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The Ubyssey Nov 27, 1970

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Array Frat will sell if price is right and others consent
By KAYE BARNETT
Plans for a high rise hotel on Wesbrook are by no
means final - but they're getting there.
The proposed hotel site is still "in the discussion
stage, with nothing concrete as yet," Paul Nicholls,
chapter advisor for Phi Delta Theta told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
"We have not agreed to make any sales at present,"
Nicholls said.
But some people interviewed felt that the three
fraternities involved in the possible sale of their properties
are interested if the price is right.
Before the hotel could be built on frat land, however,
the land would have to be re-zoned through the Greater
Vancouver Regional District. (The land is currently zoned
specifically for frats.)
Keith Margetson, president of Beta Theta Pi, said his
frat would prefer not to move, but would consent to
move under the conditions that "we were offered a good
price, and if the other two frats sold."
Margetson seemed to think that sale of the house
would be a plus factor to his frat, as it would then be able
to find a place which would accommodate more members
than the present house.
"We already have property in mind that we could buy
or lease," he said.
The scheme would also seem to prove beneficial to
the second fraternity in question, Phi Delta Theta.
Bruce Campbell, president of the frat, said
Wednesday it is "considering sale at any time, as our
house was only built to last a certain time, and it is most
advisable for us to sell at this point.
"A realty firm has stated that our property could be
worth approximately $150,000 to $175,000, and we
could make a considerable profit," he said.
Campbell disclosed three other advantages to the
proposal:
continued  on  page   25:   see  HOTEL
Vol. Lll, No. 21 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27,   1970    «*£>>'^ 228-2305
—dave enns photo
'TIS THE SEASON to be merry? Nope, not for a few more weeks, snarl student^^qTJaredancrsuibed in
Brock study spaces. This is about the time you wish you'd stuck to those September restxtutijofts^on
getting things done on time this year. Maybe next year? // ^       . *•/ i lv
U of T votes for p
TORONTO (CUP) - A University of Toronto
referendum on student parity Tuesday and
Wednesday saw the largest turnout of student voters
ever recorded at the Toronto campus.
The vote polled 47 per cent of arts and sciences
students who voted by an eight to one margain to
restructure the council of the faculty of arts and
science with equal staff-student representation. The
parity arrangement would apply on both
departmental and college levels.
On Oct. 28, student members of the faculty
council walked out in protest of the council's
refusal to accept a student motion for a
restructuring committee.
The move was supported by the referendum in
a five to one vote to boycott the meetings until a
restructuring commission is constituted with
student parity to report by March 1, 1970.
ards.
The   faculty   council
faculty and 34 students,
examination     dates    and
requirements, course contents, evalual
petitions, and scholarships.
Of the 5,141 students who voted, only 633
opposed the parity approach. The high turnout is
touted by student leaders as indicative of student
interest in the parity issue, a central precept of the
nearly dead Commission on University Government
report.
The report, published over a year ago,
recommended a total restructuring of the U of T
hierarchy with student parity at most levels. The
death of the report was mainly occasioned by
faculty opposition, and the extensive bureaucracy
of such a restructuring, with the resultant student
disinterest in the whole process.
This is the last issue of The Ubyssey for this term.
The whole operation goes into mothballs until January
as staffers repair to the library to salvage some courses.
Editors, who are beyond salvation, will repair to every
bar in town.
Prof re-hired,
investigators
blast Strand
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Nathan   Popkin,   suspended   Simon  Fraser  University Political .
Science,   Sociology   and   Anthropology   professor,   was   reinstated
Thursday.
Popkin has been reinstated by SFU president Kenneth Strand on
the basis of a recommendation by a committee established at the
university to look into his dismissal following his participation in the
PSA strike last year.
The committee also reached the unanimous conclusion that there
were no grounds for suspending or firing any of the other striking
faculty members.
The committee was made up of UBC economics prof Gideon
Rosenbluth, past president of the Canadian Association of University
Teachers, prof Gordon Nelson from the University of Calgary and
Gerald Zaslove, the only SFU faculty member to sit on the committee.
The committee held 30 hearings, examined more than 200
exhibits and heard testimony from over 30 witnesses, representing
points of view from administration, faculty and students.
The committee's decision applies to all suspended faculty since it
considered the question of what was the "reasonable course of action
for a PSA faculty member."
Professor Michael Lebowitz who acted as Popkin's council during
the hearings noted that the committee had the option to consider
Popkin's case as being different from the rest but did not do so.
In a 50 page report the committee states that members of the
PSA department were deliberately provoked into strike action by the
administration.
The committee noted that there was, in fact, evidence in May of
1969 to indicate that a purge of the department was planned by the
administration. The faculty were therefore justified in making that
assumption.
The committee also found that the rejection of Mordecai
Briemberg as chairman of the PSA department was unjustified.
"We conclude that the circumstances were such that it was
reasonable for the department to expect that the grounds for
dissatisfaction with the elected chairman should be clearly and fully
stated, and that he should be given a chance to present his side of the
case," says the report.
In the committee's opinion the fact that this was not done
increased the plausibility of the view that a purge was intended.
The committee also concluded the trusteeship imposed on the
lepartment was "unworkable" and its imposition was "a deliberate
>rovocation."
The report notes that opposition to the trusteeship and retusal to
co-operate with it extended well beyond the group that finally went
out on strike.
The committee criticized SFU president Kenneth Strand for
refusing to submit the academic and administrative affairs of the
department to investigation by an impartial external body.
The report goes on to discuss the problem which the PSA
department faced in gaining approval of a departmental tenure
committee.
The committee found that that members of the department were
justified in thinking the university tenure committee was placing special
obstacles in the way of contract extensions, promotion and tenure in
the department.
As a result of evidence examined, the committee concluded that
it was reasonable to interpret the administration's actions as "having
the ultimate objective of driving out the radical group in PSA."
continued  on  page   2:   see  COMMITTEE Page 2
T HE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
'Women forced into menial positions even with B.A!
By JUDY McLEOD
Women students who think a
bachelor of arts degree will help
them avoid the problems of
struggling in the work force are in
for a surprise.
A B.A. won't help much, you
will still be forced into the
secretarial positions. A B.A. is not
going to change anyone's attitude
on the woman's role as a
secretary.
This was one of the topics
discussed at the panel discussion,
Women in the Work Force
sponsored by the UBC Women's
Liberation Movement Thursday
noon.
Guest speakers were Nena
Boax,   a  secretary  at   the   UBC
health science centre, and Jean
McLaren, who works for thy
Surrey district school board.
"I hope you don't have any
ambition; you'll make a fine wife
and mother," said Boax.
This is a typical attitude that
most male employers have toward
female office workers, said Boax
as she spoke of the role
expectations that exist for
secretaries.
'The only decision that most
secretaries have to make is the
person that they are to spend the
rest of their lives with. They're
just looking for "husbands," she
went on to say.
''At c o f fee breaks,
conversation    centres    around
clothes, hair styles and other ways
to trap a man.
They are not interested in
furnishing an apartment with
things that they want; men will do
that for them later," said Boax.
Because of the man's role
expectations off them, most
secretaries have been reduced to a
"supportive function, someone
who is docile, friendly, loyal,' cute
and eager to wash the coffee
cups."
"Obedience and passivity are
essential to the boss' harem.
"If a woman chooses to go
outside the role expectation,"
Boax said, "she is running a great
risk. The more responsibility she
takes on, the more of a freak she
becomes."
Committee blames strike on Strand,
PSA profs to go on fighting for jobs
from page One
The committee found such
action to be a "flagrant violation
of academic freedom and the
principle of academic
government."
The burden of responsibility
for the strike lay with Srand, in
the opinion of the committee.
"There is reason to believe that
the strike would not have started
if the president had merely
appointed a negotiating
committee, without making any
further commitments," says the
report.
Both Popkins and Lebowitz
praised the committee for the
thorough and impartial manner
with which they examined the
masses of evidence presented to it.
"While I do not agree with
everything that the committee
said or did I nonetheless respect it
for seeking the truth and making
it known," said Popkin.
Popkin said that the entire
experience had been a grueling
one and that the only thing that
enabled him to keep going was the
support he received from
Lebowitz, the other suspended
faculty, and the students.
'The university in such a
hearing has many advantages that
the individual faculty member
does not have," said Popjcin.
"It has ample funds for legal
counsel, while my funds were
exhausted in the initial
preparation for the hearings," he
said.
"As a consequence the
university was represented by two
lawyers of the firm Shrum, Liddle
and Hebenton trained in the art of
argumentation and procedure.
Professor Lebowitz and I had to
learn it.
"The expense of document
preparation as exhibits for the
committee cost several hundred
dollars. A lawyer would have cost
me between $10,000 and $15,000
and would have created a life long
debt," said Popkin.
"No faculty should have to
bear such a high cost for the
defence of his professional
reputation and good name."
The committee's report makes
only two specific recommendations — one for the reinstatment
of Popkin; the other one urging
that an investigation be made into
the PSA department and the
faculty of arts at SFU.
To the suspended faculty the
report forms the basis for other
possible action.
On the basis of the evidence
and conclusions in the report all
of. the striking PSA faculty,
including Dr. Kathleen Aberle*,,
Dr. David C. Potter, John Legett,
Saghir Ahmid, Mordecai
Briemberg, Louis Feldhammer,
and Prudence Wheeldon should be
reinstated and returned to full
faculty duties, David Potter said.
William Livant, associate
professor   of psychology   at  the
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University of Saskatchewan, who
was the PSA faculty nominee in
the Palmer Committee hearings,
sent a letter to Strand following
the announcement of the
decision of the Rosenbluth
committee.
In the letter Livant urged
Strand to drop the costly
dismissal proceedings against the
remaining faculty.
Popkin sent a telegram to
Strand urging him to bring a
constructive end to problems of
the PSA department by
reinstating all the suspended
faculty, and beginning discussions.
When asked what he intended
to do about the Rosenbluth
report Strand said that he had
lifted Popkins suspension, and was
not prepared to act on anything
else at the moment.
In a meeting presently being
held in Montreal the CAUT is
considering a censure of Strand's
refusal to abide by the Palmer
committee decision.
The American Sociological
Association decided to support
the boycott against SFU by the
Canadian Sociological
Association.
In a letter to Briemberg the
ASA stated its support of CSA
action.
"We will continue to fight for
our jobs back. We won't be
satisfied until we all win," said
Briemberg.
She attributed this situation to
the fact that many women grow
up believing that this is all that is
important, for it is all that is
expected of them.
"They expect you to be
empty-headed and looking for a
man," she concluded.
Jean McLaren is a woman who
returned to work after taking
several years out to raise a family.
She spoke of the advantages of
working in union offices, where
the wages and hours were greatly
improved over what a woman can
normally except.
"I make good wages for a
woman," she said, "but men just
wouldn't work for those wages."
But in spite of the advantages
that the union offers, she finds
that some women actually feel
quilty about getting higher wages.
'They feel they don't deserve
what they're getting and
employers take advantage of it,"
said McLaren.
"Encouraged by men, a lot of
women actually feel they are
stupid and inferior and ".. .a pat
on the back from the boss is
enough.
"I don't let anyone put me
down," she said. "If you let male
employers walk all over you they
will. If we expect to be treated as
equals we have to be good, and if
we're radicals we have to be
better.
"We should be proud in the
fight for what we believe in, not
ashamed."
"After work and house work it
is a constant fight to keep our
heads above water. But it can be
done, and in a positive manner."
VOTE
IAN BRUCE KELSEY
University  Administrator
for
Vancouver School Board
N.P.A.
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MAYORALTY CANDIDATES DEBATE
Find out who is running
for mayor and hear
what they have to say
X
CONFIRMATIONS TO DATE FROM TOM CAMPBELL, BILL GIBSON,
NORMAN DENT, TONY GARGRAVE & GORDON TURNER
7
WED. DEC. 2 - Sub Ballroom   -   12:30 Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Oh no! AMS has upset the administrators
By LESLIE PLOMMER
In a surprising move at the end
of October, student council voted
18-5 in favor of declining to
co-operate in this years's selection
of UBC's "master teacher."
But the matter isn't settled yet.
On Wednesday night at 7:30,
Robert Clark, master teacher
award committee head and UBC
academic planner will attend the
Alma Mater Society's council
meeting to present his side of the
story. His mission is one of
enlightment.
Clark said Thursday he was
invited to the meeting by AMS
president Tony Hodge.
"I'm not going to try talk them
(council   members)   out  of any
Bun in Oven Fund
—david bowerman photo
DEGENERATES NEED HELP
Help put pusher
through school
By LAURA LACHRYMOSE
Things look bleak for Bill this Christmas.
Bill is UBC student who has his share of problems. We
talked to him in a six by 10 cubicle for which his landlord charges
him $75 a month.
There are oyer 45 other people in the same house, a former
rest home in the Shaugnessy area. On Bill's floor alone, over
twelve people have to share a single toilet and hotplate.
Bill is worried about his university education. It seems that
he didn't get a job last summer, so he ended up working for the
Canadian Army's Instant Miltia.He didn't make much money.
Bill didn't have enough money to pay his UBC fees, so he
started pushing dope — smack to frat men, acid to co-eds, and pot
to high school kids. It almost worked out, except one of the frat
men Bill dealt with was a narc. Bill's trial comes up in two weeks.
Bill's father wasn't too pleased to hear about the bust - so
he disowned his son, which also cut Bill off from possible funds.
As a result, Bill feels unloved. But he doesn't feel as bad as
Cindy, his fifteen-year old roomate. She's been pregnant for five
months and wants an abortion really fast. But Bill can't dredge up
the necessary funds.
So, as you can see, tilings are indeed pretty bleak for Bill
this Christmas.
Won't you make him feel a little better and help him get
through fourth year Fine Arts? After all, just think what he can
do with his B.A. when he gets out.
Send a donation to The Ubyssey's Bun In The Oven Fund
and help make Christmas cheery for Bill and hundreds of others
like him. Address your contributions to Room 241-K, SUB, UBC,
Vancouver 8. Don't let this Christmas be a sad occasion for those
less fortunate than yourself.
position they've decided on,"
Clark said.
Clark said he merely wants to
explain the award to the council.
He said the AMS decision not to
support the award by sending a
student to sit on the committee
was made without discussion with
him or the committee.
He mentioned this to Hodge
who then invited him to attend
the meeting.
Clark said he will outline the
origins of the award, the criteria
used in judging and the process
used in choosing a master teacher.
The committee was to be made
up of one alumnus, one board of
governors member (chancellor
Allan McGavin), four faculty
members and four students.
At this point, however, two
sources of student committee
members have dried up - the
AMS and the Graduate Students'
Association.
It was the refusal by the GSA
executive to participate in the
award that sparked a similar
response from the AMS.
The actual motion of refusal to
co-operate with the award was
presented to AMS council by GSA
president   Dave   Mole   and  grad
student representative Evert
Hoogers.
It asked that council endorse a
GSA executive letter informing
administration president Walter
Gage of the GSA's refusal to
participate on the committee
selecting the master teacher.
The motion also urged the
AMS executive to "similarly
decline to co-operate with the
master teacher award committee."
The reasons for the GSA's
refusal to co-operate in choosing
the master teacher were set out in
the letter to Gage:
"The Graduate Student
Association Executive has decided
that we cannot, by nominating a
member, lend our support to the
activities of the master teacher
committee," the letter states.
"It is not our intention to
question the motives that lay
behind the establishment of the
award; indeed, it is our sympathy
with the desire for better teaching
at UBC that has given us now
reason to question the endeavour.
"It is our feeling that the
presentation of the award and the
wide-spread publicity associated
with the search for the master
teachers   serves   to   convey   the
impression that UBC is an
institution dedicated to teaching.
"It appears to us that this both
misrepresents the facts and
reinforces complacency with a
promotion and tenure system that
tends rather to reward those who
have neglected their teaching for
their research interests.
One graduate student reported
to The Ubyssey that Gage had
been "most upset" over the letter.
Meanwhile, at least two
members of the AMS executive
have decided that the AMS
motion of non cooperation with
the award committee doesn't
mean the AMS is prevented from
playing some part in the selection
of a "master teacher."
Co-ordinator Hanson Lau, in
conjunction with secretary Anne
Clarkson, plans to make award
nomination forms available
through his office on the main
floor of SUB.
Asked if this is going against
the intent of the AMS motion,
Lau said Thursday, "I don't care
if it's against or for."
"We're not pushing it (the
award), we're not supporting it,
we're just making the forms
available to students," Lau said.
Polaroid negotiating for
Quebec ID card contact
TORONTO - (CUP) - Preliminary talks are
underway between Quebec officials and the
Polaroid camera corporation on setting up an ID
card system in Quebec, the Toronto Star reported
Wednesday.
The Star said Bourassa is "negotiating with the
huge U.S. Polaroid Corporation for machinery to
issue everyone in the province with an identification
card."
A spokesman for Polaroid told The Star that
the company "hopes to land a huge order from
Quebec for what the Polaroid man called the
'citizenship certificate plan.'
However, The Star added, the deal at the
moment is only in the talking stage.
For Polaroid, it will mean recouping losses the
company would have suffered now that it has been
forced by its black American workers to withdraw
from the South African market.
For Choquette and Robert Bourassa it will
mean greater control of Quebecois, despite civil
liberties arguments against the plan.
Choquette said in the Quebec national assembly
Tuesday that the tagging of Quebecois should not
now be discussed by the assembly's justice
committee because members of the assembly are
not well enough versed in the question of
compulsory identification cards.
Choquette said a partial discussion of the
proposal will appear in a white paper to be tabled
during the next Quebec session. Discussion by the
justice committee could follow the white paper, he
said.
The Toronto Star says "ironically, Quebec's
interest in the Polaroid ID kit comes at a time when
the U.S. corporation has agreed to sever all its
business connections in South Africa following
pressure from black workers in its U.S. plants."
