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Fourteenth annual report published by the Board of School Trustees City of Vancouver for the year ending… Vancouver School Board 1916

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 VANCOUVER
CITY SCHOOLS
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^/ THE LIBRARY
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA jfourteentf)
Annual Report
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jfor tfje i^ear Cniung Jimmber 3l£t, 1916
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131   HASTINGS ST. WEST, VANCOUVER, B  C  BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
BBSS!!!! 1916 flHM^iii
EXECUTIVE  BOARD,
1916,
Chairman  I . 1 J. R.  Seymour
Chairman, School Management Committee A.  C.  Stewart
Chairman, Building and Grounds Committee Fred W. Welsh
Chairman, Finance Committee Fred W. Welsh
STANDING  COMMITTEES.
School Management. Building* and  Grounds.
A.  C.  Stewart,  Chairman Fred W. Welsh, Chairman
Mrs.  I. H.  Moody A. M. Harper
Dr.  W,  H.  Lang H.  C.  N. McKim
Finance.
Fred . W.  Welsh>  Chairman
A.  C.  Stewart
J.  R. Seymour
The Chairman of the Board is  ex-officio member of all  Committees.
ATTENDANCE  OE TRUSTEES AT BOARD AND  COMMITTEE MEETINGS.
1916.
Board      Manag
Meetings.    Committee.    Committee.    Committee. Totah
em
ent    Building
Finance
ittee.    Committee.
Committee.
24
21
11
22
21
11
....
17
8
23
8
7
19
14
4
22
6
^"■?W;:  -     «.»=.»
9
O
12
2
2
12
{ I
75
Number   of   Meetings
Held     21
J. R.  Seymour   21
F. W. Welsh   16 17 41
A. C. Stewart   19 23 8 7 m
Mrs.  I.  H. Moody  18
Dr. W. H. Lang  21 22 6 49
A. M. Harper   19 3 12 2 36
H.  C.  N.  McKim  18 2 12 .... 32 I
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
y^zym0& 1917 SittiiS^ft
Dr. W. H.  Lang
Mrs, I. H. Moody
Retire December 31st,  1917.
Fred W. Welsh H.  C. N. McKim
Retire December 31st, 1918.
G.  Roy Long
J.  R. Seymour
T.  Mathews
EXECUTIVE  BOARD.
1917.
Chairman    Mrs.   I.   H.   Moody
Chairman, School Management Committee H.  C, N.  McKim
Chairman,  Building and  Grounds  Committee   T.   Mathews
Chairman, Finance Committee H. C. N. McKim
STANDING  COMMITTEES.
School Management. Building* and  Grounds.
H.   C.  N.  McKim,   Chairman T.  Mathews,  Chairman
Fred W.  Welsh J.  R.  Seymour
Dr. W. H. Lang G.   Roy Long
Finance.
H. C. N. McKim, Chairman
T.  Mathews
Mrs.  T. H. Moody
The Chairman of the Board is ex-officio member of all Committees.
DATE  OF MEETINGS.
Board  Third Tuesday in each month, at 8  p.m.
Management Committee Second Tuesday in each month, at 8 p.m.
Building Committee Thursday preceding the 3rd Tuesday, at 8 p.m.
Finance Committee Tuesday before Board meeting
All meetings for the transaction of school business are held in the School
Board Office Building, corner Hamilton and Dunsmuir Streets; and all correspondence to officials should be addressed to the same building.
OFFICIALS.
1917.
Municipal Inspector of Schools J.  S.  Gordon,  B.A.
Stenographers
j
Miss A. Balfour
l       Miss L.  Judge
Secretary and Accountant - Gerald  Upton
Clerk   Harold Hicks
Hiss D.  Chaffer
Stenographers
Miss B.  Fraser
'        F.  L.  Layfield
Building and Grounds Superintendent F. A.  A.  Barrs
Stenographer  Miss R. Spymour
( Jameiiflnglis
Attendance Officers N. Jensen
A. S.  Mulholland BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
From  1886 to  1915 inclusive
1886-1887.
Dr. D. B. Beckingsale, Secretary
J.  B.  Heiplerson
D.   B.   Charleson
.7ohn
G. I.
W. J
Wm.
i /"I
A.     v_x.
G.   F
1887-1888.
Devine, Secretary
Wilson
McGuigan, M.D.
Brown
Johnson
Baldwin
1888-1889.
G.   I.
Wilson
John
Devine
C.  W
.  Murray
Wm.
Brown
A.  H
B.  Macgowan,   S(
G.  F.
Baldwin
Secretary
1889-1890.
G. I. Wilson
Chas. Whetham, M.A.
C.  W.  Murray
Wm.   Brown
A.  H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary
G. F. Baldwin
1890-1891.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor,
J.  M.  Browning
G.   I.   Wilson
Henry  Collins
Appointed   by   the   Council.
Wm. Brown,  Chairman
A. H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary
C.  W.  Murray
G.  F.  Baldwin
1891-1892.
Appointed by the Lieut.-Governor.
B. Springer
G.   I   Wlbon
Henry Collins
Appointed   by   the   Council.
Wm.  Brown,  Chairman
A.  H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary
C. m  Murray
G. F. Baldwin
1892-1893.
Wm. Brown
A.   H.   B.   Macgowan,   Secretary
Henry Collins
G.  I.  Wilson,  Chairman
Wm.  Templeton
G. R. Gordon
1893-1894.
A. H. B. Macgowan, Chairman
C.   W. Murray,  Secretary
John McAllister
Wm.  Templeton
O.  C.  Eldridge
G.  R.  Gordon
A.
H.
C.
W.
W
.  D
W
m.
C.
C.
G.
R.
C.
F.
W
m.
C.
C.
G.
R.
C.
F.
A.
H.
C.
W.
w
. D.
1894-1895.
B. Macgowan,  Chairman
Murray,  Secretary
Brydone-Jack, M.D.
Templeton
Eldridge
Gordon
Foreman
1895-1896.
Templeton,  Chairman
Eldridge
Gordon
Foreman
B.   Macgowan
Murray,  Secretary
Brydone-Jack, M.D.
18S6-1897.
G.  R.   Gordon,   Chairman
Wm.   Templeton
C.  C.  Eldridge
J   Logan
.   J.   McGuigan,  M.D.
. D.  Brydone-Jack, M.D.
W.  Murray,  Secretary
1897-1898.
C. C.  Eldridge, Chairman
Mrs. C. Reid
Wm.   Brown
Jps.  Ramsay
W.   J.   McGuigan,   M.D.
W. D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.
C. W.  Murray,  Secretary
1898-1899.
W.  D.  Brvdone-Jack,  M.D.,
W.   J.  McGuigan,   M.D.
C. W. Murray,  Secretary
C.   C.   Eldridge
Mrs. C. Reid
Wm.   Brown
Jas. Ramsay
J.
W
W
Chairman
C. W
G.  R.
.1.  J.
J.  J.
Jas.
W.
W.
D.
J.
1899-1900.
.  Murray,  Chairman
Gordon
Banfield
Logan
Ramsay
Brydone-Jack, M.D.
McGuigan, M.D.
1900-1901.
C. W. Murray, Chairman
W.   J.  McGuigan,   M.D.
Thos. Duke
G.   R.   Gordon
J.  J.  Banfield
J.  J. Logan
Jas.  Ramsay BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
From 1886 to 1915 inclusive
1901-1902.
C. W.  Murray,  Chairman
W.  J.  McGuigan,  M.D.
Thos. Duke
G.  R.  Gordon
J.  J.   Banfield
W.  D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
James   Ramsay,   Chairman
from   1st
July, 1902, to 31st December, 1902
1902-1903.
J.  J.  Banfield,   Chairman
Thos.  Duke
Jas. Ramsay
W. J .McGuigan, M.D.
G.  R.  Gordon
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
D. Donaldson
1903-1904.
Thos. Duke, Chairman
D. Donaldson
W. J. McGuigan, M.D.
Jas.   Ramsay
William  Clubb
J. J. Dougan
W.  B.  McKechnie,  MJD.
1904-1905.
W.  B. McKechnie, M.D., Chairman
William Clubb
Jas. Ramsay
J.   J.   Dougan
Thos.  Duke
R.  P.  McLennan
J.   B.   Ferguson
1905-1906.
Wm. H. P. Clubb, Chairman
Jas.  Ramsay
W.  B. McKechnie,  M.D.
Thos.  Duke
R. P. McLennan
J.  B.  Ferguson
Victor   Odium
1906-1907.
R. P. McLennan, Chairman
W. H. P.  Clubb
Jas.   Ramsay
W.  B.  McKechnie, M.D.
Thos. Duke
J.   .1.   Dougan
V. W.  Odium   (Jan. to Oct.)
Charles  Hope   (Oct.  to Dec.)
1907-1908.
Chas. E. Hope, Chairman
R.   P.  McLennan
W. H. P. Clubb
W.  E.   Flumerfelt
Thos.   Duke
.1.   J. Dougan
W. D. Brydone-Jack, M.D.
1908-1909.
J.  D.. Breeze,  Chairman
Chas.  E.   Hope
W. H. P. Clubb
W. E. Flumerfelt
Thos.  Duke
W. D. Brydone-Jaek, M.D.
J.  J.  Dougan
1909-1910.
1
W. E. Flumerfelt, Chairman
W. H.  P. Clubb
Thos.  Duke
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack, M.D.
J.  J.  Dougan
Geo. Dyke
J. D.  Breeze
1911.
W. D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.,   Chairman
W.  E.   Flumerfelt
W.  H.  P.  Clubb
Thomas Duke
A.  C.  Stewart   (Jan. to Aug.)
J.  J.  Dougan   (Sept.  to Dec.)
Geo.  J.   Dyke
J.  D.  Breeze
1912.
W. D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D.,  Chairman
Thos.  Duke
J.   J  .Dougan
Mrs. P.  McNaughton
Wm.  H.   P.  Clubb
Geo.  J.  Dyke
W.  E.  Flumerfelt
1913,
W.  D.  Brydone-Jack,  M.D..  Chairman
Thos.  Duke
J.   J.  Dougan
Mrs.  P.  McNaughton
Wm.  H.  P.  Clubb
Geo.  J. Dyke   (Jan. to May)
W.  E.  Flumerfelt
1914.
Wm. H. P.  Clubb,  Chairman  (Jan. to
Nov.)
Thos. Duke, Chairman  (Dec.)
Fred W.  Welsh
A.   C.   Stewart
Mrs. P.  McNaughton
J.  R.  Seymour
J. J, Dougan
1915.
Fred W.  Welsh,  Chairman
A. C. Stewart
Mrs. P.  McNaughton
Dr. F.  C.  McTavish
J.  R. Seymour
A. M. Harper
C.   Sangster
1916.
J.  R.  Seymour,  Chairman
A.  C.  Stewart
A. M.  Harper
Mrs.   I. H. Moody
Dr. W. H. Lang *§P
Fred W. Welsh
H. C. N.  McKim
I BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS
Vancouver, B. C, January 10th, 1917.
Mrs. Moody and Gentlemen,—
It has been the custom for many years for the retiring Chairman of the Board to present an address covering the work accomplished by the Board during his term of office. Following the
example thus set, it is my purpose to occupy your time for a few
moments while I touch upon some of the matters affecting this
Board during the year.
Ever since I have been a Trustee, there has been a continual
pressure exercised upon the Board to retrench, and study economy
wherever possible, so as to meet the trying financial condition of
the past three years and thus relieve the taxpayer as much as possible from the heavy burden being borne by all.   I think the Board
has met the wishes of our citizens in this demand, though, by practising such rigid economy, we have had to adopt many changes in
the several departments which have not been altogether conducive
to the greater success of our schools.   Still, on the whole, we have
succeeded fairly well, and we find less disturbance in our educational
system than was expected.    Criticism of the Board has been made
at times  for what has been declared  wasteful extravagance  and
injudicious expenditure of the people's money.   To the inexperienced
citizen, unacquainted with the steadily growing demand in this most
important department of our Municipal  Government, it is sometimes difficult to realize why such and such expenditures are made.
Had our critics the insight into our school affairs that we have who
are on the inside, I am sure they would be more considerate in
their remarks and less offensive in their attitude.    We have done
the best we could with the funds at our disposal.   Had we foreseen
any mistakes that may appear after the fact, I am sure we would
have done our best to have avoided them.    I do not believe any
official or elected representative will deliberately commit an error
or mistake just for the purpose of making one;   but the very fact
of  his  endeavouring  to  avoid   such,   straining  every  nerve  and
thought to do so, causes one at times to fall into the very trap he
has tried his utmost to escape.   We must not forget when administering such an important department as the schools of our city
that more than our own citizens have an eye on our actions.   Hundreds of citizens of other sections of our Dominion have Vancouver 8
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
as their objective point for their future, more particularly those on
the prairies. The very first question they look into is the Educational System. If this is modern and up-to-date, all is well; but,
if they find it behind the advancements made in other cities, they
are going to give our city and province a wide berth, as to-day
there is more attention, more critical attention, paid to the question
than ever before by the people whose children must be educated
in the most up-to-date curriculum to fit them for the great struggle
that lies in the lap of the future. It is therefore very necessary
that we who are put in authority should guard very jealously
against any policy that will in the slightest degree lower the present
high standard we have attained. The stringent economy enforced
this year has prevented any advancement being made during the
past year; but as soon as this1 financial crisis is passed, I would
strongly advise a return to that active progressive spirit, "not
excessively extravagant," but judiciously carried on. Every dollar
carefully expended on the education of your children will be like
casting your bread upon the water, for after many days it will
return to you, and, I may say, repay you fourfold. The best advertisement for any city is a good, sound, modern educational system,
thorough in all its parts and built and sustained upon the broadest
and most up-to-date principles possible.
In preparing our estimates at the beginning of last year, we
had before us a report prepared at the request of the former school
trustees, by Mr. W. Leek, our heating and ventilating engineer,
mf CD CD CD
upon the different plants installed in our various schools. Much
dissatisfaction existed in the past regarding the ventilation system
particularly, and realizing something radical would have to be
accomplished to correct the evils, we paid marked attention to the
recommendations in this report, adopting them in their entirety.
Though $68,440.00 would be required to effect the proposed changes,
we believed the money would be well spent if these were carried
out. The amount, therefore, was put in the estimates, but to our
chagrin and disappointment, these alterations had to be postponed
owing to the unsatisfactory position of our city's finances, money
not being plentiful enough even to provide for the usual repairs
needed in the up-keep of all our buildings. Consequently this and
many other needed improvements and repairs had to be eliminated
for the time being. The year before the Board, in correcting the
serious defects existing in our air ducts, thought they had discovered and corrected this trouble in our ventilating system; but to
our regret, while the trouble was somewhat lessened, defects still
existed, and the changes to overcome this weakness in the ventilation, as suggested by Mr. Leek, must be attended to as soon as
possible.    I would therefore strongly recommend to our new Board EOARD OE SCHOOL TRUSTEES 9
that this work be not overlooked this coming year, and, if at all
possible, that a beginning be made—if only on one school.
This past year, through the economies forced upon us on
account of money stringency, we had to retrench along all lines;
and to meet the demand made upon us we had to reduce our revenue
expenditures very materially. The teaching staff was cut down by
-eliminating 24 teachers, the supervisors were abolished. The Prevocational School, and many of the night classes in night schools
as well, were discontinued; while the salaries of all teachers, janitors, and officials were cut from 5% to 13%, or an average of
about 9%, All these savings enabled your Board to carry on the
affairs of our Educational Department at a sum little in excess of
what our worthy Mayor and Aldermen thought they could afford
to provide, viz., $575,000.00. We could not reduce our estimates
below $600,000.00. So we compromised at that figure; and, with
the balance carried over from the previous year, viz., $29,000.00,
we were able to carry on our affairs fairly satisfactorily- for the
year. To our teachers, janitors, and other officials, we owe the
greatest appreciation and thanks for the way they met us in the
severe cut in their incomes. All realized the difficulties and felt
prepared to render all the assistance in their power. They accepted
the cut without any grumbling and continued to perform their
duties just as faithfully and conscientiously as if they had received
an increase instead of a cut. This loyalty in our staff throughout
any department is to be highly commended.
I am glad to report that before the year expired, our city's
financial problem so improved that we were able to restore the cut
in salaries, much to the gratification of all, as living expenses,
owing to the war, have greatly increased since our cut went into
force.
i
I regret to say this Board and the two previous Boards of
which I have been a member, have received considerable criticism
through the legacy handed down to them owing to the incompetency of former officials. Had they performed their duties faithfully, when plans were considered and buildings erected, the weakness in many of our school buildings, like the ventilation system,
would not now be causing us trouble and much extra expense to
have remedied. It is unfortunate for us to be members of such an
Important public body as the School Board during the years of
financial depression we are passing through. To administer these
departments under such circumstances without causing some criticism would be an impossibility. To have money in abundance so
everyone can get some of it without scrutinizing the expenditures
too closely, and thus make yourself a jolly good fellow, is a much 10
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
pleasanter position to be in than to come to a Board with a depleted
treasury, reduced expenditure, and scanty appropriations. No one
seems satisfied, and the disappointed ones are needlessly offensive
because they cannot receive those rewards to which they have been
accustomed. We have had much of this, but I think daylight is
ahead of us; better times seem to be in evidence on the horizon;
and, with the passing of the depression, will come another pleasanter
period when, I hope, the citizens will be able to congratulate their
Board on what they have accomplished.
During the year this Board has had a judicial investigation
made of its affairs before a Supreme Court Judge. There have
been various suggestions as to the legality of this; but we, as a
Board, will remember, notwithstanding the searching investigation,
the Board and its affairs came through highly satisfactory.
It will be gratifying to the incoming Board to realize they can
start the new year with a clean sheet after so searching an investigation. A serious complaint being lodged with Trustee Harper
by a Mr. Forshaw against Mr. Giles, our former Building Superintendent, in connection with the building completed at that time, it
was thought necessary to have these charges investigated. I accordingly appointed Mr. Kennerly Bryan, an eminent and well-known
architect, to make a thorough investigation. His report exhibits
many glaring defects and a great loss to this Board, both financially and architecturally. It will remain for the new Board to
decide what action, if any, should be taken regarding this report.
To the ordinary layman these buildings seemed to have been perfectly erected; and under these circumstances I was induced to
give a very flattering comment on Mr. Giles' work in my report as
Chairman of the Building Committee last year. If I had known
these defects now in evidence, my remarks would have been quite
different.
The action of this Board, in its efforts to retrench, brought
forth much agitation among the parents or mothers of our school
children. 1 am pleased to say this has subsided now that they
realize the changes were only temporary to meet the conditions.
