UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 6, 2012

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128871.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128871.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128871-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128871-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128871-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128871-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128871-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128871-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128871-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128871.ris

Full Text

Array STUFFED SINCE 1918
SEPTEMBER 6,2012 | VOLUMEXCIV| ISSUE II
Disoriented?
*r-' ^i:%.
Recapping the Imagine Day craziness
1< ' III
tltt^^
8^5^23^
v»S&S&>'*°L
*a£S&S""
.
, :QUH9 \
PlO-11
This man is DJing
on campus this
Friday
Learning
disruption
Renovations of 1KB
begin this fall    P3
T-Bird Liquor Woes
UBC Athletics seeks
liquor licence for arena
P3 »Page 2
What's on
HIS WEEK, MAY WE SUC
Open Air Dance Party: 9 p.m. @ theSUB Partyroom
Looking for the best venue to debut all the new moves you learned this
summer? Make sure to check out the Open Air Dance Party! So what if
you have class Friday morning? It's only the first week of school, right?
Featuring music by student DJs. Tickets $10 at the door or free with First-
week wristband.
CONCERT»
Welcome Back BBQ: 2 p.m. @
Maclnnes Field
The Alma Mater Society (your
student government) presents
the Welcome Back BBQ, the last
hurrah before school gets tough.
Plus, when else are you going to
be able to jam out on Maclnnes
Field this term? Tickets$15+.
DANCED
JOURNALISM »
The Ubyssey Production Day:
11 a.m.-8 p.m. @ SUB Room 24
Want to get the behind-the-
scenes scoop on next week's
issue? Come volunteerforyour
twice-weekly student newspaper. Free dinneris provided!
IPI
|jt>
■tap9;:,.-
M
P*'»     II <.  ^B £ -^H
[]      1            """
| iH           .--L-J^ffi       ' 1
-ffl
Shine Day
Shinerama is a fundraising competition with proceeds going to
Cystic Fibrosis Canada. UBC's
goal is $35,000, so for those who
have time between 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., help out for a great cause.
Students will hit the streets to
wash cars, sing songs and promote general merriment.
From Brock Hall with Love: 11
a.m.-5 p.m. @ AMS Art Gallery
As part of an effort to increase
student awareness of the art
gallery in the SUB, the AMS
is showcasing a pieces from
the permanent collection. The
show will run throughout the
weekin theSUB.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
Video content
Make sure to check out our
refreshed Ubyssey Weekly Show,
airing now at ubyssey.ca/video
'JjTHE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBERS,2012 | VOLUMEXCIV| ISSUEI
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coordinating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
minted itor@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
iews@ubysseyca
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
Tiwong@u byssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJPentland
sports@ubysseyca
Senior LifestyleWriter
ZafiraRajan
zrajan@u byssey.ca
Features Editor
Natalya Kautz
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
3ryce Warnes, Catherine
Gyan,David Elopjon
Chiang, Josh Curran, Scott
Mac Donald, Peter Wojnar,
Tanner Bokor, Dominic Lai.
Mark-Andre Gessaroli,RJ
Reid, Colin Chia, Anthony
Doon,Vinicius Cid,Veroniks
3ondarenko, Yara De Jong,
=van Brow, Lu Zhang
Art Director
Kai Jacobson
a rt@u byssey.ca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joe l@u byssey.ca
Layout Artist
Colly n Chan
cchan@u byssey.ca
Videographer
SooMinPark
spark@ubyssey.ca
Webmaster
Riley Tomasek
webrnaster@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official -"'
dent newspape
versity of British Columbia,
t Is published every Monday
andThursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are ar
autonomous, democratically
'un student organization, anc
all students are encouraged tc
aartlcipate.
Editorials are chosen ar
written by the Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opln-
on of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe
Jbyssey Publications Sociely
or the University of British Co-
umbla. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is
the property ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stones,
opinions, photographs andait-
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
auslness@u byssey.ca
Web Ad Sales
Ben Chen
3chen@ubyssey.es
Print Ad Sales
SHat Hasan
shasan@ubyssey.ca
Accounts
Tom Tang
ttang@ubyssey.es
work contained herein cannot
oe reproduced without the
expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey Is a founding
member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres
to CUP's guiding principles.
' to the editor must
300 words. Please
include your phone number,
student number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty
with all submissions. ID wll
oe checked when submissions are dropped off at the
edi tonal office ofThe Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be
done by phone. The Ubyssey
•eseives the right to edit sub-
Editorial Office: SUB 24
604.822.2301
Business Office: SUB 23
604.822.6681
Student Union Building
6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
Online: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: @ubyssey
missions for length and clarity. All letters must be recelvec
ay 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will bs
aubllshed in the following Issue unless there Is an urgent
time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the
Jbyssey staff.
Itls agreed by all persons
olaci ng di splay orclassified advertising thatiftheUbyssey Pub-
icatlons Society falls topubllsh
an advertise men tor if an error
n the ad occurs the liability of
theUPS will not be greater tnar
the price paid for the ad. The
J PS shall notbe responsl ble for
slight changes or typographi-
calerrors that do not lessen the
value or the Impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
Kaveh Sarhangpour combines artistic expression and entrepreneurship to helm his own production company.
Art meets business
Jonny Wakefield
Coordinating Editor
Kaveh Sarhangpour is one of
those creative types.
Perhaps you've seen Sarhangpour and his friends on
the YouTube. They're the guys
behind last year's "Shit UBC
Says" (80,000+ views) and the
New SUB skit that premiered
at the Imagine Day pep rally,
as well as a half dozen other
UBC-focused clips. Their production company, Hollis Mason
Creative, isn't just some guy
and his friends making funny
videos in their spare time. It's a
business they want to grow, and
they're using the UBC campus
as a proving ground.
"It's really fun working in
the UBC community because
you have a lot more creative liberty," said Sarhangpour. "You
can make sketches, you can
make skits, a lot of student organizations need help because
most people don't have either
the equipment or the know-
how to make these videos."
He realized that there was a
market for the kind of creative
work he was interested in
doing last November, after he'd
finished an internship at a real
estate development company.
In talking with the firm's
marketing director, it dawned
on Sarhangpour that businesses
pay thousands of dollars for old
media marketing materials like
flyers and pamphlets. The gears
in his head started turning.
"Small- and medium-sized
businesses either don't understand the value of visual media
or can't afford the rates that
professionals give them," he
said. "So I brought together
two friends I knew from high
school, Eric Lee and Kevin
Lee, and I said, 'Hey, I have the
creative direction, I could write
scripts, I could storyboard,
you guys have the technical
aspects of it. Why don't we get
out in the community and help
the small- and medium-sized
businesses out?'"
