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The Ubyssey Mar 29, 2016

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Array THE UBYSSEY
MARCH29,2016 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEXXV
WEJUSTGOTALETTERSINCE1918
P/03
P/08
P/09
P/10
//
//
//
//
NEWS
CULTURE
OPINIONS
SPORTS
Blue phones
are on
their way
Bringing 1960s
musicals to cultural
relevance
Holi isn't
for your
Insta
Storm this year
was bigger
than ever
P6/7
How is
UBC doing?
Evaluating the prevalence
of plagiarism on campus. //PAGE 2
YOUR GUIDE TO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
Vancouver
Map     Sa-ellhe      Community College
. Druaaway          ~
<
IhAve
*   I      I
Ii       «
Go nip
El 5th Ave
"%
'^
John       £
Hendry Park =
£ Broadway
+
WEDNESDAY30
////
LEISURE FAIR 2016 6 P.M. @ TROUT LAKE COMMUNITY CENTRE
Come for a wonderful opportunity to learn about recreational
activities for children with disabilities.
FREE
FRIDAY 1
////
CARNAVAL 9 P.M. @ KOERNER'S PUB
Get ready for an amazing celebration of life with colourful costumes
and "Latin vibes." All of the proceeds goes to Free The Children.
EARLY $5 / REGULAR $10 / DOOR $15
SATURDAY 2
////
BUNNY HOP ©VARIOUS BARS
Join a team, hop from bar to bar and get wasted before you
become a hermit and sleep underyour practice exams.
STARTS $15
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Kosta Prodanovic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
-% THE UBYSSEY
Coordinating Editor        Features Editor
Will McDonald Vassi Sharlandjieva
coordinating@ubyssey.cafeatures@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Copy Editor
Aiken Lao Bailey Ramsay
printeditor@ubyssey.ca    features@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
MoiraWarburton&
Emma Partridge
news@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
video@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
photo@ubyssey.ca
Opinions + Blog Editor
JackHauen
opinions@ubyssey.ca
Volohova, Jeremy Johnson-Silvers, Juliar
Yu, Sruthi Tadepalli, Karen Wang, Jessie
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Dasgupta, Isabelle Commerford, Evelina
Tolstykh, Mischa Milne, Julia Burn ham,
Gabey Lucas, Philippe Roberge, Rache
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oy phone. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters must be receivec
Kwakwaka'wakw Chieftain Beau Dick
shares his culture's stories through art
PHOTO MICHAEL R.BARRICK, MORRIS/HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
Dick is focused on teaching his students about the oral history ofthe Kwakwaka'wakw culture.
Vassilena Sharlandjieva
Features Editor
As a leader, an artist and a teacher,
Kwakwaka'wakw Hereditary Chief
Beau Dick has been an artist in
residence at UBC since 2013. But
he does not teach students the
techniques of carving or painting.
He teaches through storytelling,
immersing students in the history
and traditions of his culture.
Dick's role on campus evolved
into much more than what his job
description required of him, which
was simply to engage students
with his culture through his art.
He started meeting with members
of various UBC departments —
social workers, teachers, medical
practitioners, law students and
urban planners — and giving talks
at high schools and elementary
schools. His one-year term as
artist-in-residence turned into
three and Dick is still on campus.
His art is showcased in the Morris
and Helen Belkin Art Gallery's
current exhibition.
"It wasn't about art," Dick
reflected on his teaching. "It was
more about history and the deeper
meaning of my art form. That was
more important to understand than
to actually do it."
Dick noted how when visiting
the Museum of Anthropology on
campus, we can appreciate the
pieces we see for their aesthetic,
mystique and the emotion they
project. "But the deeper meaning
of them is the story and the history
of where they come from, which
isn't revealed just by looking
at them," he said. Dick would
open his seminars with stories
reflecting the oral traditions of his
culture and lead into discussions
about potlatching — gift-giving
rituals performed by First
Nations cultures on important
occasions such as births, deaths or
weddings — and other ceremonies,
the history of totem carving,
shamanism and witchcraft.
Born into a family of carvers,
Dick learned the art form first form
his father, grandfather and uncle.
He was then mentored by former
UBC artists-in-residence Bill Reid
and Doug Cranmer. The latter had
a strong influence on Dick's style.
Cranmar taught Dick that carvers
and artists, once they develop a
style — whether it's how they carve
eyes or the way they paint them,
for example — for which their work
becomes recognizable, they start to
limit themselves to that style. He
told Dick he could go beyond that
and that if in the future one looked
at Dick's work and wondered who
had made it, that would be the sign
of mastery. Cranmar's message
stuck with Dick.
"I really tried over the years
to grow into different styles and
experiment, explore and do things
different," said Dick.
Beyond style, Dick was able to
discover that "deeper meaning" of
his art when he went to Alert Bay
after several years of doing very
poorly in school. "My education
really began when I returned
home and spent more time with
my elders," Dick explained. "I
began to learn of my own true
history about my culture, identity,
bloodline, genealogy, ceremony
and witchcraft.
"Being gifted with some talent,
I suppose, and a passion for art
and for the understanding of it, the
deeper meaning ofthe art form just
led me down the path of discovery."
Part of that discovery meant
taking his hereditary position as a
chieftain in his community. That
role involves leading coming-
of-age rites, weddings and other
significant ceremonies such as the
potlatch.
"In Western society, it appears
that success is measured by how
much one can acquire and attain
in terms of wealth. In our society,
that doesn't matter. Anybody can
attain and acquire wealth. But can
you give it all away? That is the
measurement of accomplishment
and achievement that we put on
our coppers as a credit," said Dick
on the meaning ofthe potlatch.
The copper shield is a symbol of
wealth.
In 2014, Dick and other
members of First Nations
communities in Canada performed
a shaming ceremony on Parliament
Hill in Ottawa, which consisted
of breaking a copper shield in a
sign of protest and condemnation
ofthe Canadian government's
relationship with First Nations.
"I don't consider myself a
Canadian citizen," said Dick. "I
can be a little bit patriotic in the
sense that I'm proud of Canada,
what it may represent and what it
stands for. But at the same time,
the reality ofthe injustice that has
been served to our people — and
I'm talking about the First Nations
— has to be recognized and their
responsibility firstly should be to
us.
"I hear it all the time that this
is 'unceded territory' I kind of
wonder if that's lip service," said
Dick, ambivalent towards UBCs
engagement with First Nations.
"It's a polite and courteous thing
to do, but do they really mean it?
I'm not so sure. Although, I've met
so many wonderful people here at
UBC who are on paths of discovery
and they want get it right. They're
looking for the truth and they'll
find it." VI
Beau Dick and other activists
from First Nations communities
will be holding the final "Tea with
Beau" session ofthe year at the
Belkin on March 31 at 1 p.m., where
they will talk about the exhibition,
First Nations art and their
experiences. // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE+ M0IRAWARBURT0N
TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016
ACTIVISM //
Five days for the homeless aims to raise awareness about youth homelessness
Rachel Lau
Staff Writer
Five Days for the Homeless —
an annual student-run event
to raise awareness for youth
homelessness — was held in front
of UBC Bookstore from March
13-18.