"Polaroid imprisons black people in just 60
seconds," was the slogan used by the Polaroid
Workers Revolutionary Movement in its campaign
against the company's South African business.
The machine used by South Africa to
"imprison black people in just 60 seconds," is the
same one the Bourassa group is interested in using in
Quebec.
The Star says business prospects for Polaroid
"suggest that the extra business sparked" by the
actions of the Front de Liberation de Quebec "will
more than offset the $1,500,000 in sales Polaroid
will lose by dropping out of the South African
market."
The Polaroid identification cards were used in
South Africa to restrict millions of blacks under the
white-imposed racist regulations called apartheid.
Science dean Okulitch retires
A dean's work is ofterfslow
and frustrating, said retiring
science dean Dr. V. J. Okulitch.
At the age of 64, Okulitch is
only beginning to enjoy the
prospect of the freedom to travel
and do research. After being the
UBC dean of'science for 7 years
he will retire this June.
He graduated from UBC and
has been  teaching geology  and
paleontology here since 1944.
"I have tried to transmit my
own curiosity, enthusiasm, and
interest to my students and at the
same time continue with my
research. I feel the two are
indivisable," said Okulitch.
He said that the
time-consuming    occupation    as
Xmas job registration
Registration for Christmas jobs at the Post Office is starting now.
Students should register at UBC's Placement Office as soon as
they know when their exams will be over.
Any students not writing exams should register now.
Cam Craik, Placement Officer, said that the Post Office is holding
a bloc of jobs for UBC students only.
No experience is necessary.
These jobs are for both men and women.
The rate of pay will be 1.65 per hour for inside jobs, and»1.90
per hour for outside jobs.
dean     is     primarily    of    an
administrative nature.
"The dean no longer rules his
faculty. Any influence is exerted
through persuasion, committees
and the consensus of the faculty
members.
It oftens amounts to a slow
and sometimes frustrating
process", said Okulitch.
Through the years, Okulitch
has been sensitive to the needs of
his faculty.
"I had to build up the life
sciences, biology, zoology, and
microbiology. This required an
increase in staff and financing and
the establishment of the life
science council," he said.
Okulitch senses the same needs
for astronomy and geology, a
job for bis successor. Page,4
IE6D6HT A ,
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
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THIWSSIY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
.228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER  27,   1970
Seasons greetings
With the end of the term drawing near, the time
has come to wish everyone a (choose one) (a) Merry
Christmas (b) Happy Channukah (c) Pleasant Saturnalia.
In the true spirit of the season (the true spirits of
the season being what we've been consuming for several
hours prior to this writing) we have decided to show
everyone that we're not the critical, inconsiderate
people our present image conveys.
Therefore, here is the annual Ubyssey Christmas
list, with the appropriate gifts for those we have deigned
to honor.
For administration president Walter Gage: a
recorded "no comment."
For UBC Reports editor Jim Banham: a decent
job.
For mayor Tom Campbell: a hostel in one of his
high rise apartment buildings.
For Tony Gargrave, Bill Gibson and the nine other
challengers for the mayor's office: votes.
For Allan Fotheringham: a Campbell re-election so
he'll still have something to write about.
For Lome Parton and Jack Wasserman:
typewriters with the keys welded together.
For AMS president Tony Hodge:. 873 new
constitutions and another Hamish Earle.
For ombudsman Hamish Earle: someone to listen
to him for 16 hours a day.
For AMS vice-president and sometime fashion
model John Scott Mitchell: a matched set of "his',
"his" and "his" mirrors.
For AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce: an abacus to save
wear and tear on his counting fingers.
For head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs: a
book-burning.
For food services head Ruth Blair: a lifetime
supply of Brockburgers.
For traffic supervisor J. H. Kelly: a parking space
at SFU.
For MacMillan Bloedel, the CPR, B.C. Hydro and
all the other fun-loving corporations: nothing, they have
quite enough already.
For our readers (Harvey, Fred and Sarah): more of
The Ubyssey in second term.
DAVIES RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
The bitter farewell
Waaaaaaaa!!!
I hope you're happy. I hope you realize what
you've done with all your obscene phone calls and
critical letters.
I hope you're satisfied with crucifying me, with
subjecting me to insults, with using me as a
scapecoat for your frustrations.
Well, I've had it. My Christmas is ruined. I'm a
bundle of nerves and I've got an ulcer.
Do you think it's fun to be picked on all the
time? Do you? Do you think I enjoy criticism after
I try my double-dog darndest to portray the truth
to the good students enjoying the good classes on
the good campus. Well, do you?
After all, I've done my best. I've tried to please
you in every way I know how. I bent over
backwards telling you to beware of the Brock
Peeper ... I also bent over forwards.
I scooped the downtown press to get you, my
blessed readers, all the inside dope on theDecember
civic elections ... and dope it was, every last word!
I guess I can understand you criticising me for
my abject criticism of the Alma Mater Society —
after all, they haven't done anything.
Okay, I may have been a bit hard on the
engineers. True they're basically fine boys. They
have their redeeming social values . .. they do send
their mothers cards at Christmas.
Unkind to frats? You seem to think so. You-
criticize me endlessly for picking on these landed
gentry. Heresy, you say. Demeaning a greek god.
Okay, you hate me. Everybody hates me. My
dad   has   disowned   me.   My   friends   deny   any
knowledge of me. The Brock Peeper won't even
glare at me.
Strangers walk up to me in the street and say,
"aren't you Davies?" When I reply in the
affirmative, they ask, "Of Ravies fame?" When I
again answer "yes", they proceed to tell me that
they question my father's participation in my
birthdate, my dietary habits and my sexual
preferences.
You call me a communist. You say I'm a filthy
neo-nazi. You call me an over-sexed sex pervert.
You say I'm a queer. You accuse me of being both a
male and female reproductive organ. Why me????
I'm just a normal guy. I used to play the piano
in a marching band. My idea of a good time at a
party is sitting in the room with the coats, reading
the labels. I think a hot night on the town is
kool-aid and oatmeal cookies. Simplicity, that's me.
But still, you call me a sinner. You say I'm a big
stupid. You say I poop funny. You claim that
whenever I step in a topless bar I ask for two nipples
for a dime or try to make a clean breast of things.
Okay. That does it. So I'm cocky - does that
mean I have to be left holding the bag alia time?????
I'm through. You're not going to have old
Davies to kick around anymore. I'm quitting. I'm
not going to write anything more this year. That's
it.
There will be no more opportunities to criticize
me this year. I resign.
However, next year, 1971, I'll be back. And I'll
be more hateable than ever.
Merry Christmas	
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wife    . .." John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate ,John Twigg
Ass't News   ........ Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo   . . . .  David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
This is the issue that has been" so
breathlessly awaited by countless
engineers and internationalists —
wherein we browse through the
Ubyssey yearbook for toenail sketches
of the tools and cranks responsible for
this scandal sheet.
Smith, Nathan H. — Otherwise
known as The Big Cheese, The Head
Bagel, etc., Nate rules the paper with
an iron paw. When he says, "pretty
please," everyone jumps. Hobbies:
Learning to read, learning to walk, etc.
Pet Peeve: The Frizzies, or in his case,
misplaced pubes.
Bridge, Maurice M. — A card-carrying
dolt and part-time news editor,
Maurice has been forbidden by his
shrink from using traditional metal
"em ruler", pencils, and any other
sharp objects. So he does all layout
with a crayon and tongue depressor.
Gait, Virginia Helen — Ginny lends a
mystic touch to city desk, breaking her
somber silence only to utter profound
questions like "What is life?", and
"Where's a paper clip?" Ginny explains
her taciturn nature by saying, "Wull,
if'n I opened my mout, folks might
tink I was dumb or sumpin'."
Burgess, Robin Leigh — Also a
co-editor at city desk, Robin is always
boasting about her degree in elocution
from the famous Donald Duck
Academy. She is known for the playful
manner in which she breaks the fingers
of reporters who work past deadline.
When Robin puts her foot down, it
nearly reaches the floor. Favorite
saying: "But I am standing up!"
Jordan, Jennifer Lolita — Jennifer
helps out at news desk, when she
doesn't need to be helped out herself.
Since her ancestry is half-British, half
Watusi, it isn't surprising that she is
adept at soccer and head-shrinking.
Favorite food: Gaines Burgers.
Favorite saying: "But I am sitting
down!"
Plommer, Leslie — Another assistant
editor at news desk is pert, brown-eyed
brunette Leslie Plommer. As efficient a
typist as ever graced a newsroom or a
sweater, Leslie is always knocking
about the office, spreading joy and
hydrophobia whenever she qoes.
Curtis, Bruce W. — Managing editor.
Always a gay blade in his chartreuse
neckerchief, "Bruthie" hotly denies
rumor that it holds his chins together.
Bruce was last seen getting his jollies
with a pencil sharpener,
Andersen, John Oscar — As wire
editor, John is proud of his own little
dispatch. He used to sing the Oscar
Mayer weiner song, and last month he
got his wish. Pet Peeve: The large wart
on top of his neck.
McCloy, Scott Alexander — Our
sports editor is known for his spritely
pigeon imitation and the funny way he
trips over paper clips. Scott set out for
Thunderbird stadium last week, and we
haven't seen him since.
Wilson, Timothy J. — Head Page
Friday head, little Timmy and his
blond afro attract admiration
constantly — mostly from shortsighted
sheep. Favorite food: peat moss.
And on to the masses ....
O'Brien, Jan C. — Jan gets around.
People in the office are always
bumping into her. Pet Peeve: people
who aren't interested in her mind,
which she misplaced yesterday.
Wild, Nettie Barry Canada — He, she.
or it? We're not sure yet whether
Nettie is a person or a place. The last
person who tried to find out has
vanished.
Betts, Richard and Knox, Paul —
Perennial political hacks, Dick and
Paulie are constantly debating the
upcoming Truman-Dewey election.
Lassesen, Kenneth — Wabbit has
rapidly established his journalistic fame
through his talent for ear-wiggling.
Kass, Sandra and Margolis,
Josephine — The only Kosher
reporters on the staff, they persistently
refuse Nate's attempts at being
clannish.
Krawczyk, Christine, Boylan,
Sharon; Tarzweli Elaine; Stewart.
Katherine Carney, Katherme — They
have in common liberated views,
quaint natures, ana tha; indefinable
something bordering on human
thought.
McLeod, Judith — Very little is
known about he> o" tor that matter,
by her.
Apouchtine. Nathalie and
Dubblestyne, Bruce — Are tired of
people saying "Gesundhejt"' when
they give their names.
Ladner, Janet; Lucas, Steven; and
Schmidt, David are all masters of the
English language who think ot syntax
as what you pay to the church.
Into the jocksnop .    .
Dunbar, Keith Phink and Gardner
Donald — I myself heard Gardner
solemnly swear to Dunbar that "Yois
have to have leather balls to play
soccer."
Darkroom diliies . . .
Gans, Maureen — Maureen is the
only female photog but she wants to
be thought of as "one of the boys!"
This has created problems for other
photogs who want to visit the john In
privacy.
Bowerman,   David   Nicolas Smith
It is now a generally accepted theory
that     Bowsie's     perpetual     three-dav
To page 5 Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS
Soiled minds
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In reference to Tuesday's
article "Are You A Boy Or Are
You A Girl?" by Leslie Plommer,
I would like to know what kind of
warped personalities are being
allowed to publicly display their
ignorance these days. Is the help
situation so desperate one has to
accept drivel from every fanatic
with an axe to grind?
This person, be they male or
female, has obviously grown so
old or so embittered that they
can't remember the simple
acceptance of childhood. It's
people such as this Leslie
Plommer, with their verbal
diarrhoea that put questions into
the minds of children before the
subject is even realized. Why
should a five or six year old be
concerned with sexual paranoias
when sex itself isn't a question?
It's frightening to think that
any child coming in contact with
this person may come away with a:
slightly soiled mind before it is
necessary. Imagine a couple of
million five or six year old Leslie
Plommers: if they were at this
stage at that age, how will they
think when they are 21?
WENDY ENSOM
Education 4
Exams
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I have lasted at this university
for approximately three and a half
years to present and have got by
quite well, thank you. By keeping
my nose clean and staying away
from trouble I have remained
fairly successful.
However, on Tuesday last there
appeared in the entrance to
Sedgewick Library a paper of
great importance — four pages,
yellow and neatly typed (single
spaced mind you) — in all a paper
of mountainous consequences for
me as well as other students.
Have you ever been hosed. Do
you feel that someone just cut off
your water. They got me, yes,
they did. It took three and a half
years but they finally nailed this
clown to a cross. I can see you
snickering but I'll get even.
In a more serious vein I feel,
and I guess most students do, that
the question of exams is just one
of those asinine* hazards of an
outmoded system.
Do we really need exams? I
don't, especially this year. Do you
think that you, the creators of
this schedule could have arranged
it a little differently. Not just for
me, but for anyone else who has a
situation similar to mine.
I only have four exams and
you will say, "surely that is not
much." Three exams in one day
though, I feel, is a little much. As
a matter of fact, three exams in
any day is a little much. I could
find something else to do.
What wisdom, what sadism
sparked your mind? I know not
how much you found me out, but
congratulations on a job well
done. You have placed me, as well
as others, right up the creek.
BOB JAMIESON
Commerce 3
Traffic
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
If ours is supposed to be a
"walking campus", why are only
students walking?
This is not asked in jealousy of
those able to park nearer the inner
core. I deliberately chose the walk
from B lot to avoid sedentary
health dangers like hardening of
the arteries, shortness of breath
and V-spread. What I resent is
having to jump for my life from
UBC trucks, Hydro buses, police
cars, staff cars, VIP cars and lost
tourists after having spent a good
part of my waking hours
delivering my own car to the
boondocks. (A mammoth traffic
jam is caused by our brilliant
traffic department having
funnelled five lanes of traffic into
a one lane section of Tenth
Avenue back of the winter sports
centre. Stores road was blocked
off months before tenders were
due to be awarded for
construction beside it, and East
Mall is closed to all but
aforementioned traffic.)
Ask one of the traffic gnomes
about this and you will get the
standard answer: "Students asked
for a walking campus, and that's
what they're getting."
I can't ever recall asking for
such a campus but if I did it
would have been with the
understanding that the pedestrian
would be king. It would be
permissible and safe to use all
paved surface, not just the
presently overcrowded sidewalks.
Any traffic which had to go
through would proceed at the
speed of pedestrian traffic, on
sufferance. At present vehicles
seem to rocket along as if the
streets have been cleared of
student cars for their benefit.
I suggest we get the definition
of a walking campus clarified, and
if it means the pedestrian has the
right of way at all times, on all
roads, then all 20,000 of us
miserable, inconsequential
bastards who call ourselves
students  make   damn  good and-
sure   we   take   that  right  every
chance we get.
AUDREY DOWN
Arts 4
Davies
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In defense of hero Davies, he is
our Saviour! His twice weekly
column is the only home of the
real truth on the UBC campus.
The puritan ethic, an obvious plot
of the plainly virtuous .AMS, is
the real menace on campus. Sin,
sex and corruption is the way of
the student, it will not be
supressed.
T. G. BOSGATE
Arts 3
More Davies
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I finally thought of the perfect
expression of my feelings towards
Jim Davies.
He is a very sophisticated,
urbane whoopee cushion.
DAVID OSTREM
Arts 3
Praise
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
My joy about the upcoming
Christmas break is dampened
when I realize I will have to go
more than a month without
reading The Ubyssey.
I was sure in September that
this year's paper would be the
best yet, but you have surpassed
all my high expectations.
Coverage of events has been
excellent and the commentary on
them brilliant.
I have every hope that second
term will be even greater.
NATE SMITH
Arts 4
From page 4
shadow is due to the necessity of his
sneaking up on his mirror to shave.
Enns, David; Perrins, Kevan;
Goodman, Michael; Garrett, Brett;
Tan, Daryl and Cluff, James — These
are the other darkroom delinquents
who have resigned themselves to the
photographic type of development
rather than the mental.
Afterthoughts and afterbirths . . .
Twigg, John Maitland — The G.O.M.
(Groping Old Man) of The Ubyssey is
Associate Editor, but as little as
possible.
Gibbs, John — Is Chief Twit in
charge of Dramatic Resignations, a
post which he quits every five minutes.
Davies, James — This cherubic lad's
smiling face and paisley shorts are
known all over campus. Founder and
chairman of the Diamond Jim Fan
Club, Jim can be found any day in
Brock practicing anal meditation.
Finlay, D. Michael and Cawsey,
Frederick — These two are perhaps the
pride of last year's "best goddammed
perverts on campus". They were
picked up by campus RCMP after
several complaints from nubile
teenaged squirrels In the endowment
lands.
a thousand voices and at least as may
words keeps the entire outfit running.
What can I say? He has made the staff
into what it is today. A lynch mob.
—SHANE McCUNE
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
in the
classroom
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Anyone who's been through the UBC law school - or any law
school - will tell you law classes are almost uniformly dull.
This is often because a law education means getting a grasp of
basic technical processes. For the most part, law school is a technical,
professional school. It sounds dull and usually is dull.
Although theory undeniably comes into the study of law, there's
just no getting around the fact that first and foremost lawyers have to
know the tools of law.
But there's another reason classes in law are often so bad — profs.
Most law students will tell you that poor or mediocre law profs are the
rule rather than the exception at UBC's law school.
Law prof Albert McClean is one of the exceptions, despite the
fact that most people don't sit up late at night reading about real
property - the subject of McClean's one-term course.
On Monday at 10:30 a.m., McClean's topic was the law of
mortgages.
The mortgage, as essentially a loan transaction, creates a dual
relationship between the parties involved, McClean said, just as in the
landlord-tenant relationship.
This dual relationship consists of first a debtor-crediter
relationship and second, of a property relationship.
