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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1970

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Array —keith dunbar photo
THIS ISN'T FUN. This is blood, dung, dye and dirt. Dave Parminter, Forestry 3, is wins the race. It's the fact that he's in severe pain with serious arm lacerations. He was
plastered with the stuff as the race goes on at Thunderbird stadium during the annual pinned under the Forestry chariot during the race. This, we rep'eat, is not fun. It's
Engineering-Forestry chariot race Thursday. But Parminter's real problem isn't who       insanity. And it should stop. (See story, p. 2).
p.3—Zoology profs ratify Harger dismissal
p.7—The first in a six-part review of the Vancouver
civic election scene
p.8—Speakeasy examines Canada's abortion legislation
p.25—Sports and the politics of repression
Viet Nam protest to be allowed
By SANDY K ASS
"*^      The Viet Nam Action Committee has been granted a
permit to hold a public demonstration this Saturday.
Aid. Harry Rankin said the committee had previously
been denied a permit to stage a demonstration on the
- grounds that "there weren't enough constables around to
insure the demonstration would remain a peaceful one."
The group first applied for a permit Oct. 6 but was
told by city council that approval would be granted only
after the superintendant of traffic and the chief of police
fvindicated that they had no objections.
The superintendant said,Thursday, the demonstration
could be held and he would call in off-duty police to help
regulate traffic.
The   demonstration   will   be   held   as   part   of  an
international day of protest against American intervention
in the war in Indo-China.
The demonstration will proceed in the form of a
march leaving the courthouse at 12 noon.
It will follow a rally against the War Measures Act
beginning at the courthouse at 11 a.m.
The march will continue from the courthouse, across
Granville St. bridge to Broadway, and along Broadway to
city hall, where a demonstration will be held.
"Never before had this committee been so harrassed
and intimidated," said committee chairman Hilda
Thomas.
"We had no trouble obtaining permits from city
council for our demonstrations last December and May.
"Traffic     superintendant's     approval    is    another
\
*\
Teach-in slams government
MONTREAL - One thousand students
attending a teach-in at l'Umversite* de Montreal
have almost unanimously condemned the invoking
of the War Measures Act.
The Teach-in, held Wednesday night in an
auditorium at U de M, was sponsored by le Comite
Quebecois pour la Defense des Droits
Dernocratiques, and attracted mainly students.
A few police attended dressed as spectators.
CBC reporter Michel Burdon protested the
interference with the news. He said the control of
the CBC French language station has been so strict
during the kidnap crisis that "we are always half
an hour.later than all the other stations."
Montreal mayor Jean Drapeaa was allowed in
to preview a newsreel dealing with municipal
politics.
When the film was shown a piece was cut out
of the interview with Paul Cliche, leader of the
Montreal civic party FRAP, where he refuted
FRAP's connections with the Front de Liberation
du Quebec
Jules    Gariepy    of    the    Syndicate     des
Journalistes, said there was a psychosis of fear that
had gripped many journalists during the past week
and which had resulted in them holding back
publication of all that they knew.
Several speakers drew applause from the
audience by comparing the present military
occupation of Quebec with earlier anti military
statements made by present members of
government.
Lawyer Paul Unterberg quoted a passage from
Pierre Trudeau's book "Federalism and the French
Canadians":
"Now as everyone knows the army is not a
good school of democracy whatever the worth of
the cause which it is defending."
All speakers accused the federal government
of using repressive actions to maintain themselves
in power.
During the meeting those attending also
discussed the formation of small civil liberties
committees to ensure that prisoners are treated
well. As well groups are being formed to study the
War Measures Act in greater detail.
indication that the kind of buck passing going on within
city council at the moment will not be allowed to deny
the people of Vancouver their right to public protest/'
(Thomas is a New Democratic Party aldermanic
candidate in the upcoming civic elections.)
This move follows a revocation during Tuesday's city
council meeting ot the part of a motion that could have
led to the curtailment of public demonstrations which
city council considered subversive.
The motion, by Aid. Halford Wilson, was the second
part of a motion approving of the federal government's
action in implementing the War Measures Act.
Wilson asked during Tuesday's meeting that the
motion be deleted on the grounds that the federal
government had already taken action to provide for
legislation for the possible curtailment of certain public
demonstrations.
He was unavailable for comment at press time.
Aid. Hugh Bird, who seconded the motion, said he is
not in favor of curtailing free speech in any way, but
could not condone public demonstrations by groups
advocating subversion or the violent overthrow of
constituted governments.
"Nothing can be accomplished by violence and
murders," he said.
There has been no word from Ottawa as to any
proposals made by the federal government.
Some aldermen called the motion, political
grandstanding by the instigators and said it had no legal
value.
"Wilson just realized he was stepping out of his
bounds," said Aid. Brian Calder.
He accused Wilson of "using a law and order redneck
philosophy to perpetrate the citizens of Vancouver."
"There's no way the city council can take any action
until federal legislation comes through," said Aid. Earle
Adams.
"This matter is completely beyond our sphere of
influence," he added.
"Don't you guys realize you're 3,000 miles away
from the problem," asked federal minister of Consumer
and Corporate Affairs, Ron Basford.
continued on page 19: see WILSON'S Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 30,   1970
Blood in the teacup race
There was a tragic side to Thursday's annual
engineering-forestry chariot race held at
Thunderbird Stadium.
David Parminter, forester 3, was momentarily
trapped under the Forestry chariot and almost lost
an arm before others pulled him to safety.
After an agonizingly long wait of 25 minutes,
he was finally taken to Vancouver General Hospital,
whece be was listed at press time Thursday night in
satisfactory condition.
UBC firemen, who aided the victim at the
scene, said Parminter had suffered a severe
laceration to the arm just below the   elbow.
The accident occurred just after the start of the
race. The engineers' goon squad was in the process
of hassling Parminter and the others in the forestry
chariot while other foresters were attempting to
ward them off.
In the ensuing struggle Parminter slipped and
was pinned under the chariot, which this year was
an enclosed eight by thirty foot monstrosity with
steel supports that resembled a runaway trailer
home.
Unfortunately the people pulling the chariot
did not see what happened and the race continued.
Meanwhile, a crowd of 5,000 people ignored
the shenanigans on the ' field and watched as
bystanders assisted Parminter, who remained
conscious in spite of his extreme pain.
There were also numerous other minor injuries
sustained during the fracas. Several participants
were later treated in the University hospital for
surface wounds.
As one member of the forestry chariot said:
"This never would have happened if the Engineers
hadn't used those extra 40 guys."
The 40 he was referring to were the members of
the infamous Engineering goon' squad, who are
employed to attack the oppostion, so that the EUS
will be guaranteed of their cherished victory.
It appears that the engineers, who have won the
last 11 races, are so intent on preserving their
precious winning streak that they'll go to almost
any extreme to do so.
And the engineers are also intent on preventing
any undue publicity of their excessive physical
actions. Vancouver Sun press photographer Dan
Scott was harassed by the red mob as he attempted
to record the accident, a newsworthy event.
"The press will ruin the concept of Teacup by
misuse of pictures of the accident," one engineer
was heard to mutter.
HANDS OFF VIETNAM
Oct. 30 - MORATORIUM RALLY
SUB PLAZA 12:30
Oct. 31 - MARCH
ASSEMBLE NOON COURTHOUSE
RALLY 2 P.M. CITY HALL
END THE WAR NOW!
Lawyers and academics
protest War Measures Act
Citi/cns of Quebec are being
terrorized by the Trudeau
government, according to Herbert
Marx, an assistant law professor at
1'Universitie de Montreal.
"Canada under the War
Measures Act can best be described
as a constitutional dictatorship,"
he said.
In this instance of what Marx
describes as "constitutional
dictatorship", only those free to
continue their lives without fear
are the government and its
supporters. It is quite clear that
the government terror campaign is
both succeeding in keeping their
opponents quiet and at the same
time creating a more solid and
more determined, though perhaps
for the time being, quieter,
opposition, he said.
Opponents to the status quo in
Quebec are very conscious of this
dictatorship, he said.
Guy Bertrand, a Quebec City
lawyer, said the arrests of more
than 400 people using the WMA
was "organized kidnapping by the
federal government."
Government kidnappings have
been happening in Quebec for
over two years.
The Quartier Latin, a student
published weekly magazine,
claimed.
Robert Levesque, arrested June
12, 1966, did not have his first
trial until June, 1968 according to
the Belgian lawyer Roger
L'Allemand.
Bernard Lortie, a student at
FUniversite d'Ottawa reported
himself to the police because he
had, the same name as one of the
people being sought by the police.
Lortie was put in jail in HulL then
transferred   to   Montreal   where
police treated him as the murderer
of Pierre Laporte.
The Ontario justice minister
Arthur Wishart did not even know
Lortie had been arrested.
When finally released four days
later, Lortie had a much better
understanding of police
repression.
Lawyers in Totonto say the
War Measures Act might be used
to settle "old scores."
It is well known in Quebec that
such figures as Michel Chartrand
are being held as scape goats by
the government, they claimed.
Chartrand once worked with
Trudeau during the prime
minister's Liberal crusading days,
but since Trudeau came to Ottawa
the two men have been in
constant conflict.
Trudeau and Chartrand made
headlines last year when
Chartrand came to Ottawa and
got engaged in a yelling match
with Trudeau during a meeting
between unionists and the
government.
Since Chartrand is not a
member of the FLQ, but a
supporter of the Parti Quebecois,
it is thought that the government
is using the act to rid themselves
of undesirable (separatist)
elements.
Jean Belanger, a professor at
FUniversite de Laval, says a
vacuum has been created by the
inability of the police to find the;
kidnappers and fascism is filling it.
Belanger is convinced that
unless the men responsible for
Laporte's death — or at least some
one   whom   the   public   can   be
convinced is responsible — are
found quickly, Quebec will be in
for a prolonged period of more
authoritarian rule and perhaps
right wing extremism.
Members of the Quebec
legislature's press gallery* are
asking protection from the type
of reaction that Belanger
describes.
The reporters see the reaction
coming as a result of remarks
made by members of parliament
who criticize the press' critical
coverage of the Quebec situation.
Louis Phillippe Lacroix,
Liberal member of the Quebec
legislature has allegedly made repeated
threats against a reporter whom
he accused as being a separatist.
(It is not illegal to be a separatist
in Quebec). Lacroix allegedly
warned Jacques Guay, reporter
for Journal de Montreal, that he
would be "taken care of."
We're with it!
i    MUBBAY GOLDMAN
1                  164 W. HASTINGS                                                                n
|                  774 GRANVILLE                                                                 ||
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HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA Friday, October 30,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
We're not terrorists, says FRAP spokesman
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Front d'Action Politique is a social movement as well
as political movement,, says Adele Williams, a FRAP
candidate in Montreal's recent municipal election.
"We are not terrorists and we are not separatists. Our
only goal is to remedy the social conditions in the city of
Montreal," Williams told 100 students Thursday in Ang.
104.
She was responding to regional development minister,
Jean Marchand's recent accusation that FRAP is a front
for the FLQ.
"FRAP is aimed at ameliorating the social problems
in Montreal by working towards a real democracy —
decentralization of power and people participation," said
the McGill University philosophy professor.
"We were also faced with Montreal Mayor Jean
Drapeau's accusation: if FRAP is elected blood will flow
in the streets of Montreal.
"Because we have no access to the media the only way
we could refute this statement was to sue Mayor Drapeau.
As vet our legal success is unknown.
"We may have been able to avoid this alleged
association with the FLQ by taking a more pragmatic
approach and not even stating our support of their aims
but we are not political pragmatists.
"We are sincerely working to remedy conditions in
Montreal.
"I emphasize the fact that we're not terrorists or we
—keith dunbar photo
GOOD FENCES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS but even better support for radar equipment. UBC cops have finally
moved out from behind the bushes in their efforts to trap unwary campus criminals. The game is now being played on
fence posts of local corner lots. Here one of our finest sits wired to his vehicle at Acadia Road and Chancellor
anticipating the chance to relay evidence to colleagues farther east on the Boulevard.
would be underground right now."
Although two FRAP candidates were arrested the day
the War Measure Act was invoked by the federal
government, the action had no effect because the
candidates were released without accusation, Williams
said.
"Despite both obstacles — the arrests and the
accusations — we managed to gain 16 percent of the votes
at the Sunday municipal election.
to page 10: see FRAP
Quebec reacts
to martial law
By DICK BETTS
Resistance to the federal government's War Measures
Act is becoming louder in Quebec despite continuing
police investigations.
Stanley Ryerson, a noted Canadian Marxist historian
currently living in Montreal, mentioned in a telephone
conversation with The Ubyssey Wednesday some of the
resistance that is forming in Montreal. '
Ryerson also said the reaction in Ottawa by the
federal government indicates a significant amount; of
acceptance of the aims of the Federation de Liberation du
Quebec, if not of the FLQ's means.
Meanwhile, Parti Quebecois leader Rene Levesque
heaped criticism on Robert Bourassa's Liberal government
in his column that appears in one of Montreal's leading
daily papers.
Levesque criticized the fact that the Quebec
Assembly has not yet met over the situation in Quebec.
On the electoral front, working class and poor areas
of Montreal (almost exclusively French-speaking) showed
only a mild response in the recent civic elctions, indicating
dissatisfaction with the parliamentary system.
The same disillusionment was expressed in the April
provincial elections. The statistics of the civic elections are
interesting and show a parallel with the April elections.
Drapeau's support came from the upper class and
middle class districts in Montreal, such as Westmount,
Outremont and the suburban areas. The turnout in these
areas was close to 90 per cent.
In the poor and working class areas, the turnout was a
little over 30 per cent. What little support Drapeau's
opposition, the Front d'Action Politique, received came
from those areas.
The parallel with the April elections is close. Voter
turnouts were much the same.
In that election, the turnout in these areas was also
low. Robert Bourassa's Liberal party got many of its 70
seats from upper class and English speaking sectors of
Quebec and Montreal.
Dope favored
UBC students indicated Thursday that three quarters
of them were in favor of legalization of cannabis. Of a
total turnout of 2303, 1689 said they would like to see it
legalized, 568 said they would oppose its legislation, and
37 of them spoiled their ballots.
In the senatorial elections, Art Smolensky took a
large lead over the other candidates for senator-at-large.
John Campbell and Perry York won the other two seats
tor the same category.
The actual count was Art Smolensky, 1513, John
Campbell, 1013, Perry York, 941, and the losers Ed Mint,
847 and Clayton Volger, 738. There were 189 spoiled
ballots for a total of 2220.
Gary Letcher won the arts senate seat with 333 votes.
His opponent, Bob Smith, received 189. The 49 spoiled
ballots brought the total arts turnout to 571.
Zoology profs uphold firing of Robin Harger
The future of UBC zoology prof Robin Harger now
lies in the hands of science dean Vladimir Okulitch.
He alone can reverse a decision to fire Harger taken
by the zoology department's tenure and promotion
committee and ratified this week by zoology profs.
The profs voted 25-13 to uphold the tenure
committee recommendation that Harger be denied
promotion to associate professor rank, and to give him a
one-year terminal contract effective July 1971.
The vote was taken at a meeting Tuesday and results
were released Thursday when profs unable to attend the
meeting had been polled.
Hoar and a faculty member who is out of town did
not vote.
But zoology students' views differed radically from
those of their profs.
At a meeting of grad students earlier this week, a
motion in favor of giving Harger tenure passed 43-17 with
10 abstentions.
The grad students presented Harger's case to the
faculty meeting, but this apparently had little effect on
the result.
Harger, president of the Vancouver Society for
Pollution and Environmental Control (SPEC), has been
the centre of controversy in the zoology department since
1968, when he came up for tenure, was denied it and
given a contract expiring next June.
Students admire his unorthodox free-style teaching
methods, but there have been suggestions that he doesn't
do the kind of research that satisfies the academics who
control hiring and firing in the department. '
Last week the grad students asked anyone who
supported Harger to write on his behalf to the
department.
Pharmacology head Jim Foulks wrote that Harger's
often-controversial political opinions, especially on the
subject of ecology, should not be included in any
discussion of his academic qualifications.
But he added that Harger's political activities may
also have some significance in his role as a scholar.
"Such activities may be a way in which scholarly
activities can be displayed," he said.
"His (Harger's) public activities should not be
overlooked in examining his academic standards." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 30,  1970
M UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports. 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
OCTOBER 30,  1970
Our city council
The smell of a civic election is in the air and there
are more than a few noses twitching obscenely at city
hall.
At its meeting Tuesday, city council refused to
grant a permit for the Viet Nam Action Committee to
hold its semi-annual march. Instead, they dumped the
matter into the lap of the police department, totally
reversing the usual procedure under which civic agencies
and boards make recommendations to council.
Their hope was that they would be able to ban the
march, solidifying their hold on the votes of Tom
Campbell's middle-aged groupies, but still be able to
blame the whole thing on the police department if
anyone else complained. (This time the cops wisely
refused to be drawn into the political game and granted
the permit knowing the VAC is nothing to worry
about.)
All told, it was one of the finer performances by
the Ringling Brothers clowns who run this city.
The present council doesn't represent the people of
Vancouver, only the business community. Eight of the
eleven council members moved into politics directly
from some form of business.
Workers are effectively excluded from council by
the small financial compensation and large amount of
time required.
The Non-Partisan Association has prevented the
introduction of a ward system, thus perpetuating the
present Kerrisdale-Shaughnessy city council.
Only one member of the present council (Harry
Rankin) comes from anywhere east of Cambie Street.
Densely populated areas like Kitsilano and the West End
are not represented at all.
Who are these people who pretend to represent us?
Well, one example is Earle Adams, who developed
his deep concern for humanity as the head of a bill
collection agency.
There is Ed Sweeney, whose family owns that
eyesore of a barrel-making plant under the Cambie
Bridge. Yet this is a man who is entitled to vote on False
Creek redevelopment proposals. (Part of the problem or
part of the solution?)
There is Halford Wilson, who first entered civic
politics on a platform of overt racism, using the
orientals of 30 years ago as a political football in much
the same way Campbell uses the hippies of today.
Oh, yes. There is Tom Campbell, whose prime
concern as mayor is keeping his picture on the front
page of the Sun.
How much does his passionate desire to rescue
Vancouver from the hippie scourge stem from concern
for the rent levels in his Kitsilano apartment buildings?
Adams was once quoted as saying that city council
should be run on the same basis as the MacMillan
Bloedel board of directors.
