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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 2016

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Array FEBRUARY2.2016 | VOLUMEXCVII | ISSUEXVIII
POISONING AVOCADOSSINCE1918
SPORTS // PAGE 2
YOURGUIDETO UBC EVENTS & PEOPLE
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY2,2016
r
EVENTS
OUR CAMPUS
JT^
^^                                                                             FEB?, 2016
▼      OF RICE
& ROOTS
A NIGHT TO CELEBRATE
SOUTEAST-ASIANFOOO
TUES2
////
OF RICE AND ROOTS 6 P.M. @ THE NEST
Come by the Great Hall for some great Southeasn Asian foods
ike beef caldereta and mushroom pad see ew.
S18ENTRYTICKET
THURS4
////
SUSTAINABILITYFAIR 10AM @THE NEST
VisitThe Annual Sustainability Fair in the lower level of The Nest
to learn more about how to get involved and live sustainably.
FREE
THURS4
////
LOVE+INTIMACY 5:30 P.M. @ THE NEST
What is love? Baby don't hurt me, don't hurt me, no more.
Stop by the Lev Bukhman Theatre Lounge to learn more.
FREE
ON THE COVER
PHOTO/ART BY
Aiken Lao
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your event listings to
printeditor@ubyssey.ca
'JJthe ubyssey
= EBRUARY2,2016 | VOLUMEXCVII| ISSUEXVII
Coordinating Editor        Features Editor
Will McDonald Vassi Sharlandjieva
coordinating@ubyssey.ca features@ubyssey.ca
Design Editor Copy Editor
Aiken Lao Bailey Ramsay
3rinteditor@ubyssey.ca     features@ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Moira Warburton &
Emma Partridge
iews@ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Olivia Law
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sports+ Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
sports@ubyssey.ca
Video Producer
Tim Hoggan
vjdeo@ubyssey.ca
Photo Editor
Kosta Prodanovic
3hoto@ubyssey.es
Opinions+ Blog Editor
Jack Hauen
oplnlons@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Watt Langmuir, Josh AzEi.BillSitu.Elen;
tfo lo hova, J eremy Jo hnso n-Si l^ers, J u li a r
Yu.SriithiTadepalli, Karen Wang, Jessie
Stirling, Vicky Huang, Olarriide 01 ani><an:
Henry Allan, N atalie Morris, Migu el Sant;
viarla, Swan Spedor, Sarah Nablla,
Sophie Sutdrffe, Rithu Jagannath,
Samuel du Bols, Lucy Fox, Samanth;
WcCabe, Ben Cook, Avrll Hwang, Ber
Geisberg, Lilian Odera.Emrna HicKs,
Adam Walter, Avril Hwang, LI liar
Odera, Emma Hicks, Ben Geisberg,
Helen Zhou, Nadya Rahman, Boris
3o snjakovic.AI den Quallzza, Jerry Yin,
Arianna Leah Fischer, Tisha Dasgupta,
sa belle Cornrnerford, Evelina Tolslykl"
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Tuesday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen anc
written by the Ubyssey staff.They
arefheexpresseclopinionofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
\ibli cat ons Society or the Uni-
versity of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained
nerein cannotbe reproducec
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donotlessenthevalueorthe
mpactofthead.
Rugby coach Maria Gallo brings
four rugby World Cups, national
Gallo sees teaching kinesiology as similar to coaching.
= HOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Bailey Ramsay
Copy Editor
Maria Gallo brought her love of
rugby to four world cups over a
15-year competitive career. Now
an instructor at the School of
Kinesiology and the head coach
of the women's rugby team, Gallo
is thankful that she still continues
to learn about the things she is
passionate about.
"What people eat, how people
exercise and how that affects their
well-being — whether physically
or mentally — has always been
a passion," she said. "It was an
extension of who I was as an
athlete. I was always interested
in being in the gym, being fit and
being strong."
After receiving her
undergraduate degree at the
University of Guelph in biomedical
science, she thought — just like
everyone else — that she wanted
to become a doctor. But as an
athlete on the women's national
rugby team, she knew that medical
school would put an end to her
rugby career. Instead, she pursued
graduate studies at the University
of Alberta.
"I think the reason I remained
in school for so long was because
it allowed me to play rugby at a
high level," said Gallo. "I searched
universities across Canada that had a
really good rugby program and that's
why I ended up at U of A — to play
with the Pandas."
In addition to accomplished
rugby and academic careers under
her belt, Gallo has also tried her
hand at bobsledding. After a friendly
recommendation and a successful
tryout, Gallo was competing with
the national bobsled team within a
month. She found that her physical
strength was a key asset in becoming
a brakeman.
"My bobsled career was pretty
short, it was only two seasons. At
the time, the reason I was keen to
do it was because the training for
bobsled is very similar to the training
that you need to do in the gym for
rugby. You're basically a power
athlete in both of those sports," Gallo
explained.
There is a trend of rugby players
evolving into high-level competitive
bobsledders. "It's a natural transition
in the sense that you just need to be
raw power and [rugby players] will
make good brakemen if they stick
with it," said Gallo.
Although Gallo is no stranger to
scars, broken bones and concussions
through rugby, bobsledding is
more dangerous in that you have
less control as a brakeman at much
higher speeds — she trusted the
driver of the bobsled with her life.
"It's called a team sport, but it's
really a bit of an individual sport,"
she said. "Rugby is a sport, it's a
game. If we are playing against
each other, my actions affect your
actions — that's what makes it a
game. Where as if I find bobsled is
more of a contest. It's you and the
sled against the clock."
Gallo's move to UBC was not
an athletics-fuelled one as she
felt the next natural step in her
research was a post-doctoral
fellowship. After competing in the
2010 Rugby World Cup in England,
Gallo retired on her own terms
from professional rugby. At the
end of her one-year post-doctoral
fellowship at UBC, Gallo became a
kinesiology instructor. While her
language in the classroom might be
a bit less profane than it is on the
experience from
bobsled team
field, Gallo sees her position as an
educator as similar to coaching.
"Surprisingly enough,
[instructing and coaching] are
quite interchangeable in the sense
that when you're coaching, you're
teaching," said Gallo. "The only
thing that is different is maybe the
environment and obviously what
we're learning. In rugby, we get to hit
people — you can't really do that in
lecture."
Although many may find Gallo
intimidating upon first interaction,
whether she is shouting at you
on the pitch or calling upon you
unexpectedly in a lecture hall, she
believes in engaging closely with
UBC students.
"I don't just want the student
to sit there passively absorbing
information, I want them to be
involved in discussions. I give them a
fair warning on day one," she said.
Former head coach of women's
rugby Lesley McKenzie, with whom
Gallo played with on the national
rugby team, invited her to become
the assistant rugby coach in the
2011-2012 season. Gallo became head
coach when McKenzie left two years
later.
"After you play a sport for so
long, it becomes part of your identity.
Quitting cold turkey would have
been tough, so I got myself into
coaching. I think it's been a pretty
natural transition since," said Gallo.
"After you've played rugby for 15
years, you have so much information
and you just want to give it back
to the athletes. It's kind of like
paying it forward — people taught
me, I should teach what I know to
somebody who is younger, motivated
and keen to play the sport."
Gallo hopes that her legacy to the
women's rugby team will be seen in
the effort she puts into recruiting
the top talent in BC. She's also been
frequenting trips to the Prairies,
where she believes untapped rugby
talent may lie.
"I really like the Thunderbird
idea, even though it needs to grow. I
think the general student population
doesn't quite understand athletics
here," said Gallo. "It goes back to
athletes. Athletes are typically very
motivated, intrinsically driven,
and usually successful... Even
though they maybe have different
personalities, their goal is usually the
same, which is to be the best at their
sport. I like that mentality."