Involved in each,mortgage is either a provision for re-conveyance
of the property involved, or (more usually in B.C. ) a provision for the
mortgage to become void after a certain date.
This point by which the loan must be discharged is the date of
redemption. Tied up with this is the equity of redemption - originally
the equitable right of the mortagagor to redeem land after his
contractual right to redeem has expired.
McClean outlined a situation where a vendor sells title to land to
a purchaser for $10,000 and the purchaser in turn gives the vendor an
option for re-purchase of the property within a year, plus an additional
amount of money, say, $ 1,000.
Is this a mortgage disguised as an absolute sale of interest coupled
with an option for repurchase? McClean asked.
It must be established "what the two parties intended in the
transaction before a legal decision can be made on this, McClean said.
If it is established that the intention was to mortgage the land,
the equity of redemption may work to let the mortgagor get his
property back even after the date of discharge of the loan is past.
McClean went on to examine the extent to which redemption of
the property by the mortgagor can be impeded or prevented.
"You may not, in a mortgage, insert a term which will make
redemption impossible," McClean said.
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Law usually dull
He cited the 1904 House of Lords case of Samuel versus Jarrah
Timber in which Jarrah, as the mortgagee, had included in the mortgage
an option permitting it to purchase the land involved.
This would have effectively prevented the mortgagor, Samuel,
from redeeming the land, McClean said.
The House of Lords therefore decided that this provision for
purchase was invalid, despite the theory behind freedom of contract.
What of impeding a mortgagor's right of redemption?
McClean outlined a situation where a mortgage might state that
payments against the mortgage could only take place over a period of
40 years.
If the mortgagor finds himself in a position to pay off the
mortgage in one lump sum, can he be held to the original provision
which he will regard as an impediment to redemption?
Citing another court judgment to illustrate his point, McClean
said the court might strike such a payment clause out of the original
contract if it was shown to be "oppressive or unconscionable." This is
the test of impediment.
The law on mortgages definitely lacks the glamour attached
(often mistakenly) to criminal law. Nonetheless, one of McClean's
strong points was creating interest in a fairly dull field. His delivery was
excellent.
He spoke very clearly and his voice carried right to the back of
the large room in the East Mall hut.
His line of thought was clear and he paused frequently to ask if
the students had questions.
The few who did received short, clear answers.
There were about 70 students in Monday's class, and the few
surveyed said McClean is one of the best profs in the law faculty.
His chief failing was one shared by the majority of law profs:
dealing too much with specific, freak academic questions of law, rather
than everyday situations.
This is something which law students will only be able to evaluate
some years after they finish law school.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
FRENCH HISTORIAN SPEAKS
Polarization a threat to Canada
By NATHALIE APOUCHTINE
Polarization will eventually
ruin Canada, a French-Canadian
historian told about 200 UBC
students Thursday.
"Although the recent events
and the people who now govern
this country in a purely 'logical'
way are polarizing forces, in fact,
nothing essential has changed in
the last ten years except the
acuteness and urgency of our
problem," said Jean-Pierre Wallot,
associate professor of history at
the University of Toronto,
speaking in the SUB ballroom.
Before coming to this
conculsion, Wallot gave a brief
outline of the history of
separatism from the time of the
British take-over of French
Canada in 1760 until the present.
Following the conquest and
the American Revolution, the
major problem of the British in
North America was "to insure the
future and supremacy of a British
people ... to develop and exploit
the empire of the North on a
continental scale - the only way
to prevent an American
take-over."
And this had to be done
"despite and against the legitimate
national ambitions and the
opposition of an older people,
defeated and without the means
to exploit the country in a
sufficient way," said Wallot.
The Union Act of 1840 was "a
second conquest," said Wallot.,
"In French Canada, it was the
end of the generally accepted
ideal of a separate national
identity. For the British it meant,
at best, assimilation of French
Canadians and, at worst, coping
with the annoying but now
subordinated minority," said
Wallot.
''From then on,
French-Canadian nationalism
would    concern    itself    nearly
exclusively with the preservation
of some cultural autonomy in the
Quebec area of united Canada."
However the struggle between
the federal government's push for
centralization and the provinces'
striving to maintain some
autonomy complicated the
situation.
Wallot said although twentieth
century problems often favored
provincial autonony, the
depression and the world wars led
to increased centralization.
"By 1952, Quebec stood alone
in its opposition to federal
centralization of powers and
taxes," said Wallot.
Internal difficulties during the
Duplessis regime and the struggles
against centralization made
French Canadians "more
conscious of their collective
existence, of their own specific
destiny and of the possibilites that
were open to them if they would
only use the sole government
under their control, that of
Quebec."
In the. middle '60's, the
Pearson and Diefenbaker
governments worked out with
Quebec a "cooperative
federalism", which gave Quebec
"some sort of particular status,
which allowed the province to opt
out of certain federal-provincial
schemes," said Wallot.
"However with the, rise of
Trudeau into power and decisive
victory at the last federal
elections, the tide has turned back
to the 1940's and 1950's, with a
federal government that gives lip
service to federalism and
provincial autonomy, but grasps
in fact as much power as possible
and gives as little as possible to
the provinces," said Wallot.
At the same time the Quebec
government has remained
basically the same as before the
change in federal policy, that is, it
has consistently retained a striving
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for autonomy, said Wallot.
Alongside the events of the last
200 years, there have been
changes in ideologies in Quebec,
he said.
"A conservative ideology of
survival . . . which restricted
national character to matters of
language, civil laws, religion and
folklore," that is, an ideology
which made French Canadians a
"provincial ethnic minority,"
dominated in Quebec for a long
time. \
Separatist tendencies were^
marginal, and each time there
were manifestations of
displeasure, "prosperity and a few
federal concessions mostly
symbolic, would bring them (the
separatists) back to the generally
accepted credo," said Wallot.
Howeyer, after the second
world war, this ideology began to
evolve.
Quebec had changed to an
industrial, urban and secular
society and a whole new
generation of intellectuals saw the
need for a closer relationship
between Quebec's -cultural
identity and the striving for a
more advanced technological
society in Quebec, said Wallot.
However, the radicals of the
1940's and the early 1950's could
not come up with a common
political program, said Wallot.
"Their approach was mostly
negative, destroying the existing
order and turning blame against
French Canada itself," he said.
Later, a new movement of
radicals which held that
"federalism in itself meant
structural inferiority for the
minority dragged into it," began
to gain influence, said Wallot.
The radicals who supported
this new tendency were not
interested    in    preserving    "an
artificial piece of a museum."
"Thus, it followed that
collective self-government or
conduct in political, economic
and cultural matters or
sovereignty was the road to
normalcy for a living nation," said
Wallot.
From this idea sprang different
separatist groups, including the
more radical Marxist and anarchist
ones. •
Some turned more and more to
violence, "in the hope of
associating the French-Canadian
emancipation to the
decolonization drive throughout
the world and of emancipating the
working classes," said Wallot.
"The tactic - to provoke the
state   to  reactions which would
enhance and illuminate the
contradictions inside the
'bourgeois capitalistic
Anglo-Saxon' state," he said.
The example - the last few
weeks in Quebec.
However, Wallot pointed out
that the main group of separatists
adhere to Rene Levesque's Parti
Quebecois, which got 24 per cent
of the popular vote in the
provincial election in April.
"The discovery, of being a
majority and a nation in Quebec,
was slow in coming, and cannot
be crushed by a temporary,
powerful and well-meaning
French-Canadian group in Ottawa
nor even by an attempt at general
biculturalism throughout
Canada," said Wallot.
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Useful for Xmos Mailings
and Telephone Calling
During the Holidays
Buy Your Copy Today
at THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS & BUS. OFFICE
■
f
HELP
We need your help in gathering data
to present to the Federal Government
regarding book pricing.
HAVE YOU: (1)    Bought  a   book   downtown and found the  University  Bookstore
charges more for the same book?-
(2) Bought a  British or American book and noticed that the marked
Canadian price was higher?
(3) Bought a book last year and noticed that the same book this year
costs more money?
IF SO, PLEASE WRITE DOWN THE FOLLOWING ON A SLIP OF PAPER AND
SEND IT TO BOX 154 SUB OR HAND IT IN TO THE AMS EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
SUB, C/O ART SMOLENSKY:
The Book Title   	
The Author's Name	
The Publisher	
Relevant Price Information	
Your Name    :	
Your Phone Number	
Course (s) the book issued for.
There is a good chance that given enough information we can effect government action. Thanks
for your help.
The AMS Book Pricing Investigatory Committee Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
CIVIC ELECTION WRAP-UP
Gibson — pollution is the major problem
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Bill Gibson, The Electors'
Action Movement mayoralty
candidate, has a concern for
almost every problem — especially
the ones concerning Vancouver.
In a speech Wednesday to 150
people in SUB 207, Gibson
expressed concern on rapid
transit, pollution, hostels for
travellers, parks board and even
law'n'order.
But on himself, the UBC
doctor of psychiatry said: "I
don't want to masquerade as a
psychiatrist. Too much has been
made of my university interests.
"My interest is in the
community, not my professorship."
Gibson translates his interest in
the community and the issues this
way:
According to him, rapid transit
is mandatory for .Vancouver.
"The financing of the system is
the main concern; 75 per cent of
the cost will be shared federally
and provincially because this
amount could never be recouped
from the system itself. A 1.1 per
cent per gallon tax of gas and
diesel fuel and a tax on
single-occupancy cars will finance
the rest", says Gibson.
In    addition    to    preventing
Brown sees city with no cars,
better transit and more parks
By SHANE McCUNE
Stephen Brown thinks
Vancouver could be a "gassy place
to live". And he's not being
Sarcastic.
Brown is a 26 - year - old
journalist who is running for parks
board.
He envisages Vancouver as a
city with no cars, but rather an
efficient transit system involving
buses running every two minutes
or so on every fourth street
downtown.
Side streets could then filled in
as small parks.
Brown, one of the three New
Democratic Party candidates for
the parks board, supports a party
platform which is quite similar to
that of independent parks board
candidate Robin Harger.
This includes heavy emphasis
on preservation of the Wreck
Beach area in its present
undeveloped state.
Brown has a novel idea for the
prevention of erosion of the beach
around UBC. He suggests the use
of a "groin" constructed of piles
extending into the ocean at right
angles to the beach.
This   would   stop   the   lateral
drift   of   sand   toward   Spanish
Banks.
He is against any pavement of
the beach, including the parks
board proposal to construct a
pedestrian walkway allowing for
emergency vehicle access.
"If a fire truck can descend t>
the beach, so can any traffic," he
told The Ubyssey.
"And if preventing erosion
means ruining the beach, then let
the cliffs erode," he added.
Brown placed great emphasis
on the need for people to "live as
naturally as possible."
He said that a majority of
"people-minded" candidates
should be elected to overcome
"Non Partisan Association
indifference.
"The NPA brags that the city is
run like a business. And it is
profits — come first, not people.
"The NPA government is
damaging the health of the East
Side by encouraging industry
there. There's no industry in the
West End except the Carling
Brewery.
"The NPA people keep their
preserves free of crap."
Brown said that there should
be an "adventure playground" for
children in every block. He also
advocated more day-care centers
for pre-schoolers and more
community centers for the aged
and housewives.
'. . . a civic government
of discipline and imagi
nation . . .'
FOR MAYOR
Tony Gargrave
WE,
MUST
MOVE
NOW!
vote
NDP
TONY GARGRAVE
aldermen - bob douglas, norm levi, john
stanton, hilda thomas, dr. harry winrob.
school board - roger howard, ken
McAllister, nigel nixon, jake rempel, lillian
whitney. parks board - james atkins,
stephen brown, roy lowther.
Help the party which depends on people and puts
people first. If you can help distribute leaflets, contact
Campaign Headquarters No. 9 2414 Main St., 879-8405.
traffic from stangling our city,
rapid transit will offer the best
solution to the unemployment
problem.
"It should supply about
10,000 jobs for about three
years," said Gibson.
"Pollution, the major problem,
is not getting official attention.
Instead it has fallen to voluntary
associations like the Society for
Pollution    and    Environmental
Control", said Gibson.
Problems such as these are no
reason to stop our consideration
of people moving throughout
Canada, but adequate facilities
must be made available to them,
he said.
"I feel that the ideal hostel is
one that holds about 50 people.
Meanwhile, the idea to build
hostels for 1,000 people is
percolating in the provincial
government because it would be
cheaper."
Asked if he approved of the
ward system, Gibson said: "I do
not because in the past the
incumbent had to do the spending
of the money in the ward and this
facilitated corruption.
One of the weakest links in
civic government is the park
board, he said. It has to come to
council for appropriate funds
because it has no power of
taxation like the school board.
"The park board's appeal to
council is pathetic, and then
they're expected to do the
impossible with no funds," he
said.
Gibson posed the question:
"Who's law and who's order?"
"Robbery and crime have
doubled (since Campbell became
mayor). We need a police force
trained to do something other
than hassle youth. And of courst:
the police chief, not the mayor,
should be responsible," said
Gibson.
4
. . . a world of contemporary fashion
11  852 Granville St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
Re F Ltd
The College Shop Ltd.
869 Granville St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
687-1030
683-3239 Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
II
Abolish money, courts, cars and gravity
ft
By SANDY KASS
Money, the court system, cars,
concrete parking lots and dog
pounds will be eradicated if
Yippie mayoral candidate Betty
(Zaria) Andrews is elected.
Andrews cites her
qualifications as person, woman,
mother, welfare recipient, freak
and ex-convict.
She is running on a strictly
yippie platform of
"antiestablishmentarianism and
freedom for the people."
In an interview with The
Ubyssey Thursday, she said by
eliminating money and the
capitalistic system from the city
of Vancouver, people would be
encouraged to do the kind of
work they wanted to and not be
forced into doing something they
don't like for purely economic
reasons.
"The present system is taking
away our individuality' and
creativity. If people who like to
make the same things can get
together and run their own
factories, unemployment would
not only be reduced, but would
be eliminated," she said.
Everyone likes to do
something, she said. No one can
stand sitting and doing nothing
for very long.
"I only want to make people
aware that such a plan is feasible
if everyone works together."
She admitted that she may not
be able at present to instigate
such philosophies into city
council, but would nonetheless
push its eventual "real
possibility."
According to her plan, all
stores would become free
distribution points for goods
people made and grew.
''Industry will use
non-polluting methods and will
not over-tax the environmental
cycle.
"This    would    further    stop
NDP civic election candidates
criticize planned high rise
Plans are underway to turn
Vancouver "into more of an
"executive city" than it already is.
This was opinion of John
Stanton and Hilda Thomas, NDP
candidates for alderman in the
civic elections.
They spoke of the planned
development of a high rise, high
rent conference center at the
entrance of Stanley Park.
The proposed development is
to take place between the
Bayshore Inn and the Stanley
Park entrance on land owned by
the national harbours board.
"The development is to
consist of four 30 storey towers, a
400-room hotel and a number of
smaller buildings," Stanton said.
"It is to be an executive city.
The number of executives in this
city is about 1 per cent," said
Stanton.
"The cost to the people of
Vancouver is already enormous,"
said Thomas.
"The land is valued at $19
million. For tax purposes it is
being assessed at $5.7 million,"
she said. "The cost to the
taxpayers is about one half
million dollars."
Stanton went on to outline
the steps the private developers
went through to get the land and
the political and corporate tie-ups
off those involved.
The principal people involved
are Hugh Martin,former treasurer
of the Non Partisan Association,
and    Peter    Paul     Saunders
co-director with alderman Art
Phillips of Grouse Mountain
Resorts, said Stanton.
Phillips, is a member of The
Elector's Action Movement.
"The national harbours board
under the present directorship of
the liberal governmant in Ottawa
leased the land to the developers
for six cents a square foot for
twenty years," Stanton explained.
"The land is valued at sixteen
dollars a square foot," said
Thomas.
"You can see how these
people have their fists in the
federal treasury through the
subsidies," Stanton pointed out.
The official name of the
continued on page 10: see MORE
over-production," she said, but
did not elaborate as to how it
could.
As a further point, she would
try to dissolve the police force
and court system, and put
everyone on a "mutual trust and
sincerity" basis.
"People think revolution is just
another power change," she said.
"But it isn't. It's a long time
process of acquiring freedom.
"It's beginning now with the
establishment of free schools, and
other groups such as the
Unemployed Citizens Welfare
Improvement Council," she said.
"1 could not expect to do
everything right away. If I did I
would probably be impeached
before I was elected."
She said she would recommend
the court system staying in effect
for a while, at least long enough
to fully disillusion those who still
feel it is the best policy.
"A person's friends can be a far
greater rehabilitative force than
being plunked in some institution
and being told to reform," she
said.
"People just have to come to a
group understanding of their
natural problems," she said.
"The present system is only
producing alienation and misery."
She said that most murderers,
for example, will only kill once.
"We have already abolished
capital punishment. Why not
fulfill what that move indicated?"
She said she did not believe in
social workers or the welfare
system.
"They provide a few essentials,
but tend to discourage a person,
rather than encourage," she said.
She reflects the same attitudes
when it comes to the education
system.
"Give the schools to the
students. People who want to
teach and people who want to
learn can meet there."
Andrews is not optimistic
about her election chances, "I
really do not expect to get elected
and really haven't decided yet just
what I will do. But I know if I get
a chance, I'll think of something."
Andrews is the mother of a
two year old son, and added that
if elected, she would institute a
free day care centre in city hall.
In addition, Andrews proposes
to give the Hudson's Bay
Company and all its land to the
Canadian natives, tear up concrete
parking lots for playground
facilities, abolish the car, abolish
pounds and assist people who
want to take care of stray animals,
institute a free rapid transit
system, and repeal the law of
gravity.
Andrews has received no
financial assistance for her
campaign, and her few posters
were recently destroyed. As a
welfare recipient, she has little
money of her own to support a
massive campaign.
