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The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1970

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Array -a
AKSBC South Afric
■5gt?
***
THIS IS THE POSTER that AIESEC is using to advertise their South African trip. AIESEC is an
organization that is gathering economic and commerce students together and arranging for a tour
around the South African gold industries. The purpose of this is to acquaint students with the
organization, management, and financing of the gold industry - to give them practical experience.
uth Africa;
imperialism
power against their black citizens' cries for
justice and equality.
As an example of racism the poster on
AIESEC's door conveys such an ethic.
What kind of picture are UBC students
getting of this situation? Blacks do not mind
domination. They enjoy pulling their white
masters around and showing them the sights.
They do not mind being the black muscle for
the white mind, to complement its prowess by
their own menial, subordinate activity.
Mechanism for promoting racist ideas are
subtle and know no bounds. The subtle
conditioning inherent in AIESEC'S poster may
not provoke any response at all from the
majority of people. If it does not then we are
truly used to the white and black picture of
human relationships where the black race
serves. If people have become racist enough to
feel that this is the "natural order of things"
then they had better listen and pay heed to
what the Panthers are saying in the U.S. and to
what the Angolan people are beginning to do.
The struggle against white colonial domination
is beginning by the people who are being
dominated.
The whole situation can provoke moral
outrage. But is that all there is to it? Not really.
Not when you consider the facts about South
Africa. Racism, apartheid, colonial oppression
and exploitation of black people, not in the
U.S. in this case, but in their own land,
dominated by white masters.
Come to So
learn about
By D. J. O'DONNELL
and DICK BETTS
A recently-opened office in SUB 100A
promotes racism. Blatantly! Without apology!
And at liberal UBC!?
AIESEC (Association Internationale des
Etudiantes en Sciences Economiques et
Commerciales) is pushing an apprentice tour
around the South African gold industry for
UBC students. The tour's purpose, according to
an AIESEC poster, is: "Practical work
experience in the gold mining industry.
Seminars and lectures on the international role
of gold . . . organization, management and
financing of the South African gold mining
industry."
Practical experience in the commerce field?
Any radical would be shit upon for suggesting
that economics and commerce students are
given theoretical training in racism and
imperialism, but what is the purpose of the
"•gold" training but to find out how the South
African white racist business community can
extract gold from the land and sell it in a
profitable way?
That procedure is not a simple (amoral)
commerce "operating under the law of the
land" as one AIESEC member called it. For in
order to preserve that commerce, world trade
must accept South Africa as a legitimate
economic and political power and the local
government in South Africa must preserve that
>rfy
Students decide:
keep old guard
By JOHN ANDERSEN
UBC students voted by a 2-1
margin Wednesday in favor of
continuing the present
compulsory membership in the
Alma Mater Society.
The vote, 5489 for compulsory
membership, 2855 against and 10
spoils, represented the largest
turnout of students in AMS
history.
"The vote is a clear example of
student concern over having a
stable union," said AMS president
Fraser Hodge.
"Some people may have
disagreed with various decisions
made by the AMS but most feel
the need for a viable union.
"Selling a voluntary union is
like trying to sell an Edsel."
He called the vote "a warning
to the people who continually
rant about the AMS lacking
support among students."
John Cherrington, arts 2,
' whose petition to AMS council
forced the holding of the
referendum, said Wednesday's
referendum was only the
beginning for the students who
voted in favor of a voluntary
union.
He said legal action against
compulsory AMS membership
may be taken next year.
"Also, a referendum of this
kind will be held every year from
now on," he said.
"The AMS waged the same
type of scare campaign as the
Socreds did in the last provincial
election." said Cherrington, a
former member and president of
the UBC Socred Club.
"Fraser Hodge and his
executive didn't ever come out as
to why students should vote no.
"The only statement from the
AMS was a short article in The
Ubyssey by Dell Valair.
"Instead, they relied on
personal attacks on Carey Linde
and myself," he said.
Law student association
president Linde, who also
campaigned for a voluntary union,
said the referendum did not settle
the legal question of whether or
not a student can be forced to
belong to the organization.
He suggested as further action
that a person in fourth year who
had not yet paid tuition fees
withhold his AMS fee of $29. He
said if the university refuses him a
degree it will show the AMS is a
union which is forced on all
students by the administration.
Linde did not wish to
comment on Hodge's article in
Tuesday's Ubyssey attacking
himself and Cherrington.
"I don't want to get that low
at this point," he said.
"You shouldn't have to
respond to that sort of thing."
AMS executives were confident
of the outcome before the vote
count.
"I think we're guaranteed at
least 60 per cent of the vote," said
AMS co-ordinator Dave Grahame.
Treasurer Chuck Campbell and
secretary Ann Jacobs agreed with
Grahame's prediction.
Actual percentage vote was 66
per cent for compulsory AMS
membership and 34 per cent
against.
AUCC supports Loyola
in  firing  of  professor
OTTAWA (CUP) - The
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada, national
lobby for university
administrators, has taken on the
Canadian Association of
University Teachers, national
lobby for faculty, in a
bureaucratic version of the
conflict between professor S. A.
Santhanam and the administration
of Loyola College. In a press
statement Monday (February 2)
the AUCC unsurprisingly plumped
for the administration in the
Loyola contract dispute which has
simmered for more than seven
months now, and ticked off
CAUT for attempting to use the
threat of censure to enforce
binding CAUT arbitration to
settle the Loyola conflict.
The AUCC decision followed a
board meeting here last Thursday
and Friday (January 29 and 30).
According to the AUCC, the
all-Jesuit administration at Loyola
had fulfilled all its obligations to
Santhanam when it refused to
renew his contract last June 19.
AUCC directors also said that
was    Overstepping    its
in attempting to secure
CAUT
bounds
binding arbitration in the case of a
dismissed professor who did not
have academic tenure at the time
of his firing.
"This recommendation raises
some very important questions for
the future of the Canadian
academic community," AUCC
directors said.
Santhanam, a nuclear physicist,
was dismissed by Loyola trustees
without stated cause. His case has
kept the Loyola campus in an
uproar since September; the
Loyola administration has
declared it will seek justification
for its action in Quebec courts
February 16.
A CAUT investigation team
which researched the case last
December — without the
co-operation of the Loyola
administration — argued that the
handling of Santhanam's contracts
by the administration had been
"so confused and misleading that
it is not clear if Dr. Santhanam
has been fairly dealt with." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6,  1970
Senate  wants  to   limit  enrolment  even  more
By PETER LADNER
UBC student senator
Less than 24 hours after you read this, the UBC
senate will probably have decided to limit total enrolment
to 27,500 students. Also they will have decided whether
or not to throw out anthropology and sociology
department head Cyril Belshaw's brainchild for a system
of federated colleges here.
The senate meets tomorrow morning (at 9 a.m. on
the second floor of the old administration building —
students welcome) to make its first decisions on the
Belshaw report on long-range objectives.
By now, all faculties are supposed to have discussed
the report and made decisions on it.
Enrolment for next year's freshmen has already been
limited to 3400 students by a senate decision of a few
months ago.
What Saturday's motion will do is set the ultimate size
of the university at 27,500 students, subject to revision in
five years.
The specific recommendation in the motion is for a
limit of 22,000 undergrads and 5,500 grads. Presently
there are 18,400 undergrads and 2,600 grads, making a
total of 21,000 students.
Once this overall figure is accepted, the senators will
have to decide what faculties have to be limited.
The proposal of Belshaw's report is to limit
enrolment in the first two years of those faculties that
offer courses students could also find at other institutions
of higher hotair in B.C. — namely the faculties of arts,
agricultural sciences, education, physical education,
recreation education, science and commerce (first year
limits only).
Most of the faculty members on senate are supporting
this motion because they don't think UBC can become (or
remain, if you prefer) a first-class academic institution if
it's crammed full of not-so-smart students clogging up
scarce classrooms, labs, and professorial time.
(At the present rate, enrolment is expected to hit
34,371 by 1973, but judging by the inaccuracy of this
year's enrolment predictions, this figure is pretty
exaggerated.)
Opponents to this view argue that the University of
Michigan, with about 38,000 students, has excellent
academic standards.
Some enrolment restriction supporters are apparently
supporting it because 40,000 students would present a
huge traffic problem.
The open-enrolment advocates, including several
student senators, say we have no right to keep qualified
students out of the university, even if it means lowering
our academic standards a bit.
They say the proposal to increase the entrance
requirements to 65 per cent is just another example of
university discrimination against lower class citizens, who
usually have lower overall marks because of poorer
schools and anti-higher education vibes at home.
The main "respectable" opponent to enrolment
cutbacks is Cyril Belshaw who says the proposals were
worked out ass-backwards, as it were. He says any
enrolment restrictions should start by looking at how
many students can be accommodated in each department,
and then working out a total number, instead of the other
way around.
He also wants to tie in his enrolment opinions with
his proposal (backed by five of the eleven members of his
committee) for a system of federated colleges.
The main advantage to a decentralized federated
colleges proposal is it would provide a more human,
participatory, friendly and smaller place for each student.
He would take most of his classes in one small (less than
2,000 students) college that specializes in a discipline.
This motion appears doomed to defeat.
Some of the reasons given by those who oppose it
show the differences between being on the faculty and
being a student.
From the faculty member's point of view, there will
be too many administrators and it would have the effect
of breaking up the existing departments, even though a
skeletal departmental structure would still hold together
all faculty members in a discipline, even though they're
spread all over the campus.
For those faculty members who are comfortable
where they are, or who have spent years trying to build up
a good reputation for their departments, the college is an
ugly threat.
Speak Easy is in search of
people contacts. That is,
people who will meet other
people, people whose homes
might be used for a student
to crash for a night, people
who wouldn't mind showing
an out-of-town student
around. People who, in one
way or another, would be
willing to give some fellow a
hand. Speak Easy rejects
referrals to "institutions" or
"agencies" — it's so much
more human to bring people
together with other people. If
you've got an idea or a name,
drop by and let us know.
We promised to talk about
pregnancy in thiscolumn,some
alternatives and some ideas.
For the girl who has decided
to keep her child, four
non-profit co-op homes exist
in Vancouver which can
provide babysitting facilities,
group discussions, and
companionship for the
unmarried mother. Room and
board is quite reasonable at
these homes, but each girl is
expected to do some work
either within or outside the
home. Day-care services,
although sparse, do exist, and
subsidies for this can often be
obtained from the provincial
government.
Should a student decide,
for any number of reasons,
that she is unable to keep the
child or to continue with the
pregnancy, she might first
consider adoption. The
Children's Aid Society and
the Catholic Children's Aid
have provincial responsibility
for adoption procedures. The
parent, theoretically, has
some voice in the kind of
adoptive home most
preferable to her. As for
abortion, this column cannot
exhaust all the alternatives, as
each individual concern
requires very personal
thought, but we'd like to
bring to light at least two or
three possiblities. Abortion,
according to the new laws,
can be performed in a
registered hospital on the
advice of a psychiatrist and
physician to a hospital board.
It is theoretically performed
for physical and
psychological reasons. The
Pregnancy Counselling Clinic
operated by the Women's
Caucus (Tuesday nights from
7:30-10:30 p.m. at the
Labour Temple, 307 West
Broadway), has further
information about procedural
means for application.
Abortions can also be
obtained legally in Japan or
Great Britain (finances all
owing). Women are warned
that home remedies can be
dangerous, as can incompetent
"quack" practitioners.
Pregnancy tests,
incidentally, are available
through the Health Services
Center (UBC-Wesbrook
Medical Bldg.), the Family
Planning Clinic (West Eighth
Ave.; see last column) or the
Pregnancy Counselling Clinic.
Results are generally
obtained much more
quickly here than at most
commercial laboratories.
Electors movement hits
lack of news coverage
By JENNIFER JORDAN
The Committee of Progressive
Electors (COPE) has protested the
lack of coverage by the Sun and
the Province of their meeting last
Jan. 29.
The main gripe of COPE is that
no news of the meeting appeared
in either of Vancouver's two
major papers even though a
reporter from at least one was
present. They conclude that the
news of the meeting was either
ignored or suppressed. COPE
believes this . failure can be
attributed to the fact that both
newspapers are opposed to the
politics of COPE.
COPE secretary Frank
Kennedy said all groups who
support COPE have received the
same treatment from the press.
"Politically, these papers play
to the interests of the west end
community, with the intention of
procuring support for the next
elections, to be held in
December," he said.
This can only be viewed as a
result of the Pacific Press
monopoly which seems to have
the right to distort the news to
suit selfish business and political
interests, he charged.
Over 150 COPE members
attended the meeting where
Norman Levi, social worker and
prominent New Democratic Party
member, spoke on the welfare
situation in Vancouver and
alderman Harry Rankin reported
on city council business.
Resolutions were passed
protesting B.C. Hydro's planned
increase in electricity and bus fare
rates and also the False Creek
development scheme. It was
resolved to present city council
with briefs on several of these
points.
Phys.  Ed. conference
at  UBC on weekend
The Department of Physical
Education at UBC is holding the
fourth annual Western Canadian
Physical Education conference
today and tomorrow.
The major event scheduled for
today is a speech by Dr. Ernst
Jokl of Lexington, Kentucky on
'Factors contributing to the rise
of records in world athletics'. He
is at UBC on a Koerner
Foundation grant to give a paper
on the topic.
The presentation will be at
2:30 this afternoon in the SUB
auditorium.
Tomorrow Marsha Hall of
Nashville, Tennessee will speak in
the    auditorium    at    1:30    on
"Recreation in culturally deprived
areas'.
