehnten Jahrhun-
derts statt findende | geographische
Verbreitung aller, nach ihrer Sprach-
verwandtschaft geord- 1 neten, Volker
des Erdballs, und ihre Vertheilung in
die Reiche und Staaten | der alten wie
der neiien Welt abgebildet und versiun^-
licht worden ist. | EinVersuch | von |
Dr Heinrich Berghaus. |
Verlag von Justus Perthes in Gotha.
I 1852.
Title of the series (Dr. Heinrich Berghaus'
physikalischer Atlas, etc.)verso 1.1 recto blank,
title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-68, 19
maps, folio.
~Ho. 17. Die Oregon-Yolker treats of the
habitat and linguistic relations of the peoples
of that region, including among others the
Tsihaili-Selesh, with its dialects, p. 56.—Map
no. 17 is entitled " Ethnographische Karte von
Nordamerika," "Nach Alb. Gallatin, A. von
Humboldt, Clavigero, Hervas, Hale, Isbester,
&c."
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology.
Bible:
Matthew Spokan See "Walker (E.)
Bible stories:
Kalispel See Giorda (J.)
Big Sam.    See Eells (M.)
Bilechula.    See Bilkula.
Bilkula:
General discussion See Boas (E.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
General discussion
General discussion
Gentes
Grammatic treatise
Humerals
$Tw»er&ls,
Tolmie (W\ E.) and
Dawson (G.M.)
'Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas iE.)
katham (JR, Q,)
^d
==
Sraggg^l BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Bilkula — Continued.
Numerals
Numerals
Relationships
Sentences
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
"Words
"Words
"Words
Words
Words
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.E.)
Boas (E.)
Scouler (J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Boas (E.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Pinart (A.L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (E. L. O.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. E.)
Tolmie (W. E.) and
Dawson (G. M.)
Boas (E.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chamberlain (A. E.)
Daa (L. K.)
Latham (R. G.)
Stumpff (C.)
Bilqula.   See Bilkula.
Boas: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
belonging to the library of Dr. Franz Boas.
Boas {Dr. Franz). The language of the
Bilhoola in British Columbia.
In Science, vol. 7, p. 218, New York, 1886,4°.
(Geological Survey, Pilling.)
Grammatic discussion, numeral system, and
comments upon their vocabulary.
 Sprache der Bella-coola-Indianer.
In Berlin Gesselschaft f iir Anthropologic,
Ethnologie und TJrgeschichte, Verhandlungen,
vol. 18, pp. 202-206, Berlin, 1886,8°. (Bureau of
Ethnology.)
Grammatic discussion of the Bellacoola language.
 Myths and legends of the Catloltq of
Vancouver Island.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 10 pp. 201-
211, Chicago, 1888, 8°.    (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Catloltq terms passim.
Issued separately, with half-title as follows:
 Myths and Legends of the Catloltq,
| by Dr. Franz Boas. | Reprinted from
American Antiquarian for July, 1888.
[Chicago, 1888.]
Half-title on cover, no inside title, text pp.
201-211, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Wellosley.
 Die    Mythologie    der   nord-west-
amerikanischen Kiistenvolker.
In Globus, vol. 53, pp. 121-127, 153-157, 299-
302, 315-319; vol. 54, pp. 10-14, Braunschweig.
1888, 4°.   (Geological Survey.)
B oas (F.) — Continued.
Terms of the native languages of the northwest coast of British America, including a few
of the Bilqula, passim.
 The Indians of  British Columbia.
By Franz Boas, Ph.D. (Presented by
Dr. T. Sterry Hunt, May 30,1888.)
In Royal Soc. Canada, Trans, vol. 6, section 2,
pp. 47-57, Montreal, 1889,4°.   (Pilling.)
General comments upon the Salish linguistic
divisions, with examples, pp. 47-48. Comparative vocabulary (40 words, alphabetically
arranged by English words) of the Lk'ungen,
Snanaimuq, Skqo'mic, Sl'ciatl, P6ntlatc, and
Catlo'ltq, p. 48.—Comments on the Bilqula, p.
49. — Comparative vocabulary (20 words) of
the Bilqula and Wik'enok, the latter "a tribe
of Kwakiutl lineage," which has "borrowed''
many words from the Bilqula and vice versa, p.
49.—" English-Bilqula vocabulary, with reference to other Salish dialects," being a comparative vocabulary of 55 words, alphabetically
arranged by English words, of the Bilqula,
Lku'ngen, Snanaimuq, Skqo'mic, Sl'ciatl,
Pentlatc, and Catlo'ltq, p. 50.
 Notes on the Snanaimuq.    By Dr.
Franz Boaz.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 2, pp. 321-
328, Washington, 1889, 8°.   (Pilling.)
Names of the Snanimuq clans, p. 321.—Prayer
to the sun, with English translation, p. 326.
Issued separately with heading as follows:
— (From the American Anthropologist
for October, 1889.) Notes on the Snanaimuq.    By Dr. Franz Boas.
Kb title-page, heading only; text pp. 321-
328, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Pilling.
— Preliminary notes on the Indians of
British Columbia.
In British Ass. for Adv. Sci. Report of the
fifty-eighth meeting, pp. 233-242, London, 1889,
8°.   (Geological Survey.)
General discussion of the Salishan peoples
and their linguistic divisions, with a statement
of material collected, pp. 234, 236.—Salishan
terms passim.
Issued also as follows:
— Preliminary notes on the Indians of
British Columbia.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Eourth Report of
the committee . . . appointed for the purpose of investigating and publishing reports
on the . . . northwestern tribes of the
Dominion of Canada, pp. 4-10 [London, 1889],
8°.   (Eames, Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
p.5-7.
— First General Report on the Indians
of British Columbia. By Dr. Franz
Boas.
f —-S-
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
Boas (F.) — Continued.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Rept. of the fifty-
ninth meeting, pp. 801-893, London, 1890, 8°.
(Geological Survey.)
List of Salishan divisions with their habitat,
pp. 805-806.—A Snanaimuq legend (in English)
pp. 835-836, contains a number of Salish terms
passim.—Salish terms, pp. 847-848.
Issued also as follows:
 First General Report on the Indians
of  British Columbia.   By Dr. Franz
Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Fifth report of the
committee . . . appointed for the purpose of
investigating and publishing reports on the
. . . northwestern tribes of the Dominion of
Canada, pp. 5-97, London [1890], 8°.    (Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 9-10, 39-40, 51-52.
— Second   General    Report   on   the
Indians of British Columbia.    By Dr.
Franz Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Report of the
sixtieth meeting, pp. 562-715, London, 1891, 8°.
(Geological Survey.)
The Lku'ngen (pp. 563-582) contains a list of
gentes, p. 569; nobility names, p. 570; terms
used in gambling and pastimes, p. 571; in birth,
marriage and death, pp. 572-576; medicine,
omens and beliefs, pp. 576-577; verse with
music in Cowitchin, p. 581.—The Shushwap,
pp. 632-647, contains a few words passim—The
Salish languages of British Columbia (pp. 679-
688) treats of the Bilqula, including partial
conjugations, pp. 679-680; the Snanaimuq,
giving pronouns and verbs with partial conjugations, pp. 680-683; the Shushwap, with a
vocabulary and grammatic treatise, pp. 683-685 ;
the Stla'tlumh with sketch of the grammar,
pp. 685-686; the Okina'k'en with numerals,
pronouns, and verbs, pp. 687-688.—Terms of
relationship of the Salish languages (pp. 688-
692) includes the Sk-qo'mic, pp. 688-689; the
Bilqula, p. 689; the Stla'tlemh, pp.689-690; the
Shushwap, pp. 690-691; the Okana'ken, pp.
691-692.—Comparative vocabulary of eighteen
languages spoken in British Columbia, pp. 692-
715, includes the following Salishan languages,
numbered respectively 7-17: Bilqula, Catloltq,
Pentlatc, Siciatl, Snanaimuq, Sk'qo'mic, Lku'ngen, STtlakyapamuq, Stlatlumh, Sequapmuq,
and Okana'k'en.
Issued also as follows:
Second   General    Report   on   the
Indians of British Columbia. Bv Dr.
Franz Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Sixth report on
the northwestern tribes of Canada, pp. 10-163,
London [1891], 8°.    (Pilling.)
Linguistic contents asunder title next above,
pp. 17. 18,19, 20-24, 24-25, 29, 80-95,127-128,128-
131, 131-133, 133-134, 135-136, 136-137, 137,137-
138,138-139, 139-140,140-163.
Boas (F.) — Continued.
 Third Report on the Indians of British Columbia.    By Dr. Franz Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Report of the sixty-
first meeting, pp. 408-449, 4 folding tables
between pp. 436-437, London, 1892,8°. (Geological Survey.)
List of the villages, ancient and modern, of
the Bilqula, pp.408-409.—Gentes of the Nuqa-
lmukh, !Nusk'61etemh, and Tali6mh, p. 409.
Issued also as follows:
 Third Report on the Indians of British Columbia.    By Dr. Franz Boas.
In British Ass. Adv. Sci. Seventh report on
the northwestern tribes of Canada, pp. 2-43,
London [1892], 8°.    (Eames, Pilling.)J
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 2-3,3.
 [Texts in the PentMtc language.]
Manuscript, 9 11. folio, written on one side
only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.   Collected in 1886.
Six legends in thePSntlatc language, accompanied by an interlinear, literal translation into
English.
The original manuscript, in possession of its
author, is in PSntlatc-German. (*)
 Texts in the Catloltq language.
Manuscript, 27 unnumbered 11. folio, written
on one side only; in the library of the Bureau
of Ethnology.
The texts (legends and stories) are accompanied by a literal interlinear English translation.
— Vocabulary of the Catloltq (Comux)
language; Vancouver Island.
Manuscript, 36 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains about 1,000 entries.
The original slips of this vocabulary, numbered 1-1097, one word on each slip, are in the
same library.
 [Grammatic notes on the Catloltq
language.]
Manuscript, 14 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
 Nee'lim texts  obtained at Clatsop
Plains, from "John": July, 1890.
Manuscript, pp. 1-2, 8°; recorded in a blank
book; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Two stories in the [Nee'lim language with
interlinear translation into English.
 Siletz   texts   obtained   from  " Old
Jack" at the Siletz Reservation, June,
1890.
Manuscript, pp. 1-10, 8°; recorded in a blank
book; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
A legend in the Siletz language, with interlinear literal translation into English.
j
1 BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Boas (F.) — Continued.
Tilamook texts obtained from Haies
John and Louis Fuller at the Siletz
Reservation, June, 1890.
Manuscript, pp. 1-37,8°; recorded in a blank
book; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Five stories in the Tilamook language with
interlinear literal translation into English.
[Vocabularies of various Salishan
languages.]
Manuscript, 11.1-30, folio, written on one side
only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Leaves 1-11 (numbered I) in double columns,
contain in the first a Nee'lim and Tilamook
vocabulary of 275 entries, the words of the
respective dialects being indicated by an initial
2V" or T; the second column contains a vocabulary of 250 words in the Siletz language.
Leaves 12-18 (numbered II) are headed
Nee'lim and contain about 425 entries. A note
states that the letter T following a word means
that it is common to the iNee'lim and the Tilamook.   Obtained at Clatsop from "Johnny."
Leaves 19-30 (numbered HI) are headed TU-
amook and contain about 1.000 entries. An
accompanying note says the letter N following
a word indicates that it is common to the Tilamook and ISee'lim dialects. Collected at Siletz
from Louis Euller and verified at Clatsop with
the aid of the Indians.
Vocabulary of the  Skgo'mic   lan-
lage.
Manuscript (numbered IV), 11.1-6, folio,written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
List of the sixteen septs of the Skgo'mic, 1.
1.—Formation of words (roots and derivatives),
11.2-6.
[Material relating to the Snanaimuq
language.]
Manuscript (numbered V), 11. 1-19, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
List of Snanaimuq septs (5), 1. 1.—iNames
of tribes as given by the Snanaimuq, 1. 1.—
Phonology, 1. 2.—Grammatic notes, 11. 3-12.—
Formation of words, 11. 12-15.—Texts with
interlinear literal translation into English, 11.
16-19.
— Materialen zur Grammatik des Vil-
#ula; gesammelt im Januar 1888 in
Berlin, von Dr. F. Boas.
Manuscript, 14 unnumbered leaves, folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Jureau of Ethnology,"Washington, D. C.
Franz Boas was born in Minden,"Westphalia,
Germany, July 9,1858. From 1877 to 1882 he
attended the universities of Heidelberg, Bonn,
and Kiel. The year 1882 he spent in Berlin preparing for an Arctic voyage, and sailed June,
1883, to Cumberland Sound, Baffin Land, traveling in that region until September, 1884, returning via St. Johns, Newfoundland, to New York.
Boas (F.) — Continued.
The winter of 1884-'85 he spent in "Washington, preparing the results of his journey for
publication and in studying in the National
Museum. From 1885 to 1886 Dr. Boas was an
assistant in the Boy al Ethnographical Museum
of Berlin and decent of geography at the University of Berlin. In the winter of 1885-'86 he
journeyed to British Columbia under the
auspices of the British Association for the
Advancement of Science, for the purpose of
studying the Indians. During 1886-'88 Dr.
Boas was assistant editor of Science, in New
York, and from 1888 to 1892 docent of "anthropology at Clark University, Worcester, Mass.
During these years he made repeated journeys
to the Pacific coast with the object of continuing
his researches among the Indians. In 1891
Kiel gave him the degree of Ph. D.
Dr. Boas's principal writings are: Baffin
Land, Gotha, Justus Perthes, 1885; The Central
Eskimo (in the 6th Annual Report of the Bureau
of Ethnology); Reports to the British Association for the Advancement of Science on the
Indians of British Columbia, 1888-1892; Volks-
sagenaus Britisch Columbien, Verh. der Ges. fur
Anthropologie, Ethnologic und Urgeschichte
in Berlin, 1891.
Bolduc This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Rev. J.-B. Z. Bolduc,
Quebec, Canada.
Bolduc (Fhre Jean-Baptiste Zacaric).
Mission | de la | Colombie. | Lettre et
journal | de j Mr. J.-B. Z. Bolduc, |mis-
sionnaire de la Colombie. | [Picture of
a church.] J
Quebec: | de l'imprimerie de J.-B.
Frechette, pere, | imprimeur-libraire,
No. 13, rue Lamontagne.    [1843.]
Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-95,16°. The
larger part of the edition of this work was
burned in the printing office, and it is, in consequence, very scarce.
Quelques mots (14), Erench, Tchinoucs [Jargon] et Sneomus, p. 95.
Copies seen: Bolduc, Mallet, Wellesley.
Boston AthenaBum: These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution,
Boston, Mass.
Boston Public: These words following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in that library, Boston, Mass.
[Boulet (Pere Jean-Baptiste).] Prayer
book | and | catechism j in the | Snohomish language, j [Picture.] |
Tulalip, W. T. | 1879.
Cover title: Prayer book | and | catechism |
in the | Snohomish language. | [Picture.] |
Tnlalip mission press. 11879. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
Boulet (J.-B.) —Continued.
Cover title, dedication verso x>ioture etc. 11.
title verso introductory remarks 11. text pp. 5-
31, contents p. 32, back cover with picture and
two lines in Snohomish, 18°.
Some copies have printed at the top of the
cover title the words: Compliments of the
Compiler, | J. B. Boulet.   (Eames, Pilling.)
Morning and evening prayers with headings
in English, pp. 5-15.—Catechism, pp. 16-31.—
Appendix; Hymn for the funeral of adults, p.
31.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling, Shea,
Wellesley, "Wisconsin Historical Society.
 , editor.    See Youth's Companion.
Brinley (George).   See Trumbull (J. H.)
Brinton: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Dr. D. G-. Brinton, Philadelphia, Pa.
Brinton (Dr. Daniel Garrison). The language of palaeolithic man.
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 25, pp.
212-225, Philadelphia, 1888, 8°.
Terms for X, thou, man, divinity, in Bilhoola
and Kawitshin, p. 216.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
■ The language | of | palaeolithic man.
| By | Daniel G. Brinton, M. D., | Professor of American Linguistics and Archaeology in the University of Pennsylvania. | Read before the American Philosophical Society, | October 5, 1888. |
Press of MacCalla & co., | Nos. 237-9
Dock Street, Philadelphia. | 1888.
Cover title as above, title as above verso blank
11. text pp. 3-16,8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
p. 7.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling.
This article reprinted in the following:
 Essays of an Americanist. | I. Ethnologic and Archseologic. | II. Mythology and Folk Lore. | III. Graphic Systems and Literature. | IV. Linguistic.
| By | Daniel G. Brinton, A.M., M.D., |
Professor [&c. nine lines.] |
Philadelphia:  j Porter & Coates. |
1890.
Title verso copyright notice 1 1. preface
pp. iii-iv, contents pp.v-xii, text pp. 17-467
index of authors and authorities pp. 469-474,
index of subjects pp. 475-489, 8°. A collected
reprint of some of Dr.Brinton's more important
essays.
The earliest form of human speech as revealed
by American tongues (read before the American
Philosophical Soeiety in 1885 and published in
their proceedings under the title of '' The languages of palaeolithic man"), pp. 390-409.
Brinton (D. G.) — Continued.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
396.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
  The American Race: | A Linguistic
Classification and Ethnographic | Description of the Native Tribes of | North
and South America, j By | Daniel G.
Brinton, A. M., M. D., | Professor [&c.
ten lines.] |
New York: | N. D. C. Hodges, Publisher, | 47 Lafayette Place. | 1891.
Title verso copyright notice (1891) 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. ix-xii, contents pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 17-3 32, linguistic
appendix pp. 333-364, additions and corrections
pp. 365-368, index of authors pp. 369-373, index
of subjects pp. 374-392, 8°.
A brief discussion of the north Pacific coast
stocks (pp. 103-117) includes a list of the divisions of the Salishan family, p. 108.
Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
— Studies in South American Native
Languages. By Daniel G. Brinton, M.
D. (Read before the American Philosophical Society, February 5,1892.)
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 30,
pp. 45-105, Philadelphia, 1892, 8°. (Bureau of
Ethnology.)
Vocabulary of 22 words, Spanish and Catolq,
and numerals 1-10 in Catolq, pp. 84-85.—The
same vocabulary translated from Spanish into
English, and alphabetically arranged, p. 85.
—Studies | in | South American Native
| Languages. | From mss and rare
printed sources. | By Daniel G. Brinton, A. M., M. D., LL.D., | Professor of
American Archaeology and Linguistics
in the | University of Pennsylvania. |
Philadelphia:  j MacCalla   &   Company,  Printers, 237-9 Dock Street. |
1892.
Title verso blank 1 1. prefatory note verso
blank 1 1. contents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 7-
67, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp 46-47.
"Among the manuscripts in the British
Museum there is one in Spanish (Add. Mss.,
No. 17631) which was obtained in 1848 from the
Venezuelan explorer,Michelenay Rojas (author
of the Exploration del America del Sur, published in 1867). It contains several anonymous
accounts, by different hands, of a voyage (or
voyages) to the east coast of Patagonia,' desde
Cabo Blanco hastalas Virgines,' one of which
is dated December, 1789. Neither the name of
the ship nor that of the commander appears.
"Among the material are two vocabularies
M
1
JRH 5SW5
mm
8
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
SSL.
Brinton (D. G.) — Continued.
of the Tsoneca or Tehuelhet dialect, comprising
about sixty words and ten numerals. These
correspond closely with the various other lists
of terms collected by travelers. At the close
of the MS., however, there is a short vocabulary of an entirely different linguistic stock,
without name of collector, date or place, unless
the last words "a la Soleta," refer to some
locality. Elsewhere the same numerals are
given, and a few words, evidently from some
dialect more closely akin to the Tsoneca, and
the name Uongote is applied to the tongue.
This may be a corruption of ' Choonke,' the
name which Ramon Lista and other Spanish
writers apply to the Tsoneca (Hongote=Chon-
gote=Choonke=Tson6ca).
' 'The list which I copy below, however, does
not seeni|closely allied to the Tehuelhet, nor to
any other tongue with which I have compared
it. The MS. is generally legible, though to a
few words I have placed an interrogation mark,
indicating that the handwriting was unceitain.
The sheet contains the following [Salishan
vocabulary]".
In the issue of Science of May 13, 1892, Dr.
Brinton publishes the following note, the substance of which also appears in the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society for
April, 1892:
" In a series of ten studies of South American
languages, principally from MS. sources, which
I published in the last number of the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society,
one was partly devoted to the ' Hongote' language, a vocabulary of which I found in a mass
of documents in the British Museum stated to
relate to Patagonia. I spoke of it as an independent stock, not related to other languages
of that locality. In a letter just received from
Dr. Franz Boas he points out to me that the
'Hongote' is certainly Salish and must have
been collected in the Straits of Fuca, on the
northwest coast. How it came to be in the
MS. referred to I cannot imagine, but I hasten
to announce the correction as promptly as possible."
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
Daniel Garrison Brinton, ethnologist, born in
Chester County, Pa., May 13, 1837. He was
graduated at Yale in 1858 and at the Jefferson
Medical College in 1861, after which he spent a
year in Europe in study and in travel. On his
return he entered the army, in August, 1862, as
acting assistant surgeon. In February of the
following year he was commissioned surgeon
and served as surgeon in chief of the second
division, eleventh corps. He was present at the
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and
other engagements, and was appointed medical
director of his corps in October, 1863. In consequence of a sunstroke received soon after the
battle of Gettysburg he was disqualified for
active service, and in the autumn of that year he
became superintendent of hospitals at Quincy
Brinton (D. G.) — Continued.
and Springfield, 111., until August, 1865, when,
the civil war having closed, he was brevetted
lieutentant-colonel and discharged. He then
settled in Philadelphia, where he became editor
of The Medical and Surgical Reporter, and
also of the quarterly Compendium of Medical
Science. Dr. Brinton has likewise been a
constant contributor to other medical journals,
chiefly on questions of public medicine and
hygiene, and has edited several volumes on
therapeutics and diagnosis, especially the popular series known as Napheys's Modern Therapeutics, which has passed through so many
editions. In the medical controversies of the
day, he has always taken the position that medical science should be based on the results of
clinical observation rather than on physiological
experiments. He has become prominent as a
student and a writer on American ethnology,
his work in this direction beginning while he
was a student in college. The winter of 1856-!57,
spent in Florida, supplied him with material
for his first published book on the subject. In
1884 he was appointed professor of ethnology
and archaeology in the Academy of Natural
Sciences, Philadelphia. For some years he has
been president of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, and in 1886 he
was elected vice-president of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science, to
preside over the section on anthropology. During the same year he was awarded the medal
of the Societe Americaine de France for his
"numerous and learned works on American
ethnology,'' being the first native of the United
States that has been so honored. In 1885 the
American publishers of the Iconographic En-^
cyclopaedia requested him to edit the first volume, to contribute to it the articles on "Anthropology" and '' Ethnology" and to revise that on
'' Ethnography,' 'by Professor Gerland, of Stras-
burg. He also contributed to the second volume of the same work an essay on the "Prehistoric Archaeology of both Hemispheres." Dr.
Brinton has established a iibrary and publishing house of aboriginal American literature,
for the purpose of placing within the reach of
scholars authentic materials for the study of
the languages and culture of the native races of
America. Each workis the production of native
minds and is printed in the original. The
series, most of which were edited by Dr. Brinton
himself, include The Maya Chronicles (Philadelphia, 1882); The Iroquois Book of Rites
(1883); The Guegiience: A Comedy Ballet in
the Nahuatl Spanish Dialect of Nicaragua
(1883); A Migration Legend of the Creek Indians (1884); The Lenape and Their Legends
(1885); The Annals of the Cakchiquels (1885);
[Ancient Nahuatl Poetry (1887) \ Rig Yeda
Americanus (1890)J. Besides publishing numerous papers he has contributed valuable reports
on his examinations of mounds, shell-heaps,
rock inscriptions, and other antiquities.. He is
the author of The Floriclian Peninsula: Its Lit-
*jr SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
9
Brinton (D. G.) — Continned.
erary History, Indian Tribes, and Antiquities
(Philadelphia, 1859); The Myths of the New
World: A Treatise on the Symbolism and
Mythology of the Red Race of America (New
York, 1868); The Religious Sentiment: A Contribution to the Science and Philosophy of
Religion (1876); American Hero Myths: A
Study in the Native Religions of the Western
Continent (Philadelphia, 1882); Aboriginal
American Authors and their Productions,
Especially those in the Native Languages
(1883) and A Grammar of the Cakchiquel Language of Guatemala (1884).—Appletonys Cyclop.
o/Am.JBiog.
British Museum: These words following a title or
within parentheses after a note indicate that a
copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of that institution,
London, Eng.
Bulmer(-Dr.Thomas Sanderson). Chinook
Jargon | grammar and dictionary |
compiled by | T. S. Bulmer, M.D., CM.,
F. S. A., London, | Surgeon-Accoucheur,
Royal College of Surgeons, England. |
Author of [&c. four lines. ] (*)
Manuscript in possession of its author, Salt
Lake City, Utah, who furnished me the above
transcript of the title-page, and who writes me,
October, 1891, concerning it as follows: " I shall
issue it on Hall's typewriter, and then duplicate
copies with another special machine, and use
various types on the machine, testing the uses
of each. . . . Fifty pages will be devoted
to the origin of the language from all sources.
Examples of hymns from various languages
will be given.'
Contains many words of Salishan origin,
some of which are so indicated.
 Chinook Jargon language. | Part II.
| [Two lines Chinook Jargon.] | To be
completed in IX parts. | Compiled by |
T. S. Buhner, M. D., C. M., F. S. A. Sc.
A., London. | Ably assisted by J Rev'd
M. Eells, D. D., and Rev'd Pere N. L.
St. Onge, (formerly missionary to the
| Yakama Indians).
Manuscript; title as above verso blank 1 1.
text 11.1-124,4°.   In possession of Dr. Bulmer.
Words in the Niskwalli having some resemblance to the Chinook Jargon, 1.41.
 The Chee-Chinook  language | or |
Chinook Jargon. | In | IX parts. | Part
III. | English-Chinook dictionary. |
First edition. | By T. S. Bulmer, ably
assisted by | the Revd. M. Eells, D.D.,
& the Revd Pere Saint Onge, both missionaries to the Indians in Washington
& Oregon states.
Manuscript; title verso blank 1 1. preface
verso blank 1 1. special note for readers verso
blank 11. "memos to guide the reader" 211. text
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
alphabetically arranged by English words 11.
1-189, written on one side only, folio. In possession of its author, who kindly loaned it to me
for examination. In his " memos " the author
gives a list of letters used to indicate the origin
of the respective words C, 2V, I, E, F, Ch. Yale.,
Chinook, Nootka, Indian, English, French, Chi-
halis, and Yakama; and a second list of persons from whom the words were obtained and
localities in which they were used.
"In my selection of the term Chee-Chinook
I merely intend to convey to students that it
has its principal origin in the Old or Original
Chinook language; and although it contains
many other Indian words as well as French and
English, yet it came forth from its mother as an
hybrid, andas such has been bred and nourished
as a nursling from the parent stem. I therefore
designate it as a chee or new Chinook—the word
chee being a Jargon word for lately, just now,
new.
Part
[ ] Chinook Jargon dictionary.
III. Chinook-English.
Manuscript; 121 leaves folio, written on one
side only, interspersed with 40 blank leaves
inserted for additions and corrections. In
possession of its author.
The dictionary occupies 106 leaves, and many
of the words are followed by their equivalents
in the languages from which they are derived,
and the authority therefor. Following the
dictionary are the following: Original Indian
names of town-sites, rivers, mountains, etc., in
the western parts of the State of Washington:
Skokomish, 2 11.; Chemakum, Lower Chihalis,
Duwamish, 11.; Chinook, 211.; miscellaneous, 2
11.—Names of various places in the Klamath
and Modoc countries, 3 11.—Camping places
and other localities around the Upper Klamath
Lake, 5 11.
[ ] Appendix   to   Buhner's   Chinook
Jargon grammar and dictionary.
Manuscript, 11.1-70, 4°, in possession of its
author.
General phrases, as literal as possible, Chinook and English, 11.6-26.—Detached sentences,
11. 27-29.—Prayer in English, 11. 30-31 j same in
Jargon, 11. 32-33.—"History" in English, 11.34-
36; same in Jargon (by Mr. Eells), with interlinear English translation, 11. 37-43. — An
address in English, 11.44-46; same in Jargon,
with interlinear English translation, 11.47-53.—
A sermon in English, 11. 54-55; same in Jargon,
with interlinear English translation, 11.56-61.—
Address in Jargon to the Indians of Puget
Sound, by Mr. Eells, with interlinear English
translation, 11. 62-66.—Address "On Man," in
English, 1. 67; same in Jargon, with interlinear
English translation, 11.68-70.
Contains many words of Salishan origin,
some of which are so indicated.
[ ] Part II | of | Bulmer's Appendix |
to   the   Chee-Chinook | Grammar and
Dictionary. 10
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE
El
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
Manuscript, 57 11. 4°, in possession of its
author.
Eorm of marriage, 11. 2-3.—Solemnization of
the marriage service,11.4-10. These two articles
are in Jargon, with interlinear English translation.—Address, in English, 11.11-12; the same in
Jargon, with interlinear English translation, 11.
13-17.—'' Prom Addison," in Jargon, with interlinear English translation,ll. 18-19.—An oration
in English, 1.20; the same in Twana by Mr.
Eells, with interlinear English translation, 11.
21-22.—A Twana tradition, by Mr. Eells, with
interlinear English translation, 1.23; the same
in English, 11. 24-25.—Legends in Jargon, by
Pere L. N". St. Onge, with interlinear English
translation, 11.26-57.
Contains a number of words of Salishan
origin, many of which are so indicated.
[——] Special scientific notes.
Manuscript, 11. 1-77,4°, in possession of its
author.
General remarks on Indian languages, 11.1-
3.—Origin of languages, 11. 4-11.— Scientific
notes on the European and Asiatic languages,
11.12-35.—American Indian languages, 11.35-63,
includes remarks upon and examples in the Iroquois, Cherokee, Sahaptin, Algonkin, Nahuatl,
Shoshone, Cree, Sioux, and Jargon.—List of
words in the Chinook Jargon the same as in
Nitlakapamuk, 11.64-67.—Selish numerals, 1-18,
I. 65.—List of tribes of Alaska and its neighborhood, 1. 66.—Twana verbs, 1.67.—INiskwally
verbs, 1.68.—Clallam verbs, 1. 69.—Remarks on
the Yakama, 11.70-77.
[ ] The Christian prayers | in Chinook [Jargon],
Manuscript; 6111.4°, in the possession of its
author.
Prayers in Chinook Jargon, 11.1-5.—Lessons
1-17 in Chinook Jargon, with English headings,
II. 6-23.—List of special words adopted by
Fathers Blanchet and Demers in connection
with the service of the mass, 11. 24-25.—Translation of the Chinook prayers into English, 11.
26-38.—Copy of a sermon preached by Rev. Dr.
Eells to the Indians at "Wallawalla, with interlinear English translation, 11. 39-46. ' 'Of the 97
words used, 46 are of Chinook origin, 17 Nootka,
3 Selish, 23 English, 2 Jargon, and 6 in
French."—Articles of faith of the Congregational church at Skokomish, "Washington, in
the Jargon with interlinear English translation, 11. 47-52.—Oration in Chinook Jargon with
interlinear English translation, 11. 53-54.—
Prayers to God in English blank verse, 11. 55-
56; the same in Jargon with interlinear English
translation, 11.57-61.
 [Hymns, songs, etc., in the Chinook
Jargon and other languages.]
Manuscript; no title-page; text 77 leaves, 4°,
in possession of its author.
Songs, 1.1.—Song with music, 11.2-3.—School
songs by Mr. Eells, 11. 4-5.—Songs from Dr.
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
Boas, 11. 6-12.—Hymns by Mr. Eells, 11.13-32.
All the above are in Jargon with English translations. —Hymns in !Niskwalli by Mr. Eells, 1.
33.—Hymns in Jargon by Pere St. Onge, II. 34-
45.—Hymn in Yakama, by Pere St. Onge, 11.45-
46; the same in English, 11. 57-64.—Yakama
prose song by Father Pandosy, with French
translation, 11. 65-69.—Hymns in Jargon bjT
Mr. Eells, 11. 70-71.—Hymn in Yakama with
interlinear English translation, 11.72-73.—Song
in English, 1.74; same in Siwash, 11.75-77.
 [The Lord's prayer in various Indian
languages.]
Manuscript; no title-page; text 24 unnumbered leaves, written on one side only, 4°.
The Lord's prayer in Chinook Jargon, 1.1; in
Yakama,* 1.2; in Micmac, 1.3.—Ave Maria in
Micmac, 1.3.—Lord's prayer in Penobscot, 1.4;
in Mareschite, 1.5; inPassamaquoddy (two versions)! 5; Micmac (ancient),!6; Montagnais,
1. 6; Abenaki, 11. 6-7; pure Mareschite, 1.7;
Snohomish, 1. 7; Mskwalli,* 1.8; Clallam,* 1.9;
Twana,* 1.10; Sioux, 1.11; Flathead,*! 12; Cascade,* 1.12; Tlallam, 1.13; Huron, 1.13; Blackfoot, 1.13; Abenaki, 1.14; Choctaw.l. 14 ■ Ottawa,
1.14; Assiniboine, 1.15; Seneca, 1.15; Caughna-
waga, 1.15; other Micmac, 1.16; Totonac, 1.16;
Cora,l. 16; Mistek/l. 17; Maya,*l. 17; Algonquin,* 1.22.—Hymn in Snohomish, 11.23-24.
Those prayers marked with an asterisk are
accompanied by an interlinear English translation.
The compiler of this paper informs mo it is
his intention to add one hundred other versions
of the Lord's prayer, from the Californian and
Mexican languages.
In addition to the above papers, Dr. Bulmer is
also the author of a number of articles appearing
in Father Le Jeune's Kamloops Wawa, q. v.
I am indebted to Dr. Bulmer for the notes
upon which is based the following aocount :
Thomas Sanderson Bulmer wasborn in 1834,in
Yorkshire, England. Hewas educated at Preston grammar school, Stokesley, and at Newton
under Brow, was advanced under Rev. C. Cator
and Lord Beresford's son at Stokesley, and afterwards was admitted a pupil of the York and
Ripon diocesan college. He was appointed principal of Doncaster union agricultural schools,
but soon after emigrated to New York. There
he took charge, as head master, of General
Hamilton's free school. Thence he went to
Upper Canada and was appointed one of the professors in L'Assomption "Jesuit College. From
there he went to Rush Medical College and Lind
University, Chicago; thence to the FJcole Nbr-
male, Montreal; thence to Toronto University,
medical department. Later he continued his
studies in the iScole de Medecine and McGill
University, Montreal, and graduated in medicine at Victoria University. In 1868 he went
to London, whence he proceeded to New Zealand, and was appointed superintendent of
quarantine at Wellington.   In Tasmania and
IV
w
mm
mm* SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
11
Bulmer (T. S.) — Continued.
Australia he held similar positions. His health
failing, he went to Egypt, and later returned to
England. The English climate not agreeing
with him, he took a tour of the Mediterranean
ports. Returning to London, the Russian
grippe attacked him, and he was warned to seek
a new climate. He returned to Montreal, en
route for the Rocky Mountains, where he sought
Indian society for a considerable time. Finding
winter disastrous to him, he proceeded to Utah
in search of health. For the last two years he
has been engaged in writing up his Chinook
books,&s well as completing his Egyptian Rites
andOeremonies, in which i.e has been assisted
by English Egyptologists. Dr. Bulmbr is a
member of several societies in England and
America and the author of a number of works
on medical and scientific subjects.
Bureau of Ethnology: These words following a
title or within parentheses after a note indicate
that a copy of the work referred to has been seen
by the compiler in the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology,"Washiagton, D. C.
Buschmann (Johann Carl Eduard). Die
Volker und Sprachen Neu-Mexico's
und der Westseite des britischen Nord-
ainerika's, dargestellt von Hrn. Buschmann.
In Konigliche Akad. der "Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen, aus dem Jahre 1857, pp. 209-
414, Berlin, 1858. 4°.
Wortverzeichniss des Tlaoquatch,Kawitchen,
Noosdalum, Squallyamish, undpseudo Chinook
(Cathlascon?) pp. 375-378.—Comments on the
Billechoola, p. 382.—"Wortverzeichness der
Hailtsa (from Tolmie and from Hale) und Billechoola, pp. 385-389.—Comments on the Hailtsa,
Billechoola, and Kawitchen, with a few examples^. 390.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Die Volker und Sprachen | Neu-
Mexico's | und | der Westseite J des |
britischen Nordamerika's j dargestellt
| von | Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann. | Aus
den Abhandlungen der konigl. Akade-
mie der Wissenchaften (• zu Berlin
1857. |
Berlin | gedruckt in der Buchdruck-
erei der konigl. Akademie j derWissen-
schaften | 1858. | In Commission bei F.
Dummler's Verlags-Buchhandlung.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
notice 1 1. text pp. 209-404, Inhalts-Ubersicht
pp. 405-413, Verbesserungen p. 414, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Buschmann (J. C. E.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Pilling,
Trumbull.
The copy at the Fischer sale, catalogue no.
270, brought 14s.; at the Field sale, catalogue
no. 235,75 cents; priced by Leclerc, 1878, no.
3012, 12 fr. and by Triibner, 1882,15s.
 Die Spuren der aztekischen Sprache
im nordlichen Mexico und hoheren
amerikanischen Norden. Zugleich eine
Musterung der Volker und Sprachen des
nordlichen Mexico's und der Westseite
Nordamerika's von Guadalaxara an bis
zum Eismeer. Von Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann.
In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin,
Abhandlungen aus dem Jahre 1854, Zweiter
Supp.-Band, pp. 1-819 (forms the whole volume),
Berlin, 1859, 4°.
A general discussion of the peoples of Oregon
and Washington (pp. 658-662) includes the
Tsihali-Selish, with its tribal and linguistic
divisions, habitat, etc., pp. 658-660.—Speech of
Puget Sound, Fuca Strait, etc., p. 70, includes
the Salishan divisions.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Die | Spuren der aztekischen Sprache
| im nordlichen Mexico | und hoheren
amerikanischen Norden. j Zugleich |
eine Musterung der Volker und Sprachen J des nordlichen Mexico's [ und
der Westseite Nordamerika's | von Guadalaxara an bis zum Eismeer. | Von |
Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann. |
Berlin. | Gedruckt in der Buchdruck-
erei der konigl. Akademie | derWissen-
schaften. | 1859.
Half-title verso blank 11. general title of the
series verso blank 11.title as above verso blank
1 1. abgekurtze Inhalts-Ubersicht pp. vii-xii,
text pp.1-713, Einleitung in das geographische
Register pp. 714-718, geographische Register
pp. 718-815, verraisrhteNachweisungen pp. 816-
818, Yerbesserungen, p. 819,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Maison-
neuve, Pilling, Quaritch, Smithsonian, Trumbull.
Published at 20 Marks. An uncut, half-morocco copy was sold at the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 269, to Quaritch, for 21. lis.; the latter
prices two copies, catalogue no. 12552, one 21.2s.
the other 21.10s.; the Pinart copy, catalogue no.
178, brought 9 fr.; Koehler, catalogue no. 440,
prices it 13 M.. 50 Pf.; priced again by Quaritch,
no. 30037, 21. BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
C.
C. (J. F.)   A Happy Indian Village.
In the Ave Maria, vol. 26, pp. 444-445, Notre
Dame, Indiana, May 12, 1888, sm. 4°.   (Pilling.)
The Ave Maria in the Kalispel language, p.
445.
Reprinted in St. Joseph's Advocate, sixth
year, pp. 394-395, Baltimore, July, 1888, sm. 4°.
(Bureau of Ethnology.)
Campbell (John). Origin of the aborigines of Canada. A paper read before
the society, 17th December, 1880, by
Prof. J. Campbell, M.A.
In Quebec .Lit. and Hist. Soc. Trans., session
1880-1881, pp. 61-93, and apjpndix pp. i-xxxiv,
Quebec, 1882, 12°.   (Pilling.)
The first part of this paper is an endeavor to
show a resemblance between various families
of the New World, and between these and
various peoples of the Old "World.
Comparative vocabulary (90 words) of the
Niskwalli and the Malay-Polynesian languages, pp. xxxii-xxxiv.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Origin | of the | aborigines of Canada. | A paper read before the Literary
and historical society, | Quebec, | by |
prof. J. Campbell, M. A., | (of Montreal,) | Dele*gue" General de l'lnstitu-
tion Ethnographique de Paris. |
Quebec: J printed at the "Morning
chronicle" office. | 1881.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. text pp.
1-33, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv, 8°. Twenty-five
copies printed.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
Canadian Indian. Vol.1. October, 1890.
No. I [-Vol. I. September, 1891. No. 12].
The | Canadian | Indian | Editors |
rev. E. F. Wilson | H. B. Small. | Published under the Auspices of | the Canadian Indian Researchal [sic] | society
Contents | [&c. double columns, each
eight lines.] | Single Copies, 20 Cents.
Annual Subscription, $2.00. |
Printed and Published by Jno. Rutherford, Owen Sound, Ontario [Canada].
[1890-1891.]
12 numbers: cover title as above, text pp. 1-
356, 8°. A continuation of " Our Porest Children," described in the Bibliography of the
Algonquian languages. .The publication was
suspended with the twelfth number, with the
intention of resuming it in January, 1892. It
has been found impracticable to carry out the
project.   The word "Researchal" on the cover
Canadian Indian — Continued.
of the first number was changed to Research
in the following numbers.
Wilson (E. F.), A comparative vocabulary,
vol. 1, pp. 104-107.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
[Canestrelli (Rev. Philip).] Catechism
[ of j Christian Doctrine | prepared
and enjoined | by order of the | Third
Plenary Council of Baltimore | Translated into Flat-head | by a father of
the Society of Jesus |
Woodstock college [Md.] | 1891
Title verso blank 1 1. text (entirely in the
Kalispel language with the exception of a few
headings in English) pp. 3-100, errata pp. 101-
102, sq.16°.
Catechism, pp. 3-88.—Prayers, pp. 89-100.
Copies seen: Eames, Piliing.
[ ] Interrogationes J faciendse a sacer-
dote | ad   baptismum   conferendum |
procedente.
Co'loplion: S. Ignatii, in Montanis.
Typis missionis.    [1891.]
Frontispiece (vignette of the Virgin and child
with the inscription N. S. del Carmen) recto 1.
1, text with heading above, and with other
Latin headings scattered throughout, pp. [2-4],
24°. Printed by the school boys at St. Ignatius
Mission.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 [Litany and prayer in the Kalispel
language.
St. Ignatius Print, Montana, 1891.]
Frontispiece (vignette of the Virgin and child
with the inscription N". S. del Carmen) recto
1.1, text pp. [2-3], 12°. Printed by the school
boys at St. Ignatius Mission.
Lu Skuskuests lu t St. Marie, p. [2].—Oratio
Leonis P. P. XIII ad S. Joseph, p. [3].
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
[ ] Nchaumen   j   Lu     kaeks-auaum
1-^gal | potu hoi la sainte messe | lu tel
kae-pog6t | le pape.
Colophon: St. Ignatius Print, Montana.    [1891.]