"I cannot see spending
$25,000 on a campaign when
there are so many other places
where it's needed so desperately.
"Besides, I don't believe in
money."
DECEMBER 9 — USE YOUR VOTE
HAPPY NEW EAR
6nts pour, ,
An Advent One
Celebration
with
Steve, George & Del
12-String Guitar
Electric Guitar
String Bass
A FOLKSONG MASS
This Sunday, Nov. 29th
10:30 a.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.
Across from Administration Bldg.
DIVING SPORTSMEN
who want the best
shop at
WILLOUGHBY'S DIVERS DEN
* Wet Suits
* Tanks
* Regulators
* Spear Guns
* Complete Line of
Diving Accessories
STUDENT RATE ON RENTALS
■     WIlLOUGHBY'li
2745 W. 4th    738-6929 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
fit
MORE CIVIC ELECTION STUFF
Tenants still lack full rights " -- Yorke
By JAN O'BRIEN
The present apparatus of city hall is committed to the
concept that a tenant's only right is to pay his rent on
time said Bruce Yorke, Committee of Progressive Electors
aldermanic candidate Thursday.
Yorke, secretary of the Vancouver Tenant's Council,
is running on a tenant platform.
His program consists of:
• no rent increases to exceed the rise of the
cost-of-living index;
• abolishing security deposits;
9      no evictions without just cause;
• a tenant representative on Vancouver tenant
grievance board;
On no rent increase to exceed the rise in the cost of
living, Yorke said: "Although rents can only be raised
once a year, there is no limitation on the increase.
"Typically, a rent increase is about $8 or $10 per
month. Using last year's cost of living increase, it would
be three per cent or about $4 on a $ 140 per month rent."
"This is a workable solution to rent control, it does
not require a large bureaucratic machinery to operate.
"It could be enforced through the grievance board or
the courts," he said.
Implicit in such action from city hall is the
recognition that it is a fundamental need and must be
treated like a public utility, said Yorke.
"City hall should be getting into housing as a
landlord. It is in a better position to secure land and is
better able to plan developments in an integrated way
than are private developers.
"City hall should be developing, financing,
administrating and then leasing housing to tenants. 'This
policy is very widespread in Europe."
Yorke said the tenant's council asked for a tenant on
the grievance board when it first came into being in Sept.,
1969, but a tenant member was ruled out on the basis
that the board is not a representative board but a neutral
bodv.
"The comparison of the grievance board is
completely landlord oriented — mentally and in past
associations," said Yorke.
The board members are Theresa Galloway, whose
husband is a realtor; Reg Rose, paid secretary of the
Vancouver  Board   of Trade   for  25  years; and Orson
More traffic through park
continued  from  page  9
development is the Harbour Parks,
Four Seasons Development.
The directorship is as follows:
Graham Dawson, a member of the
Vancouver Police Commission,
appointed by the Provincial
Government, and a director of the
Power Corporation, H. S. Foley
former director of the Powell
River Co., P. P. Saunders and a
man named Saxton, a former
director of Laurentide Finance.
.Hilda   Thomas  pointed  out
the evils of such a development.
"The development will
increase traffic in an already
congested area to 25,000 car trips
per day. It will wall off the
waterfront so that it is
inaccessible to the public," she
explained.
"It will also create a city not
for the people of Vancouver but
for the executive types," Stanton
said.
Stanton and Thomas both
stressed the need for human
development in the city of
Vancouver. They cited the
interests of TEAM andd the NPA
as contrary to the interests of the
people.
"Will Vancouver be a city for
the wealthy or a human city for
people who can enjoy the
opportunities of beaches, parks,
mountains and all we have in the
natural  setting?" Thomas asked.
Banfield, former alderman for the Non-Partisan
Association.
Placing a tenant on the grievance board and on city
council would inhibit council actions like the
strengthening of the security deposit to $25 per person
per unfurnished suite and $50 per person in furnished
suites from the former $25 and $50 per suite can be
avoided.
"Security deposits should be abolished, formerly
tenants in Vancouver were in a good position having only
the $25 or $50 per suite.
"Since the passing of the provincial Landlord and
Tenants Act, which abolished security deposits,
Vancouver tenants are in an inferior position," he said.
According to the act, it is up to the tenant to prove
that there is no cause for eviction, he said.
"This should be changed to place the onus on the
landlord. A by-law like this was established in Surrey,"
said Yorke.
He said such a move would have considerable
opposition in city council because of its committment to
the landlord.
This year 55 per cent of the voters are tenants.
"If a large percentage of tenants would vote, the
election could be different," said Yorke.
Harry Rankin, COPE incumbent alderman, and Yorke
will be in the SUB ballroom Tuesday at noon.
Mayoralty debate
The AMS is sponsoring a mayoralty debate
Wednesday noon in the SUB ballroom.
All 10 candidates have been invited. Bill Gibson,
Norm Dent, Tony Gargraves, Gord Turner and the
incumbent, Tom (Spiro) Campbell will definitely take
part in the debate.
All candidates will have a few minutes to present
their opinions on the city scene. The floor will then be
open to the audience.
19 7 0
EDITION
(—   Deutsche
\ftHimmwhvn
Qesellschaft
THE    ANNUAL    DEUTSCHE    GRAMMOPHON
FESTIVAL  OF  GREAT  NEW  RECORDINGS AT
SPECIAL LOW /RICES ... FOR A LIMITED TIME
ONLY.
EIGHT DIFFERENT STEREO SETS NEVER
RELEASED BEFORE WILL BE SOLD AT
BARGAIN PRICES FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY
(UNTIL JAN.31,1971).
After Jan. 31st,  1971 they will become part of the   regular Deutsche Grammophon Price Catalogue, and
will then be sold at Regular Deutsche Grammophon Prices — All eight are being released this month
BACH ORGAN WORKS 1
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sit on a late summer's day
now
Page
in his autumn's thought
Ij^lil   ____fM   («m W7
he contemplates
a
remembered
m1 riusiy
space of spring filled dreams
that passed into a winter's truth
and no one comes to
Gift Poster by Malcolm
say hello
to an old man
and Burge Page 4
glinting through
the  sun.
Dpoem by  Keith  Dunbar
Executive ass't to the editor
Grant Dickin
Nettie Wild
Tim Wilson
Snerial efforts   . .	
-Photi
Editor RACOON COATS-
-•■/-rO-o
FOOTBALL GAMES
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IN THE FlPTTS-
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Unposed, right Malcolm, left, Drummond Burge
photo David Bowerman
Subspace?
Subspace, the working environment
exhibition by artist Malcolm and poet
Drummond Burge in SUB Gallery has to be the
best thing that ever happened to that gallery,
with musicians, studio classes with models for
art students, and folksingers all complementing
the really fine work of Malcolm and Burge.
Subspace has been in operation for three
weeks, it closes Dec. 5, but there are plenty of
things happening all next week including
musicians, models and whatever else Malcolm and
Burge can come up with. Considering the past
three weeks of activity, that could be quite a
bit. The following is an interview with Burge
and Malcolm that will hopefully better aquaint
you with two people who have spent a lot of
time and energy creating an outstanding art
environment that has enjoyed a lot of positive
response from the students.
Pf: Where are you from, Drummond?
D: Six years ago, I was from England, now
I'm from B.C.
Pf: Have you been writing poetry for a
long time?
D: I haven't really, I've been at school in
England and I wanted the opposite of that, so
I came to B.C. to do B.C. things, logging,
construction work, the opposite of what I had
been doing, in the hope that I might achieve a
sort of balance. I've been thinking for a long
time.
Pf: A balance in your poetry, or in your
life?
D: In my life.
Pf: Are you conciously seeking this balance
in your poetry? I have noticed that many of
your poems are quite gentle.
D: It's the experience, that's why I write
poetry, a mental experience, rather than
physical.
Pf: Are you trying to express anything in
particular?
D: No, each time I am trying to say
anything, I'm just trying to do it well.
Pf: What about you Malcolm, where are
you from, and what sort of things have you
been doing?
M: I'm from the Okanagan, I've worked
newspapers, lithographers and publishers, I went
to The Vancouver School of Art for a while.
Pf: Where do you usually work?
M: I have a studio in the west end, and a
gallery, Metalmorphosis, in Gastown.
Pf: Are you trying to express anything in
particular with your paintings?
M: Myself.
Pf: Do you look on art as just an
Continued on next page
PAGE FRIDAY, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970 expression  of yourself, or as a teaching space?
M: I don't know. I don't have preconcieved
visual notions when I confront a canvas.
Pf:  So each canvas is unique.
M: No. Each canvas is an individual
experience for self.
Pf: What brought Subspace on?
M: We discovered through aquaintances that
this space was available, so the idea that
Drummond and I began with, was to learn
what an exhibition was about. We decided to
live there to find out exactly what was
happening. So far, it's been a tremendous
experience. We've learned a lot of things about
the university, we've come into contact with all
sorts of new people, creative people, and people
who wanted to be turned on' creatively.
Pf: So Subspace began as a question?
M: Yes.
Pf: Has Subspace stimulated your poetry
Drummond?
D: It probably will do. It's stimulated my
life.
Pf: There has been a lot of positive
response to this exhibition, what do you think
is the reason for this?
D: The fact that people walk by here and
discover something, as opposed to being taught
it, of having to learn it from a professor; here
they can discover it for themselves.
Pf: I've noticed that you and Drummond
are fairly consistent in your emphasis on
experience. Does this means that you regard the
process or experience of creating as the most
important aspect of your art?
M: It's the learning, the learning experience
that is most important. That is the original
concept of Subspace.
D: If we just put poetry and paintings on
the wall, it would be nothing.
Pf: Subspace is over on the 5th of
December, what are your plans after this?
M: We'll carry on what we're doing now,
only we won't be living in the gallery. We hope
that the space will be used, something
happening there, as opposed to something
static.
The Girl in the
Supermarket
FOR GUYS & GALS
I met her in the dairy products.
She was standing in front of the butter and
margarine, just sort of surveying the area,
picking up a pound of something, weighing it
in her hand and replacing it. Probably doesn't
have a list - and is deciding what she can
afford to  buy, I thought.
Nearly ten minutes later, when I happened
to pass by with my cart, she was still there.
Still looking at the butter and margarine.
She had blonde, shoulder4ength hair, and
deep, inviting eyes as blue as her jeans.
I moved quietly to her side.
She was intently studying the yellow bricks.
"Can I help you?" I asked.
She grabbed a pound of butter and clutched
it to her breast.
"No! No! No. I have what I want ..."
The fear in her eyes disappeared as she
looked at my clothes.
"You're not a  ..."
"No," I replied, "I'm just a customer. Like
you."
"Oh. I was just looking for some butter."
I was unconvinced. "You seemed to be
having a little difficulty finding it."
"I'm a bit tired." She turned her eyes to
me. "I'm sort of confused."
"Maybe I could help you. What do you
need?"
"Nothing! I mean, lots of stuff. Too much
.. . You couldn't help me ... it's stuff you
couldn't find ... I can get it ..."
She fingered the handle of her cart.
I could see a man in a white coat
approaching.
"Quickly!" I whispered. "Come with me."
I took her arm and wheeled her cart into
the nearest aisle
I kept her between myself and a wall of
condensed soup. The man passed.
"What are you doing?" she asked.
"Look," I replied, glancing down the aisle.
"I know what it's like. I'm just like you too
... trapped."
"No," she sobbed. "I'm all right .. . Leave
me alone."
"You can't go back out there in front of
the butter and margarine again. It's suicide." I
held her firmly by the shoulders. "I can help
you."
"H . . hh ho ... how?" she sobbed.
"You've got to know what you're doing," I
started. "You must — Quick! Look at the
soup!"
She spun around and looked at the cans,
while I carefully selected a few to put in the
cart.
The man in the white coat approached us.
"Excuse me sir, but your cart is blocking
traffic in the dairy section."
"Oh, sorry," I replied, relieved, "I'll get it
right away."
The man left.
"You stay right here," I said to her, "and
don't worry," I wiped a tear from her cheek
with a Super Absorbent Paper Towel. "I'll be
right back."
I ran up the aisle, grabbed my cart, and
panted my way back down the aisle. I skidded
to a halt.
She was still there.
She ran into my arms.
"Oh," she cried, "I was so worried."
"It's all right, all right," I comforted her.
"We made it through that, we can make it
through anything."
I suddenly felt guilty. "I shouldn't have left
you on your own. Not without telling you how
to manage. If you don't know what to do,
they can spot you easily, and then ..."
I shuddered to think of losing her. . . to
them.
"Let's move," I said. "We can't stay here
long."
"The first thing," I told her, as we turned
into the cereal section, ."is to keep moving.
Never stay in one place very long. Secondly, if
you don't put something in your cart," I
dropped a bag of Puffed Wheat on top of the
soup, "they'll get suspicious."
'Try to put in something from every aisle. I
usually do that, and then, when I'm sure
no one can see me, I put it back, row by row,
until the cart is empty, then I start again."
"I'm afraid." She clung to my arm. "I don't
know how long I can hold out."
"Don't worry," I said. "Just as long as we're
together, we can keep it up indefinitely. I've
been here for three or four days now. Maybe
five."
"Really?" She stared in awe. "But you're
clean-shaven! How do you manage that?"
"It's not too hard." I examined the sausages.
"This place has razors and shaving cream. It's
really simple when you get down to it. And I
never go hungry. This place has plenty of
food."
We both laughed nervously.
"What about at night?" she whispered.
"When they close."
"No trouble," I told her, selecting two
pounds of apples. "They don't look very
carefully. They look up the aisles, so you have
to stay at the far end of a row. When they
check at the ends, you just go into the aisle.
Sometimes they don't even bother to check at
all."
We stood facing each other beside the
detergents.
"I was so scared," she whispered, "when I
was over by the butter. I'm so glad you found
me."
"I'm glad, too," I said.
That night, we made love in the produce.
GRANT DICKIN
FOR JEANS
fc mi —
No. 2 Water Street Gastown
UNIVERSITY TEXACO
SERVICE
uSED'
DAVE STONE and BRUCE TAGGART
Owners- Operators
Wish  to extend to  U.B.C.  Students and Faculty Christmas
Greetings and Best Wishes for a Happy & Prosperous New Year.
To SHOW OUR APPRECIATION we will
Allow a DISCOUNT of 15% off all
Labor Charges to Students & Faculty
Don't Forget to get your STAR BURST
BONUS CARD - For Stereo Albums and
other valuable items
WE OFFER A COMPLETE SERVICE TO
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
4396 W. 10 Ave.
(Corner 10th   and Trimble)
WHAT IS
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and enter our Big Burger Bonanza. You could win a
year's supply of burgers — yes, 365 great, Big Scoop
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Bi£ Scoop
burgers,
arc great!
10$ off any Big Scoop Burger on presentation of this coupon.
Fill in your name, address and phone number and enter our
Big Burger Bonanza.
PHONE
Contest closes December 15, 1970.
Winners will be asked a skill-testing question
in order to qualify for prize.
25 locations to serve you
Friday, November 27, 1970
THE       U BYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 3 ttffxlca'm y^
PAGE FRIDAY, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970 tou ftov* caiUd m Ctofot—
(taw worn ttw uxwtV for atwaKtWi
i Haw ttwttyvfc about 'it.'
ttui mother* mother grew toeseal,
nab her (ww dawWer
ktu*U m stocks wc wrists wittv cKiid;
thm will be tvo af^tfttv, cv Uttte bird chanfc.
Sim wttlte no wdtfrw^Helte Wis toil in dwt*,
and Uu«v( of toe* of a thousand Novtmbets,
A«d as she WcUvWiui her tows
ttu chad
fas&U top.
(bhummonsL BuhqsL — 70
Friday, November 27, 1970 THE      UBYSSEY PAGE  FRIDAY, 5 Fully
Licensed
vm      Live
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731-4726 384-1741
a Film By FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT
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a SUB Film Soc-presentation
FRI. 27 & SAT. 28 - 7:00 & 9:00
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University location at 4517 West 10th Ave.
DOWNTOWN - PARK ROYAL - BRENTWOOD
Theatre
Neil Dainard
Joe Egg
"Joe Egg", a play by Peter Nichols, opens tonight at
the Queen E. Playhouse. Directed by Tom Kerr, the play runs
to December 18. First produced in 1967, Joe Egg is NichoPs
first full length play, and deals with the life of a spastic child
and his parents.
Neil Dainard, above, plays the father in Joe Egg. Dainard
recently played Rosencratz in Rosencratz and Guildenstern Are
Dead.
Records
Neil Young
Now that the Buffalo's
gone ...
Once upon a time there was
a rock group called the
Buffalo Springfield. They
blended the elemental power
of rock with down-home folk
and country music. The
prettiest and most original of
their songs were usually
composed by Canadian Neil
Young. Young, passionate and
moody, is a gifted song-writer
and a fine guitarist. The
group's leader, Steve Stills, is a
superlative musician, but
tended then to fall down as a
composer. His Springfield songs
were throwbacks to Elvis.
They were characterized more
by beat than by musical
quality.
Like most rock groups, the
Springfield did not long live
happily ever after. After they
split, Steve Stills went into
session work, and did some
great things. Later, he and
ex-Bird David Crosby got
together and formed the
world's greatest barber-shop
quartet, Crosby, Stills, and
Nash.
Young swore off rock
groups and retired to Toronto
to play folk music.
While Crosby, Stills, and
Nash where becoming
notorious for their muzak
Sweet Adeline harmonies,
Young was developing an
original sound. Finally, he
burst back on the scene with
his own rock group, Crazy
Horse. With them, he made
one of last year's best pop
record. Everybody Knows This
is Nowhere (RS 6349). This
album is really creative. The
title cut, for example, has a
complex and really intriguing
rhythm, and a violin floats
over a couple of the gentler
songs, giving them and
other-worldly quality.