So far, they're sticking to
campus groups, but the political science major hopes to
expand beyond campus soon.
As for the coming year,
Sarhangpour just hopes to keep
turning out more content. Hollis Mason Creative is planning
to produce four more videos
for the Arts Undergraduate
Society as a follow-up to their
Drake-inspired Arts frosh week
video. Sarhangpour says he's
always looking for new ideas;
hopefully UBC will continue to
inspire this creative entrepreneur, tl
KAVEH
SARHANGPOUR
Hometown: Vancouver
On being a student
& entrepreneur: N o
PLAYHARD
^ £^
Volunteer for
The Ubyssey,
enjoy perks
like these. tNewsl
KEEPING QUIET »
DITORS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
Noise from student residences would be subject to the proposed bylaw if the noise can be heard by UNA residents.
UNA noise bylaw could affect students
JOSH CURRANffHE UBYSSEY
Arno Rosenfeld
Contributor
If you live adjacent to private housing on campus, you could soon be
fined $200 for talking too loudly at
night.
The UBC Board of Governors
(BoG) is considering a bylaw submitted by the University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA)
to regulate noise levels on UNA
neighbourhoods around campus.
But the bylaw wouldn't only regulate noise made on the UNA sites,
but rather all noise heard on UNA
sites.
"If the noise is outside the [UNA]
neighbourhoods, but it is still
affecting the lives of residents, then
the bylaws will... apply," explained
UNA chair Prod Laquian.
Totem Park, Thunderbird,
Acadia Park and Gage residences
are all adjacent to UNA neighbour-
NEWS BRIEFS
B.C. Libs shuffle both UBC-relat-
ed cabinet posts
New ministers have been appointed
to two positions that affect UBC
afterthe B.C. Liberals announced
a cabinet shuffle today. Bill Bennett
wasappointed minister of community, sport, and cultural development,
taking Ida Chong's position. As
UBC currently has no local government, land useforthe campus
ultimately falls under the responsibility of this ministry. This marks the
fifth leadership change in 30 months
overthe UBC land portfolio. Bennett
was previously in charge of the UBC
land portfolio before being fired
from cabinet in 2010.
Minister of Advanced Education
Naomi Yamamoto was dropped to
a junior position (minister of state
for small business) and John Yap,
previously the minister responsible
for multiculturalism, will now preside
over both of these portfolios as the
minister of advanced education, innovation and technology and minister responsible for multiculturalism.
UBC student arrested on Stanley
Cup riot charges
UBC psychology student Dakota
Schlag, wanted on charges of
participating in a riot and mischief
related to the Vancouver Stanley Cup
riot, was arrested at the U.S. border.
Schlag returned to the States
after he was charged in May and
the RCMP issued a Canada-wide
warrant for his arrest. Border officers
identified him when he tried to return
to Canada and turned him over to
the RCMP.«
hoods and would be subject to the
bylaw if it is passed. The bylaw
would ban noise above 55 decibels
during the day and above 45 decibels after 10 p.m.; violators could be
fined $200 for each offence.
An average conversation is 50
decibels, and ambient sound in a
city is usually around 40 decibels.
Even in the event that the noise
does not exceed the decibel limits,
any voices or television noise
that can be heard outside of one's
apartment or property would also
be banned.
If the Board of Governors approves the bylaw, it is unclear who
will be in charge of enforcement.
Laquian said the RCMP and Campus Security are both possibilities.
The bylaw, Laquian said, is
targeted at noisy construction and
events at Thunderbird Stadium, in
addition to individuals. It includes
higher decibel limits for construc-
CONCERTS»
Thunderbird Arena
looks for new
liquor licence
Veronika Bondarenko
StaffWriter
Alcohol may soon be served
at Thunderbird Arena
during concerts.
UBC Athletics is planning to
apply for a change to its liquor licence. If approved, the new licence
will allow the athletic organization to host and serve alcohol at
the Thunderbird Arena at a total of
ten concerts each year.
"Currently, the licence does not
permit liquor service at a musical
event," said associate director of
facilities and business development for Thunderbird Arena, Kavi
Toor. "We would like to apply for
a change in terms to allow liquor
service at events."
The athletics department began
its scuffle with the Liquor Control
and Licensing Board back in
2009, when they were denied the
ability to serve liquor at concerts
after the arena was found to
have over-served patrons during
musical events.
A number of concerts, such
electronic DJ Bassnectar and
the well-known children's music
group The Wiggles, are already
scheduled to perform at the
Thunderbird Arena in the upcoming months. The new liquor licence
would allow alcohol to be served at
some of the events that are geared
towards university students.
tion and commercial businesses,
and also imposes heftier fines
of upwards of $1,000 for construction companies that become
repeat offenders.
Renee Tang, a Thunderbird
resident who lives adjacent to the
UNA's Hawthorn Place neighbourhood, said she supports the bylaw,
but for reasons other than what
the UNA has in mind. "I don't hear
students pass by and make noise,"
Tang said. "I hear a lot of noise
from the neighbours and kids running around and crying."
Metro Vancouver's noise bylaw
has decibel limits identical to those
in the proposed UNA bylaw for
residential areas around the city.
That a neighbourhood association is in the position of imposing fines on UBC students is an
outcome of Bill 20, which divorced
the UBC campus from Metro Vancouver. Passed in 2010, Bill 20 was
intended to be followed by a second
step incorporating UBC into a
different form of government. But
that still hasn't happened, and the
BoG maintains sole control over
governance on university land.
The UNA, which represents 8,000
non-student campus residents, has
taken on roles usually reserved for
a municipal government. This is
despite the fact that the UNA lacks
any actual legal power, which is
why they sent the bylaw to the BoG
for approval.
Laquian said the UNA understands that living on a university
campus is inherently noisier than
elsewhere and that the bylaw won't
necessarily be strictly enforced.
"When we were discussing
this bylaw, we told many of the
residents that, look, we moved into
the campus knowing that students
would be here.... We have to learn
to live with that," he said. Xi
KAIJACOBSONffHE UBYSSEY
Thunderbird Arena, which has had issues with over-service and the effects of smug-
gled-in liquor at dry events, wants to serve booze at 10 concerts each year.
instead would support individual
concerts that they felt were in the
community's best interest.
"The view of the UNA Board
is that it has no objection to the
events provided they are properly managed and that the RCMP
gives assurances that security is
provided to prevent problems,"
said University Neighbourhoods
Association chair Prod Laquian.
He has high hopes that any problems will be dealt with quickly
and efficiently.
"UBC Athletics has been good
at managing the affairs. In case
some problems do arise, the
RCMP, UBC Security and the
UNA — we hope to have a noise
bylaw approved this month — have
the proper rules and regulations
that can be enforced to deal with
these."
