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The Ubyssey Sep 18, 1970

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Array MMMMffl
Vol. Lll, No. 2
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1970        «ilp»48     228-2305
—david bowerman photo
ONE HELLUVA PIECE of meat, croon frat sponsors of Thursday's beef barbecue held outside SUB.
Noted for their love of meat of all kinds, frat types served lines of students participating in the feast. The
barbecue constituted a credible kick-off as frats head into fall rush.
Students pay for too-costly
Food Services finance rates
By LINDA DRINKWATER
The major reason why the cost of food at UBC
cafeterias went up this year is the improper
financing of the Food Services.
And a change in the financing could hold the
line against future price increases.
This   was  found  by  a  five-man  committee,
v appointed by the Alma Mater Society last spring,
which met over the summer under Dr. David Bond
of the economics department.
The committee has recommended the financing
be changed.
"We have found that the present methods of
financing capital expenditures discriminates against
existing students in favor of future students", the
committee said in its report.
15 Food Services facilities are mortgaged for $1.2
million over a period of 10 years. This requires that
Food Services make enough profit to meet its
present annual payment of $163,041 on the loan.
Hence student prices must be increased to help meet
' this yearly amount.
The Bond Committee has recommended the
loan be re-financed over a longer period of time — at
least the economic life span of Food Services,
estimated by Food Services Head Ruth Blair to be
about 30 years. This would decrease the required
annual payment at the present interest rate from
$163,041 to $87,179.
And the food would be cheaper.
"I think students don't particularly want to pay
for the future students the way they are now.
They'd rather just pay for their own food," said
Sean McHugh, a student member of the Bond
committee.
Bond said re-financing of the Food Services
"would certainly be worth the effort".
So why doesn't administration re-finance Food
Services?
The answer, says McHugh, is Deputy-Treasurer
William White, who is in charge of Ancillary
Services, which includes the food operations.
He is responsible for the present financing.
to page 18 see: "WHITE WRONG"
Tenure for
citizens only'
says report
By GINNY GALT
An Alma Mater Society survey on the citizenship of UBC's
faculty shows that only 45 per cent of the full-time faculty hired since
1964 were Canadian citizens.
And, of the foreign faculty hired in the past five years, 25 per
cent were American citizens, 16 per cent were British, and 14 per cent
held other citizenships.
The report, compiled by AMS president Tony Hodge, and Art
Smolensky, former president of the Graduate Students' Association,
was released Thursday after six months of research into citizenship and
current hiring trends at UBC.
On the basis of their findings, Hodge and Smolensky urge a
Canada-first policy in hiring and recommend that tenure should only be
granted to Canadian citizens to prevent a cultural take-over of Canadian
universities.
"And quite apart from the fact that we are in danger of being
culturally swamped by an overdose of foreign academics is the
realization that many highly-qualified Candian PhD's are having
difficulty finding employment in Canada," the report says.
Hodge and Smolensky discovered a continuing tendency at UBC
to hire more foreign members — especially Americans — and fewer
Canadians in both the faculties of arts and science, despite growing
complaints about de-Canadianization of the universities.
"The disappointing thing to me is the fact that even with all the
shit that's been raised in the past year, there's been no change in hiring
trends," said Hodge.
The report reveals the imbalance in hiring in the faculty of arts is
even greater than that of the university as a whole.
"This is somewhat understandable in that in some of the newer
disciplines, Canada lags behind in producing enough academics to fill
her needs.
"This does not however apply to the alleged recent hiring for
1970-71 of eight American professors and only two Canadians in the
department of English," the report says.
English department head Dr. Robert Jordan refused to comment,
saying the university doesn't hire according to nationality.
"Last spring the senate addressed itself as to whether the
university should take a census of nationality, and the answer was a
resounding "No" ', said Jordan.
In science especially engineering, the student has to have a
knowledge of Canadian standards, Smolensky said.
"Many British profs teach British standards in engineering so
when the student goes out and gets a job the company has to retrain
him," he said.
"But I'm not advocating an all-Canadian university either. About
30 per cent of the faculty should be foreign academics."
Smolensky said he wasn't suggesting that the university penalize
any faculty members who had come from other places.
But on the question of tenure he felt a person had to make a
commitment to Canada if he planned to stay and work here
permanently.
"A man has to be here five years before he gets tenure and it
takes five years for him to get Canadian citizenship if he comes here
and takes out landed immigrant status," he said.
"So he can be given tenure and citizenship at the same time."
In Britain, France, Switzerland, and Germany, to get tenure or
the equivalent you have to be a citizen, he said.
Over 97 per cent of the people in American universities are
Americans, Smolensky said.
Hodge and Smolensky also feel that advertising job-vacancies in
Canadian universities must be mandatory.
"There are some departments at this university which will
advertise all over the world for someone with a masters or PhD. They'll
advertise everywhere but Canada and that's got to stop," Smolensky
said.
He said the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
put out a bulletin with academic vacancies which more Canadian
universities should advertise in.
Copies of the report, which is based on a random survey of 347
faculty members, were sent to members of the Board of Governors and
senate.
Smolensky said he was prepared to present his report at a senate
meeting.
Boot city hall trash
If you want to vote in the December civic election, your
name has to be on the voter's registration list by Monday Sept.
21.
So if you're not sure whether your name is on the list
phone City Hall (873-7011) and they will tell you. If you are not
on the list get your asses down to the registration office at 2512
Yukon (half a block up from Broadway) and they'll fix you up.
The office is open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. today, Saturday and
Monday.
The only requirements are that you be 19 years old and
that you have been a Vancouver resident since Jan. 1, 1970.
Do your ecological thing. Clean up city hall. Page 2
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, September 18,  1970
'Workers in doubt
over student lead'
By CHRIS READ
Not every student movement
can expect to attract the support
of the workers, Alain Krivine said
Thursday.
"Workers have confidence in
students to initiate revolutionay
movements, but not to complete
them."
Krivine told about 200
students in Angus 104 that
French students, during the '68
May and June revolt, posed the
problem of power to the
workers.
However, in the final analysis,
the combined forces of the
students and the workers were
unwilling to assume power. The
workers lacked confidence in the
student leadership, he said.
Krivine,   socialist   presidential
ALAIN KRIVINE
no one to lead
South African story
truth about travel
candidate in the most recent
French national elections, said the
second reason for failure of the
1968 revolt was the lack of
knowledge among the working
class about the operations of a
bourgeoisie state.
"The bourgeoisie mystifies and
confuses the working class in
order to continue its exploitation
of them."
Krivine told the lecture,
sponsored by UBC Young
Socialists, that the aim of a
revolutionary party is to propose
a program. In the last analysis the
worker will decide.
Krivine predicted that workers
in the United States will become
increasingly radicalized.
"The capitalist countries are
entering a period of political and
economic crisis."
"The U.S. is losing markets in
In do-China and Latin America.
The bourgeoisie will be unable to
give any more economic advances,
gained through the exploitation of
foreign markets, to the American
working class."
KERN'S   SHELL   SERVICE
SPECIALIZING IN
VOLKSWAGEN AND
PORSCHE
Service & Repairs - Reasonable Rates
1005 W. 12th Ave. at Oak       738-9033
By MICHAEL SASGES
Want to go on an "African
Safari" into South Africa?
It will cost you $1699 but it
should be worth it.
And, oh yeah, you should be
white.
If you are black, it will be a bit
different. You will be treated as a
black South African - who
cannot vote, obtain jobs or live in
sections of the major cities and
who must carry a special pass
book or risk arrest.
This was pointed out by 20
students who confronted Michael
Corbett of Holiday Travel
Consultants Ltd. Wednesday
evening at the Planetarium.
The students, six of them
black, belong to the Fraser Group,
a UBC organization concerned
with the problems of developing
nations of the Third World.
Holiday Travel, sponsors of
safaris into East Africa and the
Republic of South Africa was
presenting a publicity travelogue
which according to Corbett would
show "what Africa is all about."
But the students almost didn't
make it. At the door Corbett
questioned the six black Africans
about confirmation of seating
reservations. Whites who had
failed to confirm seating
reservations, had no admission
problems.
The six were finally admitted
after the interference in the
dispute of senior Planetarium
supervisor Clyde Netherey.
A short film followed, then the
Fraser Group began questioning
Corbett. He promised to answer
the questions after the next film.
But he again cut off the
students, this time by quickly
rolling another film.
After this, Netherey again
interfered, and requested Corbett
to give the microphone to
members of the audience.
Netherey asked the audience to
stay behind and hear both sides of
the South African story.
The audience's attitude,
however, was hostile.
One man, who said he was
asked by a Fraser Group member
to "Come outside and I'll shave
your fucking head in two
seconds."
The audience left rapidly and
the Fraser Group carried
discussion with interested people
outside the auditorium.
wm
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000  GARMENTS  TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full   Dress (Tails)
• Morning  Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White  &  Coloured Coats
• Shirts  and   Accessories
• 10'/,   U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal  Wear Rentals
631   Howe 688-2481
Cheaper Than Going to a Movie!
Ian & Sylvia
and The Great Speckled Bird
LIVE
in SUB
Ballroom
2 SHOWS ONLY ON TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
7  P.M. & 9:30  P.M. - SUB  Ballroom
Advance Student Tickets $1.75
at AMS and Information Desk in SUB
Tickets at door will be $2.50 - Non AMS $3.00 anytime.
BUY  NOW  AND  SAVE
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTATION
Lester calls on CAUT
to reconsider sanctions
BURNABY    (CUP) The
Canadian Sociology and
Anthropology Association has
advised its members not to accept
employment at SFU.
The CSAA has also issued an
appeal to Sociology and
Anthropology departments at
other Canadian universities and
abroad to offer positions to
faculty wishing to leave SFU.
Other academic associations
that have already called for a
censure of SFU through the
Canadian Association of
University Teachers include the
American Sociology Association
and the American
Anthropological Association.
SFU board of governors
chairman Richard Lester Tuesday
urged   the   CAUT   to   carefully
consider the effect of any attempt
to impose "serious sanctions"
against the university.
He was responding to a
telegram sent by the CAUT. The
telegram asked the university to
regard as final the decision of an
investigating committee which
stated there were no grounds for
the dismissal of seven faculty
members.
In a letter to the CAUT, Lester
said the decision of the committee
has been made without hearing
the evidence in the case.
He said the threatened CAUT
sanctions were being made against
the university for "insisting that a
dismissal hearing be conducted
fairly, that evidence be heard and
that the principles of natural
justice be observed."
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
EXTEND TO ALL NEW AND RETURNING
STUDENTS AND MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY
A WARM WELCOME AND BEST WISHES
FOR EVERY SUCCESS.
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
offer Hie largest- selection and lowest prices on oyer
T000 new and used typewriters and other business
machines of all makes and models.
SALES - RENTALS — SERVICE
LOW STUDENT RATES
POLSON TYPEWRITERS LTD.
458 West Broadway (near Cambie) 879-0631
"The World's First Office Equipment Super-Market" Friday, September 18, 19/0
i n c
u b t s b c T
Page 3
—bill loiselle photo
YE OLDE BELLTOWER looks down on students doing their best to postpone starting another year in
the library. Just think, if a benovolent citizen hadn't donated money for the multi-thousand dollar
tower, we wouldn't have this photo. Will this thought comfort needy library administrators?
Innovations planned
in English 100, 200
By JAN O'BRIEN
Eleven new English courses — aimed at providing a cohesive
introduction to the subject in the first two years — could replace
English 100 and 200 at UBC next year.
Dr. Robert Jordan, English department head, told The Ubyssey
that the proposals must first be approved by the arts faculty curriculum
committee — which will consider them "this month or next".