He typifies the attitude of council — run the city as
a business and always give other businessmen, such as
real estate developers, the best deal possible.
The worst part of it is that things probably won't
be any different after the December election.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wire     John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Pissed off, that's what I am. First,
some forester got his arm mangled. The
McCune was almost one whole day late
with his story. The whole paper is late.
And now I find that 568 assholes on
campus think grass should stay on the
ground. Jeezuz.
To top it off, Christine Krawczyk:
handed in two stories which I had to
edit, much to her displeasure and mine.
But otnerwise, it was a normal day ror
the pubsters, who won the boat race
for the fifty-second year in a row.
Leading the crowd in jeers were
Robin Burgess, Ginny Gait, Sandy Kass '
(what was the name again?) and Jan
O'Brien. Also helping to make the day
brighter were Nathalie Apouchtine,
Jennifer Alley, Josephine Margolis,
Nettie Wild and (yep) Linsey Beech.
On the other side, Thorn Wescott,
Dave Schmidt, Dick Betts, Jim J. C.
Davies, Don Gardner, Steve Lucas and
Paul Knox did varying amounts of
work.
Photogs were Jim Gorman,
Kevaaaaan Perrins, Keith Dunbar and
Maureen Gans. Tony Gallagher did
some work in sports.
Three stars in today's game go to
Mike Sasges, who did some chasing on
frat row, Kathleen Carney, who did
'Tween Classes and Ken Lassasen, who
put up with the Liberals.
By JIM DAVIES
Davies
There seems to be a theory in
civic politics in Vancouver this
year.
The theory, which applies to
all parties except the Non-Partisan
Association, has two parts: One —
the party leader must be
respectable and Two — the leader
must be a gracious loser
(emphasize loser).
There were several "fighting
candidates" who could have
gotten down to the real issues and
attacked Tom Terrific for what he
is, a George Wallace style
politician capitalizing on
pseudo-issues to capture the
right-wing vote.
Instead, the NDP (and COPE)
have chosen low-key, ex-MLA
lawyer Tony Gargrave, while
TEAM will be going with
ultra-respectable UBC medicine
prof Bill Gibson at the helm.
Neither of these men can stand
up under the name-calling
non-issue barrage which is soon to
come.
What a difference it could have
been if TEAM had gone with
Teamster head and new Canadian
senator Ed Lawson and the NDP
with Bob Williams.
However, these are only "ifs".
Campbell should win in a walk.
• Although everyone,
including myself, has virtually
conceded Campbell the NPA
mayoralty bid, there are at least
two persons who may have
something to say about it.
First, Bill Rathie. You
remember Rathie. He's the man
Campbell defeated to become
mayor in 1966. Now four years
later, he may come back to haunt
his successor.
George Puil, of the city parks
board, is the other possible
candidate to perhaps thwart
Campbell's bid.
There would be only one
reason for either of these men to
depose Campbell. The reason —
many influential NPA'ers feel that
Campbell shoots from the lip too
often as leader of the
"establishment" party.
If either Rathie or Puil win the
NPA endorsement, it is likely that
Campbell will run as an
independent as he did in '66, thus
splitting the conservative vote and
perhaps allowing an outsider
(Gibson?) to win. Meanwhile,
Campbell is expected to make his
intentions clear at a press
conference this morning.
Ravies
"Ifs" seem to be the only
interesting factor left in this year's
civic elections.
• Fixin' to die? If so, check
out the Memorial Society of B.C.
The average cost of a decent
funeral from private directors is
almost $1,000. Maximum cost for
a funeral from the society is $ 175.
Hope this item isn't pertinent
to you now, but it is an example
of how a thoughtful organization
can get together to help society
escape its worst exploiters.
• Just a word to all you
CKLG hypes who have pushed
Lola by The Kinks up to number
one on the fave tough boss charts
— the song is about a drag queen
(female impersonator) seducing a
young bumpkin and has some nice
subtleties concerning fellatio
(oral-genital sex).
• Two publications which
have really caught my eye in
terms of "different" presentations
are: Leatherneck, The Magazine
of Marines, and The Gay Guide, a
small 36-page pamphlet now
available free in SUB.
The poetry in the first mag is
rather informative. F'rinstance:
My Uniform
(by Capt. E. Cordero)
You've all seen how a uniform
Can really change a man.
You'll notice that he wears it
With the spirit of his land
There are so many uniforms,
Those reds, those whites, those blues.
They're all so very beautiful,
It's really hard to choose . . .
However, where this sort of
material may tend to be a trifle
too intellectual for most, the Gay
Guide will appeal to the emotions.
The following are some quotes
from that source:
"Chances are your partner will
ask you to do something you find
disgusting, eg., have sex with the
lights on or put on a sou' wester
and gumboots and chase him
around the room beating him with
a wet salmon."
"Never ask an exclusive
screwee to screw, and never ask an
exclusive screwer to submit to
being screwed as this is a very
humiliating experience. Read
Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal
for a funny story of how a man
who was humiliatingly screwed
finally got his/her revenge." .
Of particular interest to some
readers of this pamphlet will be
the section on where to go and
what to do in order to meet gays
in Vancouver.
• I understand the Castle
has   never   done   such a business.
LETTERS
More Quebec T
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
One   o.l   the   more  depressing
events   o>'   The   week   was   your     "
letters page last Friday
Your correspondents have, by
and latge. failed to take their
commcms beyond our first
natural reaction to terrorism in ^^
Quebec Although gut responses
are To be expected from the
downtown press one might have
hoped that the students and
faculty members who wrote might
have been a little more
thoughtf.ill
It is noi a sufficient argument
against political terrorism to say ^"*l
that it is unpleasant. So is hanging
people or going for them with not
sticks. We have to also show that
the normal process of dissent and
the legitimate avenues of social
change are adequate or that the
terrorist demands are
unreasonable ,,
The War Measures Act **-
specifically denies us the
opportunity to discuss these
questions and on these central
issues your correspondents are
silent. I suppose we are to assume
that the answers are self evident
to all but madmen. ^
The answers are not
self-evident to me. The
exploitation of Quebec working
people is intolerable. Crimes
against their liberty and dignity
must end without delay. Maybe
Prof, Tomkins and the rest can
afford to wait, but then they are
neither poor nor oppressed. m+m.
Let us call for an end to the
War Measures Act and then we
can begin to discuss matters of
substance again
DAVID MOLE
President
Graduate Students
Association     jy
And more
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In the Oct. 16 issue, Dick Betts
and Christine Krawzcyk
supported the activities of the
FLQ, stating that the objectives of
the FLQ were just, and since legal *^
channels did nothing to further
these objectives, the FLQ's only
recourse lay in revolutionary
tactics. *
In the Oct. 20 issue, Christine
Krawzyck is quoted as saying "I
don't know about you, but I feel
out of place sitting in Vancouver
and deciding what FLQ tactics are
necessary and what aren't." *"*
I'm sure there are many
reasons for her to have climbed
back on the political fence after
leaving it so far behind. It is
perhaps the safest place to be if
one is unwilling to admit the
possibility that such revolutionary
tactics might very well be open to _
condemnation.
There seems to be a blindness
on the part of radicals which
encourages them to endorse the
activities of any and all
revolutionary groups. The means
are justified by the ends and the
basic premise seems to be "if it is
radical and revolutionary, it's
good." I think it is time for them 'm
to broaden their perspectives, and
to recognize the validity of a sane
approach to much-needed change.
DIANE JOHNSON
Education 3 Friday, October 30,   1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
■IDEAS AT LARGE
Is anarchy the  answer?
By JOHN TWIGG
The following is a totally
.uncalled for and totally
unresearched opinion piece by a
totally unqualified student.
Hence, it is a polemic. It also
happens to be totally relevant to
the current situation in Canada.
Governments, no matter how
well meaning, are evil.
Designed and formed to serve
its citizens, every government
eventually usurps the
independance of those citizens.
Does that sound like a load of
revolutionary rhetoric to you?
Does it sound like the same old
bullshit you hear at leftist
meetings?
I hope not, because it isn't.
* Those first two sentences about
government  form the condensed
platform of intellectual anarchists.
Most people do not realize or
do not want to believe that
governments, regardless of
political leaning, are repressive.
Permit me to give a few examples.
Since most of you who have
read this far probably believe I'm
a commie, so I'll start by showing
that the Soviet Union is
repressive.
We have all heard that the
Soviet Union under Stalin wqs
repressive — the U.S. propaganda
""machine hasn't let the "free"
world forget that fact. But what
of present-day Russia?
I know we all hear lots, thanks
again to U.S. propaganda, of
prominent Russians defecting to
the West. But do you hear an
equal amount about the people
who defect to the East?
«. The problem is, how do we
make a reasonably unbiased
judgment about whether or not
the Russian government is
repressive?
First, let's look at the political
parties. There is one, and only
one.
Lenin, back in the days of the
Bolshevils and Mensheviks, staged
a political coup by steering his
minority Bolshevik party into
power. It has been in power ever
since. Surely there has been some
opposition to it, but the
opposition is currently
non-existant.
Another way of determining if
the government is repressive is to
look at the works of its authors,
assuming that their texts have not
been mangled by censors on the
way out of Russia and into
Canada.
Let's look at Yevegeny
Yevushenko, who is apparently
very popular with the people and
typical of the new young poets of
Russia.
In his autobiography,
Yevtushenko admits there is
government pressure on what he
writes (i.e. censorship of a form)
but he maintains his love for
Russia because of the people in it.
It is the government he dislikes.
And now, what of the U.S.? Is
the land of hope and glory, not to
mention freedom and Apple Pie,
repressive? God no! It's
democratic!
That's why the U.S.
government allows the
Communist Party to exist,
although more than half of its
members are Federal Bureau of
Investigation agents (Hoover's
tie a vies).
That's why government paid
police hunt down and kill Black
activists. That's why millionaires
are the only people "elected" to
government. But any two-bit
radical can show you that the U.S.
is repressive.
And what of our homeland,
Canada? (please excuse the
obvious nationalism.)
Surely Canada, that idyllic
balance between socialism and
capitalism, grants us freedoms
that other countries don't.
Canadians are proud that their
country is one of the most
progressive, permissive countries
in the world.
Bullshit.
That's why two B.C. teachers
have been fired for expressing
views the government doesn't like.
That's why seven Simon Fraser
University profs have been fired
for expressing views the
government, through the
administration, says it doesn't
like.
That's why the Georgia
Straight newspaper has often been
prevented from distributing its
subversive papers.
That's why a handful of
Quebecois felt so oppressed they
nearly started a revolution before
the government quashed them.
Yes, we certainly can thank
our Canadian governments for not
giving us freedom.
So there we have three
governments, one moderate left,
one moderate middle, and one
moderate right, that oppress their
citizens to at least some degree.
Admittedly   these   restrictions
the governments impose are not as
totalitarian as they could be, but
anarchists oppose any and all
restrictions on behavior.
As the name implies, anarchists
are against structures because
structures mean loss of personal
freedom.
Maybe somewhere there's a
government that isn't oppressive.
But I'll bet you haven't heard of
it. I know I haven't.
What is the solution to
oppressive governments? Every
polemic should have a solution
and this is no exception. Bear
with me.
Governments by their nature
are oppressive. They are elected
by a majority opinion but not by
total agreement. (It is the beauty
of humanity that someone always
differs from the norm.)
Thus governments serve the
majority, but minorities are left
out in the cold.
The solution is simple, let each
person be his own government. (I
can feel the scorn from here.)
This is what intellectual
anarchists have advocated for
centuries. Near the turn of the
century, terrorist anarchists (those
poor, misguided creatures) tried
to accomplish it be physically
destroying the state.
Anarchy was not feasible then
and it is still not feasible. But
eventually, when man is mature
enough to govern his own actions
rationally, the anarchic system
will be feasible.
When man is able to control his
own actions, he won't need
governments.
NEXT TUESDAY
AND WEDNESDAY
DR. WON-KYUNG CHO
Korea's Greafest Artiste
TUESDAY—NOV. 3
Dr. Cho in a Korean Dance program. Return visit
fitter a fantastic success 2 years ago. 8 P.M.
WEDNESDAY—NOV. 4
Dr. Cho in a poetry Recital, "Secret Yearning".
Seldom heard readings from Korean Poetry. A new
Sound experience.
SUB Auditorium—8 p.m.
PRICES FOR BOTH EVENINGS -Students (in advance) $1.50, Students
(at the door) $2.50; Non Students $3.00.
AVAILABLE AT: Student Union Building Information Desk 8 A.M. to 10
P.M.
Alma Mater Society Business Office 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
ASIAN STUDIES STUDENTS TAKE NOTE:
—a presentation of SPECIAL EVENTS
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
We Now Have Delivery Service
Open Every Day 4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. 224-6121
golden lotus
2936 W 4th Ave.
authentic
Indian Curries
vegetarian
cuisine.
open noon to 10 p.m.
No "Time Out" at    dS
-We Hurry
HILLTOP GULF SERVICE
BIG SAVINGS-20%
Discount for Labor
(UBC Students Only)
4305 W. 10th
Phone 224-7212
THIS IS IT
ROD STEWART & SMALL FACES
THE
GREATEST CONCERT OF 1970!
The two Rod Stewart albums are together the most important listening
exp< ice I've had since the Band's first album. His music speaks with
a ge .Neness and depth which seems to heal the wounds and ease the
pain. The question of which of the two albums is the better does not
interest me in the least. The music and spiritual content of them both is
so totally extraordinary that I really cannot separate the two in my
mind. Gasoline Alley is for me merely the second volume in what I
hope will be a continually expanding "Collected Works" of a supremely
fine artist.
Langdon Winner Rolling Stone Sept. 3, 197C
... Everyone was super especially Rod Stewart!
Jeff Beck, in the liner notes for "truth"
The three remaining Faces — Ian Mac Lagan, organ; Ronnie Lane, bass;
Kenny Jones, drums — all are very good instrumentalists and coupled
with Stewart and Wood they make a fine rock band.
Rod Stewart sings his butt off. His raspy, sore throat voice lends itself
well to the Faces' music. But Stewart's value lies in his unpredictability.
His phrasing and delivery are  filled with the unexpected
Joel Selvin Rolling Stone May 28, 1970
YOUR LAST CHANCE!
Hurry to get $3.50 Tickets at The Bay
At The Agrodome $4.25 cheap
W/Redbone & the legendary Seeds of Time
Sound by Kelly DeYong Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970
"People" is understanding them, not making them
By SANDY KASS
People is not a wild orgy.
It isn't a mass encounter group either.
People is an experience in human relations and
human sexuality that happens every Monday night at 7
p.m. in the SUB ballroom.
But it is more than a series of lectures; it is not being
ashamed of not knowing something about sex that you
think you should know.
It's being able to relate openly and freely with other
people, discussing what's on your mind without being
afraid someone else will think you're dumb.
In short, it's an experience in People.
The program, sponsored by the department of
inter-professional education, was formerly called Sex
Education.
If topics like An Encounter in Honesty, Um,
Contraception, or Womb Envy interest you, please read
on.
If not, please go back to your journal on organic
chemistry. We are sorry for disturbing you.
If you had disguised yourself as a person Monday
night and sat in on PEOPLE just for a laugh, you would
have discovered when you got there People is no laughing
matter.
The topic for Monday night's lecture was Human
Sexual Response.
The speaker was Dr. George Szasz, a noted
psychologist and researcher into human behavior.
The ballroom lights were dimmed, music started to
play, and a slide show began.
As the music played, the slides illustrated, almost
grotesqely, the human sexual cycle, as man developed
from an embryo, through infancy, childhood,
adolescence, adulthood, to old age.
Scenes showed infancy on Madison Avenue and
childhood in Viet Nam.
m*m$
They showed a young couple kissing on a balcony,
amid shocked stares from the people passing below.
"Sexual expression is merely an expression of
personalities," said Szsasz.
The slides continued as he talked.
"Human sexual response is a stimulation of the body
by certain thoughts of mind. The result is an amazing
chain of physiological events," he said.
"The first reaction is the swelling of the blood vessels
under the skin. A person feels a tingling sensation and the
temperature rising in his body.
"A flush goes through the body, and the heart begins
to beat faster. A person can feel his pulse without
touching his wrist. Often the pupils of his eyes widen, his
nose plugs and he can feel spasms in his navel.
"He breathes faster and becomes slightly dizzy. His
jaw puckers, and while he tries to say 'I love you' all that
comes out is 'love, love, love ...' Then POW, he's had it.'
A slide showed the crashing of violent waves upon a
rocky shore.
Szaz discussed types of orgasm - solitary, or
masturbation; heterosexual, with a person of the opposite
sex; and homosexual, with a person of the same sex.
By the way, did you know that "orgasm" is a Greek
work meaning to swell?
He went on in great detail in the physiological
changes of the sex organs during a sexually responsive
period, and concluded with a lesson on do-it-yourself
circumcision.
Slides were used to illustrate his entire lecture, which
lasted little more than an hour.
When the lecture had ended, the almost 1000
participants split up into almost 100 seminar type
discussion groups.
mmmmm
THE
CAMPUS
REVOLUTION
AS YOU'VE NEVER
REALLY SEEN IT BEFORE.
TOLD FROM BOTH SIDES..
FOR A CHANGE.
ISN'T IT ABOUT TIME?
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
WARNING — Some swearing and
coarse language.
— B.C. Director
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
STANLEY KRAMER s*»
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918 GRANVILLE
085-5434
Shows at 1 2:30, 2:40, 4:45, 6:55, 8:55
Sunday 2:40, 4:45, 6:55, 8:55
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But if you think you've ever attended a seminar like'
this before, you've another think coming.
A group of 10 people and a group leader met in
Wesbrook 237.
Again, the lights were dimmed, and a candle was-
placed in the center of the room.
But what started out to look like a medieval seance
turned out as an experience in human, sensitivity.
It began as a group rap session on any topic
participants wanted to discuss — usually themselves.
Participation was keen, and after barely a few
moments any inhibitions people had when they came in,
had melted away.
Following the session an almost spontaneous
sensitivity group was formed.
Group members stood in a circle, shoulders touching
very tightly. One member stood in the center of the circle,
and with feet planted firmly on the floor, was spun
around the circle, until all sense of balance disappeared.
The member was spun about slowly at first, then
quickly, then slowly again so that his sense of balance
could be regained.
"It was an exhilarating feeling," said one.
Participants then took turns at lifting each other off
the ground.