Your Management Committee have had a very trying and busy
year to meet the difficulties developing through our enforced economy. They are to be commended on the way they have handled
their problems, in the numerous meetings requiring their attendance. The Chairman, Mr. Stewart, has given many hours of careful thought and attention to all questions coming before him. With
an ever-increasing attendance- the largest in the history of our
city, numbering 13,805 for both public and high schools—the dif- \
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 11
Acuities arising were always great to overcome, but our Management Committee have fulfilled their duties to the satisfaction of
the entire Board.
The Building Committee have had their troubles to overcome
with so many needed repairs to be done and so little to do them
with, to a plant representing a value of nearly $3,000,000.00, covering 32 main school buildings, besides 30 other separate classrooms, all beginning to deteriorate as soon as they are built. These
must of necessity require constant attention and expenditure of
money to keep them in proper repair, for some part of these buildings is always wearing out, and, if neglected, as many of them have
been through this economic policy for several years past, more
money than ever will be required to completely repair these buildings which are fast deteriorating. The old adage that "a stitch in
time will save nine," can be applied here. A dollar spent in permanent repair work in time will save nine dollars spent later on.
We have a splendid pile of school buildings; few cities can boast
of anything better. Our citizens are proud of them; but they will
soon lose their admiration if they are allowed to go into decav for
want of proper care and protection. We are indebted to the Chairman, Mr. Welsh, for the manner in which he has carried out his
duties, keeping his expenditures well within the sum allocated for
his department. This has been difficult to do owing to the many
needed repairs required.
The Board has recently been approached by Mr. Bundy, Drill
Instructor, to see what can be done regarding the additional clothing for the cadet corps. Realizing as we do the unsatisfactory condition existing as to suitable uniforms for all the boys in the dif-
CD mf
ferent battalions, it is important for the incoming Board to secure,
if possible, from next year's Council an appropriation sufficient to
purchase the necessary outfit to dress properly and in military style
every boy now enrolled. The splendid results already achieved in
the general deportment of our boys in discipline, military bearing,
rifle shooting, and drilling, would be materially increased if each
boy found himself dressed in regular cadet uniform. I am sure
there is not a parent in the city whose son is a member of the public schools cadet corps but will approve of the money being provided for this purpose. I would therefore strongly advocate that
$5,000.00 be placed in the estimates for this special use. When we
find the Government has invested in supplies for the use of our
boys $22,506.70, of which rifles alone represent over $18,000.00, and
in addition provided ammunition valued at $3,542.44, and other
equipment of considerable value, I think it is time the Board put
forth a little greater effort towards uniforming our boys in proper 12
BOARD oE SCHOOL TRUSTEES
military form and augmenting the work so ably supported by military authorities.
A[<1
There is an ever-pressing need for greater and better school
ground playing equipment required for every school district in the
city. When some of these utensils have been supplied the children
have exhibited a marked inclination for out-door sports and exercises. At the same time they are more strongly developed, both
mentally and physically, happier in their disposition, and more
amenable to school discipline than where these outfits have not
been installed.
So soon as money can be provided, I should urge the Board to
acquire these useful additions to our playgrounds, with the least
possible delay. In the meantime, our Grounds Superintendent
should be preparing the school grounds, getting them in better condition for our children of all ages to play on. The more popular
you can make the school premises for play, the less likelihood there
is for our children being found on our streets, courting danger to
life and limb through the present modern methods of locomotion
and increasing travel. Athletic sports of all descriptions should be
more encouraged for both boys and girls in the future than they
have been in the past, for wherever these out-door sports are carried on a healthier condition exists among the growing, developing
children,
The question of establishing a system of Superannuation or a
Retiring Iumd for the benefit of our teachers, has been mooted at
different times by some o£ our past chairmen, but for diverse reasons the suggestion never got beyond a recommendation stage. It
remained for some of our principals on the teaching staff to start
something along that line for themselves. Accordingly, a meeting
Was held a short time ago to consider the question of establishing
such a fund for our school officials and teachers. After a good
deal of discussion, the movement was endorsed, and a committee
of three was appointed, with our Municipal Inspector, Mr. J. S.
Gordon, as convener, to go more fully into the question. The pro-
position in its embryo form was approved by the Management
Committee as to the principles, and adopted by the Board at its
meeting held December 30th, 1916. I trust the scheme can be
worked out to a conclusion during the coming year and put into
force before f retire from the Board. I feel an important question
of this kind has been delayed too long, and the sooner it is put
into operation the better it will be for all concerned. I hope to
see both the Provincial Government, the City Council, and the
Teaching Staff join hands on this question and insure its succespl
while I am still a member of this Board. ^
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 13
At the same meeting, the principals expressed their approval
of an Information and Juvenile Employment Bureau being opened
under the auspices of this Board in the School Board Office Building; and appointed a special committee, of which our Municipal
Inspector, Mr. J. S. Gordon, was made convener, to work out the
details of the scheme. This also had the support of the Management Committee and was endorsed by our Board.
These two important projects which you have endorsed are big
with possibilities for good; and I am hopeful that they will
materialize very soon. The central idea of the Information and
Employment Bureau is to make a systematic attempt to place boys
and "girls from 14 to 17 years of age in suitable positions when their
circumstances make it impossible for them to remain longer in the
day schools. This will necessitate the registration at the School
Board Office of all prospective juvenile workers, with such information regarding them as employers may demand. It will also
necessitate principals of schools and our Municipal Inspector keeping posted to a certain extent regarding suitable positions for these
juvenile workers. This will all mean extra work, but work well
worth the trouble. It should have a very beneficial effect upon
young people to know that their chances of getting a good start in.
the industrial, mercantile, or financial world, on leaving school,
depend upon the favourable impression they have made upon their
teacher as students. This scheme should also benefit the employer
of labor, in that it will furnish him with reliable information regarding young people seeking work, and put them in touch with the
most promising. A limited amount of such work has hitherto been
carried on in connection with our schools, but the time has now
come to extend and systematize it, if we are to keep this out of the
hands of outside employment agencies, whose chief object naturally
will be to put as many young people as possible to work whether
their education is fully completed or not. Our aim must be the
reverse: to keep them in school if possible; and, when no longer
possible, to help them find suitable employment. In years to come
a still more systematic effort will need to be made to have every
man or woman of our nation employed to the best possible advantage. That the teachers, if they will, can do much to assist in the
bringing about of such a worthy object, is unquestioned; that they
are definitely planning to do so, deserves the warmest commendation of our Board, and I hope the coming year into which we have
just entered will see the culmination of this most praiseworthy
undertaking. If it proves workable and successful here, no doubt
it will be adopted in all parts of our province.
A savings bank system among the public school children has
been adopted and put into force in the City of Toronto.    As the 14 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
spirit of the present day is to save and economize, which will be
intensified when this great war is over, it might be a suitable period
to have this question looked into further; and, if found satisfactory
in its working in the capital city of Ontario, it should also prove so
here. A movement should be made by this Board to draw our Provincial Government's attention to it and see if some similar system
cannot be incorporated in our Educational Department. If children
can be taught to save their pennies when they are young by a
school savings b.ank system, thrift and economy will by such means
be developed in the minds of the young, for their own great benefit
in after life as well as for the benefit of the state.
To our Municipal Inspector, Mr. Gordon, who holds the most
trying and sometimes most irritating position of any city official,
we are greatly indebted. I know of no position that requires greater
tact, greater skill, and greater ability to administer than that of a
Municipal Inspector, and in Mr. Gordon we have certainly an ideal
official. I am sure everyone of you will join me when I say his
work is very satisfactory to the Board and greatly appreciated.
I would like to express my appreciation to our Secretary, Mr.
Upton, for his willingness at all times to provide me with any and
all information required from time to time. His steady application
to his duties, the prompt and energetic way he handles all matters
pertaining to his departments, which are many and varied, and the
system he has adopted in connection with our books, etc.—a system
that has received the highest praise from our Auditor—are to be
commended.
The year on the whole has been a pleasant and profitable one
from an educational point of view to all concerned. There has at
times been considerable difference of opinion between the trustees
as to methods and policy best adapted to the carrying on of our
affairs. While these differences have occurred, I am satisfied the
trustees as a body had only one object in view, namely, the best
interests of our schools, and the better education of our children.
It will please you to know we have kept within our estimates of
$600,000.00, as agreed upon between this Board and the City Council. Notwithstanding" the great amount of public discussion on this
vexed question of school board expenditures, all liabilities of the
1916 Board are paid.
Finally, I wish to commend the Acting Building Superintendent
and the Grounds Superintendent, Mr. F. A. A. Barrs, for his conscientious and faithful duties towards this Board. The additional
work placed upon him by abolishing the Construction Superintendent's Department, has been quite a strain.   The combined depart- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
15
ments have been satisfactorily administered by him ; and I am sure
he has merited the approval and support of this Board.
I must say to all officials connected with the School Board
that I have recefjfed the greatest courtesy and kindest consideration possible from all, and I wish to express my appreciation and
thanks to each individually, particularly to those in the Municipal
Inspector's and Secretary's Departments. They have been kindness
itself, and will always be remembered by me.
In conclusion, I should like to express my sincere thanks and
appreciation to my co-trustees for their kindness and consideration
to me personally throughout the year. It has been a worrying year
to me, as I am sure it has been to all of you, but our trials are
over; the year 1916 has passed into history, and with it let us bury
any differences that may have been engendered and close our term
with the best wish for success and prosperity to the incoming
Board.
Respectfully submitted,
J. R. SEYMOUR, MzZZ^y^
Chairman School Board. 16
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
REPORT OF MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 10th, 1917.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Moody, and Gentlemen,—
I beg herewith to submit a report on the work of the Management Committee of this Board for the year ending December 31st,
1916. ' / ^        ^-^^f
School Accommodation.
The school year just closed, while memorable in some other
respects, witnessed the lightest building programme in the history
of the city for many years, only one small one-roomed school building having been constructed during the period. This structure was
erected on the grounds of the Lord Roberts School to relieve the
CD
congestion in that rapidly growing section of the city, where, at the
present moment, exists the most pressing need for further school
accommodation for the grades.
The enrolment in our schools was 807 in excess of that at the
close of 1915, while the number of teachers in the grade and high
schools was fewer by 15. Our high schools are now about filled to
their capacity, and increased accommodation will be needed in the
very near future. In September last when the high schools opened
there were 1,675 students enrolled as compared with 1,602 in the
corresponding month of the previous year, when the classes were
considered too large.    This increased attendance necessitated the
CD
opening of two additional rooms in the King George and one in the
Britannia High School. In the latter school it was found necessary to transform the domestic science kitchen into an ordinary
class room.
The adequate accommodation of the students entering high
school is bound to become very acute in the near future, and early
provision to meet the requirements should be made in time. As
soon as funds are available, the congestion should be relieved by
CD J
erecting a separate commercial high school. This would not only
relieve the present congestion, but also enable this department of
high school work to be carried on more efficiently than under present conditions. It will be remembered that it was contemplated to
refit the old Strathcona School as a commercial high school; but
after due consideration and many reports as to its fitness, the school
was finally condemned, and therefore unsuitable for the purpose. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 17
As recommended in the report for 1915, the Building Committee installed a full equipment for carrying on the work of domestic science and manual training in the Bayview and Beaconsfield
Schools, respectively; and as a result the city is now well provided
with facilities for these special lines of work-
Teaching Staff,
In our estimates a year ago, we provided for an increase of two
Sfrade teachers: but, in our zeal for economy and retrenchment, we
made a reduction of 24 in our staff- We also provided for an
increase of five in our high school staff, but contented ourselves bv
adding simply three of the number thus provided for, and as a
result many of the classes are too large for effective work.
Even assuming that our school population will not increase
during the year 1917, our present staff will need to be increased, as
we have already planned, by at least 23 in January and February \
and, if another 800 increase takes place, as in 1916, we should make
provision in our estimates for 20 more regular teachers for next
August. Last year we provided for an additional manual training
teacher to be added to the staff in August, but none was appointed.
As a result several intermediate grade classes are not receiving
instruction in this necessary branch of a boy's education.
Attendance in the oral class inaugurated last year has increased
from eight to eleven, thus necessitating the appointment of an additional instructor in this work.
On the first of May a class for the instruction of blind children
was opened at 1238 Melville Street, under the guidance and direction
of Mrs. Thomas Burke, an experienced teacher in. that department
of. work. Up to July 1st, the teacher received a remuneration of
$20.00 per child per month for board, lodging and tuition. The
class opened originally with two pupils; then three, later four, and
now five are enrolled. Realizing that the teacher in this case was
giving too much for the remuneration so far received, a deputation
from this Board, acting with a similar delegation from the Victoria
Board, waited on the then Minister of Education, Hon. G. A.
McGuire, and the Superintendent of Education, Dr. Robinson, when
new and more satisfactory arrangements were agreed upon for carrying on this necessary phase of education. As a -result of the
interview, the Provincial Department of Education now pays $20.00
per month per pupil for board and lodging and $460.00 per annum
toward the teacher's salary, the Victoria and Vancouver Boards
paying the balance of the salary, amounting to $130.00 each. The
present arrangement appears to be eminently satisfactory to all con- 18
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Class for the Blind
cerned;   while the children are reported to be making excellent
progress.
Public and High School Work.
Of our teachers who early joined the overseas forces, Lieutenant R. P. Steeves of the Cecil Rhodes School, is a prisoner in
Germany ; Mr. David Thomas, of the Lord Nelson School, reported
for some time among the missing, is now conceded to have made
the supreme sacrifice on the banks of the Somme in France; Lieutenant Donald Maclean, of the Alexandra School, recently reported
wounded, is now in a hospital in France.
Several good teachers joined the Canadian Expeditionary
Forces during the year. Among these were Messrs. G. A. Fergusson
and A. D. Banting, of Britannia High School, both earnest and
capable men whom we could very ill afford to lose. They heard
and heeded the call and followed the lead of their fellow teacher,
Mr. George McKay, who, early in the struggle left for his native
heaths in the north of Scotland, where he joined his countrymen in
the great conflict. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
19
From the public schools we have to record the following name's
of teachers who have heard and heeded the call: Messrs. C. B.
Crowe, of Simon Fraser; G. P. Young, of the Prevocational School;
F. C. Boyes, of Livingstone; J. L. Watson, of Kitsilano; J. F.
Walker, of Franklin; and C. C. Chute, Principal of the Hastings
School.
It is perfectly natural to expect that our schools will suffer in
efficiency to some extent by the withdrawal from the ranks of so
many experienced, earnest and conscientious teachers; but your
Committee and the Municipal Inspector are endeavouring as best
they can to fill the gaps with the best material available for the
salaries offered.
It is a matter of pleasure and also of pardonable pride to have
to record the fact that the results of the last Departmental examinations for entrance to high school, held in the month of June,
were the best in the history of the city. The showing was creditable to both teachers and pupils. Eight hundred and seventy-five
candidates wrote, of whom 717, or 82%, were successful, while the
percentage for the rest of the province was 67.
Not only in the number of successful candidates were the examination returns encouraging; the standing of classes and individual
candidates was unusually high. Many teachers had not a single
student fail in their classes, while many students made exceptionally
high percentages. Miss Phyllis I. MacKay, of Lord Roberts School,
made 881 marks out of a possible 1,100, thus winning the Governor-
General's Medal for the city and leading the entire province. Master
Norman A. Robertson, of the General Gordon School, a lad of 12,
won second place with 842 marks out of 1,100.
The high schools also gave a good>account of themselves in
the mid-summer examinations. Miss Dorothy Blakey, of King
Edward High School, led the second-year high school students of
the province with 857 marks out of a possible 1,000. Miss Frances
O. Tremlett, of the same school, led the commercial students of the
province with the splendid record of 1,037 points out of 1,200;
while in the matriculation classes of the province, William Ure,
also of the King Edward High School, led with 849 marks out of
1,000. He thus won both the Governor-General's Silver Medal and
the Royal Institution Scholarship of $150.00 for British Columbia.
Night School and Prevocational Work.
On account of the policy pursued by the Board in curtailing
the night school work, we are not in a position to avail ourselves to
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BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
of the financial aid guaranteed by the Public Schools Act when
night school work is carried on in accordance with the requirements
of the Department of Education. While by the present method,
worked out so successfully under the circumstances by the Municipal Inspector and his staff, excellent work is being done, still we
must admit that the work could have been greatly extended and
enlarged to include many deserving- students who are unable to
O J CD
attend classes which must be practically self-supporting. Under the
provisions of the School Act, the civic and provincial exchequers
between them bear the financial burden of our night schools, thus
enabling the poorest child to avail himself of the advantage of
obtaining a good serviceable education whereby his usefulness as a
CD CD •/
citizen and his powers of earning a livlihood may be much enhanced ; but under the. policy recently pursued by our Board the
financial burden is placed on the individual student. This is, to
say the least, a wide departure from the principle of free education.
While the night classes were curtailed and limited in their scope
and operation, they still fared infinitely better under our so-called
system of economy than did our prevocational classes, which were
entirely eliminated last June. These classes made provision for a
class of students who are now the flotsam and jetsam of our civilization, but who, under the provision made for them in our prevocational classes', would in all probability become useful citizens,
filling with credit to themselves honourable positions in our civic
life. These pupils are left to drift aimlessly along blind alleys,
having neither training nor guidance for any useful avocation.
High School Technical Course.
/TM
The past year marked a further advance in our city, of work
in the department of technical education. With the approval of the
Education Department, the Board, at the commencement of the fall
term, opened, in the King Edward High School, a class for students
whose ability and inclination lay in the direction of practical work.
The course of study put before these students calls for additional attention to be given to manual training, mathematics and
science, while the English work remains the same as that appointed
for the general course, and the work is done not only in the class
room but also in the laboratories and the wood and metal workshops.
The object of the course is to give the student the advantages
of the ordinary high school course and at the same time enable him
to acmtire technical mental training* and knowledge, both theoreti- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES J23
cal and practical, and it is intended that the course shall extend
over three years at least. While there is no attempt, at least for
the present, to teach the principles of any particular trade or calling, the course is designed to give a training in the mechanical,
mathematical and scientific principles and laws which underlie all
lines of practical work.
The course is new and was not advertised, but at the present
time 54 boys are taking- the course and are entering most enthu-
siastically into the work, and it is presumed that the opening of
another school year will show a marked increase in the number of
students who wish to avail themselves of the advantages offered.
It may be remarked, in this connection, that the Board, when
the demand came for a technical course, was fortunate in having in
the laboratories and shops at the King Edward High School an
equipment which, with only slight additions, was admirably fitted
for the carrying on of the practical work of such a course.
Supervisors and Supervision.