The most exciting thing
about Everybody Knows,
thought, is its power. "Down
Neil Young
by the River", already a rock
classic, is noted for its
fantastic guitar innovations.
"Cowgirl in the Sand" totally
frees Young's guitar, and it
rampages up and down the
scales to create one of the
most intensely animal
expressions in rock.
C S & N POLLUTION?
After Everybody Knows,
almost anything would be a
let-down. Young's latest album,
After the Gold Rush (RS
6383), unfortunately fulfills
this expectation. Since
Everybody Knows, he has
joined Crosby, Stills, and Nash.,
and while his abilities are the
only thing which saves them
from plastic mediocrity, their
sugary sweetness is creeping
into his music. Also, he has
adopted their big band tactic.
He has added several members
to Crazy House for this album
(among them old friend Steve
Stills, who leads some
undistinguished C S and N
vocalizing), and the result is,
in places, a wall of sound in
which individual instruments
are lost.
On this record, Young does
some acoustic stuff, but much
of it is far from great or even
interesting. 'Tell Me Why" is
not too bad. There are several
songs      with      piano
Page Six
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 6 accompaniment — pianist Nils
Lofgren is a bright spot among
the new faces — which smack
more than a little of a Joni
Mitchell influence. The tide
cut is a good example of this.
Young unfortunately lacks a
Joni-type voice. His voice is
strange and hauntingly
beautiful, but it's not cut out
for gentle folk ballads.
Traces of Dylan and Sinatra
Young's once innovative and
involved music has, with this
album, largely disappeared in a
move toward watery insipid C
S and N simplicity. The
quicksands of the Frank
Sinatra-style ballad tradition,
which have already swallowed
the Bob Dylan of Self-Portrait
without a trace, seem about to
engulf Young on ho-hum songs
like "Only Love Can Break
Your Heart". "Don't Let It
Bring You Down", interestingly
enough, sounds much like
Dylan's "Days of '49". After
the Gold Rush mostly lacks
the depth, sensitivity, and wild
flash-fire passion which made
the Young of Everybody
Knows so tremendous. In
spots, he even sounds bored,
and bores as a result.
The album isn't a total loss,
however. Young is really good,
both as a composer and as a
musician, and when he puts
out a record of lower than
usual quality, you can bet it's
still better than 90% of (he
pop records on the market.
Though I don't know if that's
saying much.
Several songs, such as "I
Believe in You", are similar to
Young's work with the old
Springfield, and are very
pleasant . if a little familiar.
"Birds", one of the Joni
Mitchell-type songs which is
done well, is really lovely, and
abounds with attractive
imagery comparing birds and
parting lovers. One of the best
things on the record is a
beautifully slow and heavy
version of Don Gibson's
country rocker of the 1950s,
"Oh Lonesome Me", and if
you remember that one, you'll
soon be eligible for the old
age pension. It's done with
deeper feeling than a lot of
the other songs, and Young's
harmonica drifts caressingly
over its melody.
Flashes of Crazy Horse
For me, though, the high
points of the album are the
two songs which recapture at
least partially the old Crazy
Horse fire. "When You Dance
I Can Really Love" has a
really beautiful intricate and
animal rhythm, and it really
does move the listener to
dance. Sitting still when this
song is playing is criminal. By
far the most powerful cut is
"Southern Man". It brings
back memories of the
wilderness of Everybody
Knows with its free,
high-flying guitar innovations
which lift the listener into
anarchic ecstasy. After the
Gold Rush is, by and large, a
far cry from the spark and
freshness of the Crazy Horse
days, but it's still one of the
best records of the last few
months. Bill Storey
Symphonic Stuff
By MARK JACQUES
The competition for the
position of Music Director of
the Vancouver Symphony is
now in full swing. The
Symphony last week prolonged
the choice by at least a year
by announcing that present
assistant conductor Simon
Streatfield would assume the
temporary conductorship for
next season.
Czech conductor Martin
Turnovsky, who conducted a
Great Concertos Series concert
recently seems to be a prime
contender — at least he's been
invited back to conduct some
concerts next year.
Turnovsky's leadership of
the orchestra was extremely
unshowy, but solid
nevertheless. He whipped up
some orchestral excitement in
Dvorak's Carnival Overture and
then developed an almost
chamber-like intimacy for
Ravel's Mother Goose Sutie.
His version of ProkofiefPs
Romeo and Juliet Suite had
some really hair-raising
dynamic contrasts, while his
backing in the Brahms' First
Piano Concerto (with soloist
Arthur Ozolins) was also
well-balanced.
The most recent VSO
Subscription Concerts featured
another guest conductor, but
not one who is a contender
for   the   orchestra's  leadership.
Mario Bernardi, currently
with the National Arts Center
Orchestra in Ottawa, led the
orchestra    in    a    version    of
Mozart's Jupiter Symphony
that was so polished and
refined that it managed to
overcome my antipathy to the
composer.
Following this, Vancouver
mezzo-soprano Judith Forst
joined the orchestra in Ravel's
Scheherazade which was
adequately performed despite
the fact that Miss Forst's
projection on the lower notes
was often insufficient. More
s a ti sf actory was her
performance of an aria by
Meyerbeer.
Contrastes by Canadian
composer Otto Joachim, which
followed the intermission,
seemed as if it might be
interesting since the program
notes remarked that it was an
aleatory piece with the
conductor cueing in various
sections.
However, I found the work
a complete bore — a collection
of effects from practically
every other contemporary
composer. I couldn't tell if the
piece was a flop because
Joachim's writing was weak or
because Bernardi hadn't cued
in sections in a satisfactory
order.
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite,
which closed the concert, was
noteable for some solo work,
like Ian Hampton's cello solo,
which nearly knocked me out
with its power and tone.
The overall effect of the
piece was a bit down, though,
but since I once heard
Stravinsky conduct the VSO in
the same piece, perhaps I'm a
bit prejudiced.
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746-4322
Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 7 Montoya Flamenco
Carlos Montoya, at the Queen E. vibrant, flamboyant,
and Spanish to the hilt.
Walking on stage, he's a picture of the balding concert
guitarist — until he sits down to play. With the first
resounding chord, the audience forgets they are two thousand
strong, but rather they are each one individually
accompanying Montoya through the history and color of the
Flemenco guitar.
Gone is the image of the sedate maestro, replaced
instead by a man who lives and breathes the spirit of a gypsy
tradition. Of his music, none of which he can read but rather
plays by ear, he says, "It is my life."
Unlike the classical guitarist who coaxes a response from
his instrument, Montoya makes harsh demands with his
staccato finger hammerings and rich rolls.
Sunday night he played a variety of traditional dance
rhythms and songs, all of which were punctuated with several
changes of rhythm and many with his fingers beating an intricate
time on the box of his guitar. Although still clinging to the
traditional, he adds, through the improvisation which is the
mainstem of Flamenco, new variations im his. pieces in every
performance.
One draws the impression from Montoya that Flamenco,
more than classical, is of a more embracing nature. It requires
a feeling of response from the audience which in turn generates
the life and fervor of the guitarist expressed through his
music. This would explain the feeling of expectancy, of things
bigger and better to come after the first set of six pieces.
Although he played technically well in the first set, there
was nothing which possessed the zest of his later pieces. It
was as if he was warming up for that moment when both
audience and guitartist would together be caught up in the
spirit of Flamenco.
That moment came with "Malaga", the second piece of
the second set. A popular song recognizable to the many
amateur guitarists in attendance, it provided the necessary link
between audience and performer.
'rGranaina," last selection of this set provided an amazing
combination of rhythm and style changes.
Montoya's last set was by far the best, starting with
"Macarena En Tango" which is his own lively Flamenco
arrangement of "La Virgen de la Macarena", a song often
heard in the Spanish bullring.
However, "Saeta", which tells of the Holy Week
procession in Seville was the high point of the performance
and the audiences' favorite. By muting his strings, Montoya
created an uncanny likeness to the drumming along with the
sharp clear notes of the coronets. Finishing with the
procession fading off into the distance, the piece offered a
relief from the strong strums with which he ended his other
selections and which sometimes proved monotonous.
Acknowledging the standing ovation with a curt matadorlike wave, he returned for two encores. After having played
17 pieces, his fatigue began to show, but it didn't matter.
Here was a man who had given more than just a concert.
He'd captured the spirit of the gypsy people in his music and
given it at least in part to all those who cared to listen.
ffltAAu? C^Jmeuv
■ MASTHEAD
The poster in the centerspread is a gift from Page Friday, Malcolm
and Drummond, the originators of Subspace and the subject of an
interview on page two. The poem on the poster is only a few hours old, as
of this writing, Drummond Burge is still writing it out in script, fresh from
the poet's experience to you. We hope that you will enjoy it. Today's cover
and poem are by Keith Dunbar. I think that's his uncle in the picture.
Page Friday this term has been assisted in various capacities by Grant
Dickin, an inordinately parenthetical personage. Nettie Wild, who doesn't
know enough big words to describe herself. Heide, whose real name no
one could ever guess. Sharon Boylan, an infamous movie critic. David G.
Bowerman, who is reputed to be merely a lens reflection. Folk pop rock
reviewer Bill Storey. Margue Jacques, the only staffer with no less than
three seasons tickets to the VS.O. Hot humorist Jim O'leary. Keith
Dunbar, our convert from the jock dept. Kevan Perrins, who was once
caught in the dark room developing 700 copies of his own head shot, Dave
Smith, our illusive but prolific cartoonist, Ruebsaat the magnificent, and
Synch editor Fred Cawsey.
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PAGE FRIDAY, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970 Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Xmas is a time of giving
• ••or is it taking?
By Dick Betts
Ubyssey Merry Christmas
reporter
"Did you ever see the faces of the children
*hey get so excited,
Waking up on Christmas morning hours before
the winter sun's ignited,
They believe in dreams and all they mean
including heaven's generosity ..."
*Peter Townsend from TOMMY
Magic, myth, peace, love, human brotherhood and
exciting expectations of material rewards which are
.supposed to signify the spirit of giving freely of oneself.
The Spirit of Christmas is supposed to exemplify all
of these things.
It is a time when reality is transformed, when
competition, exploitation, poverty, suffering, neglect,
international conflicts, and repressed feelings of love and
kindness are supposed to take a holiday along with us.
It is a time when we open up and brim over with
mirth and kindness.
This transformation of reality in most instances takes
place in form only. People are nicer to one another. Cease
fires do take place in Viet Nam.
But is this what we are looking for? Is the idea behind
"Xmassy" human brotherhood to charge our human
batteries once a year so the corporations can feel better
about robbing the workers for the rest of the year?
Conversely, are the exploited people of the society in
which we live supposed to steel themselves for the shit to
come in the new fiscal year?
The concept of Christmas belies itself. The advertising
techniques of the corporate society absorb all the human
feelings expressed at this time of year and pervert them.
Christmas itself is a time when those in the
boardrooms of the corporations hungrily look forward to
increased profits.
Work speeds up and hours of long grueling overtime
are   the   norm   in   the   month   of  December.   Mad
consumerism steps up universally.
In the nations of the Third World it is misery as usual
for the sake of business as usual in the metropolitan
countries who dominate the underdeveloped nations.
Yet "men of good will" can somehow put this out of
their minds.
Christmas is also a time when social and class
contradictions come to the fore. The problems of poverty
and unemployment are "taken care of by Empty
Stocking funds hampers and the like.
Guilt feelings are magically whisked away by more
than usual band-aid solutions to human needs. Real and
deep-seated problems remain but people forget them in
the excitement of the season.
Those who profit from Christmas would just as soon
we forget these problems and enjoy ourselves and they
create the atmosphere in which we can do it.
The large corporations who have private control over
wealth and its distribution would just as soon see to it
that we retain our sense of social apathy. We do this, but
in keeping with the season we do it under the guise of
good will.
As usual we channel our feelings into ourselves and
the immediate situations we face and give no thought to
the larger social situations of which we are a part.
Then we find ourselves laboring under a situation in
which true happiness is impossible.
We find ourselves, for a short time each year, trying
to forget the oppression each of us feels the rest of the
year at work or in school. It doesn't work.
The phoney tinsel is not just on the artificial
Christmas tree standing in the corner.
Figuratively it covers the way we relate to one
another in a society which places gain and profit before
fulfillment and happiness.
This society is incorporated into specific roles which
keeps us in our places. Therefore, we are left with no
alternative in the present order but to assert our humanity
through props which are not ours but are bought by us.
The medium of expression then quickly turns into
commodity accumulation for many. For some it is not
even this. Those on welfare can't afford commodities.
Either way, true realization of what it means to give
of oneself, to love and to share is driven off its course.
We define ourselves as consumers once again and how
much we can consume is based on how much money we
can accumulate through our labor or through exploiting
the labor of others.
An obvious symptom of this is the widespread use of
Christmas to show one's place in the social hierarchy or
the buying power one has.
A big tree and lots of presents therefore means happy
prosperous people.
Contrast this with the poor or low-salaried workers.
The middle-class sentiment is "they may not have much
but they can be happy at Christmas".
Since when was misery equated with happiness?
There can be momentary expressions of love and
happiness but this is lost in the day to day struggle of low
income groups to attain a minimum of security.
It is lost in the demand to make a show of affluence
at this time of year especially. Therefore, the poor and
workers flock to the loan companies and buy their
children's presents on consignment. The rest of the year is
spent paying off the mortgage and Christmas bills.
The myth of true happiness succumbs to the reality
of the corporate directed market, the market we are
forced to adhere to, even at Christmas.
There is a positive side to any fantasy, realizable or
unrealizable in the present system.
Perhaps it is a glimpse of what we will be like when
the problems of society are confronted and solved and
when inequality and injustice will some day vanish.
Perhaps we can see a glimmer of hope for the future
as we get stoned on Christmas.
So with this in mind let's all work to see it happen.
That way peace, love and brotherhood will be more than
seasonal trimmings.
A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Fortes. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
• SEA OPERATIONS • AIR OPERATIONS
•  LAND OPERATIONS •  ENGINEERING
• SUPPORT SERVICES
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
Why not ask one who serves? ,
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St. - Vancouver
THE CANADIAN
ARMED FORCES
Visit the Fashion Jewellery
Boutique in the Lower
Arcade of the      _#./:;,
Vancouver Hotel V*c~
and at
523 Granville
Discover Skana~stne Wholt Pin in
fake fade breathing 'pearl' bubbles.
No on* will aver guest she it an im-
psster. Priced or $3.00.
V
r
Reimer" priced from $5.00 - $15.00.
Vendome ring* in dome designs at $7.50 with the new squafe
adjustable shank.
We have one-of the largest collections of Fashion Fun Rings—
You will find antique styled designs by "The Magic of Elisabeth
For the Young Image or the Young at Heart, see our 'Jewelled'
treasure Boxes—$2.00 and $4.00.
From our group of animal pins by "Francois" find the pouting
puppy with sad 'jewelled' eyes and huge flopping rhinestone
ears; Priced at $7.50
Cameo style pins. They look unbelievably Italian and come in
"Wedgewood Blue", "Charcoal" and "Natural" in many different designs at $4.00 and $6.00 each.
Our Fashion Jewellery Gifts all come exquisitely boxed.
flrtttre  lEwjtftt? Beauty Centre
523 Granville - 684-7391
Lower Arcade
Vancouver Hotel, 688-948S Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
X-Kalay group groping
relaxes and rehabilitates
By SANDY KASS
The X-Kalay foundation now has its own group
grope.
X-Kalay program director Lou Malina said
Monday 20 UBC students have joined the
foundation's games club.
They asked to participate in the program after
X-Kalay representatives spoke and gave a
presentation on their foundation in SUB earlier this
year.
The club, in which participation is mandatory
for all X-Kalay residents, meets every Monday night
in the foundation office at 26 West Seventh Avenue.
According to Malina, it's been going strong for
the last six months, even before UBC students
joined the group.
Malina said the "game" is the focal point of
what the foundation considers its most important
rehabilitative and relaxing program.
Participants take part in many different
therapies such as encounter groups, attack therapy
(yelling and screaming and such), psychodrama,
gestalt therapy, and multiple egotisms (the ability to
be more than one person at the same time.)
When asked what would happen if X-Kalay
residents did not want to participate, Malina said he
really didn't know.
Pakistan aid drive starts
"We've never had that problem," he said.
The foundation, as well, holds a regular
Saturday night open house for anyone who wants to
come and rap with foundation residents.
"Quite often seminars and dances are
programmed as well," said Malina.
In conjunction with UBC's centre for
continuing education, Malina and foundation
worker Dave Berner are teaching a course on
X-Kalay: The Dynamics of Change in a Living
Community.
There are 35 participants in the course, 20 of
whom are X-Kalay residents.
The course stems around the development of
X-Kalay as a non-conforming rehabilitative centre
for people who want to help themselves.
"The development has to be nonconforming.
This society of ours certainly isn't conforming to
the idea of rehabilitatively helping out ex-convicts,"
Malina said.
"The course is basically a critique of the way
people say things ought to be done, and the way
things are actually accomplished," he said.
"It's a phenomenal success."
It will be run again either next spring or fall
under a similar format.
UBC Students will be able to provide aid for
victims of the Pakistani disaster.
Pakistan is still suffering from the disastrous
effects of a cyclone and tidal wave which hit ten
days ago. It is estimated that there are well over
150,000 casualties. The surviving populace is in dire
need of food, clothing and shelter.
Today a Pub-In will be held at International
House from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. under the auspices of
the German Club, which will be donating all
proceeds to the relief fund.
A Variety Entertainment Program will be held
on Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m., at International House
where donations will be accepted. Helping the
Pakistan students will be a variety of foreign
students who will take part in the show.
On Dec. 2, students will be circulating donation
tins in classes, however, volunteers are needed for
the collection. If interested leave your name and
phone number with the AMS receptionist (phone
228-3976). For additional information phone
KhaliqBaig, (228-3102).