Originally founded at the
University of Alberta in 2005,
the event is organized by the
UBC Commerce Community
Program to raise awareness and
funds for youth at risk. This year,
the campaign partnered with
Directions Youth Services — a
resource centre which provides
food, shelter and programming
for at-risk youth — to raise funds
for their organization.
Participants spend five days
and five nights without shelter,
a disposable income, access to
personal technologies or a change
of clothes. Five Days helped
participant Elaine Marshall,
fourth-year kinesiology student,
attempt to draw parallels between
her experience from this event
and those of homeless youth.
This event is not meant to
imitate homelessness, but raise
awareness of youth homelessness,
said Marshall. "It's not five days
of homelessness, let's make sure
we don't phrase it like that. But
it's five days for the homeless,"
she explained.
"Nothing will ever compare to
what someone who is a homeless
youth will go through, but we're
just trying to develop some sort
of understanding, some sort
of empathy regarding youth
homelessness. For me, a lot of it
had to do with very little things
like the fact that I had to really
plan my day accordingly because
I didn't have access to look up
when the bus was coming or
what time it was. That was a huge
struggle," said Marshall.
Planning her day was not the
only struggles Marshall faced.
"Going to work and feeling like I
smelled. I feel like I was a little
bit ostracized. I felt like I didn't
want to completely engage in
the social environment in the
workplace because I had all
this stuff with me," confessed
Marshall.
The students' efforts have
noble motivations, but they
should also be weary of trying
to identify with marginalized
groups, said Zachary Hyde, PhD
student and sessional instructor
from the department of sociology,
whose research focuses on
the relationship between class
and culture in urban capitalist
societies.
"I would caution that,
as students, we need to be
careful when we choose to try
to identify with marginalized
groups. Homeless people would
be considered a marginalized
or socially stigmatized group.
Especially when we're trying
^^i \x\ support c^
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Participants spent five days without shelter.
to identify with them from a
position of privilege," he said.
Hyde also warns that this
event addresses the immediate
issue of homelessness, but not
necessarily the structural problem
of homelessness in Canada. "I
think that asking for donations
from private citizens to potentially
mitigate the harms of homeless
is important, but we also need to
recognize that those conditions
were created by larger structural
changes," said Hyde.
Third-year commerce student
and director of Five Days Emma
Sullivan agrees with Hyde. "I think
one ofthe issues that we deal with
and talk about — but can't really fix
=HOTOTENDAYI MOYO/THE UBYSSEY
through an immediate campaign
like this — is the systemic issues of
homelessness," said Sullivan.
Hyde encourages students in
the future to build connections
with off-campus organizations
led by low-income and
homeless groups and to begin
addressing the systemic issues of
homelessness.
"We just need to remember
that alongside actions like this,
we should always be demanding
action from all levels of
government through collective
protests and lobbying so that
these types of actions are part of
a larger movement to demand for
housing for all people." '21
SAFETY//
New blue phones and cameras coming to campus
The upcoming blue phones will be installed in strategic locations, with cameras.
Sruthi Tadepalli
Senior Staff Writer
By mid-April, the number of blue
safety phones on campus will have
nearly doubled — and they come
with added features.
The blue phones are already a
common sight on campus. They
connect individuals in need with
security or RCMP members who
are then able to respond to security
situations which arise.
Campus security has announced
that 40 new blue phones are to
be installed at strategic locations
across campus, replacing the
current 20. Thirty-five of these
will be functional by mid-April,
while the remaining five have been
delayed due to construction.
Each blue phone will be
equipped with an incident-
driven camera, meaning that
when someone uses the phone,
the camera will automatically be
activated and begin recording.
UBC Campus Security's director
Barry Eccleton said that this
function allows security to gain
situational awareness and therefore
better respond to a call.
Along with the new blue
phones, cameras that will record
24/7 are being positioned at the
bus loop. Their film will only be
= HOTO CHERIHANHASSUN/THEUBYSSEY
examined when forensic purposes
call for it.
The use of all of these new
cameras will be governed by a
newly-approved safety and security
camera policy.
Policy 118 was created after
the Campus Safety working group
— formed last year as a result
ofthe series of sexual assaults
— recommended increasing the
number of blue phones with
cameras. To do so, the university
needed to create guidelines on how
security cameras should be used on
campus.
The policy has been designed
to ensure that all cameras used
on campus will be used in ways
that balance both the safety and
security concerns of people on
campus.
Previously-existing cameras
have been given a six month grace
period to conform to the standards
imposed by Policy 118 and apply
for approval. After the grace period
is over, every single camera on
campus will have gone through
a strict process to be approved.
Once approved, the completed
application for each camera
explaining the logistics of its usage
will be posted online.
The AMS expressed its support
for Policy 118 when it was still just
a proposal.
"We are very happy to see this
policy coming into effect," Jenna
Omassi, AMS VP Academic and
University Affairs, told The Ubyssey
when the policy was first being
developed. "Firstly, because it
means that those blue phones will
be refurbished and will be able to
be used properly for the security
ofthe campus community more
generally. Secondly, because it
means that there will be more of an
oversight on cameras and we can
ensure that the footage on these
cameras will be used solely in times
when it needs to be used and not
abused."
Eccleton is also happy with the
policy and thinks the new blue
phones and cameras are a positive
step for campus security.
"These blue phones and
cameras we see as a big step
forward in further safety talks that
the campus is being armed with,"
said Eccleton. "It's a good news
story." TH
SOCIETIES //
Undergrad event to
foster interfaculty
community
PHOTO COURTESY AUS
Four undergrad societies hope to put
aside the competition for a night.
Rachel Lau
Staff Writer
For the first time in UBC history, four
undergraduate societies collaborated
to plan a social event aimed at all
of their constituents happening on
March 24.
Led by AUS VP Student Life Elise
Manse, the CUS, LFSUS, SUS and
AUS began planning Paradocks — a
boat cruise party — in late January.
The large scale event was made
possible by the joint efforts of all four
undergraduate societies.
"When you break it down
between four undergraduate
societies, it's actually a lot more
manageable. It seems like a daunting
task at first, but just having everyone
onboard and everyone super excited
about it... makes it doable," said
Manse.
Paradocks was planned with the
intention of fostering connections
between undergraduate societies,
said Shivakar Sivarajan, VP Student
Life of LFSUS.
"Hopefully moving forward,
more collaborations can occur.
It's got to start somewhere, so we
decided this would be a good place to
start," he told The Ubyssey.
Manse agrees that the
collaborative nature of this event
plays a crucial role in creating a
sense of community at UBC. She
recognizes the competitiveness that
exists between faculties and hopes
that Paradocks will change this
attitude.
"I think there has been, in the
past, a spirit of more competitiveness
rather than collaboration. We're
always trying to outdo each other,
have a better event and just show
that we're the best faculty. I think it's
important for all of us to collaborate
and create this sense of community
because we want UBC to be a
community in itself rather than
being so segmented," said Manse.