Over 100 delegates are
expected from Manitoba,
Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary,
and Lethbridge.
There will also be delegates
from University of Victoria and
Simon Fraser University.
All university delegations will
make presentations during the
conference.
The conference winds up
Saturday night with banquet and
dance in SUB.
The dinner speaker will be
Emery Barnes, formerly of the
B.C. Lions football team.
ff
3 SPECIAL EVENTS
b And Contemporary Arts Festival
8 presents
ANDY WARHOL FILMS I
Series of 3 - Feb. 9, 12, 16
1st Showing - MONDAY, FEB. 9 - 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
NUDE RESTAURANT
Restricted. Warning—Scenes of excessive nudity
— obscene language.
R. W. MACDONALD, B.C. Censor
I A MAN - FEB. 12
BIKE BOY - FEB.  16
yoooooooooooeoooooooooooooooooooooooooooot
YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT
EVELYN WOOD
Will be answered by the
following U.B.C. Students — Please Phone
SALLY NASH-Home Economics-926-1590
L0RNA PATON-Mathematics-224-5801
PETER SOL-History-874-6667
BILL McMICHAEL-Political Science-922-8204 Friday, February 6, 1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
"DON'T GALLOP, MY SWEET, or else you will get two black eyes," said engineering president Duane
Zilm at stunt for gear week Wednesday. Zilm is the one in the engineering jacket. The horse later became
excited and jumped off a cliff. The poor beast was shot; however, the horse is in good condition.
Why such overt contempt for women?
The above picture shows part of engineering
week festivities. The blacked-out part is the body of
a professional dancer hired to parade around
campus topless, representing the engineers'
traditional Lady Godiva. Below, Vancouver
Women's Caucas member Ellen Woodsworth
comments on the spectacle.
From a woman, a human being who is not yet
free, to all who participated in the overt display of
their low regard for women:
You see it is not just that women can think and
understand what you mean when you say that
women* s place is in the home or that it is as a sexual
plaything; we know we are supposed to be
intelligent but not too intelligent; we know that
your self-conception as men is so very weak as to
only exist when you control and use women; but
women feel what you are doing to us when you
place us on a horse. We know you aren't saying that
human bodies are beautiful. We feel the contempt
you have for us to place us on a pedestal for
laughter and ridicule.
But if men are so far from themselves that they
can only see women as toys to satisfy their free
time, what do they see in relationships? What does
each one   of   you men feel when you are with
Canadians first
at York University
women? Can you only relate to yourself as an
animal who has erections with no feelings for the
individual or are you so afraid of this woman that
you must objectify her to deal with her at all? You
put us down to bolster yourself, but that doesn't
help either of us. We attempt to become the plastic
ideal woman image, of blonde hair, 28" waist,
sweetness, and cream — and further from ourselves.
This makes us further from you also. You then have
to become more of the man which means joining a
mob in which you don't have to think, only act out
your frustrations for today until they build up again
tomorrow. I can only feel sorry for men who are so
far from themselves and from women.
Every woman knows and thinks and feels about
what happened on Wednesday. Every woman knows
what that woman felt like displayed on the horse.
Most of us will internalize our feelings. How
angry we are. But we are beginning to burst with
feelings that say I am and I will not allow you to
treat me or any other woman as an object.
I am glad that I am a woman. I am angry that a
man puts me down in that way but I do not wish to
be a man, who is so insecure that he must try to
bolster himself by manipulating and degrading
women.
Women seen as
manual laborers
By ROBIN BURGESS
"Like the women of ancient
China whose feet were bound as a
sign of their husband's high status,
modern western women are
regarded as possessions of their
husbands", Dr. Kathleen Aberle
said Wednesday.
Aberle, a former Simon Fraser
University anthropology professor
spoke to students in SUB 211 on
"The Anthropology of Women",
the first in a series of educationals
sponsored by UBC's Women's
Liberation group.
"Housewives are forced to bum
a living from their husbands," said
Aberle. "Most receive living
expenses by a combination of
nagging and hustling."
Irregardless of her husband's
status, the average housewife falls
into the class of the manual
worker, a class that is forced to do
harder work for less money, she
said.
"Even more than manual
workers I'd call them
pre-capitalist serfs." 53 per cent
of Canadian women fall into this
class.
For women who leave the
home to join the labour force, the
story is no better. Women are
consistently paid less for equal
work and completely excluded
from other jobs, she said.
Aberle outlined three basic
changes necessary if a state at our
level of technological
development is to satisfy the
female half of its population.
First, positions of potential
power must be open to both men
and women. Secondly, the
concept of family life and child
care must be completely revised.
Thirdly, young men and women
should be permitted to set and
share living accommodation with
each other going about their own
jobs, and leading their own lives
without stigma.
"There has never been a time
when women weren't subordinate
to men and some social division
between the sexes existed," said
Aberle.
"In most pre-human primate
species there was some indication
of male dominance in the sense
that the males were bigger and
stronger and could steal food
from the females."
"With the development of a
carnivorous diet and hunting, the
roles of males and females became
firmly defined. Females with
young couldn't travel as fast or far
as the males so were forced to
stay home while the males hunted
for food."
"In most primitive hunting
societies   that   exist   today   the
labour   is   practical
idealistic,"   Aberle
division of
rather than
said.
However, women within these
societies have great personal
freedom and their role is
recognized as being vital to the
economy of the society, she said.
"In pygmy society, there's a
common belief that, while men
Aberle
fire
she
have the most to do with
today, women invented it,"
said.
According to Aberle, women's
relative rights diminished and
their spheres contracted with the
development of the society of the
state some 5000 years ago.
It was in this period that
devices such as the chastity belt
were developed to enslave and
oppress women.
She pointed out that the lot of
women has always improved in
times of war.
"As "improved" methods of
warfare enabled more and more
people to be destroyed men
became too busy fighting and
dying in times of war to carry on
the operation of the state. Women
then assumed many of these
tasks," she said.
Only with the growth of the
New Left movement in the 1960's
was any real effort made to
improve the status of women.
"I see the struggle for women's
liberation as a struggle for true
democracy within a socialistic
context. Women's liberation is a
revolution within a revolution,"
said Aberle.
The series ''Bound
Feet—Bound Minds" continues
next Wednesday, February 11 in
SUB 125 when Dr. Margaret
Benston will lead an educational
on women within the university
entitled "Always a lecturer, never
a head."
Computers invading campus
TORONTO (CUP) - The York
University political science
department will follow a
"Canadians first" policy when
hiring teaching staff for the next
term, American department
chairman Harold Kaplan
announced here Wednesday.
All Candidates, Kaplan said,
are divided into two files -
Canadians and non-Canadians.
"We proceed first with the
Canadian file and make an effort
to hire there," Kaplan said. "We
go to the non-Canadian file only if
we can find no one suitable in the
Canadian file."
The proportion in the political
science department runs one-third
Canadians to two-thirds
non-Canadians, Kaplan said.
Arts and science Dean John
Saywell said political science is
the only York department to have
adopted the "two-file system,"
but that other departments have
always followed the practice of
looking first for qualified
Canadians.
By DAVID KEILLOR
*&$%"("%&&-$%*%%)('-*" ' &
The above may be what your next year's
program will look like to both you and the
computer if the administration has its way.
hi an effort to cut red tape during registration,
many students next year will have their programs
assembled by computer. The giant IBM 360
computer, located in the civil engineering building,
will perform the task directed by systems analyst R.
A. Jahelka.
He" calls the new method a "computer-based
student scheduling system." Jahelka said when
students receive their marks in June they will select
their course and section preferences and mail them
in immediately. "It will still be the responsibility of
students to select a faculty approved program," he
said.
However, not everyone is as excited about the
system.
Science students have been exposed to a similar
kind of processing.
They complain that the computer produces
poorly organized timetables that have classes
bunched at awkward times followed by lengthy
periods with no classes.
In answer to criticisms that the new method
will contribute greatly to the de-personalization of
education, Jahelka said: "Nothing could be more
impersonal or inefficient than registration week
lineups."
Beginning next year as a pilot project. 5000
randomly selected students will be registered by the
computer. The system is expected to become fully
operational for the 1971-72 academic year. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1970
THf U8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
FEBRUARY 6, 1970
Communicate
According to reports, Alma Mater Society
president Fraser Hodge and crew consider the results of
Wednesday's referendum on voluntary fees something of
a victory.
Oh, come now. Some 2,855 people voted to make
payment of fees to the AMS voluntary. We can assume
that a large number of those people think that the AMS
is one big bureaucratic fart and voted with the express
purpose of eliminating the society (which probably
accounts for the large turnout — most of those people
wouldn't waste their time on any other AMS vote).
The rest of those people favoring voluntary fees
probably think a voluntary union would be stronger and
more democratic than the present system.
So nearly 3,000 people on this campus don't think
the AMS is doing its job. There's probably, as always,
a couple of thousand more who for some reason, maybe
out of habit, didn't bother voting, perhaps because the
referendum itself, struck them as more of the
bureaucracy they've been avoiding throughout their
university careers.
Okay, now we can assume that the AMS people
have noted this appreciable number of people who are
dissatisfied with the present state of affairs and is intent
on rectifying matters.
A few suggestions: Give more money to The
Ubyssey, one of the few and certainly the biggest
tangible return the student gets for his money.
Give money to UBC Radio so that the station can
actually transmit, creating a true university radio station
rather than a futile muzak system. We know a good 30
people who would start work on such a station
tomorrow if a transmitter were bought, many of them
with professional radio experience.
Work towards establishing some kind of television
studio for student work, an expensive undertaking but
worth it.
Communication bn a professional level will both
increase interaction on the campus and build the image
of the university in a respectable way, not through
pandering marches and shoe-shining expeditions.
How about it, youse guys.
Drawmer
It has come to our attention that there will be
another series of student-directed and, in two cases,
student-written plays performed next week in the
Freddy Wood Theatre. The productions will go at noon
Tuesday through Friday. We approve of student
presentations of this sort. We also exhort all of you fans
out there to get out and see them; they're free. Student
productions deserve student support, and those of you
who attended the last series of productions in the fall
already know they were very well done and very
entertaining. This is a good start to fuller student
participation in all areas of campus activities, and the
writers and directors of these one-act plays should be
commended for taking the reigns of production into
their own hands. If this blurb seems a bit heavy — well,
what the hell, we're just trying to give a good plug to
something we think deserves it. — F.C.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News       _.   Paul   Knox
City  —   Nate Smith
Managing        Bruce  Curtis
Wire      Irene  Wasilewski
Sports     Jim Maddin
Senior       John Twigg
Ass'l News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City    John Andersen
Page Friday   Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Sweet seventeen Robin Burgess
deserted to the Straight as Christine
Krawczyk and Phil Barkworth paired
off. Bob Bennett got stuck with tween
classes while Jan O'Brien gave her
blurb to science.
"Personally, I prefer tutti-fruiteed
tulips," said Jim Davies.
Linda Hossie and Dave Schmidt met
a fate worse than death while Jennifer
Jordan onlooked. Brian McWatters
called Nelson but Bischoff didn't come
back though Dave Keillor did and with
a damn good story, too. AMS hack
Leslie Plommer also contributed.
LETTERS
Advert
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I really enjoyed the advertisement on the back of your paper
on Tuesday. It was surely founded
on the great traditions of advertising createdby that immortal of the
airwaves, giant of the idiot-box
and hero of the record set: Stan
Freeberg. Yup, somebody sure cut
through those employment ads.
That ad was one of the best
satirical bits to appear in The
Ubyssey since the days of Ian
Cameron.
Run that up your flag pole and
see who salutes.
BARRY MILAVSKY
Noises
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It is 12:40 in Brock.
As I write this letter there are
two inconsiderate slobs sitting in
the two booths beside me.
I arrived at 11:30 and the
booths were unoccupied, except
that each contained several books.
They remained empty until 12:22
when these characters came in,
placed their coats on the chairs
and left.
They returned at 12:30, one
with a newspaper, and sat talking
for ten minutes about their wild
weekend. It is now 12:45. One of
them has left and the other one,
occupying both chairs (his feet on
one) is reading the paper.
Several people pass by looking
for a place to study (or write
letters), Thanks fellows.
S. W. HACK
arts 2
P. S. Now a girl has come
along. He politely takes his feet
off the chair, and they sit discussing important things (like each
other's horoscopes).
Congrats
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
May I congratulate Jim Davies
on his very fair survey of
residence life. He was not stating
his own views but the opinions of
people who live in residence and
as a former residence member I
can say that the views he
expressed are widespread.
I only disagree with the survey
on one point - and that is on the
question of food. I believe the
food and services provided by the
residences is excellent considering
the money they receive. I know
this for a fact as I am now living
off-campus and spending twice as
much on food and eating half as
well.
Earlier this year a
questionnaire was conducted by
the administration in the
residences to find out the
students' likes and dislikes
regarding food — yet only 28 per
cent responded. Where were all
these complainers then? It's all
very easy for some students who
do virtually nothing all day to
criticize an overworked Miss Ruth
Blair and a staff who I know work
extremely hard. They should try
working in the kitchen for one
day — then they might think
differently.
J. JONES
Homos
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your article by Mr. Davies in
the Jan. 23 edition is very
deflammatory (sic).
What the fuck!
So a guy is a homo, do you
have to make fun of all homos?
What we need now is not
flagrant (sic) shut downs of
homos, but understanding of
these demented creatures who
have strayed from the fold, as it
were.