In my report for 1915, I stated that "a further saving was
effected in the domestic science and manual training classes by
having the supervisors teach as well as attend to the work of supervision." The heads of these two departments were thus placed on
half time as teachers, the balance of the time being devoted to the
work of organization and supervision. Early in the past year the
office of supervisor was abolished and the heads of these departments were practically reduced to the ranks, being put on full time
as teachers. At present, by arrangement, each departmental head
has four and one-half hours off per week for organization and
supervisory duties.
The work being well organized at the end of June, and fortunately no changes having taken place in the teaching staffs, these
two departments have made satisfactory progress. With increasing
school population, additional teachers will become a necessity and
changes in the present staff will likely occur from time to time. All
these things will call for more supervision; and it is to be hoped
the time is not far distant when the heads of these two departments
will again be [given at least half time for the pressing duties of
organization and supervision, as was the case in 1915.
As an additional reason why more supervision is required in
these two departments of school work, it is well to recall the fact
that there is no institution as yet in this province for the instruction
and training- of teachers in domestic science and manual training.
CD CD
As a consequence of this our supply of teachers  is  necessarily 24 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
recruited from the eastern provinces and the Old Land. As a result
of this diversity of instruction and training*, close and frequent
supervision would appear to be more necessary in order to coordinate the work as effectively as possible.
No move on the part of this Board has been more calculated
to militate in the near future against successful work in the domestic
science department than that of abolishing the position of Sewing
Supervisor. We have in our city over fifty intermediate classes in
which the elementary work in sewing should be done by grade
teachers, while the boys of these classes are receiving instruction in
the manual training departments. If our grade teachers received
the necessary training in the Normal School to enable them to carry
on this work, we might be justified in dispensing with the services
of the supervisor. But this is not so, and proficiency in the art of
sewing does not come by instinct nor without previous preparation.
On the other hand, were our staff of intermediate grade teachers a
permanent body, we might concede that they, after being guided in
their work for a number of years by a supervisor in the art, should
be expected to carry on this work independently as well as they do
any other line of school work. But in the'absence of normal training in needlework and with an ever-changing staff of intermediate
grade teachers, a supervisor of sewing becomes a manifest necessity. Without such an official some good work will likely be done,
but much poor work may be expected. The inevitable results will
follow: The students entering high school will be of such unequal
ability in this subject that it will be practically impossible to carry
on dressmaking with them on the high plane of the last few years.
To pay teachers of dressmaking in high schools good salaries for
attempting to build on such poor sewing foundations as are absolutely certain to be laid in the public schools in the abscence of a
supervisor, seems to me doubtful if not altogether false economy.
It is indeed questionable if it might not be better to eliminate the
subject entirely from our schools, as we may under the School Act.
My own judgment, however, is that it will be better far to leave it
in and do it right.
From information gathered from reliable sources and backed
by the opinion and judgment of our Municipal Inspector, I am satisfied the important work in the primary divisions of our schools
has suffered from the absence of the supervisor for the past term.
It is, therefore, very gratifying that the Board decided to reinstate
Miss E. J. Trembath at the opening of the schools in January,
1917.-      yyyyzzy  fyy   t     ::    :Itf    ■!
Until the present financial depression is past, we may possibly
manage without a supervisor of drawing and without more super- BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 25
vision of the work in music; but the sooner we can return to our
former policy in the management of these subjects, it seems to me,
the better.
Medical Work.
Medical inspection of schools has been continued throughout
the year, with the usual care and efficiency that Dr. Brydone-Jack
and his staff have ever exercised in the discharge of their duties.
No radical change has taken place in the method of carrying
on the work, though one has been suggested. In this connection
I may point out that the same change was urged in 1915, but, after
a very careful investigation of the question by the Management
Committee of that time, it was deemed inadvisable to depart from
the present method, which, I am satisfied, is meeting with as little
opposition as any other phase of school work in which the general
public take the same interest. As Trustees we will be well advised
if, in this as in all debatable questions in school administration, we
give a sympathetic hearing to the officials and teachers who are in
the best position to know the far-reaching results of any proposed
change of policy. By doing so we may save ourselves the humiliation of endorsing a policy one term, only to abandon it the next.
I^^^^^^^^R^S   Dental Work. Sp??^^
This department of the medical work, under Dr. Jones, has
been carried on efficiently and well. Under the new management
everything has gone on smoothly and without friction. The amount
of work accomplished for poor children in the time is almost incredible, considering the fact that only half-time is devoted to this
important work.
An enlargement and extension of this phase of school work
is now receiving the attention of the Board.
General School Work.
As Chairman of the Management Committee, I cannot close
this report without a general reference to the admirable service
rendered by your officials and teachers during the year now under
review. For many of them the work has been unusually heavy.
The necessary—or supposedly necessary—retrenchment has greatly
increased their burdens. In all cases, however, they have taken
these up bravely; and, conscious that all worthy citizens must in
these testing times render their very best service, and that cheerfully, our officials and teachers have worked with cheerfulness as
well as courage. 26
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I deem it much to the credit of our teaching staff that during
the entire year no charge has been preferred against any of them
to be investigated by the Management Committee. With overcrowded rooms, with ventilation in consequence impaired, with
teachers' nerves often, no doubt, much on edge, from overwork, one
might have expected more than the usual amount of friction between
pupils and teachers and between parents and teachers; but such
was not the case. The parents, and the teachers and officials of our
schools have made a record in 1916 for "peace on earth and goodwill among men" that we trust may be an inspiration for coming
years.
Respectfully submitted,
ZzKyJ'-  A. C. STEWART, p|
Chairman, Management Committee. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 27
REPORT OF THE BUILDING COMMITTEE
Vancouver, B. C, January 10th, 1917.
0
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Moody, and Gentlemen,—
I beg to submit the following Report of the Building Committee for 1916:
The work falling under the review of this Committee has been
small in comparison with other years, mainly by need of the urgent
need of economy.
No new schools have been erected during the year, and only
necessary repairs and alterations have been carried out.
Early in the year the Board adopted a recommendation of this
Committee that the offices of Building Superintendent and Grounds
Superintendent should be amalgamated. This was done, and since
June last F. A. A. Barrs has been Acting Superintendent. This
plan has, in my opinion, worked out in a most satisfactory manner,
and the Board is indebted to Mr. Barrs for very efficient work done
under exceptionally difficult circumstances.
I would recommend that it be commended to the incoming
Board to continue the present system of supervision of heating,
ventilating and plumbing, which has proven so satisfactory. While
much remains to be done to make every school perfect, we have
no school which is not in good condition for the purpose for which
it was built.
While there may be many good reasons for disapproving of
some of our ventilating systems, we have to remember that while
we had before us a complete report showing the cost of replacing
these defects, we were compelled by lack of funds to postpone
their replacement, and do only necessary repairs this past year..
This important matter must receive the close attention of the incoming Board.
Grounds.
The appropriation for grounds this year has not been exceeded,
only such new work as was essential to protect work done in 1915
was authorized by the Board, and much remains to be done.
It seems to myself more than passing strange, that while
$80,000 is cheerfully voted for the buildings, the expenditure oi 28
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
a few thousands to beautify and make useful the surroundings
should be criticised.
I would point out to the Board that on many of their school
grounds there should be retaining walls built to protect the property. It is useless to repair the grounds each year, and leave
them in such a condition that the winter rains wash away much
of the surface.
While the work of the Committee has been rendered more
difficult by unfair criticism, every member has done his duty faithfully, and the Board as a whole—with possibly one exception—
will, I am sure, concur in this opinion.
My thanks as Chairman of this Committee are due to all
officials for courteous assistance, to my fellow members of the
Committee, and to the Secretary of the Board.
I  am,  respectfully yours,
)Zy•- FRED W. WELSH,   ||
Chairman, Building Committee.
m&
S3S BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 29
■REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR §llll|l||
HB  Mgj|g^0F schools SI-->'"^Sg
Vancouver, B. C, January 10th, 1917.
Mr. Chairman, Mrs. Moody, and Gentlemen,—
In a general survey of school work for the past year, one finds
the statistics on school attendance which 1 have submitted to you
at your monthly meetings, interesting and suggestive. They are
as follows:—
Average
Enrolment.    Attendance.    Percentage.
January     12,754 ^: 10,327.82 '■':<    80.97           r         I
February    13,565 11,716.79 86.37
March     13,564 12,071.33 88.99
April   13,034 11,886.66 91.12
May     13,063 12,040.46 92.17
June     12,690 11,802.72 93.
September   13,625 12,716.69 93.33
October    13,805 12,793.92 92.67
November    13,762 12,699.22 92.27
December   13,356 ^:r 12,124.37 ^ 90.77    ;:    -.   ZZ^
You will notice the attendance for the first three months was
extremely poor—in fact, the poorest for many years. This was
due to a combination of circumstances. The weather was the worst
possible for school attendance, and there was a great deal of sickness—675 cases of measles, besides some 'few cases of chicken-pox
and whooping cough in January. Such poor attendance was regrettable, but unavoidable. It undoubtedly militated against satisfactory work being done; but it was better than having the schools
entirely closed, as they were in neighbouring cities.
The bad weather and epidemic of measles in the schools early
in the year contributed, doubtless, to another consequence more
serious than poor attendance, namely, a material reduction of the
teaching staff. Time remedied the former, as a glance at the above
table will show, but it did not the latter. People, learning that certain classes in the schools had an attendance of a score or even less,
began to agitate for a reduction of the teaching staff and were successful in their agitation.   With the return of good weather and the 30
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
stamping out of the epidemic, the attendance again became normal,
but it was too late. The reduction of the staff had been agreed
upon; and this past term found the staff, reduced by twenty-four,
endeavouring to teach considerably over 2,000 more children than
were attending in January.
Another misfortune nearly resulted from the unfavourable cli-
matic conditions in January and February. A certain number of
people always have considered, and likely always will consider, the
school noon-hour should be lengthened to seventy-five or ninety
minutes. Those holding such an opinion found a most favourable
.opportunity for setting it forth last January. At that time many
children who, under ordinary conditions, could go home at noon
and return on time for the opening of school, found it difficult or
even impossible to do so. The advocates of a longer noon-hour,
finding a considerable number of new sympathizers, began an agitation for what they deemed a much-needed reform. You ordered
that a careful survey of the whole situation be made; and when it
was made the following interesting facts were gleaned for your
guidance:—
Number of pupils attending :  13,197
Number of pupils who go home to lunch  11,683
Number of pupils who have too little time for lunch      631
If the noon-hour were 1 hour and 15 minutes, 266 more
could go home to lunch than are now going.
If the noon-hour were 1 hour and 30 minutes, 508 more
could go home to lunch than are now going.
Number of teachers      366
Number of teachers who go home to lunch       87
Number  of  teachers  who  prefer  noon-hour   as   at
present     358
Number of teachers who would prefer a noon-hour
of 1 hour and 15 minutts         7
Number of teachers who would prefer a noon-hour
of 1 hour and 30 minutes         1
Note.—Children's  Home and Prevocational teachers and
students are not included in the above figures.
Number of teachers given includes' certain manual train-
/ CD
ing and domestic science teachers.
Number of principals in favour of noon-hour as at
present       26 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 31
Number of principals in favour of a noon-hour of
1 hour and 15 minutes         1
Number of principals in favour of a noon-hour of
1 hour and 30 minutes         3
Those principals in favour of noon-hour as at present
advance the following reasons in support of their opinion:
That a noon-hour of 1 hour and 30 minutes was given a
trial some years ago and proved unsatisfactory, children returning* to school as early as before and spending the additional
time in playing, thus getting overheated and unfit for the afternoon's work; also, that the extra half-hour in the afternoon
was found to be very irksome.
That many boys deliver papers and do other work in the
afternoon, and have to rush to get to work after school.
The darkness in winter and increased cost of lighting and
heating the schools.
That the extra half-hour in the afternoon would interfere
seriously with cadet work, school sports, and teachers' classes,
etc.
That very few complaints have been received regarding
the present hours.
The principal in favour of a noon-hour of 1 hour and 15
minutes considers that children hurry too much in order to get
back to school, and that more time would be available for play.
Of the three principals in favour of a noon-hour of 1 hour
and 30 minutes, one considers that the afternoon session often
drags, and that a longer break might lend an impetus to a new
session.
The two other principals think that the noon-hour should
be lengthened, but that the afternoon session should not be
extended.    Such an arrangement is, of course, impossible.
Many of the children who now remain at school during the
noon-hour remain, not because they have not time to go home
7 •/ CD
for lunch, but because there is no one at home to prepare lunch,
or for other reasons.
In the light of the above, you decided that "the greatest good
to the greatest number" could only be secured by making no change
in the length of the noon-hour.
CD 32
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
There are two other facts to be noted in connection with the
school attendance of the past year. They are not only interesting
but instructive, if interpreted aright. In September the enrolment
was better than for any previous mouth. This was exceptional.
The percentage of attendance, too, was the best for the entire year.
These are interesting facts to those of us who remember the amount
of energy expended by certain people last August to have our
schools not open till September 11. They managed to have them
closed the last week of August; but fortunately failed to have them
closed for the first week of September, for the above statistics indicate that an overwhelming majority of parents were in favour of
the schools being* open. They indicate, also, so far as actual school
work goes, that the first week of September was a valuable one for
the children.
In speaking of values in such a connection, it may be well to
set, if possible, a definite average value on a single week's work for
school children in this city. I place it at $15,000—one-fortieth of
our annual school expenditure. If these figures are right, and I am
satisfied they are, it means the school children lost $15,000 worth of
instruction last August that they should not have lost; and that
they came very near suffering a similar loss in September. If the
rank and file of parents in Vancouver realized last August what the
loss to their children actually amounted to in dollars and cents,
they would not have remained silent, while efforts were being made
to have schools closed till the 11th of September. The trouble is,
most people's ideas regarding educational values are too vague. It
is, therefore, the duty of school trustees and others, with a fuller
knowledge of school affairs, to safeguard the interests of the children and their parents against the misdirected enthusiasm of small
aggregations of people whose zeal in school matters is not according to knowledge.
School Spirit.
Notwithstanding the numerous obstacles confronting the teach-
CD O
ers during the past year, a splendid spirit prevailed among them.
Even those with heaviest burdens to bear bore them bravely and
cheerfully. There were consequently few complaints lodged against
teachers by parents or guardians. In every case, too, where it
appeared necessary to investigate a complaint, I found teacher and
parent equally reasonable and desirous of a fair settlement. This
will explain why no investigations into disputes between parents
and teachers had to be made by the Management Committee or the
Board during the year.
-s BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 33
School Contributions.
Numerous and generous contributions of money were made
during the year by both teachers and pupils towards the Canadian
Patriotic Fund, Red Cross Fund, and other worthy objects. Some
of these were secured by direct contributions; others were obtained
by holding concerts, school fairs, etc. By the latter method the
sum of $5,000 was raised in October for the relief of children in
the portion of Belgium devastated by the Germans.
The good work, carried on by the Vancouver Schools Relief
Association since August, 1914, was continued throughout the year.
In consequence, the bond of sympathy between many parents and
teachers and school officials has been strengthened. Parents in
need have found the teachers real friends.
School Exhibits.
A number of school exhibits, which called for much voluntary
effort on the part of teachers, were made during the year. The
first of these was the exhibit in the School Board Office Building of
night school work in April. This was followed shortly after by an
exhibit of dressmaking, millinery, and manual training work in each
of the three high schools. In August an exhibit of all lines of
school work was made at the Vancouver Exhibition. These five
exhibits called forth a great deal of favourable criticism. They
were a splendid advertisement of your schools. May I point out,
however, that to get them ready a great deal of labour was necessary—more, I fear, than may be secured this coming year when
your employees are fewer in number and are, consequently, in many
: cases, overworked. You may rest assured your teachers and their
pupils will continue their efforts to keep all school work up to the
high standard of the past, and will likely succeed. Whether thev
will be able to exhibit it to the same advantage as they did last
year, is doubtful.
Home Gardening.
The splendid record made b}~ the children in 1915 in home gardening, carried on under the auspices of the Vancouver Local
Council of Women, was broken by the children during the past
year.   Notwithstanding the fact that a higher standard for the gar-
•/ CD CD CD
dens was demanded of competitors, 635 entered the competition,
and, on the whole, did excellent work. The prize-winning gardens,
over seventy in number, were said by competent judges to be highly
creditable.
For the first time a school trophy, a beautiful silver cup, was
offered bv the Council;  and it is a significant fact that it was won 34
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
by the Fairview School, where children have had the advantages
of school gardening longer than those of any other city school. It
is to be hoped the Board may be able to open up school gardens in
all schools before long. For all they will cost, over and above the
Government grant, they will be well worth while.
The teachers assisted the Women's Council in their home garden scheme to a gratifying extent. Most of the preliminary visiting of gardens was done by them. They also gave competitors the
benefit of their wider knowledge of gardening operations; and
finally made a selection of the three or four best gardens in each
school district to be finally examined and judged by experts. The
sum of $50.00 was also contributed out of the School Music Fund
to the Local Council of Women to help purchase suitable books as
prizes  for successful competitors.
Strathcona Trust Prizes.
In the inspectorate comprising Vancouver, Burnaby, Point
Grey, Richmond, and Delta, nine prizes are offered annually by the
Strathcona Trust Committee for proficiency in physical training.
Seven of these were won last year by the following teachers:
Teacher.
Miss M. E. Archibald
Miss G. E. Stevens
Miss F. G. Perry
Miss K. Cairns
Miss D. Cattell
Miss E. L. Roberts
Miss M.  McKinnon
School.
Simon Fraser
Seymour
Kitsilano
Strathcona
Model   ■'-..
Florence Nightingale
Laura  Secord
Division.
Prize.
XIII.
1st
$21.00
V.
1st
21.00
X.
2nd
15.00
IV.
2nd
15.00
XL
3rd
9.00
VII.
3rd
9.00
VIII.
3rd
9.00
As formerly, one-third of the prize money has been spent on
pictures to beautify the class-rooms in which they were won. The
teachers received the balance.
The sum of $214.95 was also received and distributed among
cadets and cadet instructors of the 101st Cadet Regriment.
CD
Lectures to Teachers and Students.
During the year we were fortunate in having a number of very
helpful lectures delivered to our teachers, high school students, and
senior students of the public schools. It is to be hoped that in
future we can have more of such lectures.
Mr. J. W. Bengough, of Toronto, gave an interesting chalk-
talk to the teachers and students of the King Edward High School
'<s->
o BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 35
early in the year. Mr. Taylor Statton, of Toronto, National Y. M.
C. A. Secretary for boys' work, addressed the boys of the three
high schools on the 6th of April. Dr. Alfred Hall, of Toronto,
Senior Chaplain of the Navy and Mercantile Marine in Canada,
visited Vancouver, and delivered three very interesting lectures on
'What Is the Navv Doing?''  to high school  students and older
pupils of the public schools, in Britannia High School on October
2nd; in Roberts
on October 4th.