Sivarajan and Manse hope that
Paradocks will only be the beginning
of more collaborative events in the
future.
"If the event goes well — which
we're all hoping it will — then this
could be kind of a stepping stone
to make more events, maybe doing
this as an annual thing and having
other collaborations elsewhere," said
Sivarajan.
Echoing Sivarajan's thought,
Manse hopes to continue
collaborating with other groups on
campus.
"I think my hope in the long run
is that we'll continue doing events
when we're collaborating just
because the scale and the quality
ofthe event is so much better," she
said. "I'm hoping eventually we
can work with the AMS and just
continue to foster these events that
will bring out different segments of
the UBC community." % THE   9TH   ANNUAL   AMS
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TICKETS   AVAILABLE   AT   AMS   EVENTS   BOOTH
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CANADIAN. // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016
THEATRE //
The Laramie Project is fighting discrimination
Sofia Shamsunahar
Contributor
In 1998, a University of Wyoming
student named Matthew Shepard
was brutally beaten and left
for dead on the hills outside of
Laramie, Wyoming for being gay.
The murder brought attention to
various states for having a lack
of hate crime laws. A play was
written by Moises Kaufman and
the members of the Tectonic
Theatre Project as a reaction to
the incident, named The Laramie
Project.
The play is the story of
Matthew Shepard. But even
though he will always be central
to the story, The Laramie
Project is also a story about how
we can stand up to bullying,
support human rights and reject
discrimination.
"We still have people who
don't support gay marriage. We
have people who look down on a
'non-traditional lifestyle,'" said
Javier Sotres, an actor in The
Laramie Project. "I think that we
all can learn from Matthew and
what happened to him."
Tomo Suru Players are
bringing The Laramie Project to
Vancouver and will be showing
it from March 30 at Studio
1398 on Granville Island. With
the original score written by
Vancouver composer Jeremy
Hoffman, the performance will
bring to life the complex feelings
and thoughts victims of hate and
discrimination experience.
"This show makes me want to
think and engage in a necessary
conversation. I think that's the
main impact it's had on my life,"
said Sotres. "The show made me
realize how much we have grown
as a society and, at the same time,
how much work we still have to
do. Just last month, a Pride flag
was burnt at UBC and it made
me cringe inside because it's
been 18 years since The Laramie
Project was written and we live
in a country that is trying really
hard to be welcoming, open and a
place that embraces that which is
different."
Members of the project range in age from 11 to over 60.
= HOTOCOURTESYTHE LARAMIE CLUB
To spread the content and
message of The Laramie Project,
youth sponsors have purchased
40 tickets to be donated to young
people to watch. The producers and
sponsors believe that it is important
for the youth to get this opportunity
to see the story.
The cast is diverse, including
six women and five men. Their
ages range from as young as 11 to
above 60. 'tJ
ACTIVISM//
Students discuss "Bringing Democracy Home"
The open dialogue was in response to a feature published in The Ubyssey.
Rosemary Hu
Contributor
Students from different Hua Ren
(ethnic Chinese) communities
congregated together in the CK.
Choi building to participate in open
dialogue regarding the topic of
"Bringing Democracy Home."
The inspiration for this event
actually stemmed from a Ubyssey
article published two years ago.
With a subtitle of "Apathy,
hostility, inability and fear: Why
Chinese international students
aren't bringing Western politics
back home," the article raised and
inspired many issues within the
community. The hosts, UBC Hua
Dialogue, thought it would be of
value to create a discussion around
this.
Participating Chinese
international students quickly
realized that the question, "What
does democracy mean to you?"
first had to be answered in order
to discuss what bringing it home
entailed. But even beyond that,
students realized perhaps the
statement, "Bringing Democracy
Home," was flawed itself.
= HOTO COURTESY UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Some acknowledged that small,
gradual steps towards the idea of
democracy could benefit China
and most agreed that this could not
be achieved by starting a violent
revolution.
Moving past the political
spectrum, there was also discussion
about the difficulty of forming
meaningful friendships with non-
Chinese international students.
"According to my own
experience, I have several non-
Chinese friends, but I can only have
a meal and talk a little bit of study
life with them," said Lanita Zhuang,
a first-year Sauder student who
came to UBC from Shenzhen last
September. "Because of different
backgrounds, it's hard to share
ideas, receive relevant responses
and carry on the conversation."
Some students agreed with
the difficulty in breaking down
this barrier, but others spoke from
experience and said it was possible.
Parts ofthe event veered a bit
off-track and delved headfirst
into heated debates about the
technicalities of politics and in-
depth analyses of how the Chinese
government was structured with
people citing both the positives
and the negatives of it. However,
the success of UBC Hua Dialogue's
event was evident as a whole.
By 9:40 p.m., the event that
was set to end at 9 p.m. still had
not come to a full close. Dynamic
conversations were still going
on between students. Students
expressed their appreciation
for the event because it allowed
for reflection of different
conceptions of democracy and
how they contributed to imposed
assumptions.
The importance of "home"
was central to the open dialogue.
Although whether or not students
felt that Canada was also their
home did not get discussed in
detail, the fact that everyone was
able to come together to speak
vividly about issues was quite a
positive feat. 'M
PHOTOS //
"I Beat": transform
vulnerabilities
into strengths
Yasmin Gandham
Staff Writer
Everyone has overcome an
obstacle, faced a struggle or
dealt with something that made
them feel weak. Whether this is
something small like a bad day,
or something severe like mental
illness, we all have things that
make us unique and problems that
we have faced.
Danielle Tognetti, an
arts student, has created a
photography project detailing the
vulnerabilities and obstacles that
individuals face on a daily basis.
Her powerful project became very
popular among UBC students and
the general public.
The project titled "I Beat"
included photos of 21 girls
wearing t-shirts detailing different
obstacles that they have overcome,
including anxiety, long-distance
relationships or bullying.
"I didn't give [the models] any
direction. I let them choose it on
their own," she said. "It grew into
this bigger project that stemmed
into mental illness."
An old black-and-white photo
featuring model Kate Moss
inspired the project.
"I wanted to expand this idea
and allow the models to choose
and express vulnerabilities they
have experienced," said "I realized
that this would resonate not just
with the people who participated
in the project, but for the audience
and the greater public to really
connect with it and honour the
bravery of these girls.
"This project was more for
myself to build my portfolio and
get more practice, but it became
such a powerful message. Even the
models themselves were feeling
confident and brave. It went
beyond the photos and into the
message that they portrayed," she
said.
The project not only raised
awareness on important issues,
but it also showed that one is not
alone and all of us face difficulties
on a daily basis.
"I Beat is meant to show
that although you may not have
completely overcome it yet, these
individuals are getting there and
are on a positive journey," said
Tognetti.
"I hope through capturing
these photos, these individuals
could transform their previous
vulnerabilities into strengths.
Using this project, I want to
empower individuals to break
through their barriers and to
acknowledge themselves as the
strong and powerful people they
are today." 'M
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for details. FEATURES    I   TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016
CUT&<PASTE:
evaluating the prevalence of
plagiarism on campus
Plagiarism at UBC is an enigma.
