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Theory and design of a wave generator for a short flume Chappell, Eric Reginald

Abstract

This thesis describes the design of a proposed, new hydraulic laboratory, wave generator for use in a 39'-4¼'' long, 30" wide and 36" deep flume, and the re-design of a small wave generator previously built for a 21'-3 5/8" long, 8 3/4" wide and 10 5/8" deep flume. These relatively short flumes are installed in the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Department of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia, and the installation of the proposed, new wave generator would augment the present limited wave research facilities. The project is supported by an operating grant from the National Research Council of Canada. The preparatory study of laboratory wave generators in use, presented herein, was made to determine how they function and their design problems. It was concluded that a rigid paddle, double articulation type would be best for generating deep-water, transition and shallow-water waves in a flume of relatively short length. Biesel's wave generator theory is outlined and was used in estimating wave heights and in determining power and strength requirements. The existing wave generator for the "small" flume is a rigid paddle, double articulation type. It did not function satisfactorily due to a very irregular paddle motion. The causes were isolated and a new drive system designed and installed, with good results. The resulting new operating specifications are: power = 1. Hp (D.C.) wave period range = 0.34 to 2.1 sees. design water depth = 6.5" estimated maximum wave height = 4" The proposed, new wave generator for the "large" flume is a rigid paddle, double articulation type designed around the adjustable paddle concept of G.D. Ransford (1949) as modified by Lt. CB. Coyer (1953). The designed operating characteristics are: power = 10-Hp (D.C.) wave period range = 0.68 to 4.28 secs. design water depth = 25" estimated maximum wave height = 14"

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