2nd ; in Roberts on October 3rd; and in King Edward High School
Their addresses were highly appreciated by those who heard
them. A hearty welcome will await these gentlemen any time they
may be able to visit our schools in future.
Several short addresses were also delivered by a number of
Vancouver citizens, on "Shakespeare," in April last, during the
Shakespeare Tercentenary Celebration. To all these speakers, but
especially to the moving spirit among them, Mr. J. Francis Bursill,
the thanks of this Board are due.
Limit Tables for Public Schools,
Early in the year the tentative limit table prepared by the principals and myself, and used in the public schools in 1915, was
printed and a copy of it given to each teacher in the employ of the
Board. The drawing limit drawn up by Mr. C. H. Scott, Supervisor
of Drawing, before he joined the overseas forces in December, 1915,
was also printed and distributed for the guidance of teachers.
These tables are much appreciated. They make for greater uniformity of work in our schools; and will, if carefully adhered to
by all teachers, minimize the loss to children caused by their being
transferred from one school to another.
Prevocational Classes.
In order to curtail in School Board expenditure, the Prevocational classes that had done such good work for a couple of years,
were closed in June. It is to be hoped these classes can be organized again in the near future, for there is urgent need of them in
our city. For further particulars regarding the work done in them
during the past year, you are referred to the Report of the Director
of Prevocational Classes.
Night School Classes.
Notwithstanding the scarcity of funds and the consequent curtailment of night school activities for the past term, splendid work
has been done in the night schools.    As vou could undertake to 36
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
furnish funds only for janitors' services, light, fuel, and the few
supplies that might be required, no classes were organized except
such as were likely to be self-supporting, or approximately so, as
far as cost of tuition was concerned. Notwithstanding this limitation, however, thirty classes were opened on October 2nd, in the
Aberdeen Public School, the King Edward High School, and the
School Board Office Building. The subjects taken up were music,
both choral and orchestral; drawing, painting; shorthand, bookkeeping, typewriting; electrical engineering, ignition, etc.; navigation, mechanical engineering, mathematics, machine construction
and drawing; dressmaking, cooking; arithmetic, English, English
for foreigners, and French.
The following statistics for the opening months of the school
term will indicate the extent to which work was carried on:
No. of Students    Average Per-        No. of
Attending.    Attendance,    centage.    Classes.
October       1102       Z- 944.85    %     85.73    ffi 30
November     1140 940.52 82.5 30
December     1007   -       793.89   > r 78.83    ■;>• 30
While the enrolment was not large, it is worthy of note that
the average attendance was the best we have ever had in the night
schools. The average size of the classes, too, was good and a keen
interest was taken in the work by both teachers and students.
Special School Activities.
There are other school activities of which I need not speak,
as they have been dealt with by the heads of the various departments in their Annual Reports. I cannot close this report, however,
without expressing my appreciation of the manner in which workers in all departments have attended to their duties. There has
been on every hand an earnestness and a willing co-operation, not
only among individuals in each department but between the departments themselves, that has made my work much lighter and much
more pleasant than it otherwise could have been. I wish also to
thank you, Mr. Chairman, and the members of your Board, for
your support during a year in which my duties in organization and
super vision have often been perplexing. The opportunities for service and the facilities with which you have supplied me for carrying on my work, I appreciate. With these and your support, coupled
with the loyal co-operation of my fellow-workers, I contemplate the
work of the coming year with confidence.
Respectfully submitted,
" *    :■   "■/'.      • •;- /   ■' J. S. GORDON,       $^§.
Municipal Inspector of Schools. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 37
MEDICAL INSPECTION
Vancouver, B. C, December 22nd, 1916.
J. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver j B. C.
i\
Dear Sir,—
The following is the Report of the Medical Department for
the year ending December 31st, 1916:—
||1|^^ ,• ■■..,.*:■;>; ■ ■ .y'zy'B T°tal-
Enrolment (October) 13,805
Number examined  12,315
Number vaccinated within 7 years  1,253
Defective vision   569
Eyestrain  127
Squint  | 90
Far sight glasses  203
Short sight glasses  145
Deafness     222
Discharging ears  101
Hard wax in ears  512
Defective nasal breathing  309
Defective speech  75
Cleft palate   5
Carious permanent teeth  3,536
Alveolar abscess :  260
Hypertrophied tonsils   1,209
Adenoids    43
Goitre   336
Enlarged cervical glands   280
Anaemia   151 38 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
Heart affections, organic   130
Heart affections, functional   92
Pulmonary affections  122
Deformities, spine   149
Deformities, chest   75
Deformities, extremities   85
Defective nutrition  93
Defective mentality   41
Unclean    37
Impetigo     24
Pediculosis     118
Ringworm   12
CD
Scabies  12
Urinary incontinence   34
Hernia  24
Blepharitis   240
Deviated nasal septum   116
Hypertrophied turbinates   56
High narrow palate   83
Nasal spur   9
Trachoma     6
Special inspections  1,362
Total treatments (for defects found in 1915)  2,091
School visits   531
Report of School Nursing Staff.
Assisted Medical Officer in physical examinations  12,315
No. of children  inspected  for contagious  diseases,  cleanliness, etc  53,886
No. of children excluded   318
No. of children re-admitted   258
No. of notices sent parents  7,062 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 39
No. of children treated in school clinics j  1,151
No. of children sent to hospitals or specialists for treatment.. 87
No. of children receiving treatments as result of nurses' visits 1,932
No. of visits to schools ',  1,475
No. of visits to homes  2,990
No. of visits to hospitals or specialists with children  28
No. of swabs taken (re diphtheria)  88
No. of mornings in attendance at dental clinic  135
No. of afternoons   (after   school   hours)   in   attendance   at
School Board Medical Clinics -  233
Skin Diseases Found in School.
Eczema    ,  56
Pediculosis, old cases   518
Pediculosis, new cases  154
Impetigo     239
Ringworm   57
Scabies   41
Unclean  83
Miscellaneous   „  466
Infectious Diseases.
Chicken-pox    46
Measles     23
Whooping cough   11
Mumps'   12
Scarlet fever   1
Diphtheria   1
Sore throat   92
Conjunctivitis   16
nd at Home.
Total
48 ;:/:•■:<>,;
94
248       :; ;"'•-;
271
96     >,'.' '■>. Z
V 107
69   Z zz'-y
81
izzyy^y
yy' 2
iyyyy-'':-:
'■'")   2
ii    ~
103
0     .'
16 j
40 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
Report on School Board Medical Clinic.
Number    1,763
Teachers gdven certificates  354
Children re-admitted   505
Treatments     155
Referred to specialists or the hospital  80
»
Infectious Diseases Occurring in Children of School Age.
Anterior poleomyelitis  3
Chicken-pox  164
Diphtheria   11
Measles  1,274
Mumps   78
Scarlet fever   12
Typhoid  0
Whooping cough   162
The work of the department during the past four years has
been materially increased by developing the field of work and by
the increase in the number of pupils. In October, 1912, the figures
for the enrolment in our schools were 12,393. In October, 1916, the
enrolment reached 13,805, an increase of 1,412 pupils. Since the
beginning of this four-year period there has been no increase in the
size of the staff, with the result that much of the work that should
be done has been impossible. Each nurse has over 1,000 more pupils
under her jurisdiction than is ordinarily allowed. The nurses are
expected to visit, after school hours, the parents of children found
to be suffering from physical defects, but are unable to visit any
but the most urgent cases within a reasonable time. Others have
to wait for months after the defect has been discovered by the
doctor—some it is impossible to visit. The nurses also visit homes
in which teachers have reason to suspect there are children suffering from infectious diseases. This visiting, in cases of suspected
infectious disease and sickness, is of the utmost importance in the
control of school epidemics, but the nursing staff, because of its
size, is unable to attend to this phase of the work with the promptness which is so necessary. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 41
The doctors were able to examine some 12,315 children during
the past year. It was impossible to examine 1,490 children. During
1917, with the present staff, there will be nearly 2,000 children it
will be impossible to examine. In order that the Medical Department accomplish its work during 1917, it will be necessary to
appoint a full-time nurse and a doctor for three mornings a week.
The establishment of an open-air school for delicate children
is very necessary. It is to be hoped that the 1917 Board will give
this need their very earnest consideration.
In closing this report, the Medical Department desires to
express to the teachers and the various officials of the School
Board the deep appreciation that we feel for the interest shown in
the work of medical inspection.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^^^^^^Si:  F- W. BRYDONE-JACK, M.D.,   --<"-•-
School Medical Officer.
ECroduws   KfiH.S. 42
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
DENTAL WORK
Vancouver, B. C, December 22 y 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. G.
Dear Sir,—
We beg leave to submit our Annual Report of the Free Dental
Clinic, as follows :■—
The clinic was re-opened on 3rd April, and has been in operation three and one-half hours of each teaching day, a total of
471 hours.
There has been at all times a large waiting list, as must necessarily be the case where the capacity of the clinic is inadequate to
meet the requirements. The limitations of the clinic can best be
shown by comparing it with, say, Toronto, where, with a population about four times as large, sixteen clinics are maintained.
However, we have tried to complete as many cases as possible and
with the minimum loss of time to the pupil. This we have been
able to do by giving longer appointments, thus saving the time of
changing from one patient to another so frequently.
Local anesthetics have been freely used, the result being that
more and better work has been made possible and at the same time
eliminating the dread of the dental chair heretofore inherent in
the minds of most children.
During the time the clinic has been open there have been 198
completed cases, 1,220 fillings have been inserted, 263 root fillings,
292 treatments, and 439 extractions. More details of the work will
be found in the monthly reports.
Each pupil whose work has been completed has been instructed
by the attending nurse as to the proper method of mouth hygiene,
this being the most opportune time to impress such teaching.
Only those cases recommended by the school nurses as a result
of personal home investigation, have been treated.    The nurses BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
43
report that they meet a large class of cases where the family income
is just above the limit set for eligibility to the clinic, and yet not
sufficient to permit of dental service at the hands of the family dentist. This large class of patients is, therefore, going without dental
treatment. To remedy this, we would recommend the establishment
of a self-sustaining clinic to be operated in the afternoons, the cost
to be paid by the patients on a reduced scale of fees—just sufficient
to meet the running expenses.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^^^^^^B^IflK^   J- MILTON JONES,   §&§i;
School Dentist.
CTHU. l>im<«L».
_J 44
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MUSIC
Vancouver,. B. C, January 8th, 1917
/. S.  Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir,—
I have much pleasure in presenting this, my Eleventh Annual
Report of the Music Department of our schools. Although the past
year has been one of tribulation through the great war and consequent financial depression, it has not been without its lessons.
Our schools, like other departments of national life, have been
called upon to make many sacrifices. Many of our male teachers
have offered themselves on the altar of devotion and sacrifice for
their King and Country. Their departure has necessitated many
changes in the teaching staff, interfering with the regular routine
of work. In consequence music has, perhaps, suffered more than
any other subject. Nevertheless, through the splendid co-operation
of the teachers we have been able to maintain a fair standard of
efficiency, for which we are thankful.
Our third annual competitive festival, held in May, was highly
successful, showing a marked improvement over previous years.
Most complimentary letters were sent in by the adjudicators expressive of their pleasure and surprise at the excellence of the work
shown by the competing classes. The markings were so close that
classes were divided by one or two points only, and in one case a
tie actually occurred, and the adjudicator requested the classes to
sing again.
In addition to the usual song test, a sight singing test was
introduced, which was very interesting and brought out some excellent exhibitions of class sight singing. We hope that as time goes
on we shall be able to extend the scope of this work.
During the year much has been done through the aid of concerts and entertainments of various kinds to assist the Red Cross
and kindred organizations, thus engendering a true spirit oi benevolence and patriot*Mil among the children. Through the singing of
patriotic songs a spirit of loyalty has been developed. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 45
Very commendable efforts have also been put forth by several
schools to secure pianos. I hope that the day is not far distant
when we shall see and hear, not only pianos in our schools, but the
gramophone and the children's orchestra. Our girls and boys
should be encouraged to take up the study of some orchestral instrument; there are hundreds of them who perhaps will never amount
to much as singers', but may become skilful players on some instrument. Some of the best orchestral players I have ever known wTere
unable to sing. More music and less pool and cards for our boys
should be our watchword.
It is a pitiable sight to see so many bright young fellows aimlessly hanging about the many pool rooms and other questionable
places which, alas 1 abound in our fair city. We ought to do all we
can to counteract this baneful influence which is sapping the very
life of our young manhood.
Something ought also to be done to prevent children of tender
years singing at the theatres and picture shows. I have watched
the effect of this for some time, and have seen one after another go
down under the excessive strain. People ought not to be allowed to
make money by exploiting these children. I believe music can be
made a powerful instrument for the development of character, but
it must not be prostituted to the avarice of commercialism.
I once again express the hope that soon a place will be found
for music in our high schools.
l*b
It is a matter of thankfulness that some real work has been
done in connection with our night school classes. Notwithstanding
the severity of the times, these classes have been well attended, and
highly satisfactory results have been obtained. When the war is
ended and things resume their normal state, I hope to see something done to bridge the gulf between the grade schools and the
night schools.   Thousands of beautiful voices are lost to us here.
In conclusion, permit me to express my sincere thanks to you,
Sir, for the unfailing interest you have at all times manifested in
the Music Department; to the Board of Trustees, to other officials
of the Board, also to the principals and teachers for uniform kindness to me during the year.
Respectfully submitted,
Ei • ^S^SMMSMlyi&y^ GEa R hicks, ■*'■-■■;■.■■
Music Instructor. 46
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEED
FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF MUSIC COMMITTEE
FOR 1916.
Receipts.
Balance from 1915  $ 22.58
Net proceeds, concert in Section No. 1  140.20
Net proceeds, concert in Section No. 2   111.60
Net proceeds, concert in Section No. 3    91.63
Net proceeds, concert in Section No. 4  130.55
Total $496.56
Disbursements.
Expenses  $ 66.81
Grant to Canadian Patriotic Fund    40.00
Grant to lied Cross Society    40.00
Grant for prizes in garden competition     50.00
Payments on deficit account, 1914  233.45
I   Total  $430.26
Balance in bank  $ 66.30
F. A. JEWETT,
Secretary-Treasurer. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 47
PHYSICAL CULTURE, CADET CORPS AND ||
^^^^^^^ RIFLE TEAMS SSSSSStSl
Vancouver, B. C, January 5th, 1917.
/. 5. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir,—
I have the honour to submit the following Report on Physical
Culture, Cadet Corps and Rifle Teams for the year ending December, 1916:—    I 'I I      : Z      '       •      '%
Physical Culture.
In reporting briefly on this subject, I may state that throughout the year just ended I was unable to visit teachers and classes
as frequently as in the past. This was on account of the large
amount of routine office work in connection with the Cadet Regiment, etc. All new teachers on the staff were visited and as many
substitutes as could be were reached. Every possible assistance was
given to these in every instance. Other teachers visited received
instructions and object lessons, also explanations for the correcting
of faulty movements and positions. I have much pleasure in stating
that I found most all teachers and classes visited to be progressing
very satisfactorily.
At the commencement of the fall term a readjusted schedule
of tables of exercises was prepared to conform with the limit table
for graded schools. Each teacher was supplied with a copy, and
I am pleased to state the arrangement is very satisfactory.
101st Schools Cadet Regiment.
Owing to the volume of space that would be required to deal
fully with the cadet details for the year, I shall be obliged to report
only on the main items concerning the organization and administration of the regiment and individual corps. 48 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
Organization.
■ ■'■■■■:    •"   •■ -"■■■■' ;: •:-Zv''.   staff-   ::v^tl^M-lst!^^^^^^8
Honorary Regimental Commander Lt.-Col. G. McSpadden
Regimental Commander Lt. A. C. Bundy
Regimental Surgeon Lt. F. W. Brydone-Jack, A.M.S.
Regimental Chaplain Rev. A. H. Sovereign
Musketry Instructor Lt. A. C. Bundy
First Battalion.
Battalion Commander Lt. W. J. Nesbitt, C.S.C.I.
Adjutant  Lt. G. Bruce, C.S.C.I.
A Company King Edward High School C. C.
B Company Simon Fraser School C. C.
C Company Model School C. C.
D Company  Cecil Rhodes School C. C.
Second Battalion.
Battalion Commander _ Lt. R. Straight, C.S.C.I.
Adjutant Lt. T. W. Woodhead, C.S.C.I.
A Company Fairview School C. C.
B Company  Lord Tennyson School C. C.
C Company Kitsilano School C. C.
D Company General Gordon School C. C.
E Company Henry Hudson School C. C.
Third Battalion.     V- '' ^ZZy^Z$&^Z0g^
Battalion Commander Lt. J. R. Pollock, C.S.C.I.
Adjutant Lt. H. L. Paget, C.S.C.I.
A Company King George High School C. C.
B Company Dawson School C. C.
C Company  Dawson School C. C.
D Company Lord Roberts School C. C.
Fourth Battalion.
Battalion Commander Lt. L. B. Code, C.S.C.I.
Adjutant  Lt. H. B. Fitch, C.S.C.I. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 49
A Company Alexandra School C. C.
B Company Laura Secord School C. C.
C Company  Grandview School C. C.
D Company  Charles Dickens School C. C.
E Company  Britannia High School C. C.
^^^^tt5l|||y|il;§i-Fifth Battalion.   • "   , --      '     .\ - -.;. /
Battalion Commander Lt. W. C. Keith, C.S.C.I.
Adjutant Lt. F. A. Jewett, C.S.C.I.
A Company Lord Nelson School C. C.
B Company Macdonald School C. C.
C Company \ Franklin School C. C.
D Company  Strathcona School C. C.
E Company  . Hastings School C. C.
Establishment of Corps Ending December 1916.
Corps. Instructors. Strength of Corps.
