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The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1970

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Array —kevan perrins photo
JUST IN CASE those filthy hippies decide to storm the old Jericho hostel, the army is tearing it down.
Boarded windows and torn-off roof ensure that no one will use the building again. The army is so hard
up for space it just couldn't afford to keep the building. So hard up for space that the building is being
torn down because the land is needed badly — two years from now.
24 persons
charged
in Quebec
MONTREAL (CUP) — Ten men were charged here Thursday with
seditious conspiracy to overthrow the Canadian and Quebec
governments by force.
Along with 14 others, they were also charged with belonging, or
claiming to belong, to the Front de Liberation du Quebec.
The ten hit with the seditious conspiracy charge, which carries
maximum penalty of 14 years in prison, include:Montreal trade union
leader Michel Chartrand; journalist Jacques Larue-Langlois; Robert
Lemieux, the lawyer who acted as an imtermediary between the FLQ
and the government during the Laporte-Cross kidnappings; former
sociology lecturer Charles Gagnon and author Pierre Vallieres.
The others are described as being in their teens or early twenties.
They are: Jean Boisjoly, Come Leblanc, Gilles Cormier, Robert
Langevin, and Raymond Cormier.
One other person has also been charged with seditious conspiracy
but has not been captured and police have refused to release his name.
Those arraigned on the seditious conspiracy charge were charged
with, between Jan. 1, 1968 and Oct. 16 of this year, being "party to
a seditious conspiracy with the intent of changing the government of
Canada and especially in the province of Quebec by advocating the use
of force .. . contrary to Section 62, Paragraph C of the Criminal Code."
Trial date was set in January for all charged and bail was refused.
The charge of belonging to the FLQ carries a maximum penalty
of five years in prison.
Twenty seven persons were originally scheduled to appear at the
Thursday session but two were apparently sick in prison and one was
not accounted for.
Besides the Montreal charges, there were 13 other arraignments
throughout the province of Quebec.
They were charged with everything from advocating the politics
of the FLQ to making anonymous phone calls.
One man, Francois Mercier of Cowansvill P.Q., who admitted
being an FLQ member was remanded to Nov. 10 for sentence. His
sentence could be a good indication of the severity of the sentences to
be handed down on the others in January.
None of the charges laid Thursday appear to be directly related to
the killing of Quebec labor minister Pierre Laporte or the kidnapping of
British trade attache James Cross, the actions which supposedly
provoked the declaration of the War Measures Act Oct. 16.
All of the six public figures charged with seditious conspiracy
were highly visible before the declaration of the act and very much
available to the authorities.
They were picked up as long ago as Oct. 16 but the government
has waited until the last possible moment to charge the prisoners.
In a dramatic speech to the commons Wednesday on behalf of his
new bill, the Public Order Temporary Measures Act, 1970 (POTMA),
justice minister John Turner also brought down a virtual verdict of
guilty against Callieres and Gagnon, two members of the FLQ now
charged with seditious conspiracy.
continued on page 6 see: POLICE
CBC brass not amused at Trudeau satire
REGINA (CUP) - The Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation withdrew from broadcast a Max
Ferguson skit satirizing arrests made in Quebec under
the War Measures Act, the University of
Saskatchewan at Regina student newspaper The
Carillon has learned.
The skit, which had already been fed out to the
network stations and pre-recorded by them for later
broadcast, was never used because a following
message from the CBC brass instructed the stations
not to broadcast it.
The skit features a supposed visit by Quebec
justice minister Jerome Choquette to a Montreal jail
where a number of prisoners are being held
incommunicado after being rounded up under the
War Measures Act.
In the background, one prisoner is heard
pounding on the bars of his cell and vocally
protesting his incarceration.
Gradually  the noise coming from this activity
becomes predominant in the skit.
The listener then hears a guard ask the prisoner
what right he feels he has to contact the outside when
none of the other prisoners can do so.
The listener then hears the familiar voice of
Pierre Elliot Trudeau say that he thought the cabinet
might be interested in his whereabouts and that he
wants to contact them.
Then Ferguson comments to close the skit that at a
time like this, he wouldn't want to be in disagreement
with Mr. Choquette.
When contacted by The Carillon at his Toronto
home, Ferguson said he had made several inquiries to
find out why the skit had not been used but had
given up after getting nothing out of the CBC
bureaucracy.
"This is the first time I have been censored in 23
years," he said.
The revelation of the censorship of the Max
Ferguson   show   follows   closely   after   the   CBC's
decision to censor a scheduled documentary on
Lenin.
The CBC brass has faced mounting criticism
recently for its "gutlessness" in handling the Quebec
crisis.
In a recent television column in the Toronto
Globe and Mail, Blaik Kirby uses words such as
"cowed" and "cowardice" to describe the recent
actions of CBC officials.
For some time it has been obvious that George
Davidson became president of the CBC because it was
felt necessary to have someone in charge who knew
his way around Parliament Hill. The idea was
presumably that such a man would know how to deal
with parliament to fend off the attacks and give the
CBC some strength and determination to stand by its
principles.
The evidence indicates that instead of defending
the CBC, he is bowing to the parliamentary winds,
Kirbv wrote. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
Change must be incorporated into law
t   ir\CCDU llkir hi Anr>Ai  in mi Alanns*       .,,U ^      n. i        ,lr^, .    „
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Change is the theme of today's
society - changes in life-style,
people, and ideas, said alderman
Harry Rankin   Wednesday.
"We must recognize this
movement and work to
incorporate it into the framework
RANKIN . .. off your backsides
of law — what you can and can't
do," Rankin told students, in a
lively lecture in Bu. 106.
Rankin related a variety of
topics from Mayor Tom Campbell
to the Doukhobours to the theme
of law and order.
"Law is one of the basic areas
in which everybody is affected.
The fallout of the War Measures
Act aimed at Quebec occurs in
B.C. when the attorney general
passes a law which outlaws
teachers who preach allegiance to
the FLQ (Front de Liberation du
Quebec), said Rankin, a
Vancouver lawyer.
Rankin denounced terrorism as
a naive, irresponsible, and
dangerous philosophy which must
not be equated with social change.
Referring to a student in the
audience who expressed vague
support for the FLQ he said:
"You had better get off your
collective abstract backside and
realize that terrorism is politically
adolescent if at best it cannot
bring about political improvement
and at worst it prompts military
occupation of an area."
"It is a form of arrogance for a
minority to feel they can
overthrow a majority against the
will of the majority."
"In fact terrorism is the
creation of the middle class
intellectuals, not the labourers
that it purports to represent,"
Rankin said.
Rankin used the War Measures
Act to illustrate the power of law.
"The hoax of the War Measures
Act was felt when Drapeau was
returned unanimously to office
and the government proclaimed
an 'insurrection in Quebec'."
Evocation of the War Measures
Act, he said, is analogous to
"using an eight by eight when a
fly swatter would suffice."
"Not the War Measures act but
the Criminal Code could have
been utilitzed."
He pointed out that a few
years ago, during the Doukhobour
crisis in B.C. which included 300
to 400 bombings the government
did not evoke any war measure
powers.
"It was frustating but we
managed," said Rankin.
Rankin     posed    the    "real
questions":     "Is    the    reaction
appropriate to the action? Do you
strip everybody's liberties because
. of one death?"
He said he felt that the new
legislation being discussed in
parliament is much more
appropriate because "instead of
declaring everybody an outlaw it
declares something unlawful."
Dear Speakeasy:
I'm in first year arts and I think I'm going to drop out. This
place is so big; I hate it. I think I'm failing my courses because I
can't study, and they're a drag anyway. It's so huge out here that
I'm afraid to talk to anybody and it seems like such a waste just
to go to classes, take notes, and go back to residence. What can I
do?
First of all, don't drop out without talking to anybody
about it. You will find that you are not alone with these feelings.
In fact, there are amazing numbers of people who feel the same
way and seriously consider dropping out.
At Speak Easy we can help you talk it out and possibly
show you some things you can get involved in to make university
more relevant to life (if that's what you want). It helps to talk
about your feelings.
If your most immediate concern is your courses we have
profs in almost every department who are human and are very
willing to show you that your courses can be interesting.
You might find you'd like to change your courses, even
your faculty. That's not impossible, although you'd probably
have to wait a year to get into your interests. It is often a good
idea to take a year or two out to work to let your direction
become more clear.
There are also trained academic counsellors available at the
Student Services Building (Hut No. 07, West Mall, or 228-3811).
They are there from 9-5 and on appointment could probably
suggest better "allocation of time" or "study habits" among
other things.
If you feel intimidated by this place and are emotionally
not prepared to "fit yourself in," there are three full-time
psychiatrists over at Wesbrook (Health Services, 228-2151). They
are good people to talk to (again, you'll need an appointment as
they are busy).
You can get an appointment through us or through the
main desk in Wesbrook. Don't let the term psychiatrist scare you.
They don't restrict themselves to people with problems but will
try to help you get out of yourself and relate to others.
Don't leave without talking it out with someone else. We're
here from 10-8:30, Monday to Friday (SUB 234, or 228-3700).
"There is need for the type of
social reform in Quebec that
terrorism could never effect but
an organization like the Front
d'Action Politique (FRAP) could.
Quebec is the poorest and most
corrupt province in the judiciary
and social services."
Rankin discussed the general
trend in political revolution.
"When the majority of people
feel that this system is no good
they will wash it away like a
torrent. Cuba is a prime example
— Castro and 15 men overthrew
Batista's fascist government in a
democratic revolution that was an
act of patronism."
A different situation exists in
Canada, he said.
"To understate the matter we
may have capitalist governments
but they are not fascist."
"In our country there is room
for involvement. When only 40
per cent of the electorate votes
because it is a hot day at the
poles, the people are not that
uptight yet," he said.
"I do subscribe to change,"
said Rankin.
"I believe in a socialist society
where production is in the hands
of the government."
In the present system every
vote is a class vote, one class being
comprised of the controllers of
society, and a second class of
those who are dependent on the
controllers or who have only the
illusion of control, Rankin said.
Each of these votes could
become a vote which represent
the whole society, he said. Those
who want to promote change
must confront the appropnate
level of government, he told his.
audience.
"The Vancouver Liberation
Front at a recent meeting
bombarded the City Council with
demands to change whole
ideological concepts. They should
never   have   brought   to  council
ideas that cannot be carried out
there. All they accomplish is a
confrontation which may bolster
their political egos," said Rankin.
It is impossible to speak of the
City Council without mentioning
our mayor, Tom Campbell, he
said.
"Tom Campbell and his
aldermen are busy applying 'law
and order' in the civic field. At a
recent council meeting Alderman
Wilson's proposal that the head of
the police in Vancouver be
prepared to come to grips with
the present political crisis was met
with Campbell's reassuring
response that he had already
taken care of that," said Rankin.
Rankin referred to council's
"inane" denial to grant the
VietNam Committee a parade
permit because it would
necessitate putting four traffic
policemen on duty.
"I challenged the inaneness of
this by asking Campbell if he was
prepared to release 150 policemen
in full garb if the Viet Nam
Committee disregarded this
decision and had the parade.
Campbell said he was fully
prepared to meet this event," said
Rankin.
Vancouver must establish
priorities of reform.
"For example the traffic
situation must be improved by a
freeway or rapid transit system,"
he said.
"Shortly, council will debate
for 85 more police in Vancouver
which means a million dollar
expenditure. Instead, we should
be investigating the social
conditions which create a need for
more police," said Rankin.
"We must establish a broad
base for democracy by having
relevant, vocal represented power
groups who organize to make
their own demands.
"The elementary step is to
educate people to long range
affects of change. It is in the test
between theory and practice and
the unity between them that the
answer lies." said Rankin.
PATIO
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tfl
tfl Friday, November 6, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Government impotent in sale of Ryerson to U.S.
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Trudeau government is
powerless to do anything about the sale of Ryerson Press
of Toronto to a U.S. company.
An unnamed "spokesman in the office of prime
minister Trudeau" said the federal government can act in
such areas as uranium sales and production, banking and
broadcasting, because they come under federal
jurisdiction while publishing does not.
However, the anonymous spokesman quoted in the
commercial press said minister without portfolio Herb
Gray is expected to present a series of policy proposals to
the cabinet very shortly dealing with foreign ownership of
Canadian firms.
In other reactions to the sale announced early this
week, Canadian poet Al Purdy has announced he will not
allow Ryerson Press to publish his new anthology of
poems.
"I don't particularly want to publish in an American
branch plant," he said.
' Purdy said: "This country is being sold piece by piece
and nobody seems to say anything."
In Toronto, members of the radical New Democratic
Party Waffle group and the Toronto Typographical
Union have been picketing in front of the Ryerson Press
building to protest the sale.
Union president Terry Wilds, said about 50 members
of the bookbinders union have lost their jobs and about
50 typographers will also be laid off.
Melville Watkins, one of- the original Waffle group,
said the Ontario government should set up a crown
corporation to publish all school textbooks.
In Winnipeg, announcement of the sale has caused a
slight stir in the normal placid meeting of the Association
of Universities and Colleges in Canada.
—daryl tan photo
CUTE AIN'T IT, this new campus sign that you have to do a cartwheel to read. Smack in the middle of
the sidewalk, the guidepost reassures students who weren't certain they were sitting near Agriculture
Road. Now that they know, do they really care?
Radio-Canada broadcaster learned
about biting the hand that fed him
Media must give
tapes to CRTC
.OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Radio-Television Commission
has ordered about 20 radio and television stations across the country to
submit tapes of their programming during the Quebec kidnapping crisis
between Oct. 8 and Oct. 27.
CRTC chairman Pierre Juneau said the only television tapes
involved are those of network programming by the CBC and CTV, and
those of local programming by stations in Quebec City, Montreal and
Ottawa.
There have been fears that the tapes may be used in some way by
the authorities which would not be in the interests of Canadian
freedom of the press.
The commission would have preferred not to ask for the tapes
until the Quebec crisis subsided, because it recognizes the danger that
its move might be misinterpreted, Juneau said. He also said the
commission feels that the tapes have a historical value and therefore
had decided to move because stations are permitted to destroy them
after 30 days.
Another 'minor' factor is public complaints about the coverage of
events in Quebec, there were "not too many complaints" but enough to
justify a closer look at the programming concerned.
The stations involved in the study stretch from coast to coast but
are mostly in Quebec and Ontario where the most intensive coverage
took place.
Democracy allowed
Student democracy does exist — at least for women residents in
Place Vanier Residence.
Visiting hours at the residence have been extended, as a result of
a vote earlier this year by residents.
Visiting hours during the week have changed from noon until 10
p.m. to 10 a.m. until midnight.
Weekend hours have been extended from noon until midnight to
10 a.m. until 2:30 a.m.
The students had voted 89 per cent in favor of weekend hours
going until 3 a.m.
Housing head Les Rohringer told the residents Tuesday of the
decision to lengthen the hours.
The 2:30 a.m. deadline was a compromise between the wishes of
the students and those of the board of governors' advisory committee,
which made the decision, Rohringer said.
Actually the new deadlines will not apply to all the houses,
because the Place Vanier residences each decide individually what their
visiting hours are.