"With ten people lifting one another off the ground,
the weight is no strain at all," said group leader Pat Mills,
education 4.
"The feeling, of weightlessness was almost
super-human," she said.
"People are people who need people," wrote one
song-writer not so very long ago.
People is designed to meet these needs.
Next Monday night's topic is An Encounter of
Honesty with guest speaker Dr. Lee Pulos.
It's an experience many of us can't afford to miss.
wmmmmmtmmm
m
S,.,. WARNING:
MUCH  SWEARING
COARSE LANGUAGE AND
SIMULATED SEXUAL SCENES. B.C. Director
diary
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Shows at 12:00, 1:35, 3:35, 5:30, 7:25, 9:25
Sunday 2:00, 3:35, 5:30, 7:25, 9:25
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Moonshine War
SUNDAY MATINEE 2 P.M'
A Decade of Cannes Film Festival
Winners
RITATUSHINGHAM
"THE KNACK'
SPECIAL!
FRIDAY MIDNIGHT ONLY
ODEON WEST VAN
MORE TERRIFYING THAN
HITCHCOCK'S 'PSYCHO'!" Friday, October 30,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
CIVIC ELECTIONS
PART ONE
Half-slate platform proposed
by NDP and COPE parties
77ms is the first in a series of six
reports on Vancouver civic
politics which will hopefully
include the TEAM and NPA slates
and interviews with the three
mayoralty candidates.
By JIM DAVIES
The New Democratic Party and
the Committee Of Progressive
Electors (COPE) are the first of
Vancouver's civic parties to
present full slates to the voters of
the city.
Although there has been no
joint-slate agreement reached
between the ,two parties, the fact
is that both NDP and COPE are
running half-slates, from council
to parks board, with only one
mayoralty candidate — Tony
Gargrave.
The idea of a joint slate was
first proposed on May 30,
however, a later decision by the
NDP provincial council vetoed the
proposal.
The reasoning behind this veto
was tied to the fact that the NDP
would not affiliate with any other
group, so it was no reflection on
the political stance of COPE.
"They have a program similar
to ours: they have good people
and good policies," said NDP
Vancouver area council chairman
Fred Miller, referring to the COPE
entry in the forthcoming
elections.
Although Miller had these
complimentary words to say
about COPE, the relationship of
the two civic parties proved
somewhat shakey during the
summer months.
The first major problem arose
when Paddy Neale, Vancouver
and district labor council chief,
was nominated to head the joint
slate.
Neale's eligibility was
questioned because of a
conviction of contempt of court
in Sept. 1966 for demonstrating
at the Lenkurt Electric Co. in
defiance of a court order.
Neale  served four and a half
in the
classroom
By JANET MADEISKY
Several students have told The Ubyssey that
Fine Arts 446, taught by Marc Pessin, is one of the
best courses they attend.
Pessin combines the best of two worlds. He is
passionately interested in his subject matter, and
succeeds in capturing, maintaining and heightening
the interest of his students during his weekly lecture,
Wednesdays from 3:30 to 5:30 in Lassaire 102.
The course, Understanding of the Visual Arts is
closed to fine arts majors.
"As a course primarily for third and fourth year
students with no previous fine arts experience, the
course is unstructured and follows the ideas of the
moment," Pessin said.
"The course was not designed to set out laws or
axioms for the better understanding of art, but to
create and develop the students' own thoughts and
tastes in art."
Wednesday's lecture dealt with the early
impressionist period which followed the invention
of the x-ray and the publication of Freud's book The
Interpretation of Dreams.
It was a period, Pessin said, when artists
increasingly looked beneath the surface.
From there, Pessin went into More and Picasso
months of that sentence.
Legal sources ruled that he was
eligible in spite of the municipal
act which disqualifies persons
convicted of an indictable offence
within five years of seeking office.
These sources judged that
contempt was not classed as an
indictable offence.
By the middle of August, 10 of
the 14 civic government
candidates of the NDP had
withdrawn their nominations,
primarily because of the
provincial council's edict. Neale
was among those to withdraw.
This action prompted COPE
president Frank Kennedy to say,
"We feel it is imperative to avoid
any competitive struggle between
COPE and the NDP.
"This would only divide the
forces of the left and help big
business interests, represented in
city hall by NPA and TEAM," he
added.
"Big business" jumped to the
defensive shortly after this
statement.
Charles Widman, unsuccessful
Team candidate in 1968 and
defeated Socred candidate in the
1969 provincial elections urged
the merger of NPA and TEAM to
combat what he termed "a
new-left coalition" in the
upcoming civic elections.
By mid-September, the
differences between NDP and
COPE were settled and both
nominated half-slates with the
support of the Vancouver and
District Labor Council.
The half-slates extended
beyond the city council
nominations to the school and
parks boards.
Nominated for mayor is
ex-NDP-MLA for Mackenzie
(1952-66) and lawyer Tony
Gargrave.
Gargrave, 44, ran unopposed
on a platform of "quiet, rational
leadership in city hall."
Gargrave expressed reluctance
when  asked  if he would engage
Campbell in debate, saying that he
did not feel it was a proper time
for "confrontation politics."
Nominated for alderman are:
Norman Levi (NDP), a city
social worker.
Bob Douglas (NDP), planning
engineer with B.C. Hydro and
president of the West End
Community Council.
Hilda Thomas (NDP),
university teacher and chairman
of the Vietnam Action
Committee.
Harry Winrob (NDP), Lawyer
and president of the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association.
Harry Rankin (COPE), lawyer
and incumbent alderman.
Bruce Yorke (COPE), B.C.
Tennants'  Association president.
Ron Gomez (COPE), Letter
Carriers' union official.
Paul Sabatino (COPE), lawyer.
Muriel Pandia (COPE), school
teacher.
For school board, COPE has
nominated Peggy Chunn, a school
teacher; Paul Mitchell, salesman;
Russel Peterson, architect; and
Dennis Rankin, teacher.
School Board candidates
backed by the NDP are: Nigel
Nixon, city employee; Jake
Rempel, teacher; Lillian Whitney,
housewife; Ken McAllister,
commercial photographer; and
Roger Howard, UBC physics prof.
COPE parks board candidates
are: Donald Greenwell, electrical
worker; Sid Shelton, pharmacist;
Edward Leong, insurance
salesman, and Harry Zuker,
secretary of the Cassiar
Ratepayers' Association.
NDP candidates for the board
are: James Atkins, business
executive; Roy Lowther, music
teaacher; and Rose Mercer,
nursing instructor at Riverview.
Major campaign platforms
which apply to both parties
include:
• Taxes — a six to twenty
per cent business tax.
• Housing — the building of
Fine Arts 446 succeeds
in capturing interest
and how they developed new trends in art, such as
cubism and motion.
He presented his lecture in a clear, coherent
manner, clarifying his more complex ideas with
examples and slides.
He does not wait for students to actively
participate in discussions. Rather, he seeks this
participation by questioning the class.
When a student raises a question, Pessin's
answers are concise and to the point.
In one exhausting session several weeks ago,
Pessin and the students developed an original
interpretation of Picasso's Geurnica.
Their thesis — and remember that these are not
fine arts students — was that the painting is not
meant to depict the horrors of war,but that it is a
crucifixion scene.
Pessin later delivered a lecture on this new
interpretation to about 40 Picasso experts at
Berkeley.
Pessin may develop this thesis further.
Class attendance is still almost 100 per cent in
the 100-seat lecture hall. In most classes, numbers
gradually diminish as the year goes on.
This course has one of the highest degrees of
student-prof interaction on campus. That's the way
it should be.
2,500   low-rental   housing   units
each year.
• Pollution — the
establishment of a city pollution
control board.
• Tenant's rights — a bylaw
requiring landlords to justify rent
increases.
• Hostels — permanent
youth hostels in the city equipped
with craft workshops and with
medical care and therapy
provided.
• Youth services — a
commission of young people
established to deal with the
problems of the youth
community.
Visit the
Ponderosa Cafeteria
Try
THE SUPPER
SPECIAL
SPAGHETTI
MEAT SAUCE
PARMESAN CHEESE
GARLIC BREAD
Served Mon. to Thurs.     4 P.M. - 6:30 P.M.
FREE DINNER!
London Times Fish & Chips are tastier, bigger, better
than ever. The difference lies in the way we make
them.
The fish is greaseless, coated with great flavor. You
get lots of chips, fish and a fruit-filled dessert roll.
Just like the Old Country. And even better.
To prove it, we want you to be our guest.
For every fish & chips dinner you buy, you'll get one
FREE. See if it isn't the best you've ever eaten.
And take a look at the way we do our chicken,
prawns, and BEEF-EATERS, those juicy, king-sized
hamburgers fit for royalty.
London Times is under new management. Come on
in. Let's get acquainted.
Offer valid — Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
FISH AND CHIPS
BROADWAY at MacDONALD
2881 W. Broadway 733-2922
HOURS -     Mon.-Tues. 4-8:30    Fri.-Sat. til 10
EAT-IN  TAKE-OUT  DELIVERY Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1970
How well do you know Canada's abortion laws?
Canada's laws on abortion are something you should
know. Are you also aware of the policies of our civic
authorities governing these laws?
Sometimes these policies involve the law, but the new
provisions of the Criminal Code principally involve the
medical professions and the "accredited" hospitals.
The following are excerpts from the Criminal Code:
237. (1) Every one who, with intent to procure the
miscarriage of a female person, whether or not she is
pregnant, uses any means for the purpose of carrying out
his intention is guilty of an indictable offence and is liable
to imprisonment for life.
(2) Every female person who, being pregnant, with intent
to procure her own miscarriage, uses any means or permits
any means to be used for the purpose of carrying out her
intention is guilty of an indictable offence and is liable to
imprisonment for two years.
(3) In this section, "means" includes:
(a) the administration of a drug or other noxious
thing,
(b) the use of an instrument, and
(c) manipulation of any kind.
(4) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to:
(a) a qualified medical practitioner, other than a
member of therapeutic abortion committee for any
hospital, who in good faith uses in an accredited or
approved hospital any means for the purpose of carrying
out his intention to procure the miscarriage of a female
person, or
(b) a female person who, being pregnant, permits a
qualified medical practitioner to use in an accredited or
approved hospital any means described in paragraph (a)
for the purpose of carrying out her intention to procure
her own miscarriage, if the before the use of those means,
the therapeutic abortion committee for that acredited or
approved hospital, by a majority off the members of the
committee and at a meeting of the committee at which
the case of such female person has been reviewed,
(c) has by certificate in writing stated that in its
opinion the continuation of the pregnancy of such female
person would or would be likely to endanger her life or
health, and
(d) has caused a copy of such certificate to be given
to the qualified medical practitioner.
(5) The Minister of Health of a province may by order
(a) require a therapeutic abortion committee for any
hospital in that province, or any member thereof, to
furnish to him a copy of any certificate described in
paragraph (c) of subsection (4) issued by that committee,
together with such other information relating to the
circumstances surrounding the issue of that certificate as
he may require, or
(b) require a medical practitioner who, in that
province, has procured the miscarriage of any female
person named in a certificate described in paragraph (c) of
subsection (4), to furnish him a copy of that certificate,
together  with  such other information relating to the
procuring of the miscarriage as he may require.
The code continues, stating that the 'therapeutic
abortion committee' for any hospital means a committee
comprised off not less than three members, each of whom
is a qualified medical practitioner, appointed by the board
of that hospital for the purpose of considering and
determining questions relating to terminations of
pregnancy within that hospital."
It adds "nothing in subsection (4) shall be construed
as making unnecessary the obtaining of any authorization
of consent that is or may be required, otherwise than
under this Act, before any means are used for the purpose
off carrying out an intention to procure the miscarriage of
a female person.
It should be noted that the act does not specifically
state when an abortion may be performed. Rather, it
states the ways of procuring a miscarriage without
contravening the law. Therefore, much weighs upon the
individual legal and medical interpretation of the law.
It is strictly a question for the doctors to decide, if an
induced miscarriage is to be considered, whether it is
medically safe to do so, having in mind the length of the
period of pregnancy.
The policy, at least in Vancouver, is not to charge the
female involved in an illegal abortion, chiefly because of
the mental and frequently hazardous physical danger
which she probably has endured. When illegal activities in
this regard come to the attention of the authorities if is
often only because the female is then in the morgue.
YEAR-END
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Hypocrisy, hippopotami
featured in council zoo
Student council compromised its position on
the War Measures Act at Wednesday's meeting.
During   the   Alma   Mater   Society   meeting,
. council    unanimously    approved   a   motion   by
education rep Connie Sinkler condemning the B.C.
order-in-council   providing   for   firing   of  teachers
sympathetic to the Front de Liberation du Quebec.
Council had already admitted that the
. order-in-council was in line with the act.
Graduate Students Association president David
Mole then claimed the motion was hypocritical
alongside council's Oct. 19 endorsement of the War
Measures Act.
The motion cautioned that the act could be
abused to limit individual freedoms, but endorsed it
"in the belief that more appropriate legislation will
be introduced and enacted at the earliest possible
moment."
Mole, supported by fellow GSA rep Evert
Hoogers and social work representative Bob Smith,
said the provincial order-in-council was a "logical
extension" of the War Measures Act.
Mole then moved to rescind the Oct. 19
motion.
His motion was approved 11 to 9, but failed to
meet a two-thirds quorum needed to rescind a
motion passed by council.
The vote was one of three dramatic highlights
of the evening.
The next motion, passed also from Mole, was in
support of a letter to administration president
Walter Gage condemning the Master Teacher
awards.
Each year the award goes to one or two faculty
members judged to be outstanding in their
departments.
But according to Mole and former GSA
president Art Smolensky, the awards are given to
"old cronies" on the basis of seniority, and never to
assistant profs, or younger staff members.
The only other important motion, introduced
by science rep Svend Robinson, was in support of
the Viet Nam Action Committee's march Saturday.
But general atmosphere of the one and a half
hour meeting was that of a zoo.
AMS vice-president John Scott-Mitchell, who
was chairing the meeting, repeatedly recognized the
vote of Ubyssey photographer David Bowerman,
who astutely voted on every motion. Mitchell was
reminded at least twice to discount Bowerman's
vote.
Bowerman does not have a vote on council, or
anywhere else.
Hoogers moved, and arts rep Brian Sproule
seconded, support of a statement by Ubyssey editor
Nate Smith demanding censure of the engineering
undergraduate society for the crucifixion of
Ubyssey staffer Jim Davies, who suffered "untold
humiliation and embarrassment, such as has not
been witnessed in almost 2,000 years."
The motion passed 11 to 9, but a recorded vote
was called for and the motion was defeated 16 to 8.
Bob Smith said the motion was out of order.
"It's irrelevant," he said. "I myself heard Mr.
Davies remark at the time 'forgive them, for they
know not what they do'."
"I believe he was addressing Mr. Smith at the
moment," he added.
Davies lets Gears off hook,
criminal records too severe
Ubyssey columnist Jim Davies has decided not
to lay charges following a stunt by UBC engineers in'
•which he was "crucified" outside SUB.
However, he has made a complaint to campus
RCMP.
The "stunt" began early Oct. 23 when Davies
was awakened by two people who had gained entry
to his home by claiming to be friends of his.
"I told them to get out of the house but that
did no good. There were about a dozen engineers in
the place before we could shut the door," Davies
said later.
Davies was then escorted into a waiting car by
the engineers, driven to the campus and held in the
engineering undergraduate office for four and a half
hours.
At noon he was tied to a cross and carried to
the hill south of SUB.
The  cross  was  then  placed  into  the ground
while EUS president Chris Green gave a dissertation
on how this was punishment for crimes against the
engineers.
Davies managed to free himself of most of his
bonds within a minute after the cross was erected.
Several engineers began shaking the cross at this
time, and because Davies still had one arm secured
to the cross, he was badly bumped around.
A subsequent call to Alma Mater Society
lawyers confirmed that Davies could press
kidnapping or common assault charges against the
people involved.
He later said: "I think it would be too bad if
one stupid immature act like this would give these
gears a life long criminal record and possibly prevent
them from getting professional engineering jobs.
"All the same, they've been getting away with
this sort of thing for 50 years and some kids have
been badly hurt."
"Gestalt group promotes awareness
Fritz Perls is dead but his life's
work isn't.
A Discovery Party will be held
at the Wesbrook House, 2260
Wesbrook Crescent at 8 p.m.
tonight to prove just that.
The party is a preliminary facet
-of   Pacific    Life    Resources,   a
society dedicated to the ultimate
end of creating opportunities for
people   to   live   in   gestalt-based
^3
communities    where    they    can
pursue self-realization.
The organization, had its
unofficial beginnings under Fritz
Perls, the psychologist who led a
group at Cowichan Lake Gestalt
Institute of Canada in the fall of
1969.
Since then, the society has
expanded to a commune at
Sechelt, a house at Trafalgar and
York and a frat at UBC.
Geoff Fox, a member of the
Wesbrook community, defines the
Gestalt Discovery Party as "an
experience of sensitivity and
awareness."
"I realized the non-life life
*style that was happening. This
awakened me to something else,"
he said.
Call 224-9665 for further
information.
Heironymus MERKIN
ewr
Fwi/elf
md find true happiness j
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Students 50c - Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM
I IHmiiYiiiiis mERKIN
owl find true happiness [
FRIDAY 30 & SATURDAY 31
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday, Nov.l - 7:00
CHARTERS 71
Please Remember to Reserve EARLY for
U-Drive - Hotel Accommodation
Discounted Rail Tickets
If You Are Travelling on a
Charter to Britain or Europe
Next Year
Apply for your Passport
Immediately you Register
FOR COMPLETE TRAVEL INFORMATION
AND BROCHURES—CALL
ON CAMPUS        5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-4391
VANCOUVER'S LEADING TRAVEL ORGANIZATION
CKLG - BALLET SOCIETY and STUDENTS UNION
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Presentation in Vancouver!
TUES. -WED. NOV. 3& 4
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE 8:30 P.M.
Tickets: FAMOUS ARTISTS Now!
U.B.C. Students receive special 50c discount Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1970
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HITCHHIKING, the one and only mode of transportation for many students has now been officially condoned by the university patrol
with the appearance of signs of destination. These two students try out their luck on Wesbrook Crescent, south of University Boulevard.
MP claims War Act was not necessary
Conservative MP and former Socred
leader Robert Thompson said Wednesday the
invoking of the War Measures Act gave the
federal government dangerous powers.