Cadet Band—Lt. A. C. Bundy     22
King Edward High School C. C.—Lt A. C. Bundy     45
Britannia C. C—Lt. L. W. Taylor  162*
King George High School C. C—Mr. S. Moodie     38*
Alexandra C. C.—Lt. A. E. Shearman......     43
Charles Dickens C. C—Lt. H. B. Fitch..... ^'77
Cecil Rhodes C. C—Lt. G. Bruce     29
Dawson (B) C. C—Lt. I. M. Mullin _\     40
Dawson (C) C. C—Lt. J. R. Pollock...     51t
Fairview C. C.—Lt. S. J. Bryant     56
Franklin C. C—Lt. J. Dunbar  . 24
General Gordon C. C.—Mr. J. E. Brown     47
Grandview C. C.—Lt. L. B. Code     30
Hastings C. C—Lt. C. C. Chute * 37*
Henry Hudson C. C—Lt. H. L. Paget.     46*
Kitsilano C. C—Lt. T. W. Woodhead     38
Laura Secord C. C.—Lt. W. R. Fleming     34
Lord Nelson C. C—Lt. F. A. Jewett     65
Macdonald C. C.—Lts. W. C. Keith and E. Hemsworth     39
Model C. C—Lt. W. J. Nesbitt    37 50 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
Roberts C. C—Lt. H. D. Herd |  52*
Simon Fraser C. C.—Lt. W. J. Nesbitt  54*
Strathcona C. C—Lt. D. P. McCallum .  33*
Tennyson C. C.—Lt. R. Straight   54
Staff :      5
Instructors   23
Total establishment  1189
Remarks:   * Without uniforms,   t Without uniforms (new corps).
From the parade states rendered to January 20th, 1916, by the
instructors of corps, I am pleased to be able to report that most all
corps, with a few exceptions, continued to parade for instruction
in spite of the adverse weather conditions then existing.
The various corps continued to make good progress with the
drills and exercises in preparation for their annual inspection, previous to which it was decided, at a meeting of instructors, to hold
a review of the whole regiment in honour of Empire Day.
For the purpose of holding the review, a request was made to
the Board of Park Commissioners for the use of the oval at Brockton Point.
As the request was granted, preparations were at once proceeded with. A meeting of battalion commanders and adjutants
was held to deal with the general routine necessary, and a full meet-
CD *>
ing of all instructors was held on Thursday, May 4th, at which
arrangements were made for rehearsal, etc.
Two full rehearsals were held, one on May 12th, and one on
May 19th at the King Edward High School grounds. All corps
except Britannia and Hastings took part in these. On May 23rd,
at 10 a.m., the review took place at the Brockton Point grounds, the
only corps not participating" being that of the I fastings School.
Approximately 1200 officers and cadets were present, and the programme arranged was carried to a successful conclusion.
The inspecting- officer was Col. J. L. Hughes, of Toronto, who
expressed himself as being exceedingly pleased to have had the
pleasure of inspecting such a well-organized and well-drilled cadet
organization. n
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 51
Major R. Tripper inspected the various corps as follows:
^^^^^^^^^^ffy Monday, May 29th. ^yzyzzyyyyyyyMzy
1st Battalion, B Company—Simon Fraser School   9:00 a.m.
1st Battalion, C Company—Model  School    10:45 a.m.
1st Battalion, D Company—Cecil Rhodes School  1:00 p.m.
2nd Battalion, A Company—Fairview School   2:15 p.m.
2nd Battalion, B Company—Tennyson School   3:30 p.m.
■^^^^^pi^^Siif   Tuesday, May 30th.    ^Z:Z:   ^'••'v^^^^Sl
2nd Battalion, D Company—General Gordon School....    9:00 a.m.
2nd Battalion, C Company—Kitsilano School   10:45 a.m.
2nd Battalion, E Company—Henry Hudson School     1:00 p.m.
3rd Battalion, B & C Company—Dawson School     2:15 p.m.
3rd Battalion, A Company—King George High School    3 :30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 31st.
3rd Battalion, D Company—Roberts School      9:00 a?m.
4th Battalion, D Company'—Charles  Dickens  School.— 10:45 a.m.
4th Battalion, A Company—Alexandra School      1:00 p.m.
4th Battalion, C Company—Grandview School      2:15 p.m.
4th Battalion, B Company—Laura Secord School     3 :30 p.m.
Thursday, June 1st.
5th Battalion, D Company—Strathcona School      9:00 a.m.
5th Battalion, A Company—Lord Nelson School  10:45 a.m.
5th Battalion, B Company—Macdonald School      1:00 p.m.
5th Battalion, E Company—Hastings School      2:15 p.m.
5th Battalion, C Company—Franklin School      3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 2nd.
4th Battalion, E Company—Britannia High School     1:00 p.m.
1st Battalion, A Company—King Edward High School    3 :00 p.m.
The inspection having been carried through successfully as
arranged, the following report was received: 52 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
From the Officer Commanding 72nd Regiment, S. H. of C.
To Captain McAlpine, Inspector of Cadets,
; ,-     ■     M. O. No. 11, Victoria, B. C.    ':Wt"1^S^^
Sir,—I have the honour to report that, upon inspecting the
under-mentioned schools of cadet corps, I found them very efficient
and awarded marks as below:
School. Marks.        Cadets on Parade.
Macdonald .  96 '^V p£J     f 39    ||
King Edward High   94 93
Kitsilano     92 :.'        /'  ZZfM 35    W
General Gordon  r  89 47
Lord Nelson   87 ?^^:V- ''^M 59  J||
Simon Fraser   87 57
Cecil Rhodes  86 %^ZzMM §§   H
Fairview   —  85 51
Henry Hudson   81 53
Grandview   79 36
King George High   78 63
Franklin  77 ■ ^4 'ffS^ 28   ||
Tennyson   76 59
Strathcona  _  73 43
Charles Dickens   72 'ry^MzZSi 38    f|
Alexandra  69 ^v;^v%ii;-'S^ 38   f}|
Dawson  68 '•    •    Z: /;      100   fi:
Laura Secord   65 28
Model   64 -k!*       '■* '':'ii 53    :l\
Hastings  60 ;>f-t:|vilSl 35* ||
Roberts     60 i'zS.;^0MW$ 57* fl
Britannia   High     60 t^-W^M    I61* ft
* First year of organization, and without rifles or uniforms.
I have the honour to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
(Signed) > R. TUPPER, Major,    |||§§S
-     .;■.''-. O. C. 72nd Regt, S. H. of C.    f§ Battalion.
Marks.
Order.
No. 5    §1
1    961
i lsti
No. 2   ;|
^92^|
1 2nd
■No. 1    |
^87^;
'     3rd
■No. 4    '§
Wi79mB
1 4th 3
■ No. 3   §
A-f - 68 ig
5 th
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 53
Simultaneous with the inspection, a competition was held for
the battalion trophies, which were finally awarded as follows:
Trophy.
The Kelly Douglas Cup
fe|-Macdonald School C. C.   ^
The Seymour Cup
Kitsilano School C. C.
Hudson's Bay Cup
Simon Fraser School C. C.
The Jones Cup
Grandview School C. C.
The Leek Cup
Dawson School C. C.
At the commencement of the fall term, all corps were passing
through the process of reorganization, re-signing the organization
rolls, issuing uniforms and equipment and checking supplies generally. These rolls, together with other details of correspondence,
were forwarded to headquarters when completed.
One new corps was formed at the Dawson School, and all particulars of application and organization were forwarded to the
Inspector of Cadets for recording at the Education Department at
Victoria, B. C.
Church Parade.
A church parade of the 101st Schools Cadet Regiment was held
on Sunday, November 12th.
The instructors, cadet officers and cadets presented an exceedingly smart appearance, excepting for the fact that some of the
corps were not yet provided with uniforms.
The various corps composing the regiment were assembled by
the lieutenant instructors on the Dawson School grounds, and were
finally moved into battalion quarter column on Burrard Street,
south of Nelson Street.
Promptly at the appointed time the regiment was ordered to
move, and column of route was formed.
The corps of the Britannia High School, which is the largest
corps of the regiment, having an enrolment of 175 members, and
which was very well represented at the parade, were alloted a
position at the head of the regiment. 54
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Marching via Nelson Street to Granville, and Granville to
Georgia, to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, where the serving
was held.
The strength of each battalion, as shown on the parade states,
totalled 742 of all ranks.
The officiating clergymen were the Rev. A. H. Sovereign, who
is the Regimental Chaplain, and the Rev. Dr. Wilson. The address
to the regiment was given by the latter, who took as his text:    'Be
strong and of grood courage/'
At the conclusion of the service, the offertory was proceeded
with and a sum of $22.91 was received, which was donated to the
fund for prisoners of war.
Meetings.
Throughout the year it was necessary to hold ten meetings of
instructors of corps, at which the interior economy of the cadet
organization received prompt attention.
Tag Days.
On Saturday, June 17th, 1916, the cadets of all corps assisted
in the patriotic undertaking of raising funds for the purpose of
purchasing aeroplanes and equipment for the training of men for
the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service.
A statement was received from the secretary of the club expressing appreciation for the arrangements, assistance and results
obtained.
Kighty-two uniformed cadets also assisted in the tag day held
for the Italian Red Cross, which was also very much appreciated.
Official Rifle Teams.
The rifle competition for cadet corps was brought to a successful conclusion for the year ending December 31st. From January
to June these teams were under the instruction of Lt. I. M. Mullin.
who has been pleased to forward the following report:—
Vancouver, B. C, Sept.  1st, 1916.
Lieut   A. C. Bundy,
Supervisor of Cadets,
Hoard of School Trustees, City.
Dear Sir,— ''* .V ^;^,'-^^;;-.^S'^@?||
I have much pleasure in submitting a report on the rifle shooting competition of the lOLt Cadet Regiment of the Vancouver city
schools for the vear 1915-1916. ^
 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 55
The competition had two divisions, one for the high school
cadets, and one for the public school cadets, and consisted of twelve
matches, five of which were shot in 1915 and the remainder in 1916.
Five teams were entered in the high school division, and 19 i
n
the public school division, making a total of 24 teams.
The results have been of a very high order, all records of previous years having been broken. The standing of the teams at the
end of the competition was as follows:
Teams.                                                   Aggregate Score.
Henry Hudson      3017
B^|   Macdonald   3009     '"
H^   Dawson     2948    "•.■'...;•■'
Franklin   2786
-■Pllf.  Cecil Rhodes  $  2778     -Z   ''"
Tennyson  2720
if     j   Roberts     2640      ;\; :'.V
Simon Fraser   2605
^^^   Kitsilano     2604 ' ;.
Hastings     2577
Charles Dickens   2492
Fairview    i. 2488
^^^    Lord Nelson  \  2428   >;,   .
General Gordon   2397
Alexandra    2395
P^|   Model   2365
Laura Secord   ...   2181
Grandview   1820
H^||!.   Strathcona   1729-  '';'-." ';
The five team prizes of last year were supplemented by a sixth
—"The World Cup," presented by the Vancouver Daily World.
The following is the prize list for the competition:— 56 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
1st—A. P. Brown Challenge Shield, won by Henry Hudson
team.
2nd—Townley Cup, won by Macdonald team.
3rd—News-Advertiser Cup, won by Dawson team.
4th—Province Cup, won by Franklin team.
5th—O. B. Allan Cup, won by Cecil Rhodes team.
6th—World Cup, won by Lord Tennyson team.
H. Clay, of the Henry Hudson School, secured the highest
individual score in the city, making a total of 402 out of a possible 420.
The second highest individual score in the city was made by
R. Watt, of the Dawson School, a total of 390 out of a possible
420. These boys won the silver and bronze medals presented by
the B. C.  Rifle Association.
The thanks of the School Board and the entire regiment are
due to Mr. Sam Scott who, notwithstanding the financial stringency
of the times, again donated handsome medals for the best individual
shot in each school. These medals were won by the following
boys: T. Hampton, L. Purdy, H. Clay, G. Shaw, H. Allen, E.
Trimble, R. Stevenson, J. Weston, J. Lennie, A. Scott, C. Water-
ston, R. Reid, H. Jones, D. Smith, J. Mitchell, G. Harris, E. New-
combe, B. Taylor, E. Fleury, W. McComb and R. Jackson.
Respectfully submitted,
I. M. MULLIN, Musketry Instructor.
Commencing the fall term, at the request of the Board of
School Trustees, I was pleased to continue the instruction to these
teams.
A schedule of dates, etc., was prepared and approved of by all
instructors.
This schedule was arranged in order to have everv third Thurs-
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day free for meetings of cadet instructors, and every Wednesday
for instruction to the K. E. H. S. Cadet Corps.
I am pleased to state that the practices were continued to
December 22nd as arranged, that all members of the teams found
the arrangements very satisfactory, and that the progress for the
term was exceedingly good, as will be seen by the following report,
which shows the standing of the teams for the first half year:— BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 57
Order Possible
of Merit.            School Teams. Points                  Aggregates
1. King George High School 1120 1029
2. Britannia    High    School,
Team No. 1 ■ 1120           , .   974
3. King Edwd. High School,
■            Team No. 1 1120 . 915
4. King Edwd. High School,
i             Team No. 2                        ,       1120         j • 859
5. Britannia    High    School,
Team No. 2 1120 767
1. Henrv Hudson School 1400 1290
2. Dawson School, Team A 1400 1202
3. Fairview School 1400 1152
4. Simon Fraser School 1400           i 1129
5. Macdonald School 1400 1117
6. Laura Secord School 1400 1110
7. Franklin School. 1400 1084
8. Model School 1400         \ \ 1022
9. Lord Tennyson School 1400 1018
10. Kitsilano School 1400 999
11. Charles Dickens School 1400 960
12. Strathcona School 1400          :"■ 657
1. Cecil Rhodes School 1120 977
2. Lord Nelson School 1120 881
3. General Gordon School 1120 841
4. Alexandra School 1120 811
5. Lord Roberts School 1120 740
1. Dawson School, Team B 840 666
2.    Hastings School 840 631
Cadet Band, Team No. 1 840 442
Cadet Band, Team No. 2 840
Miniature Ranges.
In the interest of safety and protection during cadet rifle shooting on the miniature rifle rang*es at the schools, the following rules
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have been issued:—
1. No target practice of any description by cadets or others to
be permitted unless the cadet corps instructor is present.
2. Instructors to exercise control at all times during 'practice,
and no other person is permitted to exercise authority, or be
in possession of rifles or ammunition under any consideration.
3. Should the instructor be obliged to leave the range for an)
reason, he should at once order "Cease Fire," and issue instate- 58 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
tions regarding the safety of the ammunition, etc., during the
period of his absence.
Efficiency and Shooting Trophies.
I desire to report that the cadet trophies were recalled from
the schools and placed in the vault in the School Board offices, as
.by the rules of last year. These trophies, together with others,
received proper attention as regards cleaning and engraving before
being presented.
The presentation of all cups and medals for efficiency in drill
and rifle shooting was completed on Friday, June 23rd, on the
campus of the King Edward High School.
Cadet Corps Supplies.
During the year just ended a considerable amount of supplies
was received from the Department of Militia for the use of the
various corps. The value of supplies now on hand, issued by the
Department, is $22,506.70, while the estimated value of uniforms,
band instruments, etc., purchased with money from the Schools
Cadet Fund, is $3,582. These supplies consisted of .22 miniature
ammunition, Enfield rifles, felt hats, waist belts, cadet forms, cleaning material, etc., etc.
It is to be regretted, however, that all cadets are not fully supplied with complete equipment, and that the balance to the credit
of the fund in the bank is very small.
Cadet Funds.
Statement.
Jan.    1, 1916—Balance in bank  $296.11
Oct. 27, 1916—Strathcona Trust Allowance, less exchange..   72.07
I                                               '.* $368.18
Expended during year   203.30
Dec. 31, 1916—Balance in bank $164.88
In conclusion, I desire to state that I sincerely appreciate the
opportunity of expressing my sincere thanks to all members of the
Board, yourself, instructors and staff, for the valuable support and
assistance rendered to me while endeavouring to carry out my
various duties for the year.
I have the honour to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant,
I A. C. BUNDY,   -
Instructor P. C. & C. C. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 59
[PlSy-^:-  PRIMARY WORKv ;       -,.;;;Vyf,
Vancouver, B. C, January 6th, 1917.
/. 6". Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.  C.
Dear Sir,—
The following General Report upon Primary Work for the
term ending June 30th, 1916, is submitted.
At the beginning of the year there were 87 primary classes in
the city. After the semi-annual promotions were made in February
the number of classes was reduced to 76, though the number of
pupils enrolled in the various classes was generally greater than
before.
As the Department of Education prescribed a new set of readers for the Primer and First Reader classes this year, a change was
made in the course of reading.
During the term the Course of Stud}* for Primary Classes was
revised. A course in primary handwork and nature study was
definitely outlined, and some additions were made to the language
course. In order to maintain our high standard in spelling, it was
considered advisable to teach spelling to the Second Primer classes
from the Folk Lore Reader, and to the First Reader classes from
the Child Life Reader. This change was made in accordance with
the wishes of almost all the primary teachers.
As we had no special course in drawing for classes below the
First Reader, a summary of Mr. Scott's bulletins was issued as a
guide to the teachers.
The promotion lists at the end of the term were generally
satisfactory. Many of the teachers were able to promote almost
their entire classes.
Considering the disadvantages under which the teachers worked
during the term, either as regards the poor attendance of children
who were excluded from school on account of sickness, or the
number of pupils transferred from one district to another, the
majority of the teachers deserve great credit for having had such
a large number of their pupils ready for promotion.
I have to thank inspectors, principals and teachers for their
hearty co-operation during the term.
Yours respectfully,
^^^^^^M^-!H^ EMILY J. TREMBATH,
Supervisor of Primary Work. 60 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
- MANUAL TRAINING VZS$M$
Vancouver, B. C, January 5th, 1917.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B.  C.
Dear Sir,—
During the past year the work of the Manual Training Department has, in most respects, been satisfactory, but the task ot supervising* under the conditions of the last five months has been very
difficult and only partly effective. The staff readily accepted all
suggestions and frequently met for consultation and comparison of
work, but the essential thing in all educational handwork is not the
model in wood, tin or iron, but the methods employed in producing
it. This I have been quite unable to supervise, as my time has been
fully occupied in the King George Centre during actual teaching
hours.
So far as I can judge, the work is being carried on as efficiently as heretofore. We are peculiarly fortunate in having so
excellent a body of men forming- our Manual Training: staff.
During the year a new centre has been opened in the Beaconsfield School, and a tinsmithing equipment for twelve pupils has
been added to the King George High School. The boys of the latter school made all the benches, racks, and lockers for work in connection with their equipment.
The exhibition of school work at Hastings Park this year was
rather better than usual, especially in high school work of both
boys and girls.
There has been some activity among the boys after school
hours in splint-making for the Red Cross Society, but we have not
made the movement as successful as we could wish. It is hoped
that far more will be produced next year.
Good work was done for the Belgian Relief Fund, many models
being made and sold by the boys. In this connection I should like
to commend the work of Mr. II. A. Jones in the Simon Fraser
School.
From January to June the staff included fifteen teachers and
the supervisor who taught six half-days in the King George High
School; the attendance averaged 2,258 boys in 126 classes of the
public schools, and 570 boys in the high schools. U
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BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Owing to  certain re-organizations  in August,  the  staff  was
reduced by two—Mr. N. Y. Cross and Mr. J. W. Bennett.