One leaf, printed on one side only, 8°. Printed
by the school boys at St. Ignatius Mission.
Three prayers in the Kalispel language.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
[ ] Stabat mater [in the Kalispel lan
guage.]
[St. Ignatius Print, Montana, 1891.]
1 leaf, 8°, printed on one side only.   Printed
by the school boys at St. Ignatius Mission.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
13
:    SI
Carmany (J. H.) [The first three of the
ten commandments, and the Lord's
prayer in the Nanaimo language.]
In Bancroft (H. H.), Native races of the
Pacific states, vol. 3, pp. 611-612, New York,
1875, 8°.
Reprinted in the various editions of the same
work.
[Caruana (Rev. J. M.)] Promissiones
Domini Nostri Jesu Christi factae B.
Marg. M. Alacoque. | Enpoteenet la
Jesus Christ zogomshitem la | npiilg-
hues Margherite Marie Alacoque le |
chesnkueitemistos la ghul potenzutis,
ghul | sengastus la ezpoz.
Colophon: P.A.Kemper, Dayton, O.
(N.America.) [1890.] (Cceurd'Alene,
Indian.)
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above, and containing twelve '"Promises of
Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary," in the
Coeur d'Alene language. On the verso is a
colored picture of the sacred heart, with four
lines inscription beneath, in English.
Mr. Kemper has issued a similar card in
many languages.
Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Catalogue of the American library.
Trumbull (J.H.)
See
Catechism:
Kalispel
Netlakapamuk
Salish
Snohomish
See Griorda (J.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Boulet (J. B.)
Catechism   .   .   .   translated into Flathead.    See Canestrelli (P.)
Catlin (George). North and South American Indians. | Catalogue | descriptive
and instructive j of | Catlings | Indian
Cartoons. | Portraits, types, and customs. | 600 paintings in oil, | with |
20,000 full length figures | illustrating
their various games, religious ceremonies, and | other customs, | and | 27
canvas paintings | of [ Lasalle's discoveries. |
New York: | Baker & Godwin, Printers, | Printing-house square, | 1871.
Abridged title on cover, title as above verso
blank 1 1. remarks verso note 1 1. text pp. 5-92,
certificates pp. 93-99, 8°.
Proper names with English significations in
a number of American languages, among them
a few of the Spokan and Selish.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Wellesley, "Wisconsin Historical Society.
George Catlin, painter, born in Wilkesbarre,
Pa., in 1796, died in Jersey City, N. J"., Deqem.-
Catlin (G.) — Continued.
ber23,1872. He studied law at Litchfield, Conn.,
but after a few years' practice went to Philadelphia and turned his attention to drawing
and painting. As an artist he was entirety self-
taught. In 1832 he went to the Par West and
spent eight years among the Indians of Yellowstone Biver, Indian Territory, Arkansas, and
Plorida, painting a unique series of Indian portraits and pictures, which attracted much
attention, on their exhibition, both in this
country and in Europe. Among these were 470
full-length portraits and a large number of
pictures illustrative of Indian life and customs,
most of which are now preserved in the
National Museum, Washington. In 1852-1857
Mr. Catlin traveled in South and Central
America, after which he lived in Europe until
1871, when he returned to the "United States.
One hundred and twenty-six of his drawings
illustrative of Indian life were at the Philadelphia exposition of 1876. He was the author of
Notes of Eight Years in Europe (New York,
1848); Manners, Customs, and Condition of the
North American Indians (London, 1857); The
Breath of Life, or Mal-Bespiration (New York,
1861); and O-kee-pa: A Religious Ceremony,
and other Customs of the Mandans (London,
1867).—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Siog.
Catloltq.   See Komuk.
Chamberlain (Alexander Francis). The
Eskimo race and language. Their
origin and relations. By A. F. Chamberlain, B. A.
In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol. 6,
pp. 261-337, Toronto, 1889, 8°.
Comparative Eskimo and Indian vocabularies
(pp. 318-322) contains a number of words in
Kawitchen, Selish, Niskwalli, Bilkula, Kow-
elitsch, and Skwale (from Tolmie and Dawson
and from Hale), pp. 318-320.
[ ] Numerals, Vocabulary, and Sentences in the Language of the Colville
Indians at Nelson, British Columbia.
Manuscript, pp. 1-7 of a blank book, 8°; in
possession of its author.
Numerals 1-20, 30,40, 50, 60, 70, 80,90,100,200,
300, pp. 1-2.—Vocabulary (60 words), pp. 3-5.—
Phrases and sentences, pp. 5-7.—Pronouns, p. 9.
Alexander Francis Chamberlain was born at
Kenninghall, Norfolk, England, January 12,
1865, and came to New York with his parents
in 1870, removing with them to Canada in 1874.
He matriculated from the Collegiate Institute,
Peterboro, Ontario, into the University of
Toronto in 1882, from which institution he
graduated with honors in modern languages and
ethnology in 1886. From 1887 to 1890 he was
fellow in modern languages in University College, Toronto, and in 1889 received the degree
of M. A. from his alma mater. In 1890 he was
appointed fellow in anthropology in Clark University, Worcester, Mass., where he occupied
%    .J
i jfl   '"
I
14
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
3u
Chamberlain (A. F.) — Continued.
himself with studies in the Algonquian languages and the physical anthropology of America. In June, 1890, he went to British Columbia, where, until the following October, he was
engaged in studying the Kootenay Indians
under the auspices of the British Association
for the Advancement of Science. A summary
of the results of these investigations appears
in the proceedings of the association for 1892.
A dictionary and grammar of the Kootenay
language, together with a collection of texts of
myths, are also being proceeded with. In 1892
Mr. Chamberlain received from Clark University the degree of Ph. D. in anthropology, his
thesis being:' 'The Language of theMississaga%
of Skugog: A contribution to the Linguistics or
the Algonkian Tribes of Canada," embodying
the results of his investigations of these
Indians.
Mr. Chamberlain, whose attention was, early
in life, directed to philologic and ethnologic
studies, has contributed to the scientific journals of America, from time to time, articles on
subjects connected with linguistics and folklore, especially of the Algonquian tribes. He
has also been engaged in the study of the Low-
German and Prench Canadian dialects, the
results of which will shortly appear. Mr. Chamberlain is a member of several of the learned
societies of America and Canada and fellow of
the American Association for the Advancement
of Science.
In 1892 he was appointed lecturer in anthropology at Clark University.
Ohehalis:
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Geographic names
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Sentences
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
See also Salish.
Chihalis.    See Ohehalis.
See Hale (H.)
Swan (J. G.)
Tolmie (W. P.) and
Dawson (G.M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Eells (M.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Swan (J. G.)
Swan (J. G.)
Eells (M.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Swan (J. G.)
Tolmie (W. P ) and
Dawson (G.M.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Gibbs (G.)
Nicoll(E.H.)
Chinook     [Jargon]    dictionary,     See
Poones (§, F.)
Chirouze (Fr. —).    Vocabulary of the
Snohomish language. (*)
Manuscript, oblong 12°; in possession of M.
Alph. L. Pinart.
Clallam.    See Klalam.
Classification:
Salish
See Bancroft (H.H.)
Salish
Bates (H. W.)
Salish
Beach (W. W.)
Salish
Berghaus (H.)
Salish
Boas (P.)
Salish
Brinton (D. G.)
Salish
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Salish
Dawson (G. M.)
Salish
Drake (S. G.)
Salish
Eells (M.)
Salish
Gallatin (A.)
Salish
Gatschet (A. S.)
Salish
Gibbs (G.)
Salish
Haines (E. M.)
Salish
Keane (A. H.)
Salish
Latham (R. G.)
Salish
Powell (J. W.)
Salish
Prichard (J. C.)
Salish
Sayce (A. H.)
Salish
Schoolcraft (H. R.)
Salish
Trumbull (J. H.)
Clip (John).  See Eells (M.)
Coeur d'Alene.   See Skitsuish.
Colville.    See Skoyelpi.
Comparative vocabularies. See Gibbs
(G.) H     I
Comux.    See Komuk.
Congress: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
[Coones (S. F.)]   Dictionary | of the |
Chinook Jargon | as spoken on | Puget
sound and the northwest, j with | original Indian names for prominent places
| and localities with their meanings, |
historical sketch, etc. |
Published by | Lowman & Hanford
stationery & printing co., | Seattle,
Wash.    [1891.]
Cover title: Chinook Dictionary | and | original Indian names | of | western Washington.
| [Picture.] |
Lowman & Hanford | stationery & | printing
company.
Cover title, title verso blank 1 1. preface pp.
[3-4], p. 5 blank, key to pronunciation p. [6],
numerals p. [7], text pp. 9-38,18°.
Eells (M.), Original Indian names of town-
sites, etc., pp. 35-38.
Copies seen ,• Jgajnes, Pilling,
IB
-       ~
—Tumi __a
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
15
Cooper (J. G.)   Vocabulary of the Tsi-
haVlish.
Manuscript, 3 pages, 4°; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1854. Consists of 180 words.
In the same library is a copy of this manuscript, 3 pages, 4°, made by its compiler, and a
partial one, two leaves, folio,made by Dr. Geo.
Gibbs.
Cowitchen.   See Kawichen#
Cowlitz.   See Kaulits.
Craig (Dr. R. O.) Vocabulary of the Skagit.
Manuscript, 2 pages, 4°; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at Pt. Bel-
lingham, Washington Ty., Sept., 1858. Contains 72 words only.
A copy of this vocabulary, made by Dr. Geo.
Gibbs, is in the same library.
 Vocabulary of the Snohomish.
Manuscript, 4 pages folio; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Contains 45 words only-
D.
Daa (Ludwig Kristensen). On the affinities between the languages of the
northern tribes of the old and new continents. By Lewis Kr. Daa, Esq., of
Christiania, Norway.   (Read December
the 20th.)
In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. i850,
pp. 251-294, London [1857], 8°.    (Congress.)
Comparative tables showing affinities between Asiatic and American languages, pp. 264-
285, contains words from many North American
languages, the Salishan being represented by
the Tsehaili, Selish, Okanagen, Atnah, Kawi-
tchen, Noosdalum, Squalyamish, and Billechoola.
Davis (Marion).   See Eells (M.)
Dawson (Dr. George Mercer). Notes on
the Shuswap People of British Columbia. By George M. Dawson, LL. D.,
F. R. S., Assistant Director Geological
Survey of Canada. (Read May 27,1891.)
In Eoyal Soc. of Canada, Proc. and Trans, for
1891, vol. 9, section 2, pp. 3-44, Montreal, 1892,
map, 4°.   (Bureau of Ethnology.)
General discussion of the people, references
to published and unpublished linguistic material, etc., pp. 3-4.—Tribal subdivisions, with
etymologies, names given other tribes, etc.
(partly by Mackay), pp. 4-7. —Tillages and
houses, pp. 7-10, contain a number of native
terms.—Measures of length employed by the
Shuswap (6 terms), p. 19.—Plants used as food
and for other purposes, pp. 19-23, includes a
number of native terms passim.—Historical
notes (pp. 23-26) includes a number of personal
names, a vocabulary (13 words) and numerals
1-9, p. 25.—Vocabulary (11 words) obtained
from Joyaska, a native, p. 26.—Account of the
first knowledge of the whites (from Mackay),
pp. 26-28, contains a number of personal and
geographic names.—Mythology, pp. 28-35, contains a number of native words and phrases
(partly from Mackay).—Stories attaching to
particular localities, pp. 35-38, includes a number of bird and geographic names.—Names of
the stars and months, pp. 39-40.—List of 220
place-names in the  Shuswap country, with
Dawson (G. M.) — Continued.
meanings: 1, Shuswap names (130) of places
on the Kamloops sheet, pp. 40-42; 2, Shuswap
names (64) of places beyond the limits of the
Kamloops sheet, pp. 43-44; 3, Shuswap names
(20) of inhabited villages, p. 44.—A few (7) of
the principal villages beyond the limits of the
Kamloops sheet, p. 44.
"I am indebted to Mr. W. Mackay, Indian
agent at Kamloops, for several interesting contributions, which will be found embodied in the
following pages."
Issued separately, with half-title as follows:
 Notes  on   the   Shuswap   people of
British Columbia. | By George M. Dawson, LL.D., F. R. S. | Assistant Director,
Geological Survey of Canada.
[Montreal: Dawson brothers.   1892.]
Half-title on cover, no inside title, text pp. 3-
44, map, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 See Tolmie (W.F.) and Dawson (G.
George Mercer Dawson was born at Pictou,
Nova Scotia, August 1,1849, and is the eldest son
of Sir "William Dawson, principal of McGill
University, Montreal. He was educated at
McGill College and the Eoyal School of Mines;
held the Duke of Cornwall's scholarship, given
by the Prince of "Wales; and took the Edward
Porbes medal in palaeontology and the Murch-
ison medal in geology. He was appointed geologist and naturalist to Her Majesty's North
American Boundary Commission in 1873, and at
the close of the commission's work, in 1875, he
published a report under the title of '' Geology
and Resources of the Porty-ninth Parallel." In
July, 1875, he received an appointment on the
geological survey of Canada. From 1875 to 1879
he was occupied in the geological survey and
exploration of British Columbia, and subsequently engaged in similar work, both in the
Northwest Territory and British Columbia. Dr.
Dawson is the author of numerous papers on
geology, natural history, and ethnology, published in the Canadian Naturalist, Quarterly
Journal of the Geological Society, Transactions,
_^u_^____^  -._ 16
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Dawson (G. M.)—Continued.
of the Royal Society of Canada, etc. He was
in 1887 selected to take charge of the Yukon
expedition.
De Horsey (Lieut. Algernon F. R.) See
Montgomerie (J. E.) and De Horsey
(A.F.R.)
De Smet (Rev. Peter John). See Smet
P. J. de).
Dictionary:
Kalispel See Giorda (J.)
Niskwali Gibbs (G.)
Niskwali Powell (J. W~.)
Twana Eells (M.)
s
Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon.   See
Coones (S. F.)
Dictionary of the Kalispel.   See Giorda
(j.) |   1      f§.
Drake (Samuel Gardiner). The | Aboriginal races | of | North America; | comprising | biographical sketches of eminent individuals, | and | an historical
account of the different tribes, | from |
the first discovery of the continent | to
| the present period | with a dissertation on their | Origin, Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | illustrative narratives and anecdotes, | and a | copious
analytical index j by Samuel G. Drake.
| Fifteenth edition, | revised, with valuable additions, j by Prof. H. L. Williams. | [Quotation, six lines.] |
New York. | Hurst & company, publishers. | 122 Nassau Street.    [1882.]
Title verso copyright notice 1 1. preface pp.
3-4, contents pp. 5-8, Indian tribes and nations
pp. 9-16, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 19-
767, index pp. 768-787,8°.
G-atschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the
Pacific states and territories, pp. 748-763.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Wisconsin Historical Society.
Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6377, price a copy $3.
Dufosse(E.) Americana | Catalogue de
livres | relatifs a PAine'rique j Europe,
Asie,Afrique | et Oce"anie | [&c. thirty-
four lines] j
Librairie ancienne et moderne de E.
Dufosse" | 27, rue Gnene'gaud, 27 | pres
le Pont-neuf | Paris [1887]
Cover title as above, no inside title, tables
des divisions 11. text pp. 175-422,8°.
Contains, passim, titles of works relating to
the Salishan languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
This, series of catalogues was begun in 1876.
Dunbar: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library, now dispersed, of Mr. John
B. Dunbar, Bloomfield, N. J".
Durieu   (Bishop   Paul).    By   Rt.   Rev.
Bishop Durieu. O. M. I. | Skwamish. |
Morning; Prayers.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
No title-page, heading only; text pp. 1-32,
16°.   See fac-simile of first page.
Translated by Bishop Durieu into Skwamish and transcribed into shorthand by Father
Le Jeune, editor of the Kamloops Wawa, who
printed it on the mimeograph.
Morning prayers, pp. 1-12.—Night prayers,
pp. 12-16.—Preparation for confession, pp. 17-
32.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Prayers   in   Stalo    by   Rt.   Rev.
Bishop   Durieu. | O.   M.   I. | Stalo. |
Morning Prayers.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
No title-page, heading only; textpp.1-16,16°.
Translated into Stalo by Bishop Durieu, and
transcribed into shorthand by Father Le Jeune,
editor and publisher of the Kamloops Wawa,
who reproduced it by aid of the mimeograph.
Morning prayers, pp. 1-13.—The rosary, pp.
13-16.
Copies seen: Pilling.
The Rev. A. G. Morice, of Stuart's Lake Mis-,
sion, British Columbia, a famous Athapascan
scholar, has kindly furnished me the following"
brief account of this writer:
Bishop Paul Durieu was born at St. Pal-de-
Mous, in the diocese of Puy, Prance, December
3,1830. After his course in classics he entered
the novitiate of the Oblates at Notre Dame de
l'Ozierinl847and made his religious profession
in 1849. He was ordained priest at Marseilles
March 11,1854, and was sent to the missions of
Oregon, where he occupied, successively, several posts. At the breaking out of the rebellion
among the Yakama Indians he had to leave for
the Jesuit mission at Spokane. He was afterwards sent to Victoria and then to Okanagan by
his superiors. Thence he was sent as superior
of the Port Rupert Mission, and when, on June
2, 1875, he was appointed coadjutor Bishop of
British Columbia, he was superior of St. Charles
House at New "Westminster. On June 3,1890,
he succeeded Bishop L. Y. D'Herbainez as vicar
apostolic of British Columbia.
Bishop Durieu understands, but does not
speak, several  Salishan dialects, and  he is
especially noted for his unqualified  success
among the Indians.
D wamish:
Geographic names
Geographic names
Geographic names
Vocabulary
See Bulmer (T. S.)
Coones (S. P.)
Eells (M.)
Salish, s
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
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FACSIMILE OF FIRST PAGE OF DURIEU'S SKWAMISH PRAYERS,
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17
- 18
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
E.
a
Eames: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Mr. "Wilberforce Eames,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Eells (Rev. Cushing). See Walker (E.)
and Eells (C.)
At my request Rev. Myron Eells, a son of
the above, has furnished me the following biographic notes:
Rev. Cushing Eells was born at Blandford,
Mass., February 16,1810; was the son of Joseph
and Elizabeth Warner Eells; was brought up
at Blandford; prepared for college at Monson
Academy, Mass.; entered Williams College in
1830, from which he graduated four years later,
and from East Windsor (Conn.) Theological
Seminary in 1837, and was ordained at Blandford, Mass., as a Congregational minister, October 25,1837.
He was married March 5,1838, to Miss Myra
Fairbank, who was born at Holden, Mass., May
26,1805. Having offered themselves to the
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign
Missions, they were first appointed to the Zulu
mission in Africa, but owing to a war there
among the natives they were delayed, until the
call from Oregon became so urgent that they
were sent there, leaving home in March and
arriving at Walla walla August 29,1838. They
spent the next winter at Wallawalla, and the
following spring with Rev. E. Walker opened
a new station among the Spokan Indians at
Tshimakain, Walkers Prairie, Washington.
Here they remained until 1848. Mr. Eells
taught a small school part of the time, besides
preaching and doing general missionary work.
The results as they appeared at that time were
not satisfactory, but thirty-five years later it
was plain that the seed then sowed had grown
until two churches of one hundred and thirty-
seven members were the result. During the
Cayuse war of 1818 and the Yakama war of
1855-1856 the tribe remained friendly to the
whites, although strongly urged by the hostiles
to join them. As the G-overnment could not
assure them of protection from the hostile
Cayuse, they found it necessary to move to the
Willamette Valley in 1848, under an escort of
Oregon volunteers.
Mr. Eells did not immediately sever his connection with the missionary board, hoping that
the way would open to return to the Spokan
Indians, but it never did. Por many years most
of his time was spent in teaching school at
Salem, Oregon, 1848-1849; at Forest Grove, Oregon, 1848-1851, and 1857-1860 • at Hilisboro, Oregon, 1851-1857; and at Wallawalla, Wash.,
1867-1870. Here he founded Whitman College,
•f whose board of trustees he has been presi-
Eells (C) — Continued.
dent from the beginning (1859) to the time of
his death. He has since 1872 preached at a
large number of places in Washington as a
general self-supporting missionary, but mainly
at Skokomish, among the Indians, and among
the whites at Colfax, Medical Lake, and
Cheney, and the results of his labors have been
the organization of Congregational churches at
those places and at Sprague and Chawelah. Not
till 1891, at the age of about 81, did he give up
active preaching. He has given to Whitman
College nearly $10,000, besides securing for it
about $12,000 more by a canvass in the east in
1883-1884 (the only time he has visited the east
since he first went west), to various churches
in Oregon and Washington over $7,000, and to
various missionary societies about $4,000.
He received the degree of D.D. from Pacific
"University, on account of his work for Whitman College, and was assistant moderator of
the National Congregational Council, at Concord, N. H., in 1883. He died at Tacoma February 16,1893, on his eighty-third birthday. Mrs.
Eells died at Skokomish, Wash., August 9,1878,
aged 73 years. He left two sons, both of whom
have been at work among the Indians at Puget
Sound, one as Indian agent since 1871, and the
other as missionary since 1874.
Eells (Rev. Myron). Art. IV. Twana
Indians of the Skokomish reservation
in Washington territory. By rev. M.
Eells, Missionary amOng these Indians.
In Hayden (F.V.); Bulletin of the H. S. Gool.
and Geog. Survey of the Territories, vol. 3, pp.
57-114, Washington, 1877, 8°.   (Pilling.)
Section 8, Measuring and valuing (pp. 86-
88), contains the numerals 1-1000, pp. 86-87;
names of days, months, and points of the compass, pp. 87-88.—Section 13, Language and literature (pp. 93-101), contains a Twana vocabulary
of 211 words, pp. 93-98.
Issued separately with cover title as follows:
 Author's   edition. | Department   of
the interior. | United States geological
and geographical survey, j F. V. Hayden, U. S. Geologist-in-Charge. | The J
Twana Indians | of the | Skokomish
reservation in Washington territory, j
By j rev. M. Eells, J missionary among
these Indians. | Extracted from the
bulletin of the survey, Vol. Ill, No. 1.
| Washington, April 9,1877.
Cover title as above, no inside title, text pp.
57-114,8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Brinton, Eames, National
Museum, Pilling. wmemmmm
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
19
Sells (M.)—Continued.
 Indian music.   By rev. M. Eells.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 1, pp. 249-253,
Chicago, 1878-79,8°. (Bureauof Ethnology.)
Short songs in Clallam and Chemakum,with
music, p. 252.
 The Twana language of Washington
territory.   By rev. M. Eells.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 3, pp. 296-303,
Chicago, 1880-'81,8°. (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Grammatic forms of the Twana or Skokomish, pp. 296-298; of the Skwaksin dialect of
the Niskwally, pp. 298-299; of the Clallam, pp.
299-301; of the Spokane, pp. 302-303.
History of | Indian missions | on the
Pacific  coast, j Oregon,   Washington
and Idaho. [ By J rev. Myron  Eells, |
Missionary of the American Missionary
Association. | With | an introduction |
by | rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D. J
Philadelphia: \ the American Sunday-
school union, | 1122 Chestnut Street, j
10 Bible house, New York.    [1882.]
Frontispiece 11. title verso copyright notice
(1882) 11. dedication verso blank 1 1. contents
pp.v-vi, introduction by Gr. H.Atkinson pp.
vii-xi, preface (dated October, 1882) pp. xiii-
xvi, text pp. 17-270,12°.
Chapter v, Literature, science, education,
morals, and religion (pp. 202-226) contains a
short list of books, papers, and manuscripts
relating to the Indians of the northwest coast,
among them the Salishan, pp. 203-207, 209-211.
Copies seen: Congress, Pilling.
— The  Indian    languages   of   Puget
Sound.
In the Seattle Weekly Post-Intelligencer,
vol. 5, no. 8, p. 4, Seattle, Washington Ty.,
November 26,1885.   (Pilling, Wellesley.)
Remarks on the peculiarities and grammatic
forms of the Snohomish, Nisqually, Clallam,
Chemakum, Upper Chehalis, and Lower Chehalis languages.—Partial conjugation of the
verb to drink in Snohomish.
— Ten years | of | missionary work j
among  the   Indians | at | Skokomish,
Washington territory. | 1874-1884. | By
Rev.   M.    Eells, | Missionary   of   the
American Missionary Association. [
Boston: [ Congregational Sunday-
School Publishing Society, | Congregational house, | Corner Beacon and Somerset Streets.    [1886. J
Half-title (Ten years at Skokomish) verso
blank 11. frontispiece 11. title verso copyright-
notice (1886) and names of printers 11. preface
11. dedication verso note 11. contents pp. vii-x,
introduction pp. 11-13, text pp. 15-271,12°.
Indian hymns (pp. 244-255) contains a two-
verse hymn in Twana witli English translation, pp. 250-251; one in Clallam with English
Eells (M.) —Continued.
translation, pp. 251-252; and one in the Squaxon
dialect of the Nisqually, p. 252; seven different
ways of expressing I will go home in Clallam,
pp. 253; a hymn in Twana and Clallam, pp. 253-
254.
Copies seen: Congress, pilling.
 Indians   of  Puget   Sound.    (Sixth
paper.)   Measuring and valuing.
In American Antiquarian, vol. 10, pp. 174-178,
Chicago, 1888,8°.   (Bureau of Ethnology.)
Numerals, and remarks concerning the
numeral system of quite a number of the languages of Washington Territory, among them
the following divisions of the Salishan family:
Twana, Nisqually, Skokomish, Kwinaielt,
Skagit, Clallam, Lummi, Cowichen/Chehalis,
Tait, Kuwalitsk, Snanaimo, Kwantlen, Songis,
Shiwapmukh, Shooswap, Nikutemukh, Skoyelpi, Spokane, Pisquaus, Kalispelm, Coeur
d'Alene, Flathead, Lilowat, and Komookh.
The preceding articles of the series, all of
which appeared in the American Antiquarian,
contain no linguistic material. It was the inten-
tion of the editor of the Antiquarian, when the
series should be finished, to issue them in book
form. So far as they were printed in the magazine they were repaged and perhaps a number
of signatures struck off. The sixth paper, for
instance, titled above, I have in my possession,
paged 44-48.
 Hymns j in the j Chinook-f-Jargon-t-
Language | compiled by | rev. M. Eells,
J Missionary of the American Missionary   Association.  J Second   edition. (
Revised and Enlarged. ]
Portland, Oregon: | David Steel, successor to Himes the printer, J 169-171
Second Street, | 1889.
Cover title as above verso note, title as a-bovo
verso copyright notice (1878 and 1889) 11. nota
p. 3, text pp. 4-40, sq. 16°.
Hymn in the Twana or Skokomish language,
p. 32; English translation, p.33.—Hymn in tha
Clallam language, p. 34; English translation, p.
35.—Hymn in the Nisqually language, p. 36;
English translation, p. 37.—Medley in four languages (Chinook Jargon, Skokomish, Clallam,
and English), p. 36.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
The first edition of this work, Portland, 1878,
contains no Salishan material. (Eames, Pilling,
Wellesley.)
 The Twana, Chemakum, and Klallam
Indians of Washington Territory. By
Eev. Myron Eells.
In Smithsonian Institution Annual Pep. of
the Board of Regents for 1887, part 1, pp. 605-
681, Washington, 1889, 8°.   (Pilling.)
Measures and values (pp. 643-686) contains)
the numerals 1-10 of a number of Indian languages of Washington Ty., among them the
Twana, Niskwalli, Snohomish, Chehalis, K\yi-
I 20
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
SL
Eells (M.) — Continued.
naitjlt, Klallam, and Cowichan, p. 644; Lummi
and Skagit, p. 645.—Remarks on the same, pp>
645-646.—The word for God in Twana, Nisk"
walli, and Klallam, p. 679.
This article was issued separately, without
change, and again as follows:
 The Twana, Chemakum, andKlaliam
Indians of Washington territory. By
Rev. Myron Eells.
In Smithsonian Inst. Mis. Papers relating
to anthropology, from the Smithsonian report
for 1886-'87, pp. 605-681, Washington, 1889, 8°.
(Eames, Pilling.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
■ Original Indian names of town sites,
rivers,   mountains,   etc.,   of western
Washington.
In Coones (S. P.), Dictionary of the Chinook
Jargon, pp. 35-38. Seattle [1891], 18°.
Names (13) in the Twana or Skokomish language, p. 35; Nisqually (25), including Squak-
son, Puyalhrp, and Snohomish languages, p. 36;
Clallam language (8), p. 37; Duwamish language (25), pp. 37-38.
— Aboriginal geographic names in the
state of Washington.   By Myron Eells.
In American Anthropologist, vol. 5, pp. 27-35,
Washington, 1892,8°.   (Pilling.)
Arranged alphabetically and derivations
given. The languagesrepresented are: Chinook,
Chinook Jargon, Nez Perce, Chehalis, Clallam,
Twana, Calispel, Cayuse, Puyallup, and Spokane.
The Indians of Puget Sound.    By
"O
Rev. Myron Eells.
Manuscript, pp. 1-705, sm. 4°; in possession
of its axxthor.
Chapter xii, Measuring and valuing, pp. 249-
271, contains the mimerals in Twana, Nisk-
walli, Clallam, Upper and Lower Chehalis,
Chemakum, Kwill-li-ut, Hoh, Cowichan, Chinook Jargon, and Lummi, with remarks on the
same.
Chapter xvi, Writing and language, pp. 306-
352, includes a grammatic treatise of the Twana,
Niskwalli, Snohomish, Clallam, Chemakum,
Upper and Lower Chehalis, and of the Chinook
Jargon, with a comparison of these languages.
— [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the Klallam language; recorded by
Rev. Myron Eells, Washington Territory, February-June, 1878.]
Manuscript, pp. 8-102 and 3 unnumbered
leaves, 4°; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction
to the study of Indian languages, first edition.
Schedules 1,3,6-12,14-21, 23, and 24 are each
nearly filled; schedules 4,5,13, and 22 partially
so. The unnumbered leaves at the end treat
of nouns, gender, possessive case, pronouns,
adjectives, and verbs with conjugations..
Eells (M.) — Continued.
 [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the Niskwalli language, Skwaksin dialect; recorded by Rev. Myron Eells,
Washington Territory, February-September, 1878.]
Manuscript, pp. 8-102, and 4 unnumbered
leaves at the end, 4°; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction
to the study of Indian languages, first edition.
Most of the schedules given therein have been
completely filled, the remainder partially so.
The unnumbered leaves at the end treat of
nouns, possessive case, gender, diminutives,
adjectives, pronouns, and verbs with conjugations.
  [Words,   phrases,    sentences,   and
grammatic material relating to the
Twana language. Recorded by Rev.
Myron  Eells, Washington   Territory,
1878.]
Manuscript, pp. 8-102 and 2 unnumbered
leaves at the end, 4°; in possession of its
author.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction
to the study of Indian languages, first edition,
all the schedules of which are filled or nearly
so. The unnumbered leaves at the end treat
of nouns, their plural forms, possessive case,
gender, comparison of adjectives, possessive
case of pronouns, and partial conjugations of
the Twana synonyms of the verbs to eat and to
drink.
 [Words, phrases, and sentences in
the language of the lower Tsi-he'-lis
(Chehalis) of the southwestern portion
of Washington Territory. Recorded by
Rev. Myron Eells, March, 1882.
Manuscript, pp. 8-102, 4°; in possession of
its author.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction
to the study of Indian languages, first edition.
.'' Collected with the aid of John Clip, an
Indian doctor who talks good English."
 [Words,   phrases,   sentences,   and
grainmatic material of the language of
the upper Chehalis Indians of the
western portion of Washington Territory. Recorded by Rev. Myron Eells,
January-March, 1885.]
Manuscript, pp. 77-228 and 2 unnumbered
leaves, 4°; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Recorded in a copy of Powell's Introduction
to the studv of Indian languages, second edi-
tion. Schediries 1-8,10,13, 16, 20-29 are each
nearly filled; numbers 12,14,17,19, partially so,
and the remaining schedules are blank. The
unnumbered leaves at the end treat of adjectives and their comparison, pronouns, and conjugations of verbs. %?
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
Eells (M.) — Continued.
" This Chehalis tribe lies next south of the
Twanas. I have not lived with them, but have
obtained my information from Chehalis
Indians who have at times lived among the
Twanas, namely, from Marion Davis, assisted
by. Big Sam, the former an educated young
man, the latter an uneducated old one."
The Twana language.
By Rev. M.
Eells. (*)
Manuscript, pp. 1-232,8°, in possession of its
author, who has kindly furnished me a description of it under date of August 12,1892, as follows:
Volume I. Part 1, Grammar. Part 2, Twana-
English Dictionary, 151 pages, 8°. Vol. II.
Part 3, English-Twana Dictionary. Part 4,
Hymns and prayers (not published anywhere),
84 pages, 8°.
"Some years ago I thought of learning this
language, and proceeded far enough to acquire
one or two hundred words and a few sentences
and obtain a little idea of the construction. The
material lay in a box of old papers until lately,
and I have thought it worth while to enlarge
it and put it into good shape, not for publication, but for preservation in my library. The
larger number of the nouns are the same as
those I furnished Major Powell in a copy of his
Introduction to the study of Indian languages
some years ago."
— An oration in the Twana language.
In Bulmer (T.), Part II of Bulmer's appendix to the Chee-Chinook Grammar and Dictionary, 11.20-22.   (Manuscript.)
Oration in English, 1.20.—The same in Twana
with interlinear English translation, 11. 21-22.
— A tradition in the Twana language.
In  Bulmer (T.  S.), Part  II  of   Bulmer's
Appendix to the Chee-Chinook Grammar and
Dictionary, 11.23-25.   (Manuscript.)
Tradition in Twana with interlinear English
translation, 1. 23.—The same in English, 11. 24-
25.
— Copy of a sermon preached to the
Indians of Walla-Walla.
In Bulmer (T. S.), Christian prayers in
Chinook, 11.' 39-46.    (Manuscript.)
"Of the 97 words used 46 are of Chinook
origin, 17 Nootka, 3 Salish, 23 English, 2 Jargon, and 6 in Prench."
These three manuscripts are in possession of
Dr. Bulmer, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Rev. Myron Eells was born at Walker's
Prairie, Washington Territory, October 7, 1843;
he is the son of Rev. Cushing Eells, D. D., and
Mrs. M. P. Eells, who went to Oregon in 1838 as
missionaries to the Spokan Indians. He left
Walker's Prairie in 1848 on account of the Whitman massacre at Wallawalla and Cayuse war,
and went to Salem, Oregon, where he began to
go to school. In 1849 he moved to Porest Grove,
Eells (M.) — Continued.
Oregon; in 1851 to Hillsboro, Oregon, and in
1857 again to Porest Grove, at which places he
continued his school life. In 1862 he moved to
Wallawalla, spending the time in farming and
the wood business until 1868, except the falls,
winters, and springs of 1863-64, 1864-'65, and
1865-'66, when he was at Porest Grove in college,
graduating from Pacific University in 1866,. in
the second class which ever graduated from
that institution. In 1868 he went to Hartford,
Conn., to study for the ministry, entering the
Hartford Theological Seminary that year, graduating from it in 1871, and being ordained at
Hartford, June 15, 1871, as a Congregational
minister. He went to Boise City in October,
1871, under the American Home Missionary
Society, organized the Pirst Congregational
church of that place in 1872, and was pastor of
it until he left in 1874. Mr. Eells was also
superintendent of its Sunday school from 1872
to 1874 and president of the Idaho Bible Society
from 1872 to 1874. He went to Skokomish,
Washington, in June, 1874, and has worked as
missionary of the American Missionary Association ever since among the Skokomish or
Twana and Klallam Indians, pastor of Congregational church at Skokomish Reservation since
1876, and superintendent of Sabbath school at
Skokomish since 1882. He organized a Congregational church among the Klalams in 1882, of
which he has since been pastor, and another
among the whites at Seabeck in 1880, of which
■ he was pastor until 1886. In 1887 he was chosen
trustee of the Pacific University, Oregon; in
1885 was elected assistant secretary and in 1889
secretary of its board of trustees. He delivered
the address before the Gamma Sigma society
of that institution in 1876, before the alumni in
1890, and preached the baccalaureate sermon in
1886. In 1888 he was chosen trustee of Whitman College, Washington, delivered the commencement address there in 1888 and received
the degree of D.D. from that institution in
1890. In 1888 he was elected its financial secretary and in 1891 was asked to become president
of the institution, but declined both.
He was elected an associate member of the
Victoria Institute of London in 1881, and a
corresponding member of the Anthropological
Society at Washington in 1885, to both of which
societies he has furnished papers which have
been published by them. He was also elected
vice-president of the Whitman Historical Society at Wallawalla in 1889. Prom 1874 to 1886
he was clerk of the Congregational Association
of Oregon and Washington.
Mr. Eells at present (1893) holds the position
of Superintendent of the Department of Ethnology for the State of Washington at the
World's Columbian Exposition.
Ellis (Dr. —).    See Good (J. B.)
Etshiit   thlu   sitskai    [Spokan].      See
Walker (E.) and Eells (C.)
I
n 22
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
F.
Featherman (A.)  Social history | of the
J races of mankind. | First division: |
Nigritians [-Third   division:  j Aoneo-
Maranonians]. J By | A. Featherman. |
[Two lines quotation.] |
London: j Triibner & co., Ludgate
Hill. | 1885[-1889J. | (All rights reserved.)
3 vols. 8°.
A general discussion of a number of North
American families occurs in vol. 3, among them
the STisquallis, p. 356; the Salish proper, pp.
360-369.
Copies seen: Congress.
Field (Thomas Warren). An essay |
towards an J Indian bibliography. |
Being a | catalogue of books, | relating
to the | history, antiquities, languages,
customs, religion, |wars, literature, and
origin of the | American Indians, | in
the library of | Thomas W. Field. | With
bibliographical and historical notes,
and j synopses of the contents of some
of | the works least known. |
New York: [ Scribner, Armstrong,
and co. | 1873.
Title verso names of printers 11. preface pp.
iii-iv, text pp. 1-430, 8°.
Titles and descriptions of works relating to
the Salishan languages passim.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling.
At the Eield sale, no. 688, a copy brought
$4.25; at the Menzies sale, no. 718, a "half-
crushed, red levant morocco, gilt top, uncut
copy," brought $5.50.   Priced by Leclerc, 1878,
Field (T. W.)— Continued.
18 fr.; by Quaritch, no. 11996,15s.; at the Pinart
sale, no. 368, it brought 17 fr.; at the Murphy
sale, no. 949, $4.50.   Priced by Quaritch, no.
302 24, 11.
 Catalogue J of the j library j belonging to | Mr. Thomas W. Field. | To be
sold at auction, j by | Bangs, Merwin
& co., | May 24th, 1875, j and following
days, j
New York. | 1875.
Cover title 22 lines, title as above verso blank
1 1. notice etc. pp. iii-viii, text'pp. 1-376, list of
prices pp. 377-393, supplement pp. 1-59,8°. Compiled by Joseph Sabin, mainly from Mr. Field's
Essay, title of which is given above.
Contains titles of a number of works relating
to the Salishan languages.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames.
At the Squier sale, no. 1178, an uncut copy
brought $1.25.
First catechism in Thompson language.
See Le Jeune (J. M. &.)
Flathead.   See Salish.
Friendly Village:
General discussion
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Gallatin (A.)
Adelung (J. C) and
Vater (J. S.)
Gallatin (A.)
Latham (KG.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Frost (J. H.)   See Lee (D.) and Frost
(J.H.)
Fuller (Louis).    See Boas (F.)
(jr.
Gabelentz (HansGeorg Conor von der).
Die Sprachwissenschaft, j ihre Auf-
gaben, Methoden \ und j bisherigen
Ergebnisse. |Von | Georg von der Gabelentz. j [Vignette.] |
Leipzig, | T. O. Weigel nachfolger J
(Chr.Herm.Tauchnitz). j 1891.
Cover title as above, titleas above verso blank
1 1. Vorwort pp. iii-vii, Inhalts-Verzeichniss
pp. viii-xx, text pp. 1-466, Register pp. 467-502,
Berichtigungen p. 502, 8°.
Brief discussion and a few examples of the
Selish language, pp. 34, 368.
Copies seen: Gatschet.
Grallatin (Albert). A synopsis of the Indian tribes within the United States
east of the Rocky Mountains and in
the British and Russian possessions in
North America. By the Hon. Albert
Gallatin.
In American Antiquarian Soc. Trans.
(A.rchasologia Americana), vol. 2, pp. 1-422, Cambridge, 1836,8°.
Brief reference to the language of the Indians
of Friendly Village, p. 15; to the Salish or
Flat Heads, p. 134.—Vocabulary of the Salish,
lines 53, pp. 305-367.—Vocabulary (25 words) of
the language of the Indians of Friendly Vil- r
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
23
Gallatin (A.) — Continued.
lage of Salmon River, Pacific Ocean, and of the
Atnah or Chin Indians (both from Mackenzie),
p. 378.
 Hale's Indians of North-west Amer
ica, and vocabularies of North America;
with an introduction. By Albert Gallatin.
In American Eth. Soc. Trans, vol. 2, pp. xxiii-
clxxxviii, 1-130, New York, 1848, 8°.   (Pilling.)
The families of languages as far as ascertained (pp,xcix-e) includes the Tsihaili-Selish,
p. c.—North Oregon division, p. 6, includes
mention of the Selish.—The Tsihaili-Selish (pp.
10-13) includes a general discussion, pp. 10-13;
names of the months in Pisquaus and Selish,
p. 13.—Philology, the Tsihaili-Selish (pp. 26-34)
includes pronominal suffixes in Shushwap and
Selish, p. 27; affixes in Shushwap, Selish, Tsi-
hailish, and Nsietshawus, p. 27; vocabulary (9
words) of the Tsihailish, Squale, etc., and the
Nsietshawus, p. 28; the most important
grammatical peculiarities of the Selish tongue,
including prefixes, pluralization of adjectives,
diminutives, personal pronouns, possessive
affixes, tenses, modes, paradigms, transitions,
derivatives, etc., pp. 28-34.—Vocabulary (179
words) of the Selish (Flathead) pp. 88-94 —
Vocabulary of the Bilechoola (33 words and
numerals 1-10), p. 103.—Comparative vocabulary of the Tsihaili-Selish tongues (50 words
and numerals 1-10), including the Atnahs,
Skitsuish, Piskwaus, Skwale, Tsihailish,
Kowelitsk, and Nsietshawus, pp. 118-120.
Table of generic Indian families of
languages.
In Schoolcraft (H.R.), Indian tribes, vol. 3,
pp. 397-402, Philadelphia, 1853,4°.
Includes the Jelish, p. 402.