Subjectivity plagues how to assess
plagiarism, how to discipline it and how
often it occurs. We try to answer some of
these questions.
Emma Partridge
News Editor
"I hearby accept and submit myself to
the statues, rules and regulations, and
ordinances (including bylaws, codes,
and policies) of The University of British
Columbia, and of the faculty and faculties
in which I am registered."
If you're a UBC student, this is a
promise by which you are bound. Odds
are, however, that you didn't even know it
existed.
This is the student declaration, a
pledge that comes into effect for students
when they accept their offer to U BC. And if
you break it, it's on your own head.
Despite the severe consequences —
expulsion, for example — that can await a
student who chooses to break the student
declaration, some do so every year in a
particular way and with a particular end in
mind: plagiarism.
UBC, like virtually all academic
institutions, sees cases of plagiarism
every year. It makes up the bulk of the 72
academic misconduct cases listed in
the last discipline report, which tracked
academic and nonacademic misconduct
at UBC from 2013 to 2014.
A different report released by the CBC
several years ago found that compared
to other post secondary institutions in
Canada, UBCs rate of punishing people
for plagiarism was quite low. Between
2011-2012, UBC had penalized far fewer
than the hundreds of students who faced
punishmentfor plagiarism atSimonFraser
University that year.
UBC again penalized less than
100 students — out of a population of
50,000— for plagiarism during the 2013-
14 academic year.
Paul Harrison, associate dean of
student services in the Faculty of Science,
estimates that he had to deal with 20 to 60
students who had allegedly plagiarized.
In a faculty of over 7,000, this is a small
percentage.
Despite being a problem that appears
relatively insignificant when judged by
the number of punishments, plagiarism
is often on the minds of students. The
reference desk and writing commons in
Irving K. Barber Library are no strangers
to students who are worried about
plagiarizing, said Julie Mitchell, managing
librarian of Irving.
In her experience, students rarely bring
in assignments with the worry that they
have plagiarized, but are more concerned
that they are going to.
It might be easy to say 'if you don't want
to plagiarize, don't' But it's not that simple
— there are a number of lesser-known
modes of plagiarism that are considered
just as disingenuous as what Mitchell
referred to as "blatant plagiarism" — the
deliberate presentation of someone else's
ideas as your own.
Cases of blatant plagiarism litter the
academic misconduct report for 2013-14,
such as when one student "committed
academic misconduct by taking another
student's homework assignment, erasing
the student's name and student number,
and writing his/her own name on the
assignment and submitting it." Another
case: "A student committed academic
misconduct by submitting material in
a course that was plagiarized from a
research summary submitted earlier by
another group in the course."
On the other hand, examples of little-
known methods of copying include patch
plagiarism — stringing a number of ideas
together without including much original
thought—or relying too heavily on asingle
source in a multi-source assignment. Or, in
fact, plagiarizing from yourself.
"[Something] a lot of students don't
know is the idea of self-plagiarism, so
that if you've cited an idea in another
paper, you should cite it," said Mitchell.
"If you think of it this way, if you publish a
"Ifyou th ink of it th is way,
ifyou publish a paper in
a journal ...you've signed
away the copyright on
that andyou would have
to cite it... the same goes
with when you're using
papers between classes."
paper in a journal... you've signed away
the copyright on that, and you would
have to cite it... the same goes with when
you're using papers between classes."
This is where resources such as the
writing centre come in handy.
"There's a lot of one-on-one help in
the writing centre — they're going to
help students look at how to use sources
and how to use them effectively, " said
Mitchell.
Plagiarism isn't only a problem in
research papers, however. It's prominent
in courses involving coding, where there
is a misconception that there's only one
way to code for a solution. Paul Harrison,
associate dean of student services in
the Faculty of Science, said coding is a
lot like writing an essay — submissions
shouldn't look exactly the same. As a
result, some comp sci courses distribute
guides to the academic policy with each
assignment.
"[In] computer science 110 ... this
semester I think we had 450 students
and  in the fall  we  often  have  more TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016   |    FEATURES
than 800," said Meghan Allen, a UBC
computer science professor. "So for every
assignment it's not uncommon that we
would see at least a couple cases [of
plagiarism]."
In cases such as this in which the
accusation is levelled at a first year or
something else may have played a role,
the allegation is sometimes treated as a
learning experience
"Many students aren't clear on how to
cite papers orthings like that, so sometimes
it's turned into a learning experience or
a warning," said Burk, noting that the
teachers and deans will typically try to get
to the motivation for why a student cheated
and understand what in the student's life
may have contributed. "Everyone has
complicated lives and so it's about having
the conversation about how to make better
choices and why those choices, in the long
run, make more sense."
Take Sarah James, who worked for
UBC Okanagan's student newspaper,
The Phoenix, and was also involved with
multiple other academic commitments
when her professors told her she hadn't
cited properly.
"It was just extremely sloppy. I did these
papers at the same time within two days
while also doing all of [the newspaper's]
production stuff," she said. After James,
then a fine arts undergraduate, was
accused of plagiarism in her final year for
the improper citations, she was called in
by her professor and then met with the
dean, as is protocol.
Though punishments are administered
on a case-by-case basis depending on
the severity ofthe offence, the procedures
for actually reporting the incident
remains the same for all faculties, even
at UBC Okanagan. After the meeting
with professors and deans, James' case
was sent on to the President's Advisory
Committee, which handles academic
misconduct cases.
"From there I had to go to a nice big
meeting. There were representatives from
different faculties on the committee, there
were the teachers who accused me, the
dean who accused me and then the vice
chancellors," said James. "I was allowed to
bring in one witness."
According to James, the penalties she
received didn't greatly affect her academic
standing. After the president's advisory
committee hears a case, it goes to the
president who then decides what action to
take. In this case, former President Arvind
Gupta simply sent James a formal letter of
reprimand.
James also received a notation on her
transcript, which she can apply to remove
— once two years have passed.
"I did apply to a separate degree after
this degree in Vancouver.... so that didn't
really have an impact there, but I think
going into grad schools it would have," she
said.
It's also difficult to punish plagiarism
because allegations can be based on the
individual judgement of a professor.
Lisa Rudolph, a second-year physics
major, was accused of plagiarism in her
200-level computational physics class.
Rudolph was working on her final project
which involved research. She said her
professor accused her of plagiarism
because they did not believe she was
capable of understanding one of the
papers she had read "at that magnitude."
In this case, Rudolph didn't have to go
through any of the disciplinary processes.
Technically, all cases of academic
misconduct should be directed to the
dean of the faculty, but Rudolph said her
professor dropped the matter after making
her promise not to do it again and to be
conscious of it in future.
"It was really degrading to tell someone
'yeah, I won't copy this again,' because he
wouldn't believe that I had written it," she
said. "It was degrading to admit that I had
copied something when I hadn't."