At the same time the Prevocational Classes were closed, and
Mr. A. W. Parker was appointed on the Manual Training staff.
Mr. J. G. Sinclair was also appointed to teach two classes in
the King Edward High School.
During the last four months the attendance has averaged 2,254
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boys in 116 classes in the public schools, and 582 boys in the high
schools..
There are at present about 30 classes, all in the Junior Third
Reader, who do not take Manual Training.
Respectfully yours,
.   ;       ,% SAMUEL NORTHROP,      -;^-
Principal, Manual Training Department.
taTmMxtn*  K.'S.rtS. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 63
DOMESTIC SCIENCE
Vancouver, B. C, January 3rd, 1917.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit the following Report of the Home Economics
Department of the public schools for the year 1916.
In our schools there is work in some branch of home economics
being done for one half-day each week by girls in the intermediate
and senior grade classes, and for two hours per week in high school
classes. Work is1 also being done in the night classes, but as this
will be reported elsewhere, I shall not dwell upon it.
At present there are 86 intermediate grade classes in the city.
Fifty-one of these are laying the foundation in plain sewing which
is absolutely essential if work of a high school standard is to be
done in our high schools. This leaves 28 full and seven half classes
of intermediate grade which are not getting the work as it is given
to the other 51 classes. This, of course, will lower the quality and
lessen the quantity of the work in succeeding grades, and should be
remedied if at all possible.
When sewing was introduced into our high schools seven years
ago, the work was, and continued to be, quite elementary, until the
high schools began to receive girls who had systematically followed
the prescribed grade course, and it was only in the last one or two
years that our exhibits showed we were attaining to anything of
•/ CD «/ CD
high school standard. Furthermore, at the same time needlework
was introduced into the grades and it was deemed advisable by the
School Board of that year to ask the lady teachers in the intermediate grades to teach this branch while the boys were at manual
training. This method was followed because it was economical. A
vast amount of training- is not any more necessary for teaching ele-
mentary sewing than for teaching any other subject, but some training is absolutely necessary, especially because the teachers of elementary grades lay foundations. The majority of our teachers had
not this training, as sewing is a new subject in our schools.   This
L M- -        64 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
was the reason Miss Qreelman devoted her whole time to trying to
bring the work up to a satisfactory standard in every grade. It
was not being done as satisfactorily in some ways as if experts
were doing all the teaching, and it called for constant readjustment
of all the courses, as teacher.? generally became more proficient and
the high schools were able to do more advanced work. Therefore,
here also only a beginning has been made. There is still work to
be done in efficient organization, in re-arrangement and broadening
of courses, in gathering illustrative materials, in correlating needlework with nature study, geography, reading and composition, and
in helping new teachers to qualify for teaching the subject in order
to keep this a live subject on our school course.
From January to June the course was carried out as planned,
the work being supervised by Miss Creelman until April, and later
by myself. Supplies were ordered for the teachers for the opening
of schools in August, and as much help given over the telephone
and otherwise as could be managed, but I am not in a position to
further report on this part of the work, as my time has been taken
up with my own classes. It has been reported to me that while
some teachers are trying to follow the prescribed course, others are
devoting all the time to knitting or to fragmentary work, probably
very useful in itself, but not as a foundation upon which to build
up a city course.
In the senior grades all the classes in the citv are covering the
prescribed course, though there is some overlapping owing to the
fact that there are, in a few cases, two grades in one room, and
because of the nature of the work only one lesson to one grade can
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be given in the time allotted. In several cases, by special arrangement, two half classes of a similar grade from adjoining schools
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were combined into one satisfactory home economics class. It takes
time and an intimate knowledge of the whole general school ar-
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rangements to make these adjustments, and as this information is
difficult to obtain during organization at the opening of school,
some advantageous arrangements may have been overlooked in the
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fall term.
Besides trying to raise the standard of the work by more efficient organization, much has been done towards this end in other
ways. Teachers' meetings were held every month, and often every
two weeks, for discussion of methods, economic and other problems. The teachers have also continued their visits to local institutions such as mills, dairies, etc., to acquaint themselves with existing circumstances and to better illustrate their lessons in the class
rooms. The uniform examinations in theory were a great help in
getting uniformly good results in all parts of the city, but after o
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BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
trying out five half-hour examinations in theory and none in practical work, we have changed to two one-hour written examinations
and two practical examinations. The papers are set by" the principal, expected answers and values discussed in teachers' meetings,
and until this term were overlooked by the supervisor. This care
was taken because there is no text book prescribed and teachers'
standards of excellence vary.
As much work in arranging teas, sales of work, candy, home
cooking, etc., for patriotic purposes as was possible was done, and
the teas for mothers, which are a part of the Senior B Course, were
of value to the girls and in giving the mothers an opportunity of
seeing how the work is carried out.
There are 66 senior grade classes. Sixty of these are being
taught by six regular teachers and six by the high school teachers
as they get time. Changing schools two or three times a week to
pick up classes is unsatisfactory and very exhausting; and while
a certain amount of this can scarcely be avoided, as few changes as
possible centralizes a teacher's efforts and saves expenditure of time
and energy.
One new centre, Bayview, has been opened and has proven a
great convenience to pupils in that district. Work was begun in
the Beaconsfield School as soon as the boys got manual training,
but the centre was not equipped, as it was necessary for the girls
to devote their time to sewing.
In the high schools the work relates to clothing and shelter,
<—"> CD
and has been followed as reported last year. In King Edward and
King George High Schools the work is compulsory for the preliminary and junior classes, while'in Britannia it is compulsory for
all girls. There are in all 35 high school classes. We are hoping
that a technical course for girls, somewhat similar to that offered
for boys in King Edward High School, will soon be offered. This
will allow for a continuance of work in food and other subjects, as
well as in those relating to clothing and shelter. Our elementary
course should be supplemented by work in balanced rations, serving of meals, hygiene, budgets, etc., in order to give a girl an
opportunity to master her subject. Another crying need for home
economics work in our high schools is that it receive the same
credit as other subjects on the course.
Public exhibitions were held in all the high schools, and the
work of every grade was shown. These were a credit to our teachers and pupils. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
67
A large amount of work was collected in June from the schools
of the entire city for the Vancouver Exhibition. The placing of
this exhibit was left with Miss I. F. MacKay, and to her was
largely due its success. Thanks are also due to the teachers for
promptness in sending in work, and to the high school students
who lent work or assisted in arranging it.
Leave of absence for three weeks was granted Miss E. Fonda,
of Britannia High School, in June, to visit eastern schools. Such
visits broaden our outlook and act as an inspiration to the teacher,
and should be encouraged when no greater duty prevents.
Yours respectfully,
|y^Wv;V '..     •;.'/ ' •        ELIZABETH BERRY,
Principal, Home Economics Department.
I 68 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
PROVOACTIONAL CLASSES   |j§ §
Vancouver, B. C, 29th June, 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir,—
The work of the Prevocational School is now ended, at least
until the financial condition of the city improves. I wish to point
out to the Board, in my last Report, something of the value of the
work done in the school.
Altogether there have passed through the schools over 180
boys and 100 girls. The great majority of these students would
have received no further education at all had this school not been
established. The standard of mental and physical ability, as well
as of scholastic attainment, has varied between very wide degrees,
but I can assure the Board that not one of the students has failed
to receive material benefit from the time spent in the school.
That the attendance has not been satisfactory I am quite aware,
but I must point out that this is due very largely to the fact that
students have left early in order to go to work. Particularly is this
true of the latter part of this year, when, as I knew the intention
of the Board to discontinue the work of the school after the present
session, I endeavoured to find positions for as many of the pupils
as possible, and these pupils left to take up the positions as soon
as they were found.
In the case of the girls, several have found positions in millinery stores and with dressmakers. Some have practically taken
over the management of their own homes. In about a dozen cases
the girls showed a certain aptitude for commercial work, and partly
owing to their training in the school and partly also to the work
they did, at my suggestion, in the night schools, (hey are now either
completing their commercial studies or are already engaged in
business.
In the case of the boys, in the first place, of the total number
enrolled during the last two years, over 30 have enlisted. This is
a very large proportion for such a small school. I regret to say
that one at least of these boys, Archie Decker, has already lost his
life at the front. BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
69
In the remainder, practically every one of the boys has obtained a situation in an industry which will call largely for the
training received in the school. I have heard from the various
employers and they have unanimously expressed their appreciation
of the work of the boys. Messrs. Gawne & Daly, in particular,
have stated that they would be only too pleased, if they had the
business, to take every one. of the boys. They have at present three
in their employ and speak very highly, not only of the quality of
the work of the boys, but also of the fact that they can be trusted
to do as good and careful work without supervision as under the
eye of their employer. This, I think, speaks very highly for the
work done by Mr. Parker and Mr. Young.
The industries which the boys have entered include electrical
engineering (B. C. Electric and Messrs. Hoffmeister & Co.), general engineering (Vancouver Engineering Works and Northwest
Steel Co.), shipbuilding (Wallace Shipbuilding Co.), draughting
(Northwest Steel Co.), dairy farming, furniture making, etc.
I trust that in the near future conditions will so improve that
the school may be started again, in which case I have several suggestions to make which would be out of place in the present report.
Yours faithfully,
\/[ -^   ^ * GRAHAM A. LAING,   *   \.Z
Director of Prevocational and Night Classes.
It  . _■ o 70
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
SCHOOL SPORTS
Vancouver, B. C, December 31, 1916.
/. S. Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit a Report-oh School Sports for the year 1916:
At a meeting of the Vancouver Public Schools Athletic Association held in the Community Room of the School Board Office
Building, September 25, 1916, it was decided that Boys' Football,
Boys' Basketball and Girls' Basketball be carried on during the
«/ CD
fall term.
In Boys' Football two leagues were drawn up—first, schools
of ten rooms or over, and, second, schools of less than ten rooms.
At this meeting a committee was appointed to draw up a constitution for the association. The committee accordingly drew up
a constitution which was adopted at a meeting held in the School
Board Offices on October 20, 1916. J    |;
Fifteen teams entered the Senior Boys' Football League, and
these were divided into four districts as follows:
District L--Simon Fraser, Mount Pleasant, Florence Nightingale and Alexandra.    In this district Florence Nightingale won.
District II.—Fairview, Henry Hudson, Model and Lord Tennyson.   In this district the Model School won.
District III.—Central, Dawson and Roberts.
Central School won.
In this district
District  IV.—Grandview, Nelson, Seymour and Hastings.    In
CD
this district the Nelson School won.
In the semi - finals, which were played at the Cecil Rhodes
grounds, Central defeated Model by a score of 1—0; and Florence
CD J
Nightingale defeated Nelson by a score of A—1.
,* >.■■ BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
71
The final game between Central and Florence Nightingale was
O CD CD
played at the Powell Street grounds. A re-play was necessary.
In the first game the score stood two all, and in the last game Central won by a score of 1—0. Thus Central won the city championship and the Boys' Football Cup, while Florence Nightingale was
piven the football donated by the Principals' Association for the
final game.
Champion Football Team—Central School
In the league for schools of less than ten rooms there were
five entries, namely, Kitsilano, General Gordon, Cecil Rhodes, Laura
Secord and Charles Dickens. In this league the Cecil Rhodes
School won the championship without a single defeat. As a reward
they received a handsome pennant, suitably inscribed.
In the Boys' Basketball there were eight entries, and the city
was divided into two districts:
District I.—Lord Tennyson, General Gordon, Henry Hudson
and Dawson. 72
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
District II.—Seymour, Hastings, Simon Fraser and Florence
Nightingale.
Henry Hudson won in the first district, and Florence Nightingale in the second.
In the final game, played on the Tennyson grounds, Henry
Hudson defeated the Florence Nightingale b)^ a score of 29—0.
Thus the Henry Hudson School won the championship and the
Boys' Basketball Cup.
In Girls' Basketball, there were nine entries, which made two
districts as follows:
District I.—Simon Fraser, Grandview, and Seymour. In this
district the Seymour won.
District II.—Lord Tennyson, Henry Hudson, General Gordon,
Cecil Rhodes, Dawson and Roberts. In this district the Tennyson
School won.
Champion Basketball Team—Tennyson School BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
73
In the final game Seymour defaulted, leaving Tennyson as
champions.
Great interest was taken by both boys and girls in all the
games, and a keen but friendly spirit was always noticeable. The
season closes with the honors well divided and with bright prospects for 1917.
Respectfully submitted,
GRAHAM BRUCE,
President.
I. M. MULLIN,
Secretary 74
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ATTENDANCE  REPORT      WmZm
Vancouver, B. C, January 8th, 1917.
J. S.  Gordon, Esq.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, B. G.
Dear Sir,—
I beg to submit to you my Tenth Annual Report for the
year 1916.
During the year there was a total of 5,066 cases investigated,
as follows:
January, 1,058; February, 800; March, 641; April, 410; May,
485; June, 453; September, 317; October, 307; November, 272;
December, 323.
The following table will show the sources  from which the
complaints came and the schools supplying the most on the regular
visit of the officer:
School
School
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr,
May
Jne.
Sep
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Total
Central 	
Strathcona  	
44!
86
69
39
43
62
46
82
17
108
20
26
3
1
68
15
28
6
22
33
94
73
36
15
42
42
44
6
87
25
26
4
1
31
17
11
10
19
33
62
47
21
8
25
26
52
94
13
33
4
1
16
14
66
6
19
17
25
31
20
6
33
35
18
4
4
11
12
3
16
*■
36
10
9
32
51
43
18
3
25
15
29
6
44
7
6
2
12
10
27
5
6
37
45
52
21
9
29
11
16
2
20
22
12
1
"7
6
15
10
10
23
61
43
13
7
15
13
21
5
40
19
3
3
"5
9
29
43
45
19
7
15
9
25
10
26
10
....
3
11
9
25
39
31
8
4
17
15
11
11
37
10
....
4
2
9
8
19
39
43
14
22
21
16
21
17
32
6
2
2
3
9
i
292
545
Seymour 	
477
Model	
Cecil Rhodes 	
209
124
Fairview  -...
284
Tennyson 	
228
Henry Hudson	
319
Kitsilano 	
Dawson 	
Aberdeen   	
83
492
143
Lord Roberts 	
General Gordon	
118
29
Bayview 	
7
Alexandra 	
153
Laura Secord 	
Lord Nelson 	
101
181
Beaconsfield 	
48
Charles Dickens 	
85 1
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
75
"School
Jan.   Feb'. Mar. Apr. May Jne. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec. Total
Livingstone    ,.
Grandview   	
Macdonald  	
Simon Fraser	
Mount Pleasant	
Hastings	
Franklin   	
Florence Nightingale
King Edward High...
King George High...
Street cases 	
Other sources 	
10
14
6
9
5
6
4
...J 21 ....
56
23
19
12
16
21
20
6
J
117
32
21
14
22
17
11
7
4
^
128
10
12
6
6
8
9
2
2
55
99
30
34
15
26
19
3
15
17
21
279
25
19
18
12
18
7
7
106
13
13
10
7
7
5
1
56
45
32
9
5
15
8
4
5
2
4
129
1
2
....
....
1
4
....
2
....
....
!  2
11
20
18
21
24
34
10
18
18
15
I 189
4
—
2
2
2
9
3
4
—
1
27
Total  1058 800 641 410 485 453 317I307I272I323I5066
It will be seen by the table that there were far more com-
plaints attended to during the spring term than there have been
during the fall term.
The exceptionally hard weather during January and February
caused a lot of sickness, arid, as the report shows, it was April
before we reached a normal condition.
During September, October, November and December, owing
to our staff being reduced, we were not able to give the attention
that was needed for this work, and only what we considered the
most urgent cases were attended to; even then we were sometimes
at a loss for time to follow some of them up.
There were 265 cases of infectious ^disease discovered. These
were handed over to the Medical Department for their attention.
There were only 41 cases of truancy discovered, which is the
smallest number in any year, being less than one per cent, of the
total investigations*
There were five cases in which school property was damaged;
no proceedings were taken, as the offending parties had the repairs
carried out satisfactorily.
Owing to the reduction of our staff, the Juvenile Court has
not been attended regularly, but it is to be hoped that time will be
found this year so that we can keep in touch with the work carried
on there. 76
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
I am pleased to note that there is now some hope of having an
employment bureau opened for children about to leave school. This
will be a great help in placing children where they will be best
suited.
I wish to thank the principals and teachers for their co-operation, as it is the only way to get the best results.
Yours respectfully,
;     JAMES INGLIS,
Chief Attendance Officer.
r/.Mor-rij  78
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE
v."-.:■■'■. ■..': ;■•;:   FOR 1916 itif  1
Enrolment.
January  12,754
February ^  13,565
March     -  13,564
April      13,034
May     ,.  13,063
June  12,690
August	
September    13,625
October  13,805
November     13,762
December      13,356
Av. Attendance.
10,327.82
11,716.79
12,071
11,886.66
12,040.46
11,802.72
12i716"69
12,793.92
12,699.22
12,124.37
Percentage.
80.97
86.37
88.99
91.12
92.17
93.
93.33
92.67
92.27
90.74
Enrolment for the month of October for each year since 1897:
Tear. Enrolment.
1898 2724
1899 3117
1900 3393
1901 _ 3710
1902 4087
1903 .4416
1904 *994
19 05 5609
1906 6437
Year
1907..
1908..
1909..
1910..
Enrolment.
 7370
 7984
 8845
191
191
191
191
191
191
9942
1385
2393
2990
3313
3183
3805
Number of Teachers on the Vancouver staff in December for each year
since 1902.
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
December,
Males. Females.
1903    29 63
1904  30 71
1905  29 83
1906    38 92
1907    47 103
1908     58 115
1909    65 128
1910    71 155
1911     72 181
1912   :  93 220
1913    91 246
1914    102 260
1915    88 266
1916    85 254
T
otal.