Albert Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29,1761, and died in Astoria, L. I.,
August 12,1849. He was descended from an
ancient patrician family of Geneva, whose name
had long been honorably connected with the
history of Switzerland. Young Albert had
been baptized by the name of Abraham Alfonse
Albert. In 1773 he was sent to a boarding
school and a year later entered the University
of Geneva, where he was graduated in 1779. He
sailed from L'Orient late in May, 1780, and
reached Boston on July 14. He entered Congress on December 7, 1795, and continued a
member of that body until his appointment as
Secretary of the Treasury in 1801, which office
he held continuously until 1813. His services
were rewarded with the appointment of minister to France in February, 1815; he entered
on the duties of this office in January, 1816. In
1826, at the solicitation of President Adams, he
accepted the appointment of envoy extraordinary to Great Britain. On his return to the
United States he settled in New York City,
where, from 1831 to 1839, he was president of the
National Bank of New York.   In 1842 he was
Gallatin (A.) — Continued.
associated in the establishment of the American
Ethnological Society, becoming its first president, and in 1843 he was elected to hold a similar office in the New York Historical Society, an
honor which was annuallyconferred on him until
his death.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Blog.   fj
Gatschet: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the com-'
piler in the library of Mr. Albert S. Gatschet,1
Washington, D. C. -*-*«*$|j
Gatschet (Albert Samuel). Indian languages of the Pacific states and terri-
tories. |
In Magazine of Am. History, vol. 1, pp. 145-
171, New York, 1877, sm. 4°.
A general discussion of the peoples of the
region with examples, passim. The Salishan
family with its linguistic divisions is treated of
on pp. 169-170.
Issued separately with half-title as follows :
 Indian  languages | of the j Pacific
states and territories | by [ Albert S.
Gatschet | Reprinted from March Number of The Magazine of American
History
[New York: 1877.]
Half-title verso blank 11 text pp. 145-171,4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames,» Pilling,
"Wellesley.
Preprinted in the following works:
Beach (W. W.), Indian Miscellany, pp. 416-
447, Albany, 1877, 8°.
Drake (S. G.), Aboriginal races of North
America, pp. 748-763, New York, [1882], 8°.
A later article with similar title as follows:
 > Indian  languages   of   the   Pacific
states and territories and of the Pueblos
of New Mexico.
In Magazine of Am. History, vol. 8, pp. 254-
263, New York, 1882, 4°.    (Pilling.)
Brief reference to the Selish stock (Oregon-
ian dialects), p. 256.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
— Indian languages | of the | Pacific
states and territories | and of j The
Pueblos of New Mexico. | By Albert
S. Gatschet. | Reprinted from the Magazine of American History, April,
1882. |
New York: I A. S. Barnes &eo. I 1882.
Cover title, no inside title, text 5 unnumbered leaves, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, National
Museum, Wellesley.
— Winke f iir das Studium der amerikanischen Sprachen. Von Albert S.
Gatschet, in Washington, Dist. Col. mmmmmm
24
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Gatschet (A. S.) — Continued.
Separat-Abdruck aus dem Correspondenz-
Blatt der Deutschen anthropologischen Gesell-
schaft, pp. 20-23, nos. 3-4,1892,4°.   (Pilling.)
A general discussion of the grammatic peculiarities of a number of American languages,
among them the Salishan.
[Vocabulary   of
the   Nonstoki  or
Collected by A. S.
Nestucca language.
Gatschet in Tillamuk county, Oregon,
November, 1877.]
Manuscript, 10 11.4°. In"the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded on a blank
form (no. 170) issued by the Smithsonian Institution.  It contains abont 220 words. ,
In the same library is a copy of this vocabulary, made by its compiler, 7 11. folio, written on
one side only.
Albert Samuel Gatschet was born in St. Beat-
enberg, in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland,
October 3,1832. His propaedeutic education was
acquired in the lyceums of Neuchatel (1843-
1845) and of Berne (1846-1852), after which he
followed courses in the universities of Berne
and Berlin (1852-1858). His studies had for
their object the ancient world in all its phases of
religion, history, language, and art, and thereby
his attention was at an early day directed to
philologic researches. In 1865 he began the publication of a series of brief monographs on the
local etymology of his country, entitled " Orts-
etymologische Forschungen aus der Schweiz"
(1865-1*867). In 1867 he spent several months
in London pursuing antiquarian studies in the
British Museum. In 1868 he settled in New Tork
and became a contributor to various domestic
and foreign periodicals, mainly on scientific
subjects. Drifting into a more attentive study
of the American Indians, he published several
compositions upon their languages, the most
important of which is " Zwolf Sprachen aus
dem Siidwesten Nordamerikas," "Weimar, 1876.
This led to his appointment to the position
of ethnologist in the United States Geological
Survey, under Maj. John W. Powell, in March,
1877, when he removed to Washington, and first
employed himself in arranging the linguistic
manuscripts of the Smithsonian Institution,
now the property of the Bureau of Ethnology,
which forms a part of the Smithsonian Institution. Mr. Gatschet has ever since been actively
connected with that bureau. To increase its
linguistic collections and to extend his own
studies of the Indian languages, he has made
extensive trips of linguistic and ethnologic
exploration among the Indians of North America. After returning from a six months'
sojourn among the Klamaths and Kalapuyas
of Oregon, settled on both sides of the Cascade
Kange, he visited the Kataba in South Carolina
and the Cha'hta and Shetimasha of Louisiana
in 1881-'82, the Kayowe,. Comanche, Apache,
Yattassee, Caddo, Naktche, Modoc, and other
tribes in the Indian Territory, the Tonka we
and Lipans in Texas, and the Atakapa Indians
Gatschet (A. S.) —Continued.
of Louisiana in 1884-'85. In 1886 he saw the
Tlaskaltecs at Saltillo, Mexico, a remnant of the
Nahua race, brought there about 1575 from
Anahuac, and was the first to discover the affinity of the Biloxi language with the Siouan family. He also committed to writing the Tuni^ka
or Tonica language of Louisiana, never before
investigated and forming a linguistic family of
itself. Excursions to other parts of the country
brought to his knowledge other Indian languages : the Tuskarora, Caughnawaga, Penobscot, and Karankawa.
Mr. Gatschet has written an extensive report
embodying his researches among the Klamath
Lake and Modoclndians of Oregon, which forms
Vol. II of "Contributions to North American
Ethnology." It is in two parts, which aggregate 1,520 pages. Among the tribes and languages discussed by him in separate publications are the Timucua (Florida), Tonka we
(Texas), Yuma (California, Arizona, Mexico),
Chum8to (California), Beothuk (Newfoundland), Creek, and Hitchiti (Alabama). His
numerous publications are scattered through
magazines and government reports, some being
contained in the Proceedings of the American
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
Gendre (Pere—). Composed by | Father
Gendre O. M. I. ] Prayers j in Shuswap.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
No title-page; text, with heading as above,
pp. 5-12, 32°. Written in Shuswap by Father
Gendre and transliterated into shorthand by
Father Le Jeune, editor and publisher of the
Kamloops Wawa, who reproduced it by aid of
the mimeograph.
Copies seen: Pilling.
General discussion:
Atna See Adelung  (J. C.) and
Vater (J. S.)
Atna
Hale (H.)
Bilkula
Boas (F.)
Bilkula
Buschmann (J. C.
E.)
Bilkula
Tolmie (W.   F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
and
Chehalis
Hale (H.)
Chehalis
Swan (J. G.)
Chehalis
Tolmie   (W.  F.)
Dawson (G.M.)
and
Friendly Village
Gallatin (A.)
Kalispel
Smalley (E.V.)
Kaulits
Hale (H.)
Kawichen
Bancroft (H. H.)
Kawichen
Buschmann (J. C.
E.)
Kawichen
Tolmie   (W. F.)
Dawson (G.M.)
and
Klallam
Bancroft (H. H.)
Klallam
Eells (M.)
Netlakapumuk
Bancroft (H.H.)
Niskwalli
Featherman (A.)
IN isk walli
Hale (H.)
Niskwalli
Tolmie   (W. F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
and
Piskwaus
Hale (H.) mwmmm
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
25
General discussion — Continued,
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Shuswap
Shuswap
Skitsuish
"Tilamuk
Gentes:
Bilkula
Nukwalmuk
Snanaimuk
Songish
Tilamuk
Geographic names:
Chehalis
Dwamish
Dwamish
Dwamish
Kalispel
Klallam ■
Klallam
Klallam
Lummi
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Puyallup
Puyallup .
Salish
Shuswap
Skokomish
Skwaksin
Skwaksin
Snohomish
Snohomish
Spokan
Twana
.   Twana
See Anderson (A. C.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Beach (W.W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Drake (S. G.)
Featherman (A.)
Gabelentz (H. C. G.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Hale (H.)
Miiller (F.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Hale (H.)
Hale (H.)
Hale (H.)
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (P.)
Boas (F.)
See Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Coones (S. F.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Wickesham (j.)
Coones (S. F.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Eells (M.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Coones (S. F.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Geological Survey • These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by
the compiler in the library of the United States
Geological Survey, Washington, D. C.
Georgetown: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Georgetown "University,
Washington, D. C.
Gibbs (George).    Alphabetical vocabularies | of the | Clallam and Lummi. |
By | George Gibbs. I [Vignette.] |
New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1863.
Half-title (Shea's library of American linguistics, XI), verso blank 11. title verso blank
11. preface pp. v-vii, text pp. 9-40, large 8°.
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
Vocabulary of the Clallam, double columns,
alphabetically arranged by English words, pp.
9-19.—Local nomenclature of the Clallam tribe,
p. 20.—Vocabulary of the Lummi, double columns, alphabetically arranged by English
words, pp. 21-36.—Local nomenclature of the
Lummi tribe, pp. 37-39.—Names of Lummi
chiefs, p. 40.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Congress, Dunbar, Eames, National Museum,
Pilling, Trumbull,Wellesley.
Another issue with title-page as follows:
 Alphabetical   vocabularies | of the
| Clallam and Lummi. | By | George
Gibbs. | Published under the auspices
of the Smithsonian institution. ]
New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1863.
Title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, text
pp. 9-40, octavo form on large quarto.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Georgetown, Lenox, Pilling,
Smithsonian.
 Smithsonian miscellaneous collections. | 160 | Instructions | for research
relative to the | ethnology and philology I °f I America. | Prepared for the
Smithsonian institution. | By | George
Gibbs. | [Seal of the institution.] |
Washington: | Smithsonian institution : | March, 1863.
Title verso blank 11. contents verso blank 11.
introduction p. 1, text pp. 2-51,8°. Also forms
part of vol. 7, Smithsonian Institution Miscel-
laneous Collections. Prepared for.and distributed to collectors, resulting in the securing of
many manuscripts, mostly philologic, which
are now in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology-
Numerals 1-10 of the Selish or Flathead,
two sets, one "relating to things," the other
" relating to persons " (both from Mengarini),
p. 42.—Numerals 1-10 of the Nisqualli, two
sets, one " applied to men," the other "applied
to money," p. 42.
Copies seen: Astor, Eames, National Museum, Pilling, Trumbull,Wellesley.
At the Field sale, no. 810, a copy brought 30
cts.; at the Squier sale, no. 415, 45 cts.; at the
Pinart sale, no. 406,1 fr.   Priced by Koehler,
catalogue 465, no. 233,1 M. 50 Pf.
Peprinted, in part, as follows:
 Indian Systems of Numerals?   ^
In Historical Magazine, first series, vol. 9, pp.
249-252, New York, 1865, sm. 4°.    (Geological
Survey.)
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
p.250.
— Smithsonian
tions. I 161 I A
miscellaneous collec-
dictionary | of the |
Chinook Jargon, | or j trade language
JS 26
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
Gibbs (G.)
of Oregon.
Continued.
j Prepared  for the Smithsonian institution. I By I George Gibbs.
| [Seal of.the institution.] |
Washington: [ Smithsonian institution : | March, 1863.
Title verso advertisement 1 1. contents p. iii,
preface pp. v-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xiv, half-
title (Part I. Chinook-English) verso note 1 1.
text pp. 1-29, half-title (Part II. English-
Chinook) p. 31, text pp. 33-44, 8°.
Analogies between the Chinook and other
native languages includes words in the Cowlitz, Kwantlen, Selish, Chihalis, and Nisqually,
p. x.—The Chinook-English and English-
Chinook dictionary, pp. 1—43, contains 39 words
of Salishan origin, and are so designated.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Dunbar,
Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley.
"Some years ago the Smithsonian Institution printed a small vocabulary of the Chinook
Jargon, furnished by Dr. B. P. Mitchell, of the
TJ. S. Navy, and prepared, as I afterwards
learned, by Mr. Lionnet, a Catholic priest, for
his own use while studying the language at
Chinook Point. It was submitted by the
Institution, for revision and preparation for
the press, to the late Prof. W. W. Turner.
Although it received the critical examination
of that distinguished philologist and was of
use in directing attention to the language, it
was deficient in the number of words in use,
contained many which did not properly belong
to the Jargon, and did not give the sources
from which the words were derived.
'' Mr. Hale had previously given a vocabulary
and account of this Jargon in his' Ethnography
of the United States Exploring Expedition,'
which was noticed by Mr. Gallatin in the
Transactions of the American Ethnological
Society, vol. ii. He however fell into some
errors in his derivation of the words, chiefly
from ignoring the Chehalis element of the Jargon, and the number of words given by him
amounted only to about two hundred and fifty.
'A copy of Mr. Lionnet's vocabulary having
been sent to me with a request to make such
corrections as it might require, I concluded not
merely to collate the words contained in this
and other printed and manuscript vocabularies,
but to ascertain, so far as possible, the languages which had contributed to it, with the
original Indian words. This had become the
more important as its extended use by different tribes had led to ethnological errors in the
classing together of essentially distinct families.' '—Preface.
Issued also with title-page as follows:
— A I dictionary !  of the j Chinook
Jargon, } or, | trade language of
Oregon. J By George Gibbs. J
New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1863.
Half-title (Shea's Library of American Linguistics.  XII) verso blank 11. title verso blank
Gibbs (G.) —Continued.
11. preface pp. v-xi, bibliography of the Chinook
Jargon pp. xiii-xiv, half-title of part I verso
note 1 1. Chinook-English dictionary pp. 1-29,
half-title of part II verso blank 1 1. English-
Chinook dictionary pp. 33-43, the Lord's prayer
in Jargon p. [44], 8°.
Salishan contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenseuni,
Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Harvard, Lenox,
Smithsonian, Trumbull, Wellesley.
Some copies (twenty-five, I believe) were
issued in large quarto ~form with no change of
title-page.   (Pilling, Smithsonian.)
See Hale (H.)
 [Terms of relationship used by the
Spokane (Sinhu'" people wearing red
paint on their cheeks") collected at
Steilacooin, Washington Ty., November, I860.]
In Morgan (L. H.), Systems of consanguinity
and affinity of the human family, lines 69, pp.
293-382, Washington, 1871, 4°.
[ ] Comparative vocabularies. Family
xxiii.    Selish (Eastern Branches).
[Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian
Institution.]    January, 1873.
No title-page, headings only; text 11. 1-3,
printed on one side only, 4°. Proof sheets of
an unfinished and unpublished volume.
In four columns, containing in the first column 180 numbered English words, with equivalents in the other columns of: 1. Shiwapmukh
(by George Gibbs), 2. Shooswaap (by Dr. Wm.
E. Tolmie), and 3. Nikutemukh (by George
Gibbs).
At the time of his death, April 9,1873, Mr.
Gibbs "was engaged in superintending the
printing for the Smithsonian Institution of a
quarto volume of American Indian vocabularies, and had fortunately arranged and carefully criticised manj7 hundred series before his
death. This publication will continue under
the direction of Prof. W. D. Whitney, J. H.
Trumbull, LL.D., and Prof. Roehrig.—Smithsonian Annual Report for 1873, p. 224.
Copies seen: Pilling.
These vocabularies, with others, appear in
the following:
 Department of the interior.    U. S.
geographical and geological survey of
the Rocky mountain region. J. W.
Powell, Geologist in Charge. Part II.
Tribes of western Washington and
northwestern ^Oregon. By George
Gibbs, M.D.
In Powell (J. W.), Contributions to North
American Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 157-241, Appendix, Linguistics, pp. 243-361, Washington, 1877,
4°.
Geographical distribution (pp. 163-170) includes the habitat of the tribal divisions of wmmm
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
27
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
the Selish, pp. 166-170.—Notices of particular
tribes, pp. 170-181, includes the Selish
divisions. — Comparative vocabulary of the
Shihwapmukh (from a woman of the tribe),
Nikutemukh (from a man of the tiibe),
Okinaken, Shwoyelpi, Spokan (from a chief of
the tribe), and Piskwaus or Winatsha, pp. 252-
265.—Comparative vocabulary of the ELalispelm
(from a man of the tribe), Belhoola (from a
woman of the tribe), Lilowat (from a chief of
the village), Tait (from a woman), Komookhs
(from a man), and Kuwalitsk, pp. 270-283.—
Dictionary of the Niskwalli, I. Niskwalli-
English (double columns, alphabetically
arranged), pp. 28|r-307; II. English-Niskwalli
(alphabetically arranged, with many etymologies and derivatives), pp. 309-361.
 Account of Indian tribes upon the
northwest coast of America.
Manuscript, 10 leaves folio, in the library of
the Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains words in a number of Salishan languages, passim,
 Comparison of the languages of the
Indians of the north-west.
Manuscript, 23 leaves, 4°. and folio (odds and
ends), in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology-
Contains words and grammatic notes in a
number of Salishan languages.
 Local Indian names, partly Selish.
Manuscript, 4 unnumbered leaves folio; in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Contains the names of about 120 geographic
points on the northwest coast. Nearly all are
Salishan, and 30 of them are in the Lummi
language.
 Miscellaneous notes on the Eskimo,
Kinai and Atnah languages.
Manuscript, 25 leaves, 4° and folio (odds and
ends); in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology-
 Notes on the language of the Selish
tribes.
Manuscript, 10 leaves, folio; in the library of
the Bureau of Ethhology.
Eragmentary matter, evidently jotted down
from time to time as memoranda.
 Vocabularies.    Washington Terr'y.
Manuscript, 141 unnumbered leaves, most of
which are written on both sides, and some few
of which are blank, 12°; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Most of the vocabularies were copied on separate forms by Mr.
Gibbs. Those belonging to the Salishan family
are as follows: Lilowat, 8 pages; Saamena, 12
pages; Taieet, 8 pages; Chilohweck, 3 pages;
Bilhoola. 9 pages; Okinaken, 6 pages; Simil-
kameen, 13 pages; Piskwouse, 13 pages; Spokane, 22 pages; Kalispelm, 12 pages; Shooswap,
4 pages; Nooksahk, 1 page j Niskwally, 4 pages.
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
 Vocabulary of the Clallam.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves folio; in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at Port Townsend, in 1858.
Recorded on a blank form of 180 words,
equivalents of all of which are given.
 [Vocabulary of the Kwantlen language; Fraser River, around Fort
Langley.]
Manuscript, 5 unnumbered leaves folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.   Pecorded July, 1858.
Contains about 200 words.
 Vocabulary of the Kwillehyute, and
of the Cowlitz.
Manuscript, 10 unnumbered leaves, 4°; in the
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Pecorded
on a blank form prepared and issued by P£. P.
Schoolcraft.
Each vocabulary contains about 200 words.
— Vocabulary of the Lummi.
Manuscript,3 unnumbered leaves, folio; in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected atBellingham Bay, Jan., 1854. Pecorded
on a blank form of 180 words, equivalents of all
of which are given.
— Vocabulary of the Nooksahk.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves folio; in
the library of the Bureau of Ethnology
Pecorded on a blank form of 180 words, equivalents of all of which are given.
— Vocabulary of the Noosolup'h, and
of the Kwinaiutl.
Manuscript, pp. 1-25,4°; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
Pecorded on a form containing 350 English
words and the numerals 1-1,000,000,000, prepared and issued by H. P. Schoolcraft. About
one-half the English words have their equivalents in the two languages above mentioned.
— Vocabulary   of the   Toanhooch of
Port Gamble.
Manuscript, 3 unnumbered leaves folio,
written on one side only; in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology. Pecorded on a blank
form of 180 words, equivalents of all of which
are given.
"This was obtained first, I think, at Port
Gamble, in 1854, and afterwards corrected at
Olympia, with the assistance of 'Jim,' a sub-
chief."
George Gibbs, the son of Col. George Gibbs,
was born on the 17th of July, 1815, at Suns wick,
Long Island, near the village of Halletts Cove,
now known as Astoria. At seventeen he was
taken to Europe, where he remained two years.
On his return from Europe he commenced the
reading of law, and in 1838 took his degree of
bachelor of law at Harvard University. In 1848
Mr. Gibbs went overland from St. Louis to
Oregon and established himself at Columbia.
ft I
I mmm
28
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
I
>*r
Gibbs (G.) — Continued.
In 1854 he received the appointment of collector
of the port of Astoria, which he held during
Mr. Eillmore's administration. Later he removed from Oregon to Washington Territory,
and settled upon a ranch a few miles from Fort
Steilacoom. Here he had his headquarters for
several years, devoting himself to the study of
the Indian languages and to the collection of
vocabularies and traditions of the northwestern tribes. During a great part of the time
he was attached to the United States Government Commission to determine the boundary,
as the geologist and botanist of the expedition.
He was also attached as geologist to the survey
of a railroad route to the Pacific, under Major
Stevens. In .1857 he was appointed to the
northwest boundary survey under Mr. Archibald Campbell, as commissioner. In 1860 Mr.
Gibbs returned to New York, and in 1861 was
on duty in Washington guarding the Capital.
Later he resided in Washington, being mainly
employed in the Hudson Bay Claims Commission, to which he was secretary. He was also
engaged in the arrangement of a large mass of
manuscript bearing upon the ethnology and
. philology of the American Indians. His services
were availed of by the Smithsonian Institution
to superintend its labors in this field, and to his
energy and complete knowledge of the subject
it greatly owes its success in this branch of the
service'. The valuable and laborious service
which he rendered to the Institution was
entirely gratuitous, and in his death that establishment as well as the cause of science lost an
ardent friend'and an important contributor to
its advancement.. In 1871 Mr. Gibbs married
his cousin, Miss Mary EZ. Gibbs, of Newport,
P. I., and removed -to New Haven, where he
died on the 9th of April, 1873.
[Giorda (Rev. Joseph).]    A | dictionary
| of the | Kalispel or Flat-head Indian
Language, | compiled by the | missionaries of the Society of Jesus | Part I |
Kalispel-English. |
St.Ignatius Print,Montana.| 1877-8-9.
Title verso copyright notice (by Pev. J.
Giorda, 1879) 11. preface (unsigned) verso blank
11. text pp. 1-644,8°.
The author owes much to the manuscript
dictionary of Pev. G. Mengarini, who, first of
all the Jesuit missionaries, possessed himself
of the genius of this language, and, besides
speaking it with the perfection of a native
Indian, reduced it also to the rules of grammar.—Preface.
Copies seen: Congress, Dunbar, Eames,
Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley.
Appended is the following:
[ ] Appendix  j  to    the  |   Kalispel-
English Dictionary. | Compiled by the
| missionaries of the Society of Jesus |
St. Ignatius Print, Montana, J 1879
Giorda (J.) — Continued.
Title verso blank 1 1. preface (unsigned) 11.
text pp. 1-36, 8°.
The verb to be with substantives, pp. 1-2;
with double possessive personal pronouns, p.
3; with an adjective, p. 5.—Verb transitive to
be wad, pp. 6-9.—Verb transitive indefinite to
work, pp. 10-14.—Verb transitive to work, p.
18.—Verb transitive to catch, p. 19.—Conjugation of the first verb relative to look, pp. 20-23j
of the second verb relative to pray, pp. 23-25;
of the third verb relative to bring, pp. 26,28; to
guard, pp. 27, 29.—Verb impersonal, pp. 30-31,—
Verb passive, pp. 32-34.— Reduplication of
letters in the verb, pp. 34-35.—List of several
terminations of verbs, p. 36.
Copies seen: Congress, Dunbar, Eames,
Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley.
[ ] A j dictionary | of   the | Kalispel
or Flat-head Indian Language, | compiled   by   the | missionaries   of   the
Society of Jesus | Part II. | English-
Kalispel. |
St.Ignatius Print, Montana.] 1877-8-9.
Title verso copyright notice (by Rev. J.
Giorda. 1879) 11. preface (unsigned) verso blank
1 1. key to the pronounciation of the Indian
alphabet used in this dictionary 1 page, ke3r to
both parts of the dictionary 2 pages, verso of the
last one blank, text pp. 1-456,8°.
Copies seen.- Congress, Dunbar, Eames,
Pilling, Trumbull,Wellesley.
[ ] Lu | tel   kaimintis   kolinzuten |
kuitlt smiimii. | Some Narratives, Froin
the Holy Bible, in Kalispel. | Compiled
by the | missionaries of the Society of
Jesus.-1
St. Ignatius Print, Montana. | 1879.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
" Part I" 11. copyright notice (1879, by Pev. J.
M. Cataldo) verso " preface of the publishers"
1 1. text pp. 1-36,.half-title "Part II" verso
blank 11. text pp. 39-140, contents part first (in
English) pp. 1-2, contents of part second (in
English) pp. 3-7, index of the gospels of the
Sundays pp. 8-9, errata pp. 10-14,8°.
Copies seen: Congress, Dunbar, Eames,
Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] Szinime'ie-s  Jesus Christ. | -J- j A
catechism | of the | Christian doctrine
| in the | Flat-Head or Kalispel Language | composed by the | missionaries
of the Society of Jesus, j
St. Ignatius print, Montana. | 1880
Cover title as above, title as above verso
copyright notice (1880, by Pev. J. Bandini) 1 1.
half-title " Part I "recto blank 1 1. text pp. 1-
17, half-title "Part II," p. 18, text pp. 19-45,8°.
Catechism, pp. 1-33.—Hymns, pp. 35-45.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley.
r3 MM
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
29
Wi
Giorda (J.) —Continued.
These works were put in type and printed
by the Indian school boys at St. Ignatius.
In reply to a communication asking the
authorship of the works titled above, Father
Leopold Van Gorp, one of the superintendents
of the Poman Catholic missions in the northwest, wrote me under date of Jan. 4, 1887, as
follows: ' | Father Giorda may very properly be
considered the author of all the works which
we have printed in the Kalispel or Flathead
language. About 225 copies of each were
printed."
"The Saint Ignatius mission maintains two
schools for Indian boys and girls, at the Flathead Agency, on the Jocko reservation in Montana. From a population of about 2,000 Indians
are collected enough pupils to make an average
attendance of 150, who are taught industrial
pursuits as well as letters. The agent reports
that the art of printing is also taught in a neat
little printing office, where dictionaries of the
Kalispel language, the gospels, and innumerable pamphlets and circulars have been neatly
printed."—Bible Soc. Record, JSFov. 17, 1887.
Pev. Father Joseph Giorda, S. J., who died of
heart disease at Desmet Mission, among the
Coaur d'Alene Indians, aboxit the beginning of
August, 1882, was a native of Piedmont; born
March 19, 1823. He joined the Jesuit order
when twenty-two years old, and for some time
tilled the chair of divinity and held other
important offices in the colleges of the society
in Europe. In 1858 Father Giorda arrived in
St. Louis, and soon after started for the wilds
of the northwest as superior general of the
Pocky Mountain missions, which office he held
until increasing infirmities, due to arduous
labors and constant exposure, obliged those in
authority to relieve him of it. While superior
he established many new missions among the
whites and Indians throughout Montana and
the adjoining Territories. He had a wonderful
aptitude for languages, and, besides speaking
fluently the principal continental languages,
mastered, during his manifold duties, the
Blackfoot, ISTez Perce, Flathead, Yakama, Koot-
enay, and Gros Ventre dialects, and preached
to the different tribes in all these languages.
For several years he was pastor of the Church
of the Sacred Heart at St. Ignatius, Montana.—
Van Corp.
God save the Queen   [Netlakapamuk].
See Good (J.B.)
[Good (Rev. John Booth).] The Morning
and Evening Prayer, | And the Litany,
j With Prayers and Thanksgivings, |
translated into the | Neklakapam.uk |
Tongue, | for the use of the Indians of
the | St. Paul's mission, | Lytton, British Columbia. |
Victoria, B. C. | Printed by the St.
Paul's mission press. I 1878.
Good (J. B.) — Continued.
Cover title: The Morning and Evening
Prayer, | And the Litany, | Also Prayers and
Thanksgivings, | with | Office for the Holy
Communion, and | Select Hymns. | Translated
into the | Neklakapamuk Tongue | for the use
of the Indians of the | St. Paul's mission, |
Lytton, British Columbia. |
Victoria, B. C. | Printed by the St. Paul's
mission press. | 1878.
Cover title, title verso blank 11. text pp. 3-48,
12°.
Morning and evening prayer, pp. 3-33.—Administration of the Lord's supper, pp. 34-48.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Wellesley.
The latter portion of this work was issued
separately, with title-page as follows:
[ ] The   Office   for   the   Holy  Communion | translated   into the | Nekla-
kapamuk ] tongue, | for the use of the
Indians of the | St. Paul's mission, |
Lytton, British Columbia. |
Victoria, B. C. | Printed by the St.
Paul's mission press. | 1878.
Cover title: The | Office for the Holy Communion, and j Select Hymns. | Translated into
the Neklakapamuk Tongue, | for the use of the
Indians of the | St. Paul's mission, | Lytton,
British Columbia. |
Victoria, B. C. | Printed by the St. Paul's
mission press. | 1878.
Cover title, title p. [33] verso beginning of
text which occupies pp. 34-48,12°.
Lord's prayer, Prayer for duty, p. 34.—Ten
commandments, pp. 35-36. — Prayer for the
Queen, pp. 36-37.— The creed, pp. 37-38.—The
offertory sentences, p. 38.—Prayer for the
church militant, pp. 38-40.—Exhortation, p.
41.—The confession, pp. 41-42.—The absolution,
the invitation, pp. 42-43.—Sursum corda, p.
43.—Preface to the sanctus, p. 43.—Prayer of
humble access, pp. 43-44. —Prayer for conservation, p. 44.—The communion, the Lord's prayer,
p. 45.—The thanksgiving, pp. 46-47.—The blessing, p. 47.—Hymns and doxology, pp. 47-48.—
Office for the reception of catechumens, p. 48.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
[ ] The | Office for Public Baptism |
And the Order of Confirmation, | with
| select hymns and prayers | translated
into the | Neklakapamuk | or | Thompson tongue | for the use of the Indians
of the | St. Paul's mission, | Lytton,
British Columbia. | (By aid of the
Venerable society for promoting christian | knowledge.) |
Victoria, B. C, | printed by the S.
Paul's mission press (S. P. C. K.) | Collegiate school. | 1879.
Cover title as above, title as abo^e verso
beginning of text, which occupies pp. 2-32, 8°.
The  ministration  of   public   baptism   of
\m\
ss fWPP
_^=_-,—_—SB-=^_=_
n
30
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
V
Good (J. B.) — Continued.
infants, pp. 2,4,6,10,12,14,16,18 (p. 8 blank).-
The ministration of baptism to such as are of
riper years and able to answer for themselves,
pp. 3, 5,7, 9, 11, 17, 19 (pp. 13 and 15 blank).—
Select hymns for the office, p. 20.—The order of
confirmation, pp. 21-24.— Select hymns, psalms,
and prayers, pp. 25-32.
Copies seen: Dunbar, Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
  Offices for the | solemnizat[i]on of
matrimony | the visitation of the sick,
| and | The Burial of the Dead. |
Translated into the ] Nitlakapamuk |
or | Thompson Indian Tongue. | By J.
B. Good, S. P. G. missionary, Yale-Lyt-
ton. | By aid of a Grant from the Ven.
Society for Promoting j Christian
Knowledge. |
Victoria, B. C. | Printed by the St.
Paul's Mission Press, (S. P. C. K.) | Collegiate School, 1880.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. text with headings in English pp. 3-
15, 8°.
The form of solemnization of matrimony, pp.
3-6.—Order for the visitation of the sick, pp.
7-9.—The order for the burial of the dead, pp.
10-14.—Collects, p. 15.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Eames, Pilling,
Wellesley.
■ A   vocabulary j and | outlines   of
grammar | of the | Nitlakapamuk | or
| Thompson tongue, | (The Indian language spoken between Yale, Lillooet,
| Cache Creek and Nicola Lake.) |
Together with a | Phonetic Chinook
Dictionary, | Adapted for use in the
Province of | British Columbia. | By J.
B. Good, S. P. G. missionary, Yale-
Lytton. | By aid of a Grant from the
Right Hon. Superintendent of Indian
| Affairs, Ottawa. |
Victoria: | Printed by the St. Paul's
Mission Press, (S.P.C.K.) | Collegiate
School, 1880.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. preface pp. 5-6, text pp. 8-46, 8°.
Chinook Dictionary. English-Chinook, pp.
8-30 (even-numbered pages). — Thompson vocabulary, English-Nitlakapamuk, pp. 9-31
(odd numbered pages).—Chinook numerals, p.
30.—Nitlakapam.uk numerals, etc., p. 31.—Conversations, Euglish-Chinook, pp. 32,34; English-Nitlakapamuk, pp. 33, 35.—Lord'sprayer in
Jargon, p. 34; in Thompson, p. 35.—Outlines
of  [the Nitlakapam.uk] grammar, (pp. 37-46)
Good (J. B.) —Continued.
includes a story in five parts with interlinear
English translation, furnished by Dr. Ellis, of
Yale, pp. 38-40.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Dunbar, Eames, Mallet, Pilling, Wellesley.
[ ] God save the Queen.
A seven-line verse in the Netlakapamuk or
Thompson Indian tongue, with heading in
English as above, on one side of a small slip,
which looks as though it were struck off as a
proof-sheet.
Copies seen: Wellesley.
See Bancroft (H.H.)
Grammar:
See Mengarini (G.)
Eells (M.)
Salish
Twana
G-rammatic treatise
Bilkula
Chehalis
Chehalis
Chehalis
Kalispel
Klallam
Klallam
Komuk
Netlakapamuk
Netlakapamuk
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Okinagan
Puyallup
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Shuswap
Shuswap
Shuswap
Skwaksin
Snanaimuk
Snohomish
Spokan
Stailakum
Tilamuk
Tilamuk
Twana
Twana
See Boas (E.)
EeUs (M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale(H.)
Giorda (J.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (F.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Good (J. B.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (E.)
McCaw (S.P.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Petitot (E. F. S. J.)
Shea (J. G.)
Boas (F.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale(H.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (F.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Boas(F.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Buhner (T. S.).
Eells (M.)
Grant (Walter Colquhoun). Description
of Vancouver Island. By its first Colonist, W. Colquhoun Grant, Esq., F. R.
G. S., of the 2nd Dragoon Guards, and
late Lieut.-Col. of the Cavalry of the
Turkish Contingent.
In Poyal Geog. Soc. Jour. vol. 27, pp. 268-320,'j
London [1858], 8°.   (Geological Survey.)
Brief discussion of the language of Van-v
couver Island, and numerals 1-10,100, of the
Tsclallums, p. 295.
i SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
31
H
»s
vi
Haines   (Elijah   Middlebrook).   The |
American Indian | (Uh-nish4n-na-ba).
The Whole Subject Complete in One
Volume Illustrated with Numerous
Appropriate Engravings. | By Elijah
M. Haines. | [Design.] |
Chicago: j the Mas-sin-na-gan company, | 1888.
Title verso copyright notice (1888) etc. 1 1.
preface pp. vii-viii, contents and list of illus-
trations'pp. 9-22, text pp. 23-821, large 8°.
Chapter vi, Indian tribes ](pp. 121-171), gives
special lists and a general alphabetic list of the
tribes of North America, which includes the
tribes of the Pacific coast, pp. 129-131; Washington territory west of the Cascade Mountains, pp. 132-133; "Washington territory around
Puget Sound, p. 133.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling.
Hale (Horatio). United States | explor-
I ing expedition. | During the years |
1838, 1839, 1840, 1841,1842. | Under the
command of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N.
j Yol. VI. | Ethnography and philology. | By | Horatio Hale, | philologist
of the expedition. [
Philadelphia: | printed by C. Sherman. | 1846.
Half-title (United States exploring expedition, by authority of Congress) verso blank 11.
title verso blank 11. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet
pp. ix-xii, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-
666, map, 4°.
General remarks on the Tsihaili-Selish family (E. Shushwapumsh, or Shushwaps, or
Atnahs; F. Selish, Salish, or Flatheads; G.
Skitsuish,or Coeur d'Alene Indians; H.Pisk-
waus or Piscous; I. Skwale or Nisqually; J.
Tsihailish or Chikailish; K. Kawelitsk or
Cowelits; L. Nsietshawus or Killamuks, pp.
205-212, containing some scattered words in the
several dialects, and on p. 211 the names of the
twelve months in Piskwaus and in Selish.
Tsihaili-Selish family (E. Cucwapuoic; F.
Selic [c. Kulespelm; d. Tsukaetsltlin; e. S^o-
aiatxlpi]; G. Skitsuic; H. Piskwaus j1. Skwale;
J. Tsxailic If. Ts%ailic; g. Kwaiant^l; h. Kwe-
naiwitxl]; K. Kawelitsk; L.Nsietcawiis), pp.
535-512, comprising a comparative grammar of
the Shushwap, Selish, Tsihailish, and Nsietshawus, with especial reference to the Selish.
Vocabularies of Tsihaili-Selish; northern
branch: E. Shushwapumsh (Shushwaps,
Atnahs), F. Selish (Flatheads) [c. Kullespelm
(Ponderays), d. Tsakaitsitlin (Spokan Inds.),
e. Soaiatlpi (Kettle-falls, &c.)], G. Skitsuish
(U(Bur d'Anene), H.Piskwaus (Piscous); middle branch: I. Skwale (Nasqually); western
branch: J. Tsihailish (Chickailis, Chilts) [/.
Tsihailish,   g. Kwaiantl,   h. Kwenaiwitl,   k.
Hale (H.) — Continued.
Kawelitsk (Cowelits)]; southern branch: L.
Nsietshawus (Killamuks), pp. 569-629, containing on an average about three words of each
dialect on a page, in the lines designated by the
above-named letters.
"All these vocabularies (with the exception
of the Skwale, which was received from an
interpreter) were obtained from natives of the
respective tribes, generally under favourable
circumstances. For the Selish, Skitsuish, and
Piskwaus, we are indebted to the kindness of
Messrs. Walker and Eels, missionaries of the
American Board at Tshamakain, near the Spokan River. It was through the interpretation
of these gentlemen, and the explanations which
their knowledge of the Selish enabled them
to give, that the words of all three languages,
and the numerous sentences in the Selish,
illustrative of the grammatical peculiarities of
that tongue, were correctly written.
I The languages of this family are all harsh,
guttural, and indistinct. It is to the latter
quality thatmany of the variations in the vocabularies are owing. In other cases, these proceed from dialectical differences, almost every
clan or sept in a tribe having some peculiarity
of pronunciation. In the Selish, three dialects
have been noted, and more might have been
given, had it not been considered superfluous.
These three are first, the Kullespelm, spoken
by a tribe who live upon a river and about a
lake known by that name. They are called by
the Canadians Pend-Or exiles, which has been
corrupted to Ponderays; secondly, that of the
proper Selish, or Flatheads, as they are called,
and of the Spokan Indians; and that of the
Soaiatlpi, Okinakain, and other tribes upon the
Columbia.
"Of the Tsihailish, also, three dialects are
given, which differ considerably from one
another. The Quaiautl reside upon a river of
the same name, north of the Tsihailish (or
Chikailish) proper, and the Kwenaiwitl, in
like manner, are north of the Kwaiantl, not far
from the entrance to the Straits of Fuca."
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Lenox, Trumbull.
At the Squier sale, no. 446, a copy brought
$13; at the Murphy sale, no. 1123, half maroon
morocco, top edge gilt, $13.
Issued also with the following title-page:
— United States | exploring expedition. | During the years | 1838, 1839,
1840,1841, 1842. | Under the command
of Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. | Ethnography and philology. | By | Horatio
Hale, | philologist of the expedition. (
Philadelphia: j Lea and Blanchard.
I 1846.
i
i 32
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF   THE
Hale (H.) — Continued.
Half-title (United States exploring expedition) verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet pp. ix-xii, half-title
verso blank 11. text pp. 3-666, map, 4°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Eames, Lenox.
 Was America peopled from Polynesia ?
In ®ongres Int. des Am6ricanistes, Compte-
rendu, 7th session, pp. 375-387, Berlin, 1890,8°.
(Eames, Pilling.)
Table of the pronouns J, thou, we (m.c,),we
(exc), ye, and they in the languages of Polynesia
and of western America, pp. 386-387, includes
the Selish.
Issued separately with title-page as follows:
 Was America peopled from Polynesia? | A study in comparative Philology. | By | Horatio Hale. | From the
Proceedings of the International Congress of Americanists | at Berlin, in
October 1888. |
Berlin 1890. | Printed by H. S. Hermann.
Title verso blank 11. text pp. 3-15,8°.
Pronouns in the languages of Polynesia and
of western America, including the Selish, p. 14.
Copies seen: Pilling, Wellesley.
 An international idiom. I A manual
of the | Oregon trade language, | or |
"Chinook Jargon." | By Horatio Hale,
M. A., F. E. S. C, | member   [&c.  six
lines.] |
London: | Whittaker &, co., White
Hart Street, | Paternoster square.  1890.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names
of printers 1 1. prefatory note verso extract
from a work by Quatrefages 11. contents verso
blank 11. text pp. 1-63,16°.
Trade language and English dictionary, pp.
39-52; and the English and trade language, pp.
53-63, each contain a number of words of
Salishan origin; in the first portion these words
are marked with the letter S.
"This dictionary, it should be stated, is,in
the main, a copy (with some additions and corrections) of that of George Gibbs [q.v.], published by the Smithsonian Institution in 1863,
and now regarded as the standard authority, so
far as any can be said to exist; but it may be
added that the principal part of that collection
was avowedly derived by the estimable compiler from my own vocabulary, published seventeen years before."— Note, p. 39.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
For critical reviews of this work, see Oha-
rencey (H. de), Orane (A.), Leland (C. G.),
Reade (J.), and Western.
— See Gallatin (A.)
Horatio Hale, ethnologist, bom in Newport,
N. H., May 3,1817, was graduated at Harvard in
Hale (H.) — Continued.
1837 and was appointed in the same year philologist to the United States exploring expedition
under Capt. Charles Wilkes. In this capacity
he studied a large number of the languages of
the Pacific islands, as well as of North and
South America, Australia, and Africa, and also
investigated the history, traditions, and customs of the tribes speaking those languages.
The results of his inquiries are given in his
Ethnography and Philology (Philadelphia,
1846), which forms the seventh volume of the
expedition reports. He has published numerous
memoirs on anthropology and ethnology, is a
member of many learned societies, both in
Europe and in America, and in 1886 was vice-
president of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, presiding over the
section of anthropology.—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. JBiog.
Harvard: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Harvard University,
Cambridge, Mass.
[Hayden (Ferdinand Vandever)], in
charge. Department of the interior, j
Bulletin j of | the United States | Geological and geographical Survey | of j
the territories. | No. l[-Vol. VI]. |
Washington: | Government printing
office. | 1874[-1881].
5 vols, and two numbers of vol. 6, 8°. It was
not the intention, when these bulletins were
started, to collect them into volumes; consequently the first volume is irregularly paged
and titled.
Eells (M.), The Twana Indians, vol. 3, pp. 57-
114.
Copies seen: Geological Survey.