—With files from Laura Rodgers Xi
Currently, UBC Athletics is still
seeking approval from stakeholders. Consultations are being
undertaken with the RCMP, Campus Security, Campus Planning,
the University Neighbourhoods
Association (UNA), the University
Endowment Lands Community
Advisory Council and the Alma
Mater Society (AMS).
"We haven't had too many nay-
sayers so far," said Toor. "I think,
for the most part, folks like the
idea of having events in the arena."
AMS President Matt Parson is
in favour. "I fully support UBC
Athletics' application to expand on
their ability to host more concerts
with a liquor licence throughout
the year," said Parson.
The UNA Board of Directors
decided at a recent meeting they
would not be lending their broad
support to Athletics' proposal, but
URSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,2012 | 3
LIBRARIES »
Construction
moves inside 1KB
study areas
<AIJACOBSONTHE UBYSSEY
A new service desk is being built at 1KB.
Nic Roggeveen
Contributor
There will soon be construction
in the middle of campus's busiest
library.
Anew "multi-service desk" is
being constructed on the third
floor (in the Qualicum Room) of
the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre (1KB), in the middle of
an area previously reserved for
study tables.
Construction is slated to begin
on September 17 and will occur
during the day while the library is
open. "There will be some noise,
but we're going to work with... the
construction crews to minimize
that," said Gordon Yusko, assistant
director of 1KB.
The floor space available for
study tables will be reduced, but
Yusko stressed that the new desk
will only take over a "limited footprint" of the area.
Fifth-year philosophy student
Leif Buschmann questioned why
the construction is slated to happen during some of the library's
busiest periods. "I don't think
building it during the middle of
the term is the best idea. They
probably should have done that
while there were fewer people in
the summer," said Buschmann.
"Why would you build a service
desk beside studying tables?"
he continued. "It seems sort of
irrational."
The desk will be designed to
be a central resource for students
seeking out any of the library's
many amenities. "The learning
commons staff, the circulation
staff, the reference staff, [we'll]
bring them all together at one
point so that students don't have
to go floor to floor to access these
services," said Yusko.
A similar centralized desk was
completed at Koerner Library in
July, and there are plans to build
one in Woodward Library as well.
Fourth-year kinesiology student
Natasha Fung thought that a centralized resource desk in 1KB will
be beneficial once it's built. "It'll
be useful having a single place to
go to to get help.... The library is an
intimidating place," said Fung.
Construction is scheduled to
continue until December, and the
new desk will open in January.
Yusko said it is likely that the construction would continue into the
December exam period.
Small rooms to be used for one-
on-one coaching and tutorials will
also be inserted into the space.
They are being constructed off-site
and will be placed in the library
in December.
Yusko said that the disruption of the space will be "a minor
inconvenience,... but the ultimate
goal is to improve support for
students."
—With files from Laura Rodgers Xi NEWS    I   THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012
TRANSIT »
Bus parking going underground
Below-grade bus parking will be located under the new Maclnnes Field
Emma Windsor-Liscombe
Contributor
Underground bus parking
is planned for the centre
of campus.
The parking facility, which is
to be dug out underneath where
the Aquatic Centre currently
sits, will house extra bus parking underground. Construction
will start in 2015 and is expected to be finished by 2016.
The timeline for the new
parking lot will be heavily
informed by the construction of
the new Aquatic Centre and the
eventual demolition of the current one, accordingto Joe Stott,
director of campus planning.
"We're building a new Aquatic
Centre; that has to be up and
running, so that we can close
the existing Aquatic Centre
and make way for the new bus
facility," explained Stott.
The new Aquatic Centre will
be built on top of the current
Maclnnes Field, and when it is
fully built in 2016, a new field
will be put in to replace the old
Aquatic Centre. The loop where
riders board busses will be
moved slightly from its current
location, taking the place of the
parking lot that currently sits
next to War Memorial Gym.
John Metras, UBC's managing director of infrastructure
and development, said that this
KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
Although UBC scrapped the plan for an underground bus loop, the buses will be parked under (the new) Maclnnes Field.
new arrangement was "the optimum solution from a customer
service, transit operations and
public preference perspective,"
in UBC's view.
The current bus loop, built
in 2002, was always considered
temporary. After the loop's
move closer to War Memorial Gym, its placement will
be permanent.
UBC spent considerable
time and effort between 2005
and 2009 trying to plan a fully
underground bus loop, where
riders would board busses
underground. It was going to be
built under University Boulevard and East Mall, with part
of it under the new Student
Union Building (SUB). Some
work started on the project, but
had to be halted before it was
finished. "The combination of
the loss of TransLink funding
and the need to move forward
with the new SUB forced UBC
to abandon the bus terminal project at that location,"
explained Metras.
"TransLink was ultimately
able to commit funding to this
less expensive approach, which
involves only an underground
bus layover facility and not a
fully underground terminal,"
said Metras. The underground
parking lot is expected to cost
$21 million.
"TransLink has committed to
contribute $8.84 million or 50
per cent of the total final cost,
whichever is less. UBC plans
to provide the balance of the
funding from land development
proceeds as a community amenity expense," Metras added.
The plans for the location of
the new bus loop and underground bus parking, as well
as the new Aquatic Centre,
were decided upon by the Gage
South working group, whose
discussions drew to a close this
summer.
Stott acknowledged that venting exhaust from busses driving
underground is still a concern
which UBC and TransLink need
to address. "[Exhaust] will be
addressed as part of the design
process. It has been identified as a key issue," said Stott.
"There are lots of examples of
[buildings] on campus where we
have rooftop vents,... but what's
needed for diesel exhaust has to
be worked out in detail." XI
BY THE NUMBERS
2015
construction begins
9^^ million
pricetag
$8*8i| million
contribution from
TransLink
VISIT SHAW O
LOCATION AT
UBC FROM
SEPTEMBER
4TH - 14TH!
Come see us outside of the
Student Union Building for
the BEST deals on Internet
and TV!
AN\W
RHP*'""Jr
* 1B»»*H««
I?  c
/
wmfioiooi** Sports + Rec
)R C.J. PENTLAND
FOOTBALL»
Shrum Bowl continues to sit in storage
Two years since the last game, the future of the Shrum Bowl remains in limbo
C.J. Pentland
Sports + Rec Editor
UBC versus SFU. The rivalry
has existed for decades, with
each school constantly grappling for bragging rights. It is a
battle that takes place all over the
Lower Mainland, with students
of each campus going to great
lengths to prove that their school
reigns supreme.