Therefore the extension means that students have a larger range
of hours to choose from for the visiting hours in their particular house.
The votes have already been taken within the new limits by
individual secret ballot.
MONTREAL (CUP) - Montreal broadcaster
Michel Bourdon has been suspended by
Radio-Canada, the French language equivalent of
the CBC, for criticizing the CBC in a teach-in
organized by the Quebec Committee for the
Defense of Civil Liberties last week.
Speaking to 1000 people at the University of
Montreal, Bourdon related specific incidents
concerning what he considered to be news
censorship by the Radio-Canada news department.
Yesterday Bourdon received a letter from news
director Pierre Charbonnneau telling him he was
suspended for the following reasons:
e Malicious criticism of the management of
the CBC's French language news services and
research which created a "climate of
insubordination and disorder in the newsroom.
e Abusive and incorrect use of confiendtial
and priviledged information obtained through his
position as a CBC employee.
Public declaration at the Oct. 29 teach-in
which "abusively and deceptively condemned
management of the news service since the
kidnappings of James Cross and the late Pierre
Laporte.
• Participation in a teach-in which,
Charbonneau said, compromised Bourdon's
credibility and impartiality.
Yesterday union president Denis Vincent issued
a statement listing example of news tampering by
the Radio-Canada newsroom.
They included cuts or changes in extracts of the
statements by Louis Laberge, president of the
250,000 member Quebec Federation of Labour; by
Paul Cliche, leader of the Front d'Action Politique,
which unsuccessfully challenged the Civic Party of
Montreal mayor Jean Drapeau, and a report from
New York on the editorial relations of Time and
Newsweek magazines on the Canadian government
action.
Presidents endorse
War Act protest
WINNIPEG (CUP) - Twenty-eight Canadian university
student union presidents voiced their support last weekend for a
nation wide day of protest over the implementation of the War
Measures Act and subsequent legislation.
In a caucus held in Winnipeg in advance of the annual
conference of the Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada (AUCC), union presidents tabled a resolution
disapproving of the federal government's actions and demanding
that recent events in Quebec not be used as an excuse to improve
further restrictive legislation.
"It is contradictory to argue that it is necessary to destroy
democracy in order to save it," the resolution said. "Adequate
provisions for dealing with seditious activity and terrorism such as
occured in Quebec," are already in the criminal code, the caucus
continued.
The day Of protest is tentatively scheduled for Nov. 13.
In other business, the presidents discussed matters such as
student parity on university governing bodies, whether student
unions will have to be re-structured to meet the needs of
students, the structure of the AUCC and its failure to be
representative of the students. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
MWSSH
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member, Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
NOVEMBER 6, 1970
Meanwhile...
If a stranger were to suddenly find himself
somewhere in B.C., he would probably never know
anything had happened in this country.
It has been only three weeks since the invocation
of the War Measures Act, but the prevailing attitude,
fostered by the press, is now one of "back to normal".
We are told the War Measures Act is being repealed,
that we have been saved from a sinister conspiracy and
massive bloodbath and that we can now go about our
business, forgetting the whole unpleasant incident.
Some of the voices that were first raised in protest
have been intimidated into silence, while others seem to
have moved on to new issues.
But many of our rights which were taken away by
the War Measures Act are also denied by the Trudeau
government's proposed new emergency legislation.
The government still has not seen fit to tell us
about the evidence it claims to have concerning an
"apprehended insurection."
There are still 65 people in Quebec jails. Some of
them, whose only crime was dissent and who used only
words as their weapons, are now facing that familiar,
catch-all police state charge of sedition.
Another 400 have been released from jail after
experiencing the humiliation of imprisonment for
absolutely no reason.
Police raids without warrants continue daily in
Quebec. All branches of the Quebec independence
movement have been damaged by arrests, seizures and
slander.
Closer to home, the B.C. government's
witch-hunting order in council is still on the books — we
still have to be careful what we say in the classroom.
The climate of fear that the federal government
needed to operate is still very much with us.
Most important, the conditions that spawned the
FLQ still exist. Quebec is still dominated by the
English-speaking minority and the Quebecois is still a
second-class citizen in his own province.
With his long-sought confrontation, Trudeau has
managed to increase hostility to the legitimate demands
of the people of Quebec.
Some people are forgetting quickly, but it's far
from over.
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JAM ty_JK[ How^i ffcf m« r   —.'
What next?
The proposal to build a hotel on Wesbrook
Crescent, detailed on page 24, opens up interesting
commercial possibilities for the UBC campus.
Just think, when that's finished we can have a
supermarket on the top floor of the library, a penny
arcade along Main Mall or even a Ralph Williams car
dealership in C lot.
Maybe we can sell the whole place for "Academic
Acres" subdivision, then start all over again somewhere
else.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City      Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Wire    . John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Scott McCloy
Associate • John Twigg
Ass't News    ...:.... Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo   .. . ; David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
"It's just like a Soviet kiddies
show," squealed Shane Mccunet
Nathalie Apouchtineand Don Gardiner
as Sandy Kass, Jennifer Alley, Bernie
Bischoff, Nym Hughes and Ken
Lassessen grappled and gasped in the
greatest group grope ever performed
live on the Ubyssey newsdesk.
Judy McLeod, Jan O'Brien and
Sharon Boylan sat around analyzing
the situation.
Josephine Margolis stumbled gasping
into the office muttering ecstatically
about being kidnapped and held in
Calgary by the filthy foursome, Phil
Barkworth, Dick Betts, Phil Barkworth
and Scott McClov.
Jim Gorman, Kevan Perrins,
Maureen Gans, and Chris Gallagher sort
of hung around doing what ever
photogs do.
HOW WANV TMteS
H€ rUMte IN
DAT? >
■pir-Ti ooutts
WOfcfH.
—on the line, Waterloo
LETTERS
Teachers
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In connection with the article
concerning Arthur N. Olsen of
Tuesday, Nov. 3, the following
points might be noted:
(a) it is incorrect to refer to
Mr. Olsen as a "teacher" — a
teacher holds a valid certificate
and it is evident that Mr. Olsen
does not.
(b) a "letter of permission" is
not "required by all teachers
working in B.C." A valid teaching
certificate is. A "letter of
permission" is required for any
individual a school board wishes
to employ when certificated
teachers are not available. I have
checked my understanding on
this point and can state that it is
the school board which is to apply
to the superintendent of
education — not the individual.
Perhaps the school board
requested Mr. Olsen to supply a
certificate, issued by the
department of education, or let
them know that they were to
obtain a letter of permission —
only Mr. Olsen and the board can
clarify the point.
(c) The school board would
not be able to retain the services
of Mr. Olsen without either a
teaching certificate issued by the
registrar's office of the provincial
department of education or a
letter of permission from the
superintendent of education.
There are unemployed certificate
holders, some of whom might well
be willing to accept an
appointment to teach in Dawson
Creek.
(d)   Mr.     Olsen     evidently
holds a B.Sc. degree. He is not a
B.Ed, holder from UBC, nor has
he  made written  application to
the faculty for admission to the
one-year program for graduates.
J. H. WALLIS
Records Office,
Faculty of Education.
Bookstore
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Every year there have been
murmuring about the so-called
"non-profit" bookstore which
year after year bleeds the
students. It is time that murmur
became a roar.
A   certain    compulsory    text
listed at $15.95 the Armories is
now listed at $17.10 in the
Bookstore. That is inflation — 7.2
per cent.
Engineering computation
paper, which sells at 35 cents a
pad in the Bookstore goes for 25
cents a pad in the Village
drugstore, and they make a profit
on it.
It is fairly well known that
books available at downtown
book stores are considerably
cheaper than the identical books
at the UBC Bookstore. So why
not urge all the profs to place
their orders with downtown
bookstores for the sake of
conservation of the pocket book?
STEVEN SCOTTEN,
Engineering IV.
Cleanliness
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
SUB's a mess.. . ever notice?
Everybody just lifts their feet
when the janitor comes through
with his all-purpose broom (cleans
all sorts of student slop).
Couldn't we prove a lot if we
cleaned up our own filth? I mean,
at least then we'd be able to
sincerely rave against pollution,
without that twinge of conscience
telling us what bloody hypocrites
we are.
UBC's got lots of nice grass,
thick brown mud (organic, note),
and scads of people; but
sometimes your eyes get so raw
from seeing campus crap you lose
all pleasure in the natural.
I'm always transferring garbage
from grass to can and I'm waiting,
very impatiently, for 44,000
hands to help me.
ALISON INGLIS
Resistance
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: order in council
concerning teachers. All thinking
teachers should join together to
support the overthrow of the
Chilean government. If Victoria
acts and fires them, just think —
Mr. B. would be supporting
Communism! If Victoria doesn't
act, well, so much for the
order-in-council.
LORNE ELLASCHUK
Science 2
Teacup
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I was happy to see that as a
result of series of meetings
following the Teacup game, we
will race the chariots again next
year.
The genera] feeling among
those of us that took part is that
the whole concept of the race was
distorted this year by an overly
zealous desire to win on both
sides. The races should be a clown
event depicting the struggles of
the great Roman warriors.
Next year a committee will be
set up by the racing team to make
the chariots lighter and safer, limit
team sizes, and to make the event
a friendly one between faculties
working in aid of a worthy cause.
The Engineers are traditionally
condemned for many of their
"vigorous" activities but we raise
$7,000 yearly for the Crippled
Children's Fund.
I was unlucky in being injured,
but I didn't have to enter the race.
People set record crowds every
year because they get to watch
the ridiculously funny Teacup
football game, see an outrageous
bunch of charioteers, and support
a very worthy cause.
AL WASNEA,
engineering 3.
More tea
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We, as the Home Ec. Football
team and as students, deplore the
activities of the half time
"entertainment" at the Teacup
game. Although the purpose of
raising money for crippled
children is a worthwhile cause,
when new cripples are created,
this purpose is defeated. Until
something is done to remove the
danger of the half time activities,
Home Economics seriously
considers refusing to participate in
future games.
116 SIGNATURES.
We have received an
anonymous letter that raises some
interesting points about housing
at UBC.
If the letter's author would
contact us, we guarantee to
respect his or her request for
public anonymity. Friday, November 6, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
in the
classroom
By JANET MADEISKY
There is some agitation among geological
engineering students over job opportunities.
This is a result of the White Paper on Taxation
produced by federal minister Edgar Benson whose
plans t fon increased corporate and capital gains
taxation have thrown industry into a flap.
The result is that many large employers of
geological engineers are considering cutting their
costs through staff reductions.
This is a real problem for first year geological
engineering students because it will affect them
when they graduate, said associate geology professor
Richard Kucera before beginning the lecture in
Geology 100 Tuesday at 8:30.
Tuesday's lecture was on the weathering of
rocks and forms of rock transportation — by wind
and ice, for example.
Kucera said three-quarters of the earth's surface
is composed of sedimentary rock and nearly all
fossils appear in this type of rock.
Kucera enunciated well and spoke at about
average speed. He only referred occasionally to his
notes. The lecture was coherent and generally
well-prepared.
Relatively simple language was used by the prof
except for some technical terms peculiar to geology.
All Your Entertainment Needs
on the rocks
Most of the students in the class took copious
notes and diagrams throughout the lecture.
Kucera often paused to emphasize an important
basic principle. His subject was easy to follow and
his voice intonation, if nothing else, made the
lecture interesting.
The students, however, remained stoically silent
throughout, being too busy taking notes to ask
questions, it seems.
Several diagrams later, a dramatic pause, and
then: "this cross-section represents the birth and
destruction of a mountain." The topic was erosion.
Most of the class seemed to enjoy the lecture as
Kucera bantered and gesticulated his way through
sedimentary rock formations.
One student remarked that he had gone into
geological engineering because Kucera is- one of the
rare good profs in that department.
For an 8:30 lecture the class is amazingly alert.
Whether this is through necessity because of the
importance of each lecture, or because engineers
never lose their bounce, we would not care to guess.
After the lecture, three or four students stayed
behind to ask questions. Kucera will probably
produce some reasonably good rock freaks if he
keeps up his current standard.
MORE LETTERS
Scandal
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir;
Tee hee ...
Overheard in the meat
department of Safeway at Tenth
and Sasamat:
Art Smolensky, Student
Senator-at-large, ordering ground
filet. I believe the price quoted by
the lady behind the counter was
$3.25 A POUND.
Never fear, students of UBC,
when you have representatives
who can afford to consume their
protein by one of the most
expensive means on earth!
Ah, the irony of it. The Great
Soft Drink Controversy just fades
away by comparison.
SANDRA LUNDY.
Food
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As students of this institution,
we regularly patronize food
services. We have been tolerant in
paying questionable prices for
food that is adequate, yet nothing
to get excited about. Needless to
say, we feel that the price of a
certain item should be brought to
the attention of our fellow
students.
A cup of hot, (not to be
confused with boiling) water costs
10 cents in SUB and 12 cents in
Buchanan. We question the logic
involved in setting this exorbitant
price. Granted, we are aware that
a paper cup costs two cents and
are willing to pay for it. But it is
difficult to believe that it costs
this university 10 cents to heat a
cup of water. And how it is
possible to charge 12 cents for
heated water and the same for
coffee? This leads us to believe
that it costs nothing for food
services to make coffee, so why
the two cent increase?
- Since we are to have been
raised and educated in a
democratic society, we protested
the sensibility of the situation. As
a result, a food services employee
called us "cheap jerks." We feel
that such name calling is an insult
to our intelligence. What right
does food services, which is
essentially a service to the
students, have in first ridiculing
the intelligence of its clientele by
charging 12 cents for hot water
and then insulting them?
BRUCE ARNOLD
Arts 2
JUNE CRAWFORD
Arts 2
DAVID.ROZEN
Arts 3
LINDA SHINE
Arts 2
'Perverts
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Brock Hall washroom is a
den of perversion.
The other afternoon, while I
was studying in Brock, the urge
came over me so I proceeded
down to the dingle-den in the
basement.
There, while relieving myself, I
happened to notice a gnome with
greasy black hair peering over one
of the stalls and giving me the
"once-over."
I flashed a dirty look at this
gnome and he quickly sucked his
head back towards the depths
from whence he sprung.
Two hours later, the same
experience happened to a friend
of mine, and an incredible four
hours after the first incident,
when nature called me again, the
gnome was still doing his thing.
Afraid that he might want to
do my thing as well, I reported this
incident to the campus RCMP
along with two friends soon
afterward.
Since this occasion, I have
heard of several incidents
involving both "sight-seers" and
"cock-sure" exhibitionists plying
their trades through the large
holes carved in the walls of every
stall.
My question is — Where is the
mad bomber now that we need
him?
PETER VICKERS
Arts 4
Sensitivy
The Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
There is one good thing about
a police state. People learn to read
between the lines, thus their
sensitivity is being improved.
A quotation from Bert Brecht
reads:
"What.is breaking into a bank
compared with running a bank?
What is murdering a man
compared with employing a
man?"