James and Rudolph are examples of
the difficulties in identifying and punishing
plagiarism — circumstances and individual
judgements play a big role. But not every
case is considered so nuanced. More
severe are cases are those in which, for
example, a student wasn't mistakenly citing
but blatantly pulling ideas from elsewhere
without credit, particularly if the student is
in their senior year and is expected to know
how correctly use secondary sources.
These warrant harsher punishments,
such as expulsion from the university or
actual revocation ofthe degree.
"There are many cases where the
student deliberately cheated, deliberately
cut corners, ran out of time, something else
was going on in their life," said Harrison. "It
happens and students sometimes take the
easiest way out instead."
Harrison noted that intentional cheating
occurs even on assignments worth one or
two percent of the mark. Rather than take a
zero, students "will do it dishonestly... and
then they lose a lot."
But once students have been warned,
they rarely plagiarize again, according
to Harrison. That being said, if they're a
second offender, penalties are harsher.
Harrison has a case on his hands currently
of a group of five students who copied
code, one of whom he has dealt with
before.
"They're not going to get off lightly," he
predicts for the second offender. "And the
others probably will."
Rather than emphasizing on the
negative of academic misconduct,
Stefania Burk, associate dean of Arts,
suggests focusing on academic integrity
instead.
"We talk about academic misconduct,
and I think a better way of phrasing it is
about integrity. Rather than seeing it as a
bad thing you do, there's a good thing we'd
like everyone to do," said Burk. "Plagiarism
"Plagiarism isn't an
admonishment against
using other people's
work . . . it's about
acknowledging it and
being part of that
scholarly or intellectual
community."
isn't an admonishment against using other
people's work." Instead, she says, "it's
about acknowledging it and being part of
that scholarly or intellectual community."
To avoid plagiarism, one piece of
advice is offered loud and clear, and
it's not triple-checking your citations or
extensively reading about every way you
could plagiarize — it's time-management.
According to Mitchell, things like not
allocating time to take proper notes and
work in advance can lead to plagiarism.
"You're just in the mindset of you're really
tired, you've been writing a paper and you
literally forget that that idea was something
you read in another paper," said Mitchell.
Harrison agrees. "Often it's poor
time management that leads to the
poor decisions, and there are usually
alternatives," he said. "Seek an extension,
the worst that can happen is the instructor
can say no.'"JJ 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016
THEATRE //
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= HOTO COURTESY RADIO CITY MUSICAL CLUB
The musical has been popular for a really long time, but RCMC have brought it to relevancy.
Performing Zoology prof stars in Fiddler
Paula Duhatschek
Senior Staff Writer
Matt Ramer probably has
the best headshot on the UBC
Department of Zoology website.
In a directory full of hesitant
smiles, Ramer is bearded and
ascotted while belting a show
tune in a local production of The
Pirates of Penzance. Scientist
by day, actor by by night — this
professor is an excellent model
for following one's ams in a
practical, balanced capacity.
In addition to his position
with UBC, Ramer is a primary
researcher at iCord, a Vancouver-
based research facility that
specializes in spinal cord injury.
As though these two jobs weren't
enough, Ramer also spends three
days a week rehearsing to play
Mordcha in Royal City Musical
Theatre's upcoming production of
Fiddler on the Roof.
First produced in 1964,
Fiddler is one of the most
popular musicals in Broadway
history. The show is set in
pre-revolutionary Russia and
focuses on Tevye, a Jewish
dairyman who grapples equally
with his daughters' romantic
entanglements and with the
inchoate political tension that
hangs in the air.
As Mordcha, Ramer acts as
the town's innkeeper and main
"social convenor." The part
awards him the opportunity to
work on his Russian accent and to
partake in some excellent chorus
numbers, including the boisterous
pub song, To Life (L'Chaim!).
"[It's] a big bar number at
the inn and it's a celebration of
an engagement between Tevye's
daughter and a butcher. That
engagement does not come to
pass of course, but it's a party
scene and it's a wonderful tune
and great dancing," he said.
The Royal City staging
of Fiddler promises to be a
straightforward production
that doesn't depart much from
its original staging. Although
the show's politics have some
contemporary parallels —
particularly with regards to the
Syrian refugee crisis — Ramer
said that it's worth seeing
primarily because it's a classic.
"There's a slight similarity
in that this is just before the
Russian Revolution and Jews
were being evicted from all the
villages in Russia and having to
find other places to live," said
Ramer. "At the end of this show,
we find many ofthe characters
being displaced from their
village, Anatevka, and finding
new homes elsewhere in Europe
and in North America.
"Perhaps there is a tiny bit of
timeliness. But, at the same time,
it's just a really great show."
As a cast member, Ramer
might have a bit of a biased
perspective, but it's easy to take
his recommendation at face
value. He has, after all, had an
amateur musical theatre career
that's spanned over 20 years.
Active in musical theatre
throughout his Bachelor of
Science and PhD at Queen's
University, Ramer hit the ground
running Far From the Home He
Loves in Vancouver's theatre
community after coming to UBC
in 2001. As a scientist and an
artist, you might say that Now He
Has Everything, which currently
includes a war be-mandated
mustache (an occupational
hazard for amateur actors).
"I'm not normally furry," he
said.
Between the research, the
rehearsals and the facial hair,
Ramer is admittedly a busy
man. Performing in eight shows
a week while working two
separate day jobs is a pretty
impressive feat of endurance.
As with anything though, he
said that mastery comes with
practice.
"Things get quite busy.
Balancing everything would be
really challenging if I hadn't
been balancing everything for
20-odd years now. You figure out
how to fit things in."
Furthermore, Ramer believes
that theatre is a useful antidote
for the isolation that often comes
with academia.
"It's good to get out in the
community and speak to real
human beings." '51
PRIZES //
UBC writers nominated
across categories
There are 12 nominees from UBC across categories.
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSOK
Morika DeAngelis
Contributor
The nominees for this year's 32nd
Annual BC Book Prizes include
at least one UBC alumnus for
all seven categories, which is an
incredible feat in itself. Some of
these authors will also be taking a
month-long tour around schools in
British Columbia.
The nominees for the first
award — the Ethel Wilson Fiction
prize for the author with the
best work of fiction — includes
Alix Hawley. Her novel, All True
Not a Lie in It, is set during the
Revolutionary War through the
eyes of famed settler Daniel Boone.
The Roderick Haig-Brown
Regional Prize highlights those
authors whose novels have made
a contribution to the enjoyment
and understanding of BC. This
year the nominations include five
UBC alumni. Jon Bartlett and Rika
Ruebsaat have Bachelors of Arts
from UBC respectively and can
often be found at political rallies
in Vancouver. They are co-authors
of Soviet Princeton: Slim Evans and
the 1932-33 Miners' Strike and also
self described "cultural historians
and scholars of traditional song"
with a focus on "BC's Southern
Interior."
The other nominees include
Derrick Stacey Denholm.
His novel, Ground-Truthing:
Reimagining the Indigenous
Rainforests of BC's North Coast,
focuses on the classification of
British Columbia's forests by
climate, elevation and vegetation.