But for the second straight
year, this contest can't be settled
on the football field. The Shrum
Bowl between UBC and Simon
Fraser's football teams is the
biggest athletic event on campus, and it has been cancelled
once again due to to scheduling
conflicts. The future of the match
remains uncertain.
Starting in 1967, the Shrum
Bowl pitted the cross-town
rivals in an annual football game
that took place at various times
throughout the season. It quickly
turned into a popular event, with
huge crowds flocking out to show
their support, the majority of
them students who saw this as
a perfect chance to show their
school spirit and put down their
rival school.
But the circumstances of each
team have since changed, especially in the past two years, and
the Shrum Bowl trophy hasn't
been presented since 2010. With
SFU deciding to move to the
NCAA for the 2011 season and
UBC staying in the CIS, they no
longer have the same weeks off
and play in leagues that abide by
different rules, making it difficult
to schedule a match.
However, this doesn't mean
that both sides have stopped trying to continue the tradition.
"We just met with SFU last
week ... to talk about the future
of the Shrum Bowl," said Theresa
Hanson, associate director of
intercollegiate and high performance sport at UBC. "Given the
change in landscape — because
now they play under a different
set of rules than we do, they
have different windows of play
than we do — so we're looking at
some possible solutions. But the
important thing is that both institutions want to play the game. It's
historic."
Things won't be forced,
though, as the best interests
of each team will remain top
priority. Especially in a sport like
football, rest is important, and
playing extra games can cause
unnecessary wear and tear.
"To play an exhibition game
during our bye-week, which is
what Simon Fraser wants to do,
is tough," said UBC football head
coach Shawn Olson. "Would I be
excited to play it right now? No,
[because] we have about nine
injuries in our secondary,... and
all of a sudden you hurt two or
three more guys in that game and
you go, 'There goes any legitimate
chance at our season.'
"So that ends up being the
issue and that's where we're at
right now with the discussions:...
when is the best time to play, not
whether we want to play."
The idea put forward by UBC
is to play the game in January,
and SFU is currently considering the notion. It is, after
all, the actual Bowl season for
American college and university football; it also makes more
sense, since SFU can't play any
games before September 1 due to
NCAA regulations.
"[SFU] has to look at NCAA
rules and seek approval if that's
something they are allowed
to do," said Hanson. "We also
have to look at our rules as well,
because we only have so many
training days in the spring."
Olson said he also sees January
as the best possibility for both
teams, but he was hesitant to
confirm that the Shrum Bowl
will once again become an
annual event.
"If we're calling it the Shrum
Bowl, let's treat it like a bowl
game, which to me means you
do it at the end of the season, if
possible. And maybe it's a scenario where you can't play it every
single year because one team's in
a championship or something like
that, so depending on what the
schedule is, maybe it's every two
years or two out of every three
years."
The game hasn't always
been an annual event, with
33 games played in 45 years.
Moving to a biannual game
wouldn't be a strange notion,
but it still wouldn't be the same
as holding it every year. Not
knowing for sure when the
game will be played eliminates
We're looking at
some possible
solutions. But
the important
thing is that both
institutions want
to play the game.
It's historic.
Theresa Hanson
Associate director of
intercollegiate and high
performance sport at UBC
the anticipation.
However, the Shrum Bowl's
lustre might be regained if one
idea works out. The original
games used to be held at the
old Empire Stadium before the
home games switched back and
forth between UBC and SFU's
home fields, but the proposal of
holding the Shrum Bowl at B.C.
Place has surfaced. This would
help draw even more fans to an
already extremely popular game
and help create hype around
the province.
But before a location is decided, there has to be a game. Right
now, the ball is in SFU's court,
since UBC has submitted a list
of possible dates. It will just be
a matter of time to see if anything comes out of the recent set
of negotiations.
It is clear that the directors at
UBC want the game to happen,
and it seems that SFU, which
currently leads the overall series
17-15-1 and has won the past three
games, wants the same. The fans
would undoubtedly welcome
the return of the game, too; the
chance to root for the defeat of a
rival school is rarely passed up.
But most of all, the teams want
it to happen. Even though the
Shrum Bowl is just an exhibition game, the stakes are still
high, and the rivalry between
the schools hasn't gotten any
less intense.
"People not in the know end
up thinking that it's just a game,"
said Olson. "But it's more than
just a game." Xi
ft if *'£-..               i
»
n
'^                             "■>         \       ^^VA    &if        ^J                          *     V ■"  * "il   <j£ .^?-tfti^!^
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
UBC and SFU haven't played a football game against each other since 2010, and there is no guarantee to when the next game will be.
date
SEPT. 10- 14
place
S.U.B.
1ST FLOOR
hours
9-8
last day
► Fine Art
Fantasy a
Wildlife <<
► Giant-Sized Posters
Music
9-5
Frames & Hangers <
► Film
Photography
► 1000s of Posters
THE
flMAGINUS
2JVI
POSTER
SALE SPORTS + REC    I    THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012
CANADA WEST
2012 season standinqs
. Calgary 1-0
. Saskatchewan 1-0
3. Manitoba 1-0
5. Regina 0-1
5. Alberta
This week:
UBC at Regina
<J
ame will
haw TV
Friday. September 7 at 6
p.m.
Next home game:
(homecoming)
UBC vs. Saskatchewan
Saturday. September 15 at
2 p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
VARSITY GAMES
THIS WEEKEND
WOMEN'S SOCCER
UBC vs. Calgary
Friday, September 7 at 5 p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
UBC vs. Lethbridge
Saturday, September 8 at 5
p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
MEN'S SOCCER
UBC vs. Calgary
Friday, September 7 at 7 p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
UBC vs. Lethbridge
Saturday, September 8 at 7
p.m.
Thunderbird Stadium
MEN'S BASKETBALL
UBC vs. Eastern
Washington University (NCAA
Division I)
Saturday, September 8 at 7
p.m.
War Memorial Gym
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL
UBC vs. York University
Friday, September 7 at 7 p.m.
War Memorial Gym
Bringing
the
Thunder
A feature that
recognizes
the stand-out
performances
of UBC
student-
athletes.
Lucas
Spagnuolo
#7, running back
JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
The first-year Arts student ran
free on Saturday, racking up
143 all-purpose yards against
Manitoba. He rushed for 79 yards
on only four carries, with one of
those runs a 55-yard pickup and
another resulting in a touchdown.
The native of Grimsby, Ontario
also picked up 62 yards from kick
returns and two on punt returns.