FRIEDER NAKE,
Computer Science
Gears
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I have never been ashamed to
say that I am studying
engineering, but — among others
— I am becoming increasingly fed
up with being classified as a
devout believer in the prevalent
EUS code of ethics simply
because I am an engineer.
My philosophy is that a person
should be free to do whatever he
wants, as long as he doesn't
interfere with the rights of others.
I too would like to be able to
decide whether or not my own
crucifixion should take place, and
whether -or not I want my books
and clothes soaked with water.
Let me also say that I do not
agree with the use of my money
to replace damaged property or
beer stolen by a few irresponsible
engineers.
In short, I cannot grok on
"geardom" as it is viewed by most
students.
RALPH SKETCHLEY
Engineering II.
Letters to the editor must be
signed and, if possible, typed.
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit letters for reasons of
brevity, legality, grammar or taste.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
Choice is academic liberty or radicalism -AUCC
WINNIPEG (CUP) -
Universitites must limit their
enrolment and protect themselves
from radicalism masquerading in
the guise of academic freedom,
Dr. Roger Gaudry, president of
the Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada said
Wednesday in Winnipeg.
Speaking at the opening
plenary of the annual AUCC
convention, Gaudry said higher
standards must be applied to
university enrolment and greater
emphasis must be placed on
languages and mathematics.
Is it "wise to allow all students
into our univerisities and lose the
opportunity of developing great
scholars?" he asked.
He said there was a developing
conflict between traditional
academic freedoms and radical
activities on Canadian campuses.
He said universities must find
ways of protecting themselves and
must formulate a code of ethics to
govern the political activities of
faculty.
Gaudry, who spoke in French,
also called for co-operation
between university and industry
in the development of the country,
particularly in Canada's
northward expansion.
Earlier in the week 28 student
Police unsuccessful
admits Choquette
from page One
Speaking in both French and
English, Turner listed all the
possible reasons he could find for
the government's actions in
outlawing the FLQ and outlined
the need for protracted legislation
to deal with the current crisis in
Quebec.
In "Negrcs Blanc's de
I'Amerique," Turner said,
Vallieres lays out a pattern of
revolution to overthrow the
government of Quebec and
Canada.
The (POTMA) is retroactive
and all that Vallieres and Gagnorf
did in the name of the FLQ since
they first became members
become illegal acts to be
considered seditious.
Most members of parliament
did not appear to concerned by
Turner's verdict. They expressed
their assent for most of the
contents of the POTMA, although
Conservative leader Robert
Stanfield said it needs some
"cleaning up".
The members felt the POTMA
clearly defined the FLQ as the
enemy although the act states that
it applies to any group who
advocate the same changes as the
FLQ.
Turner's new proposed
legislation makes few changes in
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the   regulations  invoked Oct.   16
under the War Measures Act.
Ron Collister, a CBC reporter
called Turner's speech "a prime
ministerial victory."
Quebec's justice minister
Jerome Choquette claimed
Monday that "leaders" of the
FLQ are among the persons still
detained under the act.
He said he is "convinced that
we have arrested, among the
persons presently detained,
persons who have a very
considerable responsibility
concerning the disorders we have
experienced".
But he admitted that rewards
totalling $150,000 offered for
information leading to the arrest
of the kidnappers of Cross and
Laporte "evidently show that
police investigations so far have
proved largely unsuccessful."
Choquette also confirmed that
he met with the directors of most
Quebec newspapers and radio and
television stations Monday night.
They discussed "the attitude of a
free press in a free society
threatened with revolution."
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39
union presidents from across the
country met to draft resolutions
for presentation to the plenary.
They called for a student
directed research program and an
end to AUCC intervention in the
affairs of individual universities.
Among the priorities of such a
program would be a study of
student    aid   and   accessability,
employment, preparation of
university teachers, and the terms
of employment of faculty.
Since the caucus began to meet
last Saturday, the powers that be
in the AUCC have kept a close
watch on the meetings.
A party with liquor reportedly
supplied by the AUCC was held
for   the   presidents   and   AUCC
employees have regularly attended
caucus sessions to determine
which students would be suitable
for membership on the recently
expanded board of directors,
according to the University of
Manitoba student newspaper. The
board is now open to both faculty
and students whereas before it
was open to administrators only.
Postage stamp may honor Laporte...
OTTAWA (CUP) - Jean-Pierre Cote, minister
responsible for the post office, said Wednesday the
government was considering issuing a stamp next
year in honor of slain Quebec labor minister Pierre
Laporte.
The schedule of commemorative stamps for
1970  already  is set, Cote  said in  the  house  of
commons, but the post office is studying the
possibility of putting out in 1971 a stamp in honor
of Laporte.
No mention was made concerning the naming
or renaming of schools and streets in honor of the
slain labor minister.
JANA JORGENSON, MISS TEEN AGE CANADA 1970, WAS PLEASANTLY SURPRISED THE
OTHER DAY TO RECEIVE A PHONE CALL FROM MALCOLM POWELL, PRESIDENT OF VILLAGE
MOTOR CO. LTD., 2830 ARBUTUS STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C., OFFERING HER THE USE OF A
1971 RENAULT 12 DURING HER REIGN. JANA IS SEEN RECEIVING THE KEYS TO HER CAR
FROM MALCOLM POWELL.
J ana is attending U.B.C, 1st Year Home Economics
Career opportunities
Engineering Graduates
ELECTRICAL
& MECHANICAL
(Bachelors)
CHEMICAL
(Bachelors)
CIVIL
(Bachelors)
We invite graduates to discuss
career opportunities with us as:
Production Trainees: Responsibilities in production planning,
control, budgeting, cost analysis, production supervision,
engineering and special studies.
Design and Project Engineers: Responsibilities for plant and
equipment modification, new equipment specification and design,
and installation.
Process Engineers: Responsibility far conducting process and
quality studies and inspection, and recommending changes in
operations, raw materials, equipment of control procedures.
Technical Sales: Responsibilities in market and product
development, promotion, and sales for building materials.
lYi
MacMillan Bloedel
Interviews will be held on campus November 12 and 12, 1970.
For information and appointments, please contact your Student
Placement Office. Friday, November 6, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SUNDANCE CAME TO SUB art gallery Thursday. The boys in this band - Sundance
— played in the gallery to a small audience of people who just happened by. The music
was to go with the current art display from a Gastown gallery. Apparently it's okay to
—kevan perrins photo
transport Gastown art to SUB, but don't try it with any of those displaced wino's, you
guys. After all, the AMS might call a general meeting to discuss the whole subject.
DAVIES' RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Davies discovers dastardly deception
The NPA may have perpetrated
the biggest hoax in the history of
Vancouver civic politics.
Word has leaked from several
reliable sources (including a city
alderman) that Bill Rathie, the
"independent" candidate
opposing NPA's Tom Campbull, is
going to withdraw.
The same rumour states that
Rathie has never had any serious
intentions of running.
There are several facts which
back up this theory. First, Rathie
was nominated by city lawyer A.
T. R. Campbell (no relation to
Tom) while Campbull was
nominated by NPA president,
John Alley. Coincidentally, Alley
is A. T. R. Campbell's law partner.
Beginning to smell funny? Well,
there's more.
Several political backers had
expressed interest in contributing
to the campaign funds of TEAM's
mayoralty candidate, Bill Gibson.
These same backers now seem
to be leaning towards Rathie as
the only man who they think can
beat Campbull in the
now-complicated city hall race.
As well, the appearance of a
noted city lobbyist into the scene,
supposedly associated with A. T.
R. Campbell and Alley, does
nothing but increase suspicion
about the entire NPA nomination
meeting theatrics.
What does it gain for the NPA
if Rathie runs for this short time
and then withdraws at the
deadline three weeks hence?
Well, clearly it will remove
some available funds which may
have found their way into TEAM
or even COPE-NDP campaign
budgets. It will also weaken the
media coverage given to these
other candidates. Thus, it will give
Campbull a better chance to win.
The only question which
remains is: Why would Rathie get
involved in this scheme?
The sources answered this
question as well. It is no secret
that he is a politically ambitious
man, but even Rathie would
concede that Campbull will be
almost impossible to beat this
time around.
If Rathie withdraws, giving his
whole-hearted support to
Campbull at that time, it could
very well be that there is a
promise in the air from NPA
officials giving Rathie the
nomination in 1972 when
Campbull is through playing his
games with the city.
John Alley was phoned by The
Ubyssey Thursday afternoon and
he repeatedly claimed "there is no
truth whatsoever to the rumour."
We'll find out in three weeks
time.
• Ever notice that the NPA's
candidates' names almost all begin
with letters either at the beginning
or end of the alphabet? I doubt
that this fact has escaped the
watchful eyes of the small elite
responsible for their nominations.
Why is this significant? Well,
political scientists have made
several studies all of which show
that the electorate, when
unfamiliar with the individuals
listed on the slate, will repeatedly
vote for those names which
appear at the top and bottom of
the ballot.
Because the ballots are listed in
alphabetical order with no party
affiliation after the candidates'
names, this gives the NPA cronies
an added advantage.
There just had to be some
reason for the continued success
of Earle Adams, Hugh Bird, Ernie
Broome, and Halford Wilson, all
dapper NPA aldermen in their
sixties.
• Whatever happened to
Baby Jane is not the question of
the day. The question is:
Whatever happened to Tony
Gargrave.
You remember Gargrave. He's
the mayoralty candidate for NDP
and, for all intents and purposes,
COPE.
Gargrave has yet to make a
public statement since the day
following his nomination. I've
heard of "low key campaigns" but
this is ridiculous.
All this is doing is adding to
the theory that Gargrave is not a
serious candidate for mayor, but
only a token leader that can give
some sort of credibility to the
party.
If this isn't true, then Gargrave
had better hire a new public
relations man - he's already the
forgotten man of the election.
• On a lighter note . . . have
you noticed that the new single
by the Guess Who (Canadian
talent) currently being hyped by
local boss stations CKLG and
CKVN (nee CFUN) is being
chopped up so as to avoid
offending listeners.
The song, "Bus Rider" has had
a line cut out of it (rather
obviously, 1 might add) because it
contains the words "God damn"
in it.
A CKVN jock whom I asked
about it said they had censored it
because they had word that some
"little old lady out there" had
written to the big-daddy
organization, the C.R.T.C, about
the lyrics.
So, to that little old lady out
there who listens to boss radio:
G*d D*mn you!
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
CIVIC ELECTIONS
PART THREE
TEAM does goof but it's learning
By JIM DAVIES
The Electors' Action
Movement (TEAM) made every
mistake in the political book last
election.
• With a brand-new civic
slate, they had the misfortune of
running a "low-key" campaign.
• Their mayoralty candidate,
Alan Emmott, preserved his
respectability throughout the
campaign, refusing to attack Tom
Campbell or defend himself.
• Further, Emmott left the
party immediately after his
defeat, thus casting doubts on the
credibility of the organization.
• They did not nominate
their candidates for council, parks
board, and school board until
shortly before the election
deadline, thus failing to make
these individuals known to the
voting public.
• Their party was divided
into so many committees (47),
that any sort of co-ordination of
effort was difficult if not
impossible.
Yet, somehow, in spite of these
mistakes, TEAM is alive and well
today, ready to do battle in this
year's civic election on Dec. 9.
Some of the same mistakes are
being made this year. The slate
was presented late again and it
appears that the organization is
continuing to underplay the
importance of the campaign.
However, this year there is a
power base to work from. TEAM,
where two years ago it had no one
in civic office, now has three
aldermen on city council and
three school board trustees,
including the chairman of the
board.
As- well, TEAM has more
money to work with this year and
the organization now knows what
is expected of a functioning civic
party.
As well, there is the added
advantage of knowing the
opposition, something that was
clearly lacking in 1968.
True, they did know what the
Non-Partisan Association was, and
the sort of man that party had at
the helm, but their knowledge was
only superficial, most of it
obtained through secondary
sources and the media.
Now they have alderman Brian
Calder, 29, a former NPA
alderman and campaign chairman
among their ranks.
Calder, the TEAM alderman
who most frequently opposed the
NPA councillor:', in citv hall, has
often spoken of his reasons for
leaving the NPA.
Says Calder: "I was told by the
elected NPA members to sit quiet
for my first two years and I'd be
all right. But that wasn't the way 1
saw things."
Calder opted out of the NPA
after only a few weeks and joined
elected  TEAM   aldermen  Walter
Hardwick   and   Art   Phillips.
Now, both Hardwick and
Phillips have formulated strong
views on the state of the city and
the forces they must fight to
implement change.
Says Hardwick: "We are living
in-a period of polarization in the
city of Vancouver. We need to live
in a society of tolerant pluralism."
Meanwhile, Phillips warns,
"We're going to be in a dirty
battle. We're going to be called
hippie-lovers, bleeding hearts, and
even communists.
If it's going to be a battle,
TEAM mayoralty candidate and
UBC medicine professor Dr. Bill
Gibson appears ready to launch
the attack that was lacking in
1968.
"We cannot afford Terrible
Tom's philosophy. It smells of
Nazism," he says. (Gibson was a
university student in Germany in
1938.)
"I just wonder if the Jews were
to Hitler as the hippies are to
Tom."
Gibson has accused Campbell
of immaturity, of intentionally
polarizing different groups in the
city, and of causing Vancouver's
greatest problem — "the pollution
of intolerance."
Gibson, 57, appears ready to
tackle the almost impossible task
of unseating incumbent Campbell,
in this, his first ever attempt at
civic politics.
Endorsed by TEAM to run as
aldermen in the forthcoming
elections are three incumbents,
two candidates unsuccessful in
1968, and five new faces.
Aldermen gaining endorsement
are: Brian Calder, 29,
businessman, Walter Hardwick,
38, UBC urban geography
professor; and Art Phillips, 40, an
investment analyst.
Candidates who lost in 1968
but who will try again are: Al
Stusiak, 38, teacher; and John
Volrich, 42, lawyer.
The new hopefuls are: Don
Bellamy, 43, restaurant
association manager; Garth
Brown, 26,1.W.A. plant chairman;
Pamela Glass, 40, teacher; Frank
Wiles, 38, town planner, and Setty
Pendakur, 36, UBC planning prof.
School board candidates
feature three incumbents,
including the present board
chairman Peter Oberlander, 47,
UBC planning school director.
The others are Fritz Bowers, 44,
UBC   engineering  professor; and
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Cloud of Indecision, Joice Hall.
Mast
head
In the Fine Arts Gallery
under the library, John and
Joice Hall's show is still on. And,
Twelfth Night a Shakespeare
play will be preformed in the
Freddy Wood, November 13 to
21. Performances at 8:30 except
Monday the 16th, (7:30) p.m.
and two matinees at 12:30 on
Tuesday and Thursday, 17th and
19th. The cast is all male.
Student prices are still available.
Regular classes of Chinese
Martial Art begin at
International House this coming
Tuesday 7:30-9:30 p.m.
literary loveliness was being
prepared, the executives in
charge were forced to listen to
Thorn Wescott and Sandy Cass
act out the Glass Menagerie in
front of their unwilling eyes, it
wouldn't have been too bad,
except that neither possess any
developed acting ability, and we
were forced to listen to the
damn thing twenty times over,
which was about twenty two
time too much. f Jty m.