Denholm also takes into account
the First Nations history that is
attached to the land. This ties
the social, scientific and natural
spheres together, creating a highly
informative and unique read about
the land.
The fourth nominee for the
Roderick Haig-Brown prize is
John Thistle, who is currently a
research associate at the Labrador
Institute at Memorial University.
His novel, Resettling the Range:
Animals, Ecologies and Human
Communities in British Columbia,
is about the ecological degradation
of Interior BC, with insight to the
long term effects for wild horses
and grasshoppers. Thistle also ad
sses the idea of land as a product to
be bought and sold.
The fifth and final nominee is
Briony Penn. Her novel, The Real
Thing: The Natural History of Ian
McTaggart Cowan, is currently
nominated for two awards:
the Roderick Haig-Brown and
the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction
Prize. Her novel is about the
famed Canadian naturalist Ian
McTaggart Cowan, who changed
the understanding of ecology and
inspired people such as David
Suzuki.
The fourth category is the
Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize,
awarded to the author with the
best work of poetry. The nominee,
Amber Dawn's journey with poetry
began in a UBC summer poetry
course.
The UBC alumni nominated
for the Christie Harris Illustrated
Chil n's Literature Prize include
Robert Heidbreder and Annette
LeBox. Heidbreder's book Song
for a Summer Night: A Lullaby
is about the nighttime journeys
of chil n and animals in a
quiet neighbourhood. Many of
LeBox's novels focus on nature,
inspired by her background as an
environmentalist. Her book Peace
is an Offering is about "small acts
of kindness" in everyday life.
The nominee for the Sheila
A. Egoff Chil n's Literature Prize
includes Linda Bailey. Seven Dead
Pirates, her first novel, is about
an 11-year old boy who goes on an
adventure to recover a pirate ship
for seven dead pirates that are
haunting his house.
The final category is the Bill
Duthie's Booksellers' Choice
Award, which is awarded to
the book that stands out in
public appeal, initiative, design,
production and content. The
UBC nominees are Caroline
Adderson and Caroline Woodward.
Adderson's novel, Vancouver
Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition
and Revival, is about the consistent
demolition in Vancouver, resulting
in a loss of heritage and unique
history of our city. Woodward's
novel, Light Years: Memoir of a
Modern Lighthouse Keeper, is about
Woodward's own experience living
in a lighthouse with her husband
for seven years. '51 //OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016
EDUCATION //
FILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Don't close the Writing
Centre tutorial service
Allison O Neil
Former Writing Centre tutor
For those who might not know,
the Writing Centre tutorial
service is a free, peer-to-peer,
one-on-one writing hub where
any UBC student can come to
discuss their questions, concerns
and general what-have-yous
about writing. As a tutor, I met
some very cool friends, role
models and mentors, and carved
out a community that would
support me through my entire
undergrad and beyond. The
service is closing.
Let's take a second to think
about what we are losing here.
Yes, there are many private tutors
available in Vancouver, but they
charge exorbitant rates. On top of
the pressure to succeed despite
gruelling academic standards,
UBC is already so expensive.
Given the upcoming international
tuition increases, demands on
international students may be
particularly high, though domestic
students like me certainly struggle
too.
Think of recent high school
graduates struggling to adjust
to university-level assignments
without access to first-year
writing courses right away.
Think ofthe TAs and profs
who are expected to cover
exorbitant amounts of content in
their lectures, who are burdened
by other departmental demands,
who are often underpaid and
who are also expected to support
student success in writing.
Think ofthe scores of
international students who
come to UBC speaking multiple
languages, who have passed
difficult language proficiency
exams to earn their acceptance
and who are expected to perform
at a high level in their writing
courses. Students in certain
programs must pass further
exams post-acceptance, exams
for which they pay hundreds
of dollars out of pocket and for
which there is no free support
aside from the Writing Centre's
tutorial service.
Think of recent
high school graduates struggling to
adjust to university-level assignments without
access to first-year
writing courses
right away"
I happily spent more than
five of my eight years tutoring
in a writing centre, first at John
Abbott College in Montreal
and then at UBC. John Abbott
is a CEGEP, a publicly-funded
pre-university and professional
college. There are student fees,
but no tuition, so it's pretty close
to free. With only around 6,000
day-time students, its impact
as an educational institution
is pretty much impossible to
compare to UBCs global clout.
Yet it houses a thriving writing
centre which is integrated into
an English class so tutor-training
is ongoing and year-round. At
UBC, we received a few hours of
training at the beginning ofthe
academic year.
A similar disparity exists
in schools here in BC. Douglas
College, Langara College and
UBC-0 all house perfectly
healthy writing tutorial services
despite being disproportionately
smaller. At Douglas, tutors
receive accreditation for their
training. Why is a school that
makes millions of dollars unable
to match the services of smaller
institutions?
Heck, there are writing centres
everywhere from Azerbaijan to
Vietnam! Seriously — there's an
International Writing Centers
Association. They have a global
directory. If the decision to close
the tutorial service passes, UBC
will no longer be included.
Or will it? In his statement in
The Ubyssey earlier this week,
Peter Moroney said that "the
Writing Centre itself will remain
in operation as will its online
portal" — a series of writing
courses that cost hundreds of
dollars to register for will stay,
while free face-to-face tutoring
is cut. I'm not here to debate
semantics, but scrapping the free
writing tutorial service and still
calling oneself a "Writing Centre"
really makes me cringe.
But there's no point in
getting hung up on a name. We
would call ourselves "Midpoint
Location for Assistance with
Printed Composition" if it meant
we could continue offering our
services.
Anyone who knows me well
has endured at least one lecture
on the merits of writing tutoring.
It has been incredibly heartening
for me to hear my own beliefs
repeated and reinforced by
students, faculty and writing
centre professionals through
our petition and social media.
It is just so ironic that this
conversation is happening under
such circumstances.
I don't know why we're
closing, but I hope someone at
the top realizes that there will
be serious consequences for the
future of student success and
UBCs reputation as a world-class
university if the writing tutorial
service closes. In the meantime,
we are working hard to make sure
that we'll be back to serve you next
September. Thank you so much for
your continued support! "31
Allison O'Neil is a former tutor
at the UBC Writing Centre.
CULTURE//
Holi isnt for your Instagram
Rachel Lau
Staff Writer
UBC Holi is back again. This
event that honours the cultural
and religious festival celebrated
by Nepalese and Indian people is
being brought to our campus by
the UTSAV - UBC Indian Student
Association and The Calendar.
When I first saw the event, it raised
some major red flags. I thought
to myself, "Oh, UBC is back at
it again with their culturally
appropriative events." Yeah, Yoga
Rave, I'm looking at you. But when
I heard that UTSAV was one ofthe
organizers, I was confident that
this event is an attempt to share
this deeply important holiday with
us non-Nepalese/non-Indian/non-
Hindu folk.
Now I first want to point out
that I am neither Nepalese or
Indian-identified and I am in no
place to decide what these folks
should be offended about. I'm just
a person who cares about political
correctness and I'm here to "ruin
everything" so people don't run
around being inconsiderate bigots.