"There are many dangers in the
tremendous powers and the horrendous
strength given to the government by the War
Measures Act," said Robert Thompson
(P.C.-Red Deer) to 75 people in USB
ballroom.
Thompson criticized the government for
concealing the facts which led them to declare
the emergency.
"I don't think anyone can cast a shadow
on the loyalty of the honorable members of
the opposition and they have not been
brought into confidence.
"Not all the members of the Privy
Council have been told either."
He said that although something had to
be done, he was not convinced that the War
Measures Act was the only way out.
"I voted for it only after I had been
assured it would be limited to one month,"
said Thompson.
"The greatest travesty is the failure to use
the normal rule of law to preserve law and
order.
"We could have passed an amendment
to the Criminal Code in two hours which
would have provided the same powers where
they were necessary."
FRAP seen as social and political movement
From Page 1
"The greatest percentage of
votes came from the poorest
areas, she said.
Williams said FRAP was
created a few months ago to
consolidate diverse groups
working on social problems in
Montreal.
"It began as a movement for
action but became a political
party when we realized that the
administration refused to listen
unless we had representatives on
council," she said.
Williams designated the three
different levels at which FRAP
works.
"We fight the exploitation that
faces the worker by encouraging
workers    to    organize     among
themselves at their particular
work and initiate their own
solutions.
"We also try to counteract
exploitation at the consumer level
and by having candidates run in
Sunday's -municipal election we
hope to attain official
representation."
FRAP's priorities in social
needs are those which are
obviously lacking in official policy
said Williams.
' 'Montreal's annual budget
report exemplifies this, it was a
scandal.
"Fifty million dollars were
spent on municipal police force
and only $2 million on housing,
an obvious distortion of the needs
of Montrealers.
ADELE WILLIAMS
defeated FRAP candidate
"Our priorities are health,
welfare, recreation, and
transportation."
"Our major concern is the
people — their wants, their needs,
their fears. As we had no money
to substantiate a campaign we
went door to door to meet the
people," Williams said.
She responded to questions
from the audience on FRAP's
stand to violence with a personal
statement.
"I really wonder if after all the
trying and asking that violence
can't be the only way.
"But before we accept violence
as morally justifiable we must
have reached the level where the
whole population en masse is
asking for its liberation."  WHEN    I   WAS   A
CHILD    I   WAS  TAUGHT
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PAGE FRIDAY, 2	
3jqs^. '•*> ■
Is Violence Illegal?
Is violence illegal? Well, it depends upon
who your judges are, and future historians with
their unwritten accounts of Canada in the
twentieth century.
In a purely utilitarian sense, violence is
necessary to achieve significant social change. It
is impossible to change the direction of a
nation's system by working within that system.
Legislation enacted to change the structure of a
system can only be a part of that system and
further the already crystallized aims of that
system. We are geared to production, we must
produce widgets, or we are not good citizens,
and we are not helping to strengthen our
country.
An organization like the FLQ cannot work'
within the system if it advocates policies that are
counter to that system, just as the early
Christians and their philosophy ran counter to
the exploitive nature of the Romans, the FLQ
cannot possibly propose legislation to free
Quebec, because such legislation is directly
counter to Canada's first aim; stability through
unity, and its secondary aim of producing more
and more widgets, the production of which
would surely be hampered if all of the French
Canadian widget makers were to cease making
them for Canada and proceeded to make them
only for themselves.
The very worst thing about this whole mess
is not the FLQ: they initiated the problem,
Trudeau played right into their hands, called
their bluff, then found out that they weren't
bluffing; the worst thing is the terrible abuse of
that behemoth; The War Measures Act.
Outstanding in this regard is WAC Bennett's
Order in Council to fire all who would preach
violent revolution within his domains. This is a
patently absurd move, one worthy of his past
record for blunders.
There are few such individuals as Art Olsen,
the teacher from the Peace River School District
who was fired for attempting to enlighten his
students on the FLQ. If this is the reward for an
open mind, then the few that we have left
among the jellyfish that pass themselves off as
erudite will soon be gone.
The mayor of this fair city is likewise in
league with the battalions of those who would
spread ignorance like a wave of Kraft Peanut
butter across the land. Campbell of course is still
unsurpassed in his ability to turn anything into a
political Pigskin, as shown by the police
department's detention off members of the
fearsome VLF.
If this silly nightmare is an indication of the
future, then we are looking at the coming of old
age, rigour mortis is setting in, an inflexibility
that cannot bend to accommodate a disagreeable
citizen. The trouble is, the more inflexible the
system gets, then the more likely that it will
shatter and die in a cataclysmic upheaval.
Today, our dynamic society has reached a
level of fluidity that defies exact or rigorous
definition in law, and without a transfusion of
flexibility through an easing of the law, the
system, with the nation, will snap like an old
over-burdened tree that has lost its sap. "7./j/ffrf.
HeironyniiLS mERKIN]
md find true happiness j
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Students 50c - Others 75c
SUB AUDITORIUM
HeironymiLS mERKIN
and find true happiness >-
FRIDAY 30 & SATURDAY 31
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday, Nov.l - 7:00
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970 The Meeting
I had never been to an All-Candidates
meeting before, and I was scared. Sure, I admit
it, I was plenty scared. After all, didn't the
Tuesday UBYSSEY itself say the real power of —
the university was the Senate? And here were
these eight guys running for Senate seats at an
All Candidates meeting. "What am I going to
do?", I though. "Ah don't worry it's not - that
important", and I rented only a black tie tux
instead of a white.
Tuesday, 12:30, Sub auditorium. I ran into
the building. It was packed. Poor devils, I choked
back a tear, they couldn't get in. But I had a
friend running for office so I knew I had a seat.
I pushed through the angry mob. "There goes
one", I heard a snarl. "Yeah, he's got a seat". I
pushed harder. A girl with torn blouse and desert
breeches flung herself at me. "Take mee weeth
you!", she cried. I shoved her away and rushed
down the stairs where seventy five bodies lay,
obviously protesting lack of space. 1 threw the
doors open, banged them shut and barricaded
them. I turned to an overflow crowd of 23
people, staring blankly at me. "Ku-runch" went
an apple with droll sarcasm.
I looked again. Oh no, this wasn't the
crowd. I realized the crowd had been barred
completely. These were from the UN, here to
wish our boys luck. That bushy-eyed man eating
a peanut-butter and jelly, that was Brezhev,
right? Sure, I knew Brehznev. And that nervous
fellow reading the UBYSSEY and yawning, that
was Richard Nixon, wasn't it? You can't fool
me! And the man standing apart looking
disgusted at the whole thing, that was John
Diefenbaker, I knew. Sure, he always looks
disgusted!
I sat down in the back. What was going to
happen? They seemed to be waiting for
something. Someone to start it off, maybe. The
Queen? I swallowed my apple whole. They
seemed   to   be   engaged   in   lengthy   personal
<^Mi ^
debates. I seemed to hear certain phrases filter
up this way. "Be careful with the reins of power,
son." "You're on the razor's edge, now."
"You've got the whole world in your hands."
Something was happening. How can I
describe it? The closest I can get to it is to say
there was a feeling in the air; it got quieter and
quieter as lunch hour moved on. There was a
tension in the air, an unbearable feeling of ... of
what? Terror, for assuming the controls of this
giant university? Suspense, as on the eve of a
great general election? Despair at the thought of
ever living up to the voters' expectations? Eyes
met and looked away and looked again.
Breathing became hushed, fearful. Movements
ceased and all was still. We were riding a coffin
to the fire of the great unknown. A man blew
his nose; the explosion was tremendous. It's the
FLQ we all screamed, and dove under the seats.
When I looked up again, a candidate was on
the stage. He said the meeting was cancelled,
refused to identify himself, and slunk away. "It's
no use," my friend came up the aisle, "only 23
people showed up", he dropped his head and
wept for humanity.
"Well that's still something."
"Eight are candidates, five are friends of
mine, and at least five are here eating lunch not
knowing what the hell is going on", and he
broke down again.
"Well, there's still five."
"You're right," he said, drying his glasses.
"In an election like this, that could be a
crucial number", and went over smiling at them.
So I left, alone. Outside, there were still at least
75 people lieing about on the stairs alone, and
the rest of the building, well, you know SUP _
lunch time. And it occurred to me that the
UBYSSEY was wrong; the real power of this
university is not in the Senate, it's in all the
apathy-corps.
Jim O'Leary
Kung-Fu
In ancient Sparta lasses used to, in all their
nakedness and loveliness, wrestle with lads. That
tradition, alas, has perished, at least in public.
Kung-Fu, Chinese martial art, dates from
times immemorial. As the nomenclature attests,
it is genuine art. Besides discouraging opponents,
Kung-Fu involves a very remarkable way of life,
upholds certain all-embracing sensitivity,
preparedness and decisiveness. To emply a cliche,
Kung-Fu trains the soul as well as the body. An
expert in this fascinating art does not merely
defend himself admirably on inclement occasions,
but endeavours to forestall the arising of such
occasions. And there lies the uniqueness and
virtue of this ancient art.
We are happy and honoured to announce the
inception of our club, the Chinese Martial art
club, to-day. Mr. Winston Wan, leading
practitioner of Chinese martial art in Canada, will
assume leadership of our club. Mr. Wan is a
brilliant pupil of the grand master of the
Wing-Chun Clan style and has vast experiences in
tutoring students to maturity and confidence,
both in Hong Kong and Canada. At present he
teaches in his own dojo (school) but has kindly
consented to mould malleable students into
Kung-Fu masters.
Since the student body in its entirety is
unfamiliar with this ancient art, we have arranged
for Mr. Winston Wan and Company to give a
demonstration at Sub. 207 & 209, Tuesday Nov.
3 at noon. Agility and efficiency and esoterica
will be yours to savour, gratis, if you drag your
carcasses there, on time. Winston and Company
will give a fairly thorough display of the basic
technics and also engage in a few bona-fide
matches. Anyone willing to suffer may
participate in the sparrings.
The Chinese martial art club meets regularly
Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 7:30 - 9:30
p.m., at International House, U.B.C. Outsiders,
both sexes, are welcomed to observe and become
insiders, crossing the abyss between vulnerability
and dauntlessness.
T. L. Liu
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Friday, October 30,  1970
THE       U BYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 3 DUTHIE BOOKS
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
ALEXANDRA NADAL and Terry Thomas with Lighthouse in back, a scene from
the Shining People of Leonard Cohen and right, a scene from Brian Macdonald's
Five Over Thirteen.
Rock Ballet
The Royal Winnipeg Ballet
with Lighthouse
The Royal Winnipeg Ballet is coming to the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre on Nov. 3, 4, 5, and if
you're expecting another "Nutcracker Suite"
you've got quite a surprise coming.
Shying away from their usual classical
program the company, combined with the
Canadian Rock group, Lighthouse, will present
Canada's first rock ballet, a Ballet High.
Although the idea of integrating traditional
and contemporary elements is not new, the
Winnipeggers have gone a step further. Instead of
incorporating the rock sound simply as
background for the company's performance,
Lighthouse becomes much more a part of that
performance.
The result being an attempt by
choreographer Brian Macdonald and Lighthouse
to present a reciprocal unit of music and dance.
To accentuate this unity Lighthouse is raised
from the orchestra pit onto the stage, becoming
the physical setting for the ballet. In fact at one
point Lighthouse is left alone on stage to do two
sets by themselves.
A Ballet High will be performed on Nov. 3
NETTIE WILD
and 4 along with two other ballets also
choreographed by Macdonald, The Shining
People of Leonard Cohen and Five Over
Thirteen. Nov. 5 will be an evening of classical
ballets.
The Shining People of Leonard Cohen
features a pas de deux danced not to music but
to the voice of choreographer Macdonald reciting
some of Cohen's early love poems.
Because Special Events is helping too
sponsor the Royal Winnipeg Ballet there is a
reduction of 50 cents off the price of each ticket
purchased by UBC students. The tickets are
available at the Famous Artist box office in the
Bay.
On Monday, Nov. 2, at 8:30, Lighthouse will
perform their first and only Vancouver rock
concert in the Memorial Gymnasium here on
campus. The group, 13 strong, boasts of being a
kind of hybrid cross between an orchestra and
group complete with trumpets, trombones,
guitars, drums, a violin and possibly the only
electric cello in existence.
PAGE FRIDAY, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970 w-
THE   FORMER   PARTICIPANTS  in  the  banquet  are  enslaved  for  Caesar's  amusement  in   Fellini
Satyricon.
Another Opinion of Satyricon
With Satyricon Fellini has created a perfect
image of decadence. He has also presented a
student/poet figure seeking out purity, seeking
out a pattern, through that decadence. The story
of Rome which Fellini chose evokes feelings
analogous to those created by our situation. That
correspondence leads to the feeling of ineffable
longing which the student/poet's search provokes
in the audience, longing for a life with meaning.
The following scenes illustrate this.
Near the beginning of the play, the
student/poet, in his search for his stolen slave
lover, Giton, finds him participating in a play.
Part of the play includes the myth of the
miraculous regeneration of a hand. A slave is
brought out, his hand chopped off, and the play
goes on, uninterrupted. The film dwells on the
lost hand, its rich scarlet colour, its lonely aspect
when divorced from the body. We see the old
slave having his stump placed inside a false hand
backstage.
The reaction to this casual brutality within
the film is indifference. And more brutality is
threatened against the actor/director when he
accidentally incites the anger of his audience.
Thus the contradiction between reality as harsh,
brutal, casual and the student/poet's search for
love and frienship with Giton is established.
We see a similarly violent display of wealth
and waste when an older poet takes the young
student with him to an estate to share in a feast
given by his patron. The patron has absolute
power over life, death and poetry. The student
loses Giton but finds a compensation in
opulence.
This scene of opulence and power contrasts
sharply with the story of the Greek woman who
hangs her dead husband to save her living lover.
The simplicity and directness of emotion in this
sequence intimates the love which the student
would like but cannot find.
Instead the student is plunged into a
slave-master marriage situation with an aging
patrician. Once again he is titillated and kept
from his heart's desire,-Giton. He is liberated
once again by violence. The praetorian guard
(showing the nature of power) kills the young
Caesar and the student's patrician homosexual
"wife". The corruption of human values evinced
throughout the film here increases the haphazard
feeling we have about the student's quest for
love. He loses Giton irrevocably, Giton whose
chief merit was that he was loved, not that he
was a generous of fine person.
After losing Giton, the student loses himself
in the midst of the festival of laughter. He is
trapped with the Minotaur and finds his way out
only by reasoning with the monster/actor for his
life. The people's laughter is frozen and static, a
comment on the opulence and wealth of a
society where there exists a huge discrepancy
between potential and realization.
It is during this sequence that the student
becomes impotent. He only regains his potency
through contact with the witch of the barbarians.
The symbolism is clear. Even the person who
searches for purity, for meaning, is destroyed by
decadent social forces, he is renewed only by
contact with simplicity.
But renewed he is. When the older poet
leaves his rriches to those among his friends who
are willing to eat his gout-ridden body, the
young student leaves for new possibilities.
The last shot is remarkable. As the student
freezes into a picture in a fresco (indicating our
relation to him historically) the commentary
indicates that he is travelling to new adventures,
perhaps freer, more liberating than the last. So
that in the end, Fellini, besides presenting us
with a perfect image of decadence, also indicates
the choices open for alternatives. The student is
partially crystallized in social terms, but he also
continues to try to escape.
Sharon
Joe
Joe, is a film about a radical conservative
who is so far right that he bumps into the left
from the opposite direction. Joe admires his
acquaintance, an advertising executive who has
accidentally killed his daughter's dope-peddling
boyfriend. Joe knows of the killing, and he and
the adman get together because the adman feels
better about what he has done when he is with
Joe.
Joe hates hippies — they don't respect the
president. They don'c appreciate his efforts in the
last war, and they've "fucked up (he music". An
orgy later, they both turn into killers.
Even though the ending is really heavy, Joe's
character is not overdone. In the light of our
real-life Joes like Mayor Tbm Campbell, Reagan
and Wallace, he is not exceptional.
Much of the film is really humorous. Joe's
lines and his delivery are superb. They are funny,
especially at first, because his potency has not
been revealed and he sounds like a windbag,
blowing off about the evils of hippydom, but at
the end of the movie he shows his real
determination, and this determination give his
one-dimensional character such a terrible,
paranoia-inspiring quality.
Fellini Satyricon
Heide
In the dream sequence that
is Fellini Satyricon, decadence
reaches the end of its evolution.
It is an essay into the world of
the dead. But a world whose
decay is constant with Fellini's
visionary extravagance.
The film is phantasmagoric,
vivid, palpable - and dead.
Fellini reveals the corpse or
ae the tic extremity by
examining with mad glee the
corpse of a culture.
It was inevitable. The
evolution of Fellini's work
make this experience the
natural and ultimate one. His
continuing exploration of
image/reality interplay, the
heightened richness of form and
color with each film, the
increasing complexity,
pageantry, and abiguity of his
dream sequences leads
inexorably to Satyricon.
But Satyricon is an end
point — the final form, the
death of exploration.
An orgy of opulence rools
lavishly and boldly across the
screen. Trimalchio's banquet is
the last overstatement in
hospitality; the journey
through the complex of sexual
entertainers is depravity
compartmentalized with a
thoroughness that puts
scholasticism to shame. The
basic human requirements of
food, clothing, and shelter
become in Fellini's world
costumery, banquetry, and
palaces. Even the sunrise loses
its natural splendor and seems
somehow a private grand
scheme of Fellini's.
The   crumbling   of  cultural
decadence has its spectacular
moments. The; collapse of the
entire entertainment complex is
an unparalleled vision of decay.
The gladiator,? struggle makes
palpable the-)^.perversion of
torture. A rich old reprobate's
death and'.^the subsequent
discovery that; each beneficiary
must eat a piece of his corpse is
suitably horiifying. The
unutterable anguish of a gentle,
simple couple committing
suicide before -the end is a
startling human note in a world
of sub- and; super-humans
caught in the whirl-pool of
mass suicide. %\
Ironic hunjpr and attendant
cruelty are also-tones in this
cacaphony of' death. In the
interplay of .ftjie homosexual
triad, in the suffering of the old
poet, in the' jeers of the
gladiator-crowd ■ vicious delight
interlaces thee .humor.
Satyricon is. incredible. In
scene after opulent scene, there
is incredible beauty, incredible
perversion of human values,
incredible horror, torture, and
bloodshed, and an incredible
variation of nightmare.