A teacher of Transcendental
Meditation and graduate of UBC
David Cox will speak with
Biology and Philosophy graduate
Don Langstaff on the Science of
Creative Intelligence at 12:30 on
Thurs. Nov. 12th in Bu. 106.
This week, Page Friday was
constructed with the able and
willing help of Executive
assistant to the Editor; Grant
Dickin, and Special Assistant
Nettie Wild.
While this eminent bastion of
There will be an absolutely
FREE! (no-cost-to-you) poetry
reading tonight by well-known
poet-critic-translator HAROLD
ENRICO, in Buchanan 106.
Enrico's poetry and
translations have appeared in
such magazines as The Nation,
Commonweal, Prism
international and SPARROW
Press is currently preparing a
book of his Mon tale translations.
He has studied under
Theodore Roethke and Louise
Bogan at the University of
Washington and also at the
University of Pavia in Italy
where he became acquainted
with the work of Quasimodo,
Montale, and Ungaretti and with
Quasimodo himself (who in
1959 received the nobel Prize.)
The reading is sponsored by
the Creative Writing
Department.
PAGE FRIDAY, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  6,   1970 Sunday Morning
Today, a Sunday morning, I rose before nine
o'clock and went outside. I enjoyed being outside.
Sun and fresh air. and it was just cool enough, so I
went to the park across Marine Drive and looked
out over the wafer.
There were little boats smaller than my
thumbnail sitting on the water. Fog covered
whatever was on the horizon. Below me were log
booms.
I sat at the base of a large tree with my hands
in my pockets.
A small black car came braapping down
Marine Drive and burped its way into the parking
lot. Bup bup bup bup gurrum but but gurm. He
pulled in slowly, turned around, and tortured the
silence once more until he was finally gone.
"Get your obscenity out of here," I shouted
to his exhaust.
I'm sure he didn't hear me. He was too busy
listening to his metal mistress.
I leaned against the tree once more.
Down the road came a car. Another car.
Vrrimmm. Drraaaammmn.
A small yellow car. As it passed me, a hand
went to the driver's window and a bunch of dirty
kleenexes flew over the road.
He didn't even slow down.
I turned at him as he disappeared, wanting
desperately to scream at him, but I knew he was
already too far away.
If there had been a rock within grabbing
distance, nothing would have stopped me from
smashing it through his window into his doughy,
unseeing little face.
I stood by the tree and stared at the road. A
car going in the opposite direction passed and
whipped up the wads of tissue. They settled on the
road again.
Walking, stooping, on one side of the white
line and on the other, I placed three dirty pieces of
kleenex in each coat pocket. Walking back to the
park I picked up a milkshake carton. And the
straw. And another piece of paper.
I look for a garbage can, as my pockets are
now full. There is one at the other end of the
parking area. On its side.
Garbage spills from its mouth onto the green
grass and yellow leaves of the park floor.
With my foot, I shove much of it back into
the barrel. I place it upright
The rest must be put in by hand.
It takes several minutes.
There are two other persons in this area of the
park. Perhaps they are gazing out over the ocean.
I decide to return home.
As I pass between the garbage can and the
road, I come upon a piece of a bag, a piece of
cardboard, a sheet of paper, a cup, and pizza
menu. I read the pizza menu as I cross the road to
another litter barrel.
I take the most direct route back to my room.
Passing through the trees and past totem poles I
find a beer bottle. Partly full. Of something.
Coming out of the forest into the sunlight I
am struck by a cigarette package. Empty, of
course. Who would throw away one which wasn't
empty?
Only an idiot.
Going across our neat, green lawn, I find
several pieces of paper, separated and scattered,
but the same colour. Someone must have gone to a
bit of effort to tear it up and throw it around.
From where I now sit in my room, I can see a
large paper cup, (flattened), a paper bag, a piece of
cardboard, assorted other bits of paper, a beer
bottle, pieces of apples, a plastic bag, and pieces
and parts of dozens of firecrackers (university
students play with such sophisticated toys)
adorning the sidewalk and lawn below.
Perhaps I will admire it more closely after
lunch. After all, it is the work of my generation.
Or, more accurately, my contemporaries. I
could not call the driver of the yellow car a
member of my generation. He is perhaps twenty or
thirty years older than me.
Yet his behaviour is no different from yours.
You, my friend, (it was not very long ago)
threw a potato chip bag on the grass by the
sidewalk, justifying it with the remark "This place
is a dump."
You wouldn't have done it anywhere else.
How very thoughtful of you. It's too damn bad
you weren't somewhere else when you had that
empty bag to get rid of.
Since then you have received several
scholarships.
Would they have given them to you if they
had known what you had done? Probably.
Perhaps they would have given you a
scholarship for your outstanding achievements in
the field of garbage.
Did you never know that your empty bag
took its place beside the pop bottles, cardboard,
wrappers, empty boxes, useless furniture, rusty
stoves, old fridges, and abandoned cars that mark
your place in time?
"This place is a dump."
You belong, with all people like you, with the
driver of that yellow car, at the bottom of that
pile of garbage.
Dickin
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Friday,  November  6,   1970
THE       U BYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 3 Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.
Tom Stoppard's investigation is, however,
alive and agile in the Playhouse Theatre
Company's production.
Rosencrantz etc. follows two minor
characters from Hamlet in their muddling
of the riddles of existence. On several levels
the small, baffled men search- out a
direction and meaning for their lives and
the character of human death.
As the readers of Hamlet know,
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern have been
called by Hamlet's uncle to Elsinore to pass
a peer judgment on Hamlet's peculiar
behavior. But Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern, living it, do not know where
they're going or why.
They live in an ambiguous and
confusing world. Unable to decipher
meaning from their circumstances, they
await word from someone in authority and
fear that the word will come: "We've not
been picked out simply to be abandoned!"
one says.
Once at Elsinore, they await an
explanation, foundering in the confusion
of grand entrances and exits. "What a fine
persecution to be kept intrigued without
ever being enlightened!" It's funny,
because it's so bitterly true for all of us
who are not tragic giants.
Finally they leave for England with
orders and Hamlet, losing both on their
way and finally blinding out into oblivion,
still confused and not really very sure
whether they're dead. Having been finally
convinced of their own insignificance, this
last singling out for death is cruelly unfair.
"Who would have thought," one wails,
"that we were so important?"
Their bafflement proves the point of a
travelling theatre troupe which specializes
in gory portrayals of death, as the troupe
leader points out, it's the audiences' love of the
only kind of death people will believe in.
It's funny, frightening, and ominous. It
plays on a deep fear of all of us: that
nothing will make sense before our deaths,
and the secret knowledge that our deaths
will be a pretty sordid disappearance,
without tragedy or greatness.
In its ambiguity and wordiness, Tom
Stoppard's play could be tedious and much
of it trivial David Gardner's production
succeeds in enchanting its intricacy and
sardonic wit. It succeeds, finally, in making
the experience both entertaining and
disturbing.
The setting is gray, free-form, and
suggestive. The characters are vivid
blotches on the landscape; the tableaux
create varying atmospheres — brooding,
frolicsome, majestic.
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern (Neil
Dainard and Alan Scarfe) manage to leave
one as baffled as they are about which one
is which. But they do it by revealing their
own confusion, while still creating
individual     characters.     They     are
complementary; one dull, dog-like and
helpful, the other pedantic,
pseudo-resolute, and stuffy. They
compound each other's confusion and
strike a chord of sympathetic anguish in
every soul that has pondered its own death
and then shied away.
Paxton Whitehead dazzles as usual,,
playing the head of the travelling theatre
troupe. He leads his pageant with flourish,
in rages, and with a bitter knowledge of
their living irony. His certainty of his role
as death-purveyor, his pragmatism, and his
ability are in perfect contrast to the
bumbling and confused pair of courtiers.
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
is a complex and difficult play; Gardner's,
production is a success worthy of
attention. It makes real and overt our own
most inner doubts and fears; and it makes
ironically funny the problem itself. It is
puzzling, witty, thought-provoking - and
ultimately very, very disturbing,   o   • 1
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The Act
Jim O'Leary
5!_dc£igjU^J$&   &5*
 CJLLE1.	
I've had a strange feeling lately, and I just
realized what it is. With the war measures act and
all, they don't even need a reason to throw me in
jail. Isn't that funny: just existing, Fm illegal. The
whole country's illegal. I think we should give the
police a hand for not carting us all off to prison.
Wouldn't that be something; a whole country
leaning out of barred windows looking sad. And
then a bearded fellow in red,white and blue runs
by with his pants on fire, sees us and cackles.
I've always dreaded living in a police state,
you know. I have this fear of a knock at the door
at two in the morning and a light stabbing into my
eyes and a voice saying, "Let's see your ID. James
O'Leary, eh? James E. O'Leary . . . what's the E
stand for?
"Edmund." "(With Derision.) Yeah? Sure
it's not Eduard? (He leans closer and whispers.)
Eh, eet's all rieeght, Pierre, wheeere are they, eh?
Taaell us aeend wee laet you go baeeck to sleeep,
eh?"
But the thing that really hurts about the war
measures act is that since it's now illegal to move,
it's illegal to repeal the act. Catch-22. But our case
is not hopeless. Since we're illegal, it's the police's
duty to put us all in jail. Ah, but they haven't,
have they? They're breaking the law, too. I suggest
our only hope is to run out and make a citizen's
arrest of every policeman you see. We'd wipe out
the entire RCMP in a day. Unless they arrest us
first. In which case they're not breaking the law,
are they? (Yes, I know it gets confusing, but I
don't make these things up, do I?) So you have to
sneak up on them. Distract their attention
somehow; usually a good chop to the neck works.
Oh, but I forgot, you couldn't do that either; you
couldn't touch or even talk to them. That would
be illegal, too.
Don't get me wrong. I like the war measures
act. Hell, I'm crazy about it. But I question it's
validity in B.C. I'm sure in Quebec they're having
parties over it every night, but chief, do you really
think those guys are hiding out in B.C.? The
implcations are staggering. Why, what with
communication alone, the postage would bankrupt
them. And where would they hide? Malliardville?
Maybe, ifMallairdville?were the size of Vancouver,
but its more the size of the back of your hand. So
they'd have to hide in Vancouver. I can just see
them, hiding in an apartment with the lights off,
sending out for Kentucky Fried Chicken. And why
would they want to come to B.C. anyway? I can
just see that, too. "Eh, Louis, let's go to B.C."
"What for?"
"I like ze Okanogan apples, you know?"
"You are a fool."
"Also, eef thees does not work out, wee can get on
welfare, eh?"
B.C.,  B.C., here I come (Frer-e Jacqu-e, Frer-e
Jacqu-e.).
Bestowing the graces of the war measures act
on B.C. may seem like Sharing the Land, but \
don't think it's helping us. According to the
circumstances in which it was invoked, the
Mounties should be searching Vancouver for the
FLQ. Instead what have we got? Campbell's hired
85 more cops and he's got them hot on the trail of
the VLF, the Jericho crowd, hippies, yippies, and
who knows, maybe even Bill Rathie. And look at
the Bennett. Just what are the rules with regard to
the schools, anyway? Do they fire just those who
talk about the FLQ? How about the French
teacher? Does she lose her pension? Do they
change the cafeteria menu from "French Fries" to
"Chips", or close the caf completely? Will the
bank of Montreal be next to go?
I suggest that the police don't need or what
these extra powers. Before, arresting someone was
like hunting wild game, fun, exciting, the thrill of
the hunt and all that. But police aren't sadists;
no one likes shooting chickens in a barrel. A friend
once told me of how he had been followed for
days and days. He was carefuljhe was scrupulous
not to break the law. Every once in a while he
would turn quickly and, sure enough, a figure
behind him would dart into the shadows. Well, he
thought he was prefect, but the one thing he'd
forgotten was that it was now illegal to sleep on
the beach. And of course it was the policeman
who decided where the beach was, where it ended,'
and what composed a beach. To make it short, one
night a whole troop of them broke in his window
as he was eating crackers in bed and arrested him
for loitering. So you see, the police have enough
powers, and if you give them more, it stops being
fun.
John Turner has introduced a bill to replace
the war measures act. But it still has two readings
to go through. You know how long that could
take. Probably as long as it will take the U.S. to
get out of Vietnam; 14 years.
PAGE FRIDAY, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November 6,   1970 Ballet High collides
with Lighthouse
Nettie
Lighthouse, heavy footed, fingered and
mouthed their way through Tuesday's
performance of a Ballet High at the Queen E. The
group, aside from its questionable musical
ability was decidedly unshowmanlike. If their
informality includes talking, turning their backs to
the audience and drinking and smoking, perhaps
they were establishing an image of true greatness
for themselves by being so rude.
Throughout the performance, Lighthouse
behaved in the manner of a bunch of high school
kids in the band room, their music was rough, and
only occassionally approached any sort of
harmony, while the poor amplifying system served
only to exaggerate their tinny musical ability. It is
unfortunate that the exceptional ability of the
Ballet company had to be mated with a group who
through their actions during the performance
seemed to be saying, "Hey Vancouver, here we
are, the big band from back east, you're really
lucky that we condescended to play for all you
fisherman and lumberjacks."
In complete contrast, Christine Hennessey
danced the tragic outcast who could only look in
at the beautiful people from the outside. Miss
Hennessey presented a truly pathetic figure
struggling to gain recognition.
With the dancers obviously giving all they had
to offer, it is too bad that Lighthouse was such a
severe drawback. In direct contrast to the
company, Lighthouse displayed a complete lack of
showmanship, insulting the audience with the
sloppy presentation of many of their songs.
The shining People of Leonard Cohen was
the second and shortest work on the program. A
pas de deux danced to the recitation of poetry of
the Canadian poet, Leonard Cohen, this ballet was
the best the program had to offer.
Madeline Bouchard and Attila Ficzere
complimented each other tfiroughtout the
performance with a fluidity that must have been
difficult to achieve considering the lack of music.
The stylistic set design was a welcome relief after
the stark stage of Ballet High. Here Macdonald was
able to present a compact complete work which
stressed the unity that was lost in Ballet High.
Five Over Thirteen was the third presentation
with Lighthouse returning to the orchestra pit.
Using the work to hit his audience over their
collective heads with a moral, Macdonald attacks
our society's inhibitions. Dancing to the sporadic
blasts of Lighthouse, the company appeared in
strange eggshell sculptures from which five
managed to free themselves with these same five
unsuccessfully trying to persuade the others to
follow suit.
With such a simplistic theme, Macdonald
could have made his point in half the time and
with perhaps more impact.
The opening night audience attending the
Royal Winnipeg Ballet's new rock ballet, a Ballet
High, was presented with an unfinished product.
Trying to achieve the same casually
spontaneous effect which was evident in Hair,
choreographer Brian Macdonald has forgotten a
golden rule of the theatre — the audience has paid
to see a finished presentation. It is one thing to
create an impromptu atmosphere, it is another to
have stage hands who at times were more
predominant on stage than the dancers or the
musicians.