"If approved, we would be ready to offer the courses next year,"
he said.
The courses — which would constitute the first major alternative
to the loosely defined English 100 survey course for many years — will
be mainly one term, one and one-half units.
Five courses would be offered to first year students. Three are
primarily literary courses, which will also require essay writing:
• introduction to poetry
• introduction to drama
• introduction to short fiction
The other two are expository writing courses for students
seriously interested in writing practice:
• introduction to expository writing
• advanced expository writing (offered in the second term)
The second year courses are related to the first year courses.
The three literary courses are carried on in a study of poetry, a
study of drama and a study of novels.
As well, a study of major authors and a study of non-fictional
prose, which includes everything from sermons to essays to advertising,
would be offered.
The only three-unit course offered is a general survey of English,
primarily intended for students interested in majoring in English.
"It is similar to the present 200 course but has a fuller reading
list," said Jordan.
"Students with any 100 level English training would probably be
allowed to take second year courses."
He considers the present English 100 course to be shapeless and
unidentifiable.
"There is a tremendous difference between sections. The type of
course it is, depends on which teacher the students get.
"English 200 is very dilute, diverse and diffused. There is concern
over the kind of grab-bag casual additions and deletions being made."
If the program is approved, discussions will probably be required
with other faculties on how the freshman English requiremnt will be
designated, Jordan said.
"It might simply be three credits or a faculty might specify what
three credits it requires."
"The new courses provide a wider variety and more intensive
work. We are trying to classify the courses and make it clear for the
student what he is getting into."
Jordan also stressed the student's part in the planning, and added
that five English students had helped to plan the new program.
"I'm encouraging informal discussions between students and the
curriculum committee.
He said this plan, if approved, would have considerable
implications for third and fourth year courses.
"I'm also trying to hold some informal meetings with senior
English majors to discuss curriculum and to see what English is in
student's terms.
"We now have the machinery in the department for discussions
on where English goes from here.
"It took a long time to carve out the proposals and come to a
general agreement on the program. But once it was submitted, it was
met enthusiastically by the department."
There haven't been any changes in the English department for a
"dog's age";just compromises and additions, continued Jordan.
"English 100 has been a permanent fixture in B.C., there may be
some consternation when it disappears from UBC.
"But it's good to shake things up."
Speedy senators reject SFU boycott aid plan
By JOHN GIBBS
were very pleased with themselves
I UBC  senators
I   Wednesday night.
I They managed to wrap up their monthly meeting -
I   the first of the academic year — within 60 efficient
I   minutes.
And they still had time to spare for an off-the-cuff
description of what UBC is trying to do as a university
from administration president Walter Gage, who chaired
the meeting.
But first they had to deal with grad student senator
Stan Persky who threatened to extend the meeting with
what he had earlier described as "a little grist for their
minds."
Persky asked them to investigate the possibility of
hiring faculty who wish to leave Simon Fraser
University's political science, sociology and
anthropology department — currently the subject of a
boycott by the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology
Association.
They rejected Persky's proposal — largely ignoring
his introduction  to  the  subject and without a word
sK-i.ai
of discussion — with only four of the more than 100
senators supporting it.
Anthropology department head Cyril Belshaw was
one of those supporting the motion, however.
The CSAA has called for the boycott because of
what they termed "the most flagrant disregard for the
scholarly community ever displayed by a university
president in Canada" in the way SFU president Kenneth
Strand refused to accept the (Earl) Palmer committee's
decision that the nine suspended PSA profs be
re-instated.
The CSAA has appealed to other universities in
Canada to hire other faculty in the SFU department who
may want to support the boycott by leaving.
But UBC senators weren't interested: when Persky
rose,  he was greeted with sombre silence; while he
explained his motion, senators made hushed plans for
coffee after the meeting.
Then they voted it down.
The crisis over, there was an almost-audible sigh of
relief and — since there was lots of time — Stuart
Lefeaux, representing the Vancouver park board, called
on Gage to explain what UBC felt it should be doing.
Gage said he'd be glad to.
"I don't think we're here to be involved with what
you might call 'relevant problems'. The university should
be concerned with providing students with fundamental
principals so that when they leave they are equipped to
deal with the problem themselves.
Persky told The Ubyssey: "This body pretends to
deal with academic, scholarly subjects and when
presented with a proposal on an academic matter — they
don't offer one word of debate.
"This body pretends to deal with academic,
scholarly subjects and when presented with a proposal
on an academic matter — they don't offer one word of
debate.
"The CSAA is the highest academic body in the
country in that field (anthropology and sociology)
they chose to completely ignore it (the proposal).
Persky, whose term of office ended with the
meeting, added: "At least I went through the motion of
proposing it. It's all over for me now. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18, 1970
TMvmsn
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
SEPTEMBER 18, 1970
Canadians first
The report on citizenship of UBC faculty released
Wednesday by AMS president Tony Hodge and former
grad student president Art Smolensky doesn't really say
anything most of us don't already know.
Its value lies in the fact that it is the first report to
present the hard statistical details of that disturbing
knowledge.
Basically, the report confirms recent accusations
that UBC is hiring fewer and fewer Canadian professors
and that most of the foreign faculty members are
American.
If present trends continue, Canadian profs will
soon be in a minority at this university. When that
happens, we might as well raise the stars and stripes on
that flagpole at the end of the Main Mall.
It is unfortunate that the study of an issue as
important as citizenship had to be left to Hodge and
Smolensky, with their limited resources and a random
sample method that will be vulnerable to needless
statistical nit-picking.
However, the job was left to them because the
UBC senate refused last year to order a full-scale study
of citizenship.
Those in power at this university have consistently
failed to acknowledge the Americanization issue, the
most crucial issue facing Canadian universities today.
They have refused to admit that each country has
its particular, unique outlook and experience which
necessarily influence the way people consider a subject.
Do they really believe that an American prof
looks at political science, history, sociology or
literature in exactly the same way as his Canadian
students?
How long do they think Canada can survive as a
nation if increasing numbers of us are being taught to
think like Americans? (Studies at a number of
universities have revealed students who write about
American issues using phrases like "our problem" and
"what we must do").
Action   by   the  universities or the federal
provincial governments is long overdue.
Denial of tenure to non-Canadians
compulsory advertising of all teaching vacancies, as
Smolensky and Hodge suggest, would be a step in the
right direction.
In addition, it should be made a matter of
standing policy that only Canadian citizens be
appointed as department heads, deans or other key
administrators.
No foreign professor should be hired until the
department involved has shown it has exhausted all
possible means of finding an equally qualified Canadian.
It has been said that such a policy would violate
the traditional concept of the university as an
international community of scholars.
Crap. Rigid citizenship regulation exist for
universities in Britain, France, the U.S. and just about
every other country in the world.
Are we expected to believe that UBC is more of a
university than Oxford, the Sorbonne or Harvard?
and
and
Editor: Nate Smith
News     Maurice Bridge
City        John Gibbs
Wire        John Andersen
Photo     Alan Katowitz
Sports    Scott McCloy
Associate     John Twigg
Ass't City     Robin Burgess
Ginny Gait
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Managing        Bruce Curtis
Page Friday    Tim Wilson
All Staff are reminded of the big
party Saturday night at the West Van
home of the blonde bombshell: check
the bulletin board just inside the office
door, then come and debauch.
Names got lost and stuff wasn't
printed for lack of space. Among those
who expressed an interest in seeing
their name in print:
Cindy Brown, Nettie Wild,
Maryanne Long, Kathy McTaggart,
Peter Woodward, Josephine Margolis,
Thorn Westcott, Elaine Bougie, Bruce
Dubblestyne, Michael Sasges, Chris
Read, Jan Spencer, Elaine Tarzwell,
Ken Wabbit Lassesen, Linda
Drinkwater, Sands Kass, Norm Gidney,
Fred Cawsey, Jan O'Brien, Paul Knox,
Nela Leja and Ginny Gait.
In the jock shop, Don Gardner,
Keith Dunbar, and Tony Gallagher
carried the ball.
Amid much muck in the darkroom
were David Bowerman, Maureen Gans,
Bill Loiselle, Brett Garrett, and John
Starrek.
LETTERS
'Negativism'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Why must the editor of the
only University newspaper insist,
in the first issue, on introducing
our new students to the kind of
negative thinking that The
Ubyssey feels is either necessary,
clever or just the in-groovy-cool-
contemporary thing to do? I am
referring to your editorial of Sept.
15, outlining the so-called realities
of the University, i.e.,
overcrowding, disinterested profs,
tenure, U.S. emphasis in teaching
and unavailability of books and
housing.
Sure, many classes are bulging
at the seams but so's the whole
world; overcrowding has always
seemed minor if the topic's good.
And if it's not, there are always
other sections. Or you can forget
University.
And it seems to me that many
kids want to be nameless faces —
it saves any extra effort in
forming a seminar or making a
trip to the profs office.
And as for all those profs who
regard students as meal tickets —
that's garbage and you know it. In
my own experience, each and
every class leader at UBC, from
full professor to TA, was always
more than willing to conduct
extra discussion groups or private
tutoring sessions.
Points about tenure and US
emphasis in text books are well
taken but I gather this year's
policy will again be to exaggerate
things far out of proportion; all
my profs, in courses relevant to
Canada, have made a special and
positive effort to ensure that
whatever Canadian literature is
available takes priority.
And if you can't find your
books around town, you haven't
looked and if you still can't find
them, neither can the prof and
they just aren't there so forget it.
And if you can't find a place to
live, you haven't looked either. Or
you haven't worked to pay
enough rent.
You forgot to mention the real
realities of • university: good
conversation in SUB and in
classes, getting to know a lot of
new people, if you want to,
learning new things about the
world, if you want to, and just
having a great time.
I ask you the same question
you   put   to   your   prospective
readers - Nate Smith, with your
endless criticism and zero
suggestions for change, what are
you doing here?
LESLIE STRIKE,
Arts 2
We don't know whether to
offer you our congratulations or
our pity.
Somehow, it seems you have
managed to avoid many of the
problems that confront most
students and have found some of
the things many of us have been
trying to find for a long time. For
your sake, we hope nothing
happens to mar your blissful
existence.
But do you really believe that
students actually want to be
nameless faces, with no desire to
question what they're being
taught and no wish to improve the
way it's done?
Has it ever occured to you that
these students may accept the role
of ' nameless faces" only because
they have been intimidated by
this vast, production line?
Do you really think that a prof
can really devote much time to
students, even if he wants to,
when he is forced to operate
under an insane "publish or
perish" system?
Do you think Canadian
content means nothing more than
using Canadian literature in
courses that deal specifically with
Canada? What about the large
number of more general courses
that could, with a little effort, be
taught with some reference to our
•own country?
Have you ever needed a
reference book for an essay and
found that 100 other students
need the same five copies the
library has? If you can afford to
go out and buy the book in each
such case, congratulations.
Have you ever tried to find
off-campus housing and been told
that students aren't welcome?
Sure there are many places
available, but most are in a price
range beyond that of students,
even those students who are:
lucky enough to find summer
jobs.
As for your question, much of
my time here is spent trying to
find ways to exist under the
conditions the university imposes.
It would be a lot easier if I could
live in the kind of cocoon you
have built for yourself, but I just
can't seem to do it.   Ed.
'Disservice'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
After reading Leslie Plommer's
"In class" article in Tuum Est, I
wondered about the purpose in
writing it.
The extra edition of The
Ubyssey was supposed to help
students in the beginning of a new
life style. If you think your
"witty", "sophisticated" remarks
did any good, you are badly
mistaken. You only succeeded in
arousing a prejudice in -the
student, making him biased before
he even enters a classroom.