'T//SMEETS LAW
'/ CORPORATION
I
GRAHAM L. ZILM
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
604-899-0320
graham.zilm@smeetslaw.com
I offer a range of legal services, including:
CIVIL LITIGATION        CRIMINAL LAW       PERSONAL INJURY
ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND JUDICIAL REVIEW
SUITE 1430, 1188 W GEORGIA STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C., V6E 4A2 // NEWS
EDITORS EMMA PARTRIDGE + MOIRAWARBURTON
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY2,2016
THEWEEKOF
GUPTAGAT
Emma Partridge
News Editor
Reddit cracked the case about why
former President Arvind Gupta resigned,
discovering a number of documents
accidentally included in the release
package. From these, it became clear
that the issue which caused Gupta's
resignation was ultimately a crisis in
leadership.
"UBC deeply regrets that this
privacy breach has occurred and
we will immediately launch an
independent investigation into how
the material became public. UBC will
not be commenting on the substance
of the information as we must respect
B.C. privacy laws," wrote Hubert
slammei
I
Moira Warburton and Emma Partridge
News Editors
While an unflattering image of former
President Arvind Gupta was presented
on Wednesday by the documents the
university inadvertently leaked, the
university's Board of Governors emerged
from the scandal by no means unscathed.
Gupta noted that the manner in
which the Board of Governors operated
impacted on the communication between
himself and the board.
"In the summer, I began to realize
maybe there was some back channels
developing where some of the people
who were uneasy about this direction
were back-channeling into the board
about what they were saying," said Gupta.
Emma Partridge
. News Editor
The reason for UBC's inadvertent
breach of privacy relating to former
President Arvind Gupta's resignation
has been revealed. Last week, number
of files that were meant to be excluded
from the 861-page document pertaining
to Gupta's surprise resignation last
August were discovered. The error was
in how the files were uploaded — the
attachments that were private became
readable when viewed on Adobe
Reader, which the majority of readers
failed to do.
According to a press release put out
this afternoon, UBC uses the software
Lai university counsel and Philip
Steenkamp VP external relations and
communications in an emailed statement.
Emails between former Board of
Governors chair John Montalbano and
Gupta indicate that confidential meetings
were taking place as far back as March,
which appeared to be a month rife with
tensions. Such animosity preceded
Gupta's notorious surprise resignation.
"The Board has noted that your first
year as leader of the University of British
Columbia has been an unsettled one,"
read a note on May 24,2015 from John
Montalbano to Arvind Gupta in the form
of notes of a meeting on May 18,2015.
"Relationships with key stakeholder
groups, notably your senior executive,
the Faculty Deans and the Board of
Governors are not at functional levels,"
On March 5, in an email from Gupta
to Montalbano, Gupta wrote, "Tonight
we're all hands on deck on a sensitive
issue that breaks tomorrow... it will be
messy no matter how I look at it."
While none of these exchanges
point to an altogether breakdown in
leadership, another secret meeting was
scheduled with Montalbano and others
with the intent of working "together
to get things back on track." The notes
produced from this meeting paint a
telling picture.
Montablano sent Gupta a six-page
document that critiques virtually every
aspect of his leadership imaginable.
"Because there is a low level of trust
among those that work most closely with
you, morale is low," reads page two of
the document. "The role of a leader is to
build collegiality and collaboration across
the organization. This is particularly
crucial during a time of change.
Ironically, the very people most fearful
of change are the ones who would value
contributing to it most," reads page
three.
These cracks appear to have been
met with a non-transparent board
response, hosting in-camera and
off-the-books meetings in locations
off-campus that ultimately precipitated
to one fateful meeting to "deal with any
issues or matters that may be related to
the resignation by Professor Arvind Gupta
of his appointment as president of the
University of British Columbia." '51
According to Gupta, an ad hoc
committee of select board members had
been formed to discuss these concerns
— emphasizing that it was a sub-group
of the board, not the whole board.
"I was told that this ad hoc
committee had met, they don't have
confidence in me and then I had a tough
decision to make," he said.
The Faculty Association shares this
concern for transparency.
"Information that has come out...
has justified our concern that the Board
of Governors had acted via secret,
in-camera processes," read an open
letter from the Faculty Association
(FA), published today. The group is now
calling for an external review of the
board.
package Redax, in which it is necessary
to "sanitize" any PDF file with hidden
documents to remove these portions
which are not meant to be included in
the release. This step was inadvertently
missed for the largest release package
coming out of the Access and Privacy
Office in years.
UBC now must navigate next steps
following this unprecedented privacy
breach for the university and the former
president.
"They've already had a technical
forensic expert in who's done the
review about what happened and
about how it happened," said Philip
Steenkamp, the new VP external
relations and communications.
These in-camera meetings criticized
in their letter are also slammed for taking
place off campus and not being recorded
in any way on the board's website. Mark
Mac Lean, FA president, noted it is
problematic that the operational set of
procedures followed by the Board aren't
even written down.
"When you don't have any actual
written procedures, everything seems
to be managed by this kind of oral
knowledge - leaves you with the
impression that it's all kind of made up as
we go along," he said.
Much like Gupta himself, the FA's
letter expressed concern with a lack of
communication that could have possibly
cut off the breakdown in leadership.
"It is unclear whether Dr. Gupta
himself was aware that the series of
meetings to which he was summoned
constituted a performance review.
According to his own statements, he was
never presented with any actual evidence
of the claims that were made about his
performance," read the FA's letter.
The performance review — or lack
thereof — was a sticking point for Gupta,
too.
"I had a lot of hope [the review]
was going to happen. It was only later I
realized that there was no intention to
do any kind of formal evaluation," he told
The Ubyssey.
Overall, he regrets his decision to
resign and wishes he had pushed back
harder against the small group of board
members. 'SI
J
Central ^ptoWdingGupfa documents
The next step will most likely be an
external investigation, which UBC is
committed to fully cooperating with.
"UBC deeply regrets the error that
led to this privacy breach," said a press
release. "UBC has retained an external
expert to review its disclosure practices
and provide recommendations on any
steps that need to be taken to prevent a
recurrence."
Steenkamp could not comment on
the consequences for those responsible.
"The office opens the file on this
and then the office can conduct an
investigation. I can't speculate whether
they'll decide to do one or not," said
Steenkamp. "Hubert Lai's team [in the
Access and Privacy Office] is a very
diligent, very professional team — you
can imagine how awful they feel about
this."
Whether Gupta has grounds to sue
could not be answered by Steenkamp,
to whom the UBC Access and Privacy
Office is diverting all media queries.
As for the next while however, UBC
may not have to worry about that.
"I woke up Wednesday morning
with a whole bunch of documents and
my first reaction was, 'I need to correct
any misconceptions people have,'" said
Gupta in an interview with The Ubyssey
earlier today. "And I have really not had
time to think about anything else other
than trying to make sure I can correct
whatever I can that's out there." '51
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*Ask Manager for details.
1515 West 57th Avenue • 604.261.0732 • shannonmewsandapartments.com
WALL FINANCIAL
CORPORATION NEWS    |   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2016
MEDICINE//
Science pre-reqs no longer needed to enter MD program
= ILE PHOTO COLIN CHIA/THE UBYSSEY
Senate approved the removal of science pre-reqs as requirements to enter medicine.
Sruthi Tadepalli
Senior Staff Writer
Students hoping to enter the MD
program at UBC next fall don't have
to worry about missing a science
pre-req after last Wednesday's
senate meeting.
In an effort to encourage a
more diverse applicant pool in
terms of academic background, the
university has removed science pre-
reqs as a mandatory requirement
for entering the M.D. program.
"As the class is currently
constituted, there is a huge
predominance of applicants
that come from a very strict and
narrow science background," said
Bruce Fleming, associate dean of
admissions at the UBC Faculty of
Medicine. "We looked at the last
group of individuals who were
successful and, of the 288, there
were only nine that came from
either arts, education or music."