At one point when the band Lighthouse rose
from the orchestra pit on a delapidated platform
heaving itself towards the back of the stage, the
stage crew was slightly reminiscent of a Boeing
747 landing crew complete with earphones and
monkey wrenches.
After the introductory set by Lighthouse, the
dancers, dressed in their work-out garb, began a
series of warm-up exercises which melded into a
work of precision and unison. However the work,
though pleasing, was too long, an unfortunate trait
in all three of Macdonald's works.
One of the high points of the performance
was the appearance of Alexandra Nadal who led
the company in a work choreographed to the
sound of Lighthouse's rendition of "Higher".
Exuding vitality, Miss Nadal seemed to really
enjoy herself, transmitting to the audience a
feeling of tireless exuberence. Indeed there were
times when the audience was left wondering how
long the company could keep up their frantic
pace.
Using the back-up beat of Lighthouse,
Macdonald's choreography consisted of an
astonishing mixture of classical, and contemporary
dance along with a lot of just plain shakin' it up.
Diary of a Mad Housewife
Diary of a Mad Housewife retains the quality
of sincerity that Frank Perry demonstrated in Last
Summer but is more sophisticated and less
sophistic.
That is not to say, however, that it is not
blatant. It is, but only occasionally offensively so.
Generally it is a non-exploitative exploration of
love and adultery. The Triangle is there, inevitable,
predictable, but strangely intriguing. Richard
Benjamin (remembered from Goodbye Columbus)
is the gawky, socially pretentious husband. As the
wilful, tempestuous lover, Frank Langella is
suitably winsome. And Carrie Snodgrass is the
delightful, irresistably interesting "mad
housewife". If nothing else were interesting about
this film, her voice, husky, innocent, controlled,
would be a constant enchantment.
The story of her alienation from her husband,
the affair, and the return is seen in one long
flashback at a group therapy session, primarily
from her point of view.
The characters and issues are writ large, and
sometimes just too large for comfort. Benjamin
never speaks to his wife, but orates at her. From
playing Right-Guard Commercial she moves to the
position of cheerleader of the social world. And
any supposedly brilliant lawyer who can say
"Gee!" so ingenuously ...
Benjamin would seem to set the pace for the
minor characters. In a scene with a babysitter the
impossible is realized — an overstated Jewish
mother type. Even the visiting doctor is wise,
cheerful, blunt - a G.P.'s G.P.
Relevancy and social commentary are a bit
heavyhanded as well. A rock-band strobe-light
party is given for socially conscious real estate men
and lawyers. Well. Relevance is interjected casually
as, in a cocktail confrontation, an anonymous girl
shrills,, "I'm gonna report you to Women's Lib!"
The ruthelessness and superficiality of cocktail
parties are once again dragged out.
And yet one must not cavil unduely —even
these overworked images mesh into the ongoing
revelation of the three characters and their
struggles.
The film technique is at one with the
character development; it is mostly
straightforward, as well-suited to the genre, and
imaginatively manipulated. The scene switches
especially are clever and intriguing, a witticism of
the camera.
While at the outset Diary is overstated and
runs the risk of losing all to ludicrosity, it
successfully overmasters the cartoonery. Despite
the overstatement of mood and character, it is
eventually interesting, entertaining, and worth a
bit of thought. It is a genuine probing with love of
a problem in love.
Warning: you'll miss all that swearing, coarse
language, and simulated sex if you blink
frequently.
Heide
Lead Guitarist Ralph Cole of  Lighthouse.
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THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 5 NEW and USED
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• Pocket Books * Magazines
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Twelfth Night
By Wl LLIAM SHAKESPEARE ^"^
November 13 - 25
Directed by John Brockington
SPECIAL MATINEES STUDENT TICKETS $1:00
Tuesday, November 17 — 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 19-12:30 p.m.
(available for all performances)
Tickets: The Frederic   Wood Theatre, Rm. 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE       It Is For You
This is
the man with
no name. Danger
fits him-like
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He
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FRI. 6 & SAT. 7
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 8-7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
CL1NI EAST WDM
We regret that "The
Professionals" is not being
shown as previously
scheduled. Columbia Pictures
(Canada) cancelled our
booking.
Art
The Galleries
Things happening at the
Vancouver Art Gallery;
The V. A. Gallery is holding a
Noonhour Film Series. On
the 10th it will be "Noohalk"
by Peter Bryant and SFU
workshop, and "Magic Circle"
by Gary Lee Nova.
On the 17th "Aaeon by Al
Razutis and "Sylvester and
Venessa" by Bryan Small will be
shown.
On the 24th, three films will
be presented; "Shall We Gather
at the River" by Tom Shandel,
"Consumers Report" by Bruce
Birmelin, and "Cinetude 2", by
Keith Rodan.
The Wednesday Noon Hour
Concerts you've heard so much
about are still there. On the 11th
(next Wed.) is a thing called
Holiday". That's what it says.
Maybe it means they take the
day off. (It is a holiday.) Better
go down and pick up on it
anyway.
On the 18th is Jazz. With a
jazz band.
The 25 th - Baroque Strings
— playing baroque music.
Concerts are free — you
won't go baroque — but bring
your own lunch — or you'll go
hungry.
You can follow up those
visits with a Thursday noon
excursion to the Gallery. These
FREE events include:
Nov. 12th - blues and guitar
with Sean and Debbie.
There is nothing on the 19th.
Due to some art gallery
superstition, there will be no
noon event on the third
Thursday of each month.
Nov. 26th will be featuring
Polynesians. (That's what it
says.) In more detail, "Hawaiian,
Samoan, Tahitian, Maori and
Polynesian". I know damn well
they're trying to excite, entice,
and confuse me, but I'll go
anyway. Following Thursday, is
Friday. Friday noon is the Free
Poetry Reading time at the
VAG. Poets include: on the
13 th, Roy Kiyooka, on the
20th, Lionel Kearns, and on the
27th, David Frith.
Readings start at 12:10
(poets are strange) sharp.
November 12 (a Thursday
evening) from 8 to 10, is the
time at which you should be
there to catch "Four Episodes",
by Edwin Varney. It is an event
devoted to the imagination,
human consciousness, and dream
spaces.
An evening of meditation and
mind games is to take place in
the V.A. Gallery on November
17th. It is designed by Brian
Carpendale and is supposed to
give the audience some workable
experience in basic meditative
practices and mind exercises.
"Meditation and Mind
Games" starts at 7:30 and ends
at 9:30 (both p.m.)
Eskimo art come to the Art
Gallery for a month, starting
November IS. The exhibition
was organized to honour the
centennial of the Northwest
Territories, and includes fifty
drawings and twenty-five pieces
of sculpture.
Sub Gallery
Drummond Burge and Mike
Malcolm are still in the SUB
gallery, with their working
environment    called    Subspace
really working out well. Malcolm
has some of his paintings on
display there, go take a look at
them, they are really interesting.
This week's cover is a Mike
Malcolm poster that you can get
free down in the gallery. They
welcome everyone.
Symphonic Stuff
By MARK JACQUES
Last weekend the Vancouver
Symphony presented one of the
finest concerts I've heard in a
long time, bringing together the
orchestra under conductor
Meredith Davies and "guest
pianist Philippe Entremont.
The concert got off to a
slightly shaky start with
Symphony in Ten Parts by
Vancouver composer Barbara
Pentland. I must confess a slight
dislike for this twelve-tone piece,
which sounds like rehashed
Schoenberg in a dry musical
style resembling Stravinsky and
Bartok. The symphony's
performance, however, didn't
change my opinion. Perhaps
Davies would have been wiser to
have used the version for solo
ensemble rather than increasing
the number of strings, a move
which produced some sloppy
intonation.
With Entremeont playing
Bach's 5 th Concerto for Piano,
though, the concert got back on
its musical feet with a refined,
almost pristine interpretation.
Hans Werner Henze's 5th
Symphony which followed,
written in a twelve-tone style
reminiscent of Alban Berg, is an
extremely difficult work to
perform, but the VSO's
performance was superbly
together, a marked contrast to
the Pentland work.
If the Henze frustrated most
of the audience, they got their
chance to release their tensions
with the Ravel Piano Concerto
in G. Entremont's performance
was a veritable knockout, as was
the orchestra's accompaniment
(especially Robert Brickler's
trombone glissandos), with the
result that the crowd brought
the soloist back for four curtain
calls.
Tchaikovsky's Theme and
Variations which closed the
concert and sent the audience
home feeling good is the kind of
work which could be poured
over pancakes. Needless to say,
the orchestra again distinguished
itself in this minor-league
showpiece.
Just a reminder that the next
concert takes place next
Tuesday night, with a Great
Concerto series concert under
the direction of guest Czech
conductor Martin Tumovsky.
PAGE FRIDAY, 6
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday,   November  6,   1970 «?'''• '-'.-■-   %--Mj
Animalism and Rock
Bill Storey
mm^^^^t_______________t__
Ours is a Strange Age
Our situation is unprecedented. We're
on the verge of populating ourselves out of
existence - if we don't blow ourselves up or
smother under our mountains of garbage
first. The individual, lost in the smouldering
mass, is a virtual non-entity, and is pressured
from all sides. The average citizen today is a
programmed neurotic, numbered, stamped,
folded, stapled and dehumanized. More and
more often, his sense of helplessness and
insignificance, of being trapped and alone,
explodes into violence. Increasingly, too, the
individual's search for his lost individuality,
for some place where he is somebody, is
leading to the development of various new
"tribalisms". The best known of these,
because the most obvious and urgent, is that
of the young.
The voice of young tribalism, of course,
is rock music.
Bob Dylan and the Beatles have been
the prophets of a generation. Music, once
simply an art form and a social grace, has
come to mean much more to the young. It is
their music. It's against the old, and for the
new. By it's very nature, rock music is
revolutionary, and not just because of its
usually anti-establishment lyrics. The real
power of rock music lies in its invocation of
the animal, that primitive force which, when
freed, can make man beautiful and ugly.
This is the true anarchy of rock music. It
goes beyond words, beyond philosophy or
ideology to shake the very foundations of
conventional society. It brings man back to
his reality, and helps him to love rather than
to repress his true nature. It "lets him be".
The most extreme example of this trend
toward animal expression is the Who. Their
performances are ceremonies of violence,
and usually end with the setting off of
smoke bombs and the smashing of
instruments. Their music is wildly primitive,
with lots of guitar-hammering and
drum-bashing, and as such can be deeply
stirring.
There's little doubt that when they first
burst on the scene in the middle 60s, they
were excitingly original. Their stage anarchy,
however, is beginning to pall with much
repetition. After seeing a guy break his guitar
a few times, one begins to realize that it
doesn't require much finesse. One even
begins to suspect that the Who's overdone
theatrics  may  mask  their lack of talent.
Mick Jagger
Unfortunately, this isn't so. The Who are
good musicians, but they hide it well. They
have over-emphasized their act, and their
image as proponents of violence — which
they think their public wants — at the
expense of their music.
On record, they are better — but not
much. Their pretentious "rock opera",
Tommy, has a few good spots. The Who
obviously weren't on stage for this one,
'cause they actually play some good music.
Tommy, however, is no more opera than
Roger Daltrey is an ostritch. It is a collection
of songs jammed together with the label
"opera" stuck on it. Live at Leeds, too,
has a few merits, although it is overly
dramatic to the point of nausea. Heard a few
times, its power can really carry you away.
Its driving force is unbelievable. After a few
times more, however, you may feel like
carrying it away - to the trash can. But
then, maybe you won't find their bashing
overdone ten-minute long endings as tedious
as I did. Cecil B. de Mille would have loved
them. Now, if Cece had made Easy Rider ...
Ah, wishful thinking. All I know is, if I'm
going to listen to two guys argue about the
price of a bus, I'd rather do without all that
background noise. Maybe if they dispensed
with their instruments...
The Who's main problem is that their
anarchy is forced and artificial.
It doesn't grow out of their music
naturally. Also, they are a one-mode group.
They express only the violent side of the
animal. After the guitar-banging and
drum-thumping is over, they're lost This is
certainly not true of the Rolling Stones. The
music of the Stones is as varied as the human
animal. They can move from gentle lyricism
to raunchy amorality and back again. Above
all, they let it happen. The animalism of the
Stones is not a performance. They love being
totally alive, and expressing their aliveness in
their music:
I am just a monkey man
Glad you are a monkey woman,
too.
Their music is less cerebral, less pretty
than that of the Beatles, but it burns with an
inner fire, pulses with a pagan wildness that
the music of the Beatles never had. It is
perhaps, closer to the deep-down truth of
the surge of life that makes us all human.
The Stones have a good time with their
music. The Who take themselves seriously,
and become ridiculous, but the Stones laugh
at themselves and at their audience, and
therefore must be taken seriously. The Who
pander to their audience, singing about "My
Generation", but the Stones laugh:
They've got airborne heads
They've got dirty necks
They're so twentieth century
Mick Jagger and Co. satirize the evil label
which is often applied to them. They did an
album   called   "Their   Satanic   Majesties'
Request", and on Let It Bleed they sing:
I hope we're not too Messianic
Or a trifle too Satanic
Love to sing the blues
The last line is the measure of the difference
between the Stones and the Who. For the
Stones, the music is all-important. They
express themselves through it rather than
impose a pattern on it. The Stones have
come a long way from the days when they
were the darlings of the bubblegum set.
Both Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed
are rock masterpieces, beautiful celebrations
of the animal. Their latest, Get Yer Ya-yas
Out (NPS-5), is not as good as its two
predecessors. It is an up and down
performance and is largely a rehashing of
their recent hits. There's one big plus
though: It's live, and with the Stones that's a
big plus. The Stones live are just fantastic,
and this record is certainly no exception.
Some of the best music the Stones have
done animal-wise is on this album. There's a
wild hard-driving version of "Sympathy For
the Devil", which features some great guitar
work by Keith Richard and is preceded by a
child in the audience yelling, "paint it black
you devils". Jagger's vocal work is just
unbelievable on this and on "Stray Cat
Blues". This last has to be one of the sexiest
songs in pop music. It is followed by a slow,
sensual "Love In Vain", which is lovingly
caressed by Mick Taylor's slide guitar. A
hypnotic and fiercely violent "Midnight
Rambler" concludes side one.
There are some low spots. Despite the
fact that it's "in" to go into ecstasy over
dusty old songs from the 50s, I for one can't
get too turned on by the two Chuck Berry
songs. And there's a below-par version of
"Jumpin' Jack Flash" around as well. Even
the raggedness of the performance, however,
can't detract from the live animal power of
the whole. It's a really good thing, and for
Rolling Stones devotees, one not to be
missed.