Brandon
Deschamps
#33, running back
Deschamps also had a strong
game carrying the ball for the
Thunderbirds, leading the team
in rushing with 97 yards on the
ground and also picking up five
yards receiving. The second-year
Arts student from Prince George,
BC averaged 7.5 yards per run,
with the longest being a 29-yard
Ben
Chow
Outside hitter
The Surrey native finished his summer in impressive fashion, tying for
fifth in doubles beach volleyball at
the FIVB Beach Volleyball Junior
World Championships in Halifax,
Nova Scotia. Chow and his partner
were the No. 1 seed heading into
the tournament and made the third
round before falling to a team from
Meet one of our people and they'll ask about you.
Not your resume. Because it's you, the person,
Re31 indiviCJUdlity.     weYe interested in. After all, it's a big, diverse world
out there. Tackling global business challenges takes
different viewpoints and fresh thinking. Listening.
Sharing. Debating. It's all part of the job. All we're
missing is you. Visit ey.com/CA/Possibilities.
See More | Opportunities
Unreal togetherness. Culture I
ANNAZORIA
URSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,2012 | 7
WELCOME
BACK
DJ beats and indie whimsy to hit
Maclnnes Field for annual back-to-
school bash
Catherine Guan
StaffWriter
A"
Morgan Page
Back BBQ.
PHOTO COURTESYMORGAN PAGE
is one of the headliners of Welcome
GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Fans will fill Maclnnes Field this Friday to celebrate
the beginning of a new school year.
mong time-honoured
UBC traditions, sacrosanct is consuming
inhuman amounts of beer
while hazily rocking along to
indie darlings at the annual
Welcome Back BBQ. AMS
Archives trace the origins of
the BBQ as far back as 1984.
Maclnnes Field has been
the event's venue since its
inaugural edition. For 29
years, those sweeping green
plains have witnessed friends
newly met and reunited, the
occasional drunken brawl,
questionable booty-shaking
and even more questionable
decision-making. For 29
years, it has been the site of
endless lines to Port-A-Johns
and of half-digested brat-
wursts that queasy stomachs
couldn't quite keep down. In
short: 29 years of good times.
"The event has gone
through many transitions,"
said Anna Hilliar, Alma Mater Society (AMS) programming and events manager.
"For the past few years, we
have featured a lot of lesser-known, talented upcoming
acts."
Thunderheist, Natalie
Portman's Shaved Head and
Sex Attack! come to mind
from the more recent lineups.
"We have definitely been
able to attract some big
names for Welcome Back
BBQ as well, names such as
Matthew Good Band, Bedouin Soundclash," said AMS
President Matt Parson.
For so long, the BBQ has
played second fiddle to Block
Party, UBC's big April bash.
But Parson hopes this will
no longer be the case. "With
September being such an
exciting time, we can maybe
bring in some larger acts and
make the Welcome Back BBQ
on par with the year-end
festivities."
To that end, among the
main attractions this year
is internationally acclaimed
DJ Morgan Page, who
comes complete with his
own Wikipedia page. The
L.A.-based spinner first
made waves with his daring
remixes back in 2005. Two
Grammy nominations later,
what sets him apart from
his EDM peers? "I'm known
for my vocals," said Page,
"and really concentrating
on quality songwriting with
substance."
"A crazy adrenaline rush"
is how the DJ recalls his first
live performance. "I didn't
even recognize the kick drum
coming out the speakers,"
he admitted. "I think I just
hid behind my equipment
and tried not to screw up."
No stranger to playing for a
university crowd, Page got
his start at WRUV, a college
radio station in his native
Vermont. While he has a
habit of making up set-lists
on the fly, his signature track
"The Longest Road" is a sure
bet for Friday's performance.
Also set to play at the BBQ
is Vancouverite Tara Reeves,
better known by her moniker
DJ She. Her sound? "It's an
eclectic mix of everything
that's got a funk and soul
feel to it, regardless of genre.
Just good vibes, basically,"
said Reeves.
Growing up in the Mari-
times, Reeves did her best to
stand out from her peers. "I
just became infatuated with
DJ culture, tried to figure out
every way possible to get my
foot in the door and be that
person that runs the party
and controls the crowd."
This will be her first time
performing live at UBC.
"[I've] been trying to remember what my frosh week was
like ... kind of hazy, to be honest," she laughed. "I'm sure
people are gonna be kind of
hyped on the first week of
school and they are probably
still in summer mentality,
and just wanna party."
Of course, this wouldn't be
a Vancouver bonanza without
local sweethearts Hey Ocean!
"We are like the university's resident band," joked
lead guitarist David Beck-
ingham, referring to the
band's many past performances at the Welcome Back
BBQ. The bubbly pop trio
has been steadily gaining a
following with their marine-flavored tunes. Staying
true to their namesake,
singles like "Big Blue Wave"
and "If I Were a Ship" are
less-than-subtle odes to our
neighbouring Pacific.
"There's a mystery and
beauty that surrounds the
ocean," Beckingham rhapsodized. "It's a water source
that connects everyone
together."
The band, which has
drawn comparisons to Fleetwood Mac and Paul Simon,
is best known for quaint
instruments and tenderly
whimsical vocals courtesy of
frontwoman Ashleigh Ball.
It's hard to decide what
Starfucker is best known for.
The dance-friendly electronic
grooves? The incessant name
changes (from Starfucker
to PYRAMID to Pyramiddd
to Starfucker again in the
space of six months)? Or the
onstage antics that involve
stage-diving, dressing in drag
and, of course, stage-diving
in drag? Whichever it is,
the Portland ensemble has
been winning over crowds
at music festivals this year.
Aside from the band's own
tracks, don't be surprised
to hear their all-male cover
of Cyndi Lauper's seminal
classic, "Girls Just Wanna
Have Fun."
Last but not least, bringing all-girl glam to the BBQ
is the sassy duo of Minxy
Jones, which consists of L.A.
songbirds Erica Dee and
Honey Larochelle. Larochelle
described their style as "a
mash-up of soul, reggae and
bass music." Excited for her
new partnership with Dee,
she said, "So far, we have
played nothing but exceptional gigs."
For their show at the BBQ,
she said, "The audience
should expect powerhouse
vocals, and crazy electro raps
over break beats, dancehall
and hip hop beats." Her
expectations? "I can tell
you that I hope it's gorgeous
weather, so we can play
outside like babies in sprinklers!"
The 2012 edition of the
Welcome Back BBQ will be
a historic one. This will be
the last year that the event
will be held on the original
Maclnnes Field. Those well-
loved acres will soon undergo
construction as the site of the
new Aquatic Centre, while
the new Maclnnes Field is
set to take the place of the old
Aquatic Centre.
"For the years of construction, I would assume [the
Welcome Back BBQ] will be
hosted in the fields across
from the fraternity village,
as that is the most likely for
logistics as well as capacity
reasons," said Parson. So
for one last time, on Friday,
September 7, students will
be unleashed into Maclnnes
Field to frolic to some solid
beats in the late-afternoon
sun. Xi 8    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,2012
ART»
FOOD»
=HOTOCOURTESYOFSWARM FESTIVAL
Paul Wong likens artist-run centres to laboratories where creative types can experiment with their craft.