Banff, Jasper,
Yoho and Kootenay
National Parks
Public Hearings
"The parks are hereby dedicated to the people of Canada
for their benefit, education and enjoyment . . . and such
parks shall be maintained and made use of so as to leave
them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations." SECTION 4: NATIONAL PARKS ACT
Public hearings are being held across Canada on provisional
master plans for development and use of national parks. The plans
outline the Government's proposals for intensity of park use, interpretation of natural history, protection of park environment and
development of visitor facilities.
Hearings will be convened in Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver
to hear comments and recommendations on the provisional master
plans for Banff, Jasper, Yoho and Kootenay National Parks.
(Separate public discussion will take place on plans related to the
townsites of Banff and Jasper.) There are four individual plans to be
reviewed but because these parks are contiguous they are being
considered as a unit for the purpose of public hearings. Dates and
places of these hearings will be announced in the near future, but a
minimum of 90 days from November 13 will be allowed for the
preparation of briefs and submissions. Interested individuals and
organizations are invited to submit written briefs, in either official
language, on any one or all of the plans and to indicate if they wish
to speak at the hearings.
Copies of all four plans may be obtained for $2.00 or individual
copies for $1.00 each (remit money order or certified cheque payable to the Receiver General of Canada) from:
Regional Director, Western Region,
National and Historic Parks Branch,
300 Customs Building,
Calgary 21, Alberta.
Written briefs and requests to speak
are to be sent to:
Secretary, Public Hearings Program,
National and Historic Parks Branch,
400 Laurier Avenue West,
Ottawa 4, Ontario.
The Hon. Jean Chretien, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
^EETORBEATALLPJHCfS..
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ContacC gives 12 hours of relief from a cold.
This is the bottle
for the
Age of Ecology.
What the world needs today are containers that re-cycle.
Because every container that isn't re-cycled becomes a refuse. Or worse still, litter.
That's why the reusable, returnable bottle for Coke is the answer to an ecologist's prayer. On the average, it makes
about fifty round trips before it's through. And that means fifty less chances to add to tire world's litter problem.
So buy Coca-Cola in returnable bottles. It's best for the environment—and your best value.
It's the real thing. Coke. S
^hWP* - Trade Mark Reg.
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
Authorized battler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola ttd. Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
Womb envy will cause disaster
By SANDY KASS
Six down and six to go.
That was the score as people
counted down the closing seconds
of this term's sixth and last People
session Monday in the SUB
ballroom.
The speaker was Sun columnist
Bob Hunter, who in his discussion
of womb envy gave all indications
of being a male chauvinist in
reverse.
He began with humpback
whales.
The whale exists by floating in
a comfortable, dark room, Hunter
said. He feels nourished and
relaxed, with no thoughts, ideas,
or limbs to manoeuvre.
"It is a naked consciousness,"
he said.
Hunter compared this state as
almost identical to that of a baby
while still inside a mother's
womb.
A baby exists on naked
intuitiveness. Women carry a form
of naked intuitiveness with them
all their lives, he said.
"Women are not only
physically closer to the infant
state, maintaining their soft skin
and whatever, but also maintain a
psychological parallel with the
environment," Hunter said.
Women also possess -a definite
superiority of the natural senses,
he added.
As a result, the male balances
his state by dominating the female
with physical superiority.
"Men are just less in touch
with the environment. They need
to fill in their empty spaces,"
Hunter said.
He told a story of an East
Indian family on a fishing trip
who saw their baby fall into the
river and drown.
"They made no attempt to
save him," Hunter said. "They
would not interfere with nature.
"Our faith in technocracy is
the same kind of blind faith, as we
go roaring through a fog, firmly
believing there will be a road
ahead," he said.
"We do not place a plastic
Jesus on our car. The car is a
plastic Jesus."
Women, according to Hunter,
possess an instant ability to
respond to any given situation.
They possess an intuitive wholistic
response as opposed to a
fragmented, operational one.
Film on nudists
aids defence fund
The Free Beach Defence will sponsor a film on the joys of the
nudist life today, to raise funds for the defence of nude bathers arrested
for indecent exposure on Towers Beach last summer.
The film will be shown at noon in SUB auditorium.
After the film, UBC zoology professor and parks board candidate
Robin Harger, will talk about parks board plans for the Point Grey
foreshore beach.
Philosophy teaching assistant Mark Battersby, chief organizer of
the Free Beach Defence, is currently involved in raising funds for the
legal defence of Sheila Baupre, whose case is being tried first.
ODEON
Vague
615-54)4
Adult Entertainment
The Ultimate Escape Film
Show Times: 12:15, 2:25, 4:40
6:50, 9:05
West Van
VZ2-6343
Entertaining
^MnSloane
ItMCI 10 HMOM WMH ft
Show Times:
7:30, 9:30
Odeon
"GREATMOVIE MAKING!"
— N.Y. TIMES
diary off a mad
housewife
Ml   6RANVILLE
4I1-746I
WARNING:       Much
swearing   coarse   language.        Show Times: 12:00
Simulated sexual scenes 1:35, 3:35, 5:30
—B.C. Director 7:25, 9:25
Show Times:  12:10, 2:05
3:55, 5:50
7:45, 9:40
JACK
NICHOLSON
Coronet
851   GRANVILLE
685-6i2»
Park
DONALD SUTHERLAND   ELLIOTT GOULD r*«v™t wrinc
and Ytrjr eo«r»« l«nfu*fe,
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*Mdle at  loth
• 76-2747 Show Times: 7:30, 9:30
Varsitu ^ctoftWMeart''
»4173,S?    TECHNICOLOR     ADUIT INTBTAINMINT       Donald
Genevieve
Bujold
4375 W. 10th
Show Times: 7:30, 9:30
Sutherland
THE DOLPHIN THEATRE proudly presents
A DECADE OF CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
WINNERS—SUNDAY, 2 P.M.
"BLOW UP" - 1967 Grand Prix Winner
directed by — Anitonini
Phone 299-7303 Hastings at WiElingdon
A husband can turn to his wife,
say "the baby has fallen on its
head — do something, dear", and
she is expected to know what to
do. He certainly doesn't, he said.
Men are so busy with their
aggressive and passive moods, he
said, "they get screwed up in
between."
But, incredibly enough, women
commit the ultimate act of
aggression, he said.
"A baby within his mother's
womb is living in the ideal state. A
person who can push another out
of a space like that has to commit
the ultimate act of aggression,"
Hunter said.
"Man cannot be that
imperialistic."
He said man contributes little
more than intellect to the birth
of a child.
"He knows what goes on, but
he can never fully experience it."
He can only comment on his
child having "his brown eyes" or
"his walk", but man is essentially
barren. He can never go through
the whole thing.
To balance his need for
imperialism, man goes into
business, Hunter said.
"He creates a man-made empire
of anarchistic freedom. He builds
factories, makes bombs, and
teaches himself to fly so he can
drop them on others."
If we extend this present phase
of history, such continued male
characteristics are clearly suicidal,
Hunter said.
"We'll either wipe ourselves
out by bombs, DDT, lowering the
planet's temperature, or just by
stabbing ourselves to death.
"There are just too many of us to
cope with the present situation,"
he said, but did not recommend
contraception as a method of
reducing imperialism.
He said a greater responsibility
to the natural environment is
vital, not by turning men into
women, as has been suggested, but
by instigating a general
femininization of attitudes
towards existing society.
People tend to forget that after
birth they move only from a
smaller womb to a bigger one, in
that every man builds, or attempts
to, a comfortable world around
himself, he said.
"No one can survive if this
womb gets filled up with old tin
cans and rubber tires."
FRI. DEE. 4
INTERNATIONAL
LOOKING FOR
INTERESTING XMAS
PRESENTS??????
MARKET
HAVE YOU
HANDICRAFTS
YOU'D LIKE TO
SELL??????
NEXT FRIDAY, from 4 to 9 p.m. at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE there will be
an INTERNATIONAL MARKET and BEER GARDEN where any U.B.C. student
or club can sell their wares to prospective Xmas shoppers. You must register in
advance for a booth so drop by the office any weekday between 9 a.m. & 5 p.m.
or call us at 224-4535 or 228-3887.
(candles, belts, beads, pots, knitwear, Xmas baking etc.!!
GABRIELS
VILLAGE COIFFURES
*«WG?*
Wishes to introduce to you - its staff, so that we may receive your confidence to
serve you!
* MR. GABRIEL, formerly of David Amsom Coiffures,Gold Medalist in Haircutting —
Master of Modern and Conventional Look
* MISS FRANCIS, stylist direct from London, England with year of apprenticeship
and experience - formerly trained by VIDAL SASSON - with a touch of modern
Europe.
* MISS DONNA - Specialist in Coloring - Permanents and Body Waving
We are not inexpensive, because we use the most tested and proven, the most exclusive, & the
most expensive of all the products — From conditioners to cold waves & permanents, from
shampoos to hair sprays
But DON'T HESITATE to see us if you are on a tight budget. In our Salon Money is not
everything — HAIR is!
DROP IN AND SEE US BEFORE CHRISTMAS
We are Located in the VILLAGE SQUARE, upstairs
— Directly behind the Bank of Commerce
(Upstairs)
Western Parkway 224-7514 Page 22
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
Hamilton
Harvey
YOUR  MERRY CHRISTMAS STORES
W*
WIN
cfcai&aii m4€z
1   of 3 TRIPS
FOR 2 to
r #
VIA
AND ARRANGED BY
Canadian Air Tours
WITH ACCOMMODATION AT THE FABULOUS
1 of 3
PANASONIC
DELUXE
16" COLOR TV's
ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE AT ALL 3 STORES
Just Slightly Ahead
of our Time!"
6 MAJOR WINNERS - 2 FROM EACH STORE
A SEPARATE DRAW FOR EACH PRIZE IN EACH STORE!
NO DOWN PAYMENT
NO PAYMENT
Til JANUARY '71
On a convenient Hamilton
Harvey Charge Account!
After 30 days a monthly service
Charge wiB be added in the usual
way!
OPEN THURSDAY
& FRIDAY
9
P.M.
MONDAYJUESDAY.WEDNESDAY&SATURDAY: 9:00A.M. to 6:00P.M.
THURSDAY & FRIDAYS:  9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
FOR A NEW
ADVENTURE IN SHOPPING
VISIT YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD DEPARTMENT STORE
WEST 4th AVE.
Phone 732-8841
1 BLOCK EAST
OF MACDONALD
WEEK-
west 4th AVE. STORE ONLY
LIMITED QUANTITIES - PERSONAL SHOPPING ONLY
LADIES' SWEATERS
& VESTEES
Fine gauge Acrylic V-neck cardigans with 5
button closing, fancy design fronts in green and
gold. M. & L. only. Also a limited quantity in
the popular "Vestee" style with fancy cable or
ribbed front. Choice of blue, beige, navy and
white. Regular Hamilton Harvey price $5.95
Hamilton Harvey   $A,0Q-
-Ladies' Wear     SP EC I AL tf '
MEN'S BOXED
SHIRT & TIE SETS
A great gift idea for Christmas. Styled dress
shirt and contrasting tie sets. Permanent Press
for the easiest of care, just wash 'n wear!
Choice of two button or french cuffs in a
wonderful collection of blues, green, golds and
browns. Sizes 14 to 17. Regular Hamilton
Harvey price $9.95.
Hamilton Harvey   $~T.88
-Men's Wear       SPECIAL I
V2 PRICE!
INFANTS' CRAWLER SETS
Easy-Care Cordana crawler sets. Cozy flannel
lined with dome snap legs and shoulder straps.
Matching back button topper with pert collar.
Choice of prints or plains with screen print
animal motif. Sizes 1 to 3 in blue, aqua or pink.
Regular Hamilton Harvey price. $2.98.
Hamilton Harvey   $4 ,49
-Children's Wear SPECIAL I
CORNING WARE TEAPOTS
33 ONLY!  Hurry for this one.  Limit 1 to a
customer.
Hamilton Harvey   $4.88
SPECIAL O
weia2rc5per  MUFFIN PANS
Regular Hamilton Harvey price $1.55.
Hamilton Harvey
-Housewares       SPECIAL
77c
CALDWELL TOWELS
Attractive "Castille" pattern, a 2-tone all-over
jacquard  pattern  in a choice of blue/green,
red/blue, gold/red and gold/yellow colorings.
BATH TOWELS
Regular Hamilton Harvey price$2.09
Hamilton Harvey  $4.29
SPECIAL I
HAND TOWELS
Regular    Hamilton    Harvey   price
$1.19
Hamilton Harvey    a*
SPECIAL D9C
WASH CLOTHS
Staples
39c
25 LIGHT OUTDOOR
CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
Featuring heavy duty wiring and sockets with
unbreakable, rustproof plastic clips and add-on
connector. Complete with frosted outdoor
lamps in assorted colors. Limit 2 sets per
customer, while quantities last. Regular
Hamilton Harvey price $9.98.
Hamilton Harvey    $•% 97
SPECIAL O
—Christmas Decorations
UNFURNISHED
HARDWOOD ROCKING CHAIRS
High back hardwood rocker with wide
comfortable seat and arms. Ready-to-finish in
stain or enamel.
Hamilton Harvey $i
-Hardware SPECIAL
JOHNSON'S BABY POWDER
77c
14 oz. size. Mfg. Sug. List   $1.09.
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
ASPIRIN TABLETS
Bottles of 100 tablets. Mfg. Sug.
list 99c.
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
CLEARASIL OINTMENT
Mfg. Sug. list $1.29
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
V05 SHAMPOO »fS
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
SCOPE MOUTHWASH
17 oz. size. Mfg. Sug. list $139
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
M0DESS XtAE*
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
QTIDC   Packs of 252. Mfg.
-llrO      Sug. list$129
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
ENO'S FRUIT SALTS
7 oz. size. Mfg. Sug. list $1.19
Hamilton Harvey SPECIAL
-Hamilton Harvey (Drugs) Ltd.
49c
88c
88c
97c
$1.33
77c
77c
24
SAVE $4.10
4 lb. Wool Filled
SLEEPING BAGS
Youth's size bag with green drill outer cover
and plain lining. 30* x 72" cut size with full
zipper. Regular Hamilton Harvey price $8.98.
Hamilton Harvey   $4.88
Sporting Goods    SPECIAL "I"
PORTABLE
CLOCK RADIO
Wake up with music! Battery operated for
home or travel use. Automatic radio alarm,
buzzer & sleep switch. Deluxe case. Regular
Hamilton Harvey price $29.89.
Hamilton Harvey $J Q.89
—Transistors       SPECIAL
19
PHILIPS DELUXE;,
AM/FM CLOCK RADIOS
Many deluxe features including alarm and sleep
switch. Solid state engineered. Regular
Hamilton Harvey price $44.95
Hamilton Harvey$«*}.95
-Appliances        SPECIAL Vt4
TABLE LAMPS
Opaque white glass base trimmed with gleaming
brass and gold or white shade and trilite socket.
Regular Hamilton Harvey price $19.95
—Furniture
Hamilton Harvey
SPECIAL
$12
.88
KEYSTONE INSTANT LOAD
SUPER 8
MOVIE CAMERA
A deluxe camera featuring electric eye and fast
f1.8 lens for crisp, brilliant color movies. Fully
Guaranteed. Regular Hamilton Harvey price
$5959.
Hamilton Harvey
-Cameraland     SP EC I AL
$9 »•
Shop for the many NOT ADVERTISED SPECIALS' Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
Tom Terrific honoured by Primrose ladies
The     Primrose     Conservative (The Terrific) Campbell.
League    held    its    Tea    Party        The party — the League's social
Wednesday noon in Cecil Green highlight   of   the   year   —   was
Park in  support  of its honored attended by 25 ladies, including
guest,   mayoral   candidate   Tom the   Hon.  Grace  McCarthy   and
Campbell's lovely wife, Julie.
Campbell, although he arrived
15 minutes late, was his usual
debonair self, dressed in a
delightful, dark conservative suit,
bright paisley tie, striped shirt and
flashing smile.
The chords of For He's a Jolly
Good Fellow greeted Campbell as
he strode through the door. Then
he    began   his   speech    to   his-
enthralled followers.
"In these troubled times I am
delighted to have been invited
here to speak to you," said
Campbell.
Following enthusiastic
applause, Campbell took his place
beside his wife at the head table
and proceeded to heartily sample
the crustless sandwiches. He sat
beneath a sign saying: "Tom is
Terrific."
Campbell left immediately
after lunch to attend to the
pressing duties of office. Most of
the ladies, however, stayed to
watch a fashion show.
DEGENERATE, draft-dodging
hippie attended Primrose feed-in
at Cecil Green Wednesday and the
ladies loved it.
FRIDAY
BEER PARTY
For  Pakistan  Relief  in  International
House from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., open to
all.
EAST  ASIA  SOCIETY
Meeting   at   8:30  p.m.   at  2750  West
10th Avenue.
-WOMEN'S  INTRAMURALS
Manager's meeting in SUB 213 at noon.
UBC SFFEN
Interview with Hugo winners in SUB
115 at noon.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting in SUB 215 at noon.
UBC VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Meeting at noon in SUB 205. R. John.
son will speak.
SKIN  SOC.
Nudist movies in SUB aud. at noon.
VCF
Meeting in SUB party room at noon.
HILLEL
"The   Warsaw   Ghetto"   at   noon   in
SUB 207.
SATURDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Flamenco concert in upper lounge of
International House at 8:30 p.m.
voc
Curling  and   ice-skating   at  Thunderbird Centre at 7:15 p.m.
SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
Discussion  at reception  room,  Union
• College at 8 p.m.
LUTHERAN   CAMPUS  CENTRE
Film "Joey . .  . Sibling" at 9:30 a.m.
in the Centre.
MONDAY
ED.U.S. ASSEMBLY
Meeting in Educ. 100 at noon.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting in rm. 402 International House
at noon.