But the overstatement, palls;
the hyperbole exhausts.
Satyricon is beyong ambiguity,
it is an overview of the depths
and heights of depravity.
Its richness is too heavy.
Variety, subtlety, relief are
forsaken for the picture of the
mad phantasmagoric end. It is a
conglomerate, insanely
beautiful,   of  over-ripe   images.
Satyricon is a failure - but a
failure on a scale with Fellini:
magnificent, fascinating,
puzzling, and overpowering.
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4450 West 10th Ave. —Just outside the Gates
Friday, October 30,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 5 The University Recreation
Committee is seeking both
faculty members and students
interested in the long-term
recreational facilities
on this campus.
Interested persons should
apply by letter to
Sean McHugh, Chairman,
Rm. 324 Woodward Library
MAX DEXALL
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PAGE FRIDAY, S	
Theatre
Rosencratz   and   Guildenstern  Are   Dead, a Hamlet.
tragi-comic   play   by   English   playwright   Tom Neil   Dainard,  above  left  plays  Rosencratz,
Stoppard, opens at the Q.E. Playhouse tonight, and    Tom    Stoppard,    above    right    plays
and runs through to November 20. The play is Guildenstern.    Student    ticket    prices   are   still
based upon   two minor figures in Shakespeare's available.
Saved
HEIDE, about 5' 21/2" tall^is a grad student in Indian History.
Edward Bond's Saved is a graphic study of
the sordid. John Gray's production at the
Dorothy Somerset Studio brings out the basic
ugliness of the picture.
In the play, a set of ugly little people
torture each other and themselves in scene after
scene, to a final resolution which is nothing
more than silent endurance. One assumes that
the title is ironic. Some irony.
Two couples and an interloper exemplify
all the little people. Pam, the sleazy daughter,
screeches at her timed, faithful lover-husband,
hates her child, and clings leechlike to the local
stud. Her mother Mary is her model for the art
of bitchery. Harry, her father, is a glum figure
who has countered his wife's harangues with
unyielding silence for a lifetime. Len, the
tick-witted and kindhearted
husband-cum-dartboard for Pam, eventually and
passively follows Harry's example. Fred is the
match-chewing, hip-slinging smalltime stud.
Tawdry duplicity follows pointless violence.
Some of the illustrations of life beneath hope
are the scene of Pam's child being stoned by
Fred's buddies; Pam's mother making a
grotesque play for Len; Mary cracking a teapot
over Harry's head when he finally speaks. Not
dull stuff, certainly, but exhausting and very,
very ugly.
It become apparent in watching this motley
crew that bad parents make bad children; that
the children will imitate their parents
unconsciously; that life can be pretty awful in
very petty ways; that little people will drag
their lives down ta a petty level. But all of this
was stale before Bond felt the urge to set it
down in a two-and-a-half hour endurance test.
Even given the assumption that pettiness and
petty   people   are   intrinsically  interesting, he
no
gives    no    explanation,    no    elaboration,
Pinteresque ambiguity to his work.
The effect, then, is an enervating evening in
an obscure and futile world.
The UBC production is most effective in
conveying thee morbidity of the author's
intent, but to its credit, the production avoids
adding triviality of expression to the futility of
the work.
One by one the characters appear on a grey
set — grey sofa, grey chair and table, craced
dirty white walls, and an old and
malfunctioning TV set. Their cheap clothes are
grey, black, brown, and ill-fitting. Their speech
is convincingly Cockney, their voices harsh.
The stage is unpartitioned and a minimum
of props are used to suggest the change of
scene; the characters float from corner to
corner in the sterile and unchanging
environment.
Most effective is Norman Browning as the
gentle, ineffectual Len. He is engaging and
interesting, a fly caught in a web, and one
wants him at least, to escape.
Pam (Sue Driver) is perhaps, too flouncy,
too haughty in her bitchery, because it leaves
her little room to build to a crisis point. She
begins and remains at a screech-out breaking
point, which is nerve-wracking but consonant
with the tone of the play.
Brian Parkinson as Harry handles the
difficult role of the withered, prematurely old
man proficiently and convincingly.
All the characters, in fact, are horrifyingly
real in their unadulterated griminess and
hopelessness.
What is most horrifying is that such good
artistry can be effected toward such pointlessly
depressing ends.   It  is  a  lifelike portrayal of
death- Heide
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970 Art
Christopher Pratt
An exhibition of Christopher Pratt's magic realist
paintings is on at the Vancouver Art Gallery. They are really
far out paintings, and well worth seeing. Magic realism is a style
which demands absolute perfection from its adherents. The
exact realism of the painting creates an awesome effect which
raises the ordinary subject of a farmhouse or a woman in a slip
to the level of a dream.
The painted images are so exact that they become
hypnotic. Symbolism is rampant in this kind of painting, and as
you might notice in Pratt's paintings, many of the doors have
no handles.
Whatever you might think if art, you will feel on almost
familiar ground when you look at Pratt's paintings, and you
will certainly be able to appreciate the effect of their
perfection.
Christopher Pratt, like most magic realists, works very
slowly, so it is difficult to assemble an exhibition-size show.
This one contains 31 works, probably the largest number that
you will be able to see for a long time to come ... so go see it.
New Directions 70 is the title of the second part of the
exhibition that features Pratt. This part of the show is supposed
to show a concern with social evaluation and demonstrate
post-pop attitudes. The works were assembled by three young
Vancouver artists - Phillip Shmidtz, David Roberts and Frank
P. Prodnuk.
Seldom has a show been so misnamed. About the only
new direction in this collection of coy and pretentious crap is
the door out.
SUB GALLERY
In SUB Gallery, someone is finally doing something.
Starting Monday, there is going to be a working environment
set up there. Artist Mike Malcolm and poet Drummond Burge
will be working in the gallery for the month of November, they
welcome visitors, questions, anyone who wants to pop in.
The show starts with Malcolm's empty canvasses and
Burge's blank paper. Together they will subsequently fill up the
canvasses and the paper until the closing date, when Malcolm
will exhibit his canvasses, and Burge will recite his poetry,
meanwhile, a student in the film-making course at SFU will be
making a film of the whole thing, the film will be shown at the
closing too. I have been so fed up with walking by the locked
doors and turned out lights of that gallery, that I began to
wonder whether it would ever be used. This time it looks like
its fine display area will be well used. These people are really
friendly, they want you to see how they do what they do. It's
well worth stepping in there. They'll be there all day until the
building closes.
-T.W.
Symphonic Stuff
By MARK JACQUES
Vancouver Symphony conductor Meredith Davies has let it
be known that he is resigning at the end of this season, and the
competition for his post promises to be a pretty fierce one.
Before last Saturday, I would have been pretty well in
favor of Kazuyoshi Akiyama assuming the post based on his
superior guest conductorship during the last two seasons. Czech
conductor Zdenek Macal, who led the VSO in a concert last
Saturday night, however, also seems to be a strong contender.
Macal, who possesses a fierce, almost militaristic technique,
led the VSO in remarkably together performances of Smetana's
Bartered Bride Overture and the Second Suite from Roussel's
ballet Bacchus and Ariadne. The sound of the VSO was
especially amazing considering the limited rehearsal time which
Macal had with an orchestra new to him. It was also much more
together sounding than the previous week's concert where the
Brahms Second Symphony was given one of the sloppiest
performances I've heard from the VSO in three years of
symphony-going.
Macal's disciplined control was especially evident in his
builing of climaxes during the ballet suite. My only regret was
that the full VSO string section hadn't been employed, which
would have made the work's lush sonorities even more effective.
Pianist Louis Kentner joined Macal and the symphony in
two works. Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 24 received a sensitive
performance which was complimented by some virtuoso coughing
from the audience. The Schumann Piano Concerto was given an
excessively romantic treatment, so much so that it almost
sounded like Brahms. Nevertheless, it featured some gorgeous
playing from the orchestra, especially the solo clarinet.
The next big entry in the VSO conductorship sweepstakes
is Martin Turnovsky, who will lead the orchestra in a concert on
November 10. Judging from the extra energy present in Macal's
performance, it could also turn out to be a highly musical event.
*   *   *
Addicts of contemporary music are reminded that this
weekend the VSO will present two twelve-tone works, something
which doesn't appear too often on their programs: Hans
Werner's Henze's Fifth Symphony and Barbara Pentland's
Symphony in Ten Parts. Also featured is guest pianist Phillipe
Entremont in Ravel's jazzy piano Concerto in G and a Bach
Concerto.
A professional career with
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your plans for a
career in Chartered Accountancy during their annual recruiting
visit at the University of British Columbia.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1970
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3,1970
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4,1970
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of our Firm as
well as throughout Canada for 1971 graduates in Commerce,
Science, Arts, Engineering and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a
convenient time for a personal interview on campus or to
obtain a copy of our recruiting brochure.
If the dates of our visit do not suit your time schedule, you are
invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our Vancouver office,
at 682-7821.
DRS 70-7
After you've received your commission
on the Regular Officer Training Plan
(ROTP), we think so. We'll give you training in tactical military skills. And you'll get
a University education leading to a degree
in Engineering. Sciences. Or Arts. So when
you graduate you'll be ready to step into
the most demanding position. Ready to
take charge.
Contact your Military Career Counsellor
about FJOTP.
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St.-Vancouver
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
Nominations For
, External Affairs Officer
The External Affairs Officer is concerned with university-community
involvement across Canada. Issues such as the War Measures Act and the
Jericho Hostel are dealt with through this office.
If you are interested in local and national affairs, you may wish to run
for this position. Nominations are now open and will close Tuesday,
November 3rd at noon.
Anyone interested should contact Anne Clarkson, AMS Secretary, SUB
248, for nomination forms.
P1TI0
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Next Course Starts Tues.,
November 10th at 7:30
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ihriday, October 30,' 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 7 •
T>»
Impromptu Dance.
Dr. Won-Kyung Cho. Korean classical dancer actor, scholar
and dance critic, will be performing in SUB auaitonum on Nov.
3 and 4.
Cho will be using a variety of oriental costumes and
authentic music for his Nov. 3 solo concert which will consist of
ten different dances.
On Nov. 4 he will recite a dramatic reading on Korean love
verse partly in English. Chinese, Japanese and Korean as well as
perform his own one-act play. Secret Yearning.
Mastfoot
Tim Wilson ed.
This week, Page Friday was realized through the
determined efforts of the notorious Nettie Wild, not to mention
grappling Grant Dickin
The rather fulsome young lady on our cover, Alexandra
of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet is I think, quite a good example
of a sex object, regardless of what Women's Libbers might
think. As a matter of fact, I think that the whole Women's Lib
is financed and organized by the Gay Guys of North America
Inc. After all, with the index of female femininity going
downhill, the Gay Guys have less competition, and since they're
only number two, they can use all the help they can get.
But In  the  Fine  Arts Gallery under the  Library there is a
show of John and Joyce Hall's paintings.
Rambling Jack  Elliott
Watson Street doesn't look like one.
It looks like an ordinary cruddy Vancouver lane. It's half
a block east of Main. And half a block south of Broadway on
Watson Street is the 01 de Cellar — the newest face on a
long-time Vancouver musicians' and freaks' hangout.
It'll cost you $2.50 to get in there tonight or Saturday
and hear Rambling Jack Elliott — but we suggest you peddle
your ass if you must, to scrape it up.
Rambling Jack has been doing just that for the past 20
years, all over North America. He sings and picks Dylan,
Guthrie and other stuff, including some of his own, and he tells
stories and drawls jokes.
Shows at 9 and 11. Rambling Jack might even make you
think about a few things.
JACK
Small Faces First Step
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THE CURRY HOUSE
3934 Main (at 23rd)
Van.. Ph. 879-7236 |
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concert
Nov.
1st —
7:30 p.m.
Advance
tickets c
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Agr
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$4.25
UNIVERSITY
SHELL SERVICE
PETER LISSACK
Cvouvo)
nana
Repairs and Service
Specialists
Specializing in
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Disc BraKes — Exhaust Control
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4314 W. 10 Ave. 224-0828
Ike University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Twelfth Night
By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE *"""''
November 13 - 25
Directed by John Brockington
SPECIAL MATINEES STUDENT TICKETS $1:00
Tuesday, November 17 — 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 19-12:30 p.m.
{available for all performances)
Tickets: The Frederic   Wood Theatre, Rm. 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE       It Is For You
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATIONS
The External Affairs Office is again organizing High School Visitations
throughout the province. People who are interested in going on any or all the
trips are encouraged to drop into S.U.B. 100-A -across from the
information booth, or drop a note under same, or phone us at 228-2083.
THE TRIPS PLANNED ARE TO:
1   CHILLIWACK Jan. 12
2 ABBOTSFORD
3 KAMLOOPS-SALMON ARM
4 TRAIL-NELSON
Jan. 13
Jan. 17 - 19
Jan. 27 - 29
5 KELOWNA-PENTICTON       Jan. 31 - Feb. 2
6 QUESNEL-PRINCE GEORGE Feb.24-Feb.26
— An exciting opportunity for ALL University Students
— P.S.-Bob Smith is granted first priority on all trips -
PAGE FRIDAY, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970 Friday, October 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and  Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave. 879-0491
—jim gorman photo
LIBERATED WOMEN of The Ubyssey's boat race team celebrate their victory by default after
Thursday's animal acts extravaganza. This marks the fifty-second consecutive year that The Ubyssey has
demonstrated its superior drinking ability.
Outside agitators blamed
by former security chief
OTTAWA (CUP) - Canadian campuses must be
purged of outside agitators "preaching" political
extremism, says the former head of the RCMP
security and iintelligence squad.
W. H. Kelly, speaking to a Canadian Club
luncheon, said dozens of foreign professors and
students who preach political extremism, and any
foreigner who enters Canada to support separatism
should be told to leave the country.
School boards and universities should "see that
teachers teach, not propagate extremist ideas."
The former deputy commissioner of the federal
police said: "Canadian schools must not become
incubators of terrorism. Who is going to say 'we
have had enough?"
His audience, mainly federal government
officials and wealthy city businessmen cheered and
applauded when Kelly advocated the death penalty
for the kidnapping or murder of politicians and
judges.
He was also critical of what he termed a
minority view that there is no place for law
enforcement on the campus.
"Keeping the police off campus is in keeping
with the general aims of the extremists. If they are
successful,   they   can   carry   on   unhindered   and
undetected. At the present time, this is exactly the
situation."
Kelly did not say what he would do with real
Canadians who oppose the structures of capitalism.
He blamed instead "dozens of faculty members who
have come to Canada from other countries, as well
as some students known for extreme radicalism long
before they were given permanent landing and
citizenship" for the "indoctrination of our young
people."
Kelly did not say how long he thought it would
take once these outside agitators left the country
until everyone inside Canada would no longer be in
opposition to capitalism.
Other measures Kelly put forward to help the
forces of law and order included:
• Provision for a majority rather than a
unanimous jury verdict.
• Access to tax files by police to enable
them to cope with organized crime.
• Abandonment of the law that allows a
suspect or accused person to remain silent. Police
should be able to grill suspects. "Cases in our courts
all too often have the air of a sporting event in
which lawyers battle over rules rather than
attempting to get the full truth."
Wilson's motion out of line...
from page one
Basford returned for a few days to his
constituency of Vancouver Center for a vacation
and to catch up on some work.
The deleted motion requested Vancouver Mayor
Tom Campbell to speak with the police commission
regarding possible prevention of groups advocating
violence from demonstrating upon public property
in Vancouver.
Campbell is chairman of the commission. At
present there is no evidence that any
recommendations have been made, even though he
said he had already spoken with them at Tuesday's
council meeting.
"He's chairman of the commission. His statement
could mean anything," said Aid. Walter Hardwick.
"He could have talked to anyone or he could
have talked to himself," he said.
"He talks to the police commission about every
thing," said Calder. "I don't take his antics
seriously."
A spokesman from Campbell's office said he was
too busy to comment on Tuesday's meeting because
of all the calls he's been receiving from citizens
asking that he run for re-election as mayor.
SUN NOV 1
AGRODOME   7 30 PM
ROD STEWART
(foraierly with Jeff Beck)
nor singing with
small faces
the Legendary
SEEDS of TIME
50
advance
tickets
at the BAY
door $4.25 cheap! Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30, 1970
B.C. teacher's strike vote over pension issue
About 23,000 elementary and
high school teachers across the
province will take part in a strike
vote today.
Behind the teachers' decision
to vote  is discontent with their
pension plan, controlled by the
provincial government.
However, final action on the
vote will be decided only after
legislature's revision of the
Pensions Act in the next session
^:*M
—brett garrett photo
AIN'T IT ALWAYS THE WAY. When a woman wants to make a
buck it's back to the ironing board. Women at Place Vanier are
currently ironing shirts at 15 cents a crack in order to raise
money for a residence sewing machine. There's gotta be a better
way.
Its non-revolution
of the provincial government.
The B.C. Teachers' Federation
says that B.C. teachers get worse
treatment in pensions than federal
or provincial civil servants or
teachers in any other province.
The Federation has been
investigating the pension-plan for
about two years, and has come to
the conclusion that the general
belief that the teachers' pension
fund cannot accommodate higher
Repeal act,
says Fed
The B.C. Federation of Labor
Tuesday urged the federal
government to repeal the War
Measures Act.
The federation said: "It has
become increasingly evident that
fears expressed by NDP members
of parliament and other Canadians
regarding abuse of the War
Measures Act were well founded."
Evidence of this abuse includes
the recenl order-in-council passed
by the B.C. government denying
free speech to school teachers and
Mayor Campbell's comments
about using the act against
hippies, the federation added.
The federation also asked the
government to bring special
legislation before parliament to
deal with what it called the
"critical situation in Quebec".
Liberated?
Morse Packham of the
University of South Carolina will
present a critique on the theme of
liberation in the Hebb Theatre
Nov. 3 at 8:30 p.m.
Dr. Packham has written a lot
of books and is professor of English
and comparative literature at the
University of South Carolina.
The lecture is sponsored by the
UBC continuing education centre
and by the Leon and Thea
Koerner foundation.
''Revolution is not
revolutionary enough."
Josh McDowell, speaking to
assembled students at south plaza
SUB Tuesday noon, said:
"Destroying the system is the
biggest cop-out today," McDowell
said there are two problems in
world revolution today: "One
deals with the organism (of man),
the other with the environment.