Buzz-worthy festival brings together new artists
Rhys Edwards
Senior Culture Writer
It's the same old story.
Throughout the hallowed halls
of UBC, professors preach to their
students: "Be creative. Explore.
Experiment." Yet upon graduating,
these students face a city devoid
of government-supported creative
spaces to put their newfound skills
to the test.
Filling the void is Vancouver's
lively community of non-profit
artist-run centres, which allows
students and professionals to
practice their art without having
to cater to the public or corporate
institutions. This September, these
centres will come together for the
13th annual Swarm festival, an
eclectic event that showcases the
city's freshest emerging artists.
During this two-night festival,
several artist-run centres will
launch opening nights for new
shows simultaneously. Although
the event was originally conceived
(and still loosely coordinated) by
the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centres (PAARC), the
Swarm festival is entirely un-
sponsored, meaning that programmers are free to follow their
own prerogative.
Like its namesake, Swarm is
decentralized; awareness of the
festival is mainly spread through
the use of social media and word
of mouth. This year, PAARC is encouraging Swarm participants to
update Twitter with their festival
experience using the #SWARM13
hashtag. In this way, attendees
experience each event as part of a
larger cultural movement.
Alison Shields, a Vancouver artist who got her BFA at UBC and is
currently a Ph.D. candidate in art
education, said, "Swarm is a great
event to showcase what is going
on in the art scene in Vancouver
as a whole, and to bring more
recognition to some of the smaller,
lesser-known artist-run centres in
Vancouver."
As part of Swarm, Shields will
be exhibiting her paintings in the
Gam Gallery on East Hastings
Street. For Shields, and artists like
her, these artist-run venues represent a vital aspect of Vancouver's
alternative culture.
"This is a great artist community, where there is a constant
dialogue and exchange of ideas
between artists of various backgrounds.... The types of dialogue
that can occur in these spaces can
really move contemporary art
forward in interesting directions,"
Shields said.
And artist-run centres are not
dedicated to showing only visual
art. Local organizations, such as
the Western Front, 221A Gal
lery and UNIT/PITT Projects,
promote online networking, book
publications, lectures, discussions,
performances, film showings and
musical events.
Paul Wong, co-founder of
the infamous VIVO Media Arts
Centre and the current director
of On Main Gallery, said that Vancouver's artist-run centres have
been instrumental in providing
a voice for cultural practitioners
who work outside of traditional
platforms.
"Artist-run centres allow for a
lot of innovation and risk-taking,"
said Wong. "You're allowed to
succeed and you're allowed to fail.
They're like laboratories.... The
works that have come out of artist-run centres have been critical,
political, activist, experimental,
wacky, interesting, total disasters, failures and some amazing
surprises." Xi
"BEAUTIFUL P
MB&Tk -n
■l»v"--B^—*—''
A MULTI-MEDIA CONCERT EXPERIENCE
THE #1 TOURING VIDEO GAME CONCERT IN THE WORLD COMES TO VANCOUVER
NOVEMBER 06, 2012 - 7:30PM
0 R P H E U M
-SHOW STARTS AT 6:00PM GUITAR
COSTUME CONTEST
POST SHOW MEET AND GREET
CUTTING-EDGE VIDEO SCREEN VISUALS
STATE-OF-THE-ART LIGHTING AND SPECIAL FX
FOR ALL AGES - GAMERS AND NON-GAMERS ALIKE
■  "- ■
OR ^o©cra
m®g ©^ m pi
JOIN US ON FACEBOOK OR VIDEOGAMESLIVE.COM
First
person to
enter The
Ubyssey
offices
and hug
Will
McDonald
wins lOO
free
copies of
the paper.
Great for
swatting
flies!
COME BY THE UBYSSEYOFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Spice
up your
rez diet
SERVING IT RIGHT
by Tyler McRobbie
Times of major life changes are
a prime opportunity to start new
habits. Companies have known
this for quite some time, and willingly capitalize on the fact that
people are susceptible to buying
new products when their lives are
in flux. Transitioning to life as a
university student? Your business
is ripe for the picking.
As you wade through the first
few days out of your parents'
clutches, the choices you make
will come to define your life as a
UBC student. And it's a slippery
slope towards unhealthy and
expensive eating choices. So use
these first weeks — and the tasty
recipes below — to spice up your
dorm diet, stave off the dreaded
Freshman 15 and stick it to those
faceless fast food corporations.
Enjoy!
KD with a Kick
Kraft Dinner is a dorm staple
food that's filling and easy to
make. Unfortunately, it's not very
good for you. Fortunately, it's a
relatively blank canvas to which
any number of ingredients can
be added. Eventually you might
even get good enough to skip the
powdered crap altogether and
do it from scratch. Until then,
mix and match the following
ingredients with one finished
package of KD:
ground turkey
diced tofu
cooked beef
chorizo sausage
cooked bacon
sliced mushrooms
hot sauce
halved cherry tomatoes
shredded cheddar
shredded mozzarella
minced garlic
spinach or arugula
green peppers
red onion
tomato paste
chili flakes
Season to taste with a bit of salt
and pepper, and enjoy.
Quick Breakfast Smoothie
Breakfast is generally the first
meal axed by stressed-out
students, only to be replaced with
expensive and inadequate coffee.
But with a few simple ingredients,
you can whip together a quick
breakfast smoothie for a fraction
of the cafe cost.
1 cup orange juice (calcium and
Vitamin D fortified)
1 cup yogurt (any flavour)
2 cups frozen fruit
2 tbsp. flax seed oil
Vi cup vanilla protein powder
(optional)
Combine ingredients in
a blender until smooth. The
flavourless flax seed oil provides
a dose of Omega-3 fats, and also
makes the smoothie creamy and
thick when it emulsifies. Xi THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012    |    CULTURE
MAKING THINGS »
DIY container gardening in your dorm room
Who needs the caf when you can grow sprouts out of an empty two-litre?
H.G. Watson
The Lance (University of Windsor)
WINDSOR (CUP) - The student
diet is famously known for the
staples of Kraft Dinner, ramen
noodles and bags of frozen pero-
gies that only cost a few bucks.
But imagine your mac and
cheese spiced up with some fresh
hot pepper or a nice kale salad to
complement your ramen. Heck,
how about just some nice herbs
to liven up your frozen food?
It's entirely easy and possible to
grow these fresh foods no matter
how little space you have.