HELLENIC  CULTURAL  SOCIETY
Folk-dance at International House at
7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
PREMED
Meeting in Wesbrook 201 at noon.
VANCOUVER TENANT'S COUNCIL
Meeting in SUB ballroom at noon.
UBC   THEOLOOY   CLUB
Meeting   in  SUB   211   at  noon,  don't
forget!
HILLEL
Lecture   at   Hillel   House   by   Rabbi
Solomon at noon.
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE   ORGANIZATION
Meeting at noon in Bu. 3211.
PRE-LAW
Meeting in Angus 413 at noon.
AYN   RAND   SOCIETY
Meeting at noon in SUB 130.
LIFE SCIENCES
Meeting at noon in SUB 111.
THURSDAY
ZOOLOGY   SOCIETY
Meeting in Chem.   15  at noon.
ANGLICAN-UNITED   MINISTERS
Meeting  in Lutheran  Campus  Centre
at noon.
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Meeting in Henning 200 at noon.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Beer party from 4 to 9 p.m. in l.H.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Chris Nutter, NFB will speak on film
dialogue in Educ. 204.
SUNDAY, DEC. 6
SPORTS   CAR  CLUB
Meeting in B-lot at 10 a.m.
MONDAY, DEC. 7
ANGLICAN  UNITED CHAPLAINS
Meeting in Lutheran Campus Centre.
TUESDAY, DEC. 8
HILLEL
"Who   is   a  Jew"  by  Rabbi  Hier  in
Hillel House  at noon.
CLASSICS
Talk   by   Prof.   Winspear   in  Bu.   212
at noon.
THURSDAY, DEC. 10
VCF
Eucharist service in Brock lounge at
7:30 p.m.
ANGLICAN  UNITED  CAMP MINISTRY
Celebration at noon in Lutheran Campus Centre.
MISCELLANEOUS
SFDEN
Members please fill out Form 28 in
SUB 216E.
CAMPUS MINISTERS
Ministers are in 11 to 12, 2 to 4 on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
and Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10
to 4 in SUB 228.
LEGAL AID
Every   Monday,   Wednesday   and   Friday at noon in SUB 223, 232.
RAPISTS
Please report to 2137 Allison.
y.sK
Fresh iv> a
Flower...
inJiKtlhour
$1.49 DAY
2nd Wednesday of Every Month
$1.49 Covers Most Of The Following
Garments
COATS — DRESSES — 2-PIECE SUITS
2 SLACKS — 2 SKIRTS — 2 SWEATERS
UNIVERSITY
One hour
"mmniiiins"
THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING
2146 WESTERN PARKWAY
(In The Village — Near The Chevron Station)
OPEN 8 A.M. - 6 P.M.  MON.-FRI. - 9 A.M. - 6 P.M. SAT.
228-9414
J
BARGAIN
CONTACT
LENSES
.. There's no
such thing!
Only quality Is a bargain when
It comes to your eyes.
Vancouver Contact Lens Centre
will give your precious eyes
the attention they need and
deserve. You can be sure that
your new contact lenses will
be all you expect them to be.
Be good to your eyes, call us
today.
Call the professionals at Vancouver Contact Lens Centre lor
the complete facts.
688-7417
introductory offer
FREE SPARE PAIR
• Fully experienced In all
types of contact lenses.
• Seasonable annual
check-ups.
• Life-time prescription
Chance.
VANCOUVER
CONTACT LENS
CENTRE LTD.
7W OreavMe.K. et Reesea
(Komi eOS Royal teak ■Ma.)
Hews t-S, Mon-Fri., let. t-12
&%m% YOUR KERRISDALE FABRIC CENTRE &m
Watch For
The Eiffel Tower
GRAY'S
FASHION FABRICS
LTD.
Save 25% to 50%
with your
Student Discount
Make FABRICS
A Very
Merry Christmas Gift
Plain
2.98
VIYELLA
Prints
3.98
The Most Natural Fabric in the World
WIDE SELECTION OF IMPORTED BROCADES %
FULL STOCK OF «f
VOGUE, McCALL, SIMPLICITY. BUTTERICK. %
POLYNESIAN AND STYLE PATTERNS @
2363 W. 41st (Near Balsam)  261-9554 |
Ample Parking at Rear of Store w
Everything FOR The Skier
SKIS - HARNESS - POLES
"1
STRETCH PANTS,
SOCKS, GLOVES,       ,--£•>
PARKAS, GOGGLES, >3. ""
BOOTS, ETC.
•••x
FULL LINE OF SKATING    [
AND HOCKEY EQUIPMENT  \
SPECIAL OFFER
SKI OUTFIT
JET SKIS—Step-in Harness
Steel Poles - Complete
48
.50
Pedigree Parkas - "Ski" Ski Parkas
Pioneer Down-Filled Parkas
Warm-Up Pants — Gloves — Mitts — Sox
VAL D'OR BOOTS- TYROL BOOTS
ELAN and GRAVES SKI'S
Northwestern Sporting Goods
10th & ALMA (open Fri. 'til 9 p.m.     224-5040 Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
i
i
i
From
BOOKSTORE
Come Visit
Our
Christmas
Corner
NICOL: Vancouver
LANE: Beautiful Northwest
CLARK: Civilization
HANNON: Forts of Canada
CLARK: Civilization
THE EATON CATALOGUE 1901
DUNNINGER'S Complete €ncyclopedia of Magic
HELLYER: Find Out About Gardening
HERIOT: Travels Through the Canadas
OPIE: Children's Games in Street and Playground
PETERSON: The Gibson's Landing Story
DAVIS: North American Indian
STUMP: There is My People Sleeping
The Voyages of Captain Cook
LAROUSSE Encyclopedia of World Geography
LAROUSSE Encyclopedia of The Earth
READER'S DIGEST: Our Amazing World of Nature
FRAYNE: Hockey
BURLAND: North American Indian Mythology
CZOLOWSKI and STAINSBY; Legacy to Behold
MELLE: The Group of Seven
This is Haida
GRIFFITHS: Boating in Canada
Also a Comprehensive Selection of Childrens Books, Canadiana,
Cook Books etc.
I
r
1
Other Gift Suggestions
University Crested Rings, Jewellery, Book Ends, Glass Ware,
Ceramic Mugs, Sweat Shirts, Records, Wallets, Key
Tainers etc.
We have a good selection of Christmas Cards - UBC     \
imprint, UNICEF and General. Also Christmas Gift Wrap,
Ribbon, Etc.
P.S. - DONT FORGET a 1971 Calendar, Date Book, or Diary   ]
i
LL.—^,^
wmi^^m
CLASSIFIED
fOftM: fhRfaHUs, Faculty & Cieb-3 Bimk, 1 day $1.00; 2 day. $1.75.    .
GwMHMMreiaf«3 Km* I day $1.1$, ad^tfwndi Bmrs 30« 4 d«ys prie* «f S.
Ciimitkt&mik an net *x»ptod by tofepftone Md «r* gsf&h in.
JMtffew&KBt Office, STUDBNT UNION BLDG, Vatr. ot B*XVmeem*e 8, B.C.
A'
ClfMiHJi Uhwdiljwi Mr tilS&t.tktt dtjT1 tM>fiii)t,jinfilftiiiffriiit
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
GOLD    LOOP    EARRING
Reward.   Contact   Lost   &
SUB  or 224-4265.
LOST.
Found,
GLASSES WITH DARK BROWN
frames. Lost while hitch - hiking
Tuesday.     Finder     please     phone
 Marian at 733-4013.
LOST: BROWN LEATHER PURSE,
Monday after "People" outside
SUB Ballroom. Has contact lenses,
valuable papers. Reward — no
cjuestions asked. Phone 985-5970.
KNGLISH DEER-STALKER CAP
left in white Falcon while hitching to gates on Mond. evening.
Phone   Bob,   683-0051.
LOST: TOQUE HAT, HAND SPUN
wool, natural dyed. Sentimental
value.  Call Dave, 736-6541.
SMALL REWARD AT SUB FOR
return of green leather glasses
case   (present  from  young son). .
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED TO AND FROM
Boundary Bay (Canadian). Phone
228-3938 or 731-3056.	
CAR POOL IN BRITISH PROPER-
ties needs two drivers. Phone
Cindy 922-3581  or Liz  926-5771.
Special Notices
15
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
Valu-). Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat, till 7 p.m.
THE MOON: GAYS DATING ASSN!
Wide  choice  of  dates.  Fully  confidential.    Legally   approved.    Tel.
733-8754 or Box  3835, Van., B.C.
LEARN TO SKI AT
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
6 "weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transpor-
taion; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West BroadwTay,
Vancouver  9.   Tel.   738-3128.	
SPECIAL MARKET SUNDAY NOV.
29. 2-5 p.m. 2054 Trafalgar (off
4th). Ph. 738-7809. Old fur coats,
bean-bag chairs, rugs, boutique
clothes for Men & Chicks. Antique
clothes — Wine will be served.
THTS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE.
Traffaut's explosively funny film,
"Stolen Kisses". Fri. & Sat., 7:00,
9:30; Sun., 7:00. Nov. 27-29. AMS
50c,   Non-AMS  75c.	
LOOKING FOR INTERESTING
Xmas Presents? Have you handicrafts to sell? Next Friday, Dec.
4 from 4-9 p.m. at International
House there will be an International Market and Beer Garden
where any UBC student or club
can sell their wares to Xmas
shoppers. You must register in
advance for a booth so drop in
any weekeday 9-5 or call 224-4535
or  228-3887  for  details.	
FTRESTDE: CAMPUS " MINISTRY
will be discussed with source persons Peter Fribley and George
Hermanson. Union College (on
campus) Reception Room, 6000
Iona Drive. 8:00 p.m., Sunday,
Nov.  29.	
THE    GREAT    ED-ESTEY    MAS-
sacre.  Place Vanier,  Nov.  24,  1970
tcm, hi
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other destinations, 1-ways.
Mick. 687-2855 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunamuir St. Mon. - Sat,  9-9.
COUPLE SEEKING RIDE TO SAN
Fran. Dec. 26. Share expense. Call
Lynn and John 228-8164 supper-
times.	
TWO ONE-WAY TRAIN TICKETS
to Toronto valid till July 1, 1971.
Phone Peter 224-9833.	
MEXICO XMAS HOLIDAYS. 2~
males (with car) seek 2 healthy
females. Lou 224-1914 (after 10:00
p.m.).	
SKI SWITZERLAND CHRISTMAS!
Chalet extra special 2-week rate
for 16. Low-cost tour available.
Book  immediately.   266-5246.	
STUDENTS . . . EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
information ( air mail ) Anglo -
American Assn., 60A Pyle St.,
Newport   I.W..   England.
Wanted—Information
17
WOULD ANYONE IN TOTEM
Park area Saturday night (Nov.
21) who may have seen anyone
near the Motorcycle Parking Area
please phone 224-9813 — Brian,
Room 273. My bike was stolen —
Reward.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MORRIS MINOR 1968 HARD TOP,
26,000, good condition. Phone 261-
3728.	
'66 C O R V A I R, 34,000 MILEST
Automatic. Ph. R. Gross, 224-9820.
1962 FORD FALCON 6 CYLINDER.
Auto, trans. Good condition. Grey
Call 738-7577. Good Buy.	
1957 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION
Std. six. Radio, $60.00. Rm. 3370
BioSc.   or   736-5389   eves.	
MOVING!! MUST SELL!! 1970 V.W.
panel-van, 4 mos. old, radio, etc.
Overs   over   $2,200.   876-9857.	
DAMAGED 1966 AUSTIN COOPER,
good engine, electrical, radio. Of-
fers call Dave 224-7545 after 6 p.m.
NEED 4-WHEED DRIVE MUST
sell superb 58 Olds P.S. P.B. new
auto, transm., studded snow tires
on wheels, chains, 4 new summer
tires.   731-3942,   Virginia.
Autom obiles—Parts
23
2 4-PLY 520-10 SNOWS FOR
"Mini";   used   1   mth.   $15.00   each
 Phone 266-9009.	
B.M.C. HARDTOP FOR M.G.B.
Also like new Michelin ZX radials
and   hardwood   wheel.   321-2501.
FTBERGLAS HARDTOP FOR AL-
pine, excellent condition, offers?
Ask for John.  224-9927 Rm.   35.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care & Baby Sitting     32A
U. HILL KINDERGARTEN. OPEN-
ings for 3 & 4-year-olds for both
1971   and   71-72.   Phone   224-5990.
Scandals
37
SEE THE MOST EXOTIC, NON-
sex, but seductive scene ever in
Truffaut's film "Stolen Kisses".
Fri. & Sat., 7:00, 9:30; Sun., 7:00.
Nov. 27-29. AMS 50c. Non - AMS
75c.   SUB  THEATRE.	
DRINK TO HELP! FRIDAY, 27th:
Renowned International House
Beer Garden will donate proceeds
to Pakistan Disaster Fund. Come
out and bottoms up! 4:00 p.m.-7:00
p.m.	
EDUCATION BEER & CHICKEN
Nite. Here's one time where eating out isn't a scandal. All you
can eat and all you can drink for
$2.50. It's happening Wed., Dec.
2 in SUB Ballroom at-8:00 p.m.
Tickets available in Room 4, Edu-
cation Bldg.	
CORKY'S MEN'S "HAIRSTYLING.
Tired of getting clipped? Trv
Corky's! 3644 W. 4th, Alma on
4th.   Appointments,   731-4717.
Typing
40
ACCURATE   EXP.   TYPING   FROM
legible work;  reas.  rates.  738-6829
after 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
FAST,      A C cTj RATE      TYPING,
Electric     Typewriter,     Shorthand.
325-2934.	
STUDENTS. TERM PAPERS TYP-
ed at a reasonable rate. Call
Yvonne  at  738-6874.	
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
per page. Essays 30c per page —
5c / copy. Fast, efficient service.
Phone 274-3010. Residence Rich-
mond.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Anne Treacy,  738-8794.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
FAST     ACCURATE     ELECTRIC
typing.   Theses,   essays,    etc.    35tf
 per   page.   Mrs.   Duncan.   228-9597.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Ph.   263-5317.
ESSAYS & THESES TYPED, EX~
perienced typist. Electrical typewriter.   Call  731-8096.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MEN OR WOMEN — EARN $20-
$30 per day for next 2 weeks.
Phone   733-3116.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
SPANISH CONVERSATION. THE
shortest way to speak. Prof.
Pareja (Colombia, Argentina &
UBC) will teach, $3 hr. individual,
no group, M to S. 10 to 9. 12 hr.
paid    in    advance.     1405    Cypress
 (nr.  Cornwall).  Ph.  738-5692.   	
TROUBLE WITH COURSES? UBC
Tutoring Centre has qualified
tutors in almost all university
subjects. Register now and pass
that Christmas exam. SUB 100B,
228-4583, 12-2 p.m. weekdays.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW  AVAILABLE $1.00
at the Bookstore and
AMS Publications Office
Pre-Sale tickets redeemed only at
Publications Office
1 DOWN FILLED SKI JACKET
Size 40-42, $30; 1 pr. (new) Tyrol
Climbing boots, size 7, $45. Phone
224>0942.
NOW — 200 USED FUR COATS,
Jackets, Capes etc. $15 - $100. We
buy, sell or trade. Also custom-
made Canadian Fur Rugs and Fur
Bedspreads at Guaranteed Savings. Open only: Fri. 7 p.m. to
10 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Pappas Bros. Sell. 459 Hamilton
St. at Victory Square. Bus. phone
681-6840;  Res. 224-4597.
SMALL WHITE SHEEPSKIN
Coat  from  Greece.   266-8070.
SELLING MISC. BOOKS, HOUSE-
hold items, Beds, Chairs, Tables.
Very Cheap. 732-9806. Also Stereo,
12"   T.V.
POCKETABLE TAPE RECORDER
—runs up to 40 minutes on one
side—operates for hours on inexpensive penlight batteries—ideal
for recording lectures, dictating,
etc. Complete with remote control
dynamic mike, earphone and batteries.   Phone   732-9218.
SKIS BLIZZARD EPOXI LS 200 CM.
$40.00 O.N.O. 261-9661 after 7 p.m.
1 SET OF DRUMS AND WEIGHT-
lifting set. Call 224-0088 early
morning   or  after   5.
AQUARIUMS, HAND CRAFTED
for professional displays. Available as complete units or in
separate parts.  263-5200.
SKIERS! MUST SACRIFICE NEW
Koflach Expo Masters. $90 or best
offer, size men's 1014 m. Phone
Anthony,   261-7519.
HEAD   MASTERS    215    CM.    $65.00
or best offer.  263-5783.
SPECIAL MARKET, 2054 TRAFAL-
gar (off 4th), Sunday, 2-5 p.m.,
Nov. 29. Boutique clothes by
Evelyn Roth. Antique clothes by
Ivon. Also bean-bag chairs, old
fur  coats,  rugs.
RAICHLE RED HOTS, SIZE 10,
$100. Head giant slalom 215 cm,
$100.   Look  Nevada  bindings.   224-
UNIROYAL SNOW TIRES 6.95 BY
14. 4 ply nylon tubeless, new, $30.
988-2043.
FOR SALE, 1 PAIR 205'S KASTLE
C.P.M. 70S skis used one yr. excellent condition $100. Ph. 731-4073.
PENTAX   SPOTMATIC   CAMERA—
1.4/50Super   Takumar    lens.    $155.
TOP QUALITY TERM PAPERS
available in each of the follow^
ing subjects: English, Psychology,
Political Science, History, etc.
Ph.   224-1766  evenings.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SHARE LARGE FURNISHED
house with 2 women. $67. Own
room.  733-6509.  8th and Larch.
SLEEPING ROOM, PRIVATE EN-
trance, own bathroom. Men only.