Students are still encouraged
to complete currently required
courses, but Fleming hopes
that the revision will mean that
non-traditional applicants aren't
discouraged from applying because
of a couple requirements.
"This will open the door to
that applicant that we think might
be very well suited to medicine
and bring attributes that are
outside what we consider to be the
traditional applicant," he said.
Some medical students are
concerned about the timing of the
change. The medical school has
recently switched to a renewed
curriculum and Eric Zhao, a third-
year M.D./PhD student and Medical
Undergraduate Society president,
is concerned that having two big
transitions almost simultaneously
will prove problematic.
"We wanted to see the renewed
curriculum be proven in its capacity
to excel at teaching basic sciences
before a proposal like this one could
move forward," said Zhao. However,
he is in support of the spirit of the
change.
"This is seen as an important
endeavour in order that our medical
student body has the best chance
possible to be representative of
the BC population, which is the
population that we are drawing
students from and ultimately, as
physicians, the population that we
are going to serve," he said.
There were other, perhaps more
obvious, concerns voiced at the
senate meeting. One senator pointed
out the possible flaws with having a
medical student enter the program
without so much as a biology course
on their transcript. According
to Fleming however, applicants
will have to demonstrate to the
admission committee that they
can handle the science involved in
medicine.
"I believe that the curriculum in
its new format offers opportunity
for students from non-traditional
backgrounds to get up to speed
in areas that they may be needing
extra work," Fleming maintained.
"More flexibility is built into the
curriculum for students to explore
areas of interests. There's a spiralling
of information in such a way that
important concepts are re-visited,
rather than touched upon and
discussed and then not re-visited."
The alteration is also in line
with the M.D. program's focus
on students who are not only
academically strong, but are also
connected to their communities and
have leadership potential.
"By moving back from a strict
requirement for certain courses,
we truly believe that it will broaden
the diversity within the class and
make for not only a stronger class,
but a stronger group of physicians
going forward to serve the people
in BC," said Fleming. '51
Public Open House
Wesbrook Place Lot 23
Join us on Tuesday, February 9 to view and comment on the proposed residential development
proposal for Wesbrook Place Lot 23. Plans will be displayed for a new 6-storey 10,925m2 market
residential building with 106 units.
Date:
Place:
4:30 - 6:00 PM
day, February^ 2016
/esbrook Welcome Centre, 3378 Wesbrook Mall
Keenleyside Crescent
Pathways yVest
<\_
*e
Meeting
House   LO<
P
Wesbrook Mall
cation ultima      g^ta    M    lia
n__:t:_ .. NOUSe m„,,„
/Lot237 N<
L^J   Park
This event is wheelchair accessible.
Representatives from the project team and
Campus + Community Planning will be on hand to
discuss and answer questions about this project.
The public is also invited to attend the upcoming
Development Permit Board Meeting for this
project.
Date/Time: February 24, 5:00 - 7:00PM
Location:     Wesbrook Community Centre
3335 Webber Lane
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager, Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
Can't attend in person? Online feedback will be accepted from Jan 15 to Feb 16.
To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit:
planning, ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
JlfcM'&-fa-fl'llSft,S, &BTft£i«#o     o| #x|^ g*fc# a|s ^ 5Ufe §2fl *jfi7h sol 5Ui=fM^.
m&A%fom®° &£!# a*h =l urn aem^ H&m zs-mw huh^.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
GOVERNANCE //
Presidential search completes
consultation period
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 16003
= ILE PHOTO BORIS BOSNJAKOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Next fall, there will be a new face where interim President Martha Piper is sitting.
Moira Warburton
News Editor
The consultation period is
drawing to a close for the job
description development of UBC's
next president.
The search committee spent
several days meeting with key
stakeholders, including alumni,
past presidents, the Faculty
Association, the AMS and the
GSS. Comments were also
elicited from external actors
such as Aboriginal groups, senior
donors, municipal and provincial
governments, as well as the
presidents of organizations such
as the Canadian International
Development Agency and the
Vancouver Board of Trade — a
full list can be found online.
In addition, the committee
held two town halls — one in
Vancouver and one at UBC
Okanagan — and solicited
comments from the general
public via an online web
form, which Chancellor
Lindsay Gordon said had been
surprisingly successful.
"One of the reasons why being
president of a university is such
a challenging job is that you have
to deal with this multiplicity of
stakeholders who often have
different views about what the
[president's] priorities should
be," said Gordon.
The process to find UBC's
next president has been
expedited. Gordon noted that a
normal timeline for this type of
headhunting is a year, compared
to this search which is expected
to take nine to 10 months due to
Martha Piper's commitment to
remain as interim president until
June 30, 2016.
However, Gordon has
remained firm throughout the
search process that stakeholder
consultation will not take a hit
due to a time crunch. A greater
emphasis on consultation
is the main thing he cites as
being different from the last
presidential search in 2013-14.
"Lindsay Gordon has done,
from my perspective, a much
better job of keeping the
community aware of where
we're at on the timeline and
really inviting feedback," said
Aaron Bailey, AMS president
and member of the presidential
search committee.
"It is a very enlightening,
yet arduous, process meeting
with that many people. It's
so interesting to see some of
the similarities, but also the
differences that different people
in such a complex environment
have expectationalized [sic] for
somebody like this," said Bailey.
The leadership qualities
discussed at the Vancouver town
hall and at the AMS Council
discussion later that evening
were representative of this
difference.
At the town hall, members
of the UBC administration and
of the community expressed
a need for a leader who was
experienced in academia and
leadership.
"There are clearly some
strong common themes, such as
leadership experience in a large
university environment, having
the right values, having team-
building capacity, to work across
all the different stakeholder
groups, to have cultural sensitivity,
to be a distinguished academic,
to understand academia," said
Gordon.
The candidate profile of the
next president will be released
within the week or so.
"Will people look at the
document and say, 'I agree
with everything in it'?" asked
Gordon. "No, that's the nature of
a university. There's always going
to be some degree of what I'd
argue is healthy disagreement. But
I think there are some common
themes and I think most people
will feel pretty confident about
what they see in this document."
He noted that the time
span between the profile being
made public and candidate
identification would be short.
"We're already doing that to be
honest, but we won't get into any
discussion with candidates until
probably the second half of next
month," said Gordon. 'M // CULTURE
EDITOR OLIVIA LAW
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY2,2016
NEW YEAR//
Celebrating the Lunar New Year
in a synthesis of cultures
Hamm and Li are performing specially-commissioned pieces.
= HOTO COURTESY COREY HAMM
Tisha Dasgupta
Staff Writer
Did you know that listening to
music triggers the same hormone
in your brain, dopamine, that
is released during moments of
intense happiness or eating food?
In celebration of the Chinese
Lunar New Year, Music on the Point
Concerts with Personality presents
The Piano and Erhu Project or
PEP. PEP is a cross cultural musical
project founded by UBC professor
Corey Hamm (piano) and Chinese
musician and Concert Master of
the BC Chinese Orchestra, Nicole
Ge Li (erhu). A unique rendition of
the Chinese instrument erhu and
western instrument piano, PEP
synthesizes the best of Chinese and
western music.
The concert showcases a
selection of original compositions
by Canadian and Chinese
composers who are predominantly
UBC faculty and alumni. The
concert will also feature the world
premiere of a new piece by UBC
composer Stephen Chatman called
Remember me, Forever.
"PEP is a mix of western and
Asian cultures, which is evident in
the music," said Li.
The erhu, often referred to
as the Chinese violin, is iconic of
the Chinese culture as the piano
is certainly iconic of the western.
Hamm started learning the piano
at age 12 and was passionate about
the instrument, but has always
had a growing interest for new
contemporary pieces. Now he is a
professional pianist and a professor
of piano and chamber music at
UBC School of Music.
Li, an erhu virtuoso, has played
the erhu her whole life. After
moving to Canada a few years
back, she started playing concerts
here in Vancouver. The duo met
nearly four years ago and in playing
together, they realized their
instruments, musical stylings and
have worked very well together.