Artist and gardener Samantha
Lefort was living in a tiny Vancouver apartment when she decided she wanted fresh food 24/7,
365 days a year. "I didn't have
access to a balcony or a community garden.... I wanted something
that was fresh and as close to the
soil as I could get it."
The importance of truly fresh
herbs, vegetables and fruit can't
be understated. "As soon as
you pick any fruit or vegetable
from the stalk, it starts to lose
a good portion of its nutrients,"
said Lefort.
Produce from the grocery
store has to travel hundreds
of miles before it can be purchased — by the time it is, a lot of
nutrients are gone. "Eating food
that is as close to the ground as
possible as soon as it is picked is
healthier for you," said Lefort.
When getting started, Lefort
GRAPHIC COURTESYOFTHE LANCE
In five easy steps you can convert a sticky plastic bottle into a plastic bottle that is filled with dirt, and maybe even a plant!
recommends only starting with
the food you actually want to eat.
"Use stuff that's simple —
herbs are the best thing to start
with because you can use them
a lot and you get used to interacting with them in your kitchen
space or dorm space."
Herbs such as mint grow like
weeds, so they don't need a lot of
support to get going (mint also
allows you to make delicious
and fresh mojitos). You can also
purchase starter herbs that allow
you to get a head start on growing instead growing right from
the seed.
The Internet is a treasure
trove of gardening information
— treehugger.com, letspatch.
tumblr.comand, victorygardens-
vancouver.tumblr.com all
have great information on
container gardening.
Lefort was kind enough to
give a primer on how to grow
your own herbs and veggies
quickly and easily in simple
containers that can be made from
found objects.
Container gardening
This guide will help you build a
self-watering water bottle container for growing herbs.
You need:
• a bottle with a spout
• soil
• some rocks
• a piece of cotton or water-absorbent fabric (it needs to plug
the hole of the spout)
• seeds, or an herb starter
1. Cut the water bottle about
14 from the bottom so that the
planting area is larger than the
water reservoir.
2. Place your fabric through the
spout and tie a knot in the side
that will make up the planting area. This is so soil doesn't
breach through.
3. Put some drainage rocks in the
bottle all around the fabric — this
provides drainage and stops the
soil from mixing with the water.
4. Add soil and seeds. The seeds
should be planted just a fingernail length in the soil. Add some
water into the reservoir area.
You can also buy a plant starter
— this plant is already alive and
growing, you just have to keep
it healthy.
5. Once all these steps are complete, water the plant once from
the top. After that, the plant will
get all the water it needs from
the water reservoir.
SAVE UP
TO 90%
ON USED
TEXTBOOKS
AND 35%
ON NEW
TEXTBOOKS
BEING OF FASHIONISTA MIND but of thrift store means, I will hereby spend
less for my textbooks in order to save money for that must-have pair of skinny jeans.
amazon.ca/textbooks
^7 Opinions
THE LAST WORD
FARTING SHOTS AND SNAP JUDGMENTS ON TODAY'S ISSUES
UE&ALLEfiY
The unfortunate side effect of moving Pendulum food into the Gallery Lounge.
What does yesterday's
cabinet shuffle mean for
UBC?
Yeah, yeah, deck chairs on the
Titanic. We can say that yesterday's cabinet shuffle was just
another death knell for the B.C.
Liberal Party. But what does it
mean that two of the ministries
most closely tied to UBC are
getting new bosses?
The ministries — Advanced
Education, Innovation and
Technology, and, oddly enough,
Community, Sport and Cultural
Development — continue to be
hot potatoes. John Yap has replaced Naomi Yamamoto at Av
Ed, and Bill Bennett will step in
for Ida Chong as CSCD.
Under Yamamoto, the Liberals rolled out several modest
training programs for disadvantaged groups, and made student
loan repayment assistance
more accessible and tied to the
borrower's future earnings.
But beyond that, the past four
months have been marked by
nothing but construction-related press releases (turns out
UBC isn't the only university
taking advantage of a massive
capital projects fund). It's the
kind of post-secondary record
one would expect from an embattled government that says it
stands for both free enterprise
and families.
The other ministry might
be more appropriately titled
Community, Sport, Cultural Development and UBC
Governance Weirdness. In
2010, overseeing UBC's local
governance was placed in this
portfolio. At UBC, all the bylaw
decisions typically reserved for
elected city councils are made
by the unelected UBC Board
of Governors.
Outgoing minister Ida
Chong was criticized by almost
everyone who follows the issue
for saying that there was no
consensus in Point Grey about
whether this is a problem. At
least Bennett, who was in the
same post when it got control of UBC, is aware that the
democratic void at UBC is his
responsibility, but that part of
the portfolio is a small tributary on a backwater ministry.
These haven't been high-profile positions in the Clark
government, and the fact that
they're losing their ministers
now seems to suggest that
they're not going to be points
the Liberals will lean on too
heavily in the upcoming election.
Allowing the UNA to
dictate noise bylaws is a
dangerous precedent
The UNA's proposed noise bylaw is a strange, slapdash proposition that will set a weird
precedent for how people are
governed at UBC.
It's not so much that it's
vague and aggressive — although it is vague and aggressive. The thing is that it's a
power play that shows what
authority the UNA thinks it
should have.
The UNA wants power to
fine people who aren't UNA
members. They want power to
dictate to the university how
it can use facilities like sports
stadiums: facilities that have
been here for far longer than
they have and whose purposes
are much closer to the university's core mandate than
market housing.
So what does it mean? There
are a number of questions to
raise when you start treating
the UBC Board of Governors
as some sort of ruling council.
Under what authority are fines
collected? Who can suggest
bylaws? And who exactly counts
as a UBC citizen anyway?
Only a resident on campus? Do
students, who form the bulk of
the population in the winter,
not get a say? Do they have no
accountability when it comes to
the university? If you don't like
a law passed by the university,
you can't vote them out.
That's the weirdest part of
tryingto toss around words
LLUSTRATION ANNAZORIA/THE UBYSSEY
like bylaws or fines or enforcement at UBC: the fact that an
unelected board has the power
to implement these things.
While bylaws don't usually
make for intriguing politics,
they can have a real impact on
a university campus with so
many competing groups. And
there's nothing to stop the BoG
from listening to one group's
concerns at the expense of
another's.
Please, please, please don't
let Welcome Back fall
victim to Maclnnes Field
construction
For as long as there has been a
Welcome Back BBQ, it has taken
place on Maclnnes Field, the
stretch of grass between the
bus loop and the Student Union
Building. But surprise, surprise:
Maclnnes Field will shortly
join the growing list of campus
spots under construction. In the
interim, UBC's only dedicated
party spot — a flat, broad, obstruction-free field in the heart
of campus — will be gone.