"Those who advocate
destroying or reforming the
system are improving the
environment and not the
organism, and that is not
**"'   enough."
Some people think education is
the solution to the problems of
underdeveloped countries but
education merely brings out a
man's personality traits McDowell
rM said. He pointed out, that
prejudice exists in educated men,
too.
Other people, for example, Che
Guevara, feel lack of technological
skill is the problem, but man can
use technology to cure cancer or
- ** bomb out a street said McDowell.
"Technology only made a nuclear
giant out of a moral midget."
Elaborating    later    in    an
interview, he said he considers the
present organization of the
Peoples' Republic of China as
reform of the environment.
McDowell said that "within
twenty years China will be just
like Russia."
He pointed out that the history
of Russia since the war shows this
reformation of the environment is
only a temporary solution.
He said the basic problem is
the nature of man.
"We need a power to change a
man from the inside out."
That power is the power of
Jesus Christ, of Christianity, he
said.
"Christ understood that to
change man one must change both
the establishment and man. Christ
alone has the power to turn
hatred upside down," said
McDowell, citing his own
experience as an example.
"Moreover to believe in Christ
you don't need to shelve your
brain. There is enough evidence to
justify his messianic claims."
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pensions is false.
The Federation approached the
government with proposals for
changes in this area over a year
ago, but nothing was done.
However, the provincial
government has indicated that the
matter will be taken up in the
1971 session of the legislature,
and that teachers' pensions will be
increased.
The teachers want to be sure
that the government takes their
position seriously.
"We want to show teachers'
concern at the inadequacy of the
pension plan as it is presently,"
said Mike Midzian, systems
director of the Economic Division
of the Federation.
"Actual implementation of the
results    of the   vote   will   only
come after the decisions made by
the legislature, which will be
about February or March," said
Midzian.
Apart from general increases,
teachers want their pensions
calculated in a different manner
than they are now.
Also they are pushing for
retirement at full pension at age
60. Presently, teachers' pensions
go up considerably if they teach
until thee age of 65, and the
Federation believes that this
forces teachers to teach longer
than they should and also makes
it harder for younger teachers to
find jobs.
SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA
A Division of SCHLUMBERGER (CANADA) LIMITED
SCHLUMBERGER
Schlumberger representatives will be
on campus Nov. 5 & 6 to conduct
interviews of:
— Students graduating in ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING, or ENGINEERING
PHYSICS for field work in
Western Canada.
—Third year students for summer
training leading to full time
employment in 1972.
Contact your student Career Planning
Office for details.
Iffis year's
'Bird Call's' mas
x*rs pizzaeama
LISTED WROKJ&...
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224*7ol3
IF YOU DOWY CALL
THE RIGHT ONE
I'M <30NK)AG£T F Friday, October 30,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 21
City council makes no moves on hostel
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
City council passed up its
chance to discuss the hostel issue
at Tuesday's meeting when a
report on the hostel situation was
received but not debated.
The board of administration
presented its report to council on
the development of a hostel in the
city.
The   problem   of   additional
hostel accomodations has been
discussed on occasions by council
since Jan. 22, when council
decided to start looking for
additional facilities.
The report said council
originally thought the additional
facilities should be provided, and
that if officials were able to locate
suitable property, council would
undoubtedly     give    favorable
consideration to any proposals
submitted.
Aid. Walter Hardwick objected
to the fact that there was to be no
debate because the report was
presented for information only.
The report went on to detail
the search by staff of the property
and insurance division of the
social service department and the
department    of    permits    and
Latest feed-in seeks site
A group of Jericho hostel staffers have decided
to proceed with hostel work on their own.
"Because the governments have withdrawn
from actively participating in the whole operation,
it is very difficult for us to operate through their
stuctures," said Jericho staffer Teddy Mahood.
"We are therefore going to proceed on our own
and do what they should be doing."
"Our prime concern is to continue the feed-ins
after Inner-City stops on Sunday,'' said Bill Pick.
A group of ex-Jericho staffers have got together
to cook and serve the food.
"The First United Church at Hastings and Gore
has already agreed to let us use their kitchen to
" cook the food in," said Val Angel, another Jericho
staffer.
Cool-Aid has donated a truck and dishes to the
group.
"All we need now is to find a covered site
where we can feed the kids," said Angel.
"We are also trying to set up a board of
directors made up of solid citizens to help us set up
a series of co-op houses to re-motivate the youth,"
said Mahood.
This board would also help the staffers with the
feed-ins and act in an advisory capacity.
The group plans to rent a house and set up a
co-op for 20 transients.
"We want to use the house for a treatment
centre for people that need help. We also want to
set up a workshop to make all sorts of items we
could sell to make ourselves self-supporting," said
Pick.
"The project should be in operation by
December at the latest," said Angel.
The group's main problem now is one of
finances but it hopes to solve that by asking for
donations.
"Cool-Aid has agreed to let us use their name
when asking for donations. All money received will
be placed in a trust fund to be administered by the
board of directors," Mahood said.
The money will be used to finance the feed-ins,
and to pay the rent on a house.
BCCLA challenges gov't
with Supreme Court writ
The B.C. Civil Liberties Association Thursday
filed a writ in B.C. Supreme Court against the
provincial government's order banning teachers
from advocating the overthrow of
democratically-elected governments.
Lawyer Tom Berger filed the suit for the
BCCLA and the B.C. Teacher's Federation.
Dr. Peter Pearse, President of the UBC Faculty
Association said "Personally, I'm delighted to see
this writ filed.
"It's important that the legality of the whole
thing be tested."
He said he could not speak for the association
"but it is quite possible the faculty association will
do something further."
"Any further action, however, will depend on
the government's reaction to our previous
statement," said Pearse.
"The issue is certainly important to all our
members,"
Berger said the B.C. government does not have
the power to invoke the order passed at a special
cabinet meeting two weeks ago.
According to Berger only a federal
parliament has the power to take away the basic
rights of citizenship.
Plaintiffs in the suit will be BCCLA executive
secretary Dr. Reg Robson, BCTF vice-president
Frances May Worledge, UBC economics prof Dr.
John Dewey, and Simon Fraser philosophy prof Dr.
Lione Kenner.
Tills silent in Montreal stores
MONTREAL (CUP) - Business
in Montreal has fallen off an
average of 40 per cent since the
Front de Liberation du Quebec
first made its move to make more
obvious the contradictions within
Quebec society.
Old Montreal, containing some
of the most expensive boutiques
and   restaurants,   is   hardest   hit
Realtors gathering
as frats flounder
Several of the fraternities on Wesbrook have been approached for
their property said a university endowment land administrator
Thursday.
R. P. Murdoch said it is common knowledge that financially
many of the frats are dying.
J. E. Smith Reality Ltd. has approached him with intention
of buying Beta Theta Phi, Phi Delta Theta and Phi Gamma Delta
properties.
Murdoch said Smith Realty is interested in the land marshalling
possibilities of this unit.
"Smith Reality will not say who they are representing and they
have not presented any building plans."
It is known, however, that accommodations for outpatients, a
"hotel complex like St. Paul's Hospital" has been proposed said
Murdoch.
Dick Betts, arts 4, a UBC Left Caucus member, said the frats "were
the stepping stone into the cliques of upper business management.
"This is a false premise with the growing number of unemployed
skilled university technicians. The real economic basis for the frats is
failing. They serve no real purpose."
licences.
Several buildings were
examined at first but were rejected
as unsuitable, stated the report. A
further enquiry was undertaken,
and as a result seven new buildings
were found and inspected.
Of the seven buildings found,
only three were considered
suitable for use as hostels.
The first building listed in the
report is an old office building in
the 100 block West Pender.
The report warns that "the city
building inspector has given
reason for the limited use of the
property which makes it
uneconomical to proceed."
The second building is near the
Homer Street Hotel. The city
building inspector has approved
this building as a possible hostel
site.
The third building is on the
corner of 11th and Arbutus.
"The owner of this property
can make it available immediately
and is prepared to fully equip it
with beds, linen, and other
facilities, and would undertake to
because the police have set up
their tightest security in the area,
in which the municipal
government buildings are located.
Most of the city's largest
department stores report a pinch
in sales, although some maintain
the crisis hasn't affected them yet.
Americans visiting Montreal
have decreased in number.
"Due to the impressions
created by the media, the
Americans think we've got a
machine gun on every corner,"
says Marcel Provencher, sales
manager of the Montreal Holiday
Inn.
Hairdressers and beauty salons
are also being affected by this
drop in night life. Women are not
going out as much since the
trouble started, a spokesman said.
"The general public is just not
up to enjoying themselves, and its
pretty hard to be joyous with
what's going on," said Norm
Silver, owner of Esquire Showbar.
Over a thousand police raids
have taken place and more than
400 people have been arrested.
It's hard to see "business as usual"
in Montreal for a long time.
have it in operation very early in
1971," says the report.
The report also says the
Continental Hotel at the north
end of the Granville St. bridge
should be ready for use as a hostel
by March, 1971.
The board report also discussed
the city's attempt to get the
matter of the hostel building
placed before the welfare
department.
The reply from the assistant
deputy minister of welfare states
that "the minister (Phil Gaglardi)
does not wish to make a decision
regarding participation at this
time as we are presently reviewing
the matter of assistance to single
persons."
The board also recommended
that during the summer months
the facility be used to "house
single men for a short period of
time." In a letter sent to the
department.
"During the winter months, it
could revert to a single bunk basis
to house employable men in the
30 to 60 years age range."
PEOPLE
An Experience in Human Relations and
Human Sexuality
Monday, Nov. 2  -   7 p.m. Sharp
"An Encounter of
Honesty"
DR. LEEPULOS
SUB BALLROOM
DRESS CASUALLY AND COMFORTABL Y
SJ3S
fc
INSIDE
|»kl It'
J The
I urea"1
?   The
1 :S3«ff
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
Isn't The Most Read Book
ON CAMPUS
BUT IT IS
One of the Most Useful
Buy Your Copy Today
at THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS & BUS. OFFICE Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1970
Second campus Bank of America burns
IRVINE (CPS) - "The only legitimate business in the
world today is to fill the needs of the people ... as we
serve, so shall we prosper."-A. P. Giannini, founder of the
Bank of America.
The Bank of America has always had an image
problem.
In its early days the bank used to bill itself as "the
people's bank". Giannini, the founder, had its advertising
department nickname him "the little fellow's friend".
Frequent statements like the one above supplemented
that image.
Recently the bank's crew of image makers struck a
new course and started conducting a series of market
research studies to learn how to win more friends (that
means get more money from more people) - one of the
targets was college students.
A number of "test branches" of the bank were
located near college campuses in California.
One of the test branches was located at Isla Vista,
adjacent to the University of California at Santa Barbara.
Another was near the University of California at Irvine.
On Feb. 25 this year students delivered a decisive
experimental result by burning down the Isla Vista test
branch. And Monday the bank sustained another loss as
an early morning fire gutted the Irvine campus branch.
Firemen responded to a call from campus police
within 10 minutes, but were unable to save the structure.
The bank burned to a shell.
The arsonists were gone, but they left behind them a
collage of revolutionary slogans painted on the burning
walls.
Bank of America officials said the vault was intact
Yippies are giving Hallowe'en benefit Saturday night
The Yippies are benefitting again.
This time it's a Hallowe'en freak show dance in the
Pender Auditorium on Saturday, from 8 p.m. until you
freaks clear out.
Clique,  Uncle  Slug,  Chris  and  Rans  Fold  Band,
Rasputin and Travelling River Band will be the
benefactors, a switch-over from this summer when they
benefitted for the Yippies. Admission is $ 1.25. Things will
be happening with cartoons, a light show and Street
Theatre and Cool-Aid in attendance.
and that no papers or money was lost.
Throughout the day workers were busy erecting a
temporary structure while reaction on campus was
forming. Several student groups on this normally placid
campus passed resolutions condemning the burning and
over 500 signed a petition offering to help rebuild
capitalism - that is, the portion that the bank
represented.
The general student reaction was that Irvine students
were not involved - that outside agitators like the
Weathermen were responsible.
Others, noting the campus location in the centre of
right wing and reactionary. Orange County, speculated
that the burning was executed by the right forces to
create a situation inviting further campus repression.
Reaction outside the campus community, however,
has been notably lacking. The third bombing in two weeks
on a campus that had seen no previous violence of any
sort has left Orange County in a state of shock.
The county's right wing legislators, police, and
citizens groups will act. And when the excitement of the
action dies down, and the last of the national media crews
leave Irvine, the campus will have nothing to look forward
to but increased repression.
]he trickle
cbvvrtvc
arnprfs.
our
Some things make us nervous.
Some things turn us into a kind of stranger to
ourselves. The old dryness of the mouth sets in.
The sweat starts down.
How about those job interviews, where all of
a sudden you've got to stand out very clearly from
the herd? Inside half an hour you've got to establish
yourself to a world you never made and may not
even like.
Does the prospect make you just a little nervous? No? You're lucky.
Oh, it does? Join the club. It gets us all, even
those over thirty.
You could write a book about being nervous
about interviews. As a matter of fact, we have
written a book. A little one: "How to separate
yourself from the herd". It's packed with practical
tips on how to go to an interview on your own terms.
We wrote it because we've been there.
Without any modesty whatsoever we can tell you
we're a company whose very life depends on our
skill at coming face to face with strangers.
Our little book is tucked into a bigger one:
The Employment Opportunities Handbook, a kind
of dictionary of the companies who are looking.
This brand new handbook is yours for the asking
at the placement office.
"How to separate yourself from the herd"
won't work any magic between now and your first
interview.
But it just might help.
OsDCNUFE
InsuranceCompanyJ-ondorvCanada Friday, October 30,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
Gears bust chariot
steal victory beer
The engineers have done it
again.
The commerce undergraduate
society was forced to withdraw
from Thursday's chariot race after
forty engineers broke into the
CUS common room at night and
destroyed the chariot which had
been loaned to CUS by the
science undergraduate society.
In the raid the engineers also
stole 29 cases of beer, along with
about 90 dozen eggs and three fire
extinguishers.
They broke a window to enter
the building, broke down a locked
door to get the beer and trampled
paint over the carpet.
Peter Insley , CUS
representative to the Alma Mater
Society has asked AMS president
Tony Hodge to convene the
student court provided for in the
AMS constitution to deal with the
, matter.
Insley said that if the student
court does not make the
engineering undergraduate society
pay for the beer and all repairs
they will press charges in civil
court.
Sandy Shaw, a spokesman for
CUS, said that many commerce
students have expressed the
opinion that the student court
will be too lenient with the
engineers and support pressing
criminal charges against the
individuals concerned.
For More Efficient Studying Take
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A new course for those who want to improve and update their study methods
Federal bust at Rochdale
TORONTO (CUP) - Seventy Toronto police charged into
Rochdale College early Thursday and arrested five persons after seizing
small amounts of grass, hash, acid and speed.
The police raiding party caught Rochdale's security men on the
ground floor by surprise and the police managed to get to the sixth
floor before fire alarm bells were sounded.
Police have been foiled on earlier raid attempts when the alarms
were set off and the college's residents tossed their drugs out the
window.
The police raid came one day after federal housing minister
Robert Andras indicated Rochdale would have to be cleaned up and
three days after Toronto alderman Tony O'Donohue appealed to the
federal government to take over the 18-storey co-operative college,
which the alderman described as "a centre for promiscuity, drug-taking
and drug-marketing and ... a launching pad for revolutionary groups."
Sit-in for Alumni dollars
About 100 UBC Alumni Fund
volunteers, including 12 students,
will "sit-in" at the new
administration building from 7 to
9 p.m. Nov. 9 and 16.
The sit-in is designed to raise
money for the Alumni Fund
through canvassing UBC graduates
FRI. OCT. 30
by phone — Phonathon.
Main disbursements of Alumni
Fund proceeds are directed
towards support of scholarships,
athletics, library, the President's
Fund and various student, cultural
and intellectual activities.
9:00- 1:00
International House
RASPUTIN
OTHERSS1.00
Costume: Optional
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be an important event in any
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"'CATCH-22' says many things
that need to be said again and
again! Alan Arkin's performance as Yossarian is great!"
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pwiwouin pictuhs cofiraumo«(i«i«s<)ci*rtoN wiiK fhhywys inc mm
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
ALANARKIN    .%
%#»        MSEMWMIMHBY
mm- JOSEPH HELLER
MARTIN BALSAM, RICHARO BENJAMIN, ARTHUR GARFUNKEl, JACK GILFORD; BUCK HENRY, BOB NEWHART
ANTHONY PERKINS, PAULA PRENTISS; MARTIN SHEEN.JOAII/0IGHT8 ORSON WELLES AS DUEEDLE.
SCREENPLAY BY BUCK HENRY PRUDUCED BY JOHN GALLEY 8 MARTIN RANSOHOFF OIRECTEO BY MIKE NICHOLS
nmnCIKMIKSIGKII nOWKISYLffillT1tOIMCtllM«nUMi1Siaill«     WARNING      —     Scenes     of
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Evenings 7:30, 9:35 * CINEMA   2
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 937-3461  FREE PARKING Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 30,   1970
Shrum  Bowl game Saturday  night
By DON GARDNER
UBC's head football coach
Frank Gnup wasn't his usual
optimistic self at Tuesday's
SFU-UBC press conference held in
accordance with Saturday night's
4th annual Shrum Bowl.
"SFU is ranked 13th in the
NAIA. We're not even ranked
13th in our conference," he said.
On the basis of the teams'
comparative records this season,
one can hardly visualize SFU as
the underdog. Currently, SFU is
undefeated in five games, whereas
UBC has lost six of its seven
games.
The game will be played under
American rules, although UBC
have played all their games this
season under Canadian rules.
The switch should actually
help UBC. The four downs might
allow them to establish a sound
running game. In last year's tie,
they had great success running
inside.
UBC's defense will have their
hands full trying to contain the
versatile Clan offense. This year,
with Dave Syme at quarterback
instead of Wayne Holm, they
prefer to run the ball.
They have an excellent
fullback in freshman Terry Bailey,
who has rushed for 627 yards and
a 5.8 yard average so far this
season. They also have a
breakaway threat in their
halfback, Glen Colwill.
The Clan's passing attack
hasn't been quite as effective this
year. Syme has completed only
39.8 per cent of his passes,
although he has a couple of fine
receivers in pint-sized Mike Begg
and tight end Don Warrington.