JAMES CROFT
Tenure
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The main issue raised by the
English department tenure
conflict is whether a select group
of individuals dominated by one
man should be allowed to decide
anyone's future, especially when
the criterion on which the
decision is made is a subjective
interpretation by a chairman and
committee of basically acceptable
principles. The main issue is not
tenure, but what can be done by
refusing to award it, and therefore
turning it into a weapon. This is
the greatest danger! I can see a
future English department staffed
with fyes men' who reflect the
taste of the higher power.
Let's look  at  the   secondary
issue - tenure, itself. Job security
LETTERS
is the reasonable expectation of
any employee. But must tenure be
the only route to job security —
especially after only five years?
Tenure represents an all or
nothing stamp. Once allotted
tenure, the prof may do anything
except molest people (physically)
and nothing except keep the class
open. Ah tenure! This is what
feeds the parasite who takes up
my time under the guise of giving
a lecture. THEY will give tenure
to these people who cannot and
never could teach; whose only
ability was to ooze words onto
paper until granted tenure. And
THEY have the audacity to fire
someone — anyone — under the
pretense of one the most
ineffectual programs perpetrated
on profs and students.
Brian Mayne taught my English
340 class last year. He is the best
prof I have had out at UBC. That
THEY should even question his
ability is incredible. That THEY
should sack him is unbelievable!!
Tenure should be thrown out
as an out-dated ineffective
measure. There must be a new
program of gradual attainment of
job security benefits and a new
criterion for assessing members of
the faculty. There must be
individual assessment based on
every facet of a profs work at
UBC — class work and teaching
ability; publication of material
with a revue of the scholarship
involved; work done towards the
planning and the instituting of
new programs and courses.
HARLENE HOLM
arts 4
Letters to the editor must be
signed and bear some form of
identification: faculty and year,
address, position, etc. Unsigned
letters will not be printed. A
pseudonymn may be used if
requested.
Letters must be legible.
Typewritten submissions may
receive preference.
Letters may be sent by campus
mail or delivered personally to
The Ubyssey office in the
northeast corner of the second
floor of SUB.
Apply
Applications are now being
accepted for the position of
Ubyssey editor-in-chief for the
1970-71 academic year.
Interested persons shoud
address applications to The
Ubyssey Editorial Board, room
241-K, SUB. Submissions
should include a resume of
newspaper experience and aims
for the paper.
Applicants should be
prepared to be grilled
intensively and without mercy
by members of the editorial
board.
Selection will be made by
the board and a recommendation made to student council
for ratification, an automatic
procedure.
Absolute    deadline    for
applications is noon, Feb. 20.
The Voice of Experience
warns against anything but
light course loads, unstable
minds, lack of emotional
stability and physical
debilitation.
No photos necessary,
Triflers need not apply. Friday, February 6, 1970
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 5
Questionnaire shows clinic wanted
By SIBYLLE KLEIN
A total of 460 students
returned the questionnaire
which asked people to state
their views.
Of the 460, 447 (97.2%)
declared themselves for the
clinic, 13 against it. The total
of 460 respondents breaks
down into 340 females and
120 males.
Of the 340 females, 330
were for, 10 against the clinic; of the 120 males, 117
were for and three opposed.
In all, 226 respondents
said they would use a clinic
of this sort, 206 said they
wouldn't, 136 because they
already have a doctor.
A total of 53 students (51
female, 2 male) had approached health services for
contraception. Of these, 38
said they were unsuccessful.
Of these 38, 34 were single,
19 under 21. Although no
reasons were given for refusals, they may have all been
for health reasons.
Dr. A. M. Johnson, head
of Student Health Services,
who expressed himself to be
principally against a clinic especially devoted to birth control prior to the passing out
of the questionnaire, said in a
brief talk last Friday that he
would not be swayed by the
results of the inquiry.
Basically he said, the questionnaire was meaningless because it asked students whether they wanted facilities
which already actually existed.
According to Dr. Johnson,
the health services have done
a very good job with respect
to birth control. They have
talked to the residences and
"bent over backwards" to get
the information to the students.
At present, says Dr. Johnson, the health services are
handling between 20 and 30
students on birth control
alone and this is all available
facilities permit.
Though they serve married
students without exception,
no   single   student  has  ever
gone away without knowing
where to go. Health services
refers students to B.C. Family
Planning on 1530 West
Eighth, where "they are especially set up for it."
As another reason for his
rejection of a wide open
policy, Dr. Johnson states
that birth control is medically
still a matter of controversy.
He says he wants to leave
the decision to the judgment
of the individual doctor,
though he pointed out that
ultimately the responsibility
lies with every woman and
man who asks for service.
It is probably not too far
off the mark to assume that
most UBC students have been
able to obtain excellent information from the McGill
birth control handbook
which has been made available across campus and know
about the existence of family
planning or of a doctor who
gives the service.
The question is, why
doesn't our campus provide
adequate    facilities?
Contraception
controversy
What to do with existing services
By JAN DAVIES
Via the January 20, 1970
edition of The Ubyssey, a
birth control questionnaire
was prepared by the Women's
Liberation Group, and was
circulated to UBC students to
determine campus opinion on
an apparently popular
subject.
However, of the 16,000
questionnaires sent out, only
460 useable completed forms
were returned.
This represents only a 2.88
per cent return.
Statistically, a return of
this size renders the survey
invalid.
There was also some
uncertainty expressed by the
surveyed students as to the
meaning of some of the
questions.
Some students were not
even sure to which sex they
belonged.
Thus it is for these
reasons, the tabulated results
should not be released.
As a result of completing
the questionnaire, several
interesting points of
information have been
observed.
The Students' Health
Services office, located in the
southwest wing of Wesbrook,
offers information, advice,
and prescriptions for all types
of female contraceptives that
require a prescription. These
contraceptives include The
Pill, IUDs, and diaphragms.
Other female contraceptives
such as creams, jellies, and
foams can be obtained at
most pharmacies and do not
need a doctor's prescription.
Male contraceptives are all
available "over the counter"
at pharmacies and at
washroom dispensers in SUB.
Requests to SHS for
vasectomies (tying of the
sperm duct) are referred to a
private physician.
The policy of SHS is that
each patient requesting
contraception is to be
evaluated individually, with
the doctor alone, determining
if she should or should not
receive contraception.
The question of whether
the patient is "mature"
enough to rece ive
contraception is deemed
valid. All these prescription
contraceptives carry some
degree of risk in their use and
thus the patient bears
responsibility to herself in the
use of these devices. The
doctor too, assumes
responsibility in the issuing of
a contraceptive.
Each patient for whom
contraception is prescribed, is
given a physical examination,
including pelvic exam and
papanicoulau smear (for
cervical cancer).
She is also warned of the
dangers of the particular
device she will be using and
also of the symptoms of the
major side effects. Almost all
prescriptions are given for
only one year, and the
student, if she is still
interested in practising
contraception, is told to return
in one year for a repeat of the
examination and prescription
or if she has any problems
(such as development of a
side effect).
All women whose
requests are turned down, are
referred on to the Family
Planning Clinic. Thus, no
woman turned down by SHS
is left without a further
possible source for obtaining
contraceptives.
The general procedure for
obtaining contraceptives at
SHS is to report to the clinic.
It is only necessary to tell the
clerk that you want to see a
doctor.
A slip of paper for name,
etc. is filled out and then one
waits for 5-20 minutes until a
nurse comes in and
announces your name.
She takes you to a private
room and asks what you want
and you reply appropriately.
Then you see the doctor.
If he agrees to prescribe,
you are examined and the
contraceptive is explained.
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14 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1970
Telling tales
on your
Elections for the first slate of student council
executives (president, co-ordinator, secretary and
ombudsman) will happen on Wednesday.
Candidates' statements will appear Tuesday in The
Ubyssey. (They must be 100 words or less, typed
and in the office by 1 p.m.)
As a helpful guide to these and other
propaganda, The Ubyssey continues its annual
policy of reprinting the statements submitted last
year by members of this year's council executive.
Students are invited to compare these statements
with the councillors' performances this year as a
measure of how much faith to put in the statements
that appear Tuesday.
(This year's vice-president, treasurer, secretary
and omudsman were elected by acclamation and
didn't have to submit statements. Since internal
affairs officer Dave Gibson resigned in October, his
statement is also omitted.)
Mike Doyle
external affairs
Students!
THESE ARE THE ACTIONS I PROPOSE:
• support for a federal union of students as a
national lobby: (a) lower interest rates on
loans, (b) financing for student housing, (c)
lobbying for reduction of student
unemployment;
• grassroots communication with the people of
the province to indicate needs of higher
education including: (a) regional colleges,
interior university, technical institutions, (b)
student voice in academic planning at all levels;
• student involvement in securing revenue for the
university;
• to support president-elect Fraser Hodge in his
desire for communication both inside and
outside the university.
THIS IS MY DESIRE:
To work in these areas with a constructive and
realistic attitude.
I ask for your support.
Fraser Hodge
president
Ultimately the problem is in the classroom. It's
true the yearly issues exist, like book prices, crappy
food, parking, but overshadowing them all is the
problem we each face in the classroom. Three to
four hundred students, a prof so damn lousy he isn't
worth listening to, or a great prof who is going to be
fired.
For humanists and social scientists the problem
is the ever-widening gulf between the theory taught
in class and the facts of life outside the classrooms.
For students in the professional and technical
schools it's the increasingly apparent dilemma of
society's technical and business needs being
divorced from social and cultural needs.
The problems of the university and society
cannot be regarded separately, but must be attacked
together. We must act now. IT IS UP TO YOU.
Dave Grahame
co-ordinator
Tomorrow you will elect a co-ordinator of
activities to co-ordinate campus bookings, sit on
SUB management committee and provide leadership
for you next year.
If elected I will work to reduce the bureaucracy
of bookings, improve SUB maintenance and above
all get the new coffee-house-beer garden expansion
area operational by September.
I will emphasize decentralization of the AMS
by encouraging the creation of departmental
unions (i.e. chemistry students' union) so that
students can take part directly in effecting decisions
of immediate importance to them.
For experience, initiative and progressive ideas
elect Dave Grahame for co-ordinator.
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Science week will begin Monday with a
demonstration of holography, the making of three
dimensional pictures by the use of laser beams.
The demonstration and lecture by physics grad
student Mark Proctor will take place in Hebb
Theatre Monday noon.
H. R. MacMillan Planetarium director David
Rodger will give a lecture entitled "A Moon for All
Seasons" in the SUB ballroom Thursday noon. The
lecture will include up to date information from the
Apollo flights.
"THE YEAR'S BEST COMEDY!"
-SATURDAY RCYIW
"A MARVELOUS MOVIE!"
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SURNAME
CHRISTIAN NAMES
VANCOUVER ADDRESS  (Show Apt.  No., Zone  No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS, if different from above (Street No., Town, etc.)
REGISTRATION  NO.
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REDE
All right listen hear ya mudda fuckahs ive
got a column which is about 30" of
records so gimme 2 OK?? Then save
somewheres else about 15 " for a book
revewwhichll be juess fantabulous
mjq
AN THEN
pursuant to the above note
OKay_ folks I laid out the paper and thanks
to   my   ingenuity   we   have "our   usual   3
ad-free   pages   wity   lots   of   space   on   (I
NB
i get page seven for records how bout half
of page eight for the book see yall at ine
thiroity as above
Q i g
OK — I have gone to my class will be back
at 3:30. Anybody who has anything for
the paper or anything for anything leave it
here — or leave fuckin' notes! I am still
expecting something frok J. Davies ofn the
Mussoc thing ,,,,, and pics from Visser on
the Art Gallery so these people will leave
massages. Qiuglay you can start laying out
Wilson's stuff on the s4nter spred you lazy
lackey Ok do it
nr
30
Today's cover is a reproduction of a print
by Vancouver artist Norman Rich. Rich runs
the Odyssey Gallery at 4368 W. 10th, just
across the street from the Varsity Theatre.
Rich's graphics are an extremely colourful
blend of archtypal rftythology and
contemporary reality. At his gallery. Rich is
attempting to .sell good original graphics that
are within the range of the average person, so
most of his prints fair within the 5-30 dollar
range. Rich, assisted by Intermedia, has just
completed a twelve minute film called Garden
Tides. It rs an excellent fiim that was a
thousand hours in the making. In it, Rich
combines, his. own "«?drting> graphics jArfth an
excellent sqpiMftrarik by AJten Sharpe Dawne
Mitligan^and'^arie" Wright. Rich hopes to
distribute the film to theatres «f to any other
people that might be interested. If you are in
the market for an excellent film, you can
contact Norman Rich at the Odyssey Gallery.
In the Senter Spred this week, we have (on
your left) Pf's latest victory in the extended
campaign to scoop "Kiss Me" Magazine. (Watch
for continuing scoops in future issues of Pf.)
On your right — in the same spred - the
pseudo arty farty which we found mysteriously
placed on the Pf desk on press day, and
consequently printed (of course). It was
accompanied by an equally mysterious letter —
signed with an obvious alias — which referred
tangential ly to an intended but stolen review of
the show "FOUR ARTISTS", in whose place
this shit then appeared — along with a warning
that the (aforementioned) shit was hot and
consistently rejected by other art mags. (We,
being not proud, and always happy to receive
totally incompreshensible arty material,
reproduce it accordingly.)
FURTHERMORE, INFORMATION
recently received by us tells of The Players Club
If, which has been reformed
on campus by students interested in
theatre. The club has been formed to give
students a chance to participate in theatre,
apart from the Freddy Wood, and more directly
into the campus generally. The club got off thf
ground before Xmas and will now begin a
program noon-hour theatre presentations in
SUB and in the Arts I Blue Room.