AMS President Matt Parson
has said he "would assume"
that the next Welcome Back
BBQ will take place on the
fields across from the frat
village. That's fine: the field
doesn't make the party. But the
AMS should take care not to let
the Welcome Back BBQ (and,
by extension, the year-end
Block Party) die.
If it's "postponed" for one
year, it's a slippery slope until
it's postponed indefinitely.
This event is one of only two
truly blow-out bashes at UBC
each year. On a campus that
seems grey, quiet and downtrodden for most of the year,
whose perennial complaint is
that there's no school spirit or
student engagement, the Welcome Back BBQ is an essential
reminder that we really are
a bunch of rowdy university
students who like to drink and
dance in the sun. Xi
What to take away from
Toope s Imagine speech
EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK
by Laura Rodgers
On Imagine Day, UBC President Stephen Toope gave his yearly address
to over 6,000 new students stuffed
into Thunderbird Arena.
It was an easy room: everyone
watching seemed still in the thrall
of the biggest artificially-height-
ened-emotion-fest they'll ever
experience over their four (or, let's
be real here, five or more) years
at university.
Toope's day-to-day tasks in running UBC are far more administrative than they are professorial, but
he still keeps up that idiosyncratic
insistence of being called "professor" rather than "president."
And that slightly awkward
introduction of "Professor Toope"
was a pretty accurate predictor
of the rest of his words, where he
fumbled to address UBC's many administrative problems through the
veiled abstractions of good-ol'-time
academic speechifying.
On some level, his speech was
standard ceremonial boilerplate. Be
your own person. Think for yourself.
C'mon frosh, grow intellectually,
goddamnit!
Which is lovely, if you don't feel
like you're here out of obligation to
grind through a bachelor's degree
because that's the only way to get an
entry-level job.
Toope also urged students to
"strive to become ... effective communicators." Which again sounds
like universally applicable advice
chosen for its inoffensiveness.
But we're wondering if he was
tacitly acknowledging the employers
who say graduates of UBC's more
technically minded programs often
lack basic writing skills.
And in his longest flourish, he
called out, of all things, the overuse
of the word "awesome."
"Whenever you hear the word
casually used to describe things
that aren't even vaguely awesome,"
Toope extolled, "let it be a reminder
to you about how one of your principal objectives during your time here
is to strive for originality."
I'm going to assume this was an
unknowing dig against the most
recent Student Leadership Conference, which indiscriminately used
a slangy "awesome" across all its
promotional materials. But inadvertently slagging one of the largest
student involvement events at UBC
shows a fundamental disconnect between Toope and the undergraduate
student body.
Finally, he felt the need to raise
his voice for the following statement: "AT UBC, UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS MATTER."
C'mon, Toope — show, don't tell. Xi
Are UBC orientations
out of touch?
HAVE YOUR SAY!
Frosh weeks have been taking flak.
The latest back-to-school trend
piece is whether or not raucous, university-sponsored orientations are a
valuable part of higher education. A
CBC piece called "Is it time for frosh
week to grow up?" described one
first-year's experience:
"The English student described
her annoyance at hearing LMFAO's
hit song 'Party Rock Anthem' in 'almost every building I set foot in,' not
to mention learning four separate
school cheers before lunch on her
first day." And factor in the recent
string of drinking-related deaths
at universities across Canada, and
some say you have a valid reason for
toning down orientations.
We asked several Ubyssey writers
who are new to UBC to give their
take on the orientations: are they a
vital introduction to campus life, or
are they stuck in an era of university
that no longer exists?
Imagine Day's existence seems to
be a checked box on some UBC or
AMS "increase school spirit" to-do
list. It's possible that there are some
people just dying to dress up in an
arbitrary faculty-assigned colour,
march around campus and file into
a stadium to cheer for their new university. For them, Imagine Day may
represent the ideal start to this new
chapter of their lives. But we don't
need a day of AstroTurfed spirit to
tell us that UBC will be awesome.
We're already here, after all. None of
this is meant to diminish the work
that organizers put into the day, but
that creative energy might best be
applied toward a different goal.
—Arno Rosenfeld
First-year Arts
You know that teen sex romp
comedy you were watching a while
back, with that scene where our
heroes infiltrate a college campus
during frosh week? And there are
loud noises and bright colours and
pop music as they wander around
the quad, looking for someone
wearing Greek letters in hopes
of finding a Real College Party to
crash? And they meet a bunch of fun
stereotypes — an RA in a housecoat,
the weedy chairman of the chess
club, the smug editor of the student
paper — before finally hearing about
a party on Friday night, and the
plucky lead has to convince his shy,
nerdy sidekick that Dude, There
Will Be Girls There before he finally
agrees to go along with the whole
unlikely enterprise.
Basically what I'm saying is, after
a quick stroll down Main Mall on
Tuesday, I think I've already got
next summer's big blockbuster halfway in the bag.
-MattMeuse
Master's ofjournalism
As a first-year Arts student, I
thought I knew what I was getting
into. I obsessed over the SSC, I
planned out my entire year. Then I
get here, and there is so much that
is shoved in my face. While I loved
getting to know my f loormates and
roommate on a whim, and experiencing freedom, I did not exactly love
being shoved into Imagine Day.
Let's be honest: loudness and
peppiness doesn't equate to school
spirit, yet UBC doesn't seem to get
that. While I understand the concept behind Firstweek and frosh,
everything was too much about the
loud colours, the loud cheer, the
loud everything. While orientation
is great for students — showing
them around campus, giving them
survival tips — I couldn't deal with
the hoo-rah-rah. Show your spirit
by getting involved, not by screaming a cheer loud enough to get free
stuff, a
—Alicia Binneboese
First-year Arts Scene
.Y.SEPTEMBER6,2012 | \\
More than 6,000 new undergraduate students convened at Thunderbird Arena on Imagine Day for the pep rally.
Obnoxiousness vs. size of undergrad faculties
{AIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
FORESTRY      KINESIOLOGY
HACKEDEX
YOUR UBC WORD OF THE WEEK
Hack
(/hak/, n.)
Someone who is involved in
student politics. Can also
describe a group of questionable,
cliquey people working on the
inside.
■ OBNOXIOUSNESS AT #IMAGINEUBC -
t
rflT NIGHT!
CONSTRUCTION
¥
V
joefresh.com
|j facebook.com/joefresh
Q ©joefresh
WELCOME BACK TO CAMPUS!
SHOW US YOUR STUDENT CARD
0.
20
%
and receive ^h \J OFF your purchase!4
SEPTEMBER 7TH-9TH ONLY
*0ffer applicable on Joe Fresh® apparel and sunglasses. Excludes jewellery, cosmