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UBC Theses and Dissertations

Real time voltage stability monitoring by Thevenin impedance estimation with local measurement Foo, Ki Fung Kelvin

Abstract

As modern power systems operate closer to the limits due to load growth and financial imperatives, voltage stability becomes a more important issue and there have been more incidents caused by voltage collapse. For example, there have been 11 outages affecting more than 4000MW between 1984 and 2000 in North America [1]. In power systems, load voltages decrease as the supplied loads increase until the maximum power transfer point is reached. The voltage will collapse if the load is increased above this limit. Therefore, it is important to monitor the loadability of a system to avoid voltage collapse. The loadability of a system can be calculated when the Thevenin impedance is available as the maximum power transfer occurs when the Thevenin impedance and the load impedance are the same in magnitude. This thesis suggests a method to estimate the Thevenin impedance of a system. ABB corporation suggests the Voltage Stability Predictor (VIP) method to estimate the Thevenin impedance, but there are problems with this method and it is not gaining popularity in industry. In this thesis, a method is suggested to estimate the Thevenin impedance by taking advantage of the existance of negative sequence components in the system. The concept of this method has been proved mathematically. Simulations were performed on simple systems and on the modified IEEE 13 bus power flow test case to verify the feasibility of the method and the results are promising. Then, the method was verified with field measurements for a 25kV substation. The voltages and currents were analyzed to estimate the Thevenin equivalent impedance of the power system and the results were compared with the design Thevenin equivalent impedance. The result confirms the viability of the method as the estimated Thevenin impedance matched the design value.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

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