92
101
112
130
150
173
193
226
263
313
337
362
354
339
Special Instructors employed by the Board,  1916:
Instructors   of  Manual   Training  15
Instructors   of   Domestic   Science -,  10
Music    Instructor  1
Cadet, Physical Drill and Musketry Instructor  17
Teachers in Night Classes  17
Special Officers employed by the Board:
Municipal  Inspector  of   Schools	
Medical   Health    Officers	
Dentist    	
Nurses   	
Attendance
Officers
1
2
1
4
2
Number of Teachers holding the different grades of certificates:
University Graduate in Arts or Science  95
Academic   Certificate  10
First-class   Certificate     112
Second-class  Certificate    108
Third-class Certificate
Commercial Specialist
Commercial   Assistant
Drawing   Specialist   	
Oral     _	
Blind    	
Temporary
6
1
1
1
1
1
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X     CL> 80 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
v      LIST OF TEACHERS   ; v"ffSSB8
With Grade of Certificate and Date of Appointment !§f§|
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
Abel,   Jessie  M 2nd    February,  1915
Alexander,  Irene  B .2nd    January,  1909
Amos,  Maude A .2nd    August, 1912
Anderson,   Mary   K J3.A August,  1908, and 1912
Annand,   Margaret   A 1st   September,  1913
Anstie,   Jane   K     1st  August,  1906
Archibald,   Margaret   E 1st  August,  1912
Armstrong,  W.   G        JM.A August,  1913
Astle,  Mabel  C 2nd    March,  1908
Bain,   Nellie     1st  August,. 1908
Baker,  F.   Edna  B.A January,  1906
Balkwill,   Alice   M 2nd    August, 1911
Banting,   A.   D B.A January,  1916
Baron,    Mrs.    Edith 2nd April,  1913
Bate,   Evelyn   B 2nd    August,  1913
Beath,   James 2nd    February, 1903
Beaty,   Jennie   M  c, 2nd    November,  1914
Beckman,   Elta   M Academic     August,  1911
Beech,  W.   K JVE.A August,  1912
Bell,   Edna   B M.A August, 1909
Belyea,  Marie L 2nd    August,  1912
Benjamin,   Fanny  C  B.A October,  1912
Bentley,    Nora   M B.A August,  1910
Bermingham,  Mrs.   S.   M J3.A January,  1914
Bigney,  Anna  L 1st  August,  1909
Bigney,   Elizabeth   M 1st   January,  1913
Birley,    Lillian    F .B.A ..January,  1914
Bissett,  Vera M 2nd   December,  1916
Blair,   Eliz.   J 1st  ...August,  1911
Podie,   Tsabel   A .B.A  August,  1914
Bollert,   Lillian   G B.A January,  1916
Bolton,  Grace A ! B.A 2 , February,  1914
Bower, Mabel   2nd  August,  1914
Boves,  Francis C 1st   August,  1914
Bridgman.  Clara M Commercial August,  1913
Brinton,   Effie   S 1st  August,  1913
Brockwell.  Muriel A B.A August,  1915
Brough,   Thos.   A B.A  August,  1904
Brown,   E.   C 1st  September,  1915
Brown,  Gertrude  1st   January,  1914
Brown,   Harriet   W 2nd    August,  1912
Brown,  J. Elmer B.A August, 1912
Prown,   Verna   M 1st    August,  1913
Brown,   W.   H 2nd October,  1915
Browne,   Laurie   B.   W -M.A   August, 1914
Bruce,   Graham    1st    August.  1914
Brunton,    Lulu     2nd August,  1908
Bryant,   Ethel   D 2nd....November,   1907,   and   August, 1911
Bryant,   S.   J 1st     November, 1912
Buchanan,   Christina    Academic    August,  1915
Burke,   Mrs.   Thos Permit   May,  1916
Butler,  Constance E 2nd     January,  1912
Burpee,   Ethel   L 1st    January, 1903
Burpee,   Marjorie   F 2nd    August,  1915
f*ahill.   flattie  M 1st    September,  1912
Cairns,   Kate    2nd     January, 1910
Cairns,   Laura    2nd    January, 1913
Cairns,   Mabel    2nd    August,  1914
Cameron.   C.   Alice M.A August,  1909
Campbell,   Duncan    b.a August,  1914
Campbell,  Jessie L 1st     .October,   1902
Cantelon,   Jean   M 1st  November,  1907
Carruthers.   Irene  F 2nd     August.  1912
Carter.   Hilda   M 2nd     August, 1903
Caspell.   Edmund    fst August,  1899 H BOARD OE SCHOOL TRUSTEES 81
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
"Caspell,   Violet  1 2nd   November, 1912
■Cattell,   Dorothy     _..„....lst    January,   190i
Cattell.   Margaret  2nd    January,  1911
'Cave-Brown-Cave,   Beatrice    1st     August,  1914
Chadwick,   Clara    1st   August, 1908
•Chandler,  Dorothy  G 2nd    January,  1914
Chandler,   Florence   A 2nd    August,  1913
Chipman,  Alice  R B.A January,  1913
•Chute,   Clyde   C 1st   August,  1908
Chute,   V.   E B.A August,  1916
Clark,   Angus   1st   August,  1902
•Clark,   Edna   A 2nd     August,   1914
Clarke,   Margaret    1st     August, 1910
Close,   Florence   J 1st   August.   1912
Close,   L.   Laurina : 1st    August,  1912
Code,    Lome   B B.Sc August,  1910
Coldwell,   Ross   F B.Sc November,  1910
Cole,   Josephine  A   1st    August,  1911
Collis,   R.   E B.A August,  1913
Cook,   Eva    1st January,  1910
Coombs,   Mrs.   Florence   A B.A January,  1909
Cowan,   E.   Mabel 2nd   August, 1911
Cowan,   Susie   1 2nd    August,  1908
Cowie,   Margaret C 2nd    November,  1914
Cowperthwaite,   Dorothy    2nd    August,  1914
Cowperthwaite,  F. M B.A 1890-1897,   and 1902
Cox,   Bertha  C 1st    - - January, 1910
Creech,   Mary   M ..... 3rd  1899-1906,  March,  1914
Creech,   Winnifred   J.   E 2nd     ....April,  1902
Creelman,   Amelia    B.A August,  1910
Crombie,    Hilda     1st August,  1913
Crombie,   I M.A August,  1908
Crowe,   C.   B B.A .August,  1913
Currie,   Blanche    1st January,  1911
Currie,   Flora   M 2nd 1897-1902;   1904-10;  1913
Dauohine,  A.  Josephine  1st    January,  1910
Davidson, Jessie A 1st  September,  1910
Davidson,   Lucretia   F 1st     August,  1910
Dempsey, Violet H 2nd   March, 1914
Dewis,   Martha  E : B.A August,  1911
Dickey,  Albert  A.   F  Academic    January,  1907
Dixon,    Ellis    B _ 1st August,  1912
Dobson,   F.   H B.A August,  1907
Dunbar,   John    1st    August,  1912
Dunning,   J.   T , _ M.A August,  1906
Duthie,  Ellen P 2nd   November, 1916
Dyke,   Kathleen   A  .^ ~ 2nd     August,  1907
Eaton,   Alice   A   B.A _ October,  1912
Elderkin,   Anita   M ~ ~..B.A February,  1915
Eldridge,   Dorothy   C 2nd    * January,  1908
Elliott, Carrie I B.A August, 1916
Elliott,   Margaret    2nd March,  1908
Fimsley,   Ada B  ^ 1st    November, 1900
Estabrooke,   Emma   D B.A January, 1913
Evans,   C.   R 1st    November,  1907
Evans,  Eleanor   1st       _  August,  1907
Evans,   Nellie   D 2nd August,  1914
Fallows,   Muriel   P 2nd August,  1914
Faulkner, M.  Jean ". 1st      .  - January,  1914
Faunt,  Edith    1st     August,  1913
Faunt.   Jessie    1st .  August,  1913
Fee, Wilfred J ~ _ B.A. August,  1912
Ferguson,   Mary   J _ „ B.A August, 1912
Fergusson,   George   A B.A August,  1911',
Fessant.  Emma  2nd    August,   1914
Fierheller,   Ina    „ 2nd    October,  1911
Fisher,   Anna   M v 1st    August,  1915
Fisher,   Jessie E.   R 2nd    Januarv.  1908
Fitch, H. B M.A.,  B.Sc * August, 1912
Fleming,   J.   B M.A September.   1915
Fleming, Wm.   R „ „ 1st    August,  1915 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name. Certificate. Date of Appointment.
Fletcher,   Elizabeth   E 2nd   June,  1893
Flett,  William M.A January,  1912
Flower,  Ethel  M 1st    October, 1913
Ford,   Luvia    2nd    January,  1912
Forsythe,  R, B B.A August,  1916
Frame, Emma M 1st    August,  1909
Frederickson,   Gertrude  M 2nd    January,  1907
Frith,   Elsie    2nd    January,  1906
Fullerton,   Florence  L 1st   August,  1909
George, Elizabeth L 2nd     August,  1898
Gordon, J.  G M.A August,  1916
Gourlie,   Wm.   G B.A August,  1907
Grant,  Fannie  1 2nd ., December,  1907
Grant,   Mabel   L.___ 1st     September, 1911
Grant,  Winnifred A 2nd     August,  1915
Gray,  Susie W B.A January,  1912
Greggs,  Gladys  E B.A November,  1912
Greggs, R. Luella  B.A August, 1914, August,  1915
Grenfell,   Mary  E B.A August,  1909
Hadden,  Edith C.  : 1st    August,  1914
Hall,   J.   H B. Litt August,  1911
Hamilton,   Margaret   P 2nd August,  1910
Harding,  Mrs.  J.  M.  H 2nd    January,  1913
Harper,    Lulu   F 1st  January,  1910
Harvey,   Ruth   A 1st    September,  1916
Haughton,  Agnes    1st      August,  1912
Haviland,   Ida  I Temporary  November,  1916
Hawe,   Elsie   V 2nd    September, 1916
Hearns,   Edna  M 2nd January,  1915
Hemsworth,   E.  A 1st   August,  1910
Herd,   Henry   D Academic     January,  1916
Hewton,   Sara    2nd   1898-1900;   August,  1908
Hobson,   F.   W Oral   January,  1916
Hodgins,   Lena   B 2nd    August,  1911
Hooley,   Elizabeth    2nd    August,  1914
Hornby,   Dorothy  M 2nd    August,  1912
Houston,  W. F 2nd    August,  1916
Howard,   Edith    1st    April,  1913
Howard, F. Mabel S B.A August,  1912
Howard,   Phoebe   M 2nd    January,  1916
Howell,   B.   H Academic   October,  1916
Howell,   Lucy   M M.A January,  1915
Huggard,  Mrs.   Ada C 1st    January,  1906
Hughes,   Annie    1st    January,  1912
Jacks,  M.   Gertrude   2nd   August,  1909
Jamieson, Annie B B.A January,  1907
Jamieson,  G. W. 1st    August,  1890
Jewett,   F.   Arnold    B.A August,  1909
Johnston,   Bessie    1st    March,  1891
Johnston,   D.   B B.A January,  1902
Johnston,   Katherine S 1st    September,  1916
Johnston,   Mrs.  Mabel  C 2nd   1901-1903;   January,  1916
Johnstone,  Marion B 2nd   1891-1911;   August,  1914
Jones,   Grace   F 1st    September,  1913
Jones, Mary  Commercial   Assistant August, 1916
Jukes,   Marian  E 2nd   March, 1911
Keenleyside, Alice M B.A.    January,  1915
Keith,   Walter   C B.A March,  1912
Kelly,   Bertha  M 2nd    January,  1914
Kemp,    Wm.    N B.A December,  1915
Kerr,   Ruby   2nd     January,  1910
Kingston,   Emily   G 2nd     August,  1909
Laidlaw. Kathleen  2nd    October,  1915
Laing,   G.  A .M.A August,  1914
Laird,  Edna  J 1st ...1906-1908; 1909-1911; January,  1913
Langley,   Celia   G Academic  August, 1906
Laursen, Lili J 1st    August,  1905
Lawrence,  Edith  M 2nd   November,  1904;   January,  1916
Lawrence,   Frederick   J 1st    August,  1910 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
83
Name, Certificate. Date of Appointn
Leach, Mrs. Jean P, 1st     April,
Lee, Mrs. Mary N.  (nee Holloway) 2nd    August,
LeFeu j re,   Eva   A 1st   August,
Leith, Mrs. T Academic  1896-1902; January,
Lett, 'Mary  lj§. 3rd  August,
Lewis, Alice M 2nd    August,
Lewis,  Vera  M Academic     August,
Leyster,  Hilda   Temporary      October,
Little,   D.   C B.A  January,
Loggie,   Annie   M 1st    January,
Long, L.  Pearl 1st    October,
Loree,  Edith   -1st    August,
Lougheed,   Mary   E 1st    September,
Lovering,   J.   E M.A August,
Luscombe,   E,   Helen 1st   September,
M
M
M
M
M
M
ffl
1
M
M
M
n
M
3
1
M
M
m
m
jj
M
s
m
M
M
M
M
M
M
m
M
M
1
1
M
M
M
M
"M
M
M
M
M
M
1
M
M
M
achum,  Vetura    1st    August,
aggs,   A.   B M.A August,
anning,   Dorothy   D B'.A ..September,
arshall,   Elsie  M 2nd    January,
atheson,  E.   Corinne    2nd     September,
athews, Stanley W M.A ...April
axwell, Mary E 1st    August,
ayers,  F.   J - -B.A November,
eadows,  Stanley D B.A August,  1911; January,
essinger,  Clarence R B.A August,
iddlemiss,   Edfjh    2nd     i -.January,
iddleton,  Albert  A 2nd    January,
iller,   S.  L B.A August,
ills,  Sadie  1st ...October,
ilne, Helen B 1st   October,
oodie,   S.   F .B.A • August,
oody, Margaret H B.A August,
organ, Clovis B>.  B.A January,
organ,   Norma   M 2nd January,
orrison,   Mabel I 2nd     '. September,
orrow,   W.   H , M.A August,
ullin, Isadore M,  1st    October,
unro, Elizabeth  2nd    January
unro, Sadie H B.A January,
unn,  Emma M B'.A August,
urphy, Eva B 1st    January,
urrSy,  Christine T * st August,
cAdam,.   Guy   J M.A _ August,
cAlpine,   Sara    2nd    August,
cCallum,   Ada   E 2nd    August,
cCreery, Paul L B.A August,
acdiarmid,  Kate B.A January
acdonald, Agnes  2nd    * August,
acdonald,   Christina    2nd    February,
cDonald, Edna C 2nd    August,
acDonald, Gertrude  1st    January,
acDonald,  H. Lucretia  1st  September,
cDonald, Helen M 2nd  August,
cDonagffi, William  1st    February,
cDougall, Elizabeth'  3rd    August,
cEwen, Agnes E.  1st    August,
tpll'/en, Florence E 1st    September,
cFarland,  Cora H B.A Januarv,
acfarlane,  Edith  J 3rd March. 1914; August,
acfarlane.   Rachel    2nd   1894-1909;  February,
cGregor, Grace H 2nd    August,
aclntosh, Grace J 2nd    January,
aclntyre, Beatrice A 1st   August,
lent.-
1.914
1904
1903
1914
1916
1905
1916
1915
1906
1911
1912
1914
1912
1915
1911
1914
1910
1911
1913
1913
,1902
190S
1907
1914
1909
1916
1914
1913
1912
1905
1914
1909
1915
1916
1912
1913
1911
,1915
1915
1915
1913
1913
1911
1900
1895
1916
,1912
1910
1911
1-906
1913
1910
1916
190.3
1912
1905
1906
1911
1915
1916
1915
1914
1912
McKay,
McKee,
Minna G.
George E.
MacKenzie
MacKenzie
MacKenzie
MacKenzie
McKinnon,
McLean,
.2nd    March,
.B.A May.
Christina A 1st    October,
Grace   1 st    August,
Mary L B.A.
Winewood F B.A.
Mary   2nd
McLatchy,
Adelaide M...
'Terman  J.
.2nd	
.B.A '. August,
.. August,
..August,
January,
..October,
1891
1905
1916
1908
1908
1912
1897
1916
1915 84
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Name, Certificate. Date of Appointment.
Maclean,  Alice     , B.A „ August,  1910*
McLean, D.  R  Temporary     September,  1915
McLeish,   Kathleen   „. -1st    ~ March,  1913.
-Macleod,  Hazel E B.A „ -..January,  1912:
MacMillan, Mary R 2nd     August, 1915
McMurray, J. Ethel -' -1st     August,   1914
McNiven,   Catherine    B.A August,  1914
McNiven, Margaret  B.A,    January,  1915
McPherson, Annie R 1st    August,  1910*
Macpherson, Mary       2nd     August, 1915
MacQueen,   Elizabeth  D .„ .„ B.A December,  1907
McQueen,   Kate  H  B.A.     - January,  1911
Neil,   Mrs.  E.  B.  Stewart 1st   August,  1908
Neil.   Muriel   Stewart  2nd    ~ - August,  1915
Nesbitt, William J , 1st   August,  1913
Newby,  Myrtle E 2nd    August,  1912
Ogilvie, David *_ M.A.
Olding. Elizabeth  2nd
....August,  1915
..January, 1902
Paget, Harry L 1st
Painter, Emily  2nd
Patrick,   Grace A 2nd
Patterson,  Jean   ., 1st
Pattison, Thomas M.A
Pearson, Ethel  M  ...2nd
Perkins, Alice G	
Perkins,   Ella   D	
Perry, Florence G	
Pollock, James R	
Purdie,   A.   J.   Grosvenor
Ramage,   Wm.   G	
Rand, William  L	
Reid, Alice T. G	
Reid, Elmer W	
Reveley,  Ethel H	
Rines,  Alfred	
lines,   Alice   R.
Roberts,   Elen
Roberts, T. H
Rob son, R. M. .
Rogers, Gladys E.
Rogers, Olive M.
Ross,  A.  W	
Ross,  Ellen D	
Ross,   Lillian A  ..2nd
Ross,  Lillian M.  '. 1st
 October,
 January,
 January,
  January,
 > February,
 „  January,
1st September,
B.A August,  1905,' April,
1st     August,
1 st    August,
B.A Augu||fej
B.A August,
B.A August,
2nd     August,
B.A January,
2nd October,
 1 1st
 1st   .
Lloyd 1st   .
 B.A.
 2nd
 B.A.
 2nd
 M.A.
 1st
. August,
..August,
January,
..August,
'ebruary,
January,
January,
January,
'ebruary,
January,
..August,
Salter,  Mildred E 2nd    January,
Sanderson, J. R M.A.,  Ph.D   August,
Saunders,   M.   B Academic       August,
Selman, G.  S B.A .August,
Shearman, A. E 1st    January,
Sheepy,   *a?iet  3rd  August,
Sherman, R. S .>. 1st    February,
Sherrin, Alice M 1st    January,
Shine,   Mrs.  Alice  G .2nd    April,
Shine, Isabella M .2nd  November,
Simpson, Lilla IM 1st    January,
Sinclair, Annie M M.A September,
Sinclair, J. G Art    August,
Sinclair,  Madge  P .2nd    August,
Smith, Edith T 2nd      ....January,'
Smith, Edna  .......JJnd   March',
Snider, Emma S .2nd     .1904-1909;  August
Sparling, R 1st  Aug. 1891; Aug. 1893; Aug.,'
Spencer, Agnes  1st     August,
Sulan, Mary E 3rd January,'
Stables,   Nellie T. .2nd     . February,
Stephens,   S.   R .B.A 1906-191 1 :   August'
Stephens.  Emma  L ,    1st      Januai*jBS"
Sterns, Clara M .B.A.  August,
Stevens, Gladys E 1st    ..August,
Stewart, Christine E 1st     August
1912
1909
1916"
1907
1901
1911
1912
1911
l!tl 1
1910s
1912
1912
1914
1912
1916
1912
1908
1912
1913
1910
1916
1915
1913
1909
1912
3dBp
1911
1910
1913
1906
1916
1916
1911
1903
1909
1903
1912
1913
1911
Mini
1910
1910
1916
1912
1900
1912
l !i I ::
l up:
1914
1 :■ 1 n
1911
1914
1912
V BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
85
Name.                                              Certificate.
Stewart,  Edith  L 1st   ....
Date of Appointment.
1910
Stone, Mabel W
Story, Mary E.
Straight, R	
Stuart,  Jas. A.
Suter, R. W	
 August,
1st    February,
1st    January,
1st    August,
B.A January,
B.A.,   B.Sc October.
Sutherland, Alexander  M.A.
1914
1913
1907
1913
1902
August, 1916
Tait, Albert B M.A August,  1915
Tanner,   Rebecca   2nd    August,   1900
Tavlor, Grace A Academic   August,  1910
Taylor, L. W B.A August,  1913
Taylor,  Minnie 1st    August,  1914
Templer, Mrs. Jean  1st    August,  1911
Tom,   Gregory   H 1st  1891-1911; August, 1915
Trembath,  Emily  J 1st    February,  1900
Trembath, Barbara E 1st    August,  1914
Truswell, Grace F 2nd    Februarv,  1915
Truswell, Mary  1st    August,  1899
Tucker, Julia E 1st    January,  1913
Turner, Janet C 1st    February, 1914
Van IBlaricom, Ida M J3/.A January, 1907
Van Wart, Elsie V .B.A „ January,  1911
Vermilvea,  A.  Irene  B.A May, 1913; August,  1916
Walker, J. F 1st    January,
Ward, Blanche E 1st    January,
Ward," Edith M 2nd   November,
Ward, -Gladys 1 1st August,
Warner,
Warner,
Watson,
Watson,
Watson,
Webber,
White, I
Gertrude  1st
.February,
.... August,
 August,
...January,
.... August,
 August,
 May,
.February,
.January,
Mabel A 2nd   	
J. L B.A .....
Kathleen E ....2nd 	
Marguerite E ....2nd   	
Evelyn H 2nd	
ilva E.  2nd   	
White,  Laura M B.A	
Wickett, Evelyn  B.A	
Wiegand, Elsa M 2nd   November,
Willett,  Jane T JB.A , February,
Wilson, Janet 1 2nd   March,
Williamson,  Jessie E.  M 2nd    August,
Wilson,  F.   C.    B.A ] January,
Wilson, Rosalind  1st    January,
Wood, Berton J M.A., BlSc October,
Woodhead, Thomas W Academic  August,
Woods, William   B.A.        August,
Wright, C. W .B.A September,
1916
1912
1912
1914
1914
1912
1914
1909
1913
1916
1916
1916
1907
1916
1912
1916
1914
1908
1913
1906
1908
1910
1914
Young,  George  P.
1st    January,  1913
DOMESTIC   SCIENCE.
Bell,   Adna August, 1912
Berry,   Elizabeth    August,  1905
Cooke,   Eva    January, 1914
Creelman,   Minerva    August, 1909
Fonda,  Ethel   August,  1909
Marlatt,  Mary Norah August,  1913
Mutch,  Susie L August, 1913
Ma'cKay,   Ida F January, 1913
Oliver,  Frederica   August, 1914
Rath,  Martha    August,  1910
Smellie,   Ella   February, 1913
Sterritt, Agnes   ...August,  1914
Steven, Elsie  August, 1911
M 01 —
86
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
MANUAL  TRAINING.
Bennett,   J.  W February,  1915
Chippendale,   Thos September,  1912
Cross, N. T October,  1915
Fairey,   Francis    January,  1912
Gardner, N. H January, 1908
Hill,   William   A September,  1910
Jones,   Harry  A,    August, 1914
Lister,  J.   George October, 1903
McAdam,   Josiah   W January,  1912
McCallum, D. P August,  1913
McKeown, William A August, 1903
Northrop,   S August, 1903
Parker,  A. W January,  1909
Parker,  E. W January,  1911
Templer, F. W August,  1913
Tingley,   A.   P August,  1913
Williams,   A August, 1914
SUPERVISORS.
Berry, Elizabeth  Supervisor of Domestic Science
Bundy, Albert C Supervisor of Physical Culture
Butler, Constance  Assistant Supervisor of Music
Hicks, George P Supervisor of Music
Laing, Graham A Director of Prevocational and Night Classes
Northrop,  S i Supervisor of Manual Training
Trembath', Emily J Supervisor of Primary Classes
SCHOOL MEDICAL STAFF.
Brydone-Jack, F. W., M.D., CM., (McGill), M.R.San. I School Medical Officer
Wilson, OBIelle H., M.D Assistant School Medical Officer
Jones, J. M„ D.D.S School Dentist
Breeze, Elizabeth  Head Nurse
McLellan,   Aletha    Nurse
Jeffers, Adelaide  Nurse
Ewart,  I.  May Nurse
Inglis, Jas.
ATTENDANCE OFFICERS.
Jensen, Nels.
Godfrey, Wm.
KM '1u»"ft BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
87
TEMPORARY SALARY SCHEDULE
FOR 1916
Grade Teachers.
1st yr.
$57
2nd yr.
$61
3rd yr.
$65
4th yr.
$69
5th yr.
$73
6th yr.
$77
7th yr.
$81.50
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
1st yr.
$99
1st yr.
$126
1st yr.
$135
2nd yr.
$108
2nd yr.
$135
Senior Grade Teachers.
Maximum $90.50
Vice-Principals.
3rd yr.
$117
Principals—Small School.
3rd yr. 4th yr.
$144 $153
Principals—Large School.
4th and Succeeding yrs.
$126
5th and Succeeding yrs
$162
1st yr.
$117
2nd yr.       3rd yr.      4th yr.       5th yr.      6th vr.
$144 $153 $162 $171 $180
High School—Male Teachers.
2nd yr.   3rd. yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.
$126        $135        $144      $153        $162       $171
High School—Female Teachers.
7th and
Succeeding yrs.
$189
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd. yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.
$99      $108        $117        $126      $135        $144      $153
Manual Training Instructors.
1st yr.
$90
1st yr.
$65
2nd yr.
$99
3rd yr.
$108
4th yr.
$117
5th yr.
$126
Domestic Science Instructors and Nurses.
2nd yr.
$73 \
3rd yr.
$77
4th yr.
$81.50
5th yr.
$86
$180
8th and
Succeeding yrs.
$162
6th and
Succeeding yrs.
$135
6th and
Suceeding yrs.
$90.50
Increases in salaries were not allowed for the last five months of the
year; and teachers who had reached their maximum had their salaries
reduced $4 or $2 per month for the year, according as their salary, under
the regular schedule, was over $110 per month or below that amount.
The entire salary of each teacher for the year was paid in twelve equal
monthly instalments.
In determining the salaries of officials and teachers not provided for
in the above schedule similar reductions were made.
****** 88 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
;.:>4 salary scimpyiMi   H       m
Januar}-, 1917.
Grade Teachers
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd yr,   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.   Succeeding yrs.
$60 $65 $70 $75 $80 $85        $90 $95
Senior Grade Teachers.
(Maximum $100.)
Teachers having had two years' successful experience in graded schools,
minimum salary, $65.
Salaries of substitutes to be paid by the Board in cases of illness of
teachers up to 20 teaching days in the year, subject to Medical Certificate
from doctor in attendance, or School Medical Officer.
Vice-Principals.
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th and Succeeding yrs.
$110 $120 $130 $140
Principals—Small School.
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th anj Succeeding yrs.
$140 $150 $160 $170 $180
Principals—Large School.
7th and
1st yr.      2nd yr.      3rd yr.      4th yr.      5th yr.      6th yv.      Succeeding yrs.
$150 $160 $170 $180 $190 $200 $210
High School—Male Teachers.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd. yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.     Succeeding yrs.
$130        $140        $150       $160       $170      $180      $190 $200
High School—Female Teachers.
8th and
1st yr.   2nd yr.   3rd. yr.   4th yr.   5th yr.   6th yr.   7th yr.     Succeeding yrs.
$110        $120        $130       $140       $150      $160      $170 $180
Manual Training Instructors.
6th and
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th vr. Succeeding yrs.
$100 $110 $120 $130 $140 $150
Domestic Science Instructors and Nurses.
6th and
1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. 4th yr. 5th yr. Suceeding yrs.
$70 $80 $85 $90 $95 $100
Schedule based on twelve monthly payments each year.
No schedule increase to go into effect without the same being recommended by the Municipal Inspector of Schools.
The salary of any teacher may be fixed at a sum not indicated in the
schedule by special resolution of the Board.
For 1917. only fifty per cent of the increases provided for in the above
schedule will be paid. V-\
BOARD OE SCHOOL TRUSTEES 89
SECRETARY'S STATEMENT
Vancouver, B. C, February 21st, 1917-
*ta
The Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B. C.
Madam, Chairman and Gentlemen,
I beer to hand you herewith Financial and Statistical State
's
xnents for the year ending December 31st, 1916.
During the year the expenditures of the Board have been so
carefully scrutinized by the various committees, and nothing has
been expended except what was absolutely necessary.
There are no particular items that require pointing out in connection with your Annual Report.
Respectfully submitted,
^^^^;:"•;-^"J ■ y.J;-;;' ^r"'';:\>>.:"':;.•'":;^   GERALD UPTON, !   " ..
Secretary.
III!
miiiiiiiiiiiiiim
^^•Ssijaw^SEj |x -<s jK^^HK^^^ Q^--jxo^^^^'^^^^^^^y'^^^^
Illilll!]      illlllllllllilllillillllllllllllilllllilllllllllillllJ'lilllllllll.illlflliilMll!-       li
Jj^J., C.i 90 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEAR 1916
Vancouver, B. C, February 15th, 1917.
To the Chairman and Members,
Board of School Trustees,
Vancouver, B. C.
I have examined the attached Statement, with the Books and
Disbursement Vouchers relating thereto, and certify the Statement
is correctly drawn up so as to set forth the Board of School Trustees' Expenditures on Capital Account for the year 1916, as disclosed by the records presented for my inspection. I have received
all the information and explanations I have required.
Yours faithfully,
;.'/'.    ' _ .   •; :  '  ; JOHN KENDALL, F.C.A.,   ^$Z§§
Auditor.
' Z'ZZl '  Z:':.   BY-LAW NO. 997. ; /V:/" V#'|r^^^
By Balance brought forward as at January 1st, 1916 $35,660.52
To Desks, Furniture and Sundry Equipment—
Desks and Furniture  $ 687.35
Manual Training and Domestic
Science   1,148.15
 $ 1,835.50
Miscellaneous-
Additions to Heating and Ventilating Systems . $1,335.87
Grounds, Retaining Walls, Grading, Cement Sidewalks, Surface Draining and Fencing  6,260.62
Cadet Armouries and Equipment    458.74
Sundry Small Capital Expenditure over all Schools (32)     487.15
\         8,542.38 pwyiyy
One - room    Building,    Roberts
School $   747.00   ■ >     f  % ;|
Dawson Reconstruction   4,257.20
    5,004.20
Balance     ^";;?f 20,278.44    "^S||p
^ Z      $35,660.52 $35,660.52
By Balance down, being Credit to the Board on Account
of By-Law No. 997  $20,278.44 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES 91
BY-LAW NO. 998.
By Balance brought forward as at January 1st, 1916 $69,348.09
To Completion 1914 Contract—
Strathcona School  $    462.65
Balance   68,885.44
*~r\
$69,348.09 $69,348,09
By Balance down, being Credit to the Board on Account
of By-Law No. 998  $68,885.44
iiBftll   CAPITAL FUNDS AVAILABLE  AS AT   ZZZ^Z^-Z
^^^| |    DECEMBER 31st, 1916. -   f      ,: ; ZZ      -
By-Law No. 997  -  $20,278.44    'Z-.': :'-■-.'• ?■
By-Law No. 998      68,885.44
|     I Z       $89,163.88
To Specific Amounts set out in By-Law No.
998, of which thereof balances remaining
unexpended are as follows, and can only
be used for such construction:
King Edward High School Gvmnasium.. $50,574.90
Model School Heating Plant     10,157.00
Balance   1     28,431.98
III     111 1      tit     I $89,163.88 $89,163.88
By Balance down, being Amounts available for Miscellaneous Capital Expenditures on account of:
Bv-Law No. 997   $20,278.44
Bv-Law No. 998       8,153.54
$28,431.98
l|l§   EXPENDITURE ON REVENUE ACCOUNT TO    ■••'/:■;
DECEMBER 31st, 1916. Kg      ::Vr:;."
Salaries—
Superintendent and Assistants '...$   4,687.00
Secretary and Assistants       4,741.50
Building Superintendent and Assistants..      3,205.00
j§   Medical Department        8,342.33    :'•■:•. Z
Attendance Officers        2,590.50
K    Night Schools      *4,565.75      •;•■;"";-
Night School Janitors  914.50
m    Chauffeurs     H,087.50   Z}:{.^-.\-
Telephone Operator          490.50
mm I    i^^fiSSlSllfc-? $ 30,624.58
Carried forward  $ 30,624.58
* For January, February and March only.
-— 92 BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES	
;       Brought forward  1 „ $ 30,624.58
School Salaries—
Teachers    ... $391,50635   igfSaH
Teachers' Substitutes       3,514.95
Supervisors       8,377.00
Manual Training  _     22,813.00    ^^^M
Domestic Science  ~     11,254.00
CXZZr  437,465.30
Active Service Grants .. _  3,615.00
Janitors and Extras   44,983.25
General School Supplies—
Schools $ 13,307.56
Domestic Science       1,936.28
Manual Training        1,668.15
Medical Department ...        617,42
r  .    Night Classes    §   370.42    l^|^^
Janitors         1,628.52
Zz'Z. ■ yfZ;ZyjZ-r:-t.^y^:      19,52835
Miscellaneous—
Fuel   $ 21,659.24   ^^^^tt
Electric Light, Power and Gas  7,260.51
.;.".'    Water  £ 1,755.60   i||§JnK
Insurance  554.62
Advertising   118.49
/■     Telephone    §2,000.65   ^^^P
Auto Expense -....  1,245.25
;        Scavenging   £1,100.00   ^^^^8
Car Fares   743.25
Auditors  600.00
;:     Engineer    ■    -600.00   ||^^^
Office Expense   1,243.78
Contingent  3,923.24
:•■"',.       -7* ■.;■■•■ yy 42,804.63
Repairs and Renewals   50,733.88
a '''•'"-■.-. ■ ■y^yyzz<y      y-y >•-•.•'■- - ■yyi $629,754.99
Sinking and Interest Fund  213,432.52
•   : .••:•'■•• ■ y  yzz:y:-0 $843,187.51
We certify that the above Statement is in accordance with the
City Hall Books, as well as the School Board Records.
- 'V      r,'.'*• ,;••',-Zl   KENDALL, BARR & CO.,   f§9Bg
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BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
STOCK  STATEMENT   FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDING
ylZZyB$r^M   DECEMBER 31st, 1916. ipl^^^^^^S
School Supplies.
Stock on hand December 31st, 1915 $   5,375.82
Stock Purchased during 1916     13,307.56
-■':•■ ^ >V;^'W^M^^^I^^^^^MM^^^^ $ 18,683.38
Less Distribution as per Analysis Sheet     14,634.50
Stock on hand December 31st, 1916 $   4,048.88
Janitors' Supplies.
Stock on hand December 31st, 1915 $   2,390 72
Stock Purchased during 1916       1,628.52
'^'/v^'^'^' $   4,019.24
Less Distribution as per Analysis Sheet       2,912.82
Stock on hand December 31st, 1916 $    1,106.42
Repairs and Renewals.
Stock on hand December 31st, 1915 $ |  248.30
Expenditure during 1916     50,733.88
;—c.'. y.y.yyiz.yy^^ $ 50,982.18
Less Distributed during 1916     50,482.18
Stock on hand December 31st, 1916 $ |   500.00 T-H
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PQ BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
97
INDEX
Page
Attendance:—
Average (School)   78
List of Officers  86
Of Trustees   3
Board of School Trustees:—
fl    List of, 1886—1916 5 & 6
#   Year 1916 - - 2 & 3
]Z:.    Year 1917   4
Capital Expenditure Account, 1916  90
Chairman's Address  -  7
Committees (Standing):—
%    Year 1916  3
U~    Year 1917  ,    4
Enrolment:—
-;•■-   Year 1916  78
■?Z    Years 1897 to 1916 in October  7$
Medical Staff  86
Meetings and Retirements, School Trustees  4
Music Committee, Financial Statement of.... .  46
Officials,  1917       4
Principals, Names and Telephone Numbers  79
Reports:—
Attendance -.  74
Auditor  ; .«  90
Building and Grounds Committee  27
pZ    Dental Work  42
Management Committee   16
Medical Inspection  37
Municipal   Inspector of Schools  29
Prevocational  Classes    68
School Sports   70
Secretary     89 98
BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES
a
a
tc
a
•Supervisors, Domestic Science	
Manual Training	
Music	
Physical Culture, Cadets and Rifle Teams..-.
Primary Work	
Revenue Account, 1916 ;	
Revenue Expenditure, Analysed  , :
Revenue Expenditure, Showing Cost per Capita	
Salary Schedules, 1916 and 19-17 \ 87
Schools-—Name, Location, Number of Divisions	
Stock Statement ..-.	
Supervisors, List of	
Teachers:—
Their Certificates and Dates of Appointment	
Number each year since 1902 	
Number of Special Teachers....   	
Number Holding Different Grades of Certificates.--	
Domestic Science and Manual Training-.. ..85
Value of School Property..	
l&-
rage
63
60
44
-47
it59
91
93
n
&8S
79
94
86
80
78
78
78
&86
96'
-;; .      ;.:,./   ..- -LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS   Z'^ZZ^
Champion Basketball Team, Tennyson School..	
Champion Football Team, Central School	
Class for the Blind	
Graduating Class, King George High School	
Manual Training Exhibit, Hastings Centre....	
Technical Class in Forge Room, King Edward High School.
Technical Class in Practical Mechanics, King Edward High
School	
Trustees   : .,	
Work by Dressmaking Class, King Edward High School.
LS
72
71
18
77
61
21
20
2
65  IP

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