Nobody with a sober mind
denies that teaching is a mutual,
reciprocal activity, but you
over-emphasize the student's
importance in this activity.
In total, the article was a
disservice at a time when
student-instructor relationship
needs a more honest and positive
approach.
LOUIS MEDVECZKY
Senior Instructor
German Department
My comments in Tuum Est
were not intended to be either
witty or sophisticated. In fact, if
you think writing that article was
anything other than a sad
experience, you are badly
mistaken.
Surely you don't deny that
students entering UBC for the
first time are entitled to know
that certain classroom,
prof-student situations exist here
situations you won't find any
mention of in calendars and
official handbooks
The purpose behind The
Ubyssey editorial decision to run
an article dealing with these
situations was nothing more than
an effort to warn new students
that such things do exist.
I agree that the
student-instructor relationship
needs a more honest and positive
approach. When was the last time
you devoted a class hour or an
evening at someone's home to
discussing this subject?
Yet how can you and I, or you
and your students take this
honest, positive approach while
you persist in maintaining that the
students' part in the teaching
process is over-emphasized? The
same teaching process you say is
a mutual, reciprocal activity?
If you don't see that as things
stand now we're both the lowest
To Page 5 Friday, September 18, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Davies meets senate,
judge meets nudes
By JIM DAVIES
The scene — the old administrative building,
second floor.
The event — this term's first senate meeting.
For the uninitiated, the senate is the body
which controls the academic policies of UBC. The
chairman, administration president Walter Gage, sits
at the table in front of the rows of senators, He is
flanked by the director of academic planning,
Robert Clark, and registrar Jack Parnall.
These are the heavies. However, the one at the
head table who always knows what's happening
(and usually goes unnoticed) is special senate
secretary Frances Medley.
At 8 p.m. Wednesday the meeting gets
underway. The first six items on the 14-point
agenda are strictly for information and whiz by in
five minutes. The senators are pleased. It looks like
this meeting is going to be a quickie.
The ecstacy is short-lived. A semmingly
harmless report on UBC's phys-ed and recreation
comes up. Everyone smiles knowingly - another
quick item, that is everyone except senator Stuart
Lefeaux, Vancouver parks board superintendent.
Lefeaux, best known on senate for his
chastising of the first student senators (1967) for
having the nerve to speak at their very first meeting,
stands and proclaims "I am very proud to be a
member of conversation, .. . er, conservation, . ..
er, convocation . .."
The honourable senators look puzzlingly at one
another.
Lefeaux expresses concern about the physical
condition of the students and apologizes for his lack
of eloquence, saying, "I speak better after a couple
of martinis."
"Oh, I wouldn't say that," says Gage. Laughter
from honourable senators.
Lefeaux stands several more times on the issue.
"Give him a couple more martinis," says an
honourable senator..
The   report   is   accepted   and   the   meeting
progresses quickly. The only item which appears as
though it might take some time is under the
amorphous heading "other business".
When this comes up, Stan Persky, grad student
rep on senate (and the only student who can
apparently handle the honourable senators) stands
up to move that a committee be struck to consider
hirings of SFU political science, sociology, and
anthropology profs.
As Persky presents his motion, there is a
considerable pick-up in the mumblings around the
room. "Look, he's even got a beard now," says one
of the honourable senators.
Persky's motion gets three votes and the
honourable senators pile out of the meeting. It is
now 9:05 p.m., a new record for speed. Persky's
term as senator is over.
Otherwise on the campus:
• "Wreck beach is a nude beach. On Aug. 11, 13
naked people were charged for indecent exposure.
The first man to come before RCMP court on
campus received a short jail term. A 26-year-old
woman appeared in court Wednesday and received a
$50 fine.
As Judge M. E. Ferguson gave the guilty
verdict, he said: "Nudity in the theatre, night clubs,
and in magazines is different because the public has
a choice of seeing them or not seeing them."
He mustn't have looked at theatre row lately.
As well, the "public" has a choice of not trekking
two miles down to the beach so they can be
disgusted at the sight of the bare facts.
• Two isolated (but typical) complaints: From
Canadan University Press rep. Paul Knox - "So may
of the doors is SUB are locked, even the clubs
lounge. I have seen students give up trying to get in
the building after trying several outside doors."
From head UBC librarian, Basil Stuart-Stubbs,
"I was going through the SUB cafeteria cashier's
wicket with a cup of hot water and wound up
getting charged 12 cents. 12 cents for hot water?"
English issues remain
By LESLIE PLOMMER
So the English tenure dispute is old news, is it?
So it's a dead issue, is it?
"Forget the-whole thing. It was an unpleasant
piece of business," some people have suggested to
us.
We'd love to forget it. We'd also love to forget
about transient youth, Viet Nam and a whole host
of current issues.
But these things are happening, so we can't
forget them.
The English tenure dispute is this year. It is
every year to come. And not just because a few
more people are likely to have their tenure cases
reviewed in the future.
Tenure - whatever we might think of it - is
likely to be with us for some time.
But as David Powell and Brian Mayne correctly
point out (Ubyssey, Sept. 15) the issue goes far
beyond teachers' contracts.
The issue, as these men say, has to do with how
university departments can best serve the whole
community.
The issue has to do with what importance is
accorded to the students' role in university
education.
The issue has to do with procedures used to
review tenure cases and it has; to do with the lack of
effective avenues open to professors who want to
protest rulings made by university committees.
And the issue has to do with the fact that while
students are often able to appear before
decision-making groups such as the senior
appoinments committee, they are generally refused
representation on these committees.
Students are permitted some representation on
university committees. But always far in the
minority, and always walked over by senior faculty
and administration representatives.
Students had several reps, for example, on the
presidential selection committee formed after the
resignation of one-time administration president
Ken Hare.
But these students were not directly consulted
when the decision was made to retain Walter Gage
as president.
Students appearing at the final meeting of the
presidential selection committee were presented
with a fait accompli.
We are not objecting to the decision to hire
Gage per se. Perhaps it would have been made
democratically in the end anyway.
We are, however, objecting to the fact that the
decision was obviously made by administration and
board of governors heavies over quiet lunches at the
Vancouver Club or sedate cocktails at the Faculty
Club.
The choice to recommend that the board of
governors appoint Gage was made, we are
convinced, outside the committee meetings.
Students had representatives qn that
committee, but no real voice in what happened.
Students had no representatives at all on the
committee that ruled in the English tenure dispute.
In fact, students rarely have any part in making
the important decisions affecting their own lives at
UBC.
Is this old news? Is this a dead issue?
As one faculty member said recently, "It's a
quiet, corrupt university."
From Page 4
of the low in this whole process, I
feel sorry for you. If you don't
see that by our mutual lack of
action we're helping to maintain
this whole dog-eat-dog,hierarchial,
mark-oriented, publish or perish
system, I feel sorry for you.
And I'm not alone in this view.
I just happen to be the student
who wrote the Tuum Est article.
If you have any further
comments, come around to The
Ubyssey office — we won't talk to
you from behind our desks.
Or go ahead and write
something about how great you
think student-prof relations are at
UBC — we don't give lousy marks
to things we don't agree with. We
have even been known to print
them.
L.P.
*•      i
Interested in SELLING?
Then why not be an
ADVERTISING
SALES REP
for the
UBYSSEY
This is an excellent opportunity to gain
worthwhile sales experience and to earn
commissions for part-time work.
The AMS Publications Office needs two
second or third-year business-minded
students (preferably Commerce) who will
work hard for 6-10 hours a week.
If interested apply to the
Publications Office
Ream 241, Student Union Building     "■
After 2:30 p.m.
■ ■-  /
'A     2?
7
When
you -
need
aBank
It's nice to know you're
near one.
The Commerce.
Come in.
And find out how more of us
can do more for you.
There's a Commerce branch
at
5796 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
in the Village Shopping Plaza
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE Page 6
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, September 18,  1970
First Music anti-calendar
shows students' apathy
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Another anti-calendar has appeared on the
scene.
This time it's in the music faculty, where
students have edited the first faculty anti-calendar, a
student-oriented evaluation of faculty and courses
to guide students during registration.
"Cut us down if you can, it'll do us good", the
faculty challenged the students publishing the
anti-calendar, said Rocky Whittaker, one of six
editors.
However, some faculty members also said
editors should be discreet and avoid criticism of
faculty personalities, he said.
The editors hoped that the evaluations would
"create a feeling for the students that is a mental
preparation for coming into the faculty", said
Whittaker.
Evaluations were determined by questionnaires
given to all music students. Apathetic responses and
ambivalent evaluations were the main obstacles to
obtaining a realistic consensus of opinion on faculty
merits.
"Even though most of our faculty is wonderful,
some kids were afraid to reply to the questionnaire
because they felt that one or two teachers would
analyze the handwriting and fail them. Others felt
that most professors are nice people and you don't
feel like saying anything against them even if they
have some shortcomings," said Whittaker.
The consensus of the editors was that the
evaluations are a necessary part of a university.
The faculty should expect a more explicit, less
tactful edition next year.
McGill plans budget cuts
MONTREAL    /    (UNS)
McGill   University  administration
has announced plans to save about
$3.5  million next year in costs
including one proposal to cut all
intercollegiate    sport    and    save
$200,000.
Plans for the spending cuts are
not yet final though. McGill
principal Robert Bell is to present
AMS beckons hacks
Budding bureaucrats are
hereby called to order.
Positions are now open on five
Alma Mater Society committees,
and interested persons are asked
to contact the following:
DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE, and
STUDENT COURT, Tony Hodge,
SUB 256, 228-3972; SPECIAL
EVENTS COMMITTEE, David
Lui, SUB 220, 228-3708, SUB
ART COMMITTEE, Hanson Lau
SUB 100, 228-3961; and WORLD
UNIVERSITY SERVICE
COMMITTEE, Merrill Ferron,
4144 West 12th Ave., 228-9857.
The     discipline     committee
enforces AMS by-laws on campus
and students charged with
infractions are brought before the
student court in a trial-like
ceremony.
The special events committee
co-ordinates special entertainment
events throughout the academic
year and the SUB art committee
programs art displays in the SUB
Art Gallery.
The World University Service
committee, recently started at
UBC, gives students opportunities
to exchange views and
information with other students
at major international universities.
definite proposals later this month
to the senate and board of
governors.
The $3.5 million in planned
cutbacks is the result of a task
force set up by former principal
Rocke Robertson. Much of the
savings - about $1.4 million -
would come from budget cuts in
academic departments.
University officials said this
would be equivalent to about 90
jobs, but the ordinary turnover
and delays in hiring new
professors would minimize actual
firings.
The task force also
recommended moving the
agriculture faculty from its
present suburban location on a
farm in Ste. Anne de Bellvue to
the McGill campus in downtown
Montreal, to save about $1
million. The farm would be
leased.
MM*
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DON'T IviISS THIS YEAR'S
INTERNATIONAL BUFFET/DANCE
This Saturday, September 19 at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Food from 10 different countries
2 live bands
Sherry 6:30 - Dinner 7:00 - Dancing 8-12 p.m.
Tickets still available at l.H.
Students $2.00 Community $3.00 - 224-4535
The 18th Nite Dance
THIS FRIDA Y
SEPT. 18th
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8:30 - 1:00 a.m. — REFRESHMENTS — $1.50
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during these days of registration...
we at the Bank of Montreal would like to offer you
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Relieve those aching arches at one
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MONDAY TO THURSDAY
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
FRIDAY
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Moreover, we're open
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4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE —224-4144
VANCOUVER 8, B. C.
Editor   Tim Wilson
Litsrarary editor   Fred Cawsey
This delicious portion of The
Ubyssey is known as Page Friday,
it   is   an   attempt   to   verse   the
students here at UBC in the latest
developments   in   the   arts.   This
year. Page Friday will have a
different format. It will continue
to come with the Friday edition
of The Ubyssey, but every fourth
issue will be a literature issue
under the editorialship of one
Fred Cawsey. The other three
issues    of    the    paper    will    be
concerned with every facet of the
arts.
Page Friday would like to
invite   writers   to   submit   their
material; if possible, on regular
basis. If you have something that
you want to say, or something
that   you   do   not   feel   we   are
adequately covering then bring it
up to The Ubyssey office on thy
second floor of SUB, N.W. corner
or phone 228-2309.
This particular issue would
never have been possible without
the valiant and dying efforts of
thousands pf people, but it just
isn't possible to mention them all
here, so I won't but Nate
(Natasha) Smith did devote some
of   his   invaluable   time,   as   did
Michael (Gross) Quigley, David
(35 mm) Bowerman and Allen
(Swifty) Katowitz. I hope you
enjoy it,
QUIGLEY HELPS OUT
Porcolacchi masthed part 2
Well hi there folks one more
time for our inebriated masthead
ground out by none other than
the great mj guiggles inebriated as
he is and brought in at great
expanse to help out timmy boy
and the gang to assemble a
multitude of platitudes for your
generation consumption.
time to such back another
brown. Combattre.la pollution est
simple . . . pour vous! Ca n'allume
pas: Replacez done votre cigarette
la ou elle etait. Travaillez plutot!
No mistakes to be corrected in
this thing I trust.
"The present day procolito
refuses to be subsidized!" Ruben
Sano.
Just a reminder in case
anybody has read this far that
Frank Zapa and crew will be
Zapping everybody('s skull
beyond description tomorrow
night in the Coliseum. So much
for announcements.
Only one more inch to go and
only one more cider left and
timmy wants some help so POW
WOW and just play eight bars of
Dfaae 2wo
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18, 1970 Makonde Carvings
And  Black Poetry
The carvings that you see on the
following two pages were carved in wood
by the Makonde, a tribe that live in
Mozambique and Tanzania. The carvings
were collected over a period of years, by
Tom Wylie (above, with beard), a UBC
Anthropology Grad who has spent a lot of
time in Africa working for museums and
collecting these carvings.
Sixty of these exquisite pieces are now
on display at the Callerie Allen on Carrall
in Gastown.
Both the poetry and the carvings
exhibit the unrest that is present not only
in Mozambique  and Tanzania where the
carvings were made, but in every part of
Africa.
The anger and the sexuality of the
suppressed black African can be seen in the
three dimensional carvings, while it is
echoed in the poetry.
While you look at the poetry and the
carvings, remember that they are the
efforts of at least ten different people, still,
they all have a balance that many western
carvers and poets have never achieved. The
balance probably comes from the African
artist's sensual grip on his environment.
An environment that is harsh, but
nonetheless, rich. -TIM WILSON
Cinema, Rum Flavoured
and Wine Dipped
The Circus
The fast-vanishing
phenomenon of humour has been
revitalized by Charlie Chaplin.
The possibility of films copying
Chaplin's finesse does not seem
out of the question in this modern
day. Chaplin enacts routines that
have not been done before or
since with the result of such
uproarious laughter from the
audience.
Some call it slapstick, but that
term is better reserved for the
Three Stooges. It is a term that in
our modern day of sophistication
hass become synonymous vidth
the antics of that eternal Carry-on
Gang. Chaplin's antics are
definitely of another genre. The
perfection of timing, movement,
expression, and music turns
slapstick into something as
complex as pantomime or ballet,
and yet this complexity iss
carefully hidden so that it is only
noticed upon investigation. The
first impulse is to laugh until the
tears come rolling down your
face.
Laughing is so unusual in a
movie-theatre that the collective
sound it results in might startle
you. Such laughter is seldom
heard elsewhere and is a treat in
itself.
"The Circus" is an old film
that was somehow misplaced
among the archives and has
recently been given a face-lift by
Chaplin who not only stars in it,
but directed it and wrote the
score. Some may wonder if
perhaps Chaplin didn't save this
film himself for a day when film
technology would be at a peak
and film humour at an ebb.
The flutters have gone from
the film and the main thing that
reminds one that it is old is the
lack of sound and the gentle sense
of nostalgia that this leands.
The typical characters of the
melodrama are present in "The
Circus" — the cruel villain with
waxed mustache is the circus
operator, the virtuous heroine is
his daughter who is saved from a
life of hardship by none other
then Chaplin's tramp. Another
handsome hero, a tight-rope
walker named Rex appears to
steal the girl from the tramp.
However, before the elopement,
Chaplin becomes involved in
innumerable hilarious incidents
including stealing Rex's limelight
on the tight-rope.
Another thing that leads one to
suspect that this film may not
have   been   mislaid,   but   rather
saved, is the fact that limitless
opportunities for funny situations
were open to Chaplin within the
environs of a circus. The tramp
manages to become involved in all
the aspects of the big top from
the sideshows, the refreshment
booths, the hall of mirrors, and
the ring itself, to an impossible
career as properties man and an
equally impossible one-sided love
affair with the heroine.
All ends happily, however,
another unusual occurrence in
today's films. This aspect few of
us seem to miss, but the
wholesome, misleadingly simple,
humour of "The Circus" has
vanished and left us with a
definite sense of loss. Modern
films owe their laughter to wit or
satirical social commentary and,
unfortunately, all too often the
laughter is somewhat feeble.
Humour is nowhere to be seen.
Slapstick still exists, but in a
degenerated form that lacks the
beauty of Chaplin. Perhaps the
resurectionof this old movie will
lead to the ressurection of the fine
art of slapstick and with it
humour and the belly laugh. Let
us all hope so — laughter is so
therapeutic.
 Continued on Page 6	
WORLD
WIDE
TRAVEL
YOUR OFFICIAL TRAVEL AGENTS
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CATCH 22
J IS THE MOST MOVING, MOST
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"IT'S ONE HELL OF A FILM! A
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COMEDY! Firmly establishes
Nichols' place in the front rank
of American directors. Alan
Arkin's finest screen performance to date. 'CATCH-22' would
be an important event in any
mOVie year.    -Bruce Williamson. PLAYBOY
"'CATCH-22' says many things
that need to be said again and
again! Alan Arkin's performance as Yossarian is great!"
-Joseph Morgensttrn. NfWSWEfK
PARAMOUVTPICTURESCDRPORjmONfNASSOClXIiaNWITHFliMVWYS INC PRISMS
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM
AUNARKI    ,%
JOSEPH HELLER
MARTIN BALSAM; RICHARD BENJAMIN; ARTHUR GARFUNKEL. JACK GILFORD. BUCK HENRY, BOB NEWHART
ANTHONY PERKINS; PAULA PRENTISS; MARTIN SHEEN; JON WIGHT 8 ORSON WELLES fls mm
SCREENPLAY BY BUCK HENRY PRODUCED BY JOHN CALLEY 8 MARTIN RANSOHOFF DIRECTED BY MIKE NICHOLS
fWUCTIMOfflWK IHMSVIKII1 IECHNIC0L0R" PJtNAVISIDN«APARAMDUNFP1C1URI  I   UniOIR l/R[0UIFt(S PARCMT OR AOULI GUAH0IA\
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER 18
"Warning — Scenes of
nudity,     disgust    and
violence"
R. W. McDonald—
B.C. Director
STANLEY
GRANVILLE AT 12th AVE. - 733-2622
W'v
Evenings 7:20, 9:30. Matinee Saturday & Sunday 2:00
Friday, September 18, 1970
THE       U BYSSEY
pfage  3hree Poetry and Carvings
;*\'
I am coal!
You tear me brutally from the ground
and make of me your mine, boss
I am coal
and you burn me, boss
to serve you forever as your driving force
but not forever, boss
I am coal
and must burn
and consume everything in the heat of my combustion
I am coal and must burn, exploited
burn alive like tar, my brother
until no more your mine, boss
I am coal
and must burn
and consume everything in the heat of my combustion
Yes, boss
I will be your coal!
The Change
Your infancy now a wall of memory
in harmattan the locusts filled the sky
Destroying the sweat put into the field
And restless seas shattered canoes.
The fisher-fold put to sail by noon.
The impatience in your teens
Yet silent were your dreams
With the fires in your heart
Breaking the mask of innocence.
The evasive solitude in your womb
And the determination of your limbs
With eyes like the soaring eagle
Shattering the glass of ignorance.
Your infancy now a wall of memory
Before this you, like the worms,
Leaning on for vain indecorous dreams
And the cobras with venonous tongues
Licking the tepid blooms of hibiscus.
*l
Omen
A naked sun -
A sun all nak<
Pours waves* o
Of the river a
A naked sun -
A sun all nak<
Pours waves o
Over the river
A naked sun -
A sun all nakc
Pours waves-o
Over the river
l**-
"j_.
5«G
[4
&«*"SSi.«.
f**:.
r^
The Imprisonment of Obatala
Those stick-insect figures! they rock the dance
Of snakes, dart after Him daddy-long arms,
Tangle their loping strides to mangrove stance
And He, roped in the tightening pit of alarms
Dangles in His front, full length,
Invincible limbs cramped by love of their strength.
And that mischievous stir, late sown or split
On the way between homestead and stream,
Wells up in pots long stagnant on stilt,
Brims out to where ancestral eyes gleam
Till angry waves dam His track
And caterpillars riding break their back.
One leap upon the charcoal-coloured ass
Swishing ochre urine towards palace and sun,
Kicking impatient tattoo on the grass,
And generations unborn spared the wrong.
But the cry of a child at what it knows not
Evokes trebly there the droop, mud-crack, and clot.
pfage 4our
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18,  1970 The land where we were born
goes back
like time
An African High
Our forefathers
were born
and lived
in that land
w»si|*»*,.
:J
and they, like the coarse wild grass
were the meagre body's veins
running red, earth's fragrance
Trees and granite pinnacles
their arms
embraced the earth
in daily work
and sculpting the new world's fertile rocks
began in colour
the great design of life . . .
Brush-fire
a yellow sun
I at early dawn
gold over the bank
yellow
a white sun
I and white
silver
>f white.
a red sun
I and red
red blood
>f red.
,%>
jf
Still Life
I was playing
when my dead sister
my grandfather hung
a great fish
on a tree before our gate.
' l;,:";;	
%\
V
The fire the river that's to say
the sea to drink following the sand
the feet the hands
within the heart to love
this river that lives in me repeoples me
only to you I said around the fire
my race
it flows here and there a river
the flames are the looks
of those who brood upon it
I said to you
my race
remembers
the taste of bronze drunk hot.
We adored aubergines
I devoured the little gourds
but I had to fast
also I cried with hunger,
if I tell you
my father does not know my mother's name
I am the witness of my age
I have often seen
carcases in the air
where my blood-burns.
i
tea
Cw^-.^.^*
PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALAN KATOWITZ
Friday, September 18, 1970
THE      UBYSSEY
pfage 5ive PUBLIC ENEMY    no 1
"The public enemy is not a
character, he is a problem that
exists today" says the epilogue to
"Public Enemy No. 1", however,
in the film it is James Cagney
who is most striking.
Despite the frequent
intermissions for reel changes, the
audience at the Magic theatre
enjoyed having the dust removed
from this old film so that they
could relish the sensuality of Jean
Harlow and the utter ruthlessness
of Cagney.
"Public Enemy" follows the
"true" story of Tom Powers, a
young hoodlum who started off
his career of crime by stealing
dollar watches and went on to
mix blood with beer" as a
boot-legger during prohibition.
A moral is to be drawn from
this story, as Warner Brothers
insists on reminding you before
and after the movie. Although
Tom enjoys the spoils of his life
of crime, which include Jean
Harlow, he is murdered in the
prime of life by the rival gang of,
Schemer Burns and is delivered in
a bullet-ridden sack to his
unsuspecting mother who always
tried to give him a good
upbringing after his father, a local
policeman, died, and who still
insists that he is a "good boy".
The moral of public enemy
fails to come across today despite
its overstatement. The film is only
charming and, instead of shocking
the audience, only succeeds in
making them laugh and wonder
how Jean Harlow ever got to be
thought of as the ultimate
woman.
Harlow appears in only a few
scenes, but Cagney, in the role of
Tom Powers presents a character
that has been impersonated by
countless comedians. In view of
this, the possibility of him being
anything but humorous is very
small. The only moral to be drawn
from the film today is that time
changes everything, however,
"Public Enemy No. 1" is still a
film worth seeing, if only for the
laughs. Lesley Minot
Records
Continued from Page 6
Epitaph For The Beatles
As musicians, there can be
little doubt that the Beatles hit
their peak at the end of their
journey together. Last year, there
was Abbey Road, which, with its
unity and lyrical beauty
(particularly on the second side),
is one of pop music's great
achievements. And this year, there
is Let It Be (SOA 6351), and if
you don't know about it by now,
which closet have you been hiding
in and boy are you in for a treat.
Abbey Road was the Beatles at
work: this is the Beatles at play.
On "I've Got a Feeling", the
sound is rollicking, as are the
lyrics ("everbody pulled their
socks up/everybody put their foot
down"); "Maggie Mae" and "One
After 909" are done in old style
rocking blues, while "Get Back"
and "For You Blue" are good
time jam sessions. The McCartney
lyricism is pretty, but somewhat
vapid without the influence of
Lennon's depth and gusto. It
suffers, too, from being overdone
almost to the point of melodrama,
and Phil Spector's dubbed-in
orchestra and chorus certainly
don't help matters. "Across the
Universe", a Lennon composition,
is far and away the most beautiful
thing that he has ever done.
The poetic lyrics highlight
Lennon's understanding that the
inner life is more real than the
external, that what's really crucial
is not what's happening around
us, but how we feel about it. It is
this awareness which often made
the Beatles seem prophetic. The
real strength of Let It Be,
however, is that it reveals the
Beatles as just musicians, good
musicians having a good time. As
such, it is a fitting epitaph.
Inside
Not often am I rendered
speechless by the sheer beauty of
a recording. Listening to Paul
Horn's Inside (BXN 26466),
however, produced just such an
affect. The album is a recording
of Paul Horn playing his flute
inside thee dome of the Taj
Mahal. Period. No pyrotechnics,
no accompaniment, only the
occasional vocal contribution by a
Hindu chanier. Within the dome
of the Taj Mahal, there is a
28-second echo which results in a
singularly spiritual sound. Each
tone hangs suspended, quietly,
while the total sound blends and
flows gently through space and
time. There is no structure. The
music happens naturally; it is not
strained or forced, and is never
artificial. The silences between
each cut are lengthier than on
most records, and become spaces
in which to rest. This album is
peace set to music. No flowers, no
beads. Just peace.
-Bill Storey
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pfage 6ix
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, September 18, 1970
* ~ ~. -   > i i   i» Militant
(Volume One)
It is a loosely guarded secret
that the Writers' Union is in the
hands of radicals. A strike has
been threatened by this previously
rather inert organization unless its
demands are met.
Under the present contract,
writers receive a base rate of
$26.30 an hour, making them the
highest paid profession with the
exception of the plumbers.
Negotiators for the union are
demanding a rate of $84.36 an
hour over a four-month contract.
Other points on which the
negotiating teams have failed to
agree include a seven-hour work
week and quadruple time for
hours worked in excess of one in
the day. Another point the writers
have made is that they're rarely
able     to     collect   Workmen's
Union Leader
Compensation for injuries
sustained when skin-diving in the
Caribbean or ice-fishing in the
Arctic while collecting
background material.
A spokesman for the union,
Eldwyn Freenbaun, a noted hack
and worldwide literary figure,
said, "I was robbing a bank for
background and the (deleted) cop
shot me in the leg. Workmen's
Compensation wouldn't give me a
cent, claiming I was not following
proper safety precautions. That's
bureaucratic nibble-nabbling."
(Ed. note. The book referred
to, Down and Out in Wall Street
and Madison Avenue, is this
month's Book-of-the-Month-Club
selection.)
Writers are also demanding a
five-day weekend and an
eleven-month paid vacation. They
insist on fifty percent of all
profits from publication, the
remaining half being donated to
the union's favourite charity, the
National and International Union
of Writers, Reporters, and
Editorial Executive's United
Brotherhood.
Already the dispute is coming
to a head. Mediators from the
federal government have been
attempting to bring the two sides
together, but have so far met with
little success. One of the main
stumbling blocks is the union's
insistence that it-will put nothing
in writing until the new contract
has been signed. Management has
so far refused to make any major
concessions because the union has
refused to allow a phase-out of
the job-security clause in the
collective agreement.
Martin Hinkle, writer of the
popular Little Boy Blue series of
books for children, said, "They're
not playing fair. They're as
stubborn as mules. We have our
backs against the wall. But even a
rat will fight when cornered. I'll
kill any of the (deleted) that come
near me. They won't budge an
inch. Maybe if we give them
enough rope, they'll hang
themselves. In conclusion, I can
only say that labour-management
relations have reached their lowest
THE SINCLAIR— DICKIN REPORT
ON LABOUR MISMANAGEMENT
point ever. It's not our fault if the
s.o.b.s won't recognize our just
demands. I can't understand why
they're so unfair. It almost makes
me lose my appetite."
Negotiators and mediators
were scheduled to meet again
tonight in a last-ditch effort to
reach a settlement. Negotiators on
both sides were not optimistic.
A spokesmen for the
Management negotiators was
quoted as saying, "Frankly, we're
not optimistic."
The Labour negotiator refused
to agree. "I've always been
optimistic.     My     latest     novel,
UBC NOW
UBC is once again in the public
eye. Not too much of the public
eye though. The new television
series, "UBC Now", premiered at
7:30 last Tuesday evening on
Cable 10. The other occupants of
the time slot included Mod Squad
and the New Don Knotts
show. Considering the content
of the program, it was a good
thing there was such stiff
competition.
Technical production by the
group of self-admitted amateurs
was very good. It could easily
have passed as a product of the
local CBC-TV studios.
However, it's hard to
understand how a university with
so many English courses and
instructors cannot come up with a
coherent and interesting script.
The highlight of the program
was a very intriguing song about
the British Eighth Army and their
nickname, D-Day Dodgers. The
rest of the show crumbled around
this unexpected and unrelated
treat in an endless series of old
photos of many buildings,
finished and unfinished.
Other bits of nostalgia included
shots of past students in their
now-funny clothes and a brief
segment honoring the Great Trek.
A brief concession to present
students was made in one segment
of about seventy seconds.
Something was mentioned about
the traditional rivalry between
Science and Engineering students,
including the comment that "the
Science students always seem to
be more articulate." There was
also an ambiguous remark about
student activists as they showed
an anti-pollution poster.
The segment finished with the
inevitable series of shots of co-eds
in minis and one wearing jeans.
This was accompanied by the
statement that no matter what
you wear, "it's what you do that
counts."
Aside from these twisted
glimpses of real life, UBC
Information Services would have
Vancouver believe that UBC is
just a place where various faculties
and schools are delighted to move
into new buildings named after
former faculty heads.
What was wrong with the
program?
It was intended to give the
public a more accurate view of the
university. The program presented
UBC as a vast museum of
architecture. It isn't.
The university is a living
community. Hopefully it exists to
help shape and guide society in
general. We cannot influence
society unless we convince them
we are doing more than sitting in
expensive buildings.
There are several ways UBC
Now can be changed to bring
about this end.
The most obvious is to bring
the cameras outdoors and get
some action shots before it starts
to rain.
Another is to introduce an
element of conflict, the basis of
dramatic television. There are
certainly enough opposed points
ofviewatUBC-
A still better way is to bring
the public new academic and
scientific developments which will
affect their everyday lives.
Or is the Administration
opposed to student activity,
intellectual conflict and academic
relevance?
-THOM WESCOTT
 Forestry	
Undergraduate   Society
PRESENTS
UNDERCUT 70
Friday ■ October 2, 1970
SUB CAFETERIA
TICKETS   AVAILABLE FROM AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
ANY FORESTER, AND F.U.S. OFFICE IN MacMILLAN BLDG.
COUPLE $3.50
Doomsday is Down the Street, for
instance, is a brilliant treatment of
the theme of man's eternal
struggle and is available in
paperback at a moderate price."
We have received reports from
all over the nation that wildcat
walkouts are occuring with
increasing frequency in major
population centres.
It is expected that Vancouver
will be free from such disrup
CHINESE OVERSEAS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
ORIENTATION
PARTY
Cocktails & Dance
on
Friday, Sept. 18
6:30 to 1:00 A.M.
at
International House
FREE FOR NEW
FOREIGN STUDENTS
Others $1.25 for
Food & Dance
$1.00 for Dance only
Music by the Excites
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Next to Varsity Theatre
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Directed by John Brockington
The  play  will be presented  in the Frederic Wood Theatre in
November with an all-male cast. Men Only Needed.
AUDITION        Thurs. Sept. 17 12:30-4:30
TIMES: Fri. Sept. 18 12:30-4:30
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre - Room 112
Open to all UBC Students & Staff (Men Only)
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AUDITIONS — AUDITIONS
Could you take charge in
one of our operations?
After you've earned your commission on
the Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP),
we think you could. We'll give you a tactical
military training. And ROTP will give you a
University education leading to a degree
in Engineering. Sciences. Or Arts. So when
you graduate you'll be ready to step into a
position of responsibility. Ready to take
charge.
Contact your Military Career Counsellor
about ROTP.
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
f 545 Seymour St., Vancouver
■^y   THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Friday, September 18.  1970
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 7even POETRY
S. Persky
Contemporary Poetry of
British Columbia, Vol. I,
editor-in-chief J. Michael Yates,
associate editors George
McWhirter and Andreas
Schroeder, Sono Nis Press, 1970,
$7.95.
Contemporary Poetry of
British Columbia Vol. 1 is a
262-page volume containing 162
poems (more or less, depending
on how you count) by 54 poets. I .
report this in statistical terms as a
comment on the spirit of the
book.
Tm puzzled as to the reasons
lor creating an encyclopedic
catalogue of the poets of British
Columbia. There's a tidy smallness
of mind behind such projects. It's
the same kind of thinking that
results in putting a hotdog in a
time capsule, so that the Martian
archeologist sifting through the
volcanic ash of us will be sure to
get the picture.
Ultimately, one wants to read
the books of a poet, but if you're
going to put together an
anthology it seems to me thare
ought to be a purpose or function
for it. We have several examples to
goby.
When New Wave Canada (ed.
Raymond Souster) or The New
American Poetry 1945-60 (ed.
Don Allen) appeared there was a
great deal of genuine excitement.
Here were books proposing
movements in poetry that
challenged     the traditional
establishment, offering poetics
that promised new directions in
the language. 1 think that's about
as much as an anthology can hope
to do.
to -£JfM yoor <rf$r.
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
There are other collections that
are also useful. An anthology that
records an historically interesting
period in poetry or the sources of
our understanding (for example,
Jerome Rothenberg's recent
Technicians of the Sacred) or the
national poetry of other countries
(like Penguin's series of New
Writing in Cuba, Czechoslovakia,
etc.) makes sense. Even an
anthology that is representative of
significant kinds of poetry (one of
those books having the mundane
function of schoolroom use) will
do. Or a regional anthology, if
that place is a central poetic image
in a collection of important
poems that is, I'd understand the
rationale of an anthology of
California poetry). The key
concepts I offer by which an
anthology would have
justification are discovery,
significance, meaning or the force
of that almost instinctual voice
that recalls us to ourselves. The
idea that a thing is its own reason
for being (which might equally be
applied to automobiles) is the
denial of meaning.
But even as an encyclopaedic
enterprise ("Vol. 1" presumably
means the throng of editors will
slog on doggedly) Contemporary
Poetry of British Columbia is
suspect. One looks in vain for
those poets who have been most
active here, such as Bill Bissett,
Jim Brown, Gerry Gilbert, Frank
Davey, or Brian Fawcett (to name
some well-known writers of the
various local groups that a strong
writing scene inevitably
produces).
Instead we find Mr. So-and-So
of the Creative Writing
Programme at Manitoba, and Mr.
You-Know-Who of the Creative
Writing Dept. at Victoria and of
course, Mr. What's-His-Name from
Simon Fraser's English Dept.
(they haven't invented their
Creative Scribbling Fortress yet),
and so on.
One wonders why this volume
isn't simply titled Contemporary
Poetry of the Creative Writing
Departments. For the editors'
purpose, in large part, seems to be
a display of creative writing that
would justify the existence of
creative writing departments and
encourage their proliferation. At
least, one could understand their
goal, if not be sympathetic to it.
 - STAN PERSKY
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pfage  8ight
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18,  1970 Friday, September 18,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
A radical, a liberal
and a reactionary
The manner in which the three professors spoke
told the story.
The     reactionary    classics    professor    and
self-proclaimed  spokesman  for the  campus right
stood three feet above the students, on the stage of
the SUB ballroom, and told them they were too
L ignorant to run the university.
The liberal academic who sympathized with
students' goals but made no active commitment to
them sat down, but remained on the awe-inspiring
stage.
And the  radical who identified himself with
total     student     participation     in     university
decision-making jumped down  off the stage and
, talked to them on their own level.
The debate was on the question of how much
students should participate in university
decision-making, such as committee, senate and
other meetings.
The liberal academic was Sam Smith, president
of Lethbridge University and an ardent opponent of
authoritarianism in university structure.
Speaking into a microphone, he said the best
way to run a university is by consensus of students
and faculty.
"Authority has no part in educational
content," he said.
"I haven't made the active commitment that
some people have to these ideals," he said.
v But he added that in a university the size of
^UBC a consensus is often difficult to achieve and
~ said   the   committee   system   is   "a   second-best
structure".
As many committees as possible should include
students Smith said.
From his lofty  position,  reactionary  classics
prof    Malcolm    McGregor     assured     the     125
lunch-munching students in the ballroom that his
opposition to student participation was only in their
4 best interests.
"Students," he boomed, "are here to study"
and "do not belong on committees" because
meetings take too much time.
"It is an imposition on students" to demand
that they spend time on university committees.
Not only this, but "students are comparatively
ignorant"  of how  to  run  a university  and they
should leave such things to administrators who have
* access   to   the   cumulative   experience   of UBC's
55-year history.
"That's crap and bullshit," hollered a student.
Unruffled the white-haired classicist
continued: "The reputation of our graduates shows
how well organized we are."
The student shouted back: "Yeah, they're
screwing the workers and the people of the
province."
McGregor then said that the proper place for
student participation was in talking to professors,
who, he allowed, often learn things from their
students.
Most profs will listen to student complaints and
suggestions and have actually been known to admit
that a student is right and they are wrong, he
maintained.
McGregor's remarks were right down the alley
of Simon Fraser University prof Mordecai
Briemberg, chairman of the exiled SFU political
science, sociology and anthropology department.
After he left the stage for the floor, Briemberg
said McGregor presented "better than I could the
arguments for a total transformation of the
university.
"By saying a student is ignorant you are
categorizing him and I don't believe anyone has the
right to do this.
"It is not true that the person who is longest
here is the wisest."
Briemberg said universities in Canada today are
not responsive to the needs of most of their
students, since many will be unemployed or
employed in menial jobs after they graduate.
The "lucky ones", he added, will have positions
with large corporations whose raison d'etre is
fucking over the rest of us.
"The main purpose of the university now is to
turn out cadres for the capitalistic system," he said.
He said the experience of the PSA department,
which gave students parity on curriculum
committees, was "valuable".
"There was a lot of confusion but I think it was
a very valuable experience for both students and
profs," he said.
People like McGregor, he continued, should not
be allowed to make decisions affecting the lives of
students when they have such a disdain for students'
intellects and aspirations.
McGregor replied that he had said students
. were only "relatively ignorant".
English department head Robert Jordan was
originally scheduled to take part in the discussion
but declined when he found out he was expected to
take McGregor's side.
He said in an interview he was under the
impression at first that it would be a panel
discussion, and agreed to take part.
"I don't want to be labelled as one side or
another," he said. "I don't think it's a subject for
debate."
Jordan said there are students on English
department committees.
He Said he notified Alma Mater Society
vice-president Christine Krawczyk Aug. 18 that he
didn't want to be part of the debate, but Krawczyk
said Wednesday it was too late to change posters
advertising the event.
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
4                                         ;3fcL
BOB DOWNEY'S
w
, PUTNEY
i^*-___________w^^$*w$
wLaM__^ i*W_____Wr
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Sunday 20th
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UNITED - ANGLICAN CHURCHES
WELCOME STUDENTS
AND FAMILIES
COMBINED SERVICES
THIS SUNDAY, 11:00 A.M.
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
V* mile east of Toronto Rd.
Cheaper Than Going to a Movie!
Ian & Sylvia
and The Great Speckled Bird
in SUB
Ballroom
2 SHOWS ONLY ON TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
7 P.M. & 9:30 P.M: - SUB  Ballroom
Advance Student Tickets $1.75
at AMS and Information Desk in SUB
Tickets at door will be $2.50 - Non AMS $3.00 anytime.
BUY  NOW  AND  SAVE
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTATION Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18,  1970
Women to picket Cunningham over union rights
Women's Caucus members will picket Cunningham
Drug Stores throughout the city Saturday, to publicize
the right of all working women to belong to unions.
Caucus members have been manning picket lines at
randomly selected Cunningham stores across the Lower
Mainland for three weeks in support of eight women on
strike at C. H. Hosken Co., a Cunningham subsidiary.
The women have been on strike for five months
attempting to get their first union agreemnet.
Caucus member Bouk Elzinga said the women
recently became members of the Retail, Wholesale and
Dept. Store Union but C. H. Hosken Co. refuses to
recognize the union.
Women's Caucus members hearing of the striking
women's plight decided to lend their support to the
action. By picketing Cunningham the parent firm, the
Caucus hopes the issue will have more public impact.
"This issue is directly related to women's rights.
Eighty-five per cent of working women are not in unions
and only through union membership can working women
get job security and some control over their working
conditions," said Elzinga.
The president of Cunningham recently contacted
Women's Caucus to try to arrange a meeting and discuss
the situation.
The Caucus agreed but only on the condition that the
striking women and their union representative be allowed
to attend.
"We were attempting to get up a negotiating
situation. But management refused to attend," said
Elzinga.
Women involved in Saturday's picket-blitz will meet
at 9:30 a.m. at the Women's Caucus office, 511 Carrall.
Lost and found
Missing your Swahili 549
textbook? Or maybe your upper
plate?
Check with Hanson Lau in
Hanson's Place in SUB. There is a
large variety of coats, skirts (how
can you lose a skirt?), purses,
bags, notes and other
miscellaneous items in the Lost
and Found there.
The organizers have decided to
sell in mid-October all items left
unclaimed for more than a month.
There is a nominal charge for
claiming items at the Lost and
Found of 25 cents, or 10 per cent
of the value of the item.
The organizers suggest that
your   name,   address  and phone
number   appears   in   all  personal
belongings.
Persons with missing items are
advised to check the lost and
found soon.
Fashion?
Lovely legs and beer are the
upcoming fare at the Beer
Garden-Fashion Show coming
Wednesday Sept. 23 to SUB
ballroom. Folk entertainment will
supplement the thrill of seeing the
male members of the AMS display
this season's latest (women's)
styles.
This event will be brought to us;
by the UBC Orientation
Committee in response to
"overwhelming  public  demand".
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL SUPPLIES
DID YOU GET YOUR
FREE ASHTRAY?
IF NOT —  COME IN AND GET IT!
5754 University Blvd. 224-3202
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6:55, 9:00
SUNDAY 2:35, 4:45, 6:55, 9:00
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Coronet I "opthjaii
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1:40, 5:05, 8:30
151 GRANVIUC    300 MMIEXTON Cowboys 12:00, 3:25, 6:50
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? Warning Catholics
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—B.C. Director
Shows 12:10, 1:50, 3:40, 5:35, 7:25, 9:20
Sunday 2:00, 3:50, 5:45, 7:35, 9:30
Warning:  nudity.  se\  and
hrutulity.       —B.C.   Director
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Shows 7:30-9:40     ""*■£• Censor
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Open Fridays 'til 9 p.m. Friday, September 18,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
• Roadblocks test
campus car ban
t
—date enns photo
HAS THE AMERICAN COSMETICS industry gained yet another
convert? Fortunately, this man, it appears, is not painted and
bedecked in an effort to attract women. He is a member of a
street theatre group which performed this week in front of the
library. More of the same would be appreciated by aimless
noon-hour wanderers.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
Ptescltytion Qbtical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Roadblocks along University
Boulevard at Wesbrook Crescent
may mark another step in the
creation of vehicle-free central
campus.
UBC's deputy president and
bursar, William White said the
re-routing of traffic bound for
south parking lots around the
campus instead of straight
through the middle is being
carried out on a experimental
basis.
Faculty and staff heading to
lots adjacent to the Biological
Sciences Building can follow the
new road beginning at the south
campus extension to 10th.
White said people who have
difficulty getting to class for
medical reasons can obtain
permits for parking in the sixth
lot adjacent to the Civil
Engineering Building, a lot now
closed for general use.
Students who have to load and
jr.load    materials    for    special
projects will also be able to obtain
permits for parking in this lot.
Anyone who feels he is eligible
should apply at the Traffic
Control Office.
Deviates
summoned
Nominations are now open for
political hacks and other deviates
wishing to represent arts students
on the Alma Mater Society
council.
To be eligible for one of the
five seats, a student must have
attained marks of 65 per cent for
12 units or 60 per cent for 15
units in the last winter term at
UBC.
More information and
nomination papers are available in
Buchanan 107 until nominations
close Sept. 23.
Elections will take place Sept.
30.
THE SWINGING
NIGHTSPOT
THIS WEEK
THE
CROSSTOWN
BUS
WED. to FRI.
8:30 P.M. to 2 A.M.
SAT. 8 P.M. to 1 A.M.
5th AVE. at FIR
 736-4304
THIS COUPON ENTITLES
BEARER TO y2 PRICE
ADMISSION WITH STUDENT
CARD
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
4   ..
. . • a world of contemporary! fashion
1.  852 Granville St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
Re F Ltd
The College Shop Ltd.
869 Granville St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
687-1030
683-3239 Page   18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 18, 1970
Laurentian faculty may strike
SUDBURY, Ont. (UNS) - The
faculty of Laurentian University
have indicated they will strike
when classes resume on Monday,
unless the board of governors
makes a higher salary offer or
agrees to binding arbitration of a
contract dispute.
By a vote of 90-21, the faculty
association earlier this week called
on Laurentian's governors to
settle the dispute. Exams were
cancelled this spring at the
university because of another
confrontation with the board.
The Laurentian governors have
White Wrong
from page 1
And, according to McHugh,
"White doesn't want to admit he
is wrong. He knows about the
Bond recommendations but hasn't
done anything about them.
"The AMS isn't pushing it
either," he said.
There is some feeling that a
re-negotiation now would result in
a higher interest rate on the loan.
However, as pointed out by the
Bond Committee, this would still
be to the student's interest.
Presently, Food Services pays
an interest rate of six per cent. If
the loan was repaycd over a longer
period of time even an increase in
the interest rate would maintain a
lower annua] payment.
For example, if the term of the
loan was extended to 40 years, an
increase in the interest rate to
nine per cent from the present six
per cent would decrease the
annual payment from the present
six per cent would decrease the
annual payment to $ 111,552.
This would be about $50,000
less than the present required
annual payment.
And that means $50,000 less
would have to come from the
students. Your hamburger would
be 35 cents instead of 40 cents.
The Bond committee also
found all was not well elsewhere
in the Food Services operation.
The report cites inefficiency as
a contributing factor to the cost
of food. It said the operation fails
to market to demand.
"They don't seem to know
what students want or don't want
to eat," McHugh said. "If three
trays of jello sit untouched one
day, three more trays of jello will
still appear the next day."
The high price of maintenance
in    Food    Services    areas    also
increases costs, said the report.
"At present the daily cleaning
is done by Physical Plant and
according to Miss Blair, the charge
for the work done is quite high,"
the report said.
The committee recommended
"that Miss Blair seek outside
tenders for the routine daily
cleaning."
The report also recommended
that a new standing committee be
established to review the
efficiency and financial policies of
Food Services. This has been
done.
"One thing we should consider
is competition from outside
areas," said Walter Malkinson, a
member of the new committee,
and the Bond committee.
Said McHugh: "The university
is not in the food business but the
education business (sic). Perhaps
an outside firm could do a better
job and cheaper."
McHugh said the new
committee would meet Sept. 22.
"We're waiting for action on the
re-financing by Bill White," he
said.
Meanwhile, some
recommendations of the Bond
Committee — which also included
student John Dunham and Will
Stanbury, of the commerce and
business administration faculty —
have been implemented.
Recommendations acted on
included a straightening of the
muddled Food Services' muddled
accounts and the abolishment of
subsidizing low-priced full course
meals by charging more for
smaller items.
offered a 13.16 per cent increase
but faculty association president
Gary Clarke said this has been
rejected because it would still
leave Laurentian professors with
the lowest pay.
CLARKE
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
T'birds  look
for  first  win
By DON GARDNER
Tomorrow, the UBC
Thuderbirds will be looking for
their first win of the young season
against the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs.
Last week, the Birds lost their
season's opener to the University
of Alberta 23-10. In spite of the
loss, there were several
encouraging signs in the game.
The Birds had as many first downs
as the Golden Bears — twelve —
and were able to contain Alberta's
offence fairly well, except for a
couple of defensive lapses which
resulted in two 48 yard
touchdown runs being given up
in the third quarter.
The Birds gave up only 103
yards passing, and Roger Gregory
picked off one pass and ran it
back 27 yards.
The coaching staff was also
fairly pleased with the
performance of sophomore
quarterback Gord Diewert and are
hoping that he'll continue to
improve. In his first varsity game
he completed 7 of 19 passes for
93 yards, although he had two
intercepted.
The best news, however, was
the return of last year's
outstanding player, Dave
Corcoran. Corcoran played both
ways, at fullback and linebacker,
and was his usual hard-hitting self.
He gained 28 yards on five carries,
and ran one kickoff back for 57
yards. Along with Ron Fowler
and John Wilson, he gives the
Birds a strong ground attack.
Head coach Frank Gnup says,
"This week we're gonna take
Corcoran off the defence and give
him a chance to run the football
some more. He only carried the
ball five times last week and that's
not enough for him."
Tomorrow, the Birds should
have their hands full with the
University of Calgary, who last
week were edged 5-0 by the
University of Manitoba. Manitoba
are last year's Canadian
intercollegiate champions, and are
Athletic Notices
MEN'S FIELD HOCKEY — The men's
field hockey team is looking for anyone
who is interested in playing for the
team this season.
Practices will be held every Tuesday
and Thursday at five o'clock and twelve
forty-five respectively at Spencer Fields.
For  information  phone 224-0415.
TENNIS TEAM — The men's and
women's tennis teams will be holding
practices every day, 4:30-6:00, on the
six courts at the Winter Sports Centre.
WRESTLING TEAM — The UBC
wrestling team will have a meeting on
Thursday, September 24 at 12:30 P.m.,
in room 211, War Memorial Gym. All
interested   parties  welcome.
INTRAMURALS — The entry deadlines for Touch Football, Swimming,
and Tennis are September 17.
If   you   wish   to   participate   in   those
SKI INSTRUCTORS
Training & Employment
Phone GROUSE MTN.
985-0478
^v
%
mm oNf
THUNDERBIRDS
SAT., SEPT. 19
against
UNIV. of CALGARY
"DINOSAURS"
2 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
Free Admission To AJJ UBC Students
sports contact your unit manager or
come to room 308 of War Memorial
Gym to sign up. Badminton, Soccer,
Curling and the Cycle Drag are the
next activities on this year's program
with the entry deadlines being Sept. 24.
REFEREES WANTED — The Intramural program is officiated entirely by
students. If you are interested in re-
fereeing come to room 308 in the War
Memorial Gym. For every game re-
fereed, $2.50 can be made.
Concoran returns to lineup.
supposed     to    have     another
powerhouse this season.
Against Manitoba, Calgary
appeared to gear their offence
around the talents of their fine
quarterback,   Joe   Petrone   (12).
The key to Saturday's game
could be in the Birds' front four
keeping Petrone in the pocket,
thus preventing him from getting
to the outside and scrambling.
One thing the Birds seem to be
lacking this year is overall speed.
This, however, is a problem
they've been facing for many
years. Because the offence lacks a
breakaway threat, they must score
on long drives, where they grind
out first downs, something they
were successful in doing against
SFU last year.
In tomorrow's game, the Birds
will probably rely on their ground
attack. It should be a close,
hard-hitting game. Game time is 1
p.m. (As usual, all UBC students
are admitted free.)
sport talh
Tony Gallagher
While attending this week's two University football kick-off
luncheons, one could not help but notice the disparity in approaches
to football between UBC and Simon Fraser.
Tuesday at Frank's (Gnup) annual debacle, the sweet air of
informality and the leisurely attitude toward the football program
was again present. While exchanging well-meaning insults with the
city scribes, Gnup also tried to convince them he had a team that
could win the WCIAA championship. Although more successful at
this wily plot than usual, he still made few believers though retaining
all his followers. Everyone, including the Athletic department, knows
the program is approached in a relaxed understanding manner. They
look at the game as it is, a game and from there proceed to do as
well as possible within that context.
This differs somewhat from the theory on Burnaby Mountain.
The big thing at SFU is a total involvement on both the playing field
and in the public relations department. The team is the
representative of the school, and therefore must reflect a certain
output in talent onto the market. Hence at the Wednesday
conference, when the starting players were being introduced by
photos, each one was described as "one of the best, a great one, or a
fine pro prospect."
The point of course is not to frown upon the SFU program
but to attain some degree of acceptance for the UBC effort. For
those who wish to approach the game in a professional manner and
for those players who wish to involve themselves in a program such
as Simon Fraser's, it is obviously acceptable. Furthermore, I wish
them every success.
But Athletic Director Bus Phillips and his cronies have
established a system where the amateur can play side-by-side with
the professional, the buffoon with the fanatic. It is for this
institutionalized freedom of approach which has become inherent
in UBC's football tradition that the department is to be applauded.
And this doesn't mean that they haven't had a goodly number
of wins over the years or that this year will be a flop. Frank has two
super running backs in the personage of the veteran Dave Corcoran
and Ron Fowler. Collegiate performers like Don Lumb, Bob
Fitzpatrick and Jim Fornelli will give the Birds some experience in
positions where that commodity has often proved beneficial.
Another factor likely to aid the club is their coaching staff.
People like John Larsen, Norm Thomas and the newly acquired
Norm Rauhas have put in many years learning the Canadian football
game. Rauhaus was a member of the great Winnipeg teams under
Bud Grant, and if any of Grant's savvy can be communicated,
Frank's idle threats of victory might be something to worry about.
^a
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd.  224-6414
JOHN WURFLINGE   is A small
INDEPENDENT BUSINESSMAN WHO
DEVOTES SPECIAL ATTENTION TO
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS. BEFORE
PURCHASING ANY SPORTING
EQUIPMENT DROP INTO
SEE JOHN.
OPERATING PRINCIPLES
I Students will receive individual attention.
II Students will receive honest professional advice on
equipment selection.
III All lines carried will be of top quality in their price range.
IV Prices will be such as to offer outstanding value.
V All products will be backed by a personal guarantee Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September  18,  1970
Co-ed res
coming
By NETTIE WILD
UBC's first coeducational
residence is finally off the drawing
board.
The residence, to be just north
of SUB, is scheduled to open in
late 1971, housing 788 men and
women.
Housing director Leslie
Rohinger said the residence will
emphasize the idea of
apartment-type living, rather than
that of a dormitory.
"We feel that too often
students are made to conform to
the residences rather than the
residences being designed to
accommodate the lives of the
students," he said.
The two towers will be divided
into four complexes on each
floor. Each complex will house six
men students or six women who
will share a common kitchen,
dining and bathroom area with
each student having a private
bedroom.
Each resident will have
complete freedom to come and go
as he or she pleases unlike many
residences where students must
face locked doors at 2 a.m.
"Any student of legal age
should be able to realize his
responsibilities enough to lead his
own life," said Rohringer.
The residences will be
restricted to those students who
have   spent   at   least   one   year
FRIDAY
SCIENCE   UNDERGRAD   SOCIETY
Men's and Women's Intramurals
meetings  at  12:30 in Hennings 200.
UBC-NDP
Executive    meeting    in    SUB    212    at
12:30.
LEGAL  AID
Mon., Wed., Fri.. 12:30 in SUB 228
and 232.
SIMS
Group Meditation Mon.-Fri. 8-11 a.m.,
Tues., Wed., Fri. 3-6 p.m.; Thurs. 4-6
p.m.  International House Rm. 406.
SWAMI   LIFE
Performance    outside    SUB    Theatre
from 2:00-3:15 p.m.
Free Orientation party for foreign
students. Music by the Exciles 6:30-
1:00 a.m. in International House.
SUNDAY
SYNCRONIZED SWIMMING
First practice at Crystal Pool for all
interested girls.
'tween
classes
MONDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting in SUB 211 at noon.
COLLEGE   LIFE
Meeting at 12:30 in SUB 215.
TUESDAY
GERMAN  CLUB
Organizational meeting at 12:30 in
International House. Everyone welcome.
STUDENT   PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting in SUB, Rm. 211 or
213.
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Organizational   meeting   at    12:30   in
>~ Angus 24.
CUSO
Meeting   for   any   student   interested
in  working   overseas  for two  years.
SUB 213.
ARTS   WOMEN'S   INTRAMURALS
Meeting   for   any  Arts females interested   in   intramurals,   Buch.   214   at
noon.
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
**        General   meeting   in   SUB   207-209   at
12:30.  New people welcome!
MISCELLANEOUS
UBC  KARATE CLUB
Office is now in SUB 216-B. All old
members please drop in. New members also welcome.
VOLUNTEERS
Would you like to work with groups
•* of children, teens. North Shore
Neighbourhood House needs volunteer
group leaders for after school and
evening programs. Interested? Call
Val at 987-8138.
holiday bargain... midweek at The Harrison
It's so relaxing — and such a bargain. Your room for
3 nights beginning Sunday, Monday or Tuesday. 3 breakfasts.
2 dinners. Afternoon tea. Nightly dancing and entertainment.
Plus a free health treatment and 18 holes of golf. All in the
fabulous mountain-and-lake setting of The Harrison.
All for only $45 per person.* Plan to break away for a
special Midweek Holiday soon. See your travel agent or
call 521-8888, toll-free from Vancouver.
* Double occupancy rate; single occupancy $55.
Deluxe accommodation available at extra cost.
TUT? TTADDTCniVT a Distinguished Resort
liliJ  nflfUlJLDl/ll  at Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia
previously in residences and who
are of legal age.
A previous year in residence is
required to allow the student to
get used to both the new life style
and to make it easier to arrange
for room mates in the coming
year, he said.
CLASSIFIED
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
NOW...
choose
CONTACT
LENSES
in 27 colors
A better choice than ever
... 3 shades of blue or green
even intriguing new lovendcr
er otso cot's eye brown, blue,
ezure,  grey  or  pink.
• PRECISION MADE
• EXPERTLY FITTED
• 17 COLORS
ONE PRICE ONLY
$49
50
Come In, No Appointment Needed
1 '-	
BRING YOUR
OPTICAL
PRESCRIPTION
TO US
OPTICAL DEPT.
• 677   GRANVILLE
681-6174
• 675 COLUMBIA, NEW WEST.
LA  1-0751
• 1825 LONSDALE, N.  VAN.
987-2264
• 2987 GRANVILLE ot 14th
736-7347
• 4068 E. HASTINGS. N.  BUR.
(Across from Wosk's)
291-8491
• 5618 CAMBIE ST.
327-9451
• 1320 DOUGLAS ST., VICTORIA,
B.C.    386-7578
•   165 STATION ST., DUNCAN, B.C.
746-4322
TWO GREAT BANDS, THIN RED
Line, Tomorrow's Byes, Friday 18.
Place Vanier, 9:00-1:00 a.m. Res.
$1.00: non-res. $1.50.
DANCE TO LYNN BROOKS &
the Friendly Cactus at Totem
Park, Saturday, Sept. 19 from 9-1.
Residents 75c. Non-residents $1.25.
RUSH!
 PHI KAPPA SIGMA	
POLKA PARTY. DANCING AND
great refreshments, Friday from
9 p.m.-l a.m. at International
House.
UNDERCUT RETURNS TO SUB
Cafeteria Oct. 2, 1970. $3.50 couple.
BUM'S BALL, Sat., Sept. 26, SUB."
Tickets noon, Civil Eng. Big. $2.50
couple.   Tomorrow's   Eyes.
Greetings
 12^
TERRY SEVISKI, YOU MOTHER,
where were you all summer. Come
see me — same building as last
year — second floor. Ted.
13~
Lost & Found
LOST: BLACK WALLET, IN PON-
derosa. Initials K.D.B. in gold.
Phone Ken Berry. 277-8647.
14
Rides & Car Pools
RIDE    NEEDED    FROM    26TH    &
Nelson,   West   Vancouver.   Please
 phone 922-7625.	
RIDE WANTED FROM BROAD-
and Renfrew or Grandview for
9:30s. Phone Mary 261-0672.
Special Notices
15
DOUBLE DANCE FRIDAY 18th
Place Vanier featuring Thin Red
Line and Tomorrow's Eyes, 9:00-
1:00 a.m. Res. $1.00. Non-res. $1.50.
AQUA      SOCIET
Y
SCUBA      SCHOO
L
Expert Instruction - Heated Pool
Nationally   Recog.   NAUI
Certification
Courses  Start  Sept.  21
Sign  Up  at   Noon-Outdoors
In SUB basement
Club
GIRLS! JOIN A SORORITY NOW!
Come Sun., Sept. 20th, 10:30 a.m.
to Panhellenic house (behind in-
ternational house).	
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP. WE ARE
open 6 days a week, located 2
blocks east of Memorial Gym.
DECORATE WITH POSTERS
B.C.'s largest selection from THE
GRIN BIN, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311. Personal Photo Blowups, Black
Lights, Gifts, Jokes, Post Office
(Opposite Liquor Store & Super
Valu). Open till 9 p.m. Monday
through   Friday,   Sat,   till   7   p.m.
RUSH   THE   BIG   ONE
 PHI KAPA   SIGMA	
PHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR
a Fourth State of consciousness
during Transcendental mediation.
Write:   Sims   Box   77,   SUB.
FTND YOURSELF AT UNDERCUT
Oct.   2,   1970.  SUB Cafeteria.   	
Travel  Opportunities 16
LOCOST CHARTERS UK EUROPE
Mexico. Japan. Australia. African
Safaris. Call Mick 687-2855 or 687-
1244.   Evenings   224-0087.
18
Wanted—Miscellaneous
WANTED 1 SMALL FRTDGE. 1
srirls' bike. 3 sneed. 2 rattan Hong
Kong   chairs.   224-0447.
AUTOMOTIVE
'62    AUSTIN    50,000   MT.     EXCEL-
lent running condition $400. Phone
Gary.   224-9383.	
FALCON   1963   MINT   CONDITION.
Low  mileage,   new  clutch   $350   or
best   offer.   Must  sell  bv  September 25.   Contact  Richard  228-4488  or
224-7987.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
MUST SELL VOLVO P1800 EXC.
cond. $1800. or offers. Phone 228-
8069   or   224-0390.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Automobiles—Paris
23
TWO FORD CHROME WHEELS
14" x 6", $30. Phone Ken after 7
p.m.,  255-7864.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
TRIUMPH 650 CC SCRAMBLER,
Only 4,000 miles. 224-9073, Bill in
Room 3 — 2120 Wesbrook Cres.
UBC.
1970 YAMAHA 250CC DS6 GOOD
shape. Full service record. Offers
around $630.00. 731-8763 after 5
p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
CREATIVE GRAPHICS SPECI-
alizes in posters, scientific artwork, photography.  John 224-4146.
Scandals
37
SEE THE SCANDAL OF THE
year — Undercut '70 in SUB Cafeteria,   Fri.,   Oct.   2.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
TELECASTER BASS, HUGE
Lewis Bass. Amp. 150 watts rms.
Both new condition, $800. Dave,
733-9621.	
1 PAIR FISHER ALU RSL 205CM
Marker: 1 pair Allais Major G.S.
215cm Nevada; 1 pair Fisher
Wedelkings 195cm Solomon V.W.;
1965 leathercoat 38-40; 1 pair
Lange Comp. 7, $150; 1 pair Henke
plastics   size   9;   ski   clothing.   224-
 0942^	
SWISS WATCH $65; CLOCK RADIO
$25; camera "Zeiss Ikon" $50; electric razor $12; 3 suits, navy blue,
6-footer, size 42, $15, $25, $50;
maxi-coat, hand-tailored, black,
$90. Gunther, 1848 W. 5th Ave. (at
Burrard).
DOUBLE BED $45.00; 33 INCH
bed $30.00 as new. Tel. 266-0732.
Mrs. Lucieer, 3906 W. 37th, Van.
13.	
USED VALD'OR LACE SKI
boots with press. Good shape $20
phone Doug,  224-9510.	
U.B.C.    BEAUTY    SALON   —    WE
sell, style and color, Wigs & Hair
Pieces   at   reasonable   rates.   Tel.
228-8942,   5736   University  Blvd.
RUSH!   RUSH!   RUSH!
 PHI KAPPA SIGMA	
MODERN TABLE & TWO CHAIRS,
Like new,  apt. size,  $30.  224-9110.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING,
electric typewriter, my home.
325-2934.
TYPING  DONE   IN   HOME—PICK-
up and Delivery — 946-4070.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO, VANCOUVER'S
Largest Take-Out & Delivery Service wishes to maintain it's policy
of offering part-time employment
to male students during the coming school year. Applicants should
be over 21 with valid V.C. driver's
licence, transportation advisable
but not essential. For appointment
contact Personnel Manager, 688-
2381,  No. 4, 1170 Bute St., Van.
PIZZA PATIO WISHES TO OFFER
part-time employment to female
students to work in the new
licensed Pizza Patio's locations at
Theatre Row, Denman & Nelson—
West Van. and North Van. during
the school year. For appointment
contact- Personnel Manager, 688-
2381, No.  4, 1170 Bute, Vancouver.
BABY-SITTING & LIGHT HOUSE-
keeping, free room & board, small
remuneration,  736-0558.
COPY RUNNER REQUIRED FOR
The Ubyssey. Must have car for
Monday and Thursday between
4:30 and 6:30 p.m. Apply to B.
Curtis,   241-K  SUB or 228-2301.
SKI     INSTRUCTORS. GROUSE
Mountain      requires instructors.
Will   train   this  fall. Good wages.
Phone  985-0478.
SITTER FOR 6 MO. BABY EVERY
Wed. in your home on or near
campus. 50c per hr. Write Mrs.
Hawes, 21960 Acadia Cr. Haney.
References.
"INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ONE SINGLE ROOM — ONE
Double Room. Male or female.
Cooking, laundry facilities. 4445
W. 11th or phone 224-3078. Mature
students only.	
FURNISHED BASEMENT ROOM
near university. Third, fourth, or
graduate year female preferred;
LHK, separate entrance, shower.
Call 224-6880.	
LARGE BASEMENT ROOM FOR
2 people with kitchen privileges,
own entrance if desired Only $100
mo. No drinkers or smokers, Be
first  to  call.   732-8448.
Room &  Board
82
BRIGHT ROOM & BOARD. 30 MIN.
on Deas Tunnel. $85.00 monthly.
Phone 531-4298.      	
ROOM & BOARD FOR 2 GIRLS
near the university. $95 month.
Phone 261-9564,  4019 W. 38th.
ATTRACTIVE LIVING ROOM AND
bedroom. Share with female student. Full board. Near gates, 228-
9824.	
FOR    two males close
to   — —   campus,    phone   224-
1905 — See 4528 W. 15th.	
FREE ROOM, BOARD IN Exchange for help evenings with
children. Near Gates. 224-6192.
~KM. AND BOARD. LARGE
bright rm. Near Blanca loop. Ph.
224-3504. 	
Furnished Apts.
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
CHINESE   MARTIAL   ARTS
(King Foo)  — Self-defence lessons.
Ancient   meditation   for  tension  relief.   Chinese   studies/languages.
For   inquiries   phone   872-1106
 83
FEMALE NEEDED TO SHARE
large two bedroom apartment on
campus,  excellent  location,  $45.00.
Phone 224-6792.	
"BASEMENT SUITE PRIV. ENT. 2
rms. Suit two male students $80
per. Furn. Clean linen. Weekly.
733-4252. __^
GIRL STUDENT TO SHARE
modern furnished apt. near beach
and shopping in West End. 681-
7707,	
AVAIL. NOW FURN. GROUND
suite. Accom. 2. 4106 West 13th.
$95.00  224-5583  after 4:00   p.m.,	
84
Unfurnished Apts.
GIRL 21 WTANTS SAME TO SHARE
Marpole unfurnished apartment.
Oct.   1st.   $73   mo.   phone   Sharon,
261-0322  before   5 p.m.

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