Henry (Alexander).  Journal | of | Alexander Henry | to | Lake Superior, Red
River, | Assiniboine, Rocky Mountains, |
Columbia, and the Pacific,! 1799 to 1811,
| to establish the fur trade. (*)
Manuscript, about 1,700 pp. foolscap, preserved in the library of Parliament, Ottawa,
Canada. For its description I am indebted to
the kindness of Mr. Chai*les N. Bell, of "Winnipeg, who writes: " The sheets are evidently not
the original ones used by Alexander Henry, but
are rewritten from his journals by one George
Coventry, who seems to have been a family
friend. No date is given to the copying, nor is
there any intimation where the original documents are to be found."
The journal extends from 1799 to 1812, and
between the dates 1808 and 1809 are vocabularies
of the Oj eebois, Knistineaux, Assiniboine, Slave,
and Flat Head, about 300 words each of the first
three and a somewhat larger number of the last
two. Copies of these have been furnished the
Bureau of Ethnology by Mr. Bell, the Flathead
occupying 8 pages, folio. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
33
Hoffman (Dr. Walter James). Selish
myths.   By W. J. Hoffman, M. D.
In Essex Inst. Bull., vol. 15, pp. 23-40, Salem,
1884,8°.   (Geological Survey.)
A myth in the Selish language, with interlinear English translation, pp. 24-25.—Notes on
some of the Selish words, p. 40.
 Bird names of the Selish, Pah Uta,
and Shoshoni Indians. By W. J. Hoffman, M.D.
In the Auk, a quarterly journal of ornithology, vol. 2, pp. 7-10, Boston, 1885,8°. (Geological
Survey.)
A list of 49 bird names; Selish equivalents
of 34 are given.
Issued separately, with half-title as follows:
 (From the Auk, vol. II, No. 1, January, 1885). | Bird names of the Selish,
Pah Uta and | Shoshoni Indians. | By
W. J. Hoffman, M. D.
[Boston: 1885.]
Half-title on cover, no inside title; text pp.
7-10,8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 Vocabulary of the Selish Language.
By W. J. Hoffman, M.D., Washington,
D. C. (Read before the American Philosophical Society, March 19, 1886.)
In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 23,
pp. 361-371, Philadelphia, 1886,8°. (Geological
Survey.)
Vocabulary (300 words), pp. 361-369.—Phrases
(22), p. 369.—Numerals 1-1000, pp. 369-370.—
Myth with interlinear English translation, p.
370—List of tribes known to be Selish, p. 371.
"Walter J.  Hoffman was born in Weidas-
ille, Pa., May 30,1846; studied medicine with
his father (the late Dr.Wm. F. Hoffman, of
Peading, Pa.), and graduated from Jefferson
Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., March 10,
1866. Practiced his profession in Peading, Pa.,
until the summer of 1870, when, at the outbreak
of the Franco-Prussian war, he received a commission of surgeon in the, Prussian army and
was assigned to the Seventh Army Corps,
located near Metz. For "distinguished services
rendered" he was decorated by the Emperor
William I, and after his return to America he
was appointed, in 1871, acting assistant surgeon, H. S. A., and naturalist to the expedition
for the exploration of Nevada and Arizona,
Lieutenant (nowMajor) Wheeler,IT. S. Engineer
Corps, commanding. Dr. Hoffman was ordered,
in August, 1872, to the military post at Grand
Piver Agency (now North) Dakota, where he
served as post surgeon and prosecuted
researches in the language and mythology of
the Dakota Indians. In the spring of 1873, Dr.
Hoffman was detailed to accompany the Seventh
TJ. S. Cavalry. General Custer commanding, and
was later transferred to the Twenty-second
Infantry, the regiment of which General Stan-
SAL 3
Hoffman (W. J.) — Continued.
ley was then colonel. Returning to Reading,
Pa., Dr. Hoffman resumed the practice of medicine in November, 1873, and continued until
the autumn of 1877, when he was placed by
Professor Hayden, then director of the TJ. S.
Geological Survey, in charge of the ethnological
and mineralogical material. In this capacity
he continued nntil the organization of the
Bureau of Ethnology in 1879, when he was
appointed assistant ethnologist, which office he
fills at this date.
Dr. Hoffman has made special investigation
with  the organization   (existing  among   all
tribes of Indians, in some form or other) usually
denominated the Grand Medicine Society, and
for this purpose, as well as for the collection of
anthropomorphic and other ethnologic data,
has visited most of the aboriginal tribes of the
United  States  and  the northwest coast of
America.   In  1881  he visited the Mandans,
Hidatsa, and Arikara, to study the sign language, pictographs, and secret society of the
Arikara.   In 1882 he made a trip to the California and Nevada tribes and all known localities abounding in pictographs, gathered vocabularies of Smuwitsh (Santa Barbara), Kawi'ah
(at Tulle Piver), etc. In 1883 he visited Ottawa,
near Mackinaw, Micb., and Mdewakantawan,
at Mendota, Minn., studying pictographs and
linguistics, etc.   In 1884 he studied the tribes
of Vancouver's  Island, B.  C, Washington,
Oregon, California, and Nevada, especially their
pictography, sign language, and tattooing.   In
1886 he visited petroglyphs in West Virginia,
Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and
Pennsylvania.   In 1887-1890 he made visits to
the Ojibwa of Minnesota, to study their Grand
Medicine ritual and initiation.    In 1890-'91 he
visited the Menomini of Wisconsin and Ojibwa
of Minnesota, to study their ritual and medicine society.
Howse (Joseph). Vocabularies of certain North American languages. By
T. (J.?) Howse, Esq.
In Philological Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 4,
pp. 191-206, London, 1850, 8°.  (Congress.)
Vocabulary of the Flathead, Okanagen, and
Atna or Shoushwhap, pp. 199-206.
Hymn-book:
Netlakapamuk
Hymns:
Kalispel
Klallam
Netlakapamuk
Netlakapamuk
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Okinagan
Skwaksin
Snohomish
Twana
See Le Jeune (J. M. P.)
See Giorda (J. B.)
Eells (M.)
Good (J.B.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Tate (CM.)
Eells (M.)
Boulet (J.'B.)
I
Eells (M.)
Hymns in the Thompson tongue.
he Jeune (J. M, R.)
See I
34
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
U.K.
Interrogationes   faciendte    [Kalispel]. J
See Canistrelli(P.)
Jiilg (B.)   See Vater (J. S.)
Kalispel .-
Bible stories
Catechism
Dictionary
General discussion
Geographic names
Hymns
Litany
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Prayers
Prayers
Prayers
Text
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Giorda (J.)
Giorda (J.)
Giorda (J.)
Smalley (E.V.)
Eells (M.)
Giorda (J.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Shea (J. G.)
Smalley (E. V.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Van Gorp (L.)
Eells (M.)
C (J. F.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Lettre.
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Pinart (A.L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Poehrig (F. L. O.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Tolmie  (W. F.) and
Dawson (G. M.)
Words Youth's.
Kamloops Wawa.  See Le Jeune (J.-M.
R.)
Kane (Paul). Wanderings of an artist |
among the | Indians of North America
| from Canada | to Vancouver's island
and Oregon | through the Hudson's
bay company's territory | and | back
again. | By Paul Kane. |
London | Longman, Brown, Green,
Longmans, and Roberts. | 1859.
Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso
blank 1 1. preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xvii,
list of illustrations p. [xviii], text pp. 1-455,
appendix 411.8°.
List of peoples in the northwest, including
the Salishan tribes, 4 unnumbered leaves at end.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
British Museum, Congress, Harvard.
The edition: Les Indiens de la Baie Hudson,
Paris, 1861, contains no linguistic material.
(British Museum.)
Paul Kane, Canadian artist, born in Toronto
in 1810, died there in 1871. He early evinced
a love of art, and after studying in Upper
Canada college he visited the United States in
1836 and followed his profession there till 1810,
when he went to Europe. There he studied in
Pome, Genoa, Naples, Florence, Venice, and
Bologna. He finally returned to Toronto in
the spring of 1845, and after a short rest went
Kane (P.) — Continued.
on a tour of art exploration through the unsettled regions of the northwest.   He traveled
many thousands of miles in this country, from
the confines of old Canada to the Pacific Ocean,
and was eminently successful in delineating
the physical peculiarities and appearance of
the aborigines, as well as the wild scenery of
the far north.    He returned to Toronto   in
December, 1848, having in his possession one of
the largest collections of Indian curiosities
that was ever made on the continent, together
with nearly four hundred sketches. From these
he painted a series of oil pictures, which are now
in the possession of George W.Allen, of Toronto,
and embrace views of the country from Lake
Superior to Vancouver's Island.—Appleton's
Cyclop, of Am. JBiog.
Kaulits:
General discussion
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vooabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
See Hale (H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
-Hale (H.)
Latham (P. G.)
Powell (J.W.)
Koehrig (F. L. O.)
Wabass (W. G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Kawichen:
General discussion See Bancroft (H. H.)
General discussion
General discussion
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Sentences
Sentences
Songs
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Tolmie  (W. F.) and
Dawson (G. M.)
Youth's.
Eells (M.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Boas (F.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Tolmie  (W. F.)   and
Dawson (G. M.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Daa(L.K.)
Latham (P. G.)
Keane    (Augustus   H.)    Ethnography
and philology of America.   By A. H.
Keane.
In Bates (H. W.), Central America, the West
Indies, etc., pp. 443-571, London, 1878,8°.
General scheme of American races and languages (pp. 460-497) includes a list of the
Columbian races, embracing the Salish or Flathead, p. 474. -Alphabetical list of all known
American tribes and languages, pp. 498-545.
Reprinted in the 1882 and 1885 editions of the
same work and ou the same pages. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
35
Keane (A. H) — Continued.
■ American Indians.
In Encyclopaedia Britannica, ninth edition,
pp. 822-830, New York, 1881, royal 8°. (Bureau
of Ethnology,Pilling.)
Columbian races, p. 826, includes the divisions
of the Salishan.
Kilamook.   See Tilamuk.
Klallam:
General discussion See Bancroft (H. H.)
General discussion
Eells (M.)
Geographic names
Coones (S. F.)
Geographic names
EeUs (M.)
Geographic names
Gibbs (G.)
Grammatic treatise
Bulmer (T. S.)
Grammatic treatise
Eells (M.)
Hymns
Eells (M.)
Lord's prayer
Bulmer (T. S.)
Lord's prayer
Youth's.
Numerals
Eells (M.)
Numerals
Grant (W.C.)
Numerals
Scouler (J.)
Numerals
Tolmie (W. F.)
Sentences
Scouler (J.)
Songs
Baker (T.)
Songs
Eells (M.)
Vocabulary
Eells (M.)
Vocabulary
Gibbs (G.)
Vocabulary
Latham (P. G.)
Vocabulary
Pinart (A. L.)
Vocabulary
Poehrig (F. L. 0.)
Vocabulary
Scouler (J.)
Vocabulary
Tolmie (W.F.)
Words
Bancroft (H. H.)
Klallam — Continued.
Words
Words
Words
Words
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Daa(L.K.)
Latham (P. G.)
Youth's.
Komuk:
Grammatic treatise
Legends
Numerals
Numerals
Texts
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Kowelits.   See Kaulits.
Kuwalitsk.   See Kaulits.
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Poehrig (F.L.O.)
Boas (F.)
Kwantlen:
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Kwinaiutl:
Numerals
•   Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
See Eells (Mv
Gibbs (G.)
Poehrig (F. L. O.)
Tolmie  (W. F.)   and
Dawson (G. M.)
Gibbs (G.)
See Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Poehrig (F.L.O.)
Willoughby (C.)
L.
Latham (Robert Gordon). Miscellaneous
contributions to the ethnography of
North America. By R. G. Latham, M.D.
In Philological Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 2,
pp. 31-50, [London], 1846,8°.
Contains a number of Kawitchen, Noosda
lum, and Salish words in the comparative lists.
This article reprinted in the same author's
Opuscula, for title of which see below.
— On the languages of the Oregon territory.   By R. G. Latham, M. D.
In Ethnological Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 1,
pp. 154-166, Edinburgh [1848], 8°. (Congress.)
Comparative vocabulary (11 words) of
friendly Village (from McELenzie) and the
jBiflechoola (from Tolmie), p. 155.—Numerals
2-7,10 of the Billechoola compared with those
of Fitzhugh Sound, and Haeltzuk, p. 155.—
Comparative vocabulary (10 words) of the Atna
(from McKenzie) and Noosdalum, p. 157.—
Comparative vocabulary (12 words and numerals 1-10) of the Salish (from Gallatin), and
Okinagen (from Tolmie), p. 158—Vocabulary
of the Shoshoni (24 words) showing affinities
With a number of other languages, among them
Latham (R. G.) —Continued.
the Kawitchen, pp. 159-160.—Table of words
showing affinities between the Eskimo and
other languages, among them the Billechoola,
Kawitchen, and Squallyamish, pp. 164-165.
This article reprinted in the same author's
Opuscula, with added notes; for title see below.
 The | natural history | of | the varieties of man. j By | Robert Gordon
Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | late fellow of
King's college, Cambridge; | one of the
vice-presidents of the Ethnological society, London; | corresponding member
to the Ethnological society, | New
York, etc. | [Monogram in shield.] |
London: | John Van Voorst, Paternoster row. 1 M. D. CCCL [1850].
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names
of printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1.
preface pp. vii-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xv,
explanation of plates verso blank 1 1. contents
pp. xix-xxviii, text pp. 1-566, index pp. 567-574,
list of works by Dr. Latham verso blank 11.8°.
A comparative vocabulary (10 words) of the
"•ULIIU 36
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Latham (R. G.) — Continued.
Friendly Village (from McKenzie) and Billechoola (from Tolmie), p. 300.—Comparative
vocabulary (12 words) of the Piskwaus (from
Gallatin) and Salish, p. 314.— Comparative
vocabulary (19 words) of the Chekeeli and
Wakash (from Scouler), p. 315.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames.
 The | ethnology | of | the   British
colonies | and | dependencies. | By | R.
Q. Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | corresponding member to the Ethnological
society, New York, | etc. etc. | [Monogram in shield.] |
London: | John Van Voorst, Paternoster row. | M. DCCC. LI    [1851].
Title verso names of printers 1 1. contents
pp. v-vi, preface verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-264,
list of works by Dr. Latham, etc, 11.16°.
Chapter vi. Dependencies in Am erica, pp,
224-264, contains a list of the divisions and
subdivisions of the Billechula.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames.
 On the languages of northern, west
ern, and central America.    By R. G.
Latham, M. D.
In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. 1856,
pp. 57-115, London [1857], 8°.   (Congress.)
A general discussion of the Atna group
(including the Tsihali-Selish),with a list of its
linguistic divisions, pp. 71-72; of the Billechula, p. 72.
This article reprinted in the same author's
Opuscula, for title of which see below.
— Opuscula. | Essays | chiefly | philological and ethnographical | by | Robert Gordon Latham, | M. A., M. D., F.
R. S., etc. | late fellow of Kings college,
Cambridge, late professor of English |
in University college, London, late
assistant physician | at the Middlesex
hospital. |
Williams & Norgate, | 14 Henrietta
street, Covent garden, London | and |
20 South Frederick street, Edinburgh.
| Leipzig, R. Hartmann. | 1860.
Title verso name of printer 11. preface pp.
iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-377, addenda
and corrigenda pp. 378-418,8°.
A reprint of a number of papers read before
the ethnological and philological societies of
London, among them the following:
On the languages of the Oregon territory (pp.
249-265) contains: Comparative vocabulary (10
words) of the language of Friendly Village
(from McELenzie) and Billechula (from Tolmie), p. 250.—Vocabulary (10 words) of the
Atnah (from McKenzie) and of the Noosda-
lum, compared, p. 252.—Vocabulary (12 words
and numerals 1-10) of the Salish (from Galla-
L at ham (R. G.) —Continued.
tin) andOkinagen (from Tolmie), pp. 253-254.—
List of words showing affinities between the
languages of Oregon territory and the Eskimo
includes words of the Billechoola and Okinagen, pp.260-263.
Miscellaneous contributions to the ethnography of North America, pp. 275-297, contains
a number of Salishan words in the comparative lists.
Addenda and corrigenda, 1£59 (pp. 378-418)
contains a few additional remarks upon the
Atna group and the Billechula, p. 388.—Short
Selish vocabulary (12 words), pp. 415-416.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, Brinton,
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling.
"Watkinson.
At the Squier sale a presentation copy, no.
639, brought $2.37. The Murphy copy, no. 1438,
sold for $1.
 Elements | of | comparative philol
ogy. | By | R. G. Latham, M. A., M. D.,
F. R. S., &c, | late fellow of King's college, Cambridge; and late professor of
English | in University college, London. |
London: |Walton and Maberly,j Upper
Gower street, and Ivy lane, Paternoster
row; | Longman, Green, Longman,
Roberts, and Green, | Paternoster row.
| 1862. | The Right of Translation is
Reserved.
Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. title
verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1.
preface pp. vii-xi, contents pp. xiii-xx, tabular
"view of languages and dialects pp. xxi-xxviii,
chief authorities pp. xxix-xxxii, errata verso
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-752, addenda and corrigenda pp. 753-757, index pp. 758-774, list of
works by Dr. Latham verso blank 11.8°.
General account of the Tsihali-Selish, with a
list of linguistic divisions, p. 399.—Comparative vocabulary (50 words and. numerals 1-10)
of the Atna (from Hale), Piskwaus, Skwali,
and Kowelitsk, pp. 399-400.—Vocabulary (50
words and numerals 1-10) of the Nsietshawus
or Elilamuk, a language of the Selish or Atna
group, compared with the "Watlala and Nutka,
pp. 402-403. — Vocabulary (12 words) of the
Selish commpared with the Tshindk and Shoshoni, p. 404.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Watkinson.
Robert Gordon Latham, the eldest son of the
Rev. Thomas Latham, was born in the vicarage
of Billingsborough, Lincolnshire, March 24,
1812. In 1819 he was entered at Eton. Two years
afterwards he was admitted on the foundation,
and in 1829 went to Kings, where he took hia
fellowship and degrees. Ethnology was his
first passion and his last, though for botany
he had a very strong taste. He died March 9,
1888.—Theodore Watts in The Athenceum, March
17, 1888. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
37
Leclerc (Charles). Bibliotheca | ameri-
cana | Catalogue raisonne | d'une tres-
pre"cieuse | collection de livres anciens
| et modernes | sur FAme'rique et les
Philippines | Classes par ordre alpha-
be"tique de noms d'Auteurs. | R6dige"
par Ch. Leclerc. | [Design.] |
Paris | Maisonneuve & Cie | 15, quai
Voltaire | M. D. CCC. LXVII [1867]
Cover title as above, half-title verso details of
sale 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. v-vii, catalogue pp. 1-407,8°.
Includes titles of a number of works containing material relating to the Salishan languages.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling.
At the Fischer sale, a copy, no. 919, brought
10s.; at the Squier sale, no. 651, $1.50. Leclerc,
1878, no. 345, prices it 4 fr. and Maisonneuve, in
1889,4 fr. The Murphy copy, no. 1452, brought
$2.75.
 Bibliotheca j  americana | Histoire,
geographic, | voyages,  archenlogie   et
linguistique | des | deux Ame'riques |
et | des iles Philippines | re'dige'e | Par
Ch. Leclerc | [Design] |
Paris | Maisonneuve et Cie, libraires-
e*diteurs | 25, quai Voltaire, 25. | 1878
Cover title as above, half-title verso blank
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. avant-propos
pp. i-xvii, table des divisions pp. xviii-xx, catalogue pp. 1-643, suppl6ment pp. 645-694, index
pp. 695-737, colophon verso blank 11. 8°.
The linguistic part of this volume occupies
pp. 537-643; it is arranged under names of languages and contains titles of books relating to
the following: Langues americaines en gen6ral,
pp. 537-550; Clallam et Lummi, p. 568.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Congress,
Eames, Harvard, Pilling.
Priced by Quaritch, no. 12172, 12s.; another
copy, no. 12173, large paper, 11. Is. Leclerc's
Supplement, 1881, no. 2831, prices it 15 fr., and no.
2832, a copy on Holland paper, 30 fr. A large
paper copy is priced by Quaritch, no. 30230,12*.
Maisonneuve in 1889 prices it 15 fr.
Lee (Daniel) and Frost (J. H.) Ten
years in Oregon. | By D. Lee and J. H.
Frost, | late of the Oregon mission of
the Methodist episcopal church. |
[Picture.] J
New-York: | published for the
authors: 200 Mulberry-street. | J.
Collord, Printer. | 1844.
Title verso copyright notice (1844) 11. preface
pp. 3-6, contents pp. 7-11. text pp. 13-337, appendix pp. 339-344, map, 12°.
Vocabulary of the Killemook (80 words and
phrases), pp. 339-341.—Vocabulary of the Che-
calish (65words), pp. 341-343.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Pilling, Trumbull.
Legends:
Komuk
Pentlash
Salish
Silets
Snanaimuk
Twana
Twana
See Boas (E.)
Boas (E.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
[Le Jeune (Pere Jean-Marie Raphael).]
A ha a skoainjwts a Jesu-Kri oa Ste.
Marguerite-Marie | Alacoque. A joat
k'oe iamit oa N'jhoakwk:
Colophon : P. A. Kemper, Dayton, O.
(N.America.) [1890.] (Ntlakapamoh,
Br. Columbia.)
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of
Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary," in the
Ntlakapaniok language. On the verso is a
colored picture of the sacred heart, beneath
which is a five-line verse in English.
Copies seen: Pilling, "Wellesley.
Some issues are printed on cards which have
the verse beneath the picture in French.
(Eames.)
 Nelh te skoalwtz Jesu-Kri j n Ste.
Marguerite Mali Alacok.    Shoat koe
lamhal a tn sptenosem.
Colophon: P.A.Kemper, Dayton, O.
(N. America.) [1890.] Lillooet, Br.
Columbia.
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of
Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary "in the
Lillooet language. On the verso is a colored
picture of the sacred heart, beneath which is a
five-line verse in English.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Mr. Kemper has issued similar cards in many
languages.
[ ] [Two lines stenographic characters.] | No. 1. Kamloops Wawa May 2.
;91[-No.76 30, Apr. 1893].
A periodical in tho Chinook Jargon, stenographic characters, intended as a weekly, but
issued in its early stages at irregular intervals,-
at Kamloops, British Columbia, under the editorship of Father Le Jeune, and reproduced by
him with the aid of the mimeograph. See facsimile of the first page of the initial issue, p. 38.
A detailed description of the issues and their
contents to no. 67, inclusive, is given in the
Bibliography of the Chinookan languages.
Night prayers in Shushwap, no. 9, pp. 1-4 (pp.
51-54 of the series).
[ ] Prayers in | Shushwap. | I. Night
Prayers.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1892.]
No title-page, heading as above ,• text (in the
Shushwap language, stenographic characters,
III* ^—
i-^.-—^L^-, C/olAo^/\
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
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FACSIMILE OF THE FIRST PAGE OF THE KAMLOOPS WAWA.
mesmmia.ii   — i^al
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SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
39
Le Jeune (J. M. R.) — Continued.
with English and Latin headings in italics,
reproduced by the mimeograph), pp.1-16,16°.
Yeni Sancti, p. 1.—Act of faith, p. 1; of hope,
p.2; of love, pp. 2-3; of contrition, p. 3; of
adoration, pp. 3-4; of thanksgiving, pp. 4-5.—
Prayer for light, pp. 5-6; examen, pp. 6-7: firm
purpose, pp. 7-8; confietor, p. 9.—Misereatur
and Indulgentiam, p. 10.—The ten commandments, pp. 10-11.—Precepts of the church, pp.
11-12.—Seven capital sins, p. 12.—Mght offering, p. 13.—Prayer for the living and the dead,
pp. 14-15.—Sub tuum, pp. 15-16.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Subsequently incorporated in the following:
[ ] Prayers in Shushwap. | Morning
Prayers.
[Kamloops, B. C: 1892.]
No title-page, heading as above; text (in the
Shushwap language, stenographic characters,
with English and Latin headings in italics,
reproduced by the mimeograph), pp. 1-48,16°.
Morning Prayers: Veni Sancte, p. 1.—Adoration, p. 1.—Thanksgiving, p. 2.—Resolution,
pp. 2-3.—Petition, p. 3.—Pater, pp. 3-4.—Ave
Maria, p, 4.—Credo, pp. 4-5.—Seven sacraments, p. 6.—Act of faith, p. 6; of hope, pp. 6-7,
of love, p. 7; of contrition, pp. 7-8.—To the
blessed Virgin, etc., pp. 8-9.—Angelus, pp. 9-
10.—Gloria patri, p. 11.—Sub tuum, p. 11.—The
rosary, pp. 12-16.
Night prayers: Detailed contents as under
title next above, pp. 17-32.
Prayers before communion: Hymn, pp. 33-
34.—Act of faith, pp. 34-35; of humility, pp.
35-36; of contrition, pp. 36-37; of love, p. 37 ■ of
desire, pp. 38-39.
After communion: Prayer, p. 40.—Thanksgiving, p. 41.—Petition, p. 42.—Resolution, pp.
43-44.—Offering, pp. 44-45.—Intercession, p.
45.—Hymns, pp. 46-48.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 Prayers in Thompson. | by J. M. R.
Le Jeune O. M. I.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
ISo title-page, heading only; text (entirely
in the language of the Indians of Thompson
river, stenographic characters, reproduced by
the mimeograph), pp. 1-32,16°. See facsimile
of the first page, p. 40.
Copies seen: Pilling.
[—111 Prayers. | in Thompson. | or Mtla-
kapmah. | Morning Prayers.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1892.]
No title-page, heading only; text (in the
Mtlakapmah, stenographic characters, with
English headings in italics; reproduced by the
mimeograph), pp. 1-16,16°.
Veni Sancte, p. 1.—Adoration, p. 2 Thanksgiving, pp. 2-3.—Resolution, pp. 3-4.—Petition,
pp. 4-5.—Pater, pp. 5-6.—Ave, p. 6.—Credo, pp.
7-8.—Septem sacramenta, p. 8.—Act of faith,
pp. 8-9.—Act of hope, p. 9.—Act of love and of
Le Jeune (J. M. R.) — Continued.
contrition, p. 10.—Invocation, p. 11.—To the B.
Virgin, p. 11.—To the guardian angel, pp. 11-
12.—To the saints, p. 12.—Angelus, p. 13.—
Oremus, ad Gloria Patri, p. 14.—Sub tuum, p.
15.—Offering of the mass, pp. 15-16.
Copies seen: Pilling.
[ ] Primer and 1st Lessons in Thompson. | by. J. M. R. Le Jeune O. M. I.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
ISTo title-page, headings only; text (in stenographic characters, with headings in English
and Latin in italics, reproduced on the mimeograph) 4 unnumbered pages, 16°.
Passion hymn, p. 1.—Primer lesson, pp. 2-3.—
O ia S4 Joseph, p. 4.
Copies seen: Pilling.
 [Hymns in the Thompson tongue.
By Rev. J. M. R. Le Jeune, O. M. I.
Kamloops, B. C.: 1891.]
2To title-page, text (in stenographic characters, reproduced by the aid of the mimeograph),
4 unnumbered pages, 16°.
Passion hymn, pp. 1-2.—Hoe kanmentam, p.
3.—O ia St. Joseph, p. 4.
Copies seen: Pilling.
— Shorthand primer 'for the Thompson
Language [ by J. M. - R. Le Jeune
O. M. |
[Kamloops, B. C: 1891.]
IsTo title-page, heading only; text (in stenographic characters and italics, reproduced by
the mimeograph) 4 unnumbered pages, 16°.
Copies seen: Pilling.
[ ] First  Catechism, j in | Thompson
Language.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1892.]
~No title-page, heading only; text (in the language of the Indians of Thompson River,
stenographic characters, reproduced by the
mimeograph), pp. 1-32,16°.
Eight chapters, referring respectively to:
Grod, Trinity, pp 1-2; Creation, pp. 2-4; Jesus
Christ, pp. 4-8; Sin, pp. 8-10; Baptism, pp. 11-
12; Confirmation, pp. 12-14; Penance, pp. 14-28;
Holy Eucharist, pp. 28-32.
Copies seen.- Pilling.
[ ] First Catechism | in Shushwap.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1893^]
No title-page,heading only; text (in the
Shushwap language, stenographic characters,
with headings in English in italics, reproduced
by the mimeograph), pp. 1-32,16°.
Mne chapters, headed respectively: God,
Trinity, creation, etc., pp. 1-2.—Creation, pp.
2-3.—Jesus Christ, pp.'3-6.—On sin, pp. 6-7.—
Death, pp. 7-9.—Penance, pp. 9-16.—Eucharist,
pp. 17-18.—Confirmation, pp. 18-19.—Questions
from another catechism, not included in the
above, pp. 19-32.
Copies seen: Pilling.
1 ©
L
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Prayers    *W   TUo-wifsonn,
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FACSIMILE OF THE FIRST PAGE OF LE JEUNE'S THOMPSON PRAYERS. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
41
Le Jeune (J. M. R.) — Continued.
• Prayers. | in Okonagon Language.
[Kamloops, B. C.: 1893.]
No title-page, heading only; text (in the
Okonagon language, stenographic characters,
with Latin and English headings in italics,
reproduced by the mimeograph), pp. 1-48,16°.
Morning prayers, pp. 1-16.—Night prayers,
pp. 17-32.—Prayers for communion, pp. 33-48.
Copies seen: Pilling.
A somewhat lengthy statement of Father
Le Jeune's methods and purposes is given in
the Bibliography of theChinookan Languages,
pp. 45-51.
Pere Jean-Marie Raphael Le Jeune was born
at Pleybert Christ, Finistere, France, April 12,
1855, and came to British Columbia as a missionary priest in October, 1879. He made his
first acquaintance with the Thompson Indians
in June, 1880, and has been among them ever
since. He began at once to study their language and was able to express himself easily
in that language after a few months. When he
first came he found about a dozen Indians who
knew a few prayers and a little of a catechism
in the Thompson language, composed mostly
by Right Rev. Bishop Durieu, O. M. I., the
present bishop of New "Westminster. From
1880 to 1882 he traveled only between Tale and
Lytton, 57 miles, trying to make acquaintance
with as many natives as he could in that district. Since 1882 he has had to visit also the
Nicola Indians, who speak the Thompson language, and the Douglas Lake Indians, who
are a branch of the Okanagan family, and had
occasion to become acquainted with the Okanagan language, in which he composed and
revised most of the prayers they have in use up
to the present. Since June 1,1891, he has also
had to deal with the Shushwap Indians, and,
as the language is similar to that in use by the
Indians of Thompson River, he very soon
became familiar with it.
He tried several years ago to teach the Indians to read in the English characters, but
without avail, and two years ago he undertook
to teach them in shorthand, experimenting first
upon a young Indian boy who learned the shorthand after a single lesson and began to help
him teach the others. The work went on
slowly until last winter, when they began to be
interested in it all over the country, and since
then they have been learning it with eagerness •
and teaching it to one another.
Lenox: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the Lenox Library, New York City.
Lettre au Saint-Pere en Langue Kalispel, (Anglice Flathead.)
In Societe Philologique, Actes, vol. 15, pp.
110-112, Alencon, 1877,8°. (Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling.)
Three versions, Latin, English, and Kalispel,
of a letter to the Pone.
Liloeet.   See Lilowat
Lilowat:
Numerals
Prayers
Text
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Eells (M.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J.M.R.)
Boas (F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F.L.O.)
Tolmie   (W.    F.)
Dawson (G.M.)
and
Litany:
Kalispel See Canestrelli (P.)
Netlakapamuk Good (J. B.)
L'kungen.    See Songish.
Lord's prayer:
Kalispel
Kalispel
Kalispel
Kalispel
Kawich en
Klallam
Klallam
Lilowat
Lummi
Netl apakamuk
N etlapakamuk
Netlapakamuk
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Samish
Snanaimuk
Snanaimuk
Snohomish
Snohomish
Twana
See Shea (J. G.)
Smalley (E. V.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Van Gorp (L.)
Youth's.
Bulmer (T. S.)
Youth's.
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Youth's.
Bancroft (H. H.)
Good (J. B.)
Youth's.
Bulmer (T.S.)
Youth's.
Bancroft (H.H.) -
Bulmer (T.S.)
Marietti (P.)
Shea (J.G.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Youth's.
Smet (P.J.de).
Bancroft (H. H.)
Carmany (J. H.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Youth's.
Bulmer (T.S.)
Lu Skusskuests [Kalispel].    See Canestrelli (P.)
Lu tel kaimintis [Kalispel].   See Giorda
(J.)
Lubbock  (Sir   John).    The | origin   of
civilisation | and the | primitive condition of man. | Mental and social condition of savages. | By | sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. E. S. | author
[&c; two lines.] |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
I 1870.    j
Half-title verso names of printers 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-
viii, contents p. ix, list of illustrations pp. xi-
xii, list of principal works quoted pp. xiii-xvi,
text pp. 1-323, appendix pp. 325-362. notes pp.
363-365, index pp. 367-380, four other plates, 8°.
A few words in the Niskwalli language, p.
288.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames. Harvard. 42
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Lubbock (J.) — Continued.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. J Mental
and social condition of savages. J By |
sir John Lubbock,Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| author[&c. two lines.] |
New York: | D. Applet on and company, 190, 92 & 94 Grand street. 11870.
Half-title verso blank 11. frontispiece 11. title
verso blank 11. preface to the American edition
pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-viii, contents p. ix,
illustrations pp. xi-xii, list of principal works
quoted pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 1-323, appendix pp.
325-362, notes pp. 363-365, index pp. 367-380, four
other plates, 12°.
Linguisticcontents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Harvard, Pilling.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
Sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. R. S.
| author   [&c.   twro   lines.] | Second
edition, with additions. \
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1870.
Half-title verso names of printers 11. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-
viii, contents pp. ix-xiii, illustrations pp. xv-
xvi, list of principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx,
text pp. 1-367, appendix 369-409, notes pp. 411-
413, index pp. 415-426, list of books 11. five other
plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
327.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames, Harvard.
The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
sir John Lubbock, Bart., M. P., F. E.
S. f vice-chancellor [&c. three lines.]
| Third edition, with numerous additions. |
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
| 1875.
Half-title verso names of printer 11. frontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. preface pp. v-viii,
contents pp. ix-xiii, illustrations pp. xv-xvi,
list of the principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx,
text pp. 1-463, appendix pp. 465-507, notes pp.
509-514, index pp. 515 -528, five other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
416.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames.
— The | origin of civilisation | and the
Lubbock (J.) —Continued.
| D. C. L. LL. D. | President [&o. five
lines.] | Fourth edition, with numerous
additions. J
London: | Longmans, Green, and co.
( 1882.
Half-title verso list of works | by the same
author" 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title verso names
of printers 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents pp.
ix-xiii, illustrations pp. xv-xvi, list of the principal works quoted pp. xvii-xx, text pp. 1-480,
appendix pp. 481-524, notes pp. 525-533, index
pp. 535-548, five other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
427.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Eames,
Harvard.
 The | origin of civilisation | and the
| primitive condition of man J Mental
and social condition of savages | By |
Sir John Lubbock, bart. | M. P., F. R.
S., D. C. L., LL. D. | author [&c. four
lines]
Additions i
Fifth Edition, with numerous
| primitive condition of man. | Mental
and social condition of savages. | By |
Sir John Lubbock, Bart. M. P. F. R. S.
London | Longmans, Green, and co |
1889 J All rights reserved ■
Half-title verso names of printers 11. frontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. preface (February,
1870) pp. vii-x, contents pp. xi-xvi,illustrations
pp. xvii-xviii, list of principal works quoted
pp. xix-xxiii, text pp. 1-486, appendix pp. 487-
529, notes pp. 531-539, index pp. 541-554, list of
works by the same author verso blank 1 1. five
other plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above, p.
432.
Copies seen: Eames.
Ludewig (Hermann Ernst). The | literature | of | American aboriginal languages. | By | Hermann E. Ludewig. [
With additions and corrections | by
professor Wm. W. Turner. | Edited by
Nicolas Triibner. |
London: | Triibner and co., 60, Paternoster row. | MDCCCLVIII [1858].
Half-title "Triibner's bibliotheca glottica
I" verso blank 11. title as above verso name of
printer 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents verso
blank 11. editor's advertisement pp. ix-xii, biographical memoir pp. xiii-xiv, introductory
bibliographical notices pp. xv-xxiv, text pp. 1-
209, addenda pp. 210-246, index pp. 247-256,
errata pp. 257-258,8°. Arranged alphabetically
by languages. Addenda by "Wm. "W. Turner
and Mcolas Triibner, pp. 210-246.
Contains a list of grammars and vocabularies
and among others of the following peoples:
American languages generally, pp. xv-xxiv;
Atnah or Kinn, pp. 15,212; Elathead, Selish
(Atnah, Schouscbusp), pp. 72-74, 216, 221;
Kawitschen", p. 91; Squallaymish, p. 239.
J SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
43
Ludewig (II. E.) — Continued.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress,
Eames, Georgetown, Pilling.
At the Fischer sale, no. 990, a copy brought 5s.
6d.-, at the Field sale, no. 1403, $2.63; at the
Squiersale, no. 699, $2.62; another copy, no. 1906,
$2.38. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2075, 15 fr.
The Pinart copy, no. 565, sold for 25 fr., and
the Murphy copy, no. 1540, for $2.50.
"Dr. Ludewig has himself so fully detailed
the plan and purport of this work that little
more remains for me to add beyond the mere
statement of the origin of my connection with
the publication and the mention of such additions for which I am alone responsible, and
which, during its progress through the press,
have gradually accumulated to about one-sixth
of the whole. This is but an act of j ustice to the
memory of Dr. Ludewig. because at the time of
his death, in December, 1856, no more than 172
pages were printed off, and these constitute the
only portion of the work which had the benefit
of his valuable personal and final revision.
" Similarity of pursuits led, during my stay
in ISTew York in 1855. to an intimacy with Dr.
Ludewig, during which he mentioned that he,
like myself, had been making bibliographical
memoranda for years of all books which serve
to illustrate the history of spoken language.
As a first section of a more extended work on
the literary history of language generally, he
had prepared a bibliographical memoir of the
remains of aboriginal languages of America.
The manuscript had been deposited by him in
the library of the Ethnological Society at New
York, but at my request he at once most kindly
placed it at my disposal, stipulating only that
it should be printed in Europe, under my personal superintendence.
" Upon my return to England, I lost no time
in carrying out the trust thus confided to me,
intending then to confine myself simply to producing acorrectcopy of my friend's manuscript.
But it soon became obvious that the transcript
had been hastily made, and but for the valuable
assistance of literary friends, both in this
country and in America, the work would probably have been abandoned. My thanks are more
particularly due to Mr. E. G. Squier, and to
Prof. "William ~W. Turner, of Washington, by
whose considerate and valuable cooperation
many difficulties were cleared away and my editorial labors greatly lighteu ed. This encouraged
me to spare neither personal labor nor expense
in the attempt to render the work as perfect as
possible, with what success must be left to
the judgmentof those who can fairly appreciate
the labors of a pioneer in any new field of literary research."—Editor's advertisement.
"Dr. Ludewig,though but little known in
this country [England], was held in consider-
ableesteem as a jurist, both in Germany and the
United States of America. Born at Dresden in
1809, with but little exception he continued to
reside in his native city until 1844, when he emi-
■     grated to America; but, though in both coun-
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
tries he practiced law as a profession, his bent
was the study of literary history, which was
evidenced by his Livre des Ana, Essai de Catalogue Manuel, published at his own cost in 1837,
and by his Bibliothekonomie, which appeared
a few years later.
"But even while thus engaged he delighted
in investigating the rise and progress of the land
of his subsequent adoption, and his researches
into the vexed question of the origin of the peopling of America gained him the highest consideration, on both sides of the Atlantic, as a man
of original and inquiring mind. He was a
contributor to INaumann's Serapseum; and
amongst the chief of his contributions to that
journal may be mentioned those on 'American
libraries,' on the 'Aids to American bibliography,' and on the 'Book trade of the United
States of America.' In 1846 appeared his Literature of American Local History, a work of
much importance and which required no small
amount of labor and perseverance, owing to the
necessity of consulting the many and widely
scattered materials, which had to be sought out
from apparently the most unlikely channels.
"These studies formed a natural introduction to the present work on The Literature of
American Aboriginal Languages, which occupied his leisure concurrently with the others,
and the printing of which was commenced in
August, 1856, but which he did not live to see
launched upon the world; for at the date of his
death, on the 12th of December following, only
172 pages were in type. It had been a labor of
love with him for years; and, if ever author
were mindful of the nonum prematurin annum,
he was when he deposited his manuscript in the
library of the American Ethnological Society,
diffident himself as to its merits and value on a
subject of such paramount interest. He had
satisfied himself that in due time the reward of
his patient industry might be the production of
some more extended national work on the subject, and with this he was contented; for it was
a distinguishing feature in his character, notwithstanding his great and varied knowledge
and brilliant acquirements, to disregard his
own toil, even amounting to drudgery if needful, if he could in any way assist the promulgation of literature and science.
" Dr. Ludewig was a corresponding member
of many of the most distinguished European
and American literary societies, and few men
were held in greater consideration by scholars
both in America and Germany, as will readily be
acknowledged should his voluminous correspondence ever see the light. In private life he
was distinguished by the best qualities which
endear a man's memory to those who survive
him; he was a kind and affectionate husband
and a sincere friend. Always accessible and
ever ready to aid and counsel those who applied
to him for advice upon matters pertaining to
literature, his loss will long be felt by a most
extended circle of friends, and in him Germany 44
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Ludewig (H. E.) — Continued.
mourns one of the best representatives of her
learned men in America, a genuine type of a class
in which, with singular felicity, with genius
of the highest order is combined a painstaking
and plodding perseverance but seldom met with
beyond the confines of the Fatherland."—Biographic memoir.
Lummi:
Geographic names
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
See Gibbs (G.)
Youth's.
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Poehrig (F. L. 0.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Youth's.
M.
McCaw (Samuel R.) [Words, phrases,
sentences, and grammatic material
relating to the Puyallup language.]
Manuscript, pp. 77-228, and 4 unnumbered
leaves, 4°. In the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology. Recorded in a copy of Powell's
Introduction to the study of Indian languages,
second edition. Collected in Pierce county,
Washington, during 1886.
While but few of the schedules given in the
work are completely filled, nearly all of them
are partly so. The four leaves at the end contain verbal conjugations.
Macdonald (Duncan George Forbes).
British Columbia | and | Vancouver's
island | comprising | a description of
these dependencies: their physical |
character, climate, capabilities, population, trade, natural history, | geology,
ethnology, gold fields, and future prospects | also | An Account of the Manners and Customs of the Native Indians
| by | Duncan George Forbes Macdonald, C. E. | (Late of the Government
Survey Staff of British Columbia, and
the International Boundary | Line of
North America) Author of 'What the
Farmers may do with the | Land' 'The
Paris Exhibition' 'Decimal Coinage'
&c. | With a comprehensive map. |
London | Longman,Green, Longman,
Roberts, & Green j 1862.
Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. title
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, contents pp.
ix-xiii, text pp. 1-442, appendices pp. 445-524,
map, 8°.
Proper names of thirteen members of the
Songish tribe, pp. 164-165.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress.
Sabin's Dictionary, no. 43149, mentions: Second edition, London, Longmans, 1863,8°.
McEvoy (J.)    See Dawson (G. M.)
Mackay (J. W.)   See Dawson (G. M.)
Mackenzie (Sir Alexander). Voyages |
from | Montreal, | on the river St.
Laurence, | through the | continent of
North America, | to the | Frozen and
Pacific oceans; | In the Years 1789 and
1793. | With a preliminary account | of
the rise, progress, and present state of
| the fur trade | of that country. J Illustrated with maps. | By Alexander
Mackenzie, esq. |
London: | printed for T. Cadell, jun.
and W. Davies, Strand; Cobbett and
Morgan, | Pall-mall; andW. Creech, a J
Edinburgh. J By R. Noble, Old-Bailey.
| M.DCCC.I [1801].
Half-title verso blank 1 1. portrait 1 1. title
verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1.
preface pp. iii-viii, general history of the fur
trade etc. pp. i-cxxxii, text pp. 1-412, errata 11.
3 maps, 4°.
Vocabulary of the Atnah or Carrier Indians
(25 words), pp. 257-258.—Vocabulary of the
Indians of Friendly Village (25 words), p. 376.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Dunbar,
Eames, Geological Survey, Harvard, Trumbull,
"Watkinson.
Stevens's Nuggets, no. 1775, priced a copy 10*.
6c?. At the Fischer sale, no. 1006, it brought 5s.;
another copy, no. 2532, 2s. 6d.; at the Field sale,
no. 1447, $2.38; at the Squier sale, no. 709, $1.62;
at the Murphy sale, no. 1548, $2.25. Priced by
Quaritch, no. 12206, 7*. 6d.-, no. 28953, a half-
russia copy, 11.; Clarke & co. 1886, no. 4049.
$5.50; Stevens, 1887, priced a copy 1Z. 7*. Qd.
 Voyages j from J Montreal, | on  the
river St. Laurence, | through the| continent of North America, | to the j Frozen
and Pacific oceans: | in the years 1789
and 1793. | With a preliminary account
of | the rise, progress, and present state
of | the fur trade | of | that country. |
Illustrated with a map. | By Alexander
Mackenzie, esq, | First American edition, j •
mure** I""-
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
45
Mackenzie (A.) — Continued.
New-York: | Printed and Sold by G.
F. Hopkins, at Washington's Head, No.
118, Pearl-street. | 1802.
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank
11. preface to the London edition pp. v-viii, text
(General history of the fur trade) pp. 1-94,
(Journal of a voyage) pp. 1-296, map, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 186,271 (second pagination).
Copies seen.- Astor, Boston Athena3um.
 Voyages | from | Montreal, | on the
river St. Laurence, [through the | continent of North America, | to the | Frozen
and Pacific oceans; | in the years 1789
and 1793. | With a preliminary account
j of the rise, progress, and present state
| of | the fur trade | of that country.
| Illustrated with | a general map of
the country. | By sir Alexander Mackenzie. |
Philadelphia: | published by John
Morgan. J JR. Carr, printer. | 1802.
2 vols, in one: half-title verso blank 11. title
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. i-viii, text pp. i-cxxvi, 1-113; 115-392,
map, 8°.
Linguistic contents as in the London edition
of 1801 titled above, pp. cxiii-cxxvi, 246.
Copies seen.- Geological Survey, Harvard.
Some copies have on the title-page the words:
"Illustrated with a general map of the country
and a portrait of the author." (*)
At the Field sale, a copy, no. 1448, brought
$2.62.
 Voyages | D'Alex/11-0   Mackenzie; |
dans l'int6rieur | de | l'Arne'rique Sep-
tentrionale, | Faits en 1789, 1792 et
1793; | Le l.er, de Montreal au fort Chi-
piouyanet a la mer Glaciale; | Le2.me,
du fort Chipiouyan jusqu'aux bords de
POc6an | pacifique. | Prece'de's d'un Tableau historique et politique sur | le
commerce des pelleteries, dans le Canada. | Traduits de P Anglais, | Par J.
Cast6ra, | Avec des Notes et un Itine'-
raire, tire's en partie des | papiers du
vice-amiral Bougainville. | Tome Premier [-III]. |
Paris, | Dentu, Imprimeur-Libraire,
Palais du Tribunal, | galeries de bois,
n
o «
240. I An X.—1802.
3 vols, maps, 8°.
Linguistic contents as in the first edition
titled above, vol. 3, p. 20,277.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress.
At the Fischer sale, no. 2533, a copy brought
1*.   Priced by Gagnon, Quebec, 1888, $3.
For title of an extract from this edition see
under date of 1807 below.
Mackenzie (A.) — Continued.
 Alexander Mackenzie's Esq.
P
Xeisen
| von | Montreal durch Nordwestame-
rika | nach dem | Eismeer und der Slid-
See | in den Jahren 1789 und 1793. |
Nebst | einer Geschichte des Pelzhan-
dels in Canada. | Aus dem Englischen.
[ Mit einer allgemeinen Karte und dem
Bild- | nisse des Yerfassers. |
Berlin und Hamburg. | 1802.
Pp. i-x, 11-408, map, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
pp. 365,480.
Copies seen: British Museum.
— Voyages | from | Montreal, | on the
river St. Laurence, | through the | continent of North America, | to the | Frozen
and Pacific oceans; | In the Years 1789
and 1793. | With a preliminary account
| of the rise, progress, and present state
of | the fur trade | of that country. |
With original notes by Bougainville,
and Volney, | Members of the French
senate. | Illustrated with maps. | By
Alexander Mackenzie, esq. I YoJ.
I[-II]. |
London: | printed for T. Cadell, jun.
and W. Davies, Strand; | Cobbett and
Morgan, Pall-mall; and W. Creech, | at
Edinburgh. | By R. Noble, Old-bailey. |
M. DCCC. II [1802].
2 vols, in one; half-title verso blank 11. title
verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. vii-xiv, text pp. 1-284, contents pp. 285-
290; half-title verso blank 1 1. title (varying
somewhat in punctuation from that of vol. 1)
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 5-310 (wrongly numbered 210), notes pp. 311-312, appendix pp. 313-
325, contents pp. 326-332, maps, 8°.
Linguistic contents as in the first edition,
titled above, vol. 2, pp. 148-149, 273.
Copies seen:  Congress, Geological Survey,
Harvard.
Clarke & co., 1886, priced a copy, no. 4050, at
$3.50.
-— Voyages | from | Montrea], | on the
river St. Laurence, |through the}continent of North-America, J to the | Frozen
and Pacific oceans: | in the years 1789
and 1793. | With a Preliminary Account
of | the rise, progress, and present state
of the | fur trade | of that country. |
Illustrated with a map. | By Alexander
Mackenzie, esq. | Third American edition. |
New-York: published by Evert
Duyckinck, bookseller. | Lewis Nichols,
printer. | 1803.
<£E« 46
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
R*
Mackenzie (A.) —Continued.
Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank
11. preface pp. v-viii, text pp. 9-437,16°.
Linguistic contents as in previous editions
titled above, pp. 314,409.
Copies seen: Congress.
 Tableau | historique et politique |
du commerce des pelleteries j dans le
Canada, 1 depuis 1608 jusqu'a nos jours.
| Contenant beaucoup de details sur
les nations sau- J vages qui Phabitent,
et sur les vastes contrees qui y | sont
contigues; | Avec un Vocabulaire de la
langue de plusieiirs peuples de ces |
vastes controls. J Par Alexandre Mackenzie. | Traduit de VAnglais, | par J.
Cast6ra.| Orne" du portrait de Pauteur. |
Paris, | Dentu, Imprim.-Lib.r6,rue du
Pont-de-Lody, n.° 3. | M. D. CCC. VII
[1807].
Half-title 1 1. title verso blank 11. text pp. 1-
310, table des matieres 1 unnumbered page, 8°.
An extract from vol. 1 of the Paris edition of
1802, titled above.
Linguistic contents as in previous editions,
| titled above, pp. 304-310.
Copies seen: Congress.
Leclerc, 1867, sold a copy, no. 920, for 4 fr.;
priced by him, 1878, no. 756,20 fr.
 Voyages | from | Montreal, | on the
river St. Laurence, ] through the | continent of North America, j to the | Frozen
and Pacific oceans j | in the years 1789
and 1793. j With a preliminary account
\^S | of the rise, progress, and present state
| of | the fur trade | of that country. |
Illustrated with maps and a portrait of
the author. J By sir Alexander Mackenzie. | Vol.I[-II]. |
New-York: | published by W. B. Gil-
ley. | 1814.
2 vols.: 3 p. 11. pp. i-viii, i-cxxvi, 1-113; 11.
pp. 115-392, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under previous titles,
vol. 1, pp. 247,358-359.
Copies seen: Congress.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie, explorer, born in
Inverness, Scotland, about 1755, died in Dal-
housie, Scotland, March 12,1820. In his youth
he emigrated to Canada. In June, 1789, he set
out on his expedition. At the western end of
Great Slave Lake he entered a river, to which
he gave his name, and explored it until July 12,
when he reached the Arctic Ocean. He then
returned to Fort Chippewyan, where he arrived
on September 27. In October, 1792, he undertook
a more hazardous expedition to the western coast
of INbrth America and succeeded in reaching
CapeMenzies, on the Pacific Ocean. He returned
to England in 1801 and was knighted the following yQ&r>—>Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
Mallet : This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy
of the work referred to has been seen by the
compiler in the library of Major Edmond Mallet,
Washington, D. C
Marietti (Pietro), editor. Oratio Dominica | in ccl. lingvas versa | et j clxxx.
charactervm formis | vel nostratibvs vel
peregrinis expressa J cvrante Petro
Marietti j Eqvite Typographo Pontificio
| Socio Administro | Typographei | S.
Consilii de Propaganda Fide | [Printer's device] |
Romae | AnnoM. DCCC. LXX [1870].
Half-title 1 1. title 1 1. dedication 3 11. pp. xi-
xxvii, 1-319, indexes 411.4°.
Includes 59 versions of the Lord's prayer in -
various American dialects,  among them the
Oregonice, which may or may not be Salishaui
p. 303.   I have had no recent opportunity to
investigate the matter.
Copies seen: Trumbull.
Massachusetts Historical Society: These words
following a title or within parentheses after a
note indicate that a copy of the work referred
to has been seen by the compiler in the library
of that society, Boston, Mass.
Maximilian (Alexander Philipp) Prim
von Wied-Neuwied. Reise | in | das in-
nere Nord-America | in den Jahren 1832
bis 1834 | von | Maximilian Prinz zu
Wied. | Mit 48 Kupfern, 33 Vignetten,
vielen Holzschnitten und einer Charte.
| Erster[-Zweiter] Band, j
Coblenz, 1839 [-1841]. | Bei J. Hcel-
scher.
2 vols.: title verso blank 1 1. dedication 1 1.
half-title verso blank 11. Vorwort pp. vii-xiv, I
Inhaltpp. xv-xvi, half-title verso blank 11. text
pp. 3-630, Anhangpp. 631-653, errata p. 654, colophon verso blank 11.; title verso blank 11. half-
title verso blank 11. list of subscribers pp. v-xvi,
Inhalt pp. xvii-xix, list of plates pp. xx-xxii,
errata 1 1. text pp. 1-425, Anhang pp. 427-687,
colophon p. [688], 4°.   Atlas in folio.
Einige "Worts (25) der Flatheads in den
Kocky Mountains, vol. 2, pp. 501-502.
Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames.
At the Field sale, no. 1512, a copy of this
edition, together with one of the London, 1843
edition, brought $40.50.
 Voyage      dans   Pinte'rieur      de
PAmerique du Nord, | exe"cut6 pendant
les annCes 1832, 1833 et 1834, | par | le
prince Maximilien de Wied-Neuwied. |
Ouvrage | accompagne" d'un Atlas de 80
planches environ, J format demi-colom-
bier, | dessinees sur les lieux | Par M.
Charles Bodmer; | et j gravies par les —-
SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
47
Maximilian (A. P.) — Continued,
plus habiles artistes de Paris et de
Londres. | Tome premier [-troisieme]. |
Paris, | chez Arthus Bertrand, 6di-
teur, libraire de la Socie'te' de geographic de Paris | etdelaSoci6t6royale
des antiquaires du nord, | rue Haute-
feuille, 25. | 1840[-1843].
3 vols. 8°.
Notice sur les langues de differentes nations
au nord-ouest de ! Amerique, vol. 3, pp. 373-398,
contains a vocabulary of 19 words of the 23
different languages treated in the German edition, pp. 379-382. The Flathead occupies lines
no. 8.—De la langue des signes en usage chez
les Indiens, pp. 389-398.
Copies seen: Congress.
The English edition, London, 1843, 4°, contains no Salishan linguistics. (Astor, Boston
Athenaeum, Congress, Lenox, Watkinson.)
Alexander Philipp Maximilian, Prince of
Neuwied, German naturalist, born in Neuwied
Sept. 23,1782, died there, Feb. 3,1867. In 1815,
after attaining the rank of major-general in the
Prussian army, he devoted nearly three years
to explorations in Brazil. In 1833 he traveled
through the United States, giving especial
attention to ethnological investigations con
cerning the Indian tribes.—Appleton's Cyclop,
of Am. Biog.
Mengarini (Rev. Gregory). A | Selish or
Flat-head j grammar. | By the | rev.
Gregory Mengarini, | of the Society of
Jesus. | [Design.] |
New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1861.
Second title: Grammatica | linguae Selicae. |
Auctore | P. Gregorio Mengarini, | Soc. Jesn. |
Neo-Eboraci. 11861.
Half-title (Library of American linguistics,
II) verso blank 1 1. English title verso blank 1 ?
1. Latin title verso blank 11. prooemium pp.vii-
viii, text in Selish and Latin pp. 1-122,8°.
Pars prima Grammatica linguae Selicae, pp.
1-62.—Pars secunde, Dilucidationes in rudi-
menta, pp. 62-78.—Pars tertia. Introductio ad
syntaxin, pp. 79-116.—Appendix, pp. 117-121.—
Oratio dominicales, with interlinear Latin
translation, pp. 122.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Lenox,
"Wellesley.
 Indians of Oregon, etc.   (Note from
Rev. Gregory Mengarini, S. J., Vice-
President of the College of Santa
Clara, California. Communicated by
Geo. Gibbs, esq.)
In Anthropological Inst, of New York Jour,
vol. 1, pp. 81-88, New York, 1871-1872, 8°. (Congress.)
Numerals 1-10 of the Flathead and of the
" South Indians," p. 83.—A number of Salishan
terms passim*
Mengarini (G.)—Continued.
 Vocabulary of the Skoylpeli.
In Powell (J. W.), Contributions to N. A.
Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 253-265, "Washington, 1877,
4°.
Contains 180 words, those called for on one
of the Smithsonian blank forms.
 Vocabulary of the S'chitzui or Cceur
d'Alene, and of the Selish proper or
Flathead.
In Powell (J.W), Contributions to N. A.
Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 270-282, Washington, 1877,
4°.
Contain 180 words each, those called for on
one of the Smithsonian blank forms.
 See Gibbs (G.)
 See Giorda (J.)
Montgomerie (Lieut. John Eglinton) and
De Horsey (A. F. R.) A | few words |
collected from the | languages | spoken
by the Indians | in the neighbourhood
of the | Columbia River & Puget's
Sound. [ By John E. Montgomerie,
Lieutenant R. N. | and Algernon F. R.
De Horsey, Lieutenant R. R. |
London: | printed by George R. Odell,
18 Princess-street,Cavendish-square, j
1848.
Title verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. iii-iv,
text pp. 5-30,12°.
Vocabulary of the Chinook, Clikitat, Cascade
and Squally languages, pp. 1-23. —Numerals in
Squally, p. 24.—Chinook proper and Chehalis
numbers, p. 24.—Names of places, pp. 25-28.
Copies seen: British Museum, Sir Thomas
Phillips, Cheltenham, England.
Morgan (Lewis   Henry).   Smithsonian
Contributions   to   Knowledge. | 218 |
Systems | of | consanguinity and affinity j of the | human   family. | By |
Lewis H. Morgan. |
Washington city: | published by the
Smithsonian institution. | 1871.
Colophon: Published by the Smithsonian institution, | Washington city, | June, 1870.
Title on cover as above, inside title differing
from above in imprint Arerso blank 1 1. advertisement p. iii, preface pp. v-ix verso blank,
contents pp. xi-xii, text pp. 1-583, index pp.
585-590,14 plates, 4°.
Also forms vol. 17 of Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. Such issues have no cover
title, but the general title of the series and 6
other prel. 11. preceding the inside title.
The Salish Nations (pp. 244-249) is a general
discussion of "the Salish stock language,
spoken in the seventeen dialects above enumerated" and contains many examples from Gibbs'
manuscripts, pp. 245-246, and Mengaxini's
Selish Grammar, pp. 246-249.
v 48
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Morgan (L. H.) — Continued.
Terms of relationship used by the Okinaken,
collected by Mr. Morgan at Red River Settlement, from an Okinaken woman, lines 70, pp.
293-382.
Gibbs (G.), Terms of relationship used by
the Spokane, lines 69, pp. 293-382.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull.
At the Squier sale,no.889, a copy soldfor $5.50.
Quaritch, no. 12425,* priced a copy 4J,.
Lewis H. Morgan was born in Aurora, Cayuga
County, N.Y., November 21,1818. He was graduated by Union College, Schenectady, in the
class of 1840. Returning from college to Aurora,
Mr. Morgan joined a secret society composed of
the young men of the village and known as the
Grand Order of the Iroquois. This had a great
influence upon his future career and studies.
The order was instituted for sport and amusement, but its organization was modeled on the
governmental system of the Six Nations; and,
chiefly under Mr. Morgan's direction and leadership, the objects of the order were extended,
if not entirely changed, and its purposes
improved. To become better acquainted with
the social polity of the Indians, young Morgan
visited the aborigines remaining in New York,
a mere remnant, but yet retaining to a great
extent their ancient laws and customs; and he
went so far as to be adopted as a member by the
Seneca s. Before the council of the order, in
the years 1844,1845, and 1846, he read a series of
papers on the Iroquois, which were published
under the nom de plume of '' Skenandoah." Mr.
Morgan died in Rochester, N. Y., December 17,
1881.
Morning and evening prayer    ....
Neklakapam.uk.    See Good (J. B.)
Miiller  (Friedrich).    Grundriss j der |
Sprackwissenschaft | von | Dr. Fried-
rich Miiller | Professor[&c. three lines.]
| I. Band | I. Abtheilung. | Einleitung
in die Sprachwissenschaft[-IV. Band.
| I. Abtheilung. | Nachtrage zum Grund-
' riss aus den Jahren | 1877-1887]. |
Wien 1876 [-1888]. | Alfred Holder | K.
K. Universitats-Buchhandler.  | Kot^i-
enthurmstrasse 15.
4 vols. (vol. 1 in 2 parts, vol. 2 originally in 4
divisions, vol. 3 originally in 4 divisions, vol. 4
part 1 all published), each part and division
with an outside title and two inside titles, 8°.
Yol. 2, part 1, which includes the American
languages, was originally issued in two divisions, each with the following special title:
Die Sprachen | der | schlichthaarigenRassen
| von | Dr. Eriedrich Miiller | Professor [&c.
eight lines.] | I. Abtheilung. | Die Sprachen der
australischen, der hyperboreischen ( und der
amerikanischen Rasse[stc]. |
Wien 1879 [-1882]. | Alfred Holder j X. K.
Hof- und Universitats-Buchhandler | Rothen-
thurmstrasse 15.
Title verso "alle Rechte vorbehalten" 1 1.
dedication verso blank 11. Yorrede pp. vii-viii,
Inhalt pp. ix-x, text pp. 1-440, 8°.
Die Sprache der Tsihaili-Selisch, vol. 2, part
1, division 2, p. 243*
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Bureau
of Ethnology, Eames, "Watkinson.
N.
Nanaimoo,    See Snanaimuk.
National Museum: These words following a title
or within parentheses after a note indicate that
a copy of the work referred to has been seen
by the compiler in the library of that institution, Washington, D. C.
Nchaumen lu kaeks-auaum [Kalispel].
See Canestrelli (P.)
Nehelim:
Texts See Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Boas (F.)
Neklakapamuk.   See Netlakapamuk.
Nelh  te skoalwtz Jesu-kri   [Lilowat],
See Le Jeune (J.M. E.)
Netlakapamuk:
Catechism See Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
General discussion        Bancroft (H. H.)
Grammatic treatise      Bancroft (H. H.)
Netlakapamuk —Continued.
Grammatic treatise       Good (J. B.)
Hymn-book
Hymns
Hymns
Litany
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Prayer book
Prayer book
Prayers
Prayers
Primer
Ten commandments
Text
Text
Vocabulary
Words
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Good (J. B.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Good (J.B.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Good (J. B.)
Youth's.
Good (J.B.)
Good (J. B.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Good (J. B.)
Le Jeune (J.M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Good (J.B.)
Good (J. B.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Boas (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
*-*Tg»«i».«gp
Ipr SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
49
Nicoll (Edward Holland). The Chinook
language or Jargon.
In Popular Science Monthly, vol. 35, pp. 257-
261, New York, 1889,8°. (Bureau of Ethnology,
Pilling.)
Origin of the Chinook Jargon, including
words from a number of sources, among them
the Chehalis, pp. 257-259.
Nicoutemuch.    See Nikutamuk.
Nikutamuk:
jhNumerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Niskwalli:
liDictionary
Dictionary
General discussion
General discussion
^General discussion
See Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Geographic names
Geographic names
Geographic names
Grammatic treatise   Bulmer (T. S.)
Grammatic treatise   Eells (M.)
See Gibbs (G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Featherman (A.)
Halo(H.)
Tolmie    (W.   F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Coones (S. F.)
Eells (M.)
Wickersham (J.)
and
Hymns
Hymns
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
[Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Bulmer (T.S.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T.S.)
Youth's.
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Scouler (J.)
Campbell (J.)
Canadian.
Eells (M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Salish.
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Tolmie   (W.   F.)   and
Dawson (G.M.)
Wickersham (J.)
Wilson (E. F.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Daa (L. K.)
Gibbs (G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Lubbock (J.)
Pott (A. F.)
Youth's.
Nisqualli.    See Niskwalli.
Nooksahk.    See. Nuksahk.
Noosdalum.    See Klallam.
Nsietshawus.   See Tilamuk.
SAL i
Nuksahk:
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Nukwalimuk:
Gentes
Numerals:
Bilkula See
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Chehalis
Chehalis
"Chehalis
Kalispel
Kawichen
Kawichen
Kawichen
Klallam
Klallam
Klallam
Klallam
Komuk
Komuk
Kwantlen
Kwinaiutl
Lilowat
Lummi
Netlakapamuk
Nikutamuk
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Okinagan
Okinagan
Okinagan
Piskwau
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Shiwapmuk
Shuswap
Shuswap
Skagit
Skitsuish
Skokomish
Skoyelpi
Skoyelpi
Snanaimuk
Songish
Spokan
Tait
Twana
Nusdalum.    See Klallam
See Gatschet (A. S.)
Gibbs (G.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.
See Boas (F.)
i Boas (F.)
Latham (R. G.)
Scouler (J )
Tolmie (W.F.)
Eells (M.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Swan (J. G.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Eells (M.)
Grant (W. C)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Good (J. B.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Boas (F.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (J.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Mengarini (G.)
Salish.
Eells (M.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
EeUs (M.)
Eells (M.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Nuskiletemh.   See Nukwalimuk.
Nusulph:
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Gibbs (G.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.) 50
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
o.
Office for public baptism   .   .
kapamuk.    See Good (J. B.)
Nekla- I Okinagan — Continued.
Office for the holy communion   .
Neklakapamuk.    See Good (J. B.)
Okinagan:
Grammatic treatise
Hymns
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Prayers
Proper names
Proper names
Relationships
Relationships
Relationships
Sentences
Sentences
See Boas (F.)
Tate (C. M.)
Boas (F.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Ross (A.)
Stanley (J. M.)
Boas (F.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Ross (A.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Texts
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary'
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Howse (J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
Daa (L. K.)
Oppert (Gustav). On the classification!
of languages. A contribution to comparative philology.
In Madras Journal of Literature and Science
for 1879. pp. 1-137, London, 1879, 8°.
Relationships of the Selish family (from
Morgan), pp. 110-112.
P.
[Palladine (Rev. L.)j Promissiones
Domini Nostri Jesu Christi factae B.
Marg. M. Alacoque. | T kaekolinzuten
Jesus Christ zogshits lu pagpagt
Margarite Marie Alacoque | neu l'shei
m'ageists In potenzutis j lu spoosz
Jesus Christ.
Colophon: P. A. Kemper, Dayton, O.
(N.America.) [1890. J Selish, Indian.
A small card, 3 by 5 inches in size, headed as
above and containing twelve "Promises of
Our Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary" in the
Selish language. On the verso is a colored
picture of the sacred heart, with five-line
inscription below in English.
Mr. Kemper has issued a similar card in
many languages.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
Pend d'Oreille.   See Kalispel.
Pentlash:
Legends See Boas (F.)
Text Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Boas (F.)
Words Boas (F.)
Petitot (Rhre fimile Fortune" Stanislas
Joseph). Monographic | des | Dene-
Dindjie' | par | le r. p. E. Petitot | Mis-
sionnaire-Oblat de Marie-Inimacule'e,
Onicier d'Acad^mie, j Membre corre-
spondant de l'Acade'mie de Nancy, | de
la Soci^te* d'Anthropologie | et Membre
honoraire de la Socie'te' de Philologie
et d'Ethnographie de Paris. |
Paris | Ernest   Leroux,   £diteur | li-
braire de la Soci6t6 asiatique de Paris, j
Petitot (E.F. S.J.) —Continued.
de l'6cole des langues orientales vi-
vantes etdes Soci6te"s asiatiques de Calcutta, | de New-Haven (fitats-Unis), de
Shanghai (Chine) | 28, rue Bonaparte,
28 | 1876
Cover title as above, half-title verso name of
printer 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. text
pp. 1-109, list of publications 11.8°.
Verbal conjugations in Wakish (Tetes
Plates), p. 104.—Vocabulary (8 words) of the
same, p. 105.
Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, Eames, Pilling.
De la formation du langage;  mots
formes par le redoublement de racines
h^te'rogenes, quoique de significati<B
synonyme, c'est-a-dire par reiteration
copulative.
In Association francaise pour l'avancement
des sciences, compte-rendu, 12th session (Rouen,
1883), pp. 697-701, Paris, 1884,8°. (Geological
Survey, Pilling.)
Contains examples in a number of North
American languages, among them the St a likin.
iSmils Fortunas Stanislas Joseph Petitot was
born December 3,1838, at Grancey-le-Chateau,
department of C6te-d'Or, Burgundy, France.
His studies were pursued at Marseilles, first at
the Institution St. Louis and later at the higher
seminary of Marseilles, which he entered in 1857.
He was made deacon at Grenoble, and priest at
Marseilles March 15,1862. A few days thereafter
he went to England and sailed for America. At
Montreal he found Monseignenr Tache, bishop
of St. Boniface,with whom he set out for the SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
51
Petitot (15. F. S. J.) — Continued.
Northwest, where he was continuously engaged
in missionary work among the Indians and
Eskimos until 1874, when he returned to France
to supervise the publication of some of his
works on linguistics and geography. In 1876
he returned to the missions and spent another
period of nearly six years in the Northwest. In
1882 he once more returned to his native
country, where he has since remained. In 1886
he was appointed to the curacy of Mareuil,
near Meaux, whioh he still retains. The many
years he spent in the inhospitable Northwest
were busy and eventful ones and afforded an
opportunity for geographic, linguistic, and
ethnologic observations and studies such as
few have enjoyed. He was the first missionary
to visit Great Bear Lake, which he did for the
first time in 1866. He went on foot from Good
Hope to Providence twice and made many tours
in winter of forty or fifty days' length on snow-
shoes. He was the first missionary to the
Eskimos of the Northwest, having visited them
in 1865, at the mouth of the Anderson, likewise
in 1868 at the mouth of the Mackenzie, and in
1870 and again in 1877 at Fort McPherson on
Peel River. In 1870 his travels extended into
Alaska. In 1878 an attack of blood-spitting
caused him to return south. He went on foot to
Athabaska, whence he passed to the Saskatchewan in a bark. In 1879 he established the
mission of St. Raphael, at Angling Lake, for
the Chippewayans of that region, where he
remained until his final departure for France
in January, 1882.
For an account of his linguistic work among
the Eskimauan, Algonquian, and Athapascan
see the bibliographies of these families.
Pilling: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to is in the possession of the
compiler of this bibliography.
Pilling (James Constantine).   Smithsonian institution—Bureau of ethnology |
J. W. Powell director [ Proof-sheets | of
a | bibliography | of | the languages |
of the | North American Indians | by |
James Constantine  Pilling | (Distributed only to collaborators) J
Washington | Government printing
office | 1885
Title verso blank 1 1. notice signed J. W.
Powell p. iii, preface pp.v-viii, introduction pp.
ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of
libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii-
xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text
pp. 1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090,
index of languages and dialects pp. 1091-1135,
plates, 4°.
Arranged alphabetically by name of author,
translator, or first word of title. One hundred
and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side
of the sheet only.
Pinart (Alphonse L.) Vocabulary of the
Atnah language. (*)
Manuscript, 90 pages folio; in possession of
its author.   Russian and Atnah; collected at
Eladiak in 1872.   "Whether it is Athapascan or
Salishan I do not know; probably the latter.
Some years ago, in response to my request,
Mr. Pinart furnished me with a rough listof the
linguistic manuscripts in his possession, collected by himself, embracing vocabularies,
texts and songs. Circumstancesprevented him
from giving me detailed descriptions of this material, which embraced the following Salishan
languages: Comux, Nanaimo, Belahoola, Co wit-
chin, Shushwap (several dialects), Clallam,
Lummi, Kwinault (two dialects), Chehalis,
Niskwali, Spokan, Cceur d'Alene, Pend
d'Oreille, and Kalispel.
Piskwau:
General discussion
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabxilary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Words
See Hale (H.)
Eells (M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Fisquous.    See Piskwau.
Platzmann (Julius). Verzeichniss | einer
Auswahl | amerikanischer [ Gramma-
tiken, | Worterbucher, Katechismen |
u.   s.   w. | Gesammelt  [ von  j  Julius
Platzmann. |
Leipzig, 1876. | K. F. Kohler's Anti-
quarium, | Poststrasse 17.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. quotation
from Rouquette verso blank 11. text (alphabetically arranged by family names) pp. 1-38,8°.
List of works in Clallam, p. 12; in Selish, pp.
36-37.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley.
Ponderay.    See Kalispel.
Pott (August Friedrich). Doppelung |
(Reduplikation, Gemination) | als |
eines der wichtigsten Bildungsmittel
der Sprache, | beleuchtet j aus Sprachen
aller Welttheile | durch | Aug. Friedr.
Pott, Dr. | Prof, der Allgemeinen
Sprachwiss. an der Univ. zu Halle [&c.
two lines.] |
Lemgo & Detmold, | im Verlage der
Meyer'schen Hof buchhandlung 1862.
Cover title as above, title as above verso quotation 1 1. preface pp.iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi,
text pp. 1-304, list of books on verso of back
cover, 8°. 1
52
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
Pott (A. F.) — Continued.
Contains examples of reduplication in many
North American languages, among them the
Flathead, pp. 42,60,62,90; Nsietschaw, pp. 54,
62; Selish, pp. 183,184; Skitsuish, p. 42; Skwale,
p. 42.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Eames.
■ Einleitung in die allgemeine Sprach-
wissenschaft.
In Internationale Zeitschrift f ur allgemeine
Sprachwissenschaft,vol. 1, pp. 1-68,329-354, vol.
2, pp. 54-115, 209-251, vol. 3, pp. 110-126, 249-275,
Supp. pp. 1-193, vol. 4, pp. 67-96, vol. 5, pp. 3-18,
Leipzig, 1884-1887, and Heilbronn, 1889, large 8°.
The literature of American linguistics, vol. 4,
pp. 67-96. This portion was published after Mr.
Pott's death, which occurred July 5,1887. The
general editor of the Zeitschrift, Mr. Techmer,
states in a note that Pott's paper is continued
from the manuscripts which he left and that it
is to close with the languages of Australia. In
the section of American linguistics publications in all the more important stocks of North
America are mentioned, with brief characterization.
Powell: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Major J. W. Powell,
Washington, D. C.
Fowall (Maj. John Wesley). Indian linguistic families of America north of
Mexico.    By J. W. Powell.
In Bureau of Ethnology, seventh annual
report, pp. 1-142, Washington, 1891, royal 8°.
Salishan family, with a list of synonyms and
principal tribes, derivation of the name, habitat, etc., pp. 102-105.
Issued separately with cover title as follows:
— Indian linguistic families of America
| north of Mexico | by | J. W. Powell
| Extract   from   the seventh   annual
report of the Bureau of ethnology j
[Vignette] |
Washington j Government printing
office | 1891
Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title
p. 1, contents pp. 3-6, text pp. 7-142, map, royal
8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
PIHing, Powell.
— in charge.    Department of the inte
rior. | U. S. geographical and geological survey of the Rocky mountain
region, j J.. W. Powell, Geologist in
Charge. | Contributions | to j North
American ethnology. | Volume I [-VII].
| [Seal of the department.] |
Washington: | Government printing
office. | 1877[-1890].
Powell (J. W.) — Continued.
7 vols. 4°.   Vol. 1,1877 j vol. II (parts 1 and 2),
1890; vol. Ill, 1877; vol. IV, 1881; vol. V, 1882;
vol. VE, 1890; vol. VII, 1890.
G-ibbs (Gr.), Vocabulary of the Shihwapmukh,
vol. 1, pp. 252-265.
 Vocabulary of the Nikntemukh, vol. 1,
pp. 252-265.
 Vocabulary of the Okinaken, vol. 1, pp.
252-265.
— Vocabulary of the Shwoyelpi, vol. 1, pp.
252-265.
— Vocabulary of the Spokan, vol. 1, pp. 252-
265.
— Vocabulary of the Piskwaus, vol. 1, pp.
252-265.
Vocabulary of the Kalispelm, vol. 1, pp.
270-283.
— Vocabulary of the Bilhoola, vol. 1, pp. 270-
283.
— Vocabulary of the Lilowat, vol. 1, pp. 270-
233.
— Vocabulary of the Tait, pp. 270-283-
— Vocabulary of the Komookhs, vol. 1, pp.
270-283.
— Vocabulary of the KuwaMtsk, vol. 1, pp.
270-283.
— Dictionary of the NiskwMli:Niskwallr|
English, vol. 1,285-307.
Dictionary   of   the  Niskwalli: English-;
Mskwalli, vol. 1, pp. 309-361.
Mengarini (G.), Vocabulary of the Skoyelpeli, I
vol. 1, pp. 252-265.
 Vocabulary of the SchitKui, vol. 1, pp. 270-
283.
 Vocabulary of the Selish proper, vol. 1,
pp. 270-283.
Tolmie (W.  F.), Vocabulary of the Shoos-
waap, vol. 1, pp. 252-265.
 Vocabulary of the "Wakynakaine, vol. 1,
pp. 252-265.
 Vocabulary of the Kullespelm, vol. 1, pp.
270-283.
Prayer book:
Netlakapamuk See Good (J. B.)
Netlakapamuk Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Shuswap Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Snohomish Boulet (J.B.)
Prayer   book    and   catechism   .    .    *
Snohomish.    See Boulet (J. B.)
Prayers:
Kalispel See Canestrelli (P.)
Kalispel Smet (P. J. de).
Netlakapamuk Good (J.B.)
Netlakapamuk
Okinagan
Salish
Salish
Samish
Shuswap
Shuswap
Skitsuish
Skwamish
Snanaimuk
Stalo
Twana
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Palladine (L.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Gendre (—)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Caruana (J. M.)
Durieu (P.)
Boas (F.)
Durieu (P.)
Eells (M.) SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
53
Prayers in Shushwap. See Le Jeune (J.
M.R.)
Prayers in Shuswap.    See Gendre (—).
Prayers in   Thompson.    See Le Jeune
(J. M.R.)
Prichard (James Cowles). Researches |
into the j physical history | of | mankind. | By | James Cowles Prichard,
M. D. F. R. S. M. R. I. A. | corresponding member [&c. three lines.] | Third
edition. | Vol.I[-V]. |
London: J Sherwood, Gilbert, and
Piper, | Paternoster row; | and J. and
A. Arch, | Comhill. | 1836[-1847].
5 vols. 8°. The words'' Third edition,'' which
are contained on the titles of vols. 1-4 (dated
respectively 1836,1837,1841,1844), are not on the
title of vol. 5. Vol. 3 was originally issued with a
title numbered "Vol. III.—Part I." This title
was afterward canceled and a new one (numbered "Vol. IH.") substituted in its place. Vol.
1 was reissued with a new title containing the
words "Fourth edition" and bearing the imprint "London: | Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper,
| Paternoster row. 11841." (Astor); and again
"Fourthedition. | Vol.1. | London: | Houlston
and Stoneman, | 65, Paternoster row. 11851."
(Congress, Harvard.) According to Sabin's
Dictionary (no. 65477, note),vol. 2 also appeared
in a "Fourth edition," with the latter imprint.
These several issues differ only in the insertion
of new titles in the places of the original titles.
Brief reference to the Salishan family, its
divisions and affinities, vol. 5, pp. 437-438.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Congress, Eames.
The earlier editions, London, 1813, 8°, and
London, 1826, 2 vols.. 8°, contain no Salishan
material.
  Naturgeschichte      des | Menschen-
geschlechts | von | James Cowles Prichard, | Med. D. f&c. three lines.] | Nach
Prichard (J. C.) —Continued,
der [&c.  three lines] | von | Dr. Rudolph Wagner, | [&c. one line.] |Erster
[-Vierter] Band. |
Leipzig, | verlag von Leopold Bosk.
| 1840[-1818]. |
4 vols.; vol. 4 in two parts, 12°. A translation
of the 5 vol. edition of the Physical History.
Discussion of American languages,vol. 4, pp.
311-341,357-363,458.
Copies seen: British Museum.
Primer:
[Netlakapamuk See Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Spokan "Walker (E.) and Eells(C)
Primer     .     .     .in   Thompson.      See
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Promissiones Domini
Christi [Cceur d'Al&ne]
(J.M.)
Promissiones     Domini
Christi   [Lilowat and  Netlapamuk].
See Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Promissiones     Domini     Nostri    Jesu
Christi [Salish].    See Palladine (L.)
Proper names:
Okinagan See Ross (A.)
Okinagan Stanley (J.M.)
Salish Catlin (G.)
Shuswap Dawson (G. M.)
Songish Macdonald (D. G. F.)
Spokan Catlin (G.)
Spokan Stanley (J. M.)
Puyallup:
Geographic names See Coones (S. F.)
Geographic names Eells (M.)
Grammatic treatise       McCaw (S. R.)
Sentences McCaw (S. R.)
Vocabulary McCaw (S. R.)
Vocabulary Salish.
Nostri     Jesu
See Caruana
Nostri     Jesu
Q.R.
Queniult.    See Kwinaiutl.
Relationships:
Bilkula
Okinagan
Okinagan
Okinagan
Salish
Shuswap
Skokomish
Spokan
Spokan
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Ross (A.)
Oppert (G.{
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Report of the governor of Washington
territory.    See Squire (W.C.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)    Comparative vocabulary of the Selish languages.
Manuscript, 47 leaves folio, written on one
side only. In the library of the Bureau of
Ethnology.
The vocabulary, consisting of 180 words, is
arranged by English words as headings, equivalents in the following languages being given
under each: Selish proper or Flathead, Kalispelm, Spokan, Skoyelpi, Okinaken, Schitsui,
Schwapmuth, and Piskwaus.
 Comparative   Vocabulary   of    the
Selish languages. Und series.   Ithaca,
N. Y.    November 15th, 1870. 54
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
•i t
Roehrig (F. L. O.) — Continued.
Manuscript, 86 leaves, 4°, written on one side
only. In the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabulary, consisting of 180 words, is
arranged by English words as headings, equivalents in the following languages being given
under each: Clallam. Lummi, Nooksahk,
Nanaimook, Kwantlen, and Tait.
 Synoptical vocabulary of the Selish
languages.
Manuscript, 8 unnumbered leaves folio,
written on both sides. In the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology.
The vocabulary, consisting of 180 words, is
arranged in 15 columns as follows: English,
Clallam, Lummi, Nooksahk, ITanaimook,
Kwantlen, Tait, Toanhooch, !N"oosolupsh,
Skagit, Xomookh, Kwinaiutl, Cowlitz, Lilowat,
and Belhoola.
Ross (Alexander). Adventures | of the
first settlers on the | Oregon or Columbia river: | being | a narrative of the
expedition fitted out by | John Jacob
Astor, | to establish the | " Pacific fur
company fJ | with an account of some
| Indian tribes on the coast of the
Pacific. | By Alexander Ross, | one of
the adventurers. |
London: | Smith, Elder and co., 65,
Cornhill. | 1849.
Ross (A.) — Continued.
Title verso names of printers 11. preface pp.
iii-v, contents pp. vii-xv, errata p. [xvi], text
pp. 1-352, map, 12°.
Relationships of the Okinackens and personal names, p. 326.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Bureau of Ethnology,
Congress, Trumbull.
Alexander Ross, author, born in Nairnshire,
Scotland, May 9,1783, died in Colony Gardens
(now in "Winnipeg, Manitoba),Red River Settlement, British North America, October 23,1856.
He came to Canada in 1805, taught in Glengarry,
TJ. C, and in 1810 joined John Jacob Astor's
expendition to Oregon. Until 1824 he was a fur-
trader and in the service of the Hudson Bay
Company. About 1825 he removed to the Red
River settlement and was a member of the
council of Assineboia, and was sheriff of the Red
River settlement for several years. He was for
fifteen years a resident in the territories of the
Hudson Bay Company, and has given the result
of his observations in the works: Adventures
of the Eirst Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia
River; being a Narrative of the Expedition
fitting out by John Jacob Astor to establish
the Pacific Eur Company, with an Account of
some Indian Tribes on the Coast of the Pacific
(London, 1849); The Eur-Hunters of the Far
West, a Narrative of Adventures in the Oregon
and Rocky Mountains (2vols. 1855), and The Red
River Settlement (1856).—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. Biog.
S.
Sabin   (Joseph).    A j dictionary | of
Books relating to America, | from its
discovery to   the   present   time. | By
Joseph   Sabin.   |   Volume   I[-XX]. |
[Three lines quotation.] |
New-York: | Joseph Sabin, 84 Nassau
street. | 1868[-1892].
20 vols. 8°. Still in course of publication.
Parts cxv-cxvi, which begin vol. xx, reach the
article "Smith." !Nbw edited by Mr. Wilber-
force Eames.
Contains titles of a number of books in and
relating to the Salishan languages.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Geological
Survey, Lenox.
 See Field (T. W.)
St. Onge (Rev. Louis Napoleon).     See
Bulmer (T. S.)
"The subject of this sketch, the Rev. Louis
25T. St. Onge, of St. Alphonse de Liguori parish,
was born [in the village of St. Cesaire] a few
miles south of Montreal, Canada, April 14,1842.
He finished his classical course when yet very
young, alter "nli icli lie studied law for two years.
St. Onge (L. N.) — Continued.
Eeeling called to another field, he gave up this
career in order to prepare himself to work for
God's glory as an Indian missionary in the
diocese of NesquaHy, Washing ton Territory.
"A year and a half before his ordination,
Right Rev. A. M. Blanchet, his bishop, ordered
him to Vancouver, W. T., where he was occupied
as a professor of natural philosophy, astronomy, and other branches in the Holy Angel's
College. All his spare time was consecrated to
the study of the Indian languages, in which he
is to-day one of the most expert, so that he was
ready to go on active missionary work as soon
as ordained.
" The first years of his missionary life were
occupied in visiting different tribes of Indians
and doing other missionary work in the Territories < • f \V; i s 11 i 11 g t (ii i . 111; 111 o. M < >i i i; 111; i. and other
Rocky Mountain districts, among Indians and
miners. After suchlabors he was then appointed
to take charge of the Yakamas, lOikitats,
"Win at ch as, Wishrams, Pshwanwapams, Nar-
chez, and other Indian tribes inhabiting the
central part of Washington Territory. Having
no means of support in his new mission, Bishop SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
55
St. Onge (L.N.) — Continued.
Blanch et, in his self-sacrificing charity for the
Indians of his extensive diocese, furnished him
with the necessary outfit; and with a number of
willing though unskilled Indians as apprentice
carpenters, the young missionary set to work to
rebuild the St. Joseph's mission, destroyed in
1856 by a party of vandals called the Oregon
Volunteers, who had been sent to fight the
Takamas.
"After four years of labor, he and his devoted
companion, Mr. J. B. Boulet (now ordained and
stationed among the Tulalip Indians) had the
satisfaction to see not only a comfortable residence, but also a neat church, erected, and a
fine tract of land planted with fruit trees, and
in a profitable state of cultivation, where
formerly only ruin and desolation reigned.
'' His health breaking down entirely, he was
forced to leave his present and daily increasing
congregation of neophites. Wishing to give him
the best medical treatment, Bishop Blanchet
sent Eather St. Onge to his native land with a
leave of absence nntil his health would be
restored. During his-eighteen month s' stay in
a hospital he, however, utilized his time by
composing and printing two small Indian
books, containing rules of grammar, catechism,
hymns, and Christian prayers in Yakama and
Chinook languages, the former for children, the
latter for the use of missionaries on the Pacific
coast.
1' By the advice of his physician he then
undertook a voyage to Europe, where he spent
nearly a year in search of health. Back again
to this country, he had charge of a congregation
for a couple of years in Vermont; and now he is
the pastor of the two Erench churches of Glens
Ealls and Sandy Hills, in the diocese of Albany,
New York.
"Eather St. Onge,though a man of uncommon physical appearance, stoutly built and six
feet and four inches in height, has not yet
entirely recovered his health and strength. The
Erench population of Glens Ealls have good
cause for feeling very much gratified with the
present condition of the affairs of the parish of
St. Alphonse de Liguori, and should receive the
hearty congratulations of the entire community. Eather St. Onge, a man of great erudition,
a devoted servant to the church, and possessing
a personality whose geniality and courtesy
have won him a place in the hearts of his people, has by his faithful application to his parish
developed it and brought out all that was to
inure to its benefit and further advance its interests."—Glens Falls (N. T.) Republican, March
28, 1889.
Eather St. Onge remained at Glens Ealls until
October, 1891, when increasing infirmities compelled him to retire permanently from the min
istry. He is now living with his brother, the
rector of St. Jean Baptiste church, in Troy, N".
Y. Since his retirement he has compiled an
EiJglish-Chinook Jargon dictionary of about six
thousand words, and this he intends to supple
st. Onge (L. N.) — Continued.
ment with a corresponding Jargon-English
part. He has also begun the preparation of a
Yakama dictionary, which he hopes to make
much more complete than that of Eather Pan-
dosy, published in Dr. Shea's Library of American linguistics.
I have adopted the spelling of his name as it
appears on the title-page of his work "Yakama
Alphabet," etc., though the true spelling, and
the one he uses now, is Saintonge—that of a
Erench province in which his ancestors lived
and from which four or five families came in
1696, all adopting the name. His family name
is Payant.
Salish. [Vocabularies of some of the
Indian tribes of Northwest America.]
Manuscript, 2 vols., 82 pages folio. Bought
by the Library of Congress at Washington, at
the sale of the library of the late Mr. Geo. Brin-
ley, the sale catalogue of which says they came
from the library of Dr. John Pickering, to
whom, probably, they were presented by Mr.
Duponceau. They were presented "to Peter
S. Duponceau, Esq., with J. K. Townshend's
respects. Eort Vancouver, Columbia River,
September, 1835."
" Specimens [12 words] of a language
spoken by the following tribes in Puget Sound,
viz: the Nisqually, Poo-yal-aw-poo, Tough-no-
waw-mish, Lo-qua-mish, Skay-wa-mish, and
Too-wanne-noo."
Salish. Vocabulary of the language of the
Salish or the Flathead nation occupying; the sources of the Columbia.
Manuscript, in the library of the American
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. It is
a copy made by Mr. Duponceau, and forms no.
lxiii of a collection recorded by him in a folio
account book, of which it occupies pp. 219-220.
It is written four columns to the page, two in
English, two in Salishan, and contains about 120
words and the numerals 1-10.
Salish:
See Canestrelli (P.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bates (H. W.)
Beach (W. W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Boas (P.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Catechism
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Classification
Drake (S.G.)
Eells (M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Gibbs (G.)
Haines (E. M.)
Keane (A. H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Platzmann (J.)
Powell (J. W.)
Prichard (J. C.)
Sayce (A.H.) 56
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Salish — Continued
Classification
Classification
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
General discussion
Geographic names
Grammar
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Legends
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Numerals
Prayers
Prayers
Proper names
Relationships
Relationships
Sentences
Sentences
Sentences
Text
Text
Tribal names
Tribal names
Tribal names
Tribal names
Tribal names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Schoolcraft (H. R.)
Trumbull (J.H.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Beach (W.W.)
Berghaus (H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Drake (S. G.)
Eeatherman (A.)
Gabelentz (H. G. C.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Hale (H.)
Miiller (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Mengarini (G.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Petitot (E. E.S.J.)
Shea (J. G.)
Hoffman (W.J.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Marietti (P.)
Shea (J. G.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Youth's.
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Mengarini (G.)
Salish.
Canestrelli (P.)
Palladine (L.)
Catlin (G.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Oppert (G.)
Hoffman (W.J.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Whymper (F.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Palladine (L.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Kane (P.)
Keane (A.H.)
Sullivan (R. G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Canadian.
Cooper (J. G.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G).
Henry (A.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Howse (J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Maximilian (A. P.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Salish.
Smet (P.J.de).
Wilkes (C.)
Wilson (E. E.)
Boas (F.)
Salish — Continued
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
Words
See also Ohehalis.
Samish:
Lord's prayer
Prayers
Bulmer (T. S.)
Daa (L. K.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Hoffman (W.J.)
Latham (R G.)
Mengarini (G.)
Pott (A. F.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Squire (W. G.)
Swan (J. G.)
Treasury.
Tylor (E. B.)
See Smet (P.J.de).
Smet (P. J. de).
Sayce (Archibald Henry). Introduction
to the | science of language. | By | A.
H. Sayce, | deputy professor of comparative philology in the university of
Oxford. | In two volumes, j Vol.I[-II].
[ [Design.] |
London: | C. Kegan Paul &. co., 1,
Paternoster square. | 1880.
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso
quotation and notice 11. preface pp.v-viii, table
of contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-441, colophon verso blank 11.; half-title verso blank 11.
title verso quotation and notice 11. table of contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-852, selected list
of works pp. 353-363, index pp. 365-421,12°.
A classification of American languages (vol.
2, pp. 57-64) includes the Selish, pp. 57-60.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames.
 Introduction to the | science of language. | By | A. H. Sayce, | deputy-
professor of comparative philology,
Oxford, | Hon. LL. D. Dublin. | In two
volumes. | Vol. I[-II]. | [Design.] j
Second edition. |
London: | Kegan Paul, Trench, &
co., 1, Paternoster square. | 1883.
2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 L title verso
quotation and notice 11. table of contents verso
blank 11. preface to the second edition pp. v-xv
verso blank, preface pp. xvii-xx, text pp. 1-441,
colophon verso blank 11.; half-1 i tie verso blank
1 1. title verso quotation and notice 1 1. table of
contents verso blank 11. text pp. 1-352, selected
list of works pp. 353-363 verso blank, index pp.
365-421,12°.
Linguistics as in the first edition, vol. 2, pp.
57-60.
Copies seen: Eames.
Schomburgk (Sir Robert Herman). Contributions to the Philological Ethnography of South America. By Sir R. H.
Schomburgk.
k SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
57
Schomburgk (R. H.) — Continued.
In Philological Soc. [of London] Proc. vol. 3,
pp. 228-237, London, 1848, 8°.
Aflinity of words in the Guinau with other
languages and dialects in America, pp . 236-237,
contains, among others, examples in Atnah.
These examples may be of the Athapascan
stock or of the Salishan. I have had no opportunity recently to examine into the matter.
Schoolcraft (Henry Rowe). Historical |
and | statistical information, | respecting the | history, condition and prospects | of the | Indian tribes of the
United States: | collected and prepared
under the direction j of the | bureau
of Indian affairs, [ per act of Congress
of March 3d, 1847, | by Henry R. Schoolcraft, LL.D. (Illustrated by S. Eastman,
capt. IT. S. A. | Published by Authority
of Congress. | Part I[-VI]. |
Philadelphia: | Lippincott, Grambo &
company, | (successors to Grigg, Elliot
&co.) I 1851 [-1857].
• Engraved title:   [Engraving.] | Historical |
and | statistical information | respecting the |
history, condition and prospects | of the | Indian
tribes of the United States: | Collected and prepared under the | direction of the bureau of
Indian affairs, per act of Congress | of March
3*' 1847,} by Henry K. Schoolcraft L.L.D. | Illustrated by | S. Eastman, capt. TJ. S. army. | [Coat
of arms.] | Published  by authority of Congress. | PartI[-YI]. I
Philadelphia: | Lippincott, Grambo & co.
6 vols. 4°. Beginning with vol. 2 the words
"Historical and statistical" are left off the
title-pages, both engraved and printed. Subsequently (1853) vol. 1 was also issued with the
abridged title beginning "Information respecting the history, condition, and prospects of the
Indian tribes," making it uniform with the
other parts.
Two editions with these title-pages were published by the same house, one on thinner and
somewhat smaller paper, of which but vols. 1-5
were issued.
Part I, 1851. Half-title (Ethnological researches, | respecting | the red man of America)
verso blank 1 1. engraved title as above verso
blank 11. printed title as above verso blank 11.
introductory documents pp. iii-vi, preface pp.
vii-x, list of plates pp. xi-xii, contents pp. xiii-
xviii, text pp. 13-524, appendix pp. 525-568,
plates, colored lithographs and maps numbered
1-76.
Part n, 1852. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (Information respecting
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso
blank 11. printed title (Information respecting
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso
printers 11. dedication verso blankl 1. introductory document pp.vii-xiv, contents pp. xv-xxii,
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 17-608,
Schoolcraft (H. R.) — Continued.
plates and maps numbered 1-29, 31-78, and 2
plates exhibiting the Cherokee alphabet and its
application.
Part in, 1853. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (as in part u) ver s o blank
11. printed title (as in part n) verso printer 11.
third report pp. v-viii, list of divisions p. ix,
contents pp. xi-xv, list of plates pp. xvii-xviii,
text pp. 19-635, plates and maps numbered
1-21,25-45.
Part IV, 1854. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 1 1.
dedication pp. v-vi, fourth report pp. vii-x, list
of divisions p. xi, contents pp. xiii-xxiii, list of
plates pp. xxv-xxvi, text pp. 19-668, plates and
maps numbered 1-42.
Part v, 1855. Half-title (as in part I) verso
blank 11. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 11.
dedication pp. vii-viii, fifth reportpp. ix-xii, list
of divisions p, xiii, synopsis of general contents
of vols, i-v pp. xv-xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxii,
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 25-625, appendix pp. 627-712, plates and maps numbered
1-8,10-36.
Part vi, 1857. Half-title (General history | of
the | North American Indians) verso blank 11.
portrait 11. printed title (History [ of the | Indian
tribes of the United States: | their | present
condition and prospects, | and a sketch of their
| ancient status. | Published by order of Congress, | under the direction of the department of
the interior—Indian bureau. |By | Henry Rowe
Schoolcraft, LL. D. | Member [&c. six lines.] |
With Illustrations by Eminent Artists, j In one
volume. | Part vi. of the series. | Philadelphia:
| J. B. Lippincott & co. | 1857.) verso blank 11.
inscription verso blank 11. letter to the Presi-
den t pp. vii-viii, report pp. ix-x, preface pp. xi-
xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxvi, list of plates, pp.
xxvii-xxViii. text pp. 25-744, index pp. 745-756,
fifty-seven plates, partly selected from the other
volumes, and three tables.
Gallatin (A.), Table of generic Indian families of languages, vol. 3, pp. 397-402.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames,
National Museum, Powell, Shea, Trumbull.
At the Eischer sale, no. 1581, Quaritch bought
a copy for U. 10s. The Eield copy, no. 2075, sold
for $72; the Menzies copy, no. 1765, for$132; the
Squier copies, no. 1214, $120; no. 2032, $60; the
Ramirez copy, no. 773 (5 vols.), 51.5s.; the Pinart
copy, no. 828 (5 vols, in 4), 208 fr.; the Murphy
copy, no. 2228, $69. Priced by Quaritch, no. 30017,
10Z. 10s.; by Clarke & co. 1886, $65 j by Quaritch,
in 1888,15Z.
Reissued with title-pages as follows:
— Archives j of {Aboriginal Knowledge.
| Containing all the | Original Papers
laid before Congress | respecting the J
History, Antiquities, Language. Ethnology, Pictography, | Rites, Supersti- 58
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
■Is
Schoolcraft (H. R.) —Continued,
tions, and Mythology, | of the | Indian
Tribes of the United States | by | Henry
R. Schoolcraft, LL. D. | With Illustrations. | Onaendun ih ieu muzzinyegun
un.—Algonquin. | In six volumes. |
Volume I [-VI]. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
Co. | 1860.
Engraved title: Information | respecting the
| History, Condition and Prospects | of the |
Indian Tribes of the United States: | Collected
and prepared under the | Pureau of Indian
Affairs j By Henry P. Schoolcraft  L. L. D. |
Mem: Royal Geo. Society, London. Poyal Antiquarian Society.   Copenhagen. Ethnological
Society, Paris, &c. &c. | Illustrated by | Cap.*
S. Eastman,TJ. S.A. and other eminent artists. |
[Vignette.] | Published by authority of Congress. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott & Co.
6 vols, maps and plates, 4°.
This edition agrees in the text page for page
with the original titled above, and contains in
addition an index to each volume.
Copies seen: Congress.
Partially reprinted with title as follows:
[-
 ] The j Indian tribes] of the| United
States: | their [history, antiquities, customs, religion, arts, language, | traditions, oral legends, and myths. | Edited
by ] Francis S. Drake. | Hlustrated vrith
one hundred fine engravings on steel.
| In two volumes. | Vol. I[-II]. |
Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott &
co. | London: 16 Southampton street,
Co vent Garden. | 1884.
2 vols.: portrait 1 1. title verso copyright
notice 11. preface pp. 3-5, contents pp. 7-8, list
of plates pp. 9-10, introduction pp. 11-24, text
pp. 25-458; frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice 1 1. contents pp. 3-6, list of plates
p. 7, text pp. 9-445, index pp. 447-455, plates, 4°.
"In the following pages the attempt has been
made to place before the public in a convenient
and accessible form the results of the life-long
labors in the field of aboriginal research of the
late Henry P. Schoolcraft."
Chapter n, Language, literature, and pictography, vol. 1. pp. 47-63, contains general
remarks on the Indian languages.
Copies seen: Congress.
Priced by Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6376, $25.
Henry Powe Schoolcraft, ethnologist, born in
[Watervliet] Albany County, M". T., March 28,
1793, died in Washington, D. C, December 10,
1864. "Was educated at Middlebury College,
Vermont, and at Union, where he pursued the
studies of chemistry and mineralogy. Inl817-'18
he traveled in Missouri and Arkansas, and
returned with a large collection of geological
and mineralogical specimens. In 1820 he was
appointed geologist to Gen. Lewis Cass's explor-
Schoolcraffc (H. R.) — Continued.
ing expedition to Lake Superior and the headwaters of Mississippi Piver. He was secretary of a commission to treat with the Indians
at Chicago, and, after a journey through Illinois and along "Wabash and Miami rivers, was
in 1822 appointed Indian agent for the tribes
of the lake region, establishing himself at
Sault Sainte Marie, and afterward at Mackinaw, where, in 1823, he married Jane Johnston,
granddaughter of Waboojeeg, a noted Ojibway
chief, who had received her education in Europe.
In 1828 he founded the Michigan historical society and in 1831 the Algic society. Erom 1828 till
1832 he was a member of the territorial legislature of Michigan. In 1832 he led a government
expedition, which followed the Mississippi
Piver up to its source in Itasca Lake. In 1836
he negotiated a treaty with the Indians on the
upper lakes for the cession to the United States
of 16,000,000 acres of their lands. He was then
appointed acting superintendent of Indian
affairs, and in 1839 chief disbursing agent for
the northern department. On his return from
Europe in 1842 he made a tour through western
Virginia, Ohio, and Canada. He was appointed
by the New York legislature in 1845 a commissioner to take the census of the Indians in the
State and collect information concerning the
Six Nations. After the performance of this
task, Congress authorized him, on March 3,1847,
to obtain through the Indian bureau reports
relating to all the Indian tribes of the country
' and to collate and edit the information. In this
work he spent the remaining years of his life.
Through his influence many laws were enacted
for the protection and benefit of the Indians.
UsTumerOus scientific societies in the United
States and Europe elected him to membership,
and the University of Geneva gave him the
degree of LL.D. in 1846. He was the author of
numerous poems, lectures, and reports on
Indian subjects, besides thirty-one larger
works. Two of his lectures before the Algic
society at Detroit on the "Grammatical Construction of the Indian Languages" were translated into Erench by Peter S. Duponceau and
gained for their author a gold medal from the
Erench institute. ... To the five volumes
of Indian researches compiled under the direction of the war department he added a sixth,
containing the post-Columbian history of the
Indians and of their relations with Europeans
(Philadelphia, 1857). He had collected material
for two additional volumes, but the government suddenly suspended the publication of
the work.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am.Biog.
Schwapmuth.    See Shiwapmuk.
Schwoyelpi.    See Skoyelpi.
Scouler (Dr. John). Observations on the
indigenous tribes of the N. W. coast of
America. By John Scouler, M. 'D., F.
L. Sv &c.
In Poyal Geog. Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 11,
pp. 215-251, London, 1841,8°. (Geological Survey.) —*.
SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
69
Scouler (J.) — Continued.
Vocabulary of the Eillechoola, Salmon
Piver, lat, 53° 30' Iff", (numerals 1-1000 and 150
words and phrases), pp. 230-235.—Vocabulary
of the Okanagan spoken on Eraser's Piver
(numerals 1-100 and 105 words and phrases),
pp. 236-241.—Vocabularies of the EZawitchen.
spoken at the entrance of Trading Piver, opposite Vancouver's Island, Noosdalum of Hood's
Canal, and Squallyamish of Puget's Sound
(numerals 1-100 and 150 words and phrases),
pp. 242-247.
The vocabularies were furnished by Dr. W.
E. Tolmie. Dr. Scouler's comments upon them
are scattered through pp. 218-229.
Sentences:
Eilkula
Chehalis
Kawichen
Kawichen
Klallam
Okinagan
Okinagan
Puyallup
Salish
Salish
Salish
Skoyelpi
Snohomish
Tilamuk
See Scouler (J.)
Swan (J. G.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.E.)
Scouler (J.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W. E.)
McCaw (S. P.)
Hoffman (W.J.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Whymper (E.)
Chamberlain (A.F.)
Youth's.
Lee (D.) and Erost (J. H.)
Shea (John Gilmary).    History | of the
| Catholic missions | among  the | Indian tribes of the United States, | 1529-
1854. | By John Gilmary Shea, j author
[&c. three lines.] | [Design.] |
New York: j Edward Dunigan &
brother, 1151 Fulton-street, near Broadway. | 1855.
Engraved title: Catholic missions | among
the Indian tribes | of the United States, | [engraving with the words "Catharine Tehgak-
wita"] | by John G. Shea. |
New York: | E. Dunigan & brother, 151 Eul-
ton st.
Portrait of John Bapst 1 1. engraved title as
above verso blank 1 1. printed title as above
verso copyright notice (1854) 1 1. dedication
verso blank 1 1. contents pp. 5-13, preface pp.
15-17, text pp. 19-495, appendix pp. 497-506,
index pp. 507-514, fac-similes pp. i-iv, four other
portraits (Peyri,Brebeuf, Jogues, De Smet),12°.
The Lord's prayer in Elathead and Pends
d'Oreilles (from De Smet), footnote, p. 468.
Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Trumbull.
At the Eield sale a copy, no. 2112*, sold for
$2.25; at the Murphy sale, no. 2264, for $3.25.
 History | of the 1 Catholic missions [
among the j Indian tribes of the United
States, | 1529-1854. | By John Gilmary
Shea, | author [&c. three lines.] | [Design.] |
Shea (J. G.) — Continued.
New York: | Edward Dunigan  and
brother, | (James B. Kirker.) | 151 Fnl-
v ton street, near Broadway. | 1857.
Engraved title:   Catholic missions | among
the  Indian   tribes | of the  United   States, |
[engraving with the words "Catharine Teh-
gakwita"] | by John G. Shea. |
!New York: | E. Dunigan & brother, 151 Eul-
ton st.
Portrait of Anthony Peyri 11. engraved title
as above verso blank 11. printed title as above
verso copyright notice (1854) 1 1. dedication
verso blank 11. contents pp. 5-13, preface pp. 15-
17, text pp. 19-495, fac-similes pp. i-iv, appendix
pp. 497-506, index pp. 507-514, two other portraits (Brebeuf, Jogues), 12°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Eames.
 Geschichte | der | katholischen Mis-
sionen | unter den | Indianer-StJimmen
der Vereinigten Staaten. | 1529-1860. |
Von | John Gilmary Shea, | Verfasser
[&c. two lines.] | Aus dem Englischen
iibersetzt | von | J. Roth. | Sr. Heilig-
keit Papst Pius IX gewidmet. | Mit 6
Stahlstichen. |
Wiirzburg. | Verlag von C. Etlinger.
[1858.] (*)
Pp. 1-668,12°.   Title from the author.
 History | of the | Catholic missions |
among the | Indian tribes of the United
States, | 1529-1854. | By John Gilmary
Shea, j author of [&c.  three lines.] }
[Design.] |
New York: | T.W. Strong, | Late Edward Dunigan &, brother, (Catholic publishing house, | 599 Broadway.   [1870.]
Engraved   title:   Catholic missions | among
the  Indian  tribes | of the United  States, |
[engraving with the words "Catherine Teh-
gakwita"] | by John G. Shea. |
New York: \ E. Dunigan & brother, 599
Broadway,   [n. d.]
Erontispiece, engraved title verso blank 1 1.
printed title as above verso copyright notice 1
1. dedication verso blank 1 1. contents pp. 5-13,
preface pp. 15-17, text pp. 19-495, appendix pp.
497-506, index pp. 507-514,8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: Congress, Powell.
Priced by Clarke and co. 1886, no. 6620, $2.
 History | of the | Catholic missions |
among the | Indian tribes of the United
States, | 1529-1854. | By John Gilmary
Shea, | author [&c. three lines.] | [Design.] |
New York: | P. J. Kenedy, | Excelsior Catholic publishing house, j 5
Barclay Street,    [n. d.]
i
I FY
60
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
\w
Shea (J. G.) — Continued.
Engraved  title: Catholic  missions | among
the  Indian tribes | of the  United   States, |
[engraving with the words " Catherine Teh-
gakwita"] | by John G. Shea. |
New York: | E. Dunigan & brother, 599
Broadway,   [n. d.]
Engraved title verso blank 1 i. printed title
verso copyright notice (1854) 1 1. dedication
verso blank 1 1. contents pp. 5-13, preface pp.
15-17, text pp. 19-495, appendix pp. 497-506,
index pp. 507-514,8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: Pilling.
— Languages of the American Indians.
In American Cyclopaedia, vol. 1, pp. 407-414,
New York, 1873,8°.
Contains grammatic examples of a number
of American languages, among them the Selish
or Elathead.
John Dawson Gilmary Shea, author, born in
New York City July 22,1824; [died in Elizabeth, N. J., 1891]. He was educated at the
grammar school of Columbia College, of which
his father was principal, studied law, and was
admitted to the bar, but has devoted himself
chiefly to literature. He edited the Historical
Magazine from 1859 till 1865, was one of the
founders and first president of the United
States Catholic Historical Society, is a member
or corresponding member of the principal historical societies in this country and Canada,
and corresponding member of the Poyal Academy of History, Madrid, He has received the
degree of LL. D. from St. Erancis Xavier College, New York, and St. John's College, Ford-
ham. His writings include The Discovery and
Exploration of the Mississippi Yalley (New
York, 1853); History of the Catholic Missions
Among the Indian Tribes of the United States
(1854; German translation, Wiirzbnrg, 1856);
The Fallen Brave (1861); Early Yoyages up
and down the Mississippi (Albany, 1862);
Novum Belgium, an Account of the New Netherlands in 1643-'44 (New York, 1862); The Operations of the French Fleet under Count de
Grasse (1864); The Lincoln Memorial (1865);
Translations of Charlevoix's History and
General Description of New France (6
vol., 1866-1872); Hennepin's Description of
Louisiana (1880); LeClercqs Establishment of
the Faith (1881), and Penalosa's Expedition
(1882); Catholic Church in Colonial Days
(1886); Catholic Hierarchy of the United
States (1886); and Life and Times of Archbishop Carroll (1888). He also translated
De Courcey's Catholic Church in the United
States (1856) and edited the Cramoisy series
of narratives and documents bearing on the
early history of the French-American colonies
(26 vols., 1857-1868); Washington's Private
Diary (1861); Cadwallader Colden's History of
the Five Indian Nations, edition of 1727 (1866);
Alsop's Maryland (1869); a series of grammars
[and dictionaries of the Indian languages (15
vols., 1860-1874), and Life of PiusIX (1875). He
Shea (J. G.) — Continued.
has also published Bibliography of American
Catholic Bibles and Testaments (1859), corrected
several of the very erroneous Catholic Bibles,
and revised by the Yulgate Challoner's original
Bible of 1750 (1871), and has issued several
prayer-books, school histories, Bible dictionaries, and translations.—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. Biog.
Shiwapmuk:
Numerals See Eells (M.)
Vocabulary Gibbs (G.)
Yocabulary Powell (J. W.)
Vocabulary Roehrig (F. L. O.) I
Shooswap.   See Shuswap.
Shorthand primer   .    .
See Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Shuswap:
General discussion See Dawson (G. M.)
Thompson.
General discussion
Geographic names
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Numerals
Numerals
Prayers
Prayers
Proper names
Pelationships
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Words
Sicatl:
Yocabulary
Words
Silets:
Legend
Yocabulary
Skagit:
Numerals
Yocabulary
Vocabulary
Hale (H.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Boas (F.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Eells (M.)
Gendre (—)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Howse (J.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Boas (F.)
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
See Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
See Eells (M.)
Craig (R O.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Skitsamish.    See Skitsuish.
Skitsuish:
General discussion See Hale (H.)
Numerals
Prayers
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Words
Eells (M.)
Caruana (J. M.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Mengarini (G)
Pinart (A.L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig <F. L. O.
Smet (P.J.de).
Bancroft (H. H.)
Pott (A. F.)
\ SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
61
See Chamberlain (A. F.)
Eells (M.)
Chamberlain (A.F.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Mengarini (G.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Skokomish:
Geographic names See Eells (M.)
Numerals Eells (M.)
Relationships Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Salish.
Words Boas (F.)
Skoyelpi:
Numerals
Numerals
Sentences
Yocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Yocabulary
Yocabulary
Skwaksin:
Geographic names See Coones (S. F.)
Geographic names        Eells (M.)
Grammatic treatise       Eells (M.)
Hymns . Eells (M.)
Skwale.   See Niskwalli.
Skwallyamish.    See Niskwalli.
Skwamish:
Prayers See Durieu (P.)
Yocabulary. Salish.
Skwaxon.   See Skwaksin.
Smalley (Eugene Virgil).  The Kalispel
country.
In the Century Illustrated Magazine, vol. 29,
pp. 447-455, New York and London, 1885, 8°.
(Pilling.)
General remarks on the Kalispel language,
character of vowel sounds, and letters lacking
in the language, pp. 454-455.—Lord's prayer in
Kalispel (from Van Gorp), p. 455.
Eugene Virgil Smalley, journalist, born in
Randolph, Portage County, Ohio, July 18,1841.
He was educated in the public schools of Ohio
and New York, and passed one year in New
York central college at McGrawville. He
enlisted at the beginning of the civil war in the
Seventh Ohio Infantry and frequently sent letters ahout different engagements to the newspapers, for which descriptions he had shown a
predilection before entering the field. He
served nntil nearly the close of the struggle,
when he was discharged on account of wounds,
and as soon as he was able went to Washington, D. C, where, in 1865, he was appointed
clerk of the military committee of the House of
Representatives. He retained the post until
1873. In 1882 he entered the employment of the
Northern Pacific Railroad and in 1884 established the "Northwest,"' an illustrated maga-
zine, in St. Paul, Minn., of which he is still
(1888) the editor and publisher.—Appleton's
Cyclop, of Am. Biog.
3met (Rev. Peter John de).  Letters and
sketches | with | a narrative of a year's
residence | among j the Indian trihes |
of | The Rocky Mountains. | By | P. J.
De Smet, S.J. {
Smet (P. J.) — Continued.
Philadelphia: j published hy M.
Fithian, 61 n. Second street. | 1843.
Erontispiece recto blank 11. title verso blank
1 1. preface pp. v-ix, half-title verso blank 1 1.
text pp. 13-252,12°.
A few Elathead words and phrases, p. 190.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Eames,
Georgetown, Harvard.
 Voyages | aux | montagnes Rocheu-
ses, | et | une annexe   de   sejour | chez
les tribus indiennes | du  vaste terri-
toire   de   FOregon, j  dependant j des
Etats-Uhis d'Amerique, [ par le R. P.
Pierre de   Smet, j missionnaire  de la
compagnie de J6sus. | [Vignette.] |
Malines. | P. J. Hanicq, imprimeur
du saint sie'ge, de la sacre'e congregation | de la propagande et de Parche-
veche' de Malines.—1844.
Cover title nearly as above, half-title verso
blank 1 1. portrait of the author 1 1. title as
above verso imprimatur 1 1. "avis" and
"preface de l'edition am6ricaine" pp.iii-vi,
plate (" vue de S4. Louis du Missouri ") 11. text
pp. 1-304, eighteen other plates, folded map, 12°.
Prieres en langue Tete-Plate et Ponderas,
containing the sign of the cross, the Pater
noster, the Ave Maria, and the Credo, with
interlinear Erench translation, pp. 80-82.
This is the first Erench edition of Letters
and Sketches. It contains details not in the
Philadelphia edition.
Copies seen: Eames.
Sabin's Dictionary mentions a Dutch translation: Reis naar bet Rotsgebergte, Deventer,
bij J. W. Robijns en Comp. [1844?] 12°.
 Voyages | aux | montagnes Rocheu-
ses, j chez les tribus indiennes du vaste
territoire de r'Ore'gon, | dependant des
Etats-Unis d'Anierique, | Par le R. P.
de Smet. | [Ornament.] |
Lille. |L. Lefort, imprimeur-libraire,
| rue Esquermoise, 55. | 1845.
Cover title: Voyages | aux | montagnes
Rocheuses. |
Lille. | L. Lefort, imp. libraire, | rue Esquer-
moise, 55.
Cover title, half-title verso blank 11. frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. avis sur cette
edition pp. vii-viii, pr6face de l'edition ameri-
caine pp. ix-xii, text pp. 9-268, list of publications 2 11. list on back cover, 12°.
Prieres en langue Tete-Plate et Ponderas, as
in the preceding edition, pp. 265-268.
Copies seen: Eames.
Sabin's Dictionary mentions editions of
Lille, 1846, and Quatrieme edition, Lille: L.
Lefort, 1858; also an Italian translation,
Palermo, 1847.
 Voyages | aux | montagnes Rocheuses | chez les tribus indiennes du vaste
li
HSH 62
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Smet (P.J.) — Continued,
territoire de Y Oregon, | dependant des
Etats-Unis d'Am^rique. | ParleR. P. de
Smet. | Quatrieme Edition. |
Lille. ] L. Lefort, imprimeur-libraire,
|MDCCCLIX[1859].
Pp.i-vi,7-240,12°.
Prieres (Pater, Ave, Credo) en langue Tete-
Plate et Ponderas.
Copies seen: Bancroft.
A German translation as follows:
 Reisen | zu | den Felsen-Gebirgen |
und | ein Jahr | unter den | wilden
Indianer-Stammen des Oregon-Gebietes
| von | P. J. de Smet, S. J. | Aus dem
Franzosisehen iibersetzt von i L.
Hinssen, Pries ter. |
St. Louis, Mo. | Druck und Verlag
von Franz Saler. | 1865.
Title verso blank 11. Vorwort pp. iii-iv, text
pp. 1-220,12°.
Lord's prayer, Ave, and Credo in the language
of the Elathead and Ponderas, with interlinear
German translation, pp. 64-65.
Copies seen: Congress, Eames.
 Voyages | aux | montagnes Rocheu-
ses | et   sejour   chez   les | tribus   indiennes   de  F Oregon | (fitats-Unis) |
par | leR. P. de Smet | delaCompagnie
de Je"sus | Nouvelle  Edition | revue et
considerablement augment6e |
Bruxelles | Victor Devaux etCie | 26,
rue Saint-Jean, 26 | Paris | H. Repos
et Cie, editeurs | 70, rue Bonaparte, 70
| 1873
Cover title as above, half-title verso licence
etc. 11. portrait of the author 11. title as above
verso blank 1 1. pr6face pp. v-xii, itineraire
abrege pp. xiii-xxxv, plate of St. Louis 11. text
pp. 1-405, table des matieres pp. 407-408, folded
map, printed notice on back cover, 12°.
Pater, Ave, et Credo en langue Tete Plate et
Ponderas, with interlinear French translation,
pp. 97-99.
Copies seen: British Museum, Eames.
Sabin's Dictionary mentions an edition,
Lille, 1875.
 Voyages | aux | montagnes Rocheu-
ses | Chez les tribus indiennes du
vaste territoire de l'Oregon | dependant des Etats-Unis d\Ani6rique. | Par
de Smet | Huitieme Edition | [Design
with monogram J. L.]
Librairie   de J.  Lefort | imprimeur
c*diteur | Lille | rue Charles de Muys- I
sart, 24 | Paris | rue des Saints-Peres,
30 | Propriety et  droit  de traduction
reserves.   [1887.J
Colophon: Lille.   Typ. I. Lefort.   1887.
Smet (P. J.) — Continued.
Cover title: Le R. P. de Smet | Voyages J aux
| montagnes |  Rocheuses  | chez  les   tribus
indiennes   du  vaste   territoire   de   l'Oregon
dependant | des Etats-Unis d'Amerique. |
Librairie de J. Lefort, editenr | a Lille | rue
Charles de Muyssart, 24 | a Paris | rue des
Saints-Peres, 30
Cover title, half-title veiso frontispiece 1 1.
title verso blank 11. preface de l'edition amer-
icaine pp. v-vi, text pp. 7-237, table and colophon
verso blank 1 1. list of publications on back
cover, 8°.
Prieres en langue Tete-Plate et Ponderas,
with interlinear French translation, as in the
previous editions, pp. 235-237.
Copies seen: Eames.
There is another issue of this same edition,
with a new cover title as follows:
Le R. P. de Smet | Voyages | aux | montagnes
| Rocheuses | chez  les  tribus  indiennes du
vaste  territoire de   l'Oregon | dependant des
iSiats-.Unis d'Ainerique. |
Librairie de J. Lefort | imprimeur editeur |
Lille | rue Charles de Muyssart, 24 | Pari3 | rue;
des Saints-Peres, 30.   [1887.]
Copies seen: Eames.
 Oregon missions     and | Travels j
over the Rocky mountains, | in 1845-46.
| By | father P. J. de Smet, | Of the
Society of Jesus. |
New-York: ; published by Edward
Dunigan, 1151, Fulton-street. 1 M DCCC
XLVII[1847].
Engraved title: Oregon missions | and Travels over the | Rocky mountains, | in 1845-46. |
[Yignette of "Mary Quille in the battle against
the Crows."] | by Eather P. J. De Smet. | of the
Society of Jesus. |
New York, | Published by Edward Dunigan
| 1847.
Half-title (Oregon missions.)verso blank 11.
portrait of Elathead chief recto blank 1 1. engraved title verso blank 1 1. title verso copyright notice (1847) 1 1. dedication verso blank 1
1. preface pp. xi-xii, map, text pp. 13-408, Lord's
prayer, etc., in several Indian languages, 2 11.
twelve other plates, 16°.
Sign oi  the cross and the Lord's prayer in
the  Elathead and  Pend d'Oreille language,
with interlinear English translation, p. [409. r
Vocabulary (23 words) of the Flathead, p. [412.]
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenwum,
British Museum, Congress, Eames, Georgetown, Harvard, Pilling.
At the Eield sale, a copy, no. 2159, brought$3;
at the Brinley sale, no. 5612, $3.75; at the Murphy sale, no. 785, $5.50.
 Missions de P Oregon | et Voyages |
aux montagnes Rocheuses j aux sources
I de la Colombie, de 1'Athabasca et du
Sascatshawin, j en 1845-46. [Pictureof
" Marie Quillax dans la bataille contre
r SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
63
Smet (P. J.) — Continued,
les Corbeaux," etc.] | Par le pere P. J.
de Smet, | de la Soci6te* de Je"sus. |
Gand, | impr. &. lith. de Ve. Vander
Schelden, | e"diteur.    [1848.]
Cover title: Missions | del'Oregon | et | voy-
ages | auxmontagnes-Pocheuses, | aux sources
de | la Colombie, de 1'Athabasca | et du Sascat-
shawin; | pendant l'annee 1845-46. | Par le pere
P.-J. de Smet, | de la Compagnie de Jesus. |
Ouvrage orn6 de 16 gravures et de 3 cartes. | II
se vend au profit de la mission. |
Gand, | chez V.e Vander Schelden, | Im-
primeur-Editeur.
Cover title portrait of a Flathead chief 1 1.
engraved title verso blank 1 1. license to print
(dated 20 feb. 1848) verso 2 lines of text 1 1.
dedication (dated Grand, 20 fevrier 1848) pp. i-
ii, preface de l'editeur pp. iii-ix, map, notice
sur le territoire de l'Oregon pp. 9-39, half-title
(Missions de l'Oregon | et | voyages | aux
montagnes-Rocheuses | aux sources de | la
Colombie, de l'Athabasca et du Sascatshawin,
| en 1845-46. | Par le Pere P.-J. de Smet, de la
Comp.de Jesus.) verso blank 1 1. text pp. 41-
350, notre pere etc. in several Indian languages
pp. 351-359, origine des Americains pp. 360-378,
table pp. 379-380, notice on back cover, two
other maps and fourteen other plates, 16°. The
date of publication, 1848, is printed on the back
of the volume. The notice on the back cover
reads: "Sous presse chez le meme: Le meme
ouvrage en flamand. avec gravures et cartes."
Le signe de la croix et Notre pere en langue
Tete-Plate et Pend d'Oreille, with interlinear
Erench translation, p. 331. — Vocabulary (11
words) of the Tete-Plate and of the Checalish,
p. 338.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Congress, Eames,
Georgetown.
This translation was probably made under
the supervision of the author. It contains some
additional matter and notes, three important
maps, and new plates, which differ in style from
those in the New York edition of 1847. The
following is a different version:
— Missions | de POregon | et  voyages
| dans les montagnes Rocheuses | en
1845 et 1846, | par le pere P. J. de Smet,
| de la Soci^te" de Je"sus. | Ouvrage tra-
duit de Panglais, | Par M. Bourlez. |
[Ornament.] |
Paris | librairie de Poussielgue-Ru-
sand, | rue du Petit-Bourbon Saint-Sul-
pice, 3. | A Lyon, chez J.B. Pelagaud et
Cie. | 1848
Engraved title: Missions de l'Oregon. | Et
voyages aux | montagnes Pocheuses | en 1845
& 46. | [Vignette of " Marie Plume dans la ba-
taille contre les Corbeaux "] | Par | le pere P. J.
de Smet. | de la Societ6 de | Jesus.
Cover title: Missions | de l'Oregon | et voyages | dans les montagnes Rocheuses | en 1845
Smet (P. J.) — Continued.
et 1846, | par le pere P. J. de Smet, | de la Soci6t6
de Jesus. | Ouvrage traduit de l'anglais, | Par
M. Bourlez. | [Ornament.] <
Paris, | librairie de Poussielgue-Rusand, |
rue du Petit-Bourbon Saiot Sulpice, 3; | a Lyon,
chez J. B. Pelagaud et Cie. 11848
Covertitle, half-title (Missions | de l'Oregon.)
verso name of printer 11. portrait of Flathead
chief recto blank 11. engraved title verso blank 1
1. title verso blank 11. preface pp. i-ii, text pp. 7-
366, notre pere etc. in several Indian languages
pp. 367-375, origine des Americains pp. 376-398,
postface pp. 399-406, table pp. 407-408, twelve
other plates, list of publications on back
cover, 12°.
Le signe de la croix et Notre pere en langue
Tete-Plate et Pend d'Oreille, with interlinear
Erench translation, p. 367.—Vocabulary (11
words) of the Tete-Plate, and of the Checalish,
p. 374.
The greater part of this translation was made
from the New York edition. The latter part of
the volume, however, follows the other version
published at Ghent in the same year, from
which the supplementary matter is evidently
taken. The illustrations are identical with
those in the original American edition, the only
change being in the inscriptions.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Georgetown.
At the Eield sale, no. 2158, a copy brought
$3.25.
 Missien van den Oregon j en Keizen
[ naer de Rotsbergen | en de bronnen |
der Colombia, der Athabasca en Sascatshawin, | in 1845-46. | [Picture of
"Maria Quillac in den stryd tegen de
Corbeaux," etc.] | Door den pater P. J.
de Smet, | Van de Societeit van Jesus,
| uit het fransch | door een klooster-
ling van Latrappe. |
Gent, | Boek- en Steendrukkery van
Wwe. Vander Schelden, | Onderstraet,
N° 37. | 1849.
Cover title: Missien j van den | Oregon | en |
Reizen naar de Rotsbergen, | door | pater P.-J.
deSmet, | van de societeit van Jesus. | Versierd
met 16 platen en 3 kaarten. | [Ornament.l |
Gent, | huis heiligen Joseph, | boekdrukkerij
van H. Vander Schelden, | Onderstraat, 26.
Cover title, portrait of a Flathead chief 1 1.
engraved title verso blank 1 1. license to print
(dated 11 Oct. 1848) verso 2 lines of text 11. dedication (dated Gent, den 20 february 1848) pp.
vii-viii, vorrede van den uitgever pp. ix-xv,
map, verslag over het grondgebied van den
Oregon pp. 17-49, half-title verso blank 11. text
pp. 53-382, het onze vader etc. in several Indian
languages pp. 383-391, oorsprong der Ameri-
kanen pp. 392-411, inhoud pp. 413-423, list of
publications on back cover, two other maps and
fourteen other plates, 16°.
.  Het onze vader (and Het teeken des kruises)
in de tael Tete-Plate en Pend d'Oreille, with
\d
; , 64
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF   THE
It'
Smet (P. J.) —Continued.
interlinear Dutch translation, p. 383.—Vocabulary (11 words) of the Tete-Plate, and of the
Checalish, p. 390.
Copies seen: Eames.
The Erench version, "Troiseme edition,"
Bruxelles et Paris, 1874 (Eames), does not contain the above-mentioned linguistics.
 New Indian sketches, j By | rev. P.
J. de Smet, S. J. |
New York: | JJ. & J. Sadlier & co.,
31 Barclay-st. | Boston—128 Federal-
street. |Montreal—cor. Notre-dame and
St. Francis Xavier sts. | 1863.
Erontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. preface
pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, text pp. 9-175, plate
opposite p. 54,16°.
"The short Indian catechism in use among
the Elatheads, Kalispels, Pend d'Oreilles, and
other Pocky Mountain Indians," alternate
pages Indian and English, pp. 148-175.
Copies seen: Eames, Georgetown.
A later edition with title-page as follows:
 New Indian sketches. | By | rev. P.
J. de Smet, S. J. |
New York: | D. & J. Sadlier & co.,
31 -Barclay-st. [ Boston —128 Federal-
street. | Montreal—cor. Notre-dame
and St. Francis Xavier sts. | 1865.
Erontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. preface
pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, text pp. 9-175,16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, Eames,
Pilling.
Sabin's Dictionary mentions an edition of
[1877].
A later edition with title-page as follows:
 New Indian sketches. | By | rev. P.
J. de Smet, S. J. |
New York: j D. & J. Sadlier & co.,
31 Barclay-st. | Montreal—cor. Notre-
dame and St. Francis Xavier sts. [1885.]
Cover title: Sadliers' Household Library. |
No. 91.   Price 15 cts. \ New Indian Sketches. |
By rev. P. J. de Smet, S. J. | Complete and unabridged edition. |
New York: | D. & J. Sadlier & co., 31 Barclay
st. | Montreal: 275 Notre dame street.   [1885.]
Cover title, title verso copyright (1885) 1 1.
preface pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, text pp. 9-175,
16°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Brinton, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Georgetown, Pilling.
 Lettres  \   choisies   j  du     reverend
pere | Pierre-Jean   de   Smet |  de   la
Compagnie de Jesus | missionnaire aux
fitats-Unis   d;Am6rique |  1855-1861 |
Troisieme Edition | soigneusement revue
et corrige'e d'apres les manuscrits | de
Pauteur | et augmented de nombreuses
notes I
Smet (P. J.) —Continued.
Bruxelles || F. Haenen, libraire-e"di-
teur | 8, rue des Paroissiens, 8 | Paris |
H. Repos et Cie, Cditeurs | 70 Eue Bonaparte, 70 j 1876
Cover title as above, half-title (Lettres \
choises | du reverend pere | Pierre-Jean de
Smet) verso approbation 11. title as above verso
names of printers 1 1. preface pp. v-x, text pp.
1-414, table des matierespp. 415-416, list on back
cover, 12°.
Names of animals in the Coeur d'Alene language, about a dozen words, with definitions in
Erench, foot-note on p. 397.
Copies seen: Eames.
The first series of these "Lettres choisies,"
1849-1857, Bruxelles, 1875 (Eames), contains no
Salishan linguistics.
 Lettres | choisies | du reverend pere
| Pierre-Jean de Smet | de la Compagnie de Je"sus | missionnaire aux fitas-
Unis [sic] d'Amerique | Troisieme serie
| Troisieme Edition | soigneusement
revue et corrig^e d'apres les manuscrits
| de Pauteur J et augmented de nombreuses notes |
Bruxelles | M.   Closson et   Cie,  £di-
teurs | 26, rue de Joncker, 26 | Paris |
H. Repos et Cie, e'diteurs | 70, rue Bonaparte, 70 | 1877
Cover title as above, half-title (Lettres |
choises | du reverend pere j Pierre-Jean de
Smet) verso approbation 11. title as above verso
names of printers 11. pr6face pp. v-xi, text pp.
1-414, table des matieres pp. 415-416, list on back
cover, 12°.
Names of esculent roots and fruits in the
Coeur d'A16ne language, about 28 words, with
definitions in Erench, footnote on pp. 58-59.
Sign of the cross and Lord's prayer "en langue
des Picarries ou Sanish (lepeuple primitif),"
pp. 412-413.
Copies seen.- Eames.
The continuation, Lettres choisies, "qua-
trieme et derniere serie," Bruxelles, 1878
(Eames), contains no Salishan material.
 The | Linton | Albvm.  | By j P. S.
[sic'] De Smet | S. J.
Manuscript belonging in 1887 to the late Col.
John Mason Brown, Louisville, Ky.; embellished cover with title as above, no inside title,
pp. 1-84,4°. Pen and water-color sketches on
pp. 1, 3,15,33, 55, 61, and 65.
The Lord's prayer in the Elathead language,
p. 69.
Peter John De Smet, missionary, born in Ter-
monde, Belgium, December 31,1801, died in St.
Louis, Mo., in May, 1872. He studied in the
Episcopal Seminary of Mechlin, and while there
he f el t cal 1 < i < I to devote himself to tb e conversion
of the Indians.   "When Bishop Nerinx visited Smet (P.J.)—Continued.N
Belgium in search of missionaries, De Smet,
with five other students, volunteered to accompany him, and sail from Amsterdam in 1821.
After a short stay in Philadelphia, De Smet
entered the Jesuit novitiate at Whitemarsh,
Md. Here he took the Jesuit habit. In 1828
he went to St. Louis and took part in establishing the University of St. Louis, in which he
was afterwards professor. In 1838 he was sent
to establish a mission among the Pottawatta-
mies on Sugar Creek. P£o built a chapel,
erected, a school, which was soon crowded with
pupils, and in a short time converted most of
the tribe. In 1840 he begged the bishop of St.
Louis to permit him to labor among the Flat-
heads of the Rocky Mountains, and set out on
April 30,1840. He arrived on July 14 in the
camp of Peter Valley, where about 1,600 Indians
had assembled to meet him. "With the aid of an
interpreter he translated the Lord's prayer, the
Creed, and the Commandments into their language, and in a fortnight all the Flatheads
knew these prayers and commandments, which
were afterward explained to them. In the
spring of 1841 he set out again, and, after passing through several tribes, crossed the Platte
and met at Fort Hall a body of Flatheads who
had come 800 miles to escort the missionaries.
On September 24 the party reached Bitterroot
River, where it was decided to form a permanent
settlement. The lay brothers built a church
and residence, while De Smet went to Colville
to obtain provisions. On his return ... he
remained in the village, familiarizing himself
with the language, into which he translated the
catechism. He then resolved to visit Fort
Vancouver; ... on his return to St.
Mary's he resolved to cross the wilderness
again to St. Louis. There he laid the condition
of his mission before his superiors, who
directed him to go to Europe and appeal for aid
to the people of Belgium and France. He sailed
from Antwerp in December, 1843, with five
. Jesuits and six sisters, and reached Fort Vancouver in August, 1844. In 1845 he began a series
of missions among the Zingomenes, Sinpoils,
Okenaganes, Flatbows, and Koetenays, which
extended to the watershed of the Saskatchewan
and Columbia, the camps of the wandering
Assiniboins and Creeks, and the stations of
Fort St. Anne and Bourassa. He visited Europe
several times in search of aid for his missions.
During his last visit to Europe he met with a
severe accident, in which several of his ribs
were broken, and on his return to St. Louis he
wasted slowly away.—Appleton's Cyclop, of
Am. Biog.
Snanaimoo.    See Snanaimuk.
Snanaimuk:
Gentes See Boas (F.)
Grammatic treatise      Boas (F.)
Legends Boas (F.)
Lord's prayer Bancroft (H, H.)
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Prayers
Ten commandmeuts
Ten commandments
Texts
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Snohomish:
Catechism See
Geographic names
Geographic names
Grammatio treatise
Hymns
Lord's prayer ,
Lord's prayer
Prayer book
Sentences
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
"Words
Boulet (J. B.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Boulet (J.B.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Youth's.
Boulet (J. B.)
Youth's.
Bolduc (J. B. Z.)
Chirouze (—)
Craig (R. O.)
Boas (F.)
Youth's.
Songish:
Gentes
Numerals
Proper names
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Words
Songs:
Kawichen
Klallam
Klallam
Twana
See Boas (F.)
Eells (M.)
Macdonald (D. G. F.)
Boas (F.)
Tolmie   (W.  F.) and
Dawson (G.M.)
Boas (F.)
See Boas (F.)
Baker (T.)
Eells (M.)
Baker (T.)
Spokan:
Bible, Matthew<     Se(
Geographic names
Grammatic treatise
Numerals
Primer
Proper names
Proper names
Relationships
Relationships
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Walker (E.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Walker (E.) and Eells
(C)
Catlin (G.)
Stanley (J.M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Morgan (L. H.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Pinart (A.L.)
Powell (J. W.)
Roehrig (F.L.O.)
Squallyamish.    See Niskwalli.
[Squire (Gov. Watson C.)]   Report | of
the | governor of Washington territory
| for | the year 1884. |
HAL-
y M
66
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
Squire (W.C.)
Washington
RBI
\m
Continued.
| Government printing
office, j 1884.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
blank 11. text pp. 3-62, map, 8°.
A few Salish plant and fish names, pp. 12,13.
Copies seen: Eames, Gatschet, Pilling.
Squoxon.    See Skwaksin.
Stabat mater  [Kalispel].    See Canestrelli (P.)
Stailakum:
Grammatic treatise    See Boas (F.)
Vocabulary Boas (F.)
Stalo:
Prayers See Durien (P.)
Stanley (J. M.) Portraits | of j North
American Indians, | with sketches of
scenery, etc., | painted by | J. M. Stanley. | Deposited with | the Smithsonian
institution.! [Sealof the institution.] J
Washington: | Smithsonian institution. | December, 1852.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
names of printers 11. preface verso contents 11.
text pp. 5-72, index pp. 73-76, 8°.
Forms Smithsonian Institution Miscellaneous
Collections, 53; also part of vol. 2 of the same
series, Washington, 1862.
Contains the names of personages of many
Indian tribes of the United States, to a number
of which is added the English signification.
Among the peoples represented are the Spo-
kanes, pp. 68-71; Stony Island Indians, p. 71;
Okinagans, p. 721
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
[Geological Survey, Pilling, Powell, Smithsonian
Institution.
[Steiger (E.) Steiger's | bibliotheca glot-
tica, j part first, j A catalogue of J Dictionaries, Grammars, Readers, Expositors, etc. | of mostly {modern languages
I J spoken in all parts of the earth, |
except of | English, French, German,
and Spanish. | First division: | Abenaki
to Hebrew. |
E. Steiger, | 22 & 24 Frankfort Street,
| New York.    [1874.]
Half-title on cover, title as above verso name
of printer 1 1. notice dated Sept. 1874 verso
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-40, advertisements 211. colophon on back cover, 12°.
Titles of works relating to American languages generally, p. 3; to the Clallam, p. 24.
The second division of the first part was not
published. Part second is on the English language and part third on the German language.
In his notice the compiler states:'' This compilation must not be regarded as an attempt at
• complete linguistic bibliography, but solely as
^s
Steiger (E.) —Continued.
a bookseller's catalogue for business purposes,
with special regard to the study of philology
in America."
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
Stillacum.    See Stailakum.
Stumpf    (C.)     Lieder    der    Bilakula
Indianer.    Von C. Stumpf.
In Vierteljahrschrift fur Musik-Wissen-
sehaft, vol. 2, p. 408 [1885 ?] (*)
Swan  (James   Gilchrist).   The | northwest   coast;   | or, | three   years7   residence in Washington | territory. | By
James G. Swan. | [Territorial seal.] J
With numerous illustrations. |
New York: | Harper & brothers,
publishers, | Franklin square. | 1857.
Frontispiece 11. title verso copyright notice
(1857) 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. v-vii, contents pp. ix-xiv, list of illustrations p. [xv], map, text pp. 17-409, appendix
pp. 411-429, index pp. 431-435,12°.
Chapter xviii, Language of the Indians (pp.
306-326), contains a comparison of Chehalis
words with the Mexican, p. 313; general discussion with examples of the Chehalis language, pp. 315-317.—Vocabulary of the Chehalis (180 words and sentences), alphabetically
arranged by Chehalis words, pp. 412-415.—
Numerals 1-1000 of the Chehalis, pp. 420-421.—
Many Chehalis terms passim.
Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft, Boston
Athenaeum, British Museum, Congress, Eames,
Geological Survey, Harvard, Mallet, Pilling.
Issued also with title-page as follows: il
 The | northwest   coast j | or, | three
years' residence in Washington | territory, i By James G. Swan. | With
numerous illustrations. |
London: | Sampson Low, Son & co.,
47 Ludgate hill. | New York: Harper
&, brothers. | 1857.
Erontispiece 1 1. title 1 1. dedication verso
blank 1 1. introduction pp. v-vi, contents pp.
ix-xiv, list of illustrations p. [xv], map, text
pp. 17-409, appendix pp. 411-429, index pp. 431-
435,12°.
Linguistic contents asundertitlenext above.
Copies seen: Charles L. Woodward, New
York City.
Mr. James Gilchrist Swan was born in Med-
ford, Mass., January 11,1818, and was educatec"
at an academy in that place. In 1833 he went tc
Boston to reside, and remained there until 1849,
when he left for San Francisco, where he arrived
in 1850. In 1852 he went to Shoalwater Bay,
where he remained until 1856, when he returned
east. In 1859 he returned to Puget Sound; since
then Port Townsend has been his headquarters.
In 1860 Mr. Swan went to Neah Bay. In June,
1862, he was appointed teacher of the Makah SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
67
Swan (J. G.) — Continued.
Indian Reservation, where he remained till 1866.
In 1869 he went to Alaska, and in M ay, 1875, he
went a second time to Alaska, this time under
the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, as
a commissioner to purchase articles of Indian
manufacture for the Philadelphia Centennial
Exposition. This fine collection is now in the
U. S. National Museum at Washington. July
31, 1878, Mr. Swan was appointed an inspector
of customs at  Neah Bay, Cape Elattery, and
Swan (J. G.) — Continued.
remained there until August, 1888, addingmuch
to our knowledge of theMakah Indians, which
was reported to Prof. Baird and published in a
bulletin of the U". S. National Museum. In 1883
he went to Queen Charlotte Islands for the
Smithsonian Institution and made another collection for the U. S. National Museum.
Szmimeie-s Jesus Christ [Kalispel].
Giorda (J.)
See
T.
Tait:
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
See Eells (M.)
Gibbs pH
Powell (J. W.)
Poehrig (F.L. O.)
Talimoh.   See Tilamuk.
Tate (Rev. Charles Montgomery). [Hymn
in the Aukainenum language of Fraser
River, British Columbia.]
Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4°, in the possession of the
compiler of this bibliography.
Two verses and chorus of the hymn "Sweet
bye and bye."
Mr. Tate came to British Columbia from
Northumberland} England, in 1870. He engaged
in mission work among the Elathead Indians
at Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, in 1871, where
he learned the Aukamenum language spoken
by the Indian tribes on the east coast of Vancouver Island, lower Fraser River, and Puget
Sound. Here he spent three years, when lie
removed to Port Simpson, on the borders of
Alaska, among the Tsimpsheans. He next
moved to the Eraser Piver and spent seven-
years amongst the Elathead tribes between
Yalo and Westminster, frequently visiting the
Indians on the Nootsahk Piver in Washington
Territory. Mr. Tate spent four years, 1880 to
1884, among the Bella-Bellas, returning in the
latter year to the mission on Eraser Piver.
Ten commandments:
See Good (J. B.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Carmany (J. H.)
Netlakapamuk
Snanaimuk
Snanaimuk
Texts :
Kalispel
Komuk
Lilowat
Nehelim
Netlakapamuk
Netlakapamuk
Okinagan
Pentlash
Salish
Salish    •
Snanaimuk
Tilamuk
Twana
Twana
See Lettre.
Boas (F.)
Le Jeune (J. M. P.)
Boas (F.)
Good (J.B.)
Le Jeune (J. M. P.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Palladine (L.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Thompson River Indians.    See Netlakapamuk.
Tilamuk:
General discussion See Hale (H.)
Gentes
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Sentences
Texts
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Boas (E.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Lee (D.) and Frost (J.
H.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (P. G.)
Lee (D.) and Frost (J.
H.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Pott (A. F.)
See Tilamuk.
See Gibbs (G.)
Poehrig (F.L.O.)
Salish.
Words
Words
Tillamook.
Toanhuch:
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Tolmie (Dr. William Fraser). [Vocabularies of the northwest coast of North
America.]
In Royal Geog. Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 11,
pp. 230-246, London, 1841,8°. (Geological Survey.)
These vocabularies occur in an article by
Scouler (J.), Observations on the indigenous
tribes of the northwest coast of America, and
are as follows:
Vocabulary of the Billechoola, spoken by
coast tribes from lat. 50° 30' to 53° 30' (numerals
1-1000, and 150 words and phrases), pp. 230-
235.—Vocabulary of the Okinagen, spoken on
Fraser's Piver (numerals 1-100 and 105 words
and phrases), pp. 236-241.— Vocabulary of the
Kawitchen, spoken at the entrance of Trading
Piver, opposite Vancouver Island; Noosdalum,
Hood's Canal; and Squallyamish, Puget
Sound (numerals 1-100 and 150 words and
phrases), pp. 242-247.
-——Vocabulary of the Shooswap.
In Gribbs (G.), Comparative vocabularies, 11.
1-3, Washingt on, 1873, 4°.
 Vocabulary of the Shooswap, and of
the Wa-ky-na-kaine,
I 68
BIBLIOGRAPHY   OF  THE
Tolmie (W. F.) — Continued.
In Powell (J.W.), Contributions to N. A.
Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 252-265. Washington, 1877,
4°.
Each contains the 180 words called for on the
Smithsonian standard form.
— Vocabulary of the Kulleespelm.
In Powell (J. W.), Contributions to N. A.
Ethnology, vol. 1, pp. 270-282, Washington, 1877,
4°.
— [A list of prepositions in the Nisqually language. ]
Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4°, written on one side
only; in the library of the Bureau of Ethnology.
Recorded April 21,1856.
— and Dawson (G. M.)  Geological and
natural history survey of Canada. |
Alfred R. C. Selwyn, F. R. S., F. G. S.,
Director. | Comparative vocabularies
| of the | Indian  tribes | of | British
Columbia, | with a map illustrating distribution. ) By | W. Fraser   Tolmie, |
Licentiate of the Faculty of Physicians
and Surgeons, Glasgow. | And | George
M. Dawson, D.S.,A.S.R.M.,F.G.S.,&c.
| [Coat of arms.] j Published by authority of Parliament. |
Montreal: | Dawson brothers. | 1884.
Cover title nearly as above, title as above
verso blank 11. letter of transmittal signed by
G. M. Dawson verso blank 11. preface signed by
G. M. Dawson pp. 5b-7b, introductory note
signed by W. E. Tolmie pp. 9b-12b, text pp.
14B-131B, map, 8°.
Vocabularies (240 words) of the Kawitshin
' (Kowmook or Tlathool, by Tolmie), Kawitshin
(Snanaimooh tribe, by Tolmie), Kawitshin
(Songis tribe, by Tolmie and Dawson), and
Kawitshin (Kwantlin sept, by Tolmie and Dawson), pp. 38b-49b.—Vocabularies (240 words) of
' the Niskwalli (Sinahomish. by Tolmie and Daw-
son), and Tsheheilis (StSktamish, by Tolmie),
pp. 50B-61B.—Vocabulary (230 words) of the
' Bilhoola (Noothlakimish, by Tolmie and Dawson), and Selish (Lillooet tribe, by Dawson),
pp. 62B-73B.—Vocabulary (211 words) of the
Selish (Kullespelm tribe, by Tolmie and Daw-
' son), pp. 78b-86b.—Notes on the vocabularies:
Kawitshin, pp. 119B-120B; Niskwalli and Tsheheilis, p,12lB; Bilhoola, p. 122B; Selish, p. 123b-
124b.—Appendix II. "Comparative table of a
few (68) words in the foregoing dialects," viz:
Selish (Kullespelm), Nishwalli (Sinahomish),
Kawitshin (Songis),Kawitshin (Kwantlin), Bilhoola (Noothlakimish), p. 127b.—Appendix III.
Comparison of afew words in various languages
of North America, pp. 128b-130b, includes a few
Niskwalli, Selish, and Kawitshin.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling, Wellesley.
William Fraser Tolmie was born at Inverness, Scotland, February 3,1812, and died Decembers. 1886. al'terun illness of only t hreedays,
Tolmie (W. F.) — Continued.
at his residence, Cloverdale, Victoria, B. C He
was educated at Glasgow University, where he
graduated in August, 1832. On September 12
of the same year he accepted a position as surgeon and clerk with the Hudson's Bay Company, and left home for the Columbia River,
arriving in Vancouver in the spring of 1833.
Vancouver was then the chief post of the Hudson's Bay Company on this coast. In 1841 he
visited his native land, but returned in 1842
overland via the plains and the Columbia, and
was placed in charge of the Hudson's Bay posts
on Puget Sound. He here took a prominent part,
during the Indian war of 1855-'56, in pacifying
the Indians. Being an excellent linguist, he
had acquired a knowledge of the native tongues
and was instrumental in bringing about peace
between the whites and the Indians. He was
appointed chief factor of the Hudson's Bay
Company in 1855, removed to Vancouver Island
in 1859, when he went into stock-raising, being
the first to introduce thoroughbred stock into
British Columbia; was a member of the local
legislature two terms, until 1878; was a member
of the first board of education for several years,
exercising a great influence in educational matters ; held many offices of trust, and was always
a valued and respected citizen.
Mr. Tolmie was known to ethnologists for his
contributions to the history and linguistics of
the native races of the West Coast, and dated
his interest in ethnological matters from his
contact with Mr. Horatio Hale, who visited the
West Coast as an ethnologist to the Wilkes
exploring expedition. He afterwards transmitted vocabularies of a number of the tribes
to Dr. Scouler and to Mr. George Gibbs, some
of which were published in Contributions to
North American Ethnology. In 1884 he published, in conjunction with Dr. G. M. Dawson, a
nearly complete series of short vocabularies of
the principal languages met with in British
Columbia, and his name is to be found frequently quoted as an authority on the history of
the Northwest Coast and its ethnology. He frequently contributed to the press upon public
questions and events now historical.
Toughwamish,   See Dwamish.
Treasury.   The Treasury of Languages.
A     rudimentary, dictionary | of
universal philology. | Daniel iii. 4. |
[One line in Hebrew.] |
Hall and Co., 25, Paternoster row,
London. | (All rights reserved.) [18731]
Colophon: London: | printed by Grant and
co., 72-78, Turnmill street, E. C.
Title verso blank 1 1. advertisement (dated
February 7th, 1873) verso blank 11. introduction
(signed J. B. and dated October 31st, 1873) pp.
i-iv, dictionary of languages (in alphabetical
order) pp. 1-301, list of contributors p. [302],
errata verso colophon 11.12°.
Edited by James Bon wick, Esq.,E. R. G. S.,
assisted  by about  t wi-nty-t wo   rout ributore, SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
69
Treasury—Continued.
whose initials are signed to the most important
of their respective articles. In the compilation of the work free use was made of Bagster's
Bible of Every Land and Dr.Latham's Elements
of Comparative Philology. There are also
references to an appendix, concerning which
there is the following note on p. 301: l' Notice.—
Owing to the unexpected enlargement of this
Book in course of printing, the Appendix is
necessarily postponed; and the more especially
as additional matter has been received sufficient
to make a second volume. And it will be proceeded with so soon as an adequate list of Subscribers shall be obtained." Under the name of
each language is a brief statement of the family
or stock to which it belongs, and the country
where it is or was spoken, together with references, in many cases, to the principal authorities on the grammar and vocabulary. Addenda
follow at the end of each letter.
Contains scattered references to various dialects of the Salishan.
Copies seen: Eames.
Tribal names:
Atna See Latham (E. G.)
Bilkula Latham (R. G.)
Salish Hoffman (W. J.)
Salish Kane (P.)
Salish Keane (A. H.)
Salish Latham (E. G.)
Salish Powell (J. W.)
Triibner (Nicolas). See Ludewig (H. E.J
Triibner & Co. Registered for Transmission Abroad. | Triibner's | American
and Oriental Literary Record. | A
monthly register j Of the most important Works published in North and
South America, in | India, China, and
the British Colonies: with occasional
Notes on German, | Dutch, Danish,
French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese,
and Russian Books. | No. l[-Nos. 145-6.
Vol. XII. Nos. 11 & 12]. March 16,
1865[-December, 1879]. Price6<7. | Subscription | 5s. per Annum, | Post Free.
[London: Triibner & co. 1865-1879.]
12 vols, in 9, large 8°. No title-pages, headings only. No. 1 to nos. 23 & 24 (March 30,1867)
are paged 1-424; no. 25 (May 15,1867) to no. 60
(August 25,1870) are paged 1-816. The numbering by volumes begins with no. 61 (September
26,1870), which is marked vol. VI, no. 1. Vols.
VI to XII contain pp. 1-196; 1-272; 1-204; 1-184;
1-176; 1-152; 1-164. In addition there is a special
number for September, 1874 (pp. 1-72), and an
extra no. 128* for October, 1877 (pp. 1-16); also
supplementary and other leaves. Continued
under the following title:
Triibner's | American, European & Oriental
| Literary Record. | A register of the most important works | published in | North and South
America,India,China,Europe, \ and t lie British
Triibner & Co.— Continued.
colonies. | With Occasional Notes on German,
Dutch, Danish, Erench, Italian, Spanish, | Portuguese, Eussian, and Hungarian Literature. |
New series.   Vol. I[-IX]. | January to December, 1880[-January to December, 1888]. |
London: | Triibner & co., 57 and 59, Ludgate
hill.    [1880-1888.]
'9 vols, large 8°. Including no. 147-8 to no. 242;
each volume with a separate title and leaf of
contents and its own pagination. Continued as
follows:
Triibner's record, | a journal | devoted to the
| Literature of the East, | with notes and lists
of current | American, European and Colonial'
Publications. | No. 243[-251]. Third series. Vol.
I.   Parti [-Vol. II.   Part 3].   Price 2s.
[London: Triibner & co. March, 1889-April,
1891.]
2 vols.; printed covers as above, no title-
pages, large 8°.   No more published.
Titles of works in and relating to the Salishan languages are scattered through the
periodical, together with notes on the subject.
A list of '' Works on the aboriginal languages
of America," vol. 8 (first aeries), pp. 185-189,
includes titles under the special heading of
Clallam and Lummi, p. 186; Selish, p. 189.
Copies seen: Eames.
 Bibliotheca Hispano-Americana. | A
j catalogue | of | Spanish books [printed
in j Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, the
Antilles, | Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chili, | Uruguay, and the
Argentine Eepublic j | and of | Portuguese books printed in Brazil. | Followed by a collection of | works on the
aboriginal languages | of America. |
On Sale at the affixed Prices, by |
Triibner & co., | 8 & 60, Paternoster
row, London, j 1870. | One shilling and
sixpence.
Cover title as above verso contents 11. no i n-
side title; catalogue pp. 1-184, colophon verso
advertisements 11.16°.
"Works on the aboriginal languages of America, pp. 162-184, contains a list of books (alphabetically arranged by languages) on this subject, including: General works, pp. 162-168;
Clallam and Lummi, p. 170; Selish, p. 184.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 A | catalogue j of | dictionaries and
grammars ] of the | Principal Languages
and Dialects | of the World. | For sale
by | Triibner & co. j
London: | Triibner & co., 8 & 60 Paternoster row. | 1872.
Cover title as above, title as above verso
names of printers 1 1. notice verso blank 1 1.
catalogue pp. 1-64, addenda and corrigenda 1 1.
advertisements verso blank 1 1. a list of works
! 70
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE
Triibner & Co.— Continued.
relating to the science of language etc. pp.
1-16,8°.
Contains titles of a few works in Clallam
and Lummi, p. 12; in Selish, p. 54.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
A later edition with title-page as follows:
 Triibner's | catalogue | of | dictionaries and grammars | of the | Principal
Languages and Dialects of the World. |
Second edition, j considerably enlarged
and revised, with an alphabetical index. | A guide for students and booksellers. | [Monogram.] |
London: | Triibner & co., 57 and 59,
Ludgate hill. | 1882.
Cover title as above, title as above verso list of
catalogues 11. notice and preface to the second
edition p. iii, index pp. iV-viii, text pp. 1-168,
additions pp. 169-170, Triibner's Oriental &
Linguistic Publications pp. 1-95, 8°.
Contains titles of works in American languages (general), p. 3; Clallam, p. 38; Selish, p.
142.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
 -No.    1[-12].    January   1874 [-May,
1875]. | A catalogue | of | choice, rare,
and curious books, | selected from the
stock | of | Triibner & Co., | 57 & 59,
Ludgate hill, London.
[London: Triibner & co.  1874-1875.]
12 parts; no titles, headings only; catalogue
(paged continuously) pp. 1-192, large 8°. This
series of catalogues was prepared by Mr. James
George Stuart Bnrges Bohn. See Triibner's
American, European, & Oriental Literary Record, new series, vol. 1, pp.10-11 (February, 1880).
Works on the aboriginal languages of America, no. 8, pp. 113-118, including titles under the
headings Clallam and Lummi, and Selish.
Copies seen: Eames.
Trumbull: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull, Hartford, Conn.
Trumbull (Dr. James Hammond). Indian
languages of America.
In Johnson's New Universal Cyclopaedia,
vol.2, pp. 1155-1161, New York, 1877,8°. (Bureau
of Ethnology, Congress.)
A general discussion of the subject, including linguistic divisions, etc., treating
among others the Salishan.
[ ] Catalogue | of the | American Library | of the late | mr. George Brinley,
| of Hartford, Conn. | Parti. | America
in general | New France Canada etc. |
theBritish colonies to 1776 | New England | [-Part V. j General and miscellaneous. [ [&.c. eight lines.]
Trumbull (J. H.) — Continued.
Hartford | Press of the Case Lock-
wood   &   Brain ard   Company     1878
[-1893]
5 parts, 8°. Compiled by Dr. J. H. Trumbull.
Indian languages: general treatises and collections, part 3, pp. 123-124; Northwest coast,
p.141.
Copies seen: Eames, Pilling.
James Hammond Trumbull, philologist, was
born in Stonington, Conn., December 20, 1821.
He entered Yale in 1838, and though, owing to
ill health, he was not graduated with his class,
his name was enrolled among its members in
1850 and he was given the degree of A. M. He
settled in Hartford in 1847, and was assistant
secretary of state in 1847-1852 and 1858-1861,
and secretary in 1861-1864, also state librarian in
1854. Soon after going to Hartford he joined the
Connecticut Historical Society, was its corresponding secretary in 1849-1863, and was elected
its president in 1863. He has been a trustee of
the Watkinson free library of Hartford and its
librarian since 1863, and has been an officer of
the Wadsworthathenaeum since 1864. Dr.Trum-
bull was an original member of the American
Philological Association in 1869 and its president in 1874-1875. He has been a member of the
American Oriental Society since 1860 and of the
American Ethnological Society since 1867, and
honorary member of many State historical societies. In 1872 he was elected to the National
Academy of Sciences. Since 1858 he has devoted
special attention to the subject of the Indian
languages of North America. He has prepared
a dictionary and vocabulary to John Eliot's
Indian bible and is probably the only American scholar that is now able to read that work.
In 1873 he was chosen lecturer on Indian languages of North America at Yale, but loss of
health and other labors soon compelled his
resignation. The degree of LL. D. was conferred on him by Yale in 1871 and by Harvard
in 1887, while Columbia gave him an L. H. D.
in 1887.—Appleton's Cyclop, of Am. Biog. ■
Tsihalis.    See Chehalis.
Turner (William Wadden).    See Ludewig (H.E.)
Twana:
Dictionary
Geographic names
Geographic names
Grammar
Grammatic treatise
Grammatic treatise
Hymns
Legends
Legends
Lord's prayer
Numerals
Prayers
Songs
Text
Text
Vocabulary
See Eells (M.)
Coones (S. E.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Baker (T.)
Buhner (T. S.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.) SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
71
Tylor   (Edward  Burnett).    Anthropology : | an introduction to the study of
J man and civilization. | By | Edward
B. Tylor, D. C. L., F. R. S. | With illustrations. |
London:) Macmillan and co. | 1881. |
The Right of Translation and Reproduction is Reserved.
Half-title verso design 1 1. title verso names
of printers 11. preface pp.v-vii, contents pp. ix-
xii, list of illustrations pp. xiii-xiv, text pp. 1-
440, selected books pp.441-442, index pp. 443-448,
12°.
A few words iu the language of Vancouver
Island, pp. 134,141.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British
Museum, Congress.
 Anthropology: | an introduction to
the study of | man and civilization. |
By | Edward B.Tylor, D. C. L., F. R. S.
J With illustrations, j
New York: j D. Appleton and company, | 1, 3, and 5 Bond street. | 1881.
Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1
1. preface pp. v-vii, contents pp. ix-xii, list of
illustrations pp. xiii-xv, text pp. 1-440, selected
books pp. 441-442, index pp. 443-448,12°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above.
Copies seen: Congress, Geological Survey,
National Museum.
— Einreitung j in das I Studium der
Anthropologic j  und  | Civilisation. |
Von | Dr. Edward B. Tylor, | [&c. two
lines.] | Deutsche [&c. four lines.] |
Tylor (E. B.) — Continued.
Braunschweig, | Druck   und Verlag
von Friedrich Vie wig und Sohn. | 1883.
Pp. i-xix, 1-538, 8°.
Chapters iv, v, Die Sprache, pp. 134-178.
Copies seen: British Museum.
 The international scientific series |
Anthropology | an introduction to the
study   of | man  and   civilization | By
Edward   B. Tylor,  D.C.L., F.R.S. |
With illustrations |
New York | D. Appleton and company | 1888
Half-title o f the series verso blank 1 1. title
as above verso blank 11. preface pp. v-viii, contents pp. ix-xii, listof illustrations pp. xiii-xiv,
text p p. 1-440, selected books pp. 441-442, index
pp. 4 43-448,8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: Harvard.
 Anthropology: | an introduction to
the study of | man and civilization. |
By | Edward B. Tylor, D. C. L., F. R. S.
| With illustrations. | Second edition,
revised. |
London: | Macmillan and co. | and
New York, j 1889. | The Right of Translation and Reproducti on is Reserved.
Half-title verso design 1 1. title verso names
of printers etc. 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, contents
pp. ix-xii, list of illustrations pp. xiii-xv, text
pp. 1-440, selected books etc. pp. 441-442, index
pp. 443-448,12°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above.
Copies seen: Eames.
V.
Van Gorp (Rev. L.)    The Lord's prayer
in the Kalispel language.
In Smalley (E. V.), The Kalispel Country, in
the Century Magazine, vol. 29, p. 455, New
York and London, 1885,8°.
Vater ( Dr. Johann Sever in). Linguarum
totius orbis J Index | alphabeticus, |
quarum | Grammaticae,   Lexica, | col-
lectionesvocabulorum | recensentur, |
patria   significatur,    historia   aduin-
bratur | a | Joanne Severino Vatero, |
Theol. Doct. et Profess. Bibliothecario
Reg., Ord. | S. Wladimiri equite. J
Berolini ! In officina libraria Fr.
Nicolai. | MDCCCXV[1815].
Second title: Litteratur | der | Grammatiken,
Lexica | und "Wortersammlungen j aller
Sprachen der Erde | nach | alphabetischer Ord-
nung der Sprachen, | mit einer | gedrangten
Uebersicht I des Vaterlandes, der Schicksale I
Vater (J. S.) —Continued.
und Verwandtschaft derselben | von j Dr.
Johann Severin Vater, | Professor und Biblio-
thekar zu Konigsberg des S. Wladimir- | Or-
dens Ritter. |
Berlin | in der Nicolaisehen Buchhandlung.
11815.
Latin title verso 1.1 recto blank, German title
recto 1.2 verso blank, dedication verso blank 1
1. address to the king 1 1. preface pp. i-ii, to
the reader pp. iii-iv, half-title verso blank 1 1.
text pp. 3-250,8°. Alphabetically arranged by
names of languages, double columns, German
and Latin.
Notices of works relating to the Atnah language, p. 21.
Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames,
Pilling.
A later edition in German titled as follows:
 Litteratur | der | Grammatiken, Lex-
ika | und | Wortersammlungen I aller
Sprachen der Erde | von | Johann Se-
i V
I
72
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
ms
B
mm.
-:- *b
«.;
Vater (J. S.) — Continued,
verin Vater. | Zweite, vollig umgear-
Vocabulary— Continued.
Kaulits Gallatin (A.)
beitete Ausgabe |
von 1 B. Juler. 1
Kaulits
Gibbs (G.)
Berlin,  1847. 1
In
der Nicolaischen
Kaulits
Hale (H.)
7                              1
Kaulits
Latham (E.G.)
Buchhandlung.
Kaulits
Powell (J. W.)
Title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 1
Kaulits
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
1. Vorwort (signed B
•Iii
Ig and dated 1. Deceni-
Kaulits
Wabass (W. G.)
ber 1846) pp. v-x, titl
eso
f general works on tho
Kawichen
Pinart (A. L.)
subjectpp. xi-xii, tex
t (alphabetically arranged
Kawichen
Scouler (J.)
by names of langua<
?es)
pp. 1-450, Nachtrage
Kawichen
Tolmie (W. F.)
und Berichtigungen
PP
451-541, Sachregister
Kawichen
Tolmie  OV.  F.) and
pp. 542-563, Autorenregister pp. 564-592, Verbes-
Dawson (G. M.)
serungen 211.8°.
Klallam
Eells (M.)
List of works rela
ting to the Atnah, pp. 38,
Klallam
Gibbs (G.)
459;    Billechoola, p
. 490;   Flathead,  p. 483;
Klallam
Latham (E. G.)
Eriendly Village, p.
490
; Kawitschen, p. 503;
Klallam
Pinart (A. L.)
Nusdalum, p. 528; Okanagan, p. 335; Spokan-
Klallam
Eoehrig (F. L. O.)
Indianer, p. 483; Squ
ally
amish, p. 382.
Klallam
Scouler (J.)
Copies seen: Cong
ress
, Eames, Harvard.
Klallam
Tolmie (W. F.)
At the Eischer sale
, no
1710, a copy sold for 1*.
Komuk
Boas (F.)
J. C) and Vater (J. S.)
Komuk
Komuk
Brinton (D. G.)
Oct) AUciUllg ^t
Gibbs (G.)
Vocabulary:
Komuk
Pinart (A L.)
Atna
See Adelung (J".  C.) and
Komuk
Powell (J. W.)
Vater (J. S.)
Komuk
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Atna
Gallatin (A.)
Kwantlen
Gibbs (G.)
Atna
Hale (H.)
Kwantlen
Eoehrig (F. L. O.)
Atna
Howse (J.)
Kwantlen
Tolmie   (W. F.) and
Atna
Latham (E.G.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Atna
Mackenzie (A.)
Kwinaiutl
Gibbs (G.)
Atna
Pinart (A. L.)
Kwinaiutl
Hale(H.)
Bilkula
Bancroft (H. H.)
Kwinaiutl
Pinart (A. L.)
Bilkula
Boas (F.)
Kwinaiutl
Eoehrig (F. L. O.)
Bilkula
Gallatin (A.)
Lilowat
Boas(F.)
Bilkula
Gibbs (G.)
Lilowat
Gibbs (G.)
Bilkula
Latham (E. G.)
Lilowat
Powell (J. W.)
Bilkula
Pinart (A. L.)
Lilowat
Eoehrig (F. L. 0.)
Bilkula
Powell (J. W.)
Lilowat
Tolmie (W.  F.) and
Bilkula
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Bilkula
Scouler (J.)
Lummi
Gibbs (G.)
Bilkula
Tolmie (W. F.)
Lummi
Pinart (A. L.)
Bilkula
Tolmie   (W. F.)  and
Lummi
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Nehelim
Boas (F.)
Chehalis
Eells (M.)
Netlakapamuk
Boas (F.)
Chehalis
Hale (H.)
Netlakapamuk
Gibbs (G.)
Chehalis
Latham (E. G.)
Netlakapamuk
Powell (J. W.)
Chehalis
Pinart (A. L.)
Niskwalli
1
Campbell (J.)
Chehalis
Smet (P.J.de).
Niskwalli
Canadian.
Chehalis
Swan (J. G.)
Niskwalli
Eells (M.)
Chehalis
Tolmie  (W. F.)  and
Niskwalli
Gallatin (A.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Niskwalli
Hale (H.)
Dwamish
Salish.
Niskwalli
Latham (R. G.)
Friendly Village
Adelung (J.  C.) and
Niskwalli
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Vater (J. S.)
Niskwalli
Pinart (A. L.)
Friendly Village
Gallatin (A.)
Niskwalli
Salish.
Friendly Village
Latham (E. G.)
Niskwalli
Scouler (J.)
Friendly Village
Mackenzie (A.)
Niskwalli
Tolmie (W. F.)
Kalispel
Gibbs (G.)
Niskwalli
Tolmie  (W. F.)  and
Kalispel
Hale (H.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Kalispel
Pinart (A. L.)
Niskwalli
Wickersham (J.)
Kalispel
Powell (J. W.)
Niskwalli
Wilson (E. F.)
Kalispel
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Nuksahk
Gatschet (A. S.)
Kalispel
Tolmie (W. F.)
Nuksahk
Gibbs (G.)
Kalispel
Tolmie  (W.   F.) and
Nuksahk
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Nusalph
Gibbs (G.) SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
73
cabulary —
-Continued.
Vocabulary—
* Continued.
Nusalph
Eoehrig (F. L. 0.)
Skagit
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Okinagan
Boas (F.)
Skitsuish
Gallatin (A.)
Okinagan
Gibbs (G.)
Skitsuish
Hale (H.)
Okinagan
Howse (J.)
Skitsuish
Mengarini (G.)
Okinagan
Latham (R. G.)
Skitsuish
Pinart (A. L.)
Okinagan
Powell (J. W.)
Skitsuish
Powell (J.W.)
Okinagan
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Skitsuish
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Okinagan
Scouler (J.)
Skitsuish
Smet (P.J.de.)
Okinagan
Tolmie (W.F.)
Skokomish
Boas (F.)
Pentlash
Boas (F.)
Skokomish
Salish.
•Piskwau
Gallatin (A.)
Skoyelpi
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Piskwau
Gibbs (G.)
Skoyelpi
Gibbs (G.)
Piskwau
Hale (H.)
Skoyelpi
Hale (H.)
Piskwau
Latham (R. G.)
Skoyelpi
Mengarini (G.)
Piskwau
Powell (J. W.)
Skoyelpi
Powell (J. W.)
Piskwau
Roehrig (F.L.O.)
Skoyelpi
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Puyallup
McCaw (S. R.)
Skwamish
Salish.
Puyallup
Salish.
Snanaimuk
Boas (F.)
Salish
Candian.
Snanaimuk
Pinart (A. L.)
Salish
Cooper (J. G.)
Snanaimuk
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Salish
Gallatin (A.)
Snanaimuk
Tolmie   (W. F.)  and
Salish
Gibbs (G.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Salish
Henry (A.)
Snohomish
Bolduc (J.-B. Z.)
Salish
Hoffman (W. J.)
Snohomish
Chirouze (—)
Salish
Howse (J.)
Snohomish
Craig (E. 0.)
Salish
Latham (R. G.)
Songish
Boas (F.)
Salish
Maximilian (A. P.)
Songish
Tolmie (W.  F.)  and
Salish
Powell (J. W.)
Dawson (G. M.)
Salish
Roehrig (F.L.O.)
Spokan
Gibbs (G.)
Salish
Salish.
Spokan
Hale (H.)
Salish
Smet (P. J. de)
Spokan
Pinart (A. L.)
Salish
Wilkes (C.)
Spokan
Powell (J.W.)
Salish
Wilson (E. F.)
Spokan
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Shiwapmuk
Gibbs (G.)
Stailakum
Boas (F.)
Shiwapmuk
Powell (J.W.)
Tait
Gibbs (G.)
Shiwapmuk
Eoehrig (F.L.O.)
Tait
Powell (J. W.)
Shuswap
Boas (F.)
Tait
Eoehrig (F. L. 0.)
Shuswap
Dawson (G.M.)
Tilamuk
Boas (F.)
Shuswap
Gibbs (G.)
Tilamuk
Gallatin (A.)
Shuswap
Hale (H.)
Tilamuk
Hale (H.)
Shuswap
Howse (J.)
Tilamuk
Latham (E. G.)
Shuswap
Pinart (A. L.)
Tilamuk
Lee (D.) and Frost (J.
Shuswap
Powell (J". W.)
H.)
Shuswap
Tolmie (W.F.)
Toanhuch
Gibbs (G.)
Sicatl
Boas (F.)
Toanhuch
Eoehrig (F. L. 0.)
Silets
Boas (F.)
Toanhuch
Salish.
Skagit
Craig (E. 0.)
Twana
Eells (M.)
w.
"Wabass (Dr. W. G.) Vocabulary of the
Cowlitz language.
Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4°, in the library of the
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C.
Recorded at Cowlitz landing, February, 1858.
A list of 23 English words with Cowlitz and
Chinook equivalents.
Wakynakane.   See Okinagan.
Walker (Rev. Elkanah). [A portion of
the gospel of Matthew in the Flathead
or Spokan language. ] (*)
Walker (E.)— Continued.
Manuscript, 20 pages, 8°, belonging to Eev.
Myron Eells, Union City, Wash., who has
kindly described it for me as follows:
'' Translated from the original Greek by Eev.
Elkanah Walker, missionary of the American
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions,
in accordance with a vote of the Oregon mission passed at a meeting held in May, 1845,
Jan. 1st, 1846. I copied it from an older manuscript, which I believe my father had, and
which I presume has been burned.   It contains
^
	 Wl
74
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF THE
Walker (E.) —Continued.
only chapters 1-3 and chapter 4, verses 1-23. It
was never printed, I believe, nor am I aware
that the translation was ever finished."
[■
Etshiit J thin |
thin I Sitskai-
 and Eells  (C.)]
sitskai j thlu |  siais
sitlinish. | [Picture.] |
Lapwai: | 1842.
Literal translation: First | the | writes I the
| lesson | the | writes Creator.
Title p. 1, text in the Spokan language pp. 2-
16, sq. 16°. This is said to be the third book
printed in the United States west of the Eocky
Mountains.
Key to the alphabet, p. 2.—Siais [spelling lessons] i-iii, pp. 3-4.—Siais [reading lessons] iv-
xii, pp. 5-16.   See the facsimile of the title-page.
Copies seen: Eames, Eells, Pilling, Wickersham (Tacoma, Wash.), PacificUniversity.(For-
est Grove, Oregon). The last mentioned is the
only perfect copy I have seen. Prof. J.W.Marsh,
the president of the university, kindly permitted me to photograph the first four pages, in
order to complete the other copies mentioned.
I am indebted to Eev. Myron Eells for the
following notes:
'' Eev. Elkanah Walker was born at North
Yarmouth, Me., August 7,1805. Converted at
the age of 26, he soon began to study for the
ministry. He took an academic course, but did
not go to college. He graduated from Bangor
Theological Seminary, Me., in 1837, and gave
himself to the foreign missionary work under
the American Board of Commissioners for
Foreign Missions. At first he was appointed
to South Africa with Eev. C. Eells, but a fierce
war between two native chiefs detained them,
and in the meantime the call from Oregon
became so urgent that, with their consent, their
destination was changed.
"He was ordained at Brewer, Me., as a Congregational minister in February, 1833, and was
married March 5,1838, to Miss Mary Richardson, who was born at Baldwin, Me., April 1,
1811. Before her engagement to Mr. Walker
she was appointed as a missionary to Siam; but
after that event her destination was changed
first to Africa and then to Oregon. March 6,
1838, they started to cross the continent, in
company with three other missionaries and
their wives, where no white women had ever
been except Mrs. Wbitman and Mrs. Spalding.
From Missouri to Oregon the journey was on
horseback. They i eached Wallawalla August
29, 1838, where they wintered, and the next
spring went to Tshimakain, Walkers Prairie,
among the Spokan Indians, with Rev. C. Eells
and wife. The next ten years were spent at this
place. Atfirst the Indians were much interested,
but, when they found that Christianity meant
that they should give up gambling, incantations, and the like, their interest grew less, so
that none united with 1 he church before they
left.  Subsequent events have shown, however,
Walker (E.) — Continued.
that many of them were Christians, for their
lives have proved it.
"Mr. Walker studied the Spokan language
quite thoroughly and learned its scientific and
grammatic construction more tboroughly than
bis colaborer. He prepared [with the assistance of Rev. Cushing Eells] a small primer in
the language, which was printed in 1842 at
Lapwai, Idaho, the only book ever printed in
that language.   [See title next above.]
1' On account of the Whitman massacre, in
1847, at Wallawalla, he was obliged to remove,
with his family, to the Willamette Valley,
Oregon, in 1848. "Until 1850 he made his home
at Oregon City, and from that time until his
death at Forest Grove. In 1848 he aided in
organizing the Congregational Association of
Oregon. The same year he assisted in founding Tualatin Academy and Pacific University,
at Forest Grove, to which he gave $1,000 and of
which he was a trustee eleven years previous
to his death. He preached at Forest Grove
and in the vicinity nearly all the time he lived
there, and during his pastorate of the Congregational church at that place the church building there was erected which cost $7,000, of
which he gave $1,000. In 1870 he returned to
Maine, on his only visit east. He died at Forest
Grove, November 21,1877, aged 72 years. His
wife still lives there (1892), and of his eightchil-
dren sesen are living; five have been engaged
in active Christian work among the Indians
of the Pacific coast, and one is a missionary in
China. The eldest one is the first white boy
born in Oregon. Idaho, or Washington."
Watkinson: This word following a title or within •
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of
the work referred to has been seen bjr the compiler in the Watkinson library, Hartford, Conn.
Wellesley: This word following a title or within
parentheses after a note indicates tbatacopyof
the work referred to has been seen by the compiler in the library of Wellesley college, Wellesley, Mass.
Whymper (Frederick). Travel and ad-'
venture | in the | territory of Alaska, |
formerly Russian America—now ceded
to the | United States—and in various
other | parts of the north Pacific. | By
Frederick Whymper. | [Design.] | With
map and illustrations. |
London j John Murray, Albemarle
street. | 1868. | The right of Translation
is reserved.
Half-title verso blank 11. title verso names of3
printers 11. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface
pp. vii-ix, contents pp. xi-xix, list of illustrations p. [xx], text pp. 1-306, appendix pp. 307-
331, map, plates, 8°.
A few Salishan phrases, pp. 43,47.
Copies seen: Boston Public, British Museum,
Congress. SALISHAN LANGUAGES.
75
atgkMitXOwfm'euw^aar K-vwa
I WfatHmiMt,^*,
iWIIB
11 E S a
TIILU
S 1
*«»   .*>
s
Si is!
1 H■ fc V
a I s ill i n i s'a
teay«iagsag»MecrjatrtKEr
LAPWAI:
CSttfcWttt******
'i^.^Sj
-,
FACSIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF THE SPOKAN PRIMER, 76
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
Whymper (F.) — Continued.
At the Field sale, catalogue no. 2539, a copy
brought $2.75.
An American edition titled as follows:
 Travel   and   adventure | in  the |
territory of Alaska, | formerly Russian
America—now ceded to the | United
States—and in various other | parts of
the north Pacific. | By Frederick
Whymper. J [Design.] J With map and
illustrations. |
New York: | Harper & brothers, publishers, | Franklin square. | 1869.
Frontispiece 11. title verso blank 11. dedication verso blank 11. preface pp. xi-xii, contents
pp. xiii-xviii, list of illustrations p. xix, text
pp. 21-332, appendix pp. 333-353, map and
plates, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under title next above,
pp. 63, 66.
Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum,
Geological Survey, Powell.
Reprinted, 1871, pp. xix, 21-353,8». (*)
 Frederick  Whymper I Voyages   et
aventures dans P Alaska [ (ancien
Ame'rique russe) | Ouvrage traduit de
l'Anglais avec l'autorisation de
l'auteur j par $mile Jonveaux | Ilrus-
tre" de 37 gravures sur bois | et accom-
pagn6 d'une carte.
Paris | librairie Hachette et Cie |
boulevard Saint-Germain, 79 | 1871 |
Tous droits reserve's
Cover title as above, half-title verso names of
printers 11. titleasabove verso blank 11. preface
pp. i-ii, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-405,
table des chapitres pp. 407-412, map, 8°.
Linguistic contents as under titles above,
pp. 58,65.
Copies seen: Pilling.
Wickersham (Judge James). The name
is "Tacoma."
In the Weekly Ledger, Tacoma, Washington,
Friday, February 10,1893.   (Pilling.)
A discussion concerning the name of the
mountain, "Is it Tacoma or Rainier."
Niskwalli and Puyallup geographic terms.
Reprinted, with additions, as follows:
 Proceedings I of the I Tacoma acad
emy of science, | February 6, 1893. j
[Ornament.] | Paper   by Hon. James
Wickersham. | Is it "Mt. Tacoma" or
"Rainier." |  What  Do   History   and
Tradition Say? j [Ornament.] |
Tacoma:      Puget   Sound   Printing:
Company. | 1893.
Cover t itlo as above verso names of officers,
no inside title, text pp. 1-16.8°.
Wickersham (J.) — Continued.
Names of a number of geographic features
passim, mainly "Nisqually-Puyallup".—Ety
mology of the word Tacoma, p. 16.
Copies seen: Pilling.
  [Material relating to the Nisqually
language.]
In response to my inquiries, Judge Wickersham, of Tacoma, Wash., writes me under date
of November 14,1892, as follows:
"You ask for the title and full description of
manuscript, etc., relating to the Nisqually language. As yet it has no title and consists of
about 200 pages of words, definitions, legends,
names, etc.,collected from a Nisqually I ndian by
the name of Leschi, who is the son of the celebrated chief Quiemuth and nephew of Leschi,
the war chief of the combined Nisqually, Puyallup, Klikitat, and Yakama war of 1855-'56
on Puget Sound. I am getting, in the best possible manner, a complete vocabulary of the
Nisqually, simon pure, and intend to keep at it
until I have everything obtainable.
"My idea now is to prepare the history of j
these people since the advent of the whites,
their legends and myths, their language, habits, form of government, etc., in a small volume
for preservation. It will have, of course, only a
local interest, except to ethnologists, but it can
still be made of so great interest to the people
of our State as to become practically a history
of the State of Washington."
James Wickersham was born in Marion
county, Illinois, in 1857; received! a common-
school education. At 20 went into law office of
Senator John M. Palmer, Springfield, 111., and
in 1880 was admitted to the bar upon examination before the supreme court of Illinois. Was
employed on census of 1880 under Special
Agent Fred. H. Wines, engaged on statistical
work in connection with the defective, delinquent, and dependent classes in the United
States. Upon the completion of this work,
having married meanwhile, in 1883 moved to
Tacoma, Wash.,where he began the practice of
law. In 1884 was elected probate judge of
Pierce county; was re-elected in 1880; since
expiration of term has been engaged in the law
practice at Tacoma. He made an exploration
of the earthworks of mound-builders in Sangamon county, Illinois, in 1882 (see Smithsonian
Pep., 1883, pp. 825-835), and has since been interested in anthropological matters. Was one of
the charter members of the Tacoma Academy of
Science, and takes an active interest in its work.
Mr. Wickersham makes a specialty of history
of the northwest coast, and has gathered a fine
library on that subject as well as ethnology. Has
written Nisqually Indian languages, legends,
etc., also the Chinese language on plan adopted
by Smithsonian in collecting Indian vocabularies. He is now engaged in arranging a comparative list of words from the American
Indian and some of the Mongolian langauges.
3 SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
77
Wilkes (Charles).   Narrative | of the |
United States | exploring expedition. |
During the years | 1838,1839,1840,1841,
1842. | By | Charles Wilkes, U.S.N., |
commander of the expedition, | member  of   the   American   philosophical
society, etc. | In live volumes, and an
atlas. [ Vol.1 [-V]. |
Philadelphia: j printed by C. Sherman. | 1844.
5 vols, and atlas, maps, plates and steel
vignettes, 4°.
Names of tho months in the Flathead language, vol. 4, p. 478.
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress,
Lenox.
Only a limited number of this issue, 75
copies, I believe, were printed, and these were
for presentation. The copies of the quarto edition issued for sale are dated 1845, as described
in the next following title. Titles of several
octavo editions are also given below.
The quarto series was continued by the publication of the scientific results of the expedition to volume 24, of which vols. 18,19,21, and
22 are yet unpublished. They have a slightly
changed title, beginning: United States exploring expedition. The only one containing linguistic matter is Hale (Horatio), Philology,
vol. 6, Philadelphia, 1846, for title of which see
p. 31 of this bibliography.
— Narrative | of the | United States |
exploring expedition. | During the
years | 1838,1839,1840, 1841, 1842. | By
| Charles Wilkes, U. S. N., | commander
of the expedition, | member of the
American philosophical society, etc. |
In five volumes, and an atlas. | Vol.
I[-V]. |
Philadelphia: | Lea & Blanchard. |
1845.
5 vols, and atlas, maps, plates, and steel
vignettes, 4°.
This is the same edition as the preceding,
but with new title.
Names of the months in the Flathead language, vol. 4, p. 478.
Copies seen: Eames, Lenox.
The following are reprints:
-— Narrative | of the | United States |
exploring    expedition. | During    the
years | 1838,1839,1840, 1841, 1842. | By
| Charles Wilkes,U.S.N. | commander
of the   expedition, | member   of   the
I American philosophical society, etc. I
In five volumes, and an atlas. | Vol.
I[-V]. |
Philadelphia; I I^ea, & Pla&ch,ard, |
1845,
Wilkes (C.)—Continued.
5 vols, and atlas, maps, plates, and steel
vignettes, royal 8°.
Names o f the months in Flathead, with meanings, vol. 4, p. 450.
Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British
Museum, Congress, Geological Survey, Lenox.
 Narrative | of the | United States |
exploring    expedition. | During    the
years | 1838,1839,1840, 1841, 1842. | By
| Charles Wilkes,U. S.N. | commander
of the   expedition, | member   of   the
American philosophical society, etc. |
In five volumes and an atlas. | Vol.
I[-V]. | ' |
London:   |   Wiley   and   Putnam, j
(Printed by C. Sherman, Philadelphia,
U.S.A.) | 1845.
5 vols, and atlas, maps, plates, royal 8°.
Names of the months in Flathead, with meanings, vol. 4, p. 450.
Copies seen: British Museum, Harvard.
 Narrative | of the | United States |
exploring expedition. | During the
years | 1838, 1839, 1840,1841, 1842. | By
| Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. | commander
of the expedition, | member of the
American philosophical society, etc. |
With illustrations and maps. | Vol.
I[-V]. |
Philadelphia: | Lea & Blanchard. j
1845.
5 vols, maps, plates, 8°.
This edition differs from the quarto and
royal octavo editions in that woodcuts have
been substituted for the 47 steeLvignettes, in
having only 11 of the 14 maps bound in, in
being printed on somewhat thinner paper, in
the omission inmost copies of the 64 plates, and
in not being accompanied by the atlas.
Names of the months in Flathead, with meanings, vol. 4, p. 450.
Copies seen: Congress.
 Narrative | of the | United States |
exploring expedition. | During the
years j 1838,1839,1840, 1841, 1842. | By
j Charles Wilkes,U. S. N. | commander
of the expedition, | member of the
American philosophical society, etc. |
In five volumes, with thirteen maps. |
Vol. I[-V]. |
Philadelphia: | 1850.
5 vols, maps, plates, 8°.
Names of the months in Flathead, with meanings, vol. 4, p. 450.
Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Congress, National Museum.
The  edition of the  Narrative:   [London]
Ingram,Cooke & Co.,1852, 2 vols. sq. 16° (Boston.
A^eneeiun), cjoes not conta^n^e, linguistics,. 78
BIBLIOGRAPHY  OF  THE
%    "Vr
M
,
Wilkes (C.) — Continued.
I have seen mention of "a new edition,"
New York, 1856.
Charles "Wilkes, naval officer, born in New
York City, April 3, 1798, died in Washington,
D. C, February 8,1877. He entered the navy
as a midshipman January 1,1818, and was promoted to lieutenant, April 28, 1826. He was
appointed to the department of charts and
instruments in 1830 and was the first in the
United States to set up fixed astronomical instruments and observe with them. On August
18,1838, he sailed from Norfolk, Va., in command
of a squadron of five vessels and a storeship, to
explore the southern seas. He visited Madeira,
the Cape Yerde Islands, Bio de Janeiro, Ti-
erra del Fuego, Yalparaiso, Callao, the Pau-
motou group, Tahiti, the Samoan group (which
he surveyed and explored), Wallis Island, and
Sydney in New South Wales. He left Sydney
in December, 1839, and discovered what he
thought to be an Antarctic continent, sailing
along vast ice fields for several weeks. In 1840
he thoroughly explored the Fiji group and
visited the Hawaiian Islands, where he measured intensity of gravity by means of the pendulum on the summit of Mauna Loa. In 1841
he visited the northwestern coast of America
and Columbia and Sacramento rivers, and on
November 1 set sail from San Francisco, visited
Manila, Sooloo, Borneo, Singapore, the Cape of
Good Hope, and St. Helena, and cast anchor at
New York on June 10,1842. Charges preferred
against him by some of his officers were investigated by a court-martial, and he was acquitted
of all except illegally punishing some of his
crew, for which he was reprimanded. He served
on the coast survey in 1842-'43, was promoted to
commander July 13,1843, and employed in connection with the report on the exploring expedition at "Washington in 1844-1861. He was
commissioned a captain September 14, 1855,
and when the civil war opened was placid in
command of the steamer San Jacinto in 1861
i
and sailed in pursuit of the Confederate
privateer Sumter. On November 8, 1861, he
intercepted at sea the English mail steamer
Trent, bound from Havana to St. Thomas, W.
I.,.and sent Lieut. Donald M. Fairfax on board
to bring off the Confederate commissioners,
John Slidell and James M. Mason, with their
secretaries. The officials were removed to the
San Jacinto, in which they were taken to Fort
Warren, in Boston Harbor. The navy department gave Capt. Wilkes an emphatic commendation, Congress passed a resolution of thanks,
and his act caused great rejoicing throughout
the north, where he was the hero of the hour.
But, on the demand of the British government
that Mason and Slidell should be given up, Secretary Seward complied, saying in his dispatch
that, although the commissioners and their
papers were contraband of war, and therefore
Wilkes was right in capturing thein, he should
have taken the Trent into port as a prize for
adjudication.   As he had failed to do so and
"Wilkes (C.)—Continued.
had constituted himself a judge in the matter,
to approve his act would be to sanction the
"right of search," which had always been
denied by the United States Government. The
prisoners were therefore released. In 1862
Wilkes commanded the James B,iver flotilla
and shelled City Point. He was promoted to
commodore July 16,1862, and took charge of a
special squadron in the West Indies. He was
placed on the retired list because of age, June
25, 1864, and promoted to rear-admiral on the
retired list July 25,1866. For his services to
science as an explorer he received a gold medal
from the Geographical Society of London. The
reports of the Wilkes exploring expedition were
to consist of twenty-eight quarto volumes, but
nine of these were not completed. Of those
that were published, Capt. Wilkes was the
author of the "Narrative" of the expedition (6
vols., 4to, also 5 vols., 8vo, Philadelphia, 1845M
abridged ed., New York, 1851) and the volumes
on "Meteorology" and "Hydrography."
Admiral Wilkes was also the author of Western America, Including California and Oregon
(Philadelphia, 1*49), and Theory of the Winds!
(New York, 1856).—Appleton18 Cyclop, of Am.
Biog.
Willoughby (C.) Indians of the Qui-
naielt agency, Washington territory.
By C. Willoughby.
In Smithsonian Inst. Ann. Rept. for 1886, part-
1, pp. 267-282, Washington, 1889, 8°. (Pilling.)
A few Quinaielt terms passim.
"Wilson (Rev. Edward Francis). A comparative vocabulary.
In Canadian Indian, vol. 1 (no. 4), pp. 104-107,
Owen Sound, Ontario, January, 1891,8°.
A vocabulary of ten words in about 56 languages, mostly North American, and including
the Flathead and Nisqually.
Rev Edward Francis Wilson, son of the late
Bev. Daniel Wilson, Islington, prebendary of
St. Paul's cathedral, and grandson of Daniel
Wilson, bishop of Calcutta, was born in London
December 7,1844, and at the age of 17 left school
and emigrated to Canada for the purpose of lead-f
ing an agricultural life; soon after his arrival
he was led to take an interest in the Indians
and resolved to become a missionary. After two
years of preparation, much of which time was
spent  among   the   Indians,  he   returned  to
England, and in December, 1867, was ordained,
deacon.   Shortly thereafter  it was arranged
that he should return to Canada as a missionary!
to the Ojibway Indians, under the auspices ofj
the Church Missionary Society, which he did in I
July, 1868.   He has labored among the Indians
ever since, buildingtwo homes—theShingwauk
Home, at Sault Ste. Marie, and the Wawanosh
Home, two miles from the former—and preparing linguistic works.
Winatsha.   See Piskwau.
i\L SALISHAN  LANGUAGES.
79
Wisconsin Historical Society: These words following a title or within parentheses after a note
indicate that a copy of the work referred to has
been seen by the compiler in the library of that
institution, Madison, Wis.
Words:
See Daa (L K.)
Schomburgk (R. H.)
Atna
Atna
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Bilkula
Chehalis
Chehalis
Chehalis
Kalispel
Kaulits
Kawichen
Kawichen
Kawichen
Kawichen
Kawichen
Klallam
Klallam
Klallam
Klallam
Klallam
Komuk
Kwantlen
Kwinaiutl
Lummi
Lummi
Netlakapam uk
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Boas (F.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Daa(L.K.)
Latham (R. G.)
Stumpf (C.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Gibbs (G.)
Nicoll(E.H.)
Youth's.
Gibbs (G.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Daa(L.K.)
Latham (R. G.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Daa(L.K.)
Latham (R. G.)
Youth's.
Boas (F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Willoughby (C.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Youth's.
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Words — Continued.
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Mskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Okinagan
Pentlash
Piskwau
Piskwau
Piskwau
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Shuswap
Sicatl
Skitsuish
Skitsuish
Skokomish
Snanaimuk
Snohomish
Snohomish
Songish
Tilamuk
Tilamuk
Chamberlain (A. F.)
Daa (L. K.)
Gibbs (G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Lubbock (J.)
Pott (A. F.)
Youth's.
Daa(L.K.)
Boas (F.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Gallatin (A.)
Hale (H.)
Boas (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Daa (L. K.)
Gallatin (A.)
Gibbs (G.)
Hale (H.)
Hoffman (W. J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Mengarini (G.)
Pott (A. F.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Squire (W. G.)
Swan (J. G.)
Treasury.
Tylor (E. B.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Bancroft (H.H.)
Pott (A. F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Youth's.
Boas (F.)
Bancroft (H. H.)
Boas (F.)
Y.
Yale: This word following a title or within parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of the
work referred to has been seen by the compiler
in the library of Yale College, New Haven, Conn.
Youth's. The youth's j companion: | A
juvenile monthly Magazine published
for | the benefit of the Puget Sound
Catholic Indian | Missions; and set to
type, printed and in part | written by
the pupils of the Tulalip, Wash. Ty. |
Indian Industrial Boarding Schools,
under | the control of the Sisters of
Charity. | Approved by the Rt. Rev.
Bishop [iEgidius, of Nesqualy]. | Vol.
I. May, 1881. No. l[-Vol.V. May,
1886.  No. 60].
[Tulalip Indian Reservation, Snohomish Co. W. T.]
Youth's— Continued.
Edited by Rev. J. B. Boulet. Instead of
being paged continuously, continued articles
have a separate pagination dividing the regular numbering. For instance, in no. 1, pp. 11-14
(Lives of the saints) are numbered 1-4 and the
article is continued in no. 2 on pp. 5-8, taking
the place of 41-44 of the regular numbering.
Discontinued after May, 1886, on account of the
protracted illness of the editor.
The Lord's prayer in Snohomish, vol. a., p.
228; in Flathead, p. 256; in Nitlakapamuk of
British Columbia, p. 301; in Lummi, vol. 2, p.
28; in Clallam, p. 86; in Cowlitch, p. 106.—The
name for God in seventy different languages,
including   the   Nootsack,  Kalispel, Lummi,
Snohomish, and Clallam, vol.
p. 156.—Sen
tence in "Indian" [Snohomish],vol.2,p.247.
Copies seen: Congress, Georgetown, Pilling,
Wellesley.
!s i CHRONOLOGIC INDEX.
1801
Atna and Friendly Vills
ige
1802
Atna and Friendly Vills
ige
1802
Atna and Friendly Vilh
ige
1802
Atna and Friendly Vills
ige
1802
Atna and Friendly Vilh
tge
1802
Atna and Friendly Village
1803
Atna and Friendly Vilh
ige
1806-
1817
Atna and Friendly Vilh
ige
1807
Atna and Friendly Vilh
tge
1807
1809
Salish
1814
Atna and Friendly Vilh
ige
1815
Salish
1835
Various
1836
Various
1836-
1847
Salish
1839-
1S41
Salish
1840-
1848
Salish
.1841
Salish
1841
Various
1841
Various
1842
Spokan
1843
Salish
1843
Snohomish
1844
Salish and Kalispel
1844
Salish
1844
Tilamuk and Chehalis
1845
Salish and Kalispel
1845
Salish
1845
Salish
1845
Salish
1845
Salish
1846
Spokan
1846
Various
1846
Various
1846
Various
1847
Salish
1847
Salish and Kalispel
1848
Atna
1848
Niskwalli and Chehalis
1848
Salish and Kalispel
1848
Salish and Kalispel
1848
Various
1848
Various
1849
Okinagan
1849
Salish and Kalispel
I860
Salish
1850
Various
1850
Various
1851
Bilkula
1852
Salish
1852
Various
1853
HAT
Salish
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Bibliographic
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Classification
Vocabulary
Vocabulary  j
Classification
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Primer
Words
Vocabulary
Prayers
Words
Vocabulary
Prayers
Words
Words
Words
Words
Matthew
Grammatic and vocabularies
Grammatic and vocabularies
Words
Bibliographic
Prayers and vocabulary
Words
Vocabulary
Prayers and vocabulary
Prayers and vocabulary
Various
Various
Relationships
Lord's prayer and vocabularies
Words
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Classification
Classification
Proper names
Classification
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Adelung (J. C.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Henry (A.)
Mackenzie (A.)
Vater (J. S.)
Salish.
Gallatin (A.)
Prichard (J. C.)
Maximilian (A.)
Maximilian (A.)
Prichard (J. C.)
Scouler (J.)
Tolmie (W.F.)
AYalker (E.) and Eells (C.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Bolduc (J. B. Z.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Wilkes (C.)
Lee (D.) and Frost (J.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Wilkes (C.)
Wilkes (C.)
Wilkes (C.)
Wilkes (C.)
Walker (E.)
Hale (H.)
Hale (H.)
Latham (R. G.)
Vater (J. S.)
Smet (P.J.de). '
Schomburgk (R. H.)
Montgomerie (J. E.)
Smet (P.J.de).
Smet (P.J. de).
Gallatin (A.)
Latham (R. G.)
Ross (A.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Wilkes (C.)
Howse (J.)
Latham (R. G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Berghaus (H.)
Stanley (J. M.)
Gallatin (A.)
81 82
CHRONOLOGIC  INDEX.
Salish
Chehalis
Lummi
Toanhuch
Salish and Kalispel
Atna
Niskwalli
Salish and Kalispel
Various
Various
Various
Various
Various
Kaulitz
Klallam
Klallam
Kwantlen
Skagit
Salish
Salish and Kalispel
Snohomish
Various
Various
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish and Kalispel
Salish
Salish
Various
Salish
Songish
Various
Klallam and Lummi
Niskwalli and Salish
Salish
Salish and Kalispel
Salish
Niskwalli and Salish
Salish and Kalispel
Salish and Kalispel
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Niskwalli
Salish
Salish?
Various
Various
Various
Okinagan
Salish
Salish
Spokan and Salish
Spokan
Salish
Atna
Salish
Salish
Salish
Salish
Classification
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Lord's prayer
Classification
Words
Lord's prayer
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Words and numerals
Words and numerals
Words
Vocabulary
Numerals
Vocabulary
Vocabulary
Yocabulary
Bibliographic
Lord's prayer
Vocabulary
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Classification
Classification
Classification
Lord's prayer-
Classification
Classification
Vocabularies
Grammar
Proper names
Words
Vocabulary
Numerals
General discussion
Prayers and vocabulary
Words
Numerals ■
Prayers
Prayers and vocabulary
Bibliographie
Bibliographic
Phrases
Bibliographic
Phrases
Words
Words
Words
Bibliographic
Lord's prayer
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Relationships
Phrases
Phrases
Proper names
Relationships
Numerals
Vocabular
Bibliographic
Bibliographic
General discussion
General discussion
E.)
E.)
E.)
E.)
F.)
Schoolcraft (H. R.)
Cooper (J. G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Shea (J. G.)
Latham (R. G.)
Tolmie (W. F.)
Shea (J. G.)
Buschmann (J. C. E.)
Buschmann (J. CE.)
Swan (J. G.)
Swan (J. G.)
Daa (L. K.)
Wabass (W. G.)
Grant (W. C.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Craig (R. O.)
Ludewig (H. E.)
Shea (J. G.)
Craig (R. 0.)
Buschmann (J. C.
Buschmann (J. C.
Buschmann (J. C.
Buschmann (J. C.
Kane (P.)
Smet (P. J. de)
Gallatin (A.)
Schoolcraft (H. R
Latham (R. G.)
Mengarini (<J.)
Macdonald (D. G
Pott (A. F.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Anderson (A. C.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Smet (P. J. de).
Triibner & Co.
Leclerc (C.)
Whymper (F.)
Sabin (J.)
Whymper (F.)
Lubbock (J.)
Lubbock (J.)
Lubbock (J.)
Trubner & Co.
Marietti (P.;
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Roehrig (F. L. O.)
Roehrig (F. L. 0.)
Morgan.
Whymper (F.)
Whymper (F.)
Collin (C.)
Gibbs (G.)
Mengarini (G.)
Pinart (A. L.)
Trubner & Co.
Field (T.W.)
Shea (J. G.)
Treasurv.
sX CHRONOLOGIC  INDEX.
83
1873
Salish and Kalispel
Prayers
Smet (P. J. de).
1873
Shuswap
Vocabulary
Tolmie (F.W.)
1873
Various
Vocabularies
Gibbs (G.)
1874
Salish
Bibliography
Steiger (E.)
1874-1875
Salish
Bibliography
Trubner & Co.
1874-1876
Various
Various
Bancroft (H.H.)
1874-1876
Various
Various
Bancroft (H.H.)
1874-1881
Twana
General discussion
Hayden (F. V.)
1875
Niskwalli
Words
Lubbock (J.)
1875
Salish
Bibliographic
Field (T. W.)
1875
Snanaimuk
Text
Caruana (J. M.)
1876
Salish
Bibliographic
Platzmann (J.)
1876
Salish
Vocabulary, etc.
Petitot (E". F. S. J.)
1876
Skitsuish
Vocabulary
Smet (P. J. de).
1877
Kalispel
Text
Lettre.
1877
Kalispel
Vocabulary
Tolmie (W. F.)
1877
Niskwalli
Dictionary
Gibbs (G.)
1877
Salish
Classification
Gatschet (A. S.)
1877
Salish
Classification
Gatschet (A. S.)
1877
Salish
Classification
Beach (W.W.)
1877
Salish
General discussion
Trumbull (J. H.)
1877
Skitsuish
Vocabulary
Mengarini (G.)
1877
Skoyelpi
Vocabulary
Mengarini (G.)
1877
Shuswap
Vocabulary
Tolmie (W. F.)
1877
Skitsuish
Vocabulary
Smet (P.J. de).
1877
Tilamuk
Vocabulary
Gatschet (A. S.)
1877
Twana
Various
Eells (M.)
1877
Various
Vocabularies
Gibbs (G.)
1877
Various
Vocabularies
Powell (J. W.)
1877-1879
Kalispel
Grammar
(riorda (J.)
1877-1879
Kalispel
Grammar
Giorda (J.)
1877-1887
Salish
General discussion
Miiller (F.)
1878
Klallam
Dictionary
Eells (M.)
1878
Netlak apamuk
Prayer book
Good (J.B.)
1878
Netlakapamuk
Prayer book
Good (J.B.)
1878
Niskwalli
Dictionary
Eells (M.)
1878
Salish
Bibliographic
Leclerc (C.)
1878
Salish
Classification
Bates (H. W.)
1878
Salish
Classification
Keane (A. H.)
1878-1879
Klallam
Songs
Eells (M.)
1878-1893
Salish
Bibliographic
Trumbull (J. H.)
1879
Kalispel
Bible stories
Giorda (J.)
1879
Kalispel
Dictionary
Giorda (J.)
1879
Netlakapamuk
Prayer book:
Good (J.B.)
1879
Salish
Relationships
Oppert (G.)
1879
Snohomish
Prayer book
Boulet (J. B.)
1880
Kalispel
Catechism
Giorda (J.)
1880
Netlapakamuk
Prayer book
Good (T.B.)
1880
Netlapakamuk
Vocabulary, etc.
Good (J. B.)
1880
Salish
Classification
Sayce (A. H.)
1880-1881
Various
Grammatic treatise
Eells (M.)
1881
Salish
Classification
Keane (A. H.)
1881
Salish
Words
Tylor (E. B.)
1881
Salish
Words
Tylor (E. B.)
1881-1886
Various
Lord's prayer
Youth's Companion
1882
Chehalis
Dictionary
Eells (M.)
1882
Niskwalli
Vocabulary
Campbell (J.)
1882
Niskwalli
Vocabulary
Campbell (J.)
1882
Niskwalli
Words
Lubbock (J.)
1882
Salish
Bibliographic
Eells (M.)
1882
Salish
Bibliographic
Trubner & Co.
1882
Salish
Classification
Bates (H. W.)
1882
Salish
Classification
Drake (S. G.)
1882
Salish
Classification
Gatschet (A. S.)
1882
Salish
Classification
Gatschet (A. S.)
T 84
CHRONOLOGIC  INDEX.
1882
Salish
Classification
Keane (A. If.), note.
1882
Twana and Klallam
Songs
Baker (T.)
1882
Twana and Klallam
Songs
Baker (T.)
1882
Various
Various
Bancroft (H. H.)
1883
Salish
Classification
Sayce (A. H.)
1883
Salish
Words
Tylor (E. B.)
1884
Salish
Legends
Hoffman (W. J.)
1884
Salish
Words
Squire (W. C.)
1884
Stahkin
Words
Petitot (E\ F. S. J.)
1884
Various
Vocabularies
Tolmie (W. F.) an<]
(G. M.)
1884H889
Salish
Bibliographic
Pott (A. F.)
1885
Bilkula
Words
Stumpf (C.)
1885
Chehalis
Dictionary
Eells (M.)
1885
Kalispel
Lord's prayer
Smalley (E. V.)
1885
Kalispel
Lord's prayer
Van Gorp (L.)
1885
Salish
Bird names
Hoffman (W. J.)
1885
Salish
Bibliographic
Pilling (J. C.)
1885
Salish
Classifi cation
Bates (H. W.)
1885
Salish
Classification
Keane (A. H.), note.
1885
Salish and Kalispel
Prayers and vocabulai
ries      Smet (P. J. de).
1885
Various
Grammatic
Eells (M.)
1885-1889
Salish
Classification
Feathermann (A.)
1886
Bilkula
Grammatic
Boas (F.)
1886
Bilkula
Grammatic
Boas (F.)
1886
Komuk
Grammatic
Boas (F.)
1886
Komuk
Texts
Boas (F.)
1886
Komuk
Vocabulary
Boas (F.)
1886
Pentlash
Texts
Boas (F.)
1886
Puyallup
Vocabulary
McCaw (S. R,)
1886
Salish
Vocabulary
Hoffman (W. J.)
1886
Various
Hymns
Eells (M.)
1886
Various
Vocabularies
Boas (F.)
1887
Salish
Bibliographic
Dufosse (E.)
1887
Salish and Kalispel
Prayers
Smet (P. J. de).
1887
Various
Numerals
Eells (M.)
1887
Various
Numerals
Eells (M.)
1887
Various
Numerals
Eells (M.), note.
1888
Bilkula
Grammatic
Boas (F.)
1888
Bilkula
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Bilkula and Kawichen
Words
Brinton (D. G.)
1888
Bi 1 k 111 ;i and Kawichen
Words
Brinton (D. G.)
1888
Kalispel
Lord's prayer
C (J. F.)
1888
Kalispel
Lord's prayer
C (J. F.), note.
1888
. Komuk
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Komuk
Words
Boas (F.)
1888
Salish
Classification
Haines (E. M.)
1888
Salish
Words
Tylor (E.B.)
1888
Skokomish
Vocabulary
Boas (F.)
1888
Snanaimuk
Texts
Boas (F.)
1888
Various
Numerals
Eells (M.)
1889
Chehalis
Words
Nicoll (E. H.)
1889
Kwinaiutl
Words
Willoughby (C.)
1889
Niskwalli
Words
Lubbock (J.)
1889
Salish
Classification
Boas (F.)
1889
Salish
Classification
Boas (F.)
1889
Salish
Words
Tylor (E. B.)
1889
Skoyelpi
Vocab w 1; i ry, etc.
Chamberlain (A. F.)
1889
Snanaimuk
Gentes
Boas (F.)
1889
Snanaimuk
Gentes
Boas (F.)
1889
Various
Hymns
Eells (M.)
1889
Various
Vo cabularies
Boas (F.)
1889
Various
Vocabularies
Chamberlain (A. F.)
1890
Bilkula. and Kawichen
Words
Brinton CD. G.)
1890
Lilowat
Text
Le Jeune (J. M. B.)
1890
NVlirlim
Texts
Boas (P.)
Dawson CHRONOLOGIC  INDEX.
85
1890
Netlakapamuk
Texts
1890
Salish
Texts
1890
Salish
Words
1890
Salish
Words
1890
Salish
Words
1890
Silets
Texts
1890
Snanaimuk
Legends
1890
Snanaimuk
Legends
1890
Tilamuk
Texts
1890-1893
Klallam
Lord's prayer
1890-1893
Niskwalli
Words
1890-1893
Salish
Hymns
1890-1893
Salish
Words
1890-1893
Salish
Words
1890-1893
Salish
Words
1890-1893
Salish
Words
1890^1893
Various
Geographic names
1890-1893
Various
Numerals
1891
Kalispel
Catechism
1891
Kalispel
Catechism
1891
Kalispel
Litany
1891
Kalispel
Prayers
1891
Kalispel
Prayers
1891
Netlakapamuk
Hymns
1891
Netlakapamuk
Primer
1891
Netlakapamuk
Primer
1891
Niskwalli
Vocabulary
1891
Salish
Classification
1891-
Salish
Classification
1891
Salish and Niskwalli
Vocabulary
1891
Salish
Words
1891
Shuswap
Prayers
1891
Skwamish
Prayers
1891
Stalo
Prayers
1891
Various
Geographic names
1891
Various
Geographic names
1891
Various
Grammatic
1891
Various
Grammatic
1891-1893
Shuswap
Prayers
1892
Netlakapamuk
Catechism
1892
Netlakapamuk
Prayers
1892
Salish
Grammatic
1892
Salish
Vocabulary
1892
Shuswap
Prayers
1892
Shuswap
Prayers
1892
Shuswap
Various
1892
Shuswap
Various
1892
Twana
Text
1892
Twana
Text
1892
Twana
Text
1892
Various
Geographic names
1892
Various
Gentes
1892
Various
Gentes
1893
Niskwalli
Dictionary
1893
Niskwalli and Puyallup
Words
1893
Niskwalli and Puyallup
Words
1893
Okinagan
Prayers
1893
Shuswap
Catechism
N.d.
Atna
General discussion
N.d.
Netlakapamuk
Hymn
N.d.
Nuksahk
Vocabulary
N.d.
Nusulph
Vocabulary
N.d.
Salish
General discussion
N.d.
Salish and Kalispel
Lord's prayer
N.d.
Salish
Lord's prayer
N.d,
Salish
Vooabulary
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Palladine (L.)
Hale (H.)
Hale (H.)
Hale(H.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T.S.)
Bulmer (T.S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Bulmer (T.S.)
Bulmer (T. S.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Canestrelli (P.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M.R.)
Le Jeune (J.M.R.)
Canadian.
Brinton (D. G.)
Powell (J.W.)
Wilson (E. F.)
Gabelentz (H. G. C.)
Gendre (—).
Durieu (P.)
Durieu (P.)
Coones (S.F.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Gatschet (A. S.)
Brinton (D. G.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Dawson (G.M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Boas (F.)
Boas (F.)
Wickersham (J.)
Wickersham (J.)
Wickersham (J.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Le Jeune (J. M. R.)
Gibbs (G.)
Good (J. B.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
sShea (J. G.)
Smet (P. J. de).
Salish,
Sl_	 86
CHRONOLOGICAL  INDEX.
N.d
Salish
N.d.
Salish
N.d
Salish
N.d
Snohomish
N.d
Twana
N.d
Various
N.d
Various
N.d
Various
Words
Words
Words
Vocabulary
Grammatic
Various
Vocabularies
Vocabularies
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Gibbs (G.)
Chirouze (—).
Eells (M.)
Eells (M.)
Gibbs (G.)
Pinart (A. L.)
V.|
m
i
W  

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