This led to the formation of The
Piano and Erhu Project.
"There weren't many pieces out
there that were well suited for both
the erhu and piano," said Hamm.
With the founding of PEP,
Hamm and Li commissioned
contemporary composers to write
pieces designed specifically for
the erhu and piano. Now they have
more than 60 pieces created just for
them, ranging from avant-garde-
style works to the more accessibly
familiar.
The composers had to integrate
not the only dynamics of the
two instruments, but also the
relationship between China and
the West. These pieces have been
featured on two CDs that the duo
has already released. The second
was even nominated for Best
Classical Recording at the 2015
Western Canadian Music Awards.
In the upcoming year, PEP also
plans to release two more CDs.
Moreover, in the summer
of 2016, PEP will be doing a
tour of four cities in mainland
China. Their tour will introduce
Canadian and American musical
compositions to the music industry
in China. Their aim is also to
teach music school teachers and
students more about playing the
erhu and piano together. To enable
this, they will conduct workshops.
With so much on their agenda for
the forthcoming year, PEP is also
proud to announce that they now
have their own agent.
Hamm and Li are both very
excited to celebrate this Lunar
New Year and to drum up even
more excitement for PEP, the
erhu and piano. At the concert
this Friday, PEP will provide the
audience a chance to experience
the confluence of the two different
instruments and an opportunity to
listen to several compositions by
members of the UBC community. '21
The PEP concert will be held
at UBC Barnett Hall on Friday
February S at 7:30 p.m.
COMEDY//
Comic Maddy Kelly on offensive humour,
musical-comedy and not giving a damn
Miguel Santa Maria
Senior Staff Writer
It takes a lot of courage for
someone to take a mic and crack
jokes in front of dozens of people
— even more so when you don't
know if your humour will be a hit
or miss. Fortunately for second-
year Arts student Madeline Kelly,
she's managed to laugh her way
into the stand-up scene.
Kelly has been performing
various comedic acts since
she was 10, including acting
in musical-comedies, writing
comedy and doing improv. She
has also drawn inspiration from
a number of key figures, whether
the blunt commentary of Louis
C.K. or the observational humour
of David Sedaris. Now, she is also
one of the executives for the UBC
Improv team.
"I always wanted to make
people laugh ... I was more drawn
to comedy," said Kelly. For her,
the desire to bring humor to
others is always her top priority.
It is also one of the reasons she is
reluctant in terms of performing
competitively or being concerned
with its technicality. "It feels
inherently odd to quantify an art,
especially since everyone has
different tastes. I'd rather just
have fun making people happy."
Despite constantly wanting
to bring laughs, Kelly never
considered doing stand-up
comedy until as recently as this
past summer.
"It was one of those things I
never thought I would do. Now,
it just feels like my whole life,"
said Kelly, whose first stand-up
set was done on a whim after an
improv colleague asked if she
wanted to go see a show. "As soon
as I did that first set, it evolved
into something to challenge
yourself. [I had been] writing
jokes for so long, but I dunno why
I didn't do it my whole life ... once
I did it, I just did."
Stand-up quickly became an
avenue for Kelly to further hone
her comedy skills. This especially
since the practice can be a steep
climb in terms of challenge. A
climb that includes mismanaged
jokes, dead crowds or just no
crowds at all. Also, unlike an
improv performance, you can only
rely on yourself.
According to Kelly however,
those unlucky scenarios can be
spun around especially when
fellow comics are present.
"People sometimes think that
gets them down, but you have to
think of it more as workshop,"
she said, citing that dead spaces
can be learning experiences
to test whatever humour you
please. "When you have a booked
show where there's more of an
audience, [that's where you] go
back to that earlier tested stuff
and have fun."
Luckily for Kelly, there is no
shortage of peer support when it
comes to her work, be it improv
or stand-up. She noted that her
experience and great chemistry
with the UBC Improv team
always further motivates her in
refining her comedy.
However, seeking advice of
actual stand-up comedians was a
Kelly is set to become a big name in Vancouver comedy.
= HOTO COURTESY COLIN SHARP
little more intimidating. "They're
not [un]friendly, [but] they're
just tough nuts to crack," she
said. "Most [of them] are some of
the sweetest, smartest and most
creative people I've ever met."
Although still developing her
own skills, Kelly has plenty of
advice for others who wish to
pursue any comedy. This includes
actively seeking out shows, jotting
down anything you find funny and,
most importantly, do comedy that
you are happy with.
"I was doing musical comedy
when I started and it went well — I
had fun. But eventually it didn't
feel as exciting... I started to do
worse because the audience started
to know that I didn't care as much."
She also advises not to shy away
from offensive humour, so long as
it's done right.
"I genuinely think everything
could be funny, but some things
are immeasurably harder than
others," she said, noting execution
and intent is everything. "There
was a show [at Hot Art Wet City,
Main Street] that was all jokes
about rape from rape survivors.
[They did so] for their own
therapeutic reasons and for social
consciousness. You just have
to really be doing things with
intention I think."
In the end, whether doing it
professionally or on the side, Kelly
does not see herself divorcing
from humour anytime soon.
"I was just wanna do it all
the time. Just keep going, doing
standup, writing, acting... Just
making things that I'm proud of.
That's what I wanna do with my
life." •a
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nomination is now open and will close February 12,
2016. Campaigning period starts 12:00am on February
22, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016. Voting starts on
February 29th, 2016 and ends March 4th, 2016.
Nomination forms are available at the Nest, room 2209
between 11:00am - 3:00 pm daily.
This is not an editorial position. Members of The
Ubyssey Publications Society Board of Directors are
responsible for overseeing the finances and
administrative operations of the newspaper.
Responsibilities include attending board meetings,
tending to business as it arises and overseeing
personal projects.
For further details please email
fpereira@ubyssey.ca FEATURES    I    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2016
'BC is divided on whether
I or not divestment from
' fossil fuels is necessary, or
even helpful, for the battle against
climate change. The university has
a $1.2 billion endowment fund that
is invested in a range of companies
with an estimated $100 million
— a little less than 10 per cent of
the total — invested in fossil fuels
such as oil, natural gas and coal.
Adopting a policy of divestment
would mean that UBC would have
to shed those investments and move
them into something else.
In referendums held last year,
the student body and the faculty
both voted in favour of divestment
by a large margin. As a result,
the Board of Governors has been
increasingly pressured to make a
decision.
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According to Alex Hemmingway,
and environmental activist with
UBCC350, divestment at UBC
sends an important message. The
university is a leading educational
and research institution — the
stances UBC chooses to take on
issues such as divestment carry a lot
of weight.
"These companies depend on
a social license to operate," said
Hemmingway. "Until [we as an
institution] highlight and confront
of the fossil fuel industry in the
climate crisis both in terms of
profiting from pollution and
polluting our politics, we're not
going to be able to make the
progress we need on climate policy."
Part of the power of divestment
is in removing this social license
that allows oil companies to operate
with little ethical scrutiny. The
term "social license" refers to the
level of acceptance a community
has for a project within it — an
example of the effect removing the
social license of an industry can
have is the meat industry. When
the inhumane treatment of animals
raised for meat became publicly
exposed, many people were
appalled. This reaction attacked
the meat industry's social license
because it forced them through
the power of societal pressure to
change their practices. Examples
of these changes are increasing the
demand for alternative sources for
meat such as organic and free-range
meat, as well as creating a rigorous
certification process for humanely-
raised meat.
Divestment is an attempt to
elicit a similar effect on the energy
industry using socioeconomic
pressure to change the practices of
the industry.
Proponents of divestment argue
that the statement sent by UBC
adopting a policy of divestment
would have a ripple effect on
the province and the country.
Hemmingway believes that more
people speaking out against fossil
fuel extraction corporations will
give these companies less lobbying
power, which allows them to block
legislation that hurts their profits
but helps the environment.
Whether or not divestment will
actually have the intended social
effect is unclear. Although it is a
movement on many campuses,
charities, churches and other
groups across Canada, the United
States and the United Kingdom, it
was created less than five years ago
and the long-term results have not
had the chance to ripen yet.
David Tindall is a sociology
professor at UBC whose main
research is on environmental issues
and the social movements linked to
them. He notes that the first actors
in social movements, whether
individuals or institutions, don't
have a significant effect.
"But once you reach a critical
mass, then it can lead to a shift,"
said Tindall. He believes that
UBC's divestment would add
another weight to tip the scales,
which could eventually pressure
the government to create stricter
environmental policies.
Others take a more neutral
view, such as Sauder professor Ilan
Vertinsky, director of the Forest
Economics and Policy Analysis
Research Unit. He thinks that
UBC's voice is small in the bigger
picture and it probably will not
carry much power in the struggle
against climate change — although
he doesn't necessarily see this as a
reason to not divest.
"There are lots of voices. I
think it's another voice and I don't
think this voice will cost us too
much," said Vertinsky, arguing that
it is important to take a stand that
reflects the university's values of
sustainability. He doesn't believe
divestment will have a negative
financial impact on the value of
UBC's endowment fund if the
investments are managed properly
over the long term.
"In the long run for the
university, investment in oil is not
a good investment economically
because there is a societal,
international commitment that...
some time in the future, we will
phase out oil," said Vertinsky.
Divestment itself would not
actually have an environmental
impact at UBC — the university
has been making a very public shift
away from non-renewable energy
sources on campus for several
years. But as a symbolic gesture,
divesting could potentially have
a large environmental impact by
changing the status quo of society's
acceptance of polluting energy
companies.
\$ dv0tmmt t\
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The gesture, however, would not
be without its drawbacks. Nat
Carson, president of the Mining
Engineering Club and fourth-
"[Divestment] is a distraction from the real problem, which is
finding solutions through the better use of carbon resources,
finding technologies that change the demand for carbon
resources or finding ways to sequester or reuse carbon
year mining engineering student,
said that divestment will not
help UBC toward their goals of
climate change — much of the
research on sustainable energy in
her department is actually funded
by some of the companies UBC
would divest from.
"Something that is really
overlooked by a lot of people who
are pro-divestment is that a lot of
these energ
invest in clean technology and
they are some of the people who
are doing the most innovation,"
said Carson. "If we do divest
from these companies, does that
mean we're stopping investing in
research in the technology?"
She worries that divesting
from those companies will cause
them to stop funding research
at UBC and slow down the
development of market-viable
sustainable solutions. The way
to create sustainable solutions,
according to Carson, is to work
with energy companies rather
than against them.
"I think that [divestment] is a
distraction from the real problem,
which is finding solutions through
the better use of carbon resources,
finding technologies that change
the demand for carbon resources
or finding ways to sequester or
reuse carbon resources," Carson
explained.
She says many sustainable
energy solutions already exist, but
what is missing is an economically
viable way to implement them.
Research is the way to discover
resources.
— Nat Carson, president of Mining Engineering Club and
fourth-year mining engineering student
a relationship with fossil fuel
companies to continue to pursue
that research.
Carson says it would make
more of an impact if UBC were
able to actually become a self-
sustaining university rather
than saying we don't approve
of carbon. She believes it would TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2016   |    FEATURES
create a more significant
ripple effect across campuses
to be a leading example
in technology and action,
rather than morals.
Vertinsky believes that
fossil fuel companies would
continue to invest in clean
research at places like UBC,
divested or not. "It's of great
interest of the companies
to clean up their act," said
Vertinsky. "They would not
cut funds because it looks
bad for public relations."
Regardless of whether
Vertinsky is right, others
such as Hemmingway think
the positive societal impact
that might come from
divestment outweighs any
potential financial risk.
"We're talking about
an unprecedented global
crisis that needs immediate
action in climate change. I
network, which leads to an
avid hiring of UBC graduates.
Divestment could have an
impact on graduates hoping to
enter the energy industry.
Carson notes the conflict
between these interests and
UBC's overall emphasis on
sustainability as an institution.
"Divesting could mean
that energy companies don't
necessarily turn to UBC
students when they're looking
for the latest innovators ...
but we've come from UBC
where we do have this huge
emphasis for sustainability,"
said Carson. "Graduates
from UBC have this unique
perspective and entering
the energy industry would
allow them to change that
conversation in carbon
technology right from the
source."
Vertinsky argues it would
"What it fundamentally means is
bringing our investment practices
in line with our rhetoric and our own
hopes for excellence in sustainability."
— Alex Hemmingway, political
science PhD student and member of
UBCC350
really think we need to take
that action anyway, even
if it were to cost you some
money as an institution," said
Hemmingway.
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Of>f>Oftwti0
Although research shows that
the university's endowment
fund wouldn't be adversely
affected by divestment, many
engineers at UBC could
face a financial risk from
divestment. Funding from
energy companies provides
a lot of co-op, research and
engineering competition
opportunities for UBC
students. Companies and UBC
also form a strong alumni
be a bad PR move for those
companies to entirely cut
ties with UBC if UBC were to
take a stand on divestment.
The university, after all,
has a powerful voice and its
graduates are highly sought
after. Companies do not
want to face the backlash
from isolating the UBC
community.
UBC students saw a
recent example of this
backlash. On January 22,
Peter Kiss, the CEO of
Morgan Construction — a
construction company
specializing in the oil fields
— published a Linkedln blog
post stating that he wouldn't
hire UBC graduates if the
university chose to divest.
After a few days of uproar
in the media, he posted on
Twitter that he retracted
those statements and would still
hire from UBC.
However, it is important to
ask whether academic freedom is
hampered by corporate interests
if the university cannot act freely
in fear of losing funding.
"You have to be very careful
of being in a situation where
the views of professors are then
constrained to being in line with
the interests of corporations
or at least constrained to the
extent that they can't criticize
corporations," said Tindall.
Alan Ehrenholz, Engineering
Undergraduate Society
president and third-year civil
and environmental engineering
student, argues that academic
freedom is having access to those
opportunities, regardless of who
funds them.
"[Engineering students] want
to be able to study what they
want to study," said Ehrenholz,
arguing that divestment could
actually hamper an engineering
student's access to the learning
opportunities provided by
companies hurt by divesting.
This raises a question of whether
divestment is actually in line with
UBC's goals. Ehrenholz believes
not because it will limit access to
experiential learning for students,
but Hemmingway focuses on the
fact that it will properly reflect
student and faculty opinion,
referencing last year's ref erendums.
However, Carson says it doesn't
match up to still use gas and oil and
yet so vehemently disapprove of it.
"Pulling out and saying, All
carbon is bad, let's not use it,' and
then still living a Westernized
life is biting the hand that
feeds you," said Carson. "From
my own personal perspective,
[divestment] is a symbolic gesture
more so driven by emotion than
it is business. I think that if
UBC really wanted to make a
statement, then it should find
ways to run the campus on
renewables."
Hemmingway pointed to
UBC's goal of 100 per cent
reduction of greenhouse gas
emissions by 2050. UBC brands
itself as sustainable and even has
an associate provost in charge
of sustainability. James Tansey,
director of UBC's sustainability
initiative, signed the open letter
to the university from the faculty
calling for divestment.
"What it fundamentally
means is bringing our investment
practices in line with our
rhetoric and our own hopes for
excellence in sustainability," said
Hemmingway. "It's really about
bringing our investment actions
in line with our values."