The first production will happen nex:
Monday in the Blue Room: "Collision Course"
a collection of short plays directed by Larry
Lillo. Further productions will happen on Feb,
10th and 11th in SUB ballroom. Al!
productions are free, and at noon. (Look in
ensuing issues of Pf for further information on
the Players Club.)
AND EVEN FURTHER: The Musical
Theatre Society presents its production of Jerry
Herman's "HELLO DOLLY" tonight in the old
auditorium with additional productions on the
7th, 12th, 13th and 14th of Feb. The musical
comes from a successful run in Victoria and
should (we are told) be worth seeing. Look in
Page Tuesday for review.
J ARTS
CONTEMPORARY
1970
re:  UBC Festival of the Contemporary Arts
(January - April)
Friday Feb. 6 12:30 - AI Neil fee concert.
Music festival ball
Monday  Feb. 9 12:30 - Warhol film: NUDE
RESTAURANT,    SUB    auditorium.
Students and faculty:  .75 cents; general
public $1.50
Tuesday Feb. 10 - FOUR ARTISTS exhibition
continues at the Fine Arts Gallery to Feb.
18
Tuesay   Feb.   10   -   Display   of   COLLAGE
EXPERIMENTS   by   Fine  Arts  students
continues to Feb. 11
Thursday    Feb.   12   10:30   -   5:30   -   THE
PROTON     PEOPLE     AND     THE
DEUTERON   COSMIC ATOM.  A special
one day presentation by Greydon Moore in
the Lasserre Lobby. Refreshments at 4:30
Thursday Feb. 12 12:30 - Warhol film: I AM
A MAN, SUB auditorium. Admission: see
Feb. 9
"You fellows pay my wages!" — Ted Brown,
Printer OLbc rwsic^ Hie/lire Society prt«nfe
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Report
on the future
While crystal-ball gazing has been in the past known to be
fairly fallible, there have been a few prophetic triumphs to
redeem the art. We have carefully studied the data available, and
reached the conslusion that a successful prophet has few reliable
sources of information on the precise cast of the future. However,
further research (sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of
Scientific Research), revealed the there is one way of anticipating
tomorrow! What is this way? Ha, ha. As if well tell. However, we
will release the results of our prophetic endeavours for 1970.
JANUARY
There will be another Mid-East War. Egypt, Syria, Libya,
Iraq, Jordan, Yemen, Morocco, Algeria, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia,
Sierra Leone, Tunisia, Lebanon, Sudan, Pakistan, and the Soviet
Union will be defeated at 2:33 of the first round. Israel, having
conquered half of Africa and Asia, plus considerable chunks of
Europe, will oust all 400 million Arabs, an
God-knows-how-many Russians from its territory.
FEBRUARY
Canada's population will increase by 400 million.
MARCH
President Nasser, arrested in Montreal for putting bombs in
the mailboxes of prominent Canadian Jews, will declare at his
trial, "We will fight to the death against Zionist imperialism."
APRIL
The FBI denies charges by John White, the last living Negro
in the United States, that there is a war of genocide being waged
against the American Negro.
MAY
Premier Bennett will be forced to reveal that he has
accepted three cases of beer from the B.C. Brewers'Institute. In
the ensuing public controversy, Premier Bennett will maintain
that the beer was to be used for charitable and religious purposes.
"I use it during my enlightened moments," Bennett will say,
"when I'm plugged into God." Bennett will be forced to resign
when God, in a rare public appearance, declares the connection
was faulty.
* 1 * a  Ik I   I  i
JUNE
The New Democractic Party comes into office on the heels
of the collapse of the Social Credit government. The NDP
government announces a Proletarian Cultural Revolution to be
held in Vancouver's Civic Square. It is cancelled because no
proletariat can be found. Ex-premier Bennett denounces the NDP
government as " a bunch of godless socialists." The NDP denies
being socialist.
JULY
Atlantis rises from the sea. Strangely enough, it rises in the
Pacific. It is re-named Pacificis. The United States, finding part of
it existing within its newly-claimed 537 mile offshore limit,
begins using it a a nuclear testing range.
AUGUST
Pacificis sinks beneath the sea in disgust.
SEPTEMBER
Gulf drills for oil in Lost Lagoon.
OCTOBER
World ends unexpectedly.
MHIMHHiB^HIMpf  2WO I
THE RUEBYSSEY
THE       U BYSSEY
January .0035, 834 B.C. By K. TOUGAS
Presented by the Vancouver International Film Festival and organized by
Pearl Williams, three films by Andy Warhol are to be shown in the SUB
Auditorium.
February 9: NUDE RESTAURANT
February 12; S A MAN
February ife BIKE SOY
Showings are at 12:30 and student admission is 75c
For Andy Warhol, a film is made with 1) a camera which
simultaneously records image and sound, 2) some lights, 3) some people
(actors) in front of the camera, and 4) a zoom lens to show one person or
more than one person.
If you don't believe this is film-making you're kidding yourself. By
definition this is all you need. If some people feel like playing around with
editing, that's their business. Cutting is tedious work and Andy admits he's
lazy. Without becoming too involved, he shoots what he feels like - and
then sends the result around the world.
His superstars are placed in a setting as small as a bathtub or as large
as a restaurant. Warhol invites a revelation to the camera. It is their
common and natural fantasies which are exposed (Viva! in segments of
Nude Restaurant is particulary remarkable).
And then simply, whatever else Warhol believes is reflected in the
following quotations:
"I made my earliest films using, for several hours, just one actor on
the screen doing the same thing: eating or sleeping or smoking. I did this
because people usually go to the movies to see only the star, to eat him up,
so here at last is a chance to look only at the star for as long as you like,
no matter what he does and to eat him up all you want to. It was also
easier to make."
"My first films using the stationary objects were also made to help
the audiences to get acquainted with themselves. Usually, when you go to
the movies, you sit in a fantasy world, but when you see something that
disturbs you, you get more involved with the people next to you. Movies
are doing a little more than you can do with plays and concerts where you
just have to sit there and I think television will do more than the movies.
You could do more things watching my movies than with other kind of
movies: you could eat and drink and smoke and cough and look away and
then look back and they's still be there."
"All my films are artificial, but then everything is sort of artificial. I
don't know where the artificial stops and real starts. The artificial
fascinates me, the bright and shiny."
"Those who help me are so good and the camera when it turns on
just focuses on the actors who do what they're supposed to do and they
do it well."
"There's nothing really to understand in my work. I make
experimental films and everyone thinks those are the kind where you see
how much dirt you can get on the film, or when you zoom forward, the
camera keeps getting the wrong face or it jiggles all the time; but it's so
easy to make movies, you can just shoot and every picture comes out
right."
"I don't have any strong feelings on anything. I don't worry about
art or life I mean, the war and the bomb worry me but usually there's not
much you can do about them. I've represented it in some of my films and
I'm going to try and do more."
"I still care about people but it would be so much easier not to
care • ■ it's too hard to care ... I don't want to get too involved in other
people's lives ... I don't want to get too close ... I don't like to touch
things ... that's why my work is so distant from myself ..."
■pf Shreei
U.B.C.
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held
as follows:
SECOND SLATE:
Vice- President
Treasurer
Internal Affairs Officer
External Affairs  Officer
Nominations open — Feb. 4
Nominations close — 12:00 noon, Feb. 12
Election — Feb. 18
Polls for AMS Elections
Advance polls for 1st slate:
1. Educations — 4:00 p.m.   7:00 p.m.
Friday, Feb.  6.
2. Residences - Education — 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 10
3. S.U.B. — 11:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 10
Regular polls for 1st slate:
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Wed., Feb. 11
Chairman Required for AAC
The Academic Activities Committee is without a
Chairman. Anyone who is interested in this position
please apply in writing to the Secretary of the Alma
Mater Society second floor S.U.B., before Friday,
February 6.
February 5'/2, 1785
THE       U BYSSEY
THE QUIGLEYSSEY 'XV
■ * '<&}%. >,',
IT was a spring day sometime in April that I first met
* Paul. He was tall, dark and inevitably handsome, so
handsome that I fell all over him at the country club
swimming pool just so that he would talk to me. He spoke
sharply, saying, "Watch where you're going", but he said it
in such a nice voice that I couln't be angry with him. We
talked for a moment, and I learned that he was a garage
mechanic working his way through college.
I didn't see Paul again until one evening at the beach
when I noticed him, and he noticed me. He looked at me
hungrily. The heavens exploded, the stars flew in all
directions, and I know, oh yes I knew, that for the first
time, the last time, the only time, I was hopelessly in love.
In love, in love ... He asked me to go to the drive in with
him that very evening and I said yes . . . yes? yes!
I was so much in love that I couldn't put my makeup
on for thinking about my first real date with Paul. I just
couldn't look in the mirror, everything was so beautiful.
After, I realized that things were not the way that they
appear on the surface.
When the doorbell rang I floated to the door to answer
it, I opened the door, and right away, I know that
something was wrong. It was so dark out that I couldn't see
a thing, I was terrified, where was my beautiful Paul? I
plaintively called Paul. .. Paul? Paul! I was just going to
scream when I realized that I was looking in the closet. I
ran madly for the door: what if- he was gone when I got
there, what if someone was trying to kill him on the front
porch, what if some beautiful siren was out there, just
waiting to get her hot little hands on him, what if .. . Oh! I
A Pf EXCLUSIVE by REBECCA QUIRK
ONE MAN WASl
I HAD
TO HAVE
MO
just couldn't stand it any more. I threw open the door and
leapt into the laundryman's arms. I apologized before I had
hit the ground and ran back into the bathroom.
The doorbell rang again and I knew, oh yes I knew that
this time it was really my belover Paul. I freaked for the
door and there he was, I almost drowned in my own delight
at seeing his handsome face framed in my very own
doorway. When I looked into his clear blue eyes, I could
tell that he was a real man. I couldn't contain myself, 1
kissed him, it was a soft wet kiss that held all the world still
in one rapturous heavenly vacuum.
He helped me on with my coat and we rushed out to
I knew wh.it I
wanted but I w«isn t
prepared tor the WHIP'
his car. As we drove along the curving boulevard, I <
help noticing how strong and masculine he was, a
steady his hands held the wheel. I almost wished
would take his eyes off of the road for just a morr
look at me, after all the trouble I had taken to get r<
him.
It was at this point, that I realized that someth
dreadfully wrong in our relationship. What was it, w
gone wrong, what had I done, what hadn't I don
hadn't he done? Maybe I was too shy, maybe 1
reacting strongly enough to his advances. I decide
was probably too shy so I said to him, "Paul, why d
go back to my place?" Without taking his eyes fi
road he replied, "Later baby, I want to see the m
decided that I was worrying over nothing, but still,
feel something ominous about his presence, and wis)
I could get a hold on it.
After the movie we drove back to my apart
Riverdale. As we went in, Paul took hold of my :
pulled me close to him, and said, "I want you." I
to myself, "At last, true love, the kind that doesn't
has come to me." Later I was to realize that I could
been more pretentious than I was at this mome
asked me to remove my clothes, and I eagerly cc
but Paul didn't remove any of his. I stood waiting
while he went over and opened the attache case tha
brought in with him. First he brought out a long
whip.
Oh Paul, I thought, what has happened to yo
short time that I have known you, has our love witl
the vine? He flourished the whip and said, "Lean
couch. I sighed, "Oh Paul, you're so romantic." As
over the couch, Paul went back to his case and broi
a movie camera on a tripod. At this point I
beginnings of a twinge of anxiety shiver up my litl
Just then the doorbell rang, Paul started and said,
that?" "I don't know!" I replied.
#^VUL was visibly agitated, he ran for the door
as he reached it, he pulled out a gun and stood t
heavily. He pulled open the door and fired rapi<
times, one of the bullets richocheted off a coat ha
Paul fell, sticken dreadfully, just then the doorbell
Paul realized that he was looking in the closet. I ra
and held his dying head in my lap, he looked up a
with his last breath, he said, "Tell Laura I love he
that I fainted.
When I regained consciousness, the laundry
standing  beside  me  muttering,   I   looked  arounc
strange room and I realized I must be in a hospital,
the events together that had brought me here, am
fitted in the piece where Paul had shot himself, 11
the laundry  man and said,  "Is he ... Is he ..
laundry man looked gravely at me, and I knew, (
knew. I wept, and the laundry man said, "Go ahe;
out; that's the best thing for you." I looked aB
quietly told him to shut his mouth.
At last my curiosity got the better of me ant
him what he was doing here in the hospital. He e
that he daylighted as a laundryman while at night
heart surgeon. He told me that I had been dissolv
guilt by the police and that I was free to go, bu'
would like to keep me under close surveillance i
initial shock was over. Offhandedly, he remarked tl
was no telling what I might do in my present s;
voice contained an odd note, and later I realized
had ill intentions. v
After three days of minute inspection, the laun
I mean the doctor said that I was well enough to
THE WILSLEYSSEY
THE       U BYSSEY
June V2, 9876.5432 ? ^V.       ^""v **■* " *"* *   *
v
T ENOUGH
?E!
thanked him for all his trouble and left. I spent the next
three months deciding what I was going to do now that my
love Had withered. It was hard, but I went for long walks
and I talked it over with my best girlfriend, Ginny, who was
sympathetic, but didn't help much.