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Friday, November 6,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FRIDAY, 7 Olde Music Exhumed       *«*=^
What, you may well ask, is a krummhorn? A      spiritual, while others convey a serenity almost                                   ^
sack-but?                                                                      foreign to our troubled age. The moods expressed                                   ^Jjk
Glad am I that you asked that question.                are surprisingly various, ranging from light dances            A    . a/^^^
Only Hortulani Musicae knows for sure, but      through love songs to paeans of religious devotion           "\__\__\__f
you can get a few hints by attending their concert      and Mn^ ^ty- Md the instruments on which             ^Pt|^^    '
of English vocal and instrumental music of the      meV are Played " recorders, harpsichords, flutes,              ^1   1 ^^g,;
Renaissance   Sunday   night   at   8:30  at  the  QE      not  t0 mention  shawms  - are,  of course, just              /    \V         Wl
Theatre.                                                                        beautiful.                                                                          J       \V      ^m
This is one of Vancouver's rare opportunities             Hortulani   Musicae   are   sponsored   by   the          ^^W J   1         '
to hear the music of the early teens (from the      Vancouver Society for Early Music, and part of             ^^'
twelfth   to   the   eighteenth   century)   which   is      the proceeds from this and future concerts, such as                /PO?^
currently   enjoying   a well-deserved  revival.  The      the   one   Dec.   18th   which   will   feature   17th             /    /
unpretentiousness   of  this  music   is  refreshing,      Century Christmas music, goes into their fund for          /   /                v\y
though its apparent simplicity is deceptive.  For      me    purchase    of    old    instruments    such    as          /    /                  S$$fc
centuries, no-one seriously believed that many of      krummhorns so they can play it like it was.                     H?/        M     ^M
1
the compositions ot this period were meant to be                                                                                              II        wU   /^TffiWtift**    "         1
played note for note because they were so difficult,             Student   prices   are   available.   It's   a   fine          I     \           \A»1                /
This, of course, was a fallacy. The musicians of,     investment in unjangled nerves as well as good          \   \         \           *                J°
say,    Bach's    day,    were,    by    our   standards,     music.                                                                                \     \          1                             s
unbelievably skilful. Many of the pieces are deeply             You might even find out what a sackbut is.                    ^^SmU/Sw)                   yfc
'"^                 *"^                                   Is this a sackbut?
At U.B.C. November 12 & 13
We mean it.
Even if you have no idea of coming with us,
sign up for an interview.
Come in and rehearse.
Do it on a company whose very life depends
on its ability to come face to face with strangers.
You won't waste our time. We have a number
of surprises about the insurance business in general
and ours in particular. So if there's a latent response in you, we're confident we can trigger it.
Besides, we're perfectly willing to take the risk.
If you can't make an interview, take a look at
"How to separate yourself from the herd.'' An
eight page booklet on how to go to an interview
on your terms. What to do about nervousness.
About money. How to turn an interview around.
When to get up and walk out. Things like that.
Our booklet is tucked into the new Employment Opportunities Handbook. The handbook
is yours for the asking at the placement office.
"How to separate yourself from the herd"
won't change the world for you.
But it just might help.
IDNDONUFE
InsuranceCompantyLondorvCanada
PAGE FRIDAY, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   November  6,   1970 Friday, November 6, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
You thought life was cosmic, instead it's cosmetic
By SANDY KASS
It's amazing how cosmetic our lives can really
be.
Dr. Lee Pulos spoke to a packed SUB ballroom
Monday night at People, and few of those attending
finished the evening without leaving some of their
"put-on" superficiality behind.
The topic of the session, which turned out to be
one of the most massive group gropes UBC has ever
seen, was an Encounter of Honesty.
"We all play the image game of what people
expect us to be," said Pulos.
"Yet people for the most part seem to lose
contact with where their images leave off and their
own personalities begin," he said.
The idea of the meeting was to bring
participants out of the shells they build around
themselves as individuals; to rid themselves of their
image-consciousness, the basis of most human
interaction; to eliminate the necessity of playing
unnatural roles which people project before others.
The session aimed at self-disclosure, mutual
trust and intimacy, and personal awareness.
And it worked.
It began with the most elemental gesture — an
introduction.
Participants were told to introduce themselves
non-verbally, first by shaking right hands, then left
hands, elbows, backs, noses, and ears.
Have you ever tried to shake an ear?
Try it sometimes. It's an experience you won't
soon forget.
After the formalities were done with,
participants, still on a non-verbal level, chose
partners.
Each set of partners in turn chose other
partners, and each quartet chose another until
everyone was divided into groups of eight.
Groups were given time to talk on anything
from the weather to the last orgy they went to.
Various activities followed, from playing
statues, to leading partners around as though blind,
thereby building up dependency relationships.
"That's not the easiest thing to do with
strangers," said' one student, "but after we got
going, the contact was so close, I didn't want to
open my eyes."
"The most important criteria for developing
personal awareness are open and honest behavior,
the putting of feelings above thoughts and ideas,
and the development of the ability to converse in
statements rather than in questions," said Pulos.
"Most 'can'ts' are really 'won'ts', and thus, if a
person is bored with his behavior, he must take the
responsibility for his boredom. He cannot pass the
blame onto others," he said.
Pulos is president of the Shalal institute of
Vancouver, an institute founded for the purpose of
"expanding the limits of human potentiality".
Shalal programs offer a range of personal
growth techniques developed by widely varying
disciplines — methods of religious meditation, basic
encounter groups, such as last Monday's People,
experiences in body movement and sensory
awareness, psychodrama, movement from dance,
and therapeutic methods taken from psychology
and psychiatry.
These programs involve group meetings which
range from one lecture a week to full weekend
encounters.
The cost for most of the courses is nominal.
The Vancouver YMCA has donated free office and
classroom space to the institute, and thus the only
thing participants must pay for is qualified teachers
to lead the groups.
Anyone is invited to join a group by calling
681-0221 or by dropping into the institute office at
the downtown YMCA, 955 Burrard Street.
Courses and groups are continuing throughout
the fall and winter, and the institute has offered
assistance to any individuals experimenting with
different methods of personal awareness and
development.
The institute is modelled after the Esalen
Institute located in Big Sur, California, the first
human growth centre in North America.
Shalal was founded in 1967 by Pulos, first as a
small personal awareness group. It has since grown
to be one of the largest institutes of its kind in
North America.
The human growth centre grew from the need
to discover a more creative and effective way of
daily living, said Pulos, in an interview with The
Ubyssey.
Workers in it are concerned with the "people
frontier" and the rapid changes in our environment
and society which affect our personal and family
lives, our jobs, communities, and social and personal
values, he said.
"We try to relate to education as a learning
experience which involves the whole man, and not
just his mind. It involves all human emotions, and
the senses which are presently just left out of
educative curriculums," he said.
Groups organizing for the fall range from
Awareness, Trust, Affection and Marital
Enrichment, to Discovering the Self, to Emotional
Insight Through Hypnosis, to Psychodrama, to a
month-long course on "What am I?"
A future program to be set up for ex-convicts
will enable them to participate in groups along with
others while they are still on parole. As well it may
allow the integration of certain awareness groups
into the B.C. Penitentiary.
The feasibility of this project is still unknown,
however, because according to Pulos, "there are just
so many uptight people to contend with."
Money drive for Third World
A drive for funds to provide education for
students in the Third World is being held on Nov.
9-13 at UBC.
The drive is sponsored by UBC's fraternities
and sororities as a part of a national campaign being
organized for students of the Third World by
different university committees across Canada, said
organizer Gordon Turriff, Arts 4.
A folk concert featuring Dick Coe, Elaine
Crohnhouse and others will be held at noon
Tuesday in SUB plaza.
On Thursday at noon civic mayoralty
candidates Bill Rathie and Bill Gibson and alderman
Harry Rankin will speak in SUB ballroom.
A rock concert at noon Friday in SUB plazawill
feature the Haul-Ass Blues Band and, tentatively,
Sunshine.
Silver collections will be taken.
During the week fraternity and sorority
members will be pushing a barrel mounted on
wheels around campus in which students can drop
money.
Each student will be asked for a donation of 25
cents as his "drop in the bucket" towards
international edcuation.
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
self-awareness, you say?
The University Recreation
Committee is seeking both
faculty members and students
interested in the long-term
recreational facilities
on this campus.
Interested persons should
apply by letter to
Sean McHugh, Chairman,
Rm. 324 Woodward Library
Could you take charge of
of our big operations?
DRS 70-7
After you've received your commission
on the Regular Officer Training Plan
(ROTP), we think so. We'll give you training in tactical military skills. And you'll get
a University education leading to a degree
in Engineering. Sciences. Or Arts. So when
you graduate you'll be ready to step into
the most demanding position. Ready to
take charge.
Contact your Military Career Counsellor
about ROTP.
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St.—Vancouver
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
Comrade Bob
Mockery of Left
By L. TROTSKY
Golly, 1 sure feel sorry for all
the poor kiddies who missed the
Comrade Bob Show on Thursday.
Because Bob Cruise and the
boys from the Canadian
Communist Party
(Marxist-Leninist) really talked up
a storm in Bu. 104 at noon. It was
just like a Soviet version of a
kiddies' television show.
There was even an emcee to
warm up the audience prior to the
star's appearance.
He gave warning that those
who came to "disrupt" the
meeting were unwelcome and
should leave forthwith.
Similar admonitions were
levelled at undercover RCMP
agents ("Tell your masters we
don't care what rules you make
up. We openly defy your War
Measures Act") and "agents of the
bourgeois press" who would be
"severely dealt with" if they
reported the meeting inaccurately.
The introduction was a concise
five minute summary of Comrade
Bob's activities since the time he
renounced his bourgeois Alma
Mater Society days and entered
show bi/..
As a member of the UBC AMS
executive in the mid-sixties,
Comrade Bob had supported the
war in Viet Nam.
Since then he has become "the
first to take up arms in the
struggle against fascism." It seems
he brandished a shotgun outside a
Toronto bookstore.
Other highlights of this bright
young man's rise to stardom
include his sensational
denouncement of his UBC law
professor, his parents, and the
presiding judge at his trial as
"bourgeois fascist lackeys." What
a card!
From his very first seven-liner,
Comrade   Bob  had   the audience
rolling in the aisles, often toward
the exits.
He opened with a poker-faced
testimonial of support for the
killers of Pierre Laporte, saying
"we look forward to more
glorious tactical exercises by our
COMRADE BOB
.. . hungry?
comrades in the Front de
Liberation du Quebec."
Even the one crank who didn't
think the joke was funny was
eventually rolled in the aisle by a
couple of Comrade Bob's straight
men.
One of the banners on the
marquee tickled the crowd.
It read as follows:
"If the enemy attacks you with
fists, reply with fists . . ." with
similar exhortations for sticks and
guns.
Comrade Bob expanded on the
gag by initiating dispute over a
member of the audience taking
pictures.
Then another plant stood up
and yelled, "If the enemy attacks
you with cameras, reply with
cameras."
The crowd roared.
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VANCOUVER - 682-1022 iuuy, November 6, 1970
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
Paul Rose toys with Quebec Police
(The following story is based
on information in a Toronto Star
story Saturday written under the
byline of Tom Hazlitt.)
MONTREAL - (CUP) - As
the politicians stalled for time
during the recent Front de
Liberation du Quebec
kidnappings, the real action was
going on in the streets of Montreal
as Paul Rose led the cops around
for 48 hours before finally
ditching them and taking off.
Rose, who according to police
and government officials is one of
the FLQ kidnappers, is still free
and appears to be playing very
heavy games with those in power.
The latest move by him andthe
FLQ was last Wednesday when
portions of Rose's passport,
including his picture and a
thumbprint were sent along with
the last FLQ communique.
However, earlier in the battle
between the FLQ and the
authorities, in fact. 24 hours after
Pierre Laporte was kidnapped,
RCMP officers caught sight of him
in downtown Montreal.
According to the Toronto Star
story, police officials knew they
were looking for Rose after a
fingerprint on an FLQ
communique turned to be from
Rose.
After the RCMP spotted Rose,
they decided that rather than
scoop him up, they would follow
him, hoping of course that he
would lead them to the place
where Laporte was being held.
However, the RCMP turned the
job over to the Quebec Provincial
Police who put at least 12
plaincloth'esmen on foot and six
cars filled with cops on the tailing
job.
"This was during the period
that Quebec officials appeared to
be bargaining with the kidnappers,
and it may throw some light on
the confusing period," the Star
story says. "Unknown to the
public in those days of mounting
tension, the QPP squad shadowed
Rose through the streets, off and
on subways, into taxis and
through public buildings."
The Star says Rose had been
under surveillance many times
before, although they don't say
exactly why, and apparently Rose
quickly caught on to the fact that
a squadron of police were
watching him.
But he stopped at least once
long   enough   to   shave   off   his
"hippie" beard and "long" hair.
After about 48 hours of
leading the cops around in a
guerilla theatre action, Rose
simply disappeared. Here is how
the Star describes it:
"One minute the team trailing
him had him in view as he walked
along a downtown Montreal
street. The next instant he had
disappeared. Police don't know
whether- he slipped into a building
or a car. Despite frantic efforts to
pick up the trail Rose was away."
Following that action, a
struggle developed between the
RCMP and Quebec officials,
including QPP.
The RCMP wanted to publish
pictures of Rose on TV and in the
press and prepare to strike
immediately with a large force if
anyone reported Rose's hangout.
The Star says the RCMP argued
that there was "a fighting chance"
that Laporte would be recovered
alive.
The Quebec officials, however,
argued that "to publish the
picture of Rose at this point
would mean almost certain death
for the labor minister."
It was at this point that Pierre
Trudeau stepped in and invoked
the powers of the War Measures
Act. _
This allowed all the police and
army forces to sweep around
Montreal and Quebec arresting
anyone they wanted. Paul Rose's
name was among the 400 persons
on a prepared list of those to be
arrested.
Late Oct. 17, the FLQ phoned
to say where Laporte's body
could be found and as soon as it
was confirmed that the corpse was
indeed Laporte's, the police got
together with the politicians and
released pictures of three suspects.
"One was Rose, 27, sometime
school teacher with a long history
of hippie, revolutionary and
separatist activities in his file," the
Star says.
''Another was Marc
Carbonneau, 37, cab-driving FLQ
member.
"The official release didn't
make it clear but Carbonneau was
wanted only for the kidnapping of
James Cross..."
"Also listed as wanted — and
still a man of some mystery — was
Jacques Lanctot, 25, who had
been fingered by the RCMP from
the first as a man with a great deal
of knowledge of the Laporte
kidnapping."
The next development in the
guerilla theatre that featured the
FLQ and the police was a call
from a woman from suburban St.
Hubert, where Laporte's body was
found, saying that she had seen
Rose and that she knew he had
shaved off his beard.
The Star says:
"The police struck almost
instantly. Two officers hammered
down the door with sledge
hammers and a gigantic QPP
sergeant carrying a second world
war machine gun hurled himself
through — into an empty house.
"Later, on the basis of
interviews, the police learned that
Rose and his accomplices had
escaped only homs before.
"Incredibly, the murderers had
disposed of Laporte's body, said
the authorities, then quietly spent
the night eating and sleeping in
the house where they had been all
along.
"They left casually, waving at
neighbours as they went about 11
a.m. on Oct. 18.
The police found their
hide-away early the next
morning."
The Star concludes its story by
saying there is a theory,
apparently among police and
politicians, that Rose "is an
exponent of street theatre of the
most chilling kind. And that he is
(by sending the passport) telling
the authorities he is alive, free —
large
Students win two cents
Food services has conceded defeat — starting Monday, a
glass of pop will cost 18 cents, instead of the present 20 cents.
Byron Hender, speaking for Food Services said that student
senator Art Smolensky has won.
Smolensky did a survey of the contents of the cups used for
beverages on campus and found that there was only 87 per cent more
drink in a 20 cent cup than in a 10 cent cup.
This constituted a 13 per cent loss for the student on every large
drink he bought. Now he loses 3 per cent on each large drink.
Canada is a Chinese commie front,
says worried Louisiana Democrat
NEW YORK (CUPI) - The Front de Liberation
du Quebec is a Chinese revolutionary group
"determined to overthrow the Canadian government
and establish a People's Republic of Canada," says
John R. Rarick, Lousiana Democrat.
A member of the U.S. house of representatives,
Rarick says that "despite the recognition of the
communist threat (FLQ), Mr. Trudeau and his
government.. . extended diplomatic recognition to
the government of Red China and has given
indication of supporting the Red Chinese admission
to the United Nations."
Apparently this act of recognizing £hina is part -
of an attempt by the "left wing extremist" Trudeau
to play games "with the Canadian people" while
their attention is being diverted by a skillful
manoeuvre in sensitivity training."
Rarick also criticized the news commentators
for "no longer" describing the FLQ as a
"communist Chinese movement." The media,
Rarick   says,   may   be   fearful   of   embarrassing
"Canada's new ally, Red China".
"Mr. Trudeau has exploited the realities of the
situation magnificently," Rarick said in all
seriousness. "The shock troops of the FLQ are
safely in jail protected from the Canadian people
and Trudeau's ideological friends of Red China have
been extended diplomatic recognition without any
backlash ..."
Rarick is worried about what these latest
diplomatic moves by Canada will mean to the safety
of U.S. democracy.
"And we of the United States now have Castro
and the Soviet fleet on the south — Trudeau on the
north — our fighting men in South Vietnam — and
our attention directed to Middle East.
"Where next? Bonn? London? Or here in the
United States?"
To date, the FLQ have not made public any
plans to invade America, and attempts at confirming
Rarick's inside information have thus far proved
fruitless.
and quite likely to strike again."
The FLQ, according to their
last communique are still holding
Cross, and as far as the public has
been told, the police are still a
long way from smashing the FLQ
cells.
But the FLQ at any rate, has
managed to smash whatever was
left of liberalism in Canada.
Decorate with Posters and Prints
I B.C.'s) Largest Selection from
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3209 West Broadway
738-2311
Gifts - Jokes - Cards
We do
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The DOLPHIN THEATRE proudly presents
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SUNDAY, 2 P.M.
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Phone 299-7303
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Directed by—Luis Buruel
Hastings at Willingdon Page. 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
That's what Shell has to offer
graduates. Plenty of room for
responsible work with a good
view to advancement.
We provide challenge, you
provide performance.
That's how graduates
move up in our organization. You see, at
Shell   advancement
isn't controlled by age, it's determined by performance.
So if you're in Engineering,
or Science, check in for an interview. Get further details from
your bulletin boards
and placement office.
We'll be on campus
November 16-20
Shell Canada Limited Friday, November 6, 1970
THE      U B Y S S E Y
Page 21
Spread the word
at B.C. schools
If you want a free trip into the sticks to spread "The Word"
among high school students, here's your chance.
The annual high school visitations program to take place this year
between Jan. 12 and Feb. 26, is open for applicants in SUB 100.
The idea behind the program is to send UBC and B.C. Institute of
Technology students to high schools in the province to tell students
what life is really like at the "institutions of higher learning."
About 25 to 30 students will be sent to each school in the
program.
They will show a ten minute color film on life at UBC and BCIT,
which is being prepared by BCIT students.
The high school students will then be broken into seminar groups
of approximately ten student each with each group presided over by
one UBC and one BCIT student.
Students going on the trip are carefully screened by an AMS
committee consisting of acting external affairs officer Tom Palfrey, Iris
Carter, Nursing 2, Connie Sinkler, AMS council education rep and Peter
Insley, Comm. 3.
They will interview each interested student on his or her interests
and opinions and have final decision as to who goes on the trip.
Tutoring centre open
If you are having trouble with your courses, fear not — help is
near.
The UBC Tutoring Centre, organized by the Alumni Association
in co-operation with the Alma Mater Society, has opened its doors to
students with course troubles and to those who would like to make a
bit of money tutoring.
Each   tutor _ will set the cost of tutoring, but the centre is
recommending that tutors charge $3 per hour.
Also, a registration fee of SI will be charged, in line with the
centre's aim to remain self-supporting.
The $1 will be refunded, however, if the centre is unable to find
either students for tutors, or tutors for students.
Anybody may apply to be a tutor or to be tutored in SUB 100B
weekdays from 12 to 2, or by phoning 228-4583.
"The centre is primarily intended for first and second year
students," said a spokesman for the centre. "For example, arts students
taking a science or math course, or engineers taking English may need
help.
Library building
to start Monday
Construction of the new $3,306,000 Sedgewick Library will start
Nov. 9, said head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs Thursday.
The contract for the new building has been awarded to Cana
Construction Co. Ltd.
The library will be located underneath the main mall.
The trees lining the mall will be enclosed in concrete caissons and
incorporated into the structure of the building. Windows will look out
onto courtyards.
The new library will solve the problem of inadequate study space
for undergrads with 18,000 square feet of study area, enough to seat
2,400 students, said Stuart-Stubbs.
Architectural representative Bob Todd said he wanted to consult
students before designing study areas.
"We want to get away from the traditional rows of tables and
stiff-backed chairs," he said.
10TH & SASAMAT HOME SERVICE
4494 W. 10th - Ph. 224-1244
"WE GUARANTEE ALL REPAIRS
- 90 DAYS OR 4,000 MILES"
Licenced Mechanic
10% Labour Discount to all UBC Students
Come&
give us a try
Open 7:00 a.m.
to 12 Midnite
Featuring AFRICAN ARTS and CRAFTS
IVORY and EBONY HAND CARVINGS
Paintings-Gifts With a Difference
All items are handcrafted by African Natives
577 Howe 685-8643
—dave Mair photo
AND MAYBE, WALTER, if I can find that elusive four-leaf clover, it'll bring me good luck and my rich
great-uncle will die and leave me all his money and THEN, Walter, I can buy new jeans .. .
FOR A
MORE
FRI. 6 & SAT. 7
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 8-7:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
We regret that "The
Professionals" is not being
shown as previously
scheduled. Columbia Pictures
(Canada) cancelled our
booking.
Career opportunities
Commerce Graduates
We invite graduates to discuss career
opportunities with us as:
INDUSTRIAL
ADMINISTRATION
(BACHELORS)
MARKETING
(BACHELORS)
TRANSPORTATION
(BACHELORS)
Production Trainees: Responsibilities in production planning,
scheduling and control, capital planning and budgeting, cost
analysis, special studies and production supervision.
Control Trainees: Will gain experience in accounting and control
in both manufacturing and marketing divisions prior to
advancement to the Group Controller's office.
Desk Salesmen: Will gain experience and knowledge of marketing
and sales procedures, products, and familiarity with regional
customers.
Transportation Trainees: Responsibilities in scheduling and
co-ordinating the movement of wood products from the
supplying mills to vessels for shipment to buyers in specified
offshore markets.
AA
MacMillan Bloedel
Interviews will be held on campus November 17 and 18, 1970.
For information and appointments, please contact your Student
Placement Office. Page 22
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
FRIDAY
VCF
Meeting  in   SUB  209   at  noon   for   a
"Clue-In".
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
Meeting   in   Upper   Lounge   of   International House at noon.
SPEC
Organizational meeting at noon in SUB
119.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Meeting at noon in SUB 125.
SIMS
Group   Meditation   in   SUB   105A   at
noon.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Meeting at noon in SUB 125.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK   CLUB
Meeting   at   noon   in   SUB   105A.    A
social worker from  VGH  will  speak.
CHINESE   STUDENT   ASSOC.
Dance at International House  at 8:30.
EAST  ASIA  SOCIETY
Meeting at 2756 W. 10th at 8:30 p.m.
FOLK   DANCING  CLUB
Meeting in party room at noon.
CVC
Film "Victory Thoughts of Mao  Tse-
tung"  in   SUB  auditorium   at   8  p.m.
SATURDAY
VCF
Workshop  on   Evangelism   at   10   a.m.
at the Art Gallery.
SAILING CLUB
Party at  3410 W.  3rd  at  8:30  p.m.
A! L   :u,k -:a^*[.icHoT0Mll S
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SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
Film   "The   Red   Kite"   at   8   p.m.   in
Union College  reception room.
'tween
classes
MONDAY
EL   CIRCULO
Meeting   in   upper   lounge   of   International House  at noon.
VARSITY   DeMOLAY
Meeting  in  SUB  213  at noon.
AYN   RAND  SOCIETY
'   Meeting in  SUB 130 at noon.
TUESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Meeting in Angus 24 at noon.
AIESEC
Meeting at noon in SUB 119.
SAILING CLUB
Film  on sailing in Bu.   104 at noon.
ALPHA  &   OMEGA ORDER  OF
MELCHIZEDEK,   GEOM
Meeting in Bu.   104  at  noon  in Uni-
physies.
PRE-MED
Meeting   in   Wesbrook   201   at   noon,
Drugs and Medicine.
UBC THEOLOGICAL CLUB
Organizational   meeting   in   SUB   211
at  noon,   all   interested   persons   welcome — from atheist to theist.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting    in    rm.    402    International
House at noon.
PIG LATIN  CLUB
Meeting in south plaza at 2 a.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
VCC
A   bulletin  board   is   up   outside   208
SUB for club notices.
LEGAL   AID
Every  Friday,   Monday   and  Wednesday at noon in SUB 228 & 232.
WHEREALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
• OIL CAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
THE SUNDAY SUMMIT
♦ THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere- of the
Roaring  20's
DANCE to the updated music
of THE BROTHERHOOD
* DIRTY SALS
Contemporary elegance for a
quiet mood .  .  . with
JUDY GINN & HER GROUP
* Early Evening Entertainment
4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Admission
Mons. thru Thurs.
ONLY 	
•1
00
752 THURLOW ST. 683-7306
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1  day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before publication,
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
FITN TIMES MIXER PRESENTED
hy Your Friendly Friends. Gears
$1.00: Other Sex 25c. Lions Gate
Hall, 2611 W. 4th. 8:30 p.m. Tonight.
Greetings
12
I'M     SAVING     MY     CLAMS     FOR
Friday the 13th and the Ponderosa.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: SMALL SUM OF MONEY.
Desperate. Girl friend threatens to
cut me off if I don't take her to
The Ponderosa on Friday the 13th.
FOUND. AN IRISH SETTER ON
Campus. If you have lost one and
think may be this one is yours,
phone 988-4254.
Rides & Car Pools
14
STUDENTS NEEDING RIDE FRM.
Port Coquitlam for daily 8:30-3:30
classes,   please   phone   942-4281.
NEED RIDE FROM MAPLE RIDGE
Phone Sally - Anne, 879 - 7464 or
463-4141  after Sat. noon.
Special Notices
15
GESTALT ENCOUNTER GROUPS.
Becoming more aware of others
and oneself in the here, and now
on an experiential, not intellectual
level. For further information call
David   (Taz)  Takagi at 224-9665.
SKI  INSTRUCTION
Grouse Mtn. Ski School
Group lesson avail. Tues., Wed.
and Sat. nights. 5 nights $29.95.
All Lifts included See Bill at
V.O.C. office, Rm. 14 Grnd. fir.,
SUB, 12:30-1:30 Tues., "Wed. and
Fri. noon.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN SER-
ving on the Brock Hall Art Committee are asked to leave their
name with the Fine Arts Dept.,
rm. 401A, Lassere, phone 228-2757.
THIS WEEKEND SUB THEATRE
another Clint Eastwood thlngie:
"For A Few Dollars More", Fri. &
Sat., 7:00, 9:30; Sun., 7:00. AMS
50c,   Non-AMS  75c.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS . . .
B.C.'s largest selection from the
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway,
738-2311: gifts, jokes, post office.
(Opposite Liquor Store and Super
Valu>. Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday, Sat. till 7 p.m.
LEARN TO SKI  AT
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transportation; for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9. Tel. 738-3128.
FIRESIDE: A FILM, THE RED
Kite, will be shown followed by
discussion on Man's Search For
Meaning. Union College Reception
Room at 8:00 p.m. Nov. 8 (on
campus).
THE MOON
Men Dating Men Association
—   Wide   Choice   of   Dates  —
FULLY CONFIDENTIAL
LEGALLY APPROVED
For Appointment Call 733-8754
11:00 a.m.  .  9:00 p.m.
Feel  free to call  at  any time!
Travel Opportunities
16
CHARTERS U.K., CONTINENT,
Africa, other distinations, 1-ways.
Mick, 687-2856 or 224-0087. 106-709
Dunsmuir St. Mon. - Sat.,  9-9.
STUDENTS . . . EUROPE FOR
Christmas, Easter or Summer.
Employment Opportunities, Economic Flights, Discounts. Write for
" information (air mail) Anglo -
American Assn., 60A Pyle St.,
Newport I.W., England.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
ONE   WAY  TICKET   TO   LONDON
or  U.K.   Room   515.   684-2436.   Stu.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1960 DODGE SEDAN, 65,500 miles.
Radio, new tires, valves, shocks,
$195.  Ph.  922-3170
'65 CHEV BELAIR, 6 CYL. STD.
Best  offers,  738-7051.
1961 FOUR-DOOR FALCON. RADIO
for sale. 224-9769.  Steve Owen.
'63 MGB, RADIO, SOFT TOP,
Tonneau. New Radials and Carpet.
$800.  732-9948.
'68 FIAT 124 CONV. FORCED TO
Sell Immediately. Good condition.
Red. 5-Speed. Extras. Will take
small trade. 731-3706.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
HONDA 305. REBUILT ENG.  AND
trans.  $300.  985-2783 after 6.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Serrices
31
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS — HIGH
Fidelity Graphs, Maps, Charts,
Text-Book Illustrations and Formulations. Advertising. Phone
980-2928.
PROFESSIONAL INK RENDERING
Also lettering. Botony and Biology
or  ? Call  228-8164.
Day Care & Baby Silting    32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
DON'T BE ALONE — WALK TO A
phone — P.Y.C. Dating Club —
434-2636.
SUB FILM SOC SAYS SORRY, BUT
"The Professionals" is out! How
about "For A Few Dollars More"
—Clint Eastwood's No. 2 movie;
SUB  Theatre,   this weekend.
CORKY'S MENS' HAIRSTYLING.
Regular and Teen-size cuts. 3644
W. 4th. Alma on 4th. Appointments.  731-4717.
GOTTA BUY A GIFT FOR SOME-
bady but haven't got a clue what
to get? Get some different ideas
from us, Pier 1 Imports in Greater
Gastown,. 682-6681.