Holi, if done right, can be a
beautiful and glorious form of
cultural exchange. But if you're
not going to this event with the
FILE PHOTO JUSTIN LEE/THE UBYSSEY
intention of exchanging knowledge
and learning about another
person's culture, you need to sit
down. If you're going to this event
to get a hip, colourful profile
pic or 100 Insta likes, then do
everybody a favour and just stay
home.
For those who celebrate Holi,
it is the festival of sharing love
and the festival of colours. It's
a significant holiday which is
meant to mark the beginning of
spring and celebrate forgiveness
and renewal. If you're about to
trivialize this holiday into some
one-off event so you can get a few
likes, then please don't go.
Consider Holi as somebody's
home. When someone invites you
to their home — a very personal
part of someone's life — you
put your feet up, take a couple
pictures and peace it. That's
rude. This event is an invitation
to something personal and
meaningful, so don't be a lazy
and inconsiderate participant,
and like any good guest, don't
overstay your welcome. "31
Rachel Lau is a staff writer for
The Ubyssey. Her opinions do not
necessarily reflect those of The
Ubyssey as a whole.
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EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016  ill
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 16008
Public Open House
Eton - Lot 15 Wesbrook Place
Join us on Tuesday, April 5 to view and comment on the proposed residential development proposal
for Eton on Lot 15 in Wesbrook Place. Plans will be displayed for the proposed new market residential project comprising 272 units within a 20 storey highrise, 5 storey low-rise, and townhomes.
Date:
Place
4:30-6:00 PM
Tuesday,April5,2016
Wesbrook Welcome Centre, 3378 Wesbrook Mall
Public Open House
Wesbrook   Location
Tower /      Keenleyside
Tapestry
/
*
MBA
House
Larkspur       Spim
Wesbrook Mali
Pacific        Ultima
Dahlia
House
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be on hand to discuss and
answer questions about this project.
The public is also invited to attend the upcoming
Development Permit Board Meeting for this project
Date/Time: April 27, 5:00 - 6:30PM
Location:     Wesbrook Community Centre
3335 Webber Lane
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be accepted until April 12,2016.
To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/proiects-consultations
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
&£!* *I°H =l 5!# maisfe AHr# S2|*W7| HUNcf.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
The 38th annual UBC
Storm the Wall wrapped
up Wednesday night with
the champions' awards
ceremony. With over 850 teams and
3,500 participants, this year's event
was bigger and better than ever. It
marked the inaugural year ofthe
Wall Challenge, a new race for teams
who just want to climb the wall.
"Unfortunately, it's a little
bit wet, but it's been really great
up until today. We only hope to
continue on our really awesome
streak and everyone's been having a
great time," said Alyssa Reyes who
helped organize the event with UBC
Rec.
With precipitation on three of
the four race days, all teams finished
strong and competed well to get
over the wall. Spirits were certainly
running high, especially during
Wednesday's Gag Heat, which
boasted racers dressed up in all
manners of costumes.
"I saw a bicycle built for two out
there. I think the gag heat will be
interesting," said Amy Gibson, the
marketing and communications
coordinator for UBC Rec.
Ever since the introduction of
Just For Fun teams, Storm The Wall
has seen tremendous growth.
"It's really great to just see
everyone come out and check it off
their bucket list," said Reyes.
The Wall's location has shifted
over the years, especially recently
with the construction ofthe Nest.
But this year has finally come to
what officials see as its resting place
for the foreseeable future.
Joining the Wall outside the Nest
this year was also the second annual
Storm The Wall Party at the Plaza
featuring live music, a Justin Bieber
dance tutorial and a Storm After
Party at the Pit Pub.
The UBC Men's Ironman
Champion, who named himself and
his team G-baby spoke highly ofthe
spirit and energy at Storm the Wall
this year and that winning, "feels
like I'm in a dream right now, but it's
happening. It feels good."
G-baby will join the likes of
teams such as #RCLyfe, To Infinite
and Beyonce, Sassy Science Sistas,
2KOOL4SCHOOL, Ain't No
Wallaback Girl and plenty more as
champions of 2016. "0 TUESDAY, MARCH 29,2016   |    SPORTS+REC    |    11
THUNDERBIRDS //
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
CANDID COMPETITORS
by Isabelle Commerford
1. What song gets you fired up on the day of
Anything on A$AP Rocky's
new album will get me
1 actually prefernot to
listen to music because 1
Definitely varies depending on my mood.
"Crazy In Love" by
Beyonce gets me feeling
A Thousand Miles by
Vanessa Carlton
super pumped up.
perform betterwhen I'm
Usually some Eminem
fierce and flawless before
relaxed.
orsomeJasonAldean.
Like lsaid.it varies. You
can even throw in "Intro"
by The XX.
a game.
2. Ifyou had to spend the day as another athlete, who would it be?
would pick Rickie Fowler. I would liketoaskhim
how he battled at such
a young age to have the
consistent success he
has today.
Teammate Thomas
Kellnerbecauseheisa
stud muffin.
don't know him too
well, but maybe fellow
TAC member Liam
Edward from men's
rugby. I mean ...that
flow! Come on!
would love to spend
the day as Jordan
Jensen-Whyteso I could
fulfill my dream of dunking on someone.
Sarah Korpach because
wa nt to know what it's like
to be athletic, fast, smart
and beautiful.
3. Ifyou hosted yourown radio show on CiTR,
Myradioshowwillbeall
1 would like to promote
Have to go with sports
The Spencer Latu Show
Tattoos and hood rat
what would you talk about?
overthe place. Of course
aguajogging-it'sa
talk. 1 would like to share
would be an action
things.
it has to be golf related,
sport whose time has
my two cents about how
packed hourconsist-
but 1 also want itto be ca
come.
theFlamessuckand
ing of myself reading
sual and as if lam talking
howthe Canucks aren't
Harry Potter books with
to friends. 1 will (also) talk
doing much better.
a mouthful of peanut
about fashion trends.
butter.
4. How have you been celebrating UBCs
centennial year?
5. What's yourfavourite adjective beginning
with a C? I will incorporate the best one into
the title of this 5-on-5.
attended the UBC
Millennial breakfast in
March.
Confident, candid, chic.
I've been doing 100
hours of homeworka
weekand attending more
varsity games to support
otherteams.
Chocolatey.
I've mainly been "soaking" up the centennial
year with trips to the ice
bath [in the] physio room.
[Team] commitments
havetakenatollonmy
poorbody. Ha...ha...ha...
I thinkwhat works best
forthis is cheesy!
OverlOO national championships and counting
forthe University of
British Columbia.
Chill.
By winning another
conference and nationa
championshipforUBC
along with something
that rhymes with "dah
foxy."
Cuddly.
HOCKEY//
Danielle Dube leads the 'Birds at CIS tournament at 39
Jenny Tang
Contributor
Most UBC students have trouble
balancing school, social life and
occasionally the odd part-time job.
But Thunderbirds women's hockey
goalie Danielle Dube takes it to the
next level.
At the age of 39, Dube sits at the
top ofthe Canada West women's
hockey league as the top goalie and
is also a mother of two and full-
time firefighter who is finishing
up her undergraduate degree this
year.
"I'm not very good with time
management, but I'm so busy. I'm
"I could hear it, I could feel it —
instant pain, numbness and loss
of sensation in my arm. It was
pretty scary. That was probably the
scariest injury that I've had."
- Danielle Dube, women's
hockey goalie.
kind of forced to be," admits Dube.
"It's a lot of late night studying
after the kids go to bed and
whatnot. I've had a lot of help from
family and friends."
Originally, Dube hadn't planned
on returning to the ice. Having
retired from playing men's hockey
over 10 years ago, she had thought
of coaching the Thunderbirds
instead. But the head coach
Graham Thomas had other ideas.
"At the end of our meeting
about coaching, he was like, 'Oh,
[three-time Olympian] Danielle
Goyette said you might want to
play,' and I was like, 'Oh, it was
kind of a joke. I have a family and
a job.' He said, 'Well, you know we
can make it work ifyou want to
try.'"
"I was kind of only going to do
it for one year, to be honest, just to
say, 'Oh yeah, varsity athlete — did
that," said Dube. "But then actually
I realized I could come out with
a degree from it in four years. So
then I just played it out year by
year as long as it was working for
the girls and for the family."
Coach Thomas also recalls the
story fondly. "I still remember her
calling me that summer and her
wanting to come in and be a coach.
Then we kind of turned around
and said, 'Hey, why don't you play?
You've never played before,' and
that was the idea there," he said.
"It's definitely a really neat story
for sure."
As the oldest member ofthe
team, the age difference doesn't
affect Dube as much as you might
think.
"I had never sat in that kind of
role as a leader — I'm more of a
quieter player and I always have
been," said Dube. "It's also forced
me to be a little more vocal. The
girls pay attention when I say
things and that's just from the
experience I've had throughout my
career."
On her age difference between
Thomas, she said, "I look at him
like I look at any other coach from
when I was younger. He's in that
coach's role. He has his plan for
the team and I'm a piece of that
puzzle and him being younger has
no effect on me."
"There's never anything like
she's bigger than us or the team.
She doesn't have that attitude. For
us, she's the right person and it
doesn't matter how old you are,"
said Thomas on the same matter.
Because Dube played
professional hockey, her varsity
status eligibility was reduced by
one year so she will be graduating
in four years.
"I could probably fight to
get that year back since they
"There's never anything like she's
bigger than us or the team. She
doesn't have that attitude. For
us, she's the right person and it
doesn't matter how old you are."
- Graham Thomas, head coach.
gave that to [former Olympian
Hayley Wickenheiser], but for
me if I got through all four years
and graduated, that's kind of
completing it for me," said Dube. "I
just don't know if that's fair for the
kids and for me and at my age now.
I'm done and I've had my hockey
career."
Throughout her career, Dube
has had some bumps and bruises
along the way. The worst, in her
opinion, was the injury sustained
during the last regular season
game against the University of
Manitoba Bisons. After covering a
puck on all fours, Dube had three
players driving her neck into her
shoulders and resulted in having
two slipped disks in her neck.
"I could hear it, I could feel it —
instant pain, numbness and loss of
sensation in my arm. It was pretty
scary, I've played hockey for 34
years now and that was probably
the scariest injury that I've had,"
she said.
After getting the green light
from the doctors, she went on to
play the semifinal match against the
University of Regina and shut them
out 1-0.
"Knowing it was my last year,
I wanted to pull it off," she said.
"This could be my last time ever in
competitive hockey. I just wanted to
be able to enjoy it."
Going to nationals in her last
year as a varsity athlete is just the
cherry on top for Dube.
"Being a student in your 20s,
just know that it's one step in
your life. There are so many more
opportunities out there and at
any age. You never know what
opportunity is gonna come so just
seize the moment," advised Dube.
The Ubyssey Publications Society
ANNUAL
GENERAL
MEETING
WHEN
April 1,2016- 1 i
WHERE
Michael Kingsmill Forum in the Nest
AT THE AGM, EDITORIAL CANDIDATES WIL
INTERVIEWED FOR THE FOLLOWING YEAR'S
POSITIONS. VOTING WILL TAKE PLACE FROM
APRIL 4 TO APRIL 8 AT 5 P.M.
WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT 5 P.M., APRIL 8 12    |    GAMES AND COMICS    |   TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016
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COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
MARCH 22 ANSWERS
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ACROSS
1-Metamorphicrock:
7-Air rifle ammo;
10-Apprehends:
14-Eye membrane:
15-Slice of history;
16- Shrinking Asian sea:
17-Think;
18- room;
19-Capital of Yemen:
20-Capital of Utah;
23- Become less intense, die off;
26-Help, resource;
27-Anklebone;
28- First class;
29-Raggedy doll;
30-Hockey's Bobby;
9—°"-Cam
31- More than a little excited:
58- Plate appearances:
33-Defunct airline;
62-Me neither;
34-Ukr. orLith., once;
63- "The Simpsons" bartender
37-SomeMITgrads;
64- Tastelessly affected;
38-Foot digit;
65-2002erupter;
39-Conducted:
66-Grads-to-be;
40-Tax pro;
67-In a faint;
41- Banned insecticide:
42-Religious sch.;
43-Using no fluid;
DOWN
45-DDE opponent:
l-Chem.,forone;
46-Gore and more;
2-Atlantic food fish;
47- NeighborofSask.;
3- Charlemagne's realm: Abbr.
48- Stable compartment;
4-Agitated;
51-Hoopla;
5-Stiff bristles;
52-Apple juice;
6-Chinese weight;
53-Largest ocean;
7-Capital of Germany;
56- High-performance Camaro:
8-Baked dough;
57-Orch. section;
9-Large bag;
life-on-campus.wikia.com
—n
COMICJULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
Mvf mum sepjs yoOvt just
never me-f anyone -Iml"
•p) liked mote -ton yourself
Screw Your mum.
/
COMIC PATRICKMURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY
1
2
5
1
9
7
8
2
6
9
3
4
8
3
8
9
2
5
3
4
2
7
1
8
6
3
10-Winston Cup org.;
11-Thin as ;
12- African language group;
13-Does in;
21- Bicycle built for two;
22-Online brokerage;
23-Oohed and ;
24-Greeted the villain;
25-Emo anxiety;
29-Healing plants;
30-1936 Olympics star;
32-In and of ;
33-Aztec god of rain;
34-Reprimand;
35-III will;
COURTESY KRAZYDAD.COM
36-Speeder spotter;
44-Multicolored;
45- Actress Silverstone;
46-Idolizes;
48-Backbone;
49- Fortune-telling cards;
50-Nutofanoak;
51-Thespian;
52-The YoungerandThe Elder;
54-Doctrines;
55-1 could_ _horsel:
59-From Z;
60-Likewise;
61-Male child;
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