If the Birds' defence can
contain Bailey's running, they
could do much better than a lot
of people suspect. So far this
season, they have managed to
contain their oppositions' running
fairly well.
Coach Gnup has come up with
a new defensive weapon this
week, just in time for the SFU
game.
"We're gonna have long
huddles. We're gonna use up the
whole 30 seconds. That way their
offence won't get the ball so
much."
Well, Coach Gnup's idea
sounds original, and Saturday
night UBC fans will get a chance
to witness its effectiveness. Game
time is 8 p.m. at Empire Stadium.
Tickets, which are only a buck for
UBC students, are on sale in the
main foyer in SUB.
FOOTNOTES: Stadium
officials are very worried about
the problem of fireworks.
Apparently, fireworks will do
irreparable damage to the Tartan
turf. The police have warned that
anyone caught with fireworks will
be charged and apparently they're
going to be very strict about the
situation . . . Ron Fowler has been
limping in practice and is a
doubtful starter . .. many of the
Birds starters like Dave Corcoran,
Don Lumb, Ian Jukes, will be
going both ways.
- TV;  ■'■-.A"-.-.■•■»■:*".
—keith dunbar photo
A football game is one of the few
times a girl can head for the hole
and Home Ec 35 decides to try
her luck. Waiting to make sure
that she doesn't make it is Nurse
28 while clearing the way is Home
Ec 69. Behind our liberated girls is
a portion of the capacity crowd.
Nurses edged Home Ec 12-6 as
the engineers continued to defeat
themselves.
Time Out
By SCOTT McCLOY
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Intercollegiate Football
4th Annual Shrum Bowl Game
U. B.C.
THUNDERBIRDS
vs
S. F. U.
CLANSMEN
Tomorrow—at 8 p.m-—Tomorrow
EMPIRE STADIUM
NOTE: FIREWORKS PROHIBITED; Police will charge anyone
in possession of fireworks at Empire Stadium.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.00 Seat
on presentation of A.AA.S. Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets from Athletic Office
Last Chance For Tickets
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM AND SUB
UP TO AND INCLUDING FRI., OCTOBER 30th
It's not often that football coach Frank Gnup gets
out-manuevered off the field (where he excels in the realm
of public speaking), but that's the way it appeared.at the
press conference to publicize the Shrum Bowl game
Saturday night.
It seems fitting therefore, for his usurper to be Lome
Davies, former assistant and now head coach for the Simon
Fraser Clansmen.
For a man more proficient at fielding questions than
fielding footballs the Gnupper definitely came out with
the short end of the stick.
"SFU is ranked 13th in the NAIA (which comprises
560 schools). We're not even ranking 13th in our
conference" he implored.
When asked if his team would run against Simon
Fraser, the coach replied, "Which way?"
In contrast to Gnup's flamboyant, relaxed manner
Davies appeared quite sincere and intense — a guise he had
worked on for some time, I'm sure.
He first patronized Frank by stating. "That's the
same script as last year's speech when you tied us 6-6."
He then launched into the main body of his
dissertation reluctant to cast the patsies.
"It seems as though the Birds get super-psyched for
our game every year. They have a couple of good running
backs in Fowler and Corcoran and have more overall size
and experience than we have."
"Some people say we will run away with the game
but with their attitude towards this one big game of the
year anything could happen."
But the Gnupper was not duped and said, "They're
just trying to make themselves the underdog."
The damage was done, however, and nothing the
coach could say could make the writers believe that Frank
had lost most of his games just to dupe the Clansmen.
Out of this good-natured bickering a number of
interesting facts made themselves evident.
The Clansmen are basically healthy, while key
players in the Bird backfield like Ron Fowler will be
absent.
The Birds will definitely be up for this game for a
win against the cross-town rivals would salvage a dismal
season and satisfy the fans.
At any rate don't count on the Birds winning this
one but don't count on the Clansmen running away with it
either. Friday, October 30,   1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 25
Athletes act on oppression
Despite the escalation in activism on the
Berkeley campus since the free speech movement in
1964, one group — the Cal jocks — has remained
steadfastly isolated from the student movement.
Until recently, the athletic department was able to
proclaim proudly that theirs was the one remaining
basion of patriotism at Berkeley; and they always
looked the other way when their football stars
became involved in demonstrations as goon squads
beating up left-wingers.
The athletic department staff is physically, as
well as politically, removed from the campus
community. On the walls of the elevator that takes
you up to their offices on the fourth floor of the
Cal student office building are the slogans you
would expect to find: "Free Bobby"; "Riot on!":.
"Judge Hoffman Is a Geritol Freak". But when you
step out onto the fourth floor, it's like suddenly
entering a 1950 movie set. The first thing you see is
- a   line-up   of  photographs  of  formidable-looking
Golden Bar Gridiron Greats.
Then there are the coaches. With one or two
exceptions, they are cut uniformly from the John
Wayne mold — open-faced and square of jaw — and
you can tell by looking at them that they pride
themselves on their firm handshakes. Head football
coach Ray Willsey, for instance, still believes that
everyone   on   campus   is   concerned  about  Cal's
- chances of making it to the Rose Bowl.
And Paul Brechler, the athletic director, is
trying hard to stop referring to Cal's black athletes
as "colored boys", although he sometimes slips up.
Talking to a group of students at the school of
education last year, Brechler responded to a
question from a black graduate student about why
he seemed so fond of one particular black football
player. "I like John because he's always laughing
and grinning," Brechler told the startled student,
"and that's the kind of colored boy I like."
Not surprisingly, it was before an athletic
boosters' banquet composed of this kind of man
that Thomas Foran was given a standing ovation
when he attacked members of the Chicago Eight as
being a "bunch of freaking fags".
It was in this atmosphere that I began teaching
a course in the school of education last quarter. The
course was titled, "Intercollegiate athletics and
higher education: a socio-psychological evaluation",
and because it allowed jocks to atriculate latent
dissatisfaction, it quickly became something of a
cause celebre. Because they already regarded me as
the worst kind of turncoat — a jock who had gone
over to the radical cause — the Cal athletic
department was suspicious from the beginning,
especially when it became clear that an important
purpose of the course was to explore the myths
, about athletes that the department worked full-time
to create.
Approximately 400 students, over 100 of
whom were athletes, had enrolled in the course by
the second week. During the first lecture. 1
discussed my involvement in athletics and politics
and told the class that although I could not be
impartial myself, I would try to examine significant
issues in the athletic world by opening the class to
whoever cared to attend, including Members of the
athletic department.
I invited guest lecturers ranging from Harry
Edwards ancj pro football's recently retired radical
Dave Meggyesy, to conservative spokesmen in the
athletic world such as Payton Jordan, 19€8 IJ.S.
Olympic track and field coach, and California state
- superintendent of public instruction (and
unsuccessful 1968 senatorial candidate), Max
Rafferty, once a highly successful high school
football coach who still gives speeches on the
character-building value of athletics.
Jordan and Rafferty, along with Cal's football
coach Ray Willsey (who said he was too busy
recruiting high school football prospects), turned
down my invitation, and therefore the tone of the
* course was given by liberal/radicals who spoke of the
corruption in the world of athletes and of the
measures needed to humanize it.
IMPLICATIONS OF  BEING  JOCKS
One of the most significant aspects of the
course was that an environment was created in
which athletes could begin to examine the role they
were forced to play and the implications of being
"jocks". We discussed the effect their participation
in sports had on their personal development and on
society. The course was very emotional at times,
especially because many of the athletes were
beginning for the first time to question what was
happening to them.
The racism that is rampant in athletics was
examined throughout the course, and for the first
time many of the white athletes began to come to
terms with the problems their black teammates
encounter.
Toward the end of the quarter I realized that
many athletes had changed their attitudes toward
their own involvement in sports and toward the role
of athletics within the university. But I did not
know if these changes would ever be reflected in
their behavior. 1 was still pondering the impact of
the course when Nixon announced he had sent US
troops into Cambodia
Within a few days the campus was topsy-turvy
in a fury of anti-war activity, and on May 11,
students, employees and faculty members jammed
into manmoth Harmon gymnasium for a mass rally.
Over 10,000 people the largest crowd ever to fill
the gym — turned out. The bleachers were packed
tightly and people were sitting on the basketball
court, in the press box, and standing in the
aisles.Hundreds of people were outside, unable to
get in because of the overflow crowd. The meeting
began with speeches by Tom Hayden and John
Turner, a member of the campus black student
union. It then settled down to a discussion and
finally a vote on the course of action the university
community should take in response to the national
and international turmoil created by the Nixon
administration.
DOESN'T  ANYTHING   EFFECT  THEM?
During the rally three Cal athletes wearing their
letterman jackets were seated near me in the
balcony of the gym. When they got up and walked
out after the third or fourth speech, I heard the
person next to me say, "Well, I guess it's time for
practice. What's wrong with those guys? Doesn't
anything affect them?" His friend whispered to him
to be quiet, obviously fearing the jocks might come
over and beat up on them.
I imagine that these sentiments were echoed
throughout the crowd, since well Over a hundred
other Cal athletes were leaving the rally at about the
same time. But people should have noticed the
change in the athletes' appearance. Despite the
objection of the athletic director and some coaches,
many of those leaving the meeting had long hair and
beards or mustaches and were wearing strike
buttons and black armbands.
Nor were they going to practice; rather, they
were on their way to a general meeting of all
athletes to discuss what action they as a group could
take against the government's southeast Asia policy.
This was one day when athletic business did not
take place as usual.
This meeting was first suggested by
Randy Smyth, a sports columnist for the school
newspaper, The Daily Californian. Randy, an
all-american football player in junior college and
later a university of California iecord-holder in track
and field, is a graduate student and was an unofficial
assistant in the course I had taught. Hc'was regularly
involved in radical activities on campus and during
last year's people's park struggle he was arrested for
assaulting a police officer. His long hair and political
activism constantly got him in trouble with his
coaches while he was competing, and now most
coaches refuse to talk to him.
From his extensive contact with Cal athletes,
Randy felt they were ready to take some kind of
stand against the war if they could just be gotten
together in a group. He arranged a preliminary
meeting between myself, the Daily Californian
sports editor and five or six Cal athletes who he
knew were strongly opposed to the war. Given the
climate on campuses throughout the country, we
all agreed that it was the ideal time to attempt to
get Cal athletes to take the first step that would lead
to involvement in the student movement.
The meeting was announced in the sports pages
of the school paper and the sports editor helped to
stimulate interest by running interviews with
prominent Cal athletes who were angered and upset
by the Cambodian invasion. Much to everyone's
amazement, including those of us who organized the
meeting, over 150 athletes, along with a worried
athletic director and a few coaches, showed up.
NO  BUSINESS  AS  USUAL
Once it became clear -that the overwhelming
majority of athletes present was opposed to the war,
the meeting turned to a discussion of how they
could best express their dissent. They agreed with
the campus sentiment that "business should not go
on as usual", but were divided on the question of
whether    or    not    to    continue    practicing   and
competing.
Those opposed to competing felt that since
athletics was the most visible part of the university,
the only way they could show that business was not
as usual with them was by refusing to compete,
devoting the time normally spent on athletics to
anti-war activities. They also felt that then
willingness to give up athletics temporarily would
emphasize the seriousness of their committment.
Others argued that they should capitalize ov
their visibility by continuing to compete but making
their position known by wearing symbols of protest
on their uniforms. There were other suggestions tha;
the group sign petitions and issue public statements
in opposition to the war. Paul Brechler, the athletic
director, also spoke out, but from a differem
viewpoint. "I've been in a couple of wars." he said,
"and nobody likes war, but I wouldn't wain to see
you mix up college athletics with the wav
The question of whether or not to compete was
a difficult one for the whole group to handle, since
not all sports were currently involved m
competition. For instance, the basketball players,
whose season was over, felt they had no right to
vote on whether or not the track athletes should
compete for the rest of their season. The athlete*
therefore broke up into groups according to ther-'
sport and debated what action to take as a team.
After about half an hour of debate, the meeting
reconvened. Steve Sawin, a student who had never
before been involved in any form of protest activity.
served as the spokesman for the football team
Sawin told the group that the football team had
decided to skip the rest of spring practice and
involve themselves in some type of anti-war activity.
He also added that the football players would
attempt to protect any striking athlete from
possible reprisals.
The wrestling team voted to boycott the
national AAU wrestling championships, and all
other teams (except the baseball team) issued
statements condemning the war and asking for
withdrawal of all U.S. troops from southeast Asia
The track and field and tennis teams, which were to
compete in Los Angeles over the weekend, indicated
they would use black armbands, clenched fists and
other symbols of protest while competing
Paul Brechler, who admits he would not have
takent the athletic director's job a few years ago if
he had known what it was going to be like at Cal.
talked with me after the meeting.
, "I just don't know what is going on. If this
issue is settled, there will just be another one in the
fall." I asked him how he felt about the possibility
of Cal athletes wearing sympbols of protest while
competing. "We have a hundred-year-old tradition
of what is the standard Cal uniform," he told me,
"and I'd be personally embarrassed if the boys wore
black armbands or black legbands or anything like
that. I can't see what it will accomplish. The jiext
thing you know, they'll want to wear shirts saying
'Blake's Bakery'." He did emphasize that athletes
have the right to speak out as individuals, but that
their protest should in no way enter the sports
world.
Television crews, photographers and
sportswriters crowded into a small conference room
in the athletic department the following afternoon
to attend a press conference called by the athletes.
Ray Willsey, the head football coach, sat at a table,
flanked by two football players and three other
prominent Cal athletes. Willsey was there in his
capacity as assistant athletic director, since Brechler
had left Berkeley that morning to attend a meeting
in Los Angeles. The football players announced that
they had decided to resume practicing after having a
number of meetings with Coach Willsey since the
previous afternoon. Willsey did not directly threaten
the football players at these meetings. He stressed
the importance of spring practice and then simply
asked them individually to explain to the coaching
staff their reasons for wanting to skip the final five
days of spring ball.
Regrettably — though quite understandably —
most of the football players were not able to tell
Coach Willsey that they were more concerned about
the war than about spring football practice. They
well know what the consequences would be with
regard to their football careers under Willsey if they
ever made such a statement.
MYTH  OF  "APOLITICAL"  SPORTS
But they, along with the athletes from all the
other Cal    teams,    did    issue    the    following
to page 26 Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 30,  1970
ATHLETES   ACT
from page 25
statement   signed  by  the  united
athletes   of   the    university    of
California:
We, the overwhelming majority of
California athletes, find that we
can no longer live in the so-called
"apolitical atmosphere " which has
permeated the athletic
community. We find it necessary
now to voice our opposition to
president Nixon's oppressive
policies at home and abroad. We
condemn United States activity in
southeast Asia and call for a
unilateral withdrawal of all United
States forces in southeast Asia.
Furthermore, we call for a
reconstitution of American
universities as centres against the
war.
Cross-country squad
winners in Washington
This statement was issued by
those athletes who chose to
compete, but 45 other top ivy
league track athletes, including
Harvard's star miler, Royce Shaw,
registered their protest by
boycotting the meet entirely.
Even if the coaches and
athletic departments throughtout
the country cannot understand
the tremors shaking the sports
world, the implications of those
tremors have not escaped the
nation's number-one sports fan in
Washington, D.C. During the
height of the protest against
Cambodia, a spokesman for the
Nixon adminstration commented,
"Once we heard that the athletes
and pom-pom girks had joined the
demonstrations, we knew we were
in trouble."
The UBC cross-country team
continued its winning ways in an
invitational meet at Bellingham
sponsored by Western
Washington. In overwhelming the
opposition the Birds took first,
third, fourth, fifth, and eighth
places.
On a fast dry course, Norm
T re rise showed his potential
running the 5.2 mile course in the
time of 24:45 to set a new record.
Next placers for UBC were Ken
French, Rick Woods, Ken Hirst
and Duncan Klett in that order.
This weekend the team will be
more sports on
pages 24 and 25
travelling to Winnipeg for the
WCDA cross-country
championships. The main
opposition is expected from the
University of Saskatchewan who
have won the event the last two
years.
This year, however.
Saskatchewan will be hard pressed
to maintain the title; a title UBC
has never won.
Intramurals
The last day for participation in the
tennis ladder is tomorrow Oct. 30. The
badminton ladder ends the following
Friday Oct. «. Only the league leaders, or those on the top of the ladders enter into the round robin competition.
PROFESSIONAL
INSTRUCTION
in
SCUBA DIVING
BY
Greg     Kocher-Underwater
Sports.     All     Equipment
Supplied. 6 Wk. Course $40.
NAUI & Navy Certification
Private & Group Lessons
Phone 733-5809
Next Course Starts Tues.,
November 10th at 7:30
JUNIOR HOCKEY
FRIDAY 8:30
Vancouver Centennials
vs.
Vernon Essos
KERRISDALE ARENA
Advance Tickets Available
at Thunderbird Shop
Students $1.00
Fri., Nov. 6, 8:30 vs Chilliwack
^6?
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
OPEN TILL 9 - Thurs. & Friday
Before Purchasing Sporting
Equipment, drop in and
discuss your needs with
JOHN
WURFLINGER
John will devote the time
to recommend the best value
buy that will suit your
requirements and your pocket
book.
INTRODUCING
"SKI-LO" CARDS
Now for the first time anywhere, John brings you a new
concept in Ski Slope Hospitality. "Ski-Lo" cards are
personalized cards which enable you to meet new
friends easily — and maintain contact.
DROP INTO VARSITY SPORTS CENTRE
AND ASK FOR DETAILS
"THINK SNOW
11
As can be seen, there is no
animosity between UBC football
coach, Frank Gnup and Simon
Fraser football coach, Lome
Davies. But just wait until
Saturday night when their two
teams clash in the annual Shrum
Bowl game to decide Lower
Mainland football supremacy.
Game time is 8:00 p.m. at Empire
Stadium.
& -
Si.
11&& Jhwukhbbid
iVinisJi Sport* Csm^M
- Phone 228-9707 -
HANDBALL / SQUASH / RACQUETBALL
Four Single Squash Courts
and 2 Doubles Handball Courts
Free Monday - Friday
8:30-12:30
(Excepting University Holidays
No Reservations Required)
COURTS   RESERVATIONS   MAY BE MADE ON A   PHONE IN   BASIS
(UP TO SEVEN DAYS AHEAD)
PHONE   228- 9708
FEES - CASUAL   .50c EACH    (% hr   Booking   period)
MONTHLY 5.00
YEARLY 30.00
RENTAL SQUASH &  RACQUET BALL RACQUETS AVAILABLE
BALLS & OTHER EQUIPMENT SOLD AT SPORTS SHOP  IN CENTRE
CURLING
FREE U.B.C. STUDENTS *
MON-WED-FRI-8.00-    10 am
10.30 -   12.30 am
TUE& THURS       8.00      10 am
12.45      2.45 pm
* On other than U.B.C. Holidays
League Curling Evenings
Phone Stan Floyd for Information 228-9707
FEATURE HOCKEY GAMES
SKATING
UBC Thunderbirds - UBC Braves
And Some Simon Fraser—BCIT Home Games
Most Friday and Saturday Evenings
Game Time - 8:00 P.M.
UBC STUDENTS FREE
Information 228-3197
HOCKEY RENTAL ICE
Weekday, Afternoon Time, Late Evening Rentals,
And Some Cancelled Times. Phone 228-9707
SOME SKATING PARTY TIMES AVAILABLE
WEDNESDAY AND SUNDAY EVENINGS
Phone 228-9707
Evenings - 7:30-10:00
Wed.-Fri.-Sat. & Sun. (On Dual Rinks)
Skating Music — Wed.-Sun.
Popular Music — Fri. & Sat.
Weekday Afternoons - 3:50-6:00
Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri.
Saturday & Sundays & Holidays - 12:30-3:30
Three rinks are used Sat. & Sun. if attendance warrants
Admission — Afternoons—35c — Evenings—50c
Season Cards - 1 Month-$3.50  -  3 Months-$9.00   -  6 Months-$16.00
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FREE UBC STUDENTS SKATING AVAILABLE MON.-FRI.
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Skates Available For Rental 35c — Sharpening 35c
(or 50c While You Wait)
FREE SKATING ADMISSION
Present this coupon to the Box Office Cashier. This qualifies you for one free skate at the UBC,
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, at one of the above listed skating sessions.
(Valid only during November or December) Friday, October 30,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
FRIDAY
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
SUB 207, 8:00 meeting.
AQUASOC
General   Meeting,   SUB  205,   12:30.
COMPUTER SOCIETY
"The role of the consultant", Chemistry,  room  250.   12:30.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
SUB   auditorium,   12:30.
IVCF
"Peace    Probe    and    Prayer",    SUB
Theater,   12:30.
SIMS
SUB 211,  12:30 meeting.
NEWMAN CENTER
Polk  Mass   practise,   St.   Mark's   College Music room  12:30.
VCF
SUB   auditorium   at  noon.
UBC   ANTI-WAR   COMMITTEE
Anti-war Moratorium Rally at SUB
Plaza,   12:30.
FLYING CLUB
Meeting in  SUB   105A  at 12:30.
PRE-SOCIAL    WORK    CLUB
Meeting in SUB 105B at 12:30. Adoption   Social   Worker   to   speak.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Meeting in  SUB  125  at noon.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting Friday noon at IH (Upper
Lounge. New members welcome:.
Free   coffee.
THEOLOGICAL CLUB
Organizational meeting at 7 p.m. for
all students interested in Church
Reform and Theology. In Conference room, Lutheran Campus Centre.
FOLKSOC
General   meeting,   SUB   209,   12:30.
SATURDAY
V.O.C.
Hallowe'en party at Whistler Cabi:n
in  the   evening.
SUNDAY
Folk Mass at St. Mark's College Chapel,   11:30.
PRE-MED
Abortion Seminar at 7 p.m.   in SUB
215.
'tween
classes
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
International   House   (Upper   Lounge)
at   12:30.
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOCIETY
Greek Club  meeting at  7:30 p.m.  at
l.H.
UKRAINIAN   VARSITY   CLUB
Meeting   in   SUB   211   at   noon.
WOMEN'S LIBERATION
Meeting at 2449 New Sciences Wing.
8:00  p.m.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED
Wesbrook   201   at   noon.   Dr.   Drum-
mond, head  of Biochem speaking.
CHINESE   MARTIAL   ART   CLUB
Demonstration   at   7:30   p.m.,   Lower
Lounge,  l.H.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting  to   plan  Beer  Night  in  Angus  24  at  noon.
PHOTOSOC
Darkroom   classes  in  SUB  254;   7:30-
9:30.
CUSO
Info   session   on  Africa;   l.H.   402   at
7:30 p.m.
CANOE CLUB
Meeting  in  SUB   125  at   noon.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT   WIVES   CLUB
Cecil Green Park at 8 p.m.   Speaker
from SPEC.
UBC   TEAM   CLUB
Art   Phillips   speaks   in  SUB   211   at
noon.
PRE-LAW
Buchanan   106   at   12:30.   Harry  Rankin on the  War Measures Act.
EL-  CAFFE
Meeting   every   Wed.   noon   on   3rd
floor  of   l.H.
PRE-DENTAL
Dr.   Rondeau   speaks   on   Oral   Surgery.   SUB   119  at  noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
THUNDERBIRD   SKI   CLUB
Ski trip to Snow Valley in Rockies
Dec. 26 to Jan. 3. Open to all on
campus. Details at Athletic Office,
Memorial Gym.
LEGAL AID
Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon.  SUB 222 and 232.
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commereiaf-3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads an not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AT TOTEM PARK WITH
Mantra this Friday Oct. 30. Prom
9-1. Residents 75c. Non-residents
$1.25.
DID YOU KNOW THAT BOB DY-
lan, the Rolling Stones and the
whole 200,000 people at the Isle of
Wight Pop Festival went wild
over Lighthouse? Don't be left out,
hear Lighthouse.
CAMPASS FROLIC — FEATURES
Sunshyne. SUB Ballroom, Friday,
Oct. 30, 8:30 - 12:00. Residents,
$1.00;   non-residents,   $1.25.
SPRING HAPPENING IN THE SUB
Ballroom. Come dance from 9:00
P.m. until 12:30 a.m.. Saturday,
Oct.   31st.
Greetings
12
HOMOSEXUAL GIRLS AND GUYS:
read "A Gay Guide", HQ7SG74,
1970, in Speciai Collections or
Speakeasy or Box 8969. Station H
or  683-4864
I'M SAVING MY CTjAM1T~FOR
Friday the 13th and the Ponderosa.
Lost & Found
13
LOST — GOLD WHTTTBNAVER
watch with gold expansion strap.
Finder please phone 244-4578
ANYONE SEEING CARSEAT FOR
Austin-Healey, stolen in C-lot between 7:15 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, contact 224-6134
SUBSTANTIAL REWARD FOR RE~
turn of leather purse and contents left in R. 205 at Arts dance
Friday. Desperately needed! Ph.
738-0784,   Barb.
GOLD WIRE FRAME~GLASSES IN
green case, lost Monday afternoon
between Buchanan and Bookstore.
Desperately needed. Reward. Return to Lost and Found, Main
Floor, SUB, or call 522-8245 . . .
Thanks.
Rides  & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
JOIN THE SITZMARK SKI CLUB
and ski Mt. Baker. 6 chairs — 4
ropes. $10.00 annual dues — $2.00
per weekend for sleeping and party
facilities at Glacier — 20 min. from
the top. For information phone
Stan Lloyd, 929-3441 or Jean Bov-
chuk, 526-3641 between ■9:00 and
4:00.
HALLOWE'EN DANCE, SAtTocT.
31. "Amethyst" Place Vanier, 9:00
p.m.-1:00 a.m. Res. SI.00 non-res.
$1.50.   Costumes   optional.
SNOW VALLEY XMAS SKI TRIP,
Dec. 26 to Jan. 3rd. Details Athletic Office Memorial Gym.
IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT YOU'VE
never heard of Lighthouse. After
all who ever heard of the Beatles
in 1963? Monday, 8 p.m. in the
gym. $1.50. SUB information.
THE MOON
Men Dating Men Association
— Wide Choice of Dates —
FULLY CONFIDENTIAL
LEGALLY APPROVED
For   Appointment   call   733-8754
11:00 a.m. - 09:00 p.m.
DON'T BE TAKEN FOR $4.00 JUST
because the group has a big name.
The best value this weekend Is
Lighthouse on Monday at the War
Memorial Gym, $1.50 at SUB.
DOING ANYTHING AFTER THE
Football game Saturday? Come
dance to Spring in the SUB Ballroom.
INTERESTED IN AFRICA? AFRIC-
an Information Session, Nov. 3,
7:30 p.m. International House,
Room  402.
GESTALT ENCOUNTER GROUPS.
Becoming more aware of others
and oneself in the here and now
on an experiential, not intellectual
level. For further information call
David  (Taz)  Takagi at 224-9665.
SKI  INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mtn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14, 2nd fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., Wed. and
Fri.  noon.
Special Notices (Cont.)
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
ValuV Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat. till 7 p.m.
LEARN  TO  SKI   AT
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transportation; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9.  Tel. 738-3128.
Scandals (Cont.)
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2855 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St.  Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
LONDON  RETURN $225
also   other   destinations   —■   1-ways.
687-1244  — 224-0087
2 "GUYS DRIVING TO ME XICcT
City, Xmas break. Return ride for
2 Girls $100. Send resume to 3005
Glen Lake Rd.    Victoria.
STUDENTS . . TEUROPE FOR
Christmas, Ea.ster or Summer.
Employment Opportunities. Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
information (air main Anglo-American Assn., 60A Pyle St., Newport I.W.,  England.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
SKI CHALET FOR HONEYMOON,
Dec. 30 - Jan. 10. Call Bill, 224-7496
from. 10:00  to  11:00 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969 MORGAN PLUS FOUR. LIKE
new, $3000. Call Bob, 733-4585.
GOOD MGA FOR~SALE. OFFERS.
738-0539  evenings.
lT6T~DOl5Gl¥^EDAN, 65,500~miles.
Radio, new tires, valves, shocks,
$195.   Ph.  922-3170
'68 FIAT 124 CONVERTIBLE, RED,
b-nek    int.   Good   condition, must
sell   immediately.   Will   take small
trade, 731-3706
'69 TR6 EXCELLENT CONDITION
very low mileage. Never raced,
rallied,   revd   or marked.   876-4447
'63 TR-4. EXC. BODY AND MECH.
cond.   Ph.   922-2180
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
Fidelity Production of Graphs,
Maps, Text - Book Illustrations,
Charts, Formulations, Advertising.
Phone 980-2928
Day Care & Baby Sitting
32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
DON'T BE ALONE
phone   —   P.Y.C.
434-2636.
— WALK TO A
Dating  Club   —
HALLOWE'EN DANCE. SATUR-
day, Oct. 31 'Amethyst' Place
Vanier 9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. Res.
$1.00, Non-Res. $1.50. Costumes optional.
AQUASOC MEMBERS'! HADLO-
we'en Nite Dive and Party Saturday! Larson Bay, 7:00 p.m.,
3625 Hillcrest, N. Van. 9:00 p.m.
THE ONLY CONCERT . . . THIS
weekend where the Promoters are
not out to make a fast buck.
Lighthouse, Monday in the Gym.
$1.50.  Cheap!   Cheap!   Cheap!
WHAT'S A CAMPUS MINISTER?
Find out by rapping with one
everday in SUB 228; today, George
Hermanso.
CORKY'S    MEN'S~~HAIRSTYLING.
Don't be a U.F.O. See Corky, 3644
W. 4th, Alma on 4th. Appointments.
731-4717
IF YOU'RE TIRED OF STUDYING
on Thursday evenings, come on
down to the Young Alumni Club
at Cecil Green Park after 7 p.m.
for a relaxing evening of bridge
or chess.
SPRING IS COMING TO THE SUB
Ballroom, Saturday, Oct. 31st.
Thaw from 9:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
AQUA SOC MEMBERS! MOVIE
Nite! Underwater chicks by Jim
Willoughby, Tuesday, Nov. 3rd,
7:30 - 9:30 p.m., SUB 209. Absolutely FREE!!
WATCH MERKIN HUMP(PE)
Mercy. He can, you know, but
"can FTeironymous jvlerkin ever
forget Mercy Humppe and find
true happiness?" SUB Theatre
this  weekend.
SHOP THE WORLD
at
PIER I IMPORTS
100   POWELL
IN   GREATER  GASTOWN
682-6681
Sewing Sc Alterations
38
Typewriters  ft  Repairs 39
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home: essays, theses, etc.
Neat accurate work reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Anne  Treasy,   738-8794
EXPERIENCED IBM SELECTRIC
typing service: theses, essays, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.  Mrs.   Troche, 433-1355
ON-CAMPUS TYPING, FAST, Accurate, all types of theses, texts,
essays,   IBM  Selectric,   224-9183.
T^PINGT~EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, engineering, social science,
psychological terminology. High
quality   low   charge.   733-47.08".
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED: COOK, TO COOK TWO
meals on weekends. Pit. 224-7843.
Ask for Len or Gary.
ARE THE FINE POINTS OF CAL-
culus giving you trouble? French
verbs confusing? Is botany enslaving you? Register now at the
[ BC Tutoring Centre and get help
with any course before exam time.
SUB 100A, 228-2083, 12-2 p.m.
weekdays. Opens Nov. 2.
COCKTAIL WAITRESS FOR THE
Daisy. Part-time, $1.65/hr. Attractive. For interview, 8:30 - 9:30
p.m., Tues. - Fri. Ask for Vicki.
No phone calls, please.
Employment Wanted
52
YOUNG   MAN   DESPERATE
work   will  do  anything.   Call
298-9569
FOR
Rob,
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
SPANISH CONVERSATION, THE
shorter wax to speak. Prof. Pareja
(Colombia, Argentina * UBC) will
tutor $3 hr., individual, no groups,
II to S, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 12
hours minimum paid in advance.
Limited number. 1405 Cypress (nr.
Cornwall)   738-5691.
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.
LEND A HAND — AND EARN
some money. If you have a particular area of academic competence, apply at the UBC Tutoring
Centre. We need tutors. Open to
profs, TA's, grad. students, and
senior students. SUB 100A, 228-
2083, 12-2 p.m. weekdays. Opens
Nov. 2.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW AVAILABLE $1.00
at the Bookttore ami
AMS  Publications  Office        m*
Pre-tale ticket* redeemed only at
Publication! Office
FOR MEN ONLY. ASSTD. NEW
100/33 rpm party & stag records.
Also—8 track stereo cassettes—
reg. $8.00 each to clear $5.00. Ph.
731-2343   evenings.
FENDER TELECASTER, HUM-
bucking pick-up. Signature amp.
55 watts rms, 2—15" heavy-duty
speakers.   228-9325   Jacques.
12.". FUR'COATS, NEW AND USED,
we will buy, sell and trade! Used
coats $0 to $100. Pappus Bros.
SELL 4.",:! Hamilton, at Victory
Square. Open only Fri. 7-9 p.m.;
Sat.,   in a.m. -5 p.m.  Ph. 081-6840.
ONE PAIR LADIES' CLIMBING
Boots.  7Mm.  733-1365 after 0 p.m.
BEAUTIFUL BIG BLACK PORT-
able Stereo; detachable speakers,
Gerard t urntable, new needle,
Just reconditioned, Eiectrohome,
$120   or  best  offer.   733-4027
TRIO AMPLIFIER AM/FM TUNER.
Two banks of 9 4" speakers.
Speakers alone, $75. Everything,
$200.  Phone 228-9871
COMPLETE SCUBA OUTFIT FOR
■sale. Regulator, tanks, etc., $125.
228-9464
PHILCO SOLID STATE STEREO
record player, $110. Tony TC-100
portable cassette recorder, $85. Ph.
261-8647 — 531-1758 after 6 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
DON'T BUILD AN AUK! LIVE ON
campus for less. Quiet rooms with
kitchen privileges, linen changed
weekly. Large T.V. and study
rooms. $50 mon. Phone Bill Dins •
more   224-4530.   5760  Toronto  Rd.
ROOM & BATH. PRIVATE EN-
trance. Some cooking facilities.
Quiet person only. Less rent for
work   if   desired.   733-6447.
SHARE A HOUSE AND Expenses with three others. Your
own bedroom. 1st and MacDonald.
733-7358.
ROOM FOR RENT, NEAR UBC.
Male students, quiet, abstainers,
non-smokers Meals possible. Ph.
738-2305
SICK OF THE POLLUTED CITY.
Live in White Rock. For sleeping
rooms, double or single, phone
531-5963, commutor service available.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD (ONE FE-
male). Two blocks from Gates.
Large bedroom. Cheap! Available
now.   224-3737
ATTRACTIVE ROOM WITH PRO-
fessor's family for girl student.
Rent, board cheap in return for
minimal household help. 224-5042
eves.
Furnished Apts.
83
GIRL TO SHARE 2 BEDROOM DU-
plex with same. $50 per month.
Avail.   Nov.    1st.   Phone   733-6953.
ON CAMPUS FEMALE SEEKS
apartment companion. Expenses
equivalent to residence. Private
bedroom.   Phone  687-4249
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
TWO U.B.C. STUDENTS WITH
house need four others to share
rent. Available Nov. 1st Phone
Irv 263-3653.
WANTED: MALE GRAD STUDENT
to share large house with 2 others,
8th near Macdonald. $67 and utilities. Ph.  732-6479
BUY — SELL
INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Page 28
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  30,   1970
We don't want a handout.
iiBSe #*  itr*    *-*V      * > ■ r   ft   ■» * ■
A handout doesn't help anyone in the long
run. No one becomes a better person for it,
neither the giver nor the receiver. A helping hand
is a different matter.
Your fair share donation to the Untied
Apple, and to the myriad agencies which it
supports is money that will be used wisely to
benefit the entire community of highly-paid
administrators and bureaucrats through services
ranging from providing memberships in the
Vancouver Club for agency executives to helping
exploitative companies feel better after lending
their aspiring young executives to the Untied
Apple.
Your donation to the Untied Apple is no
handout. It's a helping hand to your
neighbor in need, an expression of concern and
care that is well- used and deeply appreciated. An
expression that will last, that will improve the life
of another human being.
Just like we helped the lives of the transients
at Jericho, the Yippies at English Bay, the draft
dodgers who were "exported" through the Sumas
crossing, the residents of Gastown who were
displaced to provide a place for exploiters of our
"groovy cultural values", and all the others.
Remember: "Society hides what it can't cure."
tuum est, baby.
GIVE THE UNTIED WAY
MacMill and Blow Dell has donated this space to relieve its feelings of corporate guilt.

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