One day, in the fall, I answered the door, and there was
the laundryman, I mean doctor. I asked him in. "You're
looking well," he said. I thanked him and asked him to sit
down in the livingroom while I collected the laundry. When
I re-entered the livingroom, I was stricken with a desire to
tell him all about my relationship with Paul. I brought up
the subject by asking him what was the best cure for an
affliction such as mine. He told me that the best thing to do
under the circumstances was to find a replacement for my
affections. I suddenly noticed how blue his eyes were, and
at that moment, I fell head over arches in love with him. He
took me in his arms and kissed my unkissable lips. I knew
that this time, there was no mistake, I was really in love.
/
found out two important things about the doctor
that day, his name was George, and he had a way about him
that was unmistakeably the mark of a great lover.
George lasted over the years, better than most, but
there came a time when he could no longer satisfy me, but
later I realized that this wasn't important at all. George gave
up both the laundry business and heart surgery, when a
friend of his, a little Puerto Rican in New York named
Chico got him a job at True Sagas Magazine where he has
been working ever since under the name of Paul Haig. Just
last spring, he was imprisoned for submitting a false
account of how two of True Sagas' veteran hunting experts
had died on Mt. Espangol Fly in the Andes mountains.
Now that Paul is in prison, my days pass slowly. I go to
visit him every Wednesday, but somehow that doesn't fill
the void that is with me all the time that he's not here.
Lately I have taken to going for long walks and talking my
problems over with Ginny. Her husband Chico helps me out
too, even though he is blind, he is very handy and he seems
to have an unlimited number of contacts that are almost
too eager to help me. Somehow, I get a shiver up my spine
when I see Chico, even though he helps so much. I suppose
it's just one of those feminine institutions, but I confess
that something very strange is lurking about in the back of
my mind.
... and
Paul was
only the
FIRST
Blistering Impressions
of a Canadian Pedant
r
h
%
:•*■.»**"
•*fts
*   .
]' £i**~;
£.1*.:;, "w'A; <%■ «• :\^^^^^^'X^^-
By A. Y. JACKBOOT
In a small tiled ante-room, just across the
broad hall and down a flight of waxed stairs from
the large gallery rooms where the Vancouver
display of Conceptual Art entitled "955,000" is
situated, I chanced upon a most delightful
canvas. Tucked away as it was in this small room,
of which surely half Vancouver's art patrons have
never seen the interior, I found this portrait so
charming in its content, so faithful and true to
life in its representation that I could not hesitate
to judge it, without qualification, the best work
on display. Unsigned and untitled as it was, (an
unfortunate oversight on the part of the gallery
staff), I can only specify it roughly to the reader
by its size and its whereabouts. Moderate in size,
oblong in shape, perhaps twenty inches high and
thirty-six wide, it is hung, - or rather, —
mounted, upon the south wall of the tiny
sub-gallery, just slightly above, and to the left of
a small green soap dispenser.
Of my initial reaction to the painting - were
I to say that I found it 'attractive' or 'pleasant'
and for a rule I do not squander these wanton
adjectives casually, so to preserve them for the
singular peaks of my visual experience) — I
should be guilty of excessive understatement.
How then shall I describe the tumultuous
anarchy occasioned in me at first sight of this
exquisite canvas? How shall I portray with
whatever critical restraint remains to me, that
moment of my libidinous fall - the instant of
my first unwilling tumble down the sheer
precipice of irrepressible perceptual pleasure?
How can I repulse the hot flushes of memory and
forge with proper critical aplomb, a pithy image
of this, my initial plummet into the cavernous
deeps of a maroon and urochrome purgatory; — a
purgatory beset with the dense glistening
stalagmites of exquisite ocular joy?
After much reflection I have decided to set
this account within the epic framework of the
battle scene. I apologize profusely to the reader
who adores my writing for its usual disdain of
any extreme, and I apologize also to those
numerous readers who revel in my precious
ability to condense even the most intense
experience into several terse, perfectly chosen
phrases. For this is an account almost intestinal
in length, but without a word of exaggeration:
the protoplasmic struggle begun within me by
the singular power of this painting cannot be
properly extruded by any other than the most
visceral account — an account of out-and-out
battle! Indeed, a battle which, before my
delivery, bloodied all four corners of the flat land
I should rather not call my soul.
Bear with me, then, poor reader, anomolous
critic that I am, and I shall attempt to cut out for
you    the    umbiliform   configuration   of   the
opposing forces. On one hand, and of course my
favorite, the haughty soldiery of clear reason,
strong for its spiritual nature, the unlikelihood of
pinning it down; cunning with its propensities for
tactical disinvolvement, evasive maneuver and
frequent concealment among the labyrinthine
structures it has once created and now uses for
defense. Its weaponry, — the hair-splitting blade
of criticism; — its weakness, — that of a blade,
and an entire structure, grown brittle for want of
renewal and scaled with an encrustation of pride.
On the other hand, the blunt, enthusiastic forces
of indomitable emotion. Though long immured
by the crystaline forms of their ageing opponent,
they ply for relief, striving always to overthrow
the abhorent strictures of calculation, and they
await only a suitable ally an insurgent capable of
piercing reason's crusty heel, thus precipitating a
heady rebellion.
Imagine my consternation when this
insurgent force burst forth from within this mere
painting. At once, barrage upon barrage of
high-explosive joy pummelled the crumbling
armour of my disinterest. Multiple battalions of
of armiferous perception marched sturdily across
the fuscid no-man's land which lay between the
work and my callous critic's eye. And here each
entered, struggling hand to hand with my rods
and cones, not stopping there, — but advancing,
riddling my optic nerves, — to press the waning,
siege-impoverished forces of my central nervous
system.
Meanwhile, from below, countless grey cell
groups rallied from amongst the proletariat of
my back brain, and like a populous fifth column,
they sabotaged my mental factories from within.
Understand the myriad subversive blows
suffered by my pride, understand the bastillian
devastation of my critic's honor, understand the
unsightly    battle    scars    still    born    by    my
Cont'd on pf 6
WHAT CRITICS HAVE SAID OF A. Y.
JACKBOOT'S 'IMPRESSIONS':
"The rudimentary tracks of a Cretan soul. "
P. Bunyan
Pulp Magazine
"The most opprobrious marks ever made by a
heel on the smooth gloss of Canadian Art. "
Gloria Glocoat
"The bizarre and epic struggle of a man who
should have died forty years ago. "
Rex Toothsome,
MaClean's Mag.
"Jackboots 'Impressions' would seem to
reflect a glassy self-esteem, a pungent arrogance,
surpassed in superficiality only by the illusory
sense of depth one misperceives in this
'miraculous' canvas of his. "
Charlotte Villageslimitt
The Provincial.
"Jackboot has bitten off more than he can
chew. At center his product is syrupy in the
extreme, and wholly indigestible. Around this he
pours a layer of tasteless, gooey description -
and it sticks to one's teeth. Although his
packaging is voluminous, always gaudy; its
content is irrggular, wizzened and often very
hard to find among the wrapping. Moreover, it
leaves a bad taste in my mouth — we don't need
any more bitter nuts like this in the art business
- to my mind he's just another turd in a candy
wrapper."
Joan Lowney,
Jersey Milk Journal
August 49, 1932
THE       U BYSSEY
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ITINERARY  HIGHLIGHTS
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r
More Reflective Experiences
(Continued from pf5)
self-control, and you shall doubtless
comprehend the loss, and subsequent death of
my critical diffidence, — (the very essence of
what had been my success).
Yes, I had fallen victim to pleasure. Had
experienced heightened emotion at the hands of
a painting; — in fact, had fallen desperately,
unreservedly, disgustingly in love. For what? — A
mere painting, a simple two-dimensional object,
untitled, crafted by an anonymous artist, and
obscured in a little-frequented portion of the
gallery.
What was it about this simple canvas that
should build in me, — the sore-minded critic, —
the misanthropic voyeur, — a pocket of high
pressure, — a tempestuous passion I should never
have forecast? Was it the miraculous
composition? Was it, for example, that
drizzliesome and gently curved fountainous
porcelain fixture in the background which first
set me duchamping at the bit? No. Or, rather, I
should say, — perhaps it was at first, but only in
passing. Was it then the sensual haze which
obscured the canvas itself, — the inevitable
residue a painting accumulates during twenty-five
years of inattention?
No..It was no such surface element either. It
was in fact a more formidable perception which
fused me to the canvas, a perception
undoubtedly calculated to transfix the unwitting
viewer by the insolent artist himself.
When I first glanced up from my other
business in the room, it was the delectable
meeting of eyes, — that silent and inscrutable
emotional transaction, which sparked our
affinity. Shyly, at first, I looked into the
apparent depth of the canvas, and there beheld
the anonymous eyes of the young artist himself,
those two opalescent orbs, gleaming proudly
back at me. It was a self-portrait, gently masked,
cunningly translucent through the motley film
which covered the artifice. Shamelessly we
shared that direct and, I confess, highly sensual
delight of mutual discovery. I took in every
incisive nuance of his facial expression, and grew
to know him for the imitative craftsman he was.
I sensed the demand he must have put upon
himself to render in such a small, apparently
facile work, a crystalline duplication of reality,
incontestable in its detail and perfection. Therein
I discerned his intelligence, and from the
expression on his face, I thought him to be
discerning of mine. Simultaneously we paid
tribute, — a near-imperceptable smirk, I thought,
played upon his lips; tribute to the brilliant
concept he had developed in this work. His idea,
— to achieve early recognition by expedient of
portraying the subject matter closest to the
hearts of all gallery patrons. And for myself at
least, his canvas excited the most paramount
viewing enjoyment. I have already confessed to it
at some length. But it does not end here.
His canvas evokes also a participatory
enjoyment. I began to sense a growing rapport
between us, — as if I too could share in the
miracle of his self-expression! As if anyone
could! I wanted to shake his hand in
congratulation, but of course we could only
touch fingertips.
Here, Atlas, was an artist who could stand
before his canvas, brush in hand, and with a toss
of his head and a few practised strokes, slick
down the unruly strands of his own bristling
reality. And yet, an artist whose freshly
completed work strains to free itself from the
flattened strictures imposed by his brush, and
crinkle out once again into a bushy three
dimensionality. So vital is this' slippery
command, one knows it to be squeezed from the
wild root of his commercial soul. It is the very
cream of this oil.
MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUE
But to Holt up and contemplate glassily the
pleasurable content of his work without once
reflecting upon the silvery corruscation of his
technique and mastery of materials would be a
visible smear upon this unknown painter's
industry. It would be a pane fully obscurant
neglect of his craftsmanship.
What of his materials, then? Is it not
incredible for a man to create suchanimated
likenesses using only silicone and potash?
Clearly, another man of less innovative mind
should be foiled if constrained to use these
common earths. When ground to a fine powder,
and mixed with the usual oil and turpentine they
can be made to do little with a brush. Hence this
anonymous artist must have abandoned the
traditional handling of materials early in his
career.
Instead, he struck upon the brilliant idea, —
(a technique typical of his genius), — of heating
the pigments together in a melting pot, — and
when they become plastic and clear, - of rolling
the new compound through a special contrivance
not very different from an bid washing machine
wringer. When the resulting sheet cools upon a
flat surface, it becomes hard, with a texture
utterly smooth on both sides. On one side then,
he affixes a thin layer of fine silver dust, and
covers it over for its better protection. And on
the other side, — Voila! The finished work of art.
The result is really too extraordinary for one to
comment on further.
Needless to say he fastens hooks near the
edges and a wire between them for hanging, or
else he affixes the masterpiece directly to the
wall, using small plastic clips which can be
bought discretely, or in large numbers.
ipS 61x1
THE SINCLAIR-DICKBNSSEY
THE       U BYSSEY
September 28, 1964 Musically speaking, the rock opera Arthur by The Kinks
(Pye NSPL 183117) is superb. Lyrically speaking, it is something
else. All the songs (which I presume are only part of the story
originally presented by Granada Television in London) evolve
around events on the day when Arthur, "a plain simple man in a
plain simple working class position," sees his son Derek and his
wife off to Australia. Out of this relatively simple situation come
some fairly bitchy lyrics.
The feeling produced by the words in the songs Mr.
Churchill Says and Brainwashed is similar to that of Richard
Lester's film How I Won the War and similar to the "dead from
the neck up" bleakness of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning in
the cuts Shangrila, Nothing to say, and Arthur.
Because of this lyrical oppressiveness, I really can't buy the
contention that group leader and song writer Ray Davies has
"understanding and sympathy" for the working class man as a
perceptive Campus Magazine review suggests.
Still, musically speaking, The Kinks show themselves to be
nearly on par with the Beatles and The Who in melodic output
and musical ingenuity alone. My advice would be to buy the
album and glue the accompanying lyric sheet with the words to
the wall, leaving a poster of Queen Victoria clutching Arthur in
his Shangrila working-class hou^'. -MICHAEL QUIGLEY
* * *
In pop music's most creative year, 1967, the Quicksilver
Messenger Service was one of San Francisco's lesser-known (and
better) rock groups. On their first album, still my favorite, their
music was wild and free. The interaction of the two lead guitars
of Gary Duncan and John Cipollina produced some fantastic
free-form guitar work. On the second album, though, Happy
Trails, it was evident that the group was approaching a musical
dead end and a new direction was needed.
On their third album, Shady Grove (Capitol SKAO-391),
the group has been startlingly revamped and the sound shows it.
Lead guitarist Gary Duncan has been replaced by British pianist
extraordinaire Nicky Hopkins, and their previous heavy format
has been modified by country and ragtime influences. That raw
Quicksilver sound remains, though, and the addition of Hopkins
leads the group into some good honky-tonk.
Quicksilver's contribution to the current country trend is
here distinctive and often lyrical. However, as a whole, the album
is certainly not as memorable as their first.
-BILL STOREY
Time for blues freaks who dig bottleneck. Capitol Records
has jumped on the blues wagon by recording an old sessions man,
Fred McDowell, duly equipped with electric axe, bass and drums
and turned out a passable, although not outstanding, album.
I do not Play no Rock and Roll (Capitol ST 409) is a fairly
slow-moving record, punctuated by a couple of rap sessions. It is
not likely to appeal to someone who is not in the habit of
listening to blues, since the arrangements are definitely blues, and
avoid a rewed-up rock style with its accompanying beat.
McDowell has been playing bottleneck for long time, and
he uses a precision not often found in recent records. His singing
is fair, although occasionally unintelligible, but well-suited to the
music. His sidemen are proficient, and the somewhat unusual use
of drums is an asset. This album takes a little to get into, but
seems to improve with listening.
-MAURICE BRIDGE
* * *
With his maudlin Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet
which sold over a million copies, Henry Mancini discovered a
musical formula of piano-with-strings-and-chorus which he has
used in two recent albums. The latest of these - Six Hours Past
Sunset (RCA Victor LSP-4239) - strikes me as an all-time low
for Mancini creativity in terms of both original compositions and
arrangements of the works of others. Aside from occasional
sensitive piano stylings by Mancini, there's little to recommend
this album, not much of an advance over A Warm Shade of Ivory,
the other (and better) album in the same format. His arrangment
of the Moonlight Sonata on the latest album I'm sure will find his
old fans praying foi extreme unction. —M.Q.
* * *
After suffering through the film De Sade and then
masochistically enduring the soundtrack album from the same
film (Capitol ST 6336), I don't recall that the film had nearly as
much musical variety as the thirty-five odd (?) minutes of music
captured on the album.
Some of the titles of the cuts are pretty neat — for
example, Nocturnal Permission. (Get it?) As well, a couple of
rock-oriented tracks feature hysterical giggling and tortured
screams.
In short, the ideal record for your next bacchanal. And if
you run out of sexual perversions to perform to these
sado-musical undulations, you can always snatch a glance at the
nifty photos on the back cover and notice how craftily the
Capitol Records photo department has selected only the most
j discreet shots, obviously not wanting to offend anyone. See Keir
*■ Dullea as De Sade tastefully screwing Senta Berger, for example.
How's that for perverse, eh? (Pant! Pant!)
-MARK JACQUES
To Tell YOU About
READING DYNAMICS
Tuesday. Feb. 10th at 12:30 p.m.
ROOM 102 - BUCHANAN BUILDING
Now hear the inside story of Reading Dynamics and
its beginning from the real EVELYN WOOD - discoverer
of the breakthrough that has changed the Reading
habits of the world . . .
The person whom the late President John F. Kennedy
asked to teach the remarkable skill to his staff at the
White House.
(owtjm ffocd
READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
1900 W. BROADWAY - 732-7696
November 8,696,04%, 20467
THE       UBYSSEY
THE MISCELLANEOUSSEY ROCK BOOK:
•fc,
.M
the best so far
Carl Belz? The Story of Rock (Oxford Press, $6.75 ) is, in spite
of some faults, the best book published so far on the phenomenon
of pop music of the 50's and 60's.
It joins an array of other books all published within the last
year - Rock and Other Four Letter Words, The Jefferson Airplane
and the San Francisco Sound (Gleason), The Rock Revolution
(Arnold Shaw), Rock (Nik Cohn), the World of Rock (Gabree), The
Poetry of Rock (Goldstein), and The Age of Rock, the last being a
collection of essays, interviews and articles which range from
penetrating to ponderously academic.
Although Belz' style occasionally becomes just a "trifle
academic for comfort (he's an Assistant Professor in the Art History
Department at Brandeis University), what distinguishes his book
from practically all of the others is that he manages to fairly
successfully present a theory for an aesthetic justification of rock.
As he states in his Preface, "the present historical Study
concentrates on the art of rock as opposed to its sociological,
political, or economic aspects."
His theories, I suspect, will be for many a controversial point-
I'm a sociological-economic man myself. Belz, while conscious that
the music is "a youth movement and ... the reflection of a way of
life radically different from the one which prevailed before the
1950's" claims that rock spoke to the new generation as "a voice of
the people rather than an art which talked about them from a
detached and self-determined vantage point... The music has been
a confrontation with reality rather than a confrontation with art."
Rock is therefore folk art because "A folk idiom's immediate
concern is with issues of life and reality and with overt expression of
those issues."
Historically speaking, however, Belz' account is not very
adequate inasmuch as it's designed to back up his claim that rock
equals fine art rather than be all-encompassing like an encyclopedia.
With his scholarly approach, he does offer a few interesting insights,
for example, the respective developments of 33rpm and 45rpm
records in the 50's.
Belz spends a great deal of space discussing, with some
interest, the work of Bob Dylan and The Beatles. The latter group
receives special consideration in view of their double album The
Beatles, ' which he! claims is "a conscious looking back at their own
musical (and hence artistic) experiences". Therefore this album
poses a threat to Belz' theory.
My main objection to his dwelling on these artists is that he
neglects several other groups and artists which could also have been
discussed in relation to rock as fine art — artists such as The Byrds,
Nilsson, Van Dyke Parks, Blood, Sweat and Tears, The Fugs,
Incredible String Band, Blind Faith, Led Zeppelin, and Pink Floyd,
to name just a few. Hopefully some other rockologist will carry on
Belz' explorations in dealing with these — obviously time (the book
was published last year) is an influential factor on their omission
from this book.
Still, The Story of Rock deserves support mainly because it
does present a theory based on aesthetics, and does so in a lucid,
intelligent, and objective manner. One hopes that Belz will be
around when and if rock is finished or when it changes to a new
form in order to provide an accurate and complete chronicle of its
history. A voice like his is certainly welcome in the midst of much of
the drivel which currently passes for rock criticism.
-MICHAEL QUIGLEY
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SHINERAMA
70
Positions open for Publicity and
Physical co-chairmen (women) and
other executive. Conference, all-
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lata February. Especially Frosh . . .
get involved — it's a bash.
MEET IN SUB, RM. 213 AT
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Personal  discussions with  Ottawa  recruitment  staff,
SATURDAY, FEB. 7   -   9 A.M.-12 NOON
CUSO office — International House
The Village printwrights
2109 AtUSON RD. AT UNIVERSITY BLVD., VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
Phone 224-1015
COMPLETE   PRINTING,   BINDING   AND   MAILING   SERVICE
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DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
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685-2271
Tel. 385-4431
Op.n fiv. Cava a W—k—Friday unlil 9:00—C!o»d Wed.
THE ANONYMOUSSEY
THE       UBYSSEY
Fill in your own date Friday, February 6,  1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
AMS candidates see no need for change
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
and PHIL BARKWORTH
Alma Mater Society vice-president Tony Hodge apparently has
not had enough of the AMS. He is one of two candidates to be next
year's AMS president.
The first thing Hodge plans to do if elected is to get council
more involved in campus issues.
"As it stands, very few council members really know what is
happening on this campus. It scares me to think that THAT council
is administering money," said Hodge.
Hodge's opponent is current AMS treasurer Chuck Campbell.
Campbell agrees with Hodge that there is a need for more AMS
involvement.
"I want to see the AMS take a stand on issues that affect the
students. On all other issues the AMS should remain neutral. It
should, however, strive to educate the student on the issues by
sponsoring teach-ins," said Campbell.
Hodge would like to see the AMS become more involved with
community problems such as pollution, poverty or the "save the
beach" situation.
"Much more needs to be done in the way of informing the
students and the public at large as to what is involved in these
different issues," he said.
"The AMS could do a lot in this area by sponsoring teach-ins,"
said Hodge.
Campbell would like to see the AMS get involved with course
unions and anticalendars.
"We have to foster the development of smaller academic
groups on campus," said Campbell.
Both candidates see the need for more recreation facilities on
^ the campus.
"The AMS should get involved in trying to get Empire pool
covered and in seeing to it that an adequate replacement is found to
the women's gym," said Campbell.
Hodge is considering a scheme that would replace parking lots
on campus with recreation facilities such as fields.
Inadequate student services are also high on the priority list of
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HIPPY
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these two candidates.
"The AMS must get involved with providing better housing on
campus as this is a very urgent problem that has been neglected far
too long," said Hodge.
Both candidates also want to try and do something about the
employment situation.
"The AMS has been trying to ease student unemployment and
will continue to do so," said Campbell.
"Many things need doing on campus and next year's AMS will
try and do some of these," said Hodge.
Both candidates for the AMS secretary and activities
co-ordinator positions have won by acclamation.
The new activities co-ordinator, Hanson Lau, arts 4, said he
hopes to make SUB facilities more accessible to students. "Any
individual or group of students that wants to hire a room in SUB
should be allowed to," he said.
He intends to have more cultural events in SUB, and hopes to
serve gourmet food in the building once a month.
Anne Clarkson, arts 3, was elected secretary.
"I have no desire to change the AMS and I just want to serve
the Council in any way I can," said Clarkson.
One of the advantages of the secretary's position is that she is
granted a certain amount of money to start some special program,
she said.
Richard Harrison, arts 2, gave this statement to The Ubyssey
about why he is running for ombudsman.
"Why do I want, to be ombudsman? I want to be able to solve
the complaints and problems that students at UBC have. I have no
intention of making wild promises that I will cure all the ills of
university life. But I do promise to use my initiative in solving as
many problems as possible. Give me a chance to bring some action
into the ombudsman's office - all I can offer you is results!"
The other candidate for ombudsman, Donald Sorochan, law 2,
said he thinks the AMS is becoming more a business than a service to
students. "Instead of worrying about Aleutian bomb tests I feel the
AMS should concentrate on such things as student parking, medical
coverage for students, and student housing."
UBC FLYING CLUB
Office
SUB 216 G      Ph. 228-4392
Activities:  See Classified
FRIDAYS
SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
a film soc
presentation
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
Get Some - See Home Ad Page 6
THUNDERBIRD
BASKETBALL
Feb. 12 - Thursday - 12:30 Noon
University of Victoria "VIKINGS"
FREE   -   Admission for Students   -    FREE
3rd Annual Buchanan Trophy Classic
Feb. 14 - Saturday - 8 p.m.
PACIFIC  COLISEUM
SIMON FRASER
u
ft
CLANSMEN
JV's play at 6 p.m.
Student Tickets: $1.00 for a $2.00 Res. Seat
ON SALE NOW AT MEMORIAL GYM
WCIAA Semi-Finals (Feb. 20-21) and
Finals (Feb. 28-29) at UBC's Memorial Gym
Under the jurisdiction of the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
STUDENTS PRICES WILL BE ANNOUNCED SHORTLY Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1970
FRIDAY
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK  CLUB
Executive   meeting   12:30,    SUB   113.
All interested invited to attend.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   MOVEMENT
Meetings    regarding   educationals   at
noon, SUB 226.
CONTEMPORARY   ARTS   FESTIVAL
Al   Neil,   free   Concert,   12:30.   Music
building recital hall.
DEPT.  OF  SOIL  SCIENCE, UBC
Dr.    Julius   Kane,    resource   science
center.   Night   soil   in   the   day,   2:30
p.m.  MacMillan building  166.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
General meeting,  noon, SUB 119.
FILM SOCIETY
Marat Sade,  7:00 and 9:30 p.m.,  SUB
theatre.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Panel Discussion, noon,  SUB 125.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOCIETY
"The Great Deception",  discussion at
noon, Bu. 234.
SINCLAIR-DICKIN   ADORATION
SOCIETY
General   meeting,   noon,   Sinclair  and
Dickin   will   speak    on   the   modern
classic.
NDP   CLUB
Executive  meeting,   noon,   SUB  216A.
SCIENCE   UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY
Meeting   at   noon   with   CUSO   Chem.
250 for math and science students.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Meeting, free coffee, noon, I.H.
'tween
classes
SATURDAY
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Normal    sailing    at    Kitsilano    Yacht
Club,  10:00 a.m.
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Scrambles   and   dirt   bash   11:30   a.m.
S.W. Marine Dr.  at Tamath Crescent.
Open to anyone with a bike.
FILM   SOCIETY
Marat Sade,  7:30 and 9:30 p.m.,  SUB
theatre,    "The    Further    Adventures
SUNDAY
Marat  Sade,   7:00  p.m.   SUB   theatre,
"The Further Adventures of ...   "
MONDAY
LEGAL  AID
Campus legal  aid  panels,  noon,   SUB
237 and 237A.
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
Meeting at noon in SUB 211.
SPEAK EASY
12-9:00 p.m., SUB 218 or call 228-3706.
TUESDAY
SPEAK  EASY
12-9:00 p.m.   in SUB 218 or call 228-
3708.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Beer-Nite 7:00 p.m.-ll:00, l.H. 50 cents
for three beers, all welcome
EUS   ACADEMIC  SEMINAR
Dr.  Cyril Belshaw speaks at noon on
"Belshaw   Report",   civil   engineering
201.   Everyone welcome.
UBC JUDO CLUB
General meeting.  SUB 119.
UBC  SAILING CLUB
Film and general meeting at noon in
Bu. 104.
WEDNESDAY
LEGAL AID
Campus legal  aid  panels,  noon,   SUB
237 and 237A.
:   UBC SAILING CLUB
Film and general meeting at noon in
Bu. 104.
SOUTHERN   AFRICAN'
SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Meeting at noon in SUB 224.
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION
MEDICINE
"/ There will be an informal orientation
meeting at 7:00 p.m. in hut B2 of the
school of rehabilitation medicine for
anv student planning to enteT the
school in 1970. Coffee will be served.
THURSDAY
UBC  FLYING  CLUB
Film   at  noon in  SUB   105B   on high
sneed flieht.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Pollution    discussion   (Automobile   &
Pollution") at noon in l.H.
Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd. UBC
Across from the Adm. Bldg.
Sunday: 9:30 a.m.—College
10:30 a.m.—"The Fifth Dimension:
Sight" (Sermon)
2 p.m.—Beach Cleaning (LSM)
5 p.m.—Cost Supper
7 p.m.—Mr. Bohlen, Sierra Club
and others on "Pollution"
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
225 E. 2nd Ave.
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
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San Francisco!
Weekend for
YOU & A FRIEND   |
See Home Ad-Page 6        FREE*!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75?, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25tf;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
11
Dances
DTNNKlF & DANClTTjRGANrZEU
by M-SSA. Sat., Feb. 14, 7:00 p.m.
 International   House.    $2.00    each.
DANCE TO THE TRIALS OP
Jason Hoover. Friday, Feb 6
!l:;«)-l:00 at Place Vanier. Res
1.25.   Non-res.. $1.C0.
12
Greetings
JUST BECAUSE YOU DON77?
want a baby right now doesn't
mean you can't cxeprience preg-
nancy and childbirth (vicariously,
of course!) Queen K. theatre Feb.
25.   "The   Rose"
Valentine Greeting' 12A
BIS ORIGINAL — SEND VALEN-
tine Greetings to your friends with
a Classified ad in the Feb. 13 issue. Make arrangements in the
Publications office, 241 SUB
Deadline   11   a.m.   Feb.   12th.
Wanted Information
13
RE: YELLOW VALIANT DOORS
creased Sunday, Empire Pool pay
lot. Information wanted. Please
phone   321-9919
Lost & Found 14
LOST IN EAST MALL ANNEX,
large red folder with photograph
inside. Personal, sentimental
value. Reward offered. Phone Allen   733-7019.
ATTENTION GREEN FIREBIRDS.
Anyone finding a 100 ft. yellow
extension cord in their car after
Mardi Gras at the Showmart
building. Please return to SUB
information   desk..
rXIST OR STOLEN WALLET CON-
taining I.I>. Credit cards and all
my money for Feb. Please return!
FOUND PAIR OF BROWN LADIES
glasses at the Mardi Gras. Dance
Jan.    30.   224-3293/266-2101.	
LOST PARKER PEN MONDAY,
Feb.   2.  Phone 872-1747 Ev.
FOUND—DUFFLE BAG INCLITD-
ing sports equipment and Law
course material. Phone Mrs Murray   325-1110.	
LOST DARK GREEN NOTE BIN-
<ler in Henry Angus last Friday.
Contact   Kelly.    926-1528.    Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
WEST VAN. CAR POOL. MON.-
Fri. for 8:30's. Phone Bob, 922-7955.
FROM No. 5 RD. & STEVESTON
Hwy. for 8:30 classes. Ph. 274-2360
after 6  p.m.  Ask  for  Tony.
NEEDED A DRIVER FOR OUR
car pool. Kerrisdale area. Phone
261 -14:S5   ask   for   Susan.
Special Notices
16
LORD TWKEDSMUIR HOMECOM-
ing, Friday, Feb. 6, 7:30-???. All
ex-Tweedie-ites welcome. Come
and meet your old teachers,
friends, etc. Guided tour of the
new labs and facilities.
SEE "MARAT SADE' SUB THE-
atre. This will start you thinking!
Shows on Fri. & Sat., 7:00, 9:30
and Sun. 7:00. Enjoy good movies
in a good  theatre for only 50c!
BECOME A LEGALLY ORDAINED
minister. $2.00 donation appreciated. World Life Church, Inc.
P.O. Box 717. Ceres, Cal.  95307.
MARG HOGGIE (OF VERNON?)
(or acquaintance) please - call
Sharon    084-2688.    Have    mail    for
- you.	
UBC FLYING CLUB. TUESDAY
night. Airport Air Sea Rescue
Series. Thursday noon SUB. 105B
Film High Speed Flight. Everyone
welcome.    	
THE QUEEN E. THEATRE IS
free from atmospheric contaminants, residual pesticides, environmental collapse, and other 20th
Century pitfalls! See this miracle
on Feb. 25 at 8. Just $1.50. Prize
winning films will be shown too.
Tickets 683-3255.  "The Rose."
Special  Notices  (Cont.J
16
SCUBA COURSE
* N.A.U.I. Certification
* Professional instruction
* All equipment supplied
* 35 hour—6 wk. course
* Internationally recognized
For  further   information,   course
brochure   or   registration
685-6017 (24 hrs.)
SUB - AQUA
International   Diving   School
POLLUTION SERIES: "AUTOMO-
bile and Pollution. Feb. 12, 12:30.
International    House.
Travel Opportunities
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
65 MUSTANG CONVERT 289 4-
spd excellent condition. Best of-
fer.   684-4007.	
1959 ZEPHYR CONVERTIBLE.
Good running condition. $150. Call
Rudi.   731-0348.	
FANTASTIC 1953 CHEV. CANNOT
describe in short ad. Any test.
$300,00,  no offers."Phone  261-5840.
1958 AUSTIN — EXCELLENT
mileage. $125.00 or best offer.
Phone  299-7652.	
1967 CUTLASS 30,000 MILES.
Radio P.S., P.B. Immaculate condition. Best offer takes. Call eol-
lect   532-1071.	
1968 COROLLA $1300 OR BEST
cash offer.  Phone Jim at 224-9720.
'62 BEL AIR V8 AUTO RADIO,
excellent.   876-9104.	
TWIN CARBURETORS FROM '69
Mini Cooper $40 or offer.  922-8744.
1963 NSU PRINZ. MUST SELL, $75
or best offer. 45 miles/gallon. John
224-5214,    Room    434.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — SPEC-
ialists in graphs, maps, textbook
illustrations, complete formulae,
scientific displays, advertisements.
Ph.   733-4506.
Miscellaneous
33
ARTWORK PHOTOGRAPHY Posters call me and see if I can't do
it.   John   Kula   224-4146.
RESIDENCE DWELLERS! TRADE
4 claustrophobic walls for the
larger environment of the Queen
E. Theatre, Feb. 25 at 8. See the
prize-winning film of birth, "The
Rose" plus others. Only $1.50!
Tickets 683-3255 (Van. Ticket
Centre).	
WISSENSCHAFTLICHE GRAPHIK
—experten in techn. zeichnungen,
landkarten, Buchillustrationen,
complexen enwurten, wissen-
schaftl Austellungen U. Werbung.
Tel   733-4506.
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
WHO IS INSANE — THE AUDI-
ence or the actors? Try some
'Marat Sade' and see for yourself!
EVER MADE LOVE ON A FUR
rug? Aghan coats double nicely
in a pinch. $80 (cheap) at Sas-
parilla and Blind Owl on 4th Ave.
Say hello  to the  nice  people!
Scandals (Cont.)
37
IS THE SUB SLOWLY COLLAPS-
ing? Frotect yourself! Relax in
the sturdy concrete womb of the
Queen E. Theatre Feb. 25 at 8.
"The Rose" and other prize winning films. Tickets $1.50 at 683-
3255   (Van.   Ticket   Centre).	
COME AND HEAR THIS YEAR'S
election promises Monday at 12:30,
SUB   Ballroom.
Sewing & Alterations 38
Typewriters & Repairs 39
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, these, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
THESES TYPED. EXPERIENCED
typist. IBM-machine. Call Jenifer
Tomiin, days 688-8572, eves. 682-
5380.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers. 	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
 Please   call   224-6129	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 321-2102.	
EXPERT TYPING—THESIS 35c/
page. Essays 30c/page — 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Ph.
325-0545.	
TYPING SERVICE — MRS. GAIL
Symons, 224-6435. 3885 W. 12th
Avenue.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST — ELEC-
tric machine. Reas. rates. Phone
738-7881.	
UBC GRAD. TYPING SERVICE,
.25/page; .05/carbon copy; theses
welcome. Phone 681-0221 (any-
time) — other office services!
COMPETENT TYPING (Documents, theses, essays, general),
my home. Sr. legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722.	
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794. 35c page — 5c
copy.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
FEMALE HELP WANTED SIX TO
eight hours week, $1.75 hr. Keep
house   clean.   266-1611.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
TO BE ABLE TO MAKE SOME
sort of intelligent decision in the
elections come to the all-candidates meeting, Monday at 12:30
in   the   SUB  Ballroom.
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
DULCIMERS — FINEST HAND-
crafted. Try one at the Med Shop,
4339   W.   10th   Ave.   228-9061.
Tutoring
64
TUTORING IN MATH - PHYS. -
Stat by instructor (Ph.D.) $5 per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.  Eve.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BLOW YOUR HORN — USED
trumpet with case and instructions
$25 or offers, phone Doug, 224-
9535.	
PIRELLI SKI BOOTS SIZE 8,
poles, Vogg White Comet Mark II
72" skis $65.00. Phone Joan 266-
6669.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
BIRD CALLS
Your   Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
at  the  Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Offico
and Thunderbird  Shop
LOVELY LAVENDAR GOWN —
full length formal with white bod-
dice  and delicate  trim.   437-1808.
KOFLACK LACE SKI BOOTS;
size 11M, $35.00—1 season. 738-
7793.	
SKIS 205 EPOXY MARKER TOE-
pieces; Tyrol size 11-12 boots. All
good   condition.   Eves.   266-4338.
PORTABLE FLEETWOOD TV, 21-
inch, two . years old, hardly used,
excellent condition. Call Rudi
731-0348.	
SKIS, ROSSIGNOL ALLAIS MAJ-
ors, G.S., 215cm, 1 yr., good shape,
Nevada bindings. Dave Pugh 224-
1678.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT ROOMS WITH REC.
room, T.V., record player, private
entrance, bathroom, near UBC.
263-9609. .	
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620.	
SHARE FULLY FURNISHED
room. Heat, light, phone supplied.
All male house, Kitsilano. Phone
738-0784.	
ROOMS IN CO-OP, 3857 W. 19th,
224-6844, couple two sharing Feb.
1   $45  and   $70.	
ROOM FOR RENT $70, MALE OR
female, pref. senior student to
share entire house and domesticities with two other students. Contact us after six at 2619 W. 3rd
(near  Macdonald).	
BASEMENT BED SITTING ROOM
furnished, fridge, hotplate, private entrance, bathrodm. 3035 Hem-
lock.    Tel.    738-4090   after    6   p.m.
LIVE ON CAMPUS CHEAPLY'!
Room & kitchen privileges for
male students, only $50. Board if
desired $45. Weekly linen. Clean
quiet accommodation & parking.
224-0327 or come to 5670 Toronto
Rd.	
MALES ; NEWLY FURNISHED
room,: 1 or 2; TV room, light
cooking, warm, near UBC. 228-
8040.
Room & Board
82
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725  Agronomy,   224-9620,   224-6374.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. COLOR T.V.
Sauna. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Road.   224-9684   or  224-7843.	
ROOM, BOARD, INCREDIBLY
friendly surroundings, food and
TV. Phone 224-0723 or 224-9073.
Phi Delta Theta 2120 Wesbrook
Cres.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MALE ROOM-MATE TO SHARE
one bedrm. apt. in West End, $70
month.   Ph.  685-1581.
Unf. Houses & Apts.
84
SENSITIVE "INTUNE" COUPLE
or guy wanted to share big house
Kitsilano area with growth & joy
oriented people. All expenses
shared evenly. Call Michael, Judy
or  Juliet.  733-3385.
FOR BEST RESULTS USE YOUR UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Friday, February 6,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS
BUREAUCRACY!
AMS ALL CANDIDATES MEETING
February 9 In S.U.B. Ballroom
HEAR CANDIDATES FOR
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
OMBUDSMAN
COORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
The NOW Place
. ..to Buy
RECORDS
NEW RELEASES!!
ROCK!!
Stereo
LIST
PRICE
$5.29
6.29
OUR
PRICE
$3.69
3.89
• TEN WHEEL DRIVE!
• THE JAMES GANG!
• QUINTESSENCE!
• FREE!
• PLASTER CASTERS BAND!
• GRATEFUL DEAD "LIVE"!
• RASCALS "SEE"!
• ALMOND BROTHERS!
• YES!
• PINK FLOYD "UMMAGUMMA"!
• JOHN MAYALL "DIARY"!
Stereo
LIST
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• ROLLING STONES
-LET IT BLEED
• TAJ MAHAL
• BEATLES-VERY TOGETHER
• LED ZEPPELIN 1 & II
• PENTANGLE
• CREEDENCE CLEARWATER
• STEPPENWOLF-"MONSTER"
• FRANK ZAPPA-"HOT RATS"
• JOHN MAYALL-"DIARY"
• THE BAND
• BLOOD SWEAT & TEARS
• SANTANA
• FAIRPOINT CONVENTION-NEW!
• THE POPPY FAMILY
• KING CRIMSON
• EDWARD BEAR BEARINGS
• GRAND FUNK RAILROAD
• BEATLES-ABBEY ROAD
• SALVATION
• MOODY BLUES "CHILDREN*
• 100'S OF OTHERS
DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON
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From Bach to Wagner
OPERA, CONCERTOS, SYMPHONIES, CHAMBER
WORKS, CHORAL, SOLOISTS
IMPULSE BLUES AND JAZZ AT ITS BEST!!
LIST 6.29
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X?L xHZJNDEBBiBD
List 6.98
SALE 3.99
S.U.B.
SHOP Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6,  1970
A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Forces. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
AIR WEAPONS CONTROL
LAND ORDNANCE ENGINEERING
MEDICAL ASSOCIATE (BIO-SCIENCE)
MILITARY ENGINEERING
MARITIME SURFACE & SUB-SURFACE
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver
666-3136
THE CANADIAN
~   ARMED FORCES
Ti/itttex SfcwU @e*ttne
HANDBALL - SQUASH
PHYSICAL EDUCATION TIME IS AVAILABLE
MON. TO FRIDAY INCLUSIVE — EXCEPT ON
UNIVERSITY HOLIDAYS
UBC Students may use these facilities FREE from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each morning.
Squash  Racquets  are available  for  rent — 25c
Hand Gloves — 15c
Hand and Squash Equipment may be purchased
from the Sports Shop
At other than Phys. Ed. times, UBC Students may
reserve courts at a Rental Rate of 50c per person
(casual rate).
$5.00 per month or $15.00 to Sept. 15th
or $30.00 annually.
Phone 228-9708
THUNDERBIRD RALLY
ACTION - Jim Bowie and
Tom Burgess navigate a corner on gravelly Common-
dale Road between Vernon
and Kelowna in last weekend's T'Bird rally, on their
way to a fourth place finish
in the rally. That's a checkpoint farther back along the
road, and Okanagan Lake in
the background.
T'Bird rally finished now
The major event of the year for
the UBC Sports Car Club, the
Thunderbird Rally, was run last
weekend through some of the
toughest driving conditions in the
province in the Okanagan and
Fraser Valleys.
The winning team, driving a
Volkswagen, was Bob Owen from
the Okanagan Autosport Club and
Mike Hunter from the Columbian
Autosport Club. Both are former
UBCSCC members and are past
Thunderbird rally masters.
Of the 46 cars that started the
800 mile event, nine did not
finish. Four cars had mechanical
By BARRY NAROD
difficulties, three entrants
withdrew on route, and two
entrants withdrew due to language
problems (they were Portuguese
and couldn't speak English).
Second place went to Jim
Thomson and Gary Wikjord of the
Volvo Car Club of B.C.
Third were Jim and Randy
Black of VCCBC; fourth were
Tom Burgess of the Kokanee
Autosport Club and Jim Bowie of
VCCBC. Burgess is a former
president of the UBCSCC.
Fifth, also of VCCBC, were
Gorden lindsdell and Tom Day.
Gary Brookes, a rally official,
said that up to noon Sunday the
times were close.
Crossing the snow-covered
Hedley Road, from Penticton by
Apex Mountain to Hedley, the
cars spread out. Brooks said that
snow on the roads enabled the
Volkswagens to get ahead due to"
their better traction.
Brooks added that the
Thunderbird Rally is known as
one of the toughest rallies in
Canada, as it is officially a
Championship event.
Braves win overall battle
By DICK BUTTON
The UBC Braves hockey team proved a point
while the Vancouver Centennials won a game
Wednesday night at the Winter Sports Centre.
The Centennials, who are battling for the lead
of the inter-city Junior A hockey league in B.C.
have considered their brand of hockey to be far
superior to collegiate hockey.
They have stalled playing the Braves so far
this year by claiming the Braves would not be
good enough competition.
However, they got one of the better games
they've had this year as the Braves all but won thei
game.
The final score was 2-1 for the Centennials,
but the Braves missed a couple of shots at a wide
open net to allow the score stay that way.
The Braves outshot Vancouver 47-41, and
controlled the play for over 70% of the game.
They also overwhelmingly outhit and outchecked
the Centennials, and UBC's Bruce Stevenson won
the only fight of the game.
The game was a welcome change for UBC,
who have been stuck with playing low calibre
competition so far this year.
Defensively, UBC turned in their strongest
performance of the season, as indicated by therlow
score. Defenceman Roily Oliver led the Braves
with solid bodychecking, good passing and some
very hard shots from the point. Behind Oliver
goaltender Fred Masuch made some sparkling saves
to keep the Braves in the game.
UBC lacked finish in front of the net, according to coach Don Fidler, and a lot of rebounds
went wasted as the centers were not in position.
The Centennials are trying to arrange a game
with the UBC Thunderbirds, possibly next
Wednesday, at Kerrisdale Arena. At other
universities in western Canada, the colleges have
defeated the Junior A teams in their cities,
including Calgary and Edmonton, the two best
Junior A teams in Western Canada.
The Braves return to Pacific Intercollegiate
League play this weekend with a trip to Selkirk
College and Gonzaga University.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
Come and hear the candidates for the
A.M.S.  Executive speak.
Monday in the SUB Ballroom
at 12:30
-'2?**,! f X :tf%£mm
WmM
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.rri.
BANK AUTO SALES
1205    Kingsway
Student Discount
Available
GRANT SURREY
879-0248 Friday, February 6,  1970
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
Birds join Victoria
and give Reps battle
By SCOTT McCLOY
Last weekend the combined
squads of UBC and UVic went up
against the tentative B.C. Reps
team and gave an excellent
account of themselves, while
losing 25-13.
They did not win, but they
certainly proved that there is a lot
of talent lurking about on the
university practice fields.
The team started slowly, giving
up ten points in the first half to
their none. The players seemed to
be feeling each other out as they
had not played together before.
In the second half, however,
they managed 13 points while the
opposition scored 15. It is
interesting to note, though, UBC's
Doug Shick was playing for the
reps side and personally
accounted for 15 of the reps'
points. If he had been on the
university's side the score could
have been reversed.
The whole point of this game,
however, was for the coaches to
get a final look at the players
before deciding which to pick for
the reps team.
UBC's players seemed to have
impressed the coaches because
two, Doug Shick and Dave Austin,
along with alternate Lee Hillier,
were selected. UVic contributed
three players as well.
This weekend UBC enters the
university schedule with its
meeting of the University of
Oregon on Saturday, 2:30 p.m. at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Coach Donn Spence expects a
fast, wide-open maich as Oregon
much improved over last year.
When UBC and Oregon met last
season the Birds broke the game
open with minutes to go and won
17-9.
Spence feels that the Birds will
have the edge, as they have a
greater amount of experience
through playing in the city league.
Most crucial test ahead
for ice hockey TBirds
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey team face their most crucial
game of the season on Friday night, 8:00 p.m. at the Thunderbird
Winter Sport Center.
The Brandon Bobcats will attempt to wrestle fourth place and
the last playoff spot from the Birds.
With three games left for the Birds, and two for Brandon;
Brandon is tied with the Birds, so the whole season is balanced on
the outcome of Friday's game.
To make it worth a little more, the teams will be playing for
the John Owen Memorial trophy. This is the fifth year the Birds
have competed for the trophy, winning it in the last four. This
trophy is donated by the University District Lions Club.
The Birds almost are healthy again with the return of Laurie
Vanzella but Wayne Schaab is unlikely to play this weekend,
however, he should be ready if the Birds make the playoffs.
Saturday night, the Birds will play the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies, a gain at 8:00. UBC defeated the Huskies 7-1
last Saturday in Saskatoon and will try to repeat the performance
here. The game will be almost anticlimactic, as a win Friday night
and a win Saturday or next weekend against University of Victoria,
which is an absolute certainty, clinches the playoff spot for the
Birds.
In the event of a tie for fourth place, Brandon would win out
over the Birds by virtue of their two wins against UBC.
The playoffs will be held in two weeks, with the Birds, if they
make it, probably playing Calgary Dinosaurs in Calgary. The other
semifinal series will likely see Manitoba Bisons playing Alberta
Golden Bears in Edmonton.
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS — SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For Full Information & Dates. Etc., Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162
TBirds look for
a weak chinook
The UBC Thunderbirds undefeated basketball squad chalks
up their fifteenth WCIAA victory this Saturday as they meet the
University of Lethbridge Chinooks.
The inevitability of the result of the game is obvious as the
Chinooks two weeks ago received all 2-49 schellacking on their
home court. While it is certainly true that they were successful in
downing the University of Winnipeg and giving Manitoba more
than they bargained for, their is virtually no conceivable way the
Birds will let their undefeated season elude them at this juncture.
After Saturday's game the Birds have one remaining
conference game, at noon next Thursday against the UVic
Vikings.
Clearly the only game worthy of any discussion is the SFU
encounter, a full week away. Coach Peter Mullins has already
admitted it will be one of the most stringent tests of the year
"They'll be tough, there is absolutely no question about that."
Providing Mullins with the most concern would have to be a
6'5" forward named Larry Clark. The native of San Francico
leads the Clan in rebounds, and has been the most consistent
scorer in their line-up all year.
The man with pleasant task of keeping Clark off the boards
is the Birds' Derek Sankey who has some rather impressive
credentials of his own.
Leading the WCIAA is rebounds, Sankey will have his
rugged style going for him on defense and an excellent shot on
offense which hopefully will draw Clark further out from the
SFU zone further than he would prefer.
Further match-ups will be commented on in late editions
but in the meantime you might amuse yourself by watching the
Birds and the Chinooks.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - The Thunderettes had an
inconsistent week as they won the WCIAA championship by
clubbing Saskatoon twice 59-25 and 57-19 Monday and Tuesday
evenings. In the Tuesday game, Linda Williard led UBC with 17
points.
Wednesday evening, playing their fifth game in six nights
the Thunderettes dropped the first game of a Senior A total point
semi-final series 47-39 to Molsons.
BASKETBALL—Playoffs   are   now   in
progress in the War Memorial Gymnasium; all spectators are welcome.
Feb. 6, 12:30: Div. II: Union H vs Beta
Pledge; Beta It vs PE VI. Div. Ill: Beta
III vs Carey Hall. Feb. 9, 7:00: Div. I:
Figi I vs Eng I; Ed I vs S.A.M. Div. III.
For III vs Eng V.
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
!&"£   •>>,'
Get Some - See Home Ad Page 6
Mr. DINO
Proudly Announces
Miss Lillie & Mr. Samir
Mis* lillie
Mr. Samir
Have Joined The Staff of
DINO & EMILI0
HAUTE COIFFURE
They wish to Welcome to all their
Friends & Clients to their New Location
MONDAY - SATURDAY
4532 W. 10TH AVE. 224-6523 or 224-7440
BOWLING   —   Feb.   10,   Rink   I,  4:20:
Sigmi Chi vs Arts. 7:35: Phi Delta vs
St. Marks. 8:5:0 Psi U vs AD. Rink II,
11:40: Dekes vs Eng *B'.
WRESTLING — Mondays, Wednesday,
Friday at 12:30 in the Wrestling Room
at Thunderbird Stadium. Check schedule at the Intramural office.
BRIDGE —> Tournament is cancelled.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
mm
EAT IN •TAKEOUT. DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000   GARMENTS  TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full   Dress (Tails)
• Morning  Coats
• Directors'  Coats
• White &  Coloured Coats
• Shirts  and   Accessories
• 10'/!    U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal  Wear  Rentals
631   Howe 688-2481
Ring enlarged to show detail.
What you should
look for
in a diamond
Puzzled by the wide variety
in diamond pricing? Confused by "discount" promises
in mail-order ads and catalogs? Then you need someone you can trust to give you
factual information about
what to look for in a diamond. As a member firm of
the American Gem Society,
we have such a diamond specialist on our staff. He will be
happy to properly and ethically advise you on the subtle
differences in diamond quality that affect the price you
pay. Come in and see us.
MEMBER AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
LIMITED
Registered Jeweller
Granville at Pender
Since 1904
SKIERS
• • •
LOOK
FAMILIAR?
Get your Volkswagen
tuned-up now so you'll
really enjoy your ski trip.
Very reasonably priced, too!
AUT0-HENNEKEN
8914 Oak St.     263-8121 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 6, 1970
At left, UBC students picket Portuguese consulate,736
Granville, to mark ninth anniversary of start of armed
struggle of Angolan people against brutal Portuguese
rule. Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola
(MPLA) is now fighting on five fronts in nine of Angola's
15 districts.
Centre, MPLA guerrillas meet
with people's militia. Bottom left,
a village destroyed by American-
produced napalm. Bottom right,
MPLA's eastern regional congress, August 1968.
ANATOMY OF NATIONAL LIBEI
Photos:
top. Marc Kenton
others, Jacques Roi,
African Relief
Services Committee
r«t*as
J 4s%.*V"'-—
£<% '/**"*
',m'":f
' ^^^gitf^
| LAW STUDENTS &
I   ASSOCIATION    |
©Announcement of fee levyJ
©referendum held Feb. 4,^
X1970. The levy of $3 passedj
8160-63.
OSean M. Hogan
Q Treasure   LSA.
ft—,	
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
In The Village
(Next to U.B.C. Barber Shop)
WE SERVE GOOD CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
For Take-Out Service
Ph. 224-6121
Open Every Day
4:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.
To all students planning to enter
the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine, U.B.C, in September 1970.
An informal orientation meeting has been arranged. This
will be held on Wednesday, February 11th, at 7:00 p.m.
at the School of Rehabiltation  Medicine.
The object of this meeting is to introduce you to
some aspects of Rehabiltation Medicine. These
will be presented by therapists currently working
in the community, and students who are presently
attending the school.
Coffee will be served.
IF YOU INTEND TO COME TO THIS MEETING, WOULD YOU
PLEASE   PHONE   THE   SCHOOL,   228-3213   OR   228-3214.
COME AND HEAR
WOULD-BE AMS
HACKS SPOUT
RHETORIC
All Candidates Meeting
MONDAY 12:30
SUB BALLROOM

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