Sr. or Masters only. $55.00 mo.
224-4506.
BRIGHT ATTRACTIVE ROOM IN
young household. Kitchen privs.,
phone, washer. Near U.B.C. $50
p.m. plus som baby sitting. Girl
only   228-9597.
ROOM IN HOUSE, $40 PLUS
utilities, male, female or couple.
Phone 732-9629  after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD, GOOD FOOD,
quiet, colour T.V., sauna bath.
Ph. 224-9684 (Len) or (Gary).
5785 Agronomy Rd. U.B.C.
Furnished Apts.
83
Unfurnished Apts.
84
WANTED — PERMANENT UN-
furnished accommodation on/near
Campus. Mature student, with
shower. 228-8282.
Halls For Rent
85
INTIMATE DOWNTOWN NIGHT-
Club available — Parties etc. Call
683-9937.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 25
Quebec tightens screws
The repression in Quebec is
taking more subtle forms.
Last week Quebec education
minister Guy St. Pierre
announced four measures
designed to tighten the screws on
radical teachers in public schools
and at the universities.
The four measures are:
# Nomination of a
commissioner of inquiry whose
job will be to receive complaints
from parents and school
administrators about teachers
"abusing" their positions for the
purposes of spreading "political
propaganda" or "indoctrinating
their students".
# 'Warnings to the rectors of
universities, directors of CEGEPs
(junior colleges) and school
commissioners to stop these
"abuses", and a threat that if they
don't, the minister will personally
interfere.
# Institution of mechanisms to
control the work of teachers to be
sure they do not use their links
with students to propagandize.
• Creation of a joint
committee of representatives of
the teachers, the school
commissions and the minister to
draw up a "code of ethics"
defining the relationship between
teacher and student.
The Alliance des Professeurs de
Montreal, which represents all the
French Catholic teachers in the
city and comprises the biggest
local of the Quebec Teachers
Corporation (CEQ), has
denounced the projected
measures, calling them "a
permanent extension of the War
Measures Act."
Already there have been many
arrests within the scholastic
community: professors have been
arrested in front of their classes.
One teacher was-arrested because
his principal, while eavesdropping
Hotel may give
space for frats
continued from page One
"It would give us the capital to
rent another facility during the
interim when the hotel complex is
being built.
"One of the proposed investors
has suggested he will allot us space
on the top floor of the hotel with
pool and sauna facilities.
"This would enable us to
reduce our fraternity fees quite
substantially next spring."
He ended by saying "our
fraternity is definitely not in
financial trouble."
Phi' Gamma Delta has also
stated it is not in trouble
financially, and that it is up to the
alumni whether or not they
decide to sell.
James Smith, head of J. E.
Smith Realty which claims to
represent the unknown land
developer, stated Thursday that
he feels the hotel complex would
serve as a benefit to the entire
campus.
Nicholls also feels this hotel
would serve as mutual advantage
to the fraternities, the developers,
UBC generally (more facilities to
meet the expansion of the
university), and the students.
This complex would be able to
employ a great number of
students on a part-time basis, he
said.
R. P. Murdoch, manager of the
university endowment lands, told
The Ubyssey Thursday that he is,
prepared to consider any proposal
put forward, providing that it
meets the following conditions: a.
satisfactory development plan; a
satisfactory proof oi concluding
an agreement with the fraternities
as tar as disposal oi property and
its   availability;  anu   a complete
disclosure    of    all    principals
involved in a development.
"We are not locked into any
development," Murdoch said,
"but I think it fair to say we are
going to give a careful look at
point one in those conditions
stated. We want to alleviate the
possibility of the property being
developed in a haphazard
fashion."
However, Murdoch's earlier
statements about the need of
overnight accommodations at the
university imply that the hotel
idea has a good chance for
approval.
If the hotel developers get to
the stage of asking that the frat
land be re-zoned to permit hotel
construction, the university could
apply pressure for or against the
request through the endowment
lands commission which operates
under the Greater Vancouver
Regional District.
The hotel, whose room are
expected to run at $40-$50 a
night, would accommodate
dignitaries and profs who are
expected to be attracted to UBC
on completion of the health
sciences complex on Wesbrook.
on the school intercom, caught
part of the answer he was giving a
student concerning the crisis.
City council
Ward Carson believes that
Vancouver could become the
trade and cultural centre of the
Pacific Rim.
Carson, one of the lesser
known candidates for mayor of
Vancouver, is a man who defies
classification.
He began his career by
breaking one of the first Japanese
codes of World War II.
When he returned to his
civilian job as an electrician he
applied the principles he had used
in breaking codes to problems of
astronomy and nuclear physics.
His solutions to these problems
have been recognized by
Buckminster Fuller, who created
the geodesic dome.
Carson would apply these same
principles to the running of
Vancouver. He wants to relate
Vancouver to the rest of the
world and take advantage of its
natural potential.
Carson will be at the
all-candidates meeting in the SUB
ballroom Wednesday.
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
Announcing WUSC
International Seminar
IN
COLOMBIA
June - August 1971
THEME:
"Aid and development"
For details contact:
MERRILL FEARON
166 Brock Annex
Students from all
disciplines invited
to apply.
UNUSUal
men's & women's boutique
the bad boys ragge-shoppe
315 Seymour St.
683-3734
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In - Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.        224-6121
In the Village
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Vofkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave. 879-0491
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
from your Executive
Treasured Symbol of Devotion
Falling in love and getting engaged
what a happy, important time in your
life! Of course you'll choose your
diamond   with   the   greatest   of
care, because it's the symbol
of your love. And when you
choose a Miller diamond, you
know   you   are   getting   the
finest diamond - one that
will truly mean more . . . now
and forever.
QUALITY CONTROLLED:
Every Miller Bridal Bouquet
Diamond is constantly
checked for weight, cut,
clarity and colour during
EVERY phase of processing
to assure you of greatest-
value for your dollar.
FOR CHRISTMAS
20% off to students and
faculty easy terms — 10%
down — up to a year to
pay!
655 Granville
683-6651
47 W. Hastings
682-3801
622 Columbia
New West.
■ 526-37711
CAMERAsDARKROOM
SALE
SUPPLIES
GREAT SAVINGS and IDEAS
FOR CHRISTMAS
i
i
NOW ON AT
*mr
i
RUSH ANT CAMERAS
224-5858 224-9112
4558 W. 10th Ave. Page 26
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970
AS THIS PICTURE SHOWS, the intramural program can provide
its exciting moments for those who are willing enough to
participate.
Intramurals
DIV. I, SOCCER FINALS—Engineering and PE played to an overtime 1-1
tie. This game will be replayed on Monday at noon, 12:30. This year's soccer
participation has surpassed previous
years with 32 teams and 365 participants.
CURLING ends on Nov. 30; all score
sheets must be in by Dec. 1. All teams
are requested to check at the Intramural office regarding a bonspiel on
Sat., Jan. 9.
BASKETBALL concludes on Nov. 30
for this term but will begin again on
Jan. 11. Check the schedules for your
games.
HOCKEY also concludes on Nov. 26
and returns on Jan. 7.
BADMINTON finals will be held Tues
day at 12:00. All spectators are welcome.
TENNIS—i All players scheduled to
play in the play-offs please check with
the office.
If you wish to participate in intramurals we have many more activities
commencing in January. The bowling,
snooker and skiing sign-up date is
Jan. 14. Other January activities include wrestling, Softball and volleyball.
GOLF FINAL RESULTS
1. Dentistry    188 pts.
2. Forestry   163
3. Engineers     136
4. Betas   136
■-   5.    Phys Ed      91
6. Architecture      71
7. Science         54
<#y%
OVERSEAS AUTO
12th & Alma
Telephone 736-9804
Sports Car Accessories, also goodies for Datsun — Mazda —
Toyota — VW — Cortina — Mini and other popular imports.
(10% Discount With AMS Card)
SKI PRO
140 LONSDALE AVENUE, NORTH VANCOUVER
SKIS
DYNASTAR
HART
•HERZOG
TONI SAILER
KAESTLE
BLIZZARD
**FIS
*$ 125—Full Fibreglass
**  $98—Metal — Same as Head 360
BOOTS
VAL D'OR
KASTINGER
ROSEMOUNT
INNSBRUCK
HENKE
RELCO
GARDENA
SALES — RENTALS— TRADE-INS
988-6220 Parking at Rear
10% Discount to all UBC Students with Cards
Birds back from Prairies
Last weekend the Thunderbird basketball team
played like the defending Canadian champions they
are downing the University of Saskatchewan,
Brandon and the University of Saskatchewan
(Regina campus).
Friday night before a capacity Husky crowd the
Birds were never really in danger of losing until the
last five minutes when Saskatchewan pulled within
six points. But UBC shook them off to win 85-72.
Saturday the Birds travelled to Brandon to take
on the tough Bobcats. At least they thought they
would be tough, but they provided little problem
bowing to UBC 83-64.
The Birds had a bit of a scare at the half when
they were trailing the Bobcats 39-31.
Finaily on Monday evening the Birds took on
the University of Saskatchewan (Regina campus)
Cougars and it was no contest.
The inexperienced Cougars were run ragged by
the UBC attack and were swamped 77-42. The score
could very well have been higher if the Birds had
not been coming off two previous games.
The Cougars could not handle the Bird fast
break and when they took to the offensive the full
court press put on by UBC forced many turnovers.
In Friday night's game irrepressible Ron
Thorsen tallied for 25 points, closely followed by
Terry MacKay with 21 and Derek Sankey with 15.
Saturday Thorsen again led the scoring potting
18 points, followed by MacKay with 13.
The going was much tougher in this contest and
the Birds had to work that much harder to win.
Brandon has one of the biggest squads that has been
seen in this league for some years and in the first
half were taking most of the rebounds.
On Monday who-else-but-Thorsen again led
with 26, while guard Stan Calligari found the mark
as well contributing 15.
Hockey Birds polish off
Saskatchewan and Brandon
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team had a rather easy time of it
last weekend.
They yawned their way
through the Saskatchewan
Huskies 10-2 Friday night and
Saturday dispatched the Brandon
Bobcats, 6-3.
In Friday's debacle Tom
Williamson proved to be the
Birds' top marksman with three
goals. Second was Bob MacAneely
with two and Roy Sakaki, Barry
Wilcox, Rich Longpre, Doug
Buchanan and Jeff Wilson with
one each.
■er
By the end of the first period
the score showed UBC to be up
6-0 over the hapless Huskies.
After that period Saskatchewan
switched goal tenders and were
held to just four more goals.
TOM WILLIAMSON,
high scorer Friday
UBC's penalty killing team of
Dwayne Biagoni, Roy Sakaki,
Jack Moores and Tom Williamson
literally tied up the Saskatchewan
attack. In that game UBC was
charged with 20 penalty minutes
to the Huskies eight. So it looks
like the Birds will be a hitting as
well as a high scoring team.
Saturday night against Brandon
the Birds had a little more
trouble. It was a very tight game
until Park's goal broke the 3-3 tie.
Brandon did not score again while
the Birds tallied twice more to
beat the Bobcats 6-3.
The Birds travel to the
University of Victoria this
weekend to play the Vikings
twice. Last weekend the Vikings
split their games, beating Brandon
Friday night and losing to the
Huskies Saturday.
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY.
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
Fill in and return this coupon or phone today. No obligation. No salesman will call.
MAIL THIS COUPON  FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Residence
Address ....
(PI*
i Print)
Occupation   -	
Phone: Home   Ottlco 	
City Pro*.
Ago     Mole □   Fanwla O
Married O    Single O
Data tint liconaad to drive -	
Give number and datea of accident In laat S yaare,
(circle datea of those accldente which ware not your
fault).
In the laat five years has your
licanss bean suspended?
Year of automobile
Make of automobile
No. of cylinders
Modal (Impels, Dart, etc.)
2/4 dr-Sdn, s/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area
One way driving diatanca
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in  last 5 years.
Car No. 1
Csr No. 2
Yes D No D
Yes D No D
Are you new Insured? 	
Date currant policy expires.
This  coupon   is  designed  solely   to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
LIST ALL ADDITION
AL DHIVI
EM
Age
Mala or
Female
Relation
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
%otUse
#i
#2
%
' %
%
%
1%
%
FPR UBC 21
I
I
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
critn Friday, November 27, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
Cross-country team supreme,
capture PNW championship
On Saturday, November 22 the Northwest Championships.
UBC     cross-country     team        In the junior division Ken Hirst
annihalated     all     opposition of  UBC   ran   in   the   four  and
sweeping the open men's and the one-half mile course in 23:28.5
junior   divisions   of   the   Pacific for a first place finish.
Rugger chaps winners
win Tisdal Cup trophy
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team has virtually become the
proud owner of the Tisdal Cup
trophy after defeating Georgians
last week 30-9.
Vancouver first division rugby
,. standings for the Tisdal Cup, to
decide Fall League champion are:
Doug Shick are playing on  the
Canadian side.
UBC continues its schedule on
Sunday at UBC against
Ex-Britannia. The last match of
the season will be the following
Saturday at UBC against
Meralomas.
WLF
A   Pts.
UBC T'Birds
8  0  213
52   16
Meralomas
6   1   131
61    12
Georgians
6  2   125
69    12
Capilanos
5   3   110
82    10
Trojans
4  3    91
77     8
Kats
4 3   110
73     8
Ex-Brit.
3  4    82
126     6
Row. Club
3  4    82
126     6
Seattle
2  7    84
163     4
Pocomo
1   6    41
128     2
Red Lions
0  8    30
179     0
RUGBY NOTES: Canada plays
Fiji   at   Swangard   Stadium   in
Burnaby on
Saturday, Nov. 28 at
2:30.   UBC
s   Bob  Jackson   and
Volleyballers
here Saturday
The UBC Invitational
volleyball tournament goes
Saturday, November 28 at 9:00
a.m. in War Memorial Gym.
Teams from Calgary,
Edmonton, Portland, and Seattle
will be competing.
The semi-finals will begin at
3:15 and the finals at 5:00 p.m.
BEEFBURGERS
10 Delicious Toppings
RED APPLE
RESTAURANT
41st & E. Blvd.
MAMCfeKS *
GIVING R IO%
DISCOUNT  ow   19*71
ORDERS PLACED 6EF0RE
W£ CLOS5 ON DECS'*
Coming third, fifth, and
eleventh were teammates Duncan
Klett, Graham Laughlin and
Andre Gerard, for a total of 20
points to second place University
of Victoria with 35 points.
In the open men's division, it
was expected that the extremely
powerful Vancouver Olympic
CLu would retain their title. But
even though UBC split their forces
between the junior and senior
teams, they had their best day
with Norm Trerise, Ken French,
Rick Woods and Bill Dove
capturing second, third, eighth,
and fourteenth positions.
This brought the team to a first
place finish with 27 points, with
VOC in second with 36 points.
d«nMe<*+eq
The staff of The Ubyssey Sports Department would like
to wish all of its readers a Merry Christmas and a Happy New
Year.
^a
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
JOHN WURFLINGER
Wishes All Students
The Best Of Luck
In Exams
and
A VERY, VERY
MERRY
CHRISTMAS
Drop in & see us for ALL your Skiiing Needs
* ROSSIGNOL *   DYNASTAR *   ATOMIC
* LE TRAPPEUR       *   LA DOLOMITE *   HESCHUNG
* NANCY   GREENE   -   ALPINE   -   TYROL   SKI   WEAR
Personal Guarantee with All Purchases
Open THURSDAY and FRIDAY till 9 pm
Alpine skiers prep
for upcoming meets
This is the first year that the men and women's ski team have had
their program together.
Coach Bob Calladine has given an extensive dry land training
program which started early in September. The program consisted of
running, weight training, circuit training and calisthenics.
About sixty will compete for the Thunderbird ski team. Those
that are not in the Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference race circuit will
compete mainly in the Vancouver area in Canadian Ski Association
competition.
Some of the collegiate races scheduled are: Bend, Oregon; Crystal
Mountain, Washington; Mt. Baker, Washington; Alpental, Washington
and conference championships at Multophor, Oregon. UBC will host
the Elwood Peskett Memorial race in conjunction with a collegiate meet
in Vancouver.
The team is holding the Christmas training Camp at Snow Valley
in Fernie this year. There are also arranging for a inclusive ski package
to other interested skiers thinking of a ski holiday. There are only nine
places still open for this trip so anyone interested should seek
information in the men's athletic office immediately.
Cross country skiing is getting to be a big thing within the team as
several more have taken to it this season. The Northwest Collegiate Ski
Conference encourages competition in both Alpine and Nordic events
and as a result the team gains more points for competing in cross
countrry as well as slalom, giant slalom and downhill events. Some of
the cross country skiers will go to Prince George for their Christmas
training camp.
The first cross country race is at Manning Park on December 6,
1970.
Although members of the team have not been specifically chosen,
there appears to be several excellent skiers awainting the open
positions. Five Alpine men and women will be chosen as well as five
Nordic men to compete for UBC.
This is the first year the UBC men's team has competed in the
Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference but the second season for the
women. Last year the women placed third in the conference.
Two members of the women's team who showed very well last
year are Joy Ward and Karen Williams. As well as taking several top
places in the conference they were chosen to compete internationally in
the DuMaurier at Grouse Mountain as well as in the Pontiac Cup finals
in Quebec.
No "Time Out" at
— We Hurry
HILLTOP GULF SERVICE
BIG SAVINGS-20%
Discount for Labor
(UBC Students Only)
4305 W. 10th
Phone 224-7212
INTERCOLLEGIATE
BASKETBALL
SEE
CANADA'S
NO. 1 TEAM
The Thunderbirds
PLAY
University of Victoria
"Vikings"
Fri.. Nov. 17 - Sat., Nov. 28
WAR MEMORIAL GYM — 8 P.M.
U.B.C. STUDENTS ADMITTED FREE Page 28
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 27, 1970

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