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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Diversity PSK signals in impulsive noise and generalized fading Chaiyakul, Thanes

Abstract

Diversity combining techniques are well-known and useful to improve the performance of digital communication systems that experience fading. However, most research topics deal with the performance evaluation of modulation schemes in fading and AWGN channels, with diversity reception. Relatively few research topics cope with the performance evaluation of diversity techniques in non-Gaussian noise and fading. Therefore, to broaden research in the area of diversity combining techniques in a more realistic noise model, this thesis deals in particular with the performance evaluation of diversity combining techniques in the presence of impulsive noise and fading. Several contributions are made to the system model of modulation schemes in impulsive noise and fading, with diversity reception. In the first part, the PDFs of the sum of impulsive noises are derived. Then, a system model without fading is considered and theoretical expressions of the error rate performance of modulation schemes in impulsive noise, with or without diversity reception, are derived. It is demonstrated that the diversity technique chosen affects the PDF of the sum of impulsive noises and makes the signal performance with diversity reception different from the signal performance without diversity reception. This is in contrast to the signal performance in the AWGN channel. In the second part, for the digital communication system in impulsive noise and fading, analytical expressions of the signal performance in impulsive noise and fading are derived and validated through simulation. The final part contains a system in impulsive noise and fading with diversity reception. Performance evaluations of the error rate performance of modulation schemes in impulsive noise and fading, with diversity reception, are derived and compared with the previously derived results. All analytical expressions are validated through numerous simulation results.

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