The Board of Governors is
expected to make a decision on
whether or not UBC will adopt a
policy of divestment on February
3.1
ADVANCE SCREENING
Wednesday, February 10 7:00pm
Zoolander.com
In Theatres February 12
I
Pick-Up your tickets at
Room 2209 in the Nest! 8    I    CULTURE    I    TUESDAY FEBRUARY 2,2016
EVENTS //
Arts and Culture night provides snapshots of student life
Ana-Maria Oproescu
Contributor
On Wednesday night, The
Calendar, in collaboration with
UBC's Arts and Culture District,
hosted its first Arts and Culture
night, an evening dedicated to
celebrating student expression in
its diversity. Performing for over
300 attendees were members of the
Blank Vinyl Project, UBC Slam and
UBC Improv. Held fittingly at the
Museum of Anthropology, the acts
provided a snapshot of student life
as it stands in 2016.
Part of the The Calendar's
initiative was to bring to light the
artistic talents of some of UBC's
smaller clubs as well as to the
unique spaces on campus. Hosting
the event at the MOA allowed
students to discover a campus
venue they otherwise might not
have known about or had the
chance to visit.
The audience was seated in
MOA's Great Hall, an airy, modern
space serving to highlight the mid-
19th century art of the Northwest
Coast's First People. The beautiful
room was inspiring for performers
and audience members alike - a
rousing backdrop for the evening
exploring student culture.
Beginning the night were
performances by artists from
BVP, the space lending unique
acoustic qualities to the music
and lengthening the notes sung in
The evening was a huge success in all areas.
chorus by the audience. Following
this were performances by UBC
Slam, with readings spanning
the subjects of mental health
awareness (motivated by the
coinciding Bell Let's Talk Day), to
gender identity and sexuality.
Acts by UBC Improv had
people laughing at outrageously
inventive scenarios, as to be
expected. Taking cues from the
audience, the actors seamlessly
navigated scenes about centaurs
and "fjord-viewing fjords." Another
memorable cue was themed around
a Czechoslovakian substitute
professor in a student's European
medieval history class.
Students also had the
opportunity to tour one of MOA's
current exhibitions before the
show, a collection ethereal work
= HOTO AUSTEN ERHARDT/THE UBYSSEY
focused on Taiwanese traditional
and religious values in modern
society. The exhibit is open until
April 3.
Exposing students to a
spectrum of perspectives and
experiences, the night served to
broaden our understanding of the
modern individual and to play
our parts in building a collective
cultural identity. 'M
OPERA//
Colour, Comedy and Carnival: UBC Operas A Night in Venice
The operetta isa musical forthe classy.
Katharina Friege
Contributor
A night at the opera often involves
tragedy, death, politics or a
combination of all three. Johann
Strauss' operetta, A Night in Venice,
couldn't be further removed from
this image. Unlike an opera, an
operetta — the precursor to the
musical — is almost always a
comedy. It is shorter than an opera
and incorporates spoken dialogue.
UBC Opera's production
of A Night in Venice stays true
to the spirit of the operetta
and brings with it all of the
ingredients necessary for a night of
uninterrupted fun — a convoluted
plot, tremendous energy and an
exquisite set that will transport
the audience to the carnival in 18th
century Venice.
The story twists and turns
through love affairs, mistaken
= HOTO COURTESY UBC OPERA
identities and complex intrigues
enough to satisfy anyone's appetite
for drama. When the Duke of
Urbino arrives in Venice with the
design to seduce as many women as
possible, in particular the beautiful
Barbara, a tumultuous series of
events is triggered and culminates
in the carnival celebrations at St.
Mark's Square.
"It's a sparkling upbeat sort
of operetta," said director Nancy
Hermiston, head of UBC Opera.
"It's full of colour, beautiful music,
lively tunes, lots of jokes and lots of
comedy."
Once you add the individual
motivations of each character
into the mix, a tangled muddle is
inevitable. Cook Pappacoda wants
a permanent position, servant
Ciboletta wants to marry him as
soon as possible, Annina is angry at
her sweetheart Caramello and all
Barbara really wants is to celebrate
the carnival with her lover Enrico.
Confused?
"If you're not confused, then
you're not watching an operetta,"
said Alireza Mojibian, one of the
students who is playing Pappacoda.
At the same time, the story
is accessible, the characters are
relatable and the humour is
constantly uproarious. In opera,
"there's always ... the question
of relationships and how we as
humans deal with each other,"
Hermiston said. "I think the
audience always sees themselves in
[the] characters."
Preparations for A Night in
Venice began in September and it
will be performed entirely in its
original German. Bringing across
the spoken dialogue in a foreign
language authentically with
the precise cadence and accent
distinctive of that language has
required dedication on the part of
the students.
"Making it flow as if it was just
one seamless line is the hardest
thing," Mojibian said.
For Hermiston, this focus
on language goes beyond the
performance on stage. While
the audience can rely on the
subtitles to follow events, for the
students performing, this is also
an important way to prepare for a
future career in opera.
In fact, the students gain a
diverse range of experience in the
months leading up to a new show.
Student involvement is a crucial
part of the UBC Opera program.
"Our students help build the
set, they help build the costumes
... they do the ticketing, they do
the marketing," Hermiston said.
"They're guided by professionals,
but they do a lot of the work."
"[It's] very hands on," said
first-year MFA student Marie
Civitarese. "It's long hours ... long
days, but it's all worth it."
The product of all this work
is presented to the audience with
what Hermiston identifies as a
unique "joy and... wonderment
and energy." Whether Civitarese is
channelling her inner Baby Spice
to portray Ciboletta or the entire
cast is laughing at one very tall
Duke squeezed into one very small
gondola, this operetta is not only
entertaining for the audience.
"There isn't a moment where
people aren't laughing," Mojibian
said.
With its unapologetic joy
and pure fun, A Night in Venice
promises to be a romp for both
seasoned opera aficionados and
newcomers to the genre. '21
Tickets are available online.
BOOKS //
Illusion for Pencils
of Promise
THE
SHOCKING
TRUTH!
HOW
PHOTO
SHOPPED
IS THIS
PICTURES
= HOTO COURTESY CARLYSOTAS
Sotas's book takes form as a magazine.
Jamie Dee
Contributor
Carly Sotas, a fourth-year
environmental student graduating
this year, has published her first
book, Illusion, with all proceeds
going to Pencils of Promise, an
organization dedicated to ensuring
that children have opportunities to
learn.
Illusion is a collection of
anecdotes from Sotas' life which
she ties to greater life lessons.
"I think the scariest part was
just making that first move, like
putting yourself out there to be
criticized," said Sotas when asked
what her biggest challenge was in
publishing her book.
Through the process of writing
Illusion, Sotas came into contact
with many people, getting the
chance to listen to their stories.
The other inspiration behind
the book is the organization,
Pencils of Promise. Sotas read
Adam Braun's (founder of Pencils
of Promise) book about the
organization, his mission and his
experiences. Through this, she
found the courage and confidence
to share her work.
"If my writing could inspire just
one person like his book did for me,
then I had to share it," she said.
Pencils of Promise has been
around since 2009 and is a global
organization that establishes
schools, creates educational
programs and forms partnerships
with communities to provide
education for youths in developing
countries.
Other than writing her book,
Sotas is also involved in a variety
of extra-curricular activities. She
is a peer support counselor for
the Kaleidoscope — UBC's mental
health support group —she has
been a writer at The Ubyssey
and is a co- director for the city
piano program. She also recently
founded a Pencils of Promise club
at UBC as a space for student
leaders to come together and
collaborate to host events and
fundraisers in support of the
global organization.
Currently, Pencils of Promise
at UBC is comprised of a small
executive team, but they are
planning to soon host their
fundraisers such as quick
connections, very much like
speed-dating with a theme each
month that focuses on skill
development with proceeds going
to the organization. They also
plan to host transition nights for
high school students wanting to
attend UBC after graduating. 'M
As for Illusion, it is currently
being sold in local bookstores in
Manitoba, Amazon and the UBC
Bookstore. // OPINIONS
EDITOR JACK HAUEN
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY2,2016
ADVICE //
Ask Natalie: My roommate likes avocados way too much
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice columnist
"Dear Natalie
My roommate really, really, really
loves avocados. She buys them in
bulk. Like Costco bulk. She eats
a lot to be sure, but she doesn't
eat enough for the amount she
buys. We always have to throw
out at least three avocados a week
because she can't finish all of them.
Is it my place to say anything? I
just feel like it's a waste of money."
On one hand, it's her money, her food
and her choices and you have limited
say in that.
But on the other hand, avocados
are expensive! At least a dollar each.
If she's throwing out that many
avocados a week, that means she's
throwing out at least 12 bucks a
month. That's ridiculous. I mean,
you could buy 12 avocados for that
kind of cash! Why is she eating so
many? That can't be healthy. Is it? I
don't know. I'm not in LFS.
Whatever, people are crazy.
Offer to buy some avocados off
her if you are also buying avocados
separately. Maybe her avocado
dealer only sells by the dozen. Use
those beautiful avocados for what
they're good for — eating delicious,
delicious meals.
"Dear Natalie,
When canyoufinally unfriend
someone on Facebook?"
Whenever you want. That's the
power of the unfriend button — it
doesn't have to be a mutual decision.
If you don't want to see someone's
posts about their crappy ex or over-
political nonsense, you have the
=HOTO JACK HAUEN/THE UBYSSEY
option not to. Unfollow or unfriend,
totally up to you.
If you're worried about hurting
their feelings, don't be. If they're a
close friend, then you'll be talking
about it sometime anyway. I'm sure
if a conversation needs to happen,
it will happen — outside of the
internet.
If they are not a close friend, then
it's a non-issue. The only reason they
would notice that you unfriended
them would be if they looked you
up on Facebook. That would mean
they can never bring it up because
that would mean admitting that they
were the unwanted one.
Facebook's made for creeping and
I'd say half of my friends I have on
Facebook aren't people who I stay in
regular contact with — or, now that
I'm thinking about it, any contact at
all. If I unfriended them I think no
one would notice until I was brought
up in a conversation years in the
future and someone goes, "I wonder
what Natalie's doing?"
It doesn't matter what that
answer is because that answer is
always, "Oh wow, I forgot how much
she likes cats."
If she's throwing
out that many
avocados a week,
that means she's
throwing out at
least 12 bucks a
month... you could
buy 12 avocados for
that kind of cash!
"Dear Natalie,
I was rejected to be an RA and I'm
really confused. I thought I had
really good references and I wrote
my application well. I'm really
upset about this."
I have never been an RA or involved
with the RA hiring process, but
I know a lot of people who have
applied and done variously well in
the process.
Don't take it personally. They
say they are "looking for something
special," but just because you didn't
make it doesn't mean you don't have
whatever it is. It just means there
happened to be a lot of people who
also had that whatever.
Maybe they were looking to
balance a few things. Maybe they
needed more upper year RAs or
more RAs in Science. I honestly have
no idea what the process is like, but
I know a lot of amazing people who
would have made amazing RAs who
didn't get it, so I'm not completely
sold on the process. Don't take
it personally, because it wasn't
personal.
"Dear Natalie,
What are the 10 things you should
do before you graduate?"
My personal list:
1. Pick your major
2. Hate your major
3. Come visit The Ubyssey's snazzy
new office (2208 in the Nest)
4. Go to all the lovely bars on
campus as least once - even if you
don't drink
5. Get lost in the Buchanans at least
once
6. Wonder how a university like
UBC still seems to have a Board
of Governors that acts like a high
school clique
7. Explore bus routes other than
the 99
8. Run into that one person you hate
on campus at least once a week
9. Buy candy in bulk at least once.
Like stupid bulk. Like, "I never have
to buy Smarties again in my life"
stupid bulk.
10. Graduate 1
Need advice? Contact Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@ubyssey.
ca and have your questions answered
in an upcoming issue.
= ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Remember who the courtesy seats are for
SUSAN KNUDSEN
TransLink has courtesy seats at
the front of the bus for people
with disabilities and seniors. I
have a physical disability, am a
senior and have a handicapped
bus pass.
I most often cannot get a seat
as able-bodied adults are sitting
in them. I'm expected to wait
until I'm noticed (a long wait),
then I have to participate in an
interrogation — "Do you want
this seat?" — and I have to thank
the person (no comment). This is
inappropriate.
I have one thing to say: STOP.
The courtesy seats are for the
disabled and seniors — sitting in
a courtesy seat is important for
their safety. 'M
Operetta in Three Acts by JOHANN STRAUSS II (1825-1899;
Sung in German with English Surtitles
FEBRUARY4, 5,6//7:30PM | FEBRUARY7//2:00 PM | CHAN CENTRE FORTHE PERFORMING ARTS
JONATHAN GIRARD   Conductor     NANCY HERMISTON  Director
with the UBCSYMPHONYORCHESTRA
TICKETS: 604.822.6725 // ubcoperatickets.com     UBCTHEATRE&FILM // SPORTS+REC
EDITOR KOBY MICHAELS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY2,2016  HI
ubc winter classic
WORDSBILLSITU   PHOTOS PHILIPPE ROBERGE, JEREMY JOHNSON-SILVERS AND BEN GEISBERG
After going 2-8 in the
last 10 games, the UBC
men's hockey team were
desperate to impress
a crowd of 3,575 hopeful fans
at the Winter Classic, only to
finish with a disappointing 4-1
loss.
"The guys were fired up.
When you get to play in front
in this kind of crowd, you want
to put on a show and it makes
it just doubly hard when we
lose," said Adam Shell, the
Thunderbirds' head coach.
UBC showed some strong
offensive play during the first
period. The crowd almost had
their first moment to cheer early
in the game when forwards
Manraj Hayer and Kyle Becker
managed a 2-on-l opportunity,
albeit unsuccessfully.
While 6:57 into the game,
UBC defenceman Devan Fafard
took a boarding penalty. On the
ensuing Lethbridge power play,
the arena again filled with noise
when forward Joe Antilla got a
breakaway and nearly netted a
short-handed goal. But as the
puck made its way back to the
attacking zone, Pronghorn Ryon
Moser managed to net the first
goal of the game.
Down 1-0 after the first
period, the T-Birds again
showed strong offensive play
in the second, outshooting the
Pronghorns 10-8, but still did
not manage to get onto the
scoreboard.
"I think we generated
chances, but you measure
yourself in goals and we only
scored one, so in that sense it's
not enough," said Shell.
A little over two minutes
into the period, Jay Merkley
buried a goal in front of the net
to increase Lethbridge's lead
to 2-0. Another goal came only
four minutes later from Tim
Campbell to make the score 3-0
in favour of the Pronghorns.
Midway into the second, UBC
again got into penalty trouble
as defenceman Dillon Wagner
took a double minor for high-
sticking, but solid defence by the
T-Birds kept the Pronghorns in
check and prevented them from
scoring.
UBC then sought to
capitalize on a power play near
the end of the second, but strong
goaltending by Damien Ketlo
helped the Pronghorns secure
the 3-0 lead.
"[Lethbridge] beat us three
times, they're real tough, they're
opportunistic. They had five [or]
seven scoring chances all night
... and they buried it," said Shell.
With UBC now desperate
to gain ground, forward Scott
MacDonald finally brought the
team onto the scoreboard early
in the third when he fired a shot
past two defenders in front of
the Lethbridge net.
The T-Birds' next closest
scoring chance came three
minutes later when David
Robinson and Riley Guenther
got another 2-on-l opportunity,
but Guenther's shot went wide.
"We've still not been able
to bang enough in, but we
generated stuff, so that's real
good. I'm really proud of that,"
said Shell.
Hoping to compensate for the
two-goal deficit with less than
two minutes remaining in the
game, UBC pulled goalkeeper
Matt Hewitt from the net for an
extra attacker. However, there
was no joy for the T-Bird fans in
the arena as Moser managed to
find the empty net and secure
the 4-1 win for Lethbridge.
UBC now holds a record of
9-11-3 and place sixth in Canada
West. 'tJ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2016   |    SPORTS+REC    |   11
RECREATION//
Faculty Cup was
crazier than ever
Malcom Wilkins
Contributor
This past weekend, UBC's annual
Faculty Cup concluded with Forestry
beating out the 13 other faculties to
take the top spot. Nevertheless, the
combined efforts of all the faculties
made for a riveting tournament.
According to organizers, the
cup is meant to create a sense of
togetherness, UBC and faculty spirit
and fun.
The Faculty Cup, a joint AMS
and UBC Recreation venture,
was bigger than ever this year. It
also included an expanded fair
for those who were interested or
able to compete. The fair aimed to
promote faculty and UBC pride, as
well as health and wellness.
This year, the fair included
mechanical bull rides, rock climbing,
performances, club booths,
inflatables, yoga and Zumba classes
and wellness workshops.
What makes the Faculty Cup so
much fun are the unique spins they
put on all of their games.
MONSTER PONG
A unique twist on the all-too-
familiar party game, Monster Pong
retains the same rules and objective.
But instead of a ping-pong ball, one
gets a deflated soccer ball. Also, the
cups happen to be large garbage
bins placed in a similar pattern to
beer pong. Of course, it is easy to
be fooled into thinking this game
may be easier when, in actuality,
this is hardly the case. Regardless,
the unique twist does nothing to
diminish the fun.
BUBBLE SOCCER
Bubble soccer, also known as zorb
football, sees an equal number of
players on each team attempt to
score goals while being encased
in large inflatable zorbs. A zorb
is a hollow plastic "bubble"
suit, which players wear as they
attempt to not only score, but
also bump into each other. An
extremely fun and popular sport
at events such as stag parties,
birthday parties, bachelor parties
and large picnics, the Faculty Cup
was no exception.
GIANT INFLATABLE MAZE
Ever been in a maze? Well, if
the answer is no, then another
question can be asked. Have
you have ever been in a bouncy
castle? Irrespective of whether
the answer is yes or no, one can
surely imagine finding their way
through an intricate bouncy maze.
Tricky to find one's way in and out
and perhaps even trickier to do so
while standing, the giant inflatable
maze proved to be an instant hit. 'M
ULOL//
UBC eSports gears up to defend
League of Legends championship
=HOTOTENDAYI MOYO/THE UBYSSEY
UBC swept crosstown rivals SFU on Saturday in the uLoL Campus Series.
Sophie Sutcliffe
Senior Staff Writer
It would be an understatement
to say that the UBC eSports
Association had an amazing year
in 2015. In addition to winning
the AfreecaTV International
Collegiate Championship in
Gangnam, South Korea, the team
also won the North American
Collegiate Championship
tournament for League of
Legends, a title that awarded
$30,000 to each winning player
for a total of $180,000.
Turn Your Passion
Into a Profession
Pursue the undergraduate subjects you are passionate
about and become career-ready with the UBC Bachelor
+Master of Management Dual Degree.
Get the best of both worlds with two degrees in 2.5 years*,
and open up your career options. Learn applicable business
fundamentals that will help you in any sector. Gain practical
experience with consulting projects, business simulations,
& more, to land your dream job.
tor students entering Third Year in September 2016.
Applications due February 28,2016.
faster of Management.
Program length will also vary depending on opportunities such as exchange & co-op.
Apply at FollowYourPassion.ca
UBC > SAUDER
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
UBC eSports is now looking to
build on last year's success in their
new season, starting with their
viewing party for their match against
SFU in the 2016 League of Legends
Campus series this Saturday. The
other arena that eSports wants to
improve in, however, is their role as a
team at UBC and the general public's
perception of them as "just gamers."
"It becomes like a job," said
Ramsey Devaraj, a first-year
commerce student who has been
playing with UBC eSports since
the beginning of the year. "If you
compare it to physical sports, some
people [think that you're] just sitting
in front of a computer and playing.
They don't understand the amount
of hours you have to put in to be this
good at the game."
"Usually, the team trains every
week, hours and hours into screen
practices... going over strategies,
team compositions and how to work
as a team. [People think] you sit in
front of a computer and it's not [just
that], we put in easily 20 hours a
week."
Other players emphasized
that given the team's success, the
university should give them greater
support and a more legitimate role
at UBC.
"I feel like eSports is a growing
thing, so it would help if UBC
accepted us," said Sean Wang, a
second-year engineering student
who was on last year's winning
team. "We play right now from our
own homes. The UBC internet is
really stable, so [having a place to
practice on campus] is what we
really need to play together right
now."
"There's already some
universities that are recognizing
eSports and they're even giving
eSports scholarships," said Jason
Dong, a third-year statistics student
and player on last year's team.
"eSports is a developing scene, it
would be really cool to see if UBC
could support it." 'M 12    I    GAMES AND COMICS    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2016
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CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
1- San Antonio landmark:
6-Wallops;
11-1860s insignia:
14- One in second, say:
15-Birdlike;
16- Dawn deity:
17-Patriot Allen;
18-Subsequently;
19- Shipping magnate
Onassis;
20- Light on one's feet;
COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
JAN 26 ANSWERS
22-Alleviated;
50-Gloss;
DOWN
21-Actress Lollobrigida;
49-Sharon's land:
24- Severe;
53- Fashionable;
1-Ginger       ;
23- Language letters;
50- Scottish landowner;
28-She'saDahl;
54- Foil maker;
2- Parking place;
24-Sketches;
51-Stomach woe;
29-Putrid;
55-Toil;
3-Shadeof blond;
25- Logrolling contest;
52- Part of an act;
30-Brittle;
57- Frozen water;
4-Give        break!;
26- In anyway;
53-"PeerGynt"
32-Jai        ;
58-Churns up;
5- Elaborately adorned;
27-Shortdagger;
playwright;
33- For all to hear;
60-On       -to-know
6- Fundamental;
28-Assist;
55-Fibbed;
35-Coop group;
basis;
7- Heinous;
30-        Rica;
56-Too;
39-Commendably;
65-Stimpy's pal;
8-Queue;
31- Feltsorry about;
59-UKhonor:
40-Sugar suffix;
66- Corpulent;
9-Tic-       -toe;
34- Like Hawaiian shirts;
61-Not for a Scot;
41-Med school subj.;
67-          beaver;
10-Scoffs;
36- Foe;
62-Silly Putty holder:
42-Boot bottom;
68- Dr. of rap;
11-Quit;
37- Pertaining to birth;
63- Hosp. readout;
43- Perform better than;
69-Ate;
12- Philosopher
38-Stagnant;
64- Boring;
45-        carotene;
70- Having long gams;
Kierkegaard;
43-        the fields we go...;
46- Bara of thesilents;
13- Line in a play directed
44-Cry of disbelief;
48-Wintry;
to the audience;
47- Learn about;
life-on-campus.wikia.com
COMIC JULIAN YU/THE UBYSSEY
(
X dortf-jh'rnk I can do fc.
\\ looks complicate)-" and slipper/ j
"ip^ Come on. You'll be fine.
Whoj- do I even do?
1 really wish u)£
Came for toe. lesson
Oh, never mind-look,
^/oo like bocce, correct
Wdl lkre v|ou go! Curlino)
IS jus| bocce mee-ta
^huf^lelooara... inee+5
I15W housekeeping-
Hmm. Canlsoty I'm cxlr^e
%n of housekeeping. Have
you guvs seen my room?
//flh>(eoh.Well wecon
f [ probably slop W yat\.
JusHHrou) fte s+ones
ta)ice as Viard...
COMIC PATRICK MURRY AND MIKE PAROLINI/THE UBYSSEY

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