THIS IS NOT A PIZZA AD! CHAP-
lains can be found in S.U.B. 228
Everyday!  Nov.  9.  Tom Fowler.
PSYCH STUDENTS! RAP WITH
your/ profs and peer group at the
Psychology Club Beer Night Thurs.
Nov.   12,   7:30 -11:00   at  I.   House.
Sewing St Alterations
38
Typewriters it Repairs 39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
and Theses. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Anne Treacy,  738-8794
ON-CAMPUS TYPING, FAST, Accurate, all types of theses, texts,
essays,   IBM  Selectric,   224-9183.
"TYPING: EXPERIENCED MEDI-
cal, engineering, social science,
psychological terminology. High
quality   low  charge.   733-4708".
FAST   ACCURATE   ELECTRIC
typing.   Theses,   essays,   papers,  35c
page,  call  Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter; shorthand. 325-
2934.
ESSAYS, THESES, DOCUMENTS
typed quickly and accurately. 35c
per  page.   266-4264.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERV-
ice. Theses, Essays, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,   437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
LEND A HAND — AND EARN
some money. If you have a particular area of academic competence, apply at the UBC Tutoring
Centre. We need tutors. Open to
profs, TA's, grad. students, and
senior students. SUB 100B, 228-
4583, 12-2 p.m. weekdays. Opens
Nov. 2.
Employment Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.
TUTJORING IN FORTRAN AND
some Mathematics wanted. Please
phone 738-4736.
ARE THE FINE POINTS OF CAL-
culus giving you trouble? French
verbs confusing? Is botany enslaving you? Register now at the
UBC Tutoring Centre and get help
with any course before exam time.
SUB 100B, 228 - 4583, 12 - 2 p.m.
weekdays. Opens Nov. 2.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW AVAILABLE 11.00
at the Bookstore and
AMS  Publications  Office-
Pre-sale tickets redeemed only at
Publications Offieo
FOR MEN ONLY. ASSTD. NEW
100/33 rpm party & stag records.
Also—8 track stereo cassettes—
reg. $8.00 each to clear $5.09. Ph.
731-2343   evenings.
125 FUR COATS, NEW AND USED,
we will buy, sell and trade! Used
coats $5 to $100. Pappas Bros.
SELL. 459 Hamilton, at Victory
Square. Open only Fri. 7-9 p.m.;
Sat., 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Ph. 681-6840.
FOR SALE SONY TAPERECORD-
er, $40, 1% years old, phone after
6:00, 224-0927.
FOR SALE: SKIS — YAMAHA
standards 185 cm with Tyrolia
step-ins, $50.00 and Lange boots
10 m,   $60.00.  Ralph,   224-9017.
8 TRACK STEREO RECORDER,
player 3 months old. Call 731-4322.
PENTAX FISH EYE LENS. CALL
731-4322.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM & BATH. PRIVATE EN-
trance. Some cooking facilities.
Quiet person only. Less rent for
work   if   desired.   733-6447.
LITTLE ANNEE FANNY SAYS: —
Live at 5760 Toronto Road for less.
Quiet rm. with kitchen priveleges.
Clean linen weekly. TV and study
area. Phone Bill 224-4530. $50 per
month.
WANTED ROOM IN HOUSE. COM-
munal or? 733-8409.
ROOM TO SHARE WITH 4TH
Year Student. Private entrance,
toilet, shower, kettle and toaster.
224-6757.
BED STUDY ROOM, KITCHEN
privileges. Washer and Dryer. Girl
student or business - woman. Call
224-6757.
GRADUATE FEMALE STUDENT
desires quiet room or suite. Preferably on campus. Jan. 1. Phone
Elaine, Room 21. 224-9031 10rll:30
a.m.
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE
house with two others near Gates.
Rent $58 plus share of utilities.
Phone  224-3140.
WANTED SENIOR STUDENT FE-
male, to share furnished apartment with two others. Own bedroom $55/mo.   Call  733-0092.
GIRL TO SHARE SUITE IN COM-
munal House. Communal Cooking.
$50 month. Call Naomi, 228-9631.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE ONE
bedroom furnished apt. on or before Dec. 1. $60 mo. Call Frances,
733-9648.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
BUY — SELL
INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads. Friday, November 6, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
Thirds hockey readying
for winning ice season
Thunderbird basketball star Derek Sankey, seen here in a game against
Simon Fraser last year, will return to the line-up this season. For the
reason he almost didn't, see the   story below.
Sankey returning
in time for Grads
The leading rebounder in the WCIAA has rejoined the UBC's
basketball team, just in time for Friday night's annual Grad game.
Derek  Sankey,  a member of
the Canadian national team, will
be in the lineup Friday night
when the Varsity hosts the Grads.
The Grads will play an
intrasquad game beginning at 8
p.m., then they'll join forces and
take on the Varsity at 9 p.m.
Sankey, who averaged 15.6
points a game last year, will give
UBC eight returnees from last
year's Canadian Intercollegiate
champions. The 1969-70
compiled a record of 28-4.
Sankey was previously thought
Intramurals
In touch football the Beta's have
dominated the playoffs totally. Their
first and third division teams took their
respective league titles while the second
division team tied for first place in
their league. The game for first will
be played today at noon.
The basketball schedule is now up
and league play starts on Monday. So
check the schedule outside the intramural  office  for game  times.
The ice hockey schedule Is also
posted.
to be ineligible because he failed
one course in Law last year and
was unable to get into 2nd year
law. But because he obtained a 53
per cent average overall, he retains
his years' eligibility.
With only one big man on the
starting squad - 6'7" Terry
MacKay - Coach Peter Mullins
will concentrate on a fast break
offense and a pressing defence.
Coach Mullins plans to start
three National Team members —
Sankey, MacKay, and Ron
Thorsen — along with forward
John Mills and guard Stan
Callegari.
Callegari sat out most of last
season with a knee injury but is
expected to combine effectively
The UBC Thunderbird ice
hockey team swings into action
this weekend in preparation for
the WCIAA season opener
November 20th.
Exhibition games are scheduled
Footballers
last game
The UBC football
Thunderbirds will close out
another successful season
Saturday afternoon when they
clash with the University off
Alberta Golden Bears at 2 p.m. at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Successful? Well, they've won a
game, which for the Birds, makes
this season one to remember.
This year the Birds abandoned
their independent schedule against
American schools because the
competition was too tough. This
year they joined the WCIAA and
they're got the very same
problem.
Currently the Birds have a
record of 1-7. In eight games,
they've scored 44 points, which
isn't very much, and they've
allowed 245 points, which is a
helluva lot.
In Alberta, they'll be facing a
team that beat them 21-10 in the
first game of the season. A 32-14
loss last week to Manitoba gives
the Golden Bears a record of 4-3
and third place in the conference.
Alberta's offense is based
mainly around their running
attack. They don't pass too often,
although they have the
conference's second leading
receiver in Mel Smith, who has
caught 15 passes for an amazing
496 yards.
FOOTNOTES: Arthur Delamont
and the UBC Pep Band did a great
job at the SFU game and deserve a
lot of credit. . . The Birds have
the conference's leading kickoff
return man in Dave Corcoran,
who has returned 11 for 294
yards.
with Thorsen, who was the
M.V.P. in last years' CIAU
championships, in the
backcourt.
JUNIOR HOCKEY
TONIGHT-8:30
Vancouver Centennials
vs.
Chilliwack Bruins
KERRISDALE ARENA
Advance Tickets Available
at Thunderbird Shop
Students $1.00
Mon. Nov. 9, 8 p.m. vs New Westr.
Let Greg Kocher Teach
You How To
SCUBA DIVE
NAUI & Navy
Certification
6 Wk. Course-$40
All Equip. Supplied
NEXT COURSE STARTS:
TUES., NOV. 10 AT 7:30
In Memorial  Gym Rm. 213
PHONE - 733-5809
SdQ
arsity
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
JOHN WURFLINGER
IS A SMALL INDEPENDENT BUSINESSMAN
WHO DEVOTES
SPECIAL ATTENTION
TO SKIERS. BEFORE
PURCHASING ANY
SPORTING EQUIPMENT,
DROP IN TO SEE JOHN.
OPERATING PRINCIPLES
Skiers will receive individual attention.
Skiers will receive honest professional advice on
equipment selection.
All lines carried will be of top quality in their price range.
Prices will be such as to offer outstanding value.
All products will be backed by a personal guarantee.
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY TILL 9 P.M.
for Friday and Saturday against
the Coquitlam Heaters and the
Schmyr Flyers.
This     season,    Coach    Bob
Hindmarch  is  more enthusiastic
Jack Moores, team captain.
than ever about the potential of
his players. Hindmarch feels that
this is the fastest skating team he
has ever coached.
Among the talent the coach
has assembled this year...
includes returning veterans
Dwayne Biagioni, Doug
Buchanan, Mike Darbrough, Steve
Fera, Jack Moores, Roy Sakaki,
Barry Wilcox, Tom Williamson,
Jeff Wilson, and Laurie Vanzella.
New members include Bill
Cartwright,   Rich   Longpre,   Bob
MacAneely, Fred Masuch, Norm
Parks, Bruce Ratcliffe, Rod Silver
and Bob Trennamen.
Both Bob MacAneely and
Barry Wilcox had professional
tryouts with California Golden
Seals and Vancouver Canucks
respectively. MacAneely played
previously with the Edmonton Oil
Kings.
Not only can the Thunderbirds
skate but they can... also score
goals.
The Birds have skated to
pre-season exhibition victories
over Chilliwack (11-2), and North
Vancouver (13-3). They also
recorded victories in Reno Nevada
by scores of 12-8 and 9-1.
The teams' most recent success
was over Powell River last
weekend. Here they scored
victories of 7-2 and 6-1.
In this two game series Bob
MacAneely counted three times,
Buchanan, Sakaki, and Wilson
each scored twice, and Darbrough,
Longpre, Parks, and Vanzella
added one goal apiece.
Exhibition games this weekend
are set for Friday at 8:00 p.m.
and Saturday at 1:00 p.m. in the
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Center.
Basketball
Opener
GRADS
vs
THUNDERBIRDS
Tonight   9 p.m,
Old Grad Game - 8p.m.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Football
ANNUAL
"RAIN BOWL"
TROPHY GAME
W THUNDERBIRDS
--*"  vs
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
GOLDEN BEARS
SATURDAY NOV. 7
(TOMORROW at 2 P.M.)
Thunderbird Stadium
I Page 24
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 6, 1970
Great UBC land grab is on!
Land speculators are out to get property on frat row.
But just try to find someone who admits knowing about
it.
A neat little deal is cooking, it appears, but no one
wants to talk about it.
The deal in question concerns a land development
company backed with English money, which is interested
in gaining title to the first three frat houses on the north
end of Wesbrook.
If the land is obtained by the developers, it will be
used for a high class, high rise hotel.
The company acting as a front for the developers is J.
E. Smith Realty. It seems the realtors want to keep the
matter under the table for the time being.
James Smith, head (or, to be more exact, nominee) of
the company said Thursday he didn't want news of the
Three Frats have land but little money . . .
land transaction to come to public attention.
"I don't want this news released for a couple of days
or it'll end up a political football," Smith said.
He would not reveal the principals involved in the
transaction.
Smith said that a high rise hotel with "the best of
everything" was in the plans. It would include VIP suites,
a coffee bar, dining room and possibly a pub.
He said lie had written to attorney-general Les
Peterson about the possibility of obtaining a licence for
the proposed pub.
Smith said he had a meeting scheduled with Peterson
Thursday to discuss the pub licence. Peterson is currently
in Vancouver.
"Since the university is expanding, there is a need for
a hotel to accommodate visiting alumni, profs, families
and, of course, students," Smith said.
He claimed that the board of governors and university
administrators right down the line have already agreed in
principle to the idea of a hotel close to the campus core.
When contacted by The Ubyssey, chancellor Allan
McGavin, a member of the board, said he had heard
"some talk" of a development.
But McGavin would go no farther than to suggest that
the man to contact was John Liersch, chairman of the
board.
Liersch, however, said that in his capacity as UBC
board chairman he knows nothing of the hotel plan.
There appears to be some kind of credibility gap on
the board.
If the government won't pay for UBC,
someone's got to do it. Now UBC needs
the land speculators and the land
speculators need UBC. The land rush
has begun.
By MIKE SASGES
and LESLIE PLOMMER
Administration information officer Arnie Myers also
said he knew nothing of the proposal and denied Smith's
claim that the board had approved the idea in principle.
He said the matter has not been considered or
approved by the board.
The three frats in question are Beta Theta Pi, Phi
Delta Theta and Phi Gamma Delta, who all hold title to
their land.
The other frats along the row lease their property
under the Universities Land Administration Act which
falls under the jurisdiction of provincial lands and forests
minister Ray Williston.
Could the developers, then, go ahead and obtain land
from the first three frats despite objections from the
university?
Myers said it is his understanding that even the
holders of such leases would have to have provincial
cabinet approval before the land sale could take place to
outside developers.
Despite the fact that the three frats do hold leases on
their land, the lots are zoned specifically for frat use, and
cabinet approval would be necessary to change the zoning,
Myers said.
The question then is whether the university
administration, the board of governors and the cabinet
would be likely to approve such zoning change and land
deal.
"Overnight accommodations are thin around campus
and would probably be approved by the administration,"
R. P. Murdoch, manager of the university endowment,
lands, told The Ubyssey Thursday.
He said the faculty club offers some accommodation
for visitors. The club, however, offers very limited
facilities for housing visiting profs and favored guest
speakers.
Thus Murdoch's philosophy that endowment lands
and developers have money but little land
so the solution is obviously ... a hotel
development must meet a university need fits in well, for
such accommodation is rare close to campus.
By his own admission, Murdoch feels the
administration would look kindly on the land scheme.
With administration approval, it is unlikely that the
Socred cabinet would flinch at approving the needed zone
change.
Although UBC wishes and Socred aims have rarely
made friendly bed fellows, in this case it is reasonable to
think their principles will coincide.
The government has given UBC clear indication that
the university must increasingly pay its own way in the
years to come.
The large capital grants annually requested by UBC
are known to be an albatross around premierBennett's
dam-building neck.
With this in mind, the university has the word that it
must find ways to operate at less expense to the
government and the taxpayers.
One of the most obvious ways of providing
self-financing is development of the endowment lands.
There has been some informal discussion about
forming a UBC committee to study use of the land, but so
far this has not been brought forward publicly.
There is at least one person who wants the land
currently belonging to the frats. He is dean John
McCreary of the medicine faculty.
McCreary said Thursday he would like facilities for a
family practice unit for patient management outside the
Health Sciences Centre or a day care centre for psychiatric
patients.
The present psychiatric hospital is located across
Wesbrook and a few hundred feet down the street from
the three frats involved in the land deal.
The psychiatric hospital is part of a total proposed
Health Sciences complex along Wesbrook. Many students
are also eager to obtain the existing frats — some of which
are in financial trouble — for student housing close to
campus.
Meanwhile, the land deal that no one seems to know
about keeps simmering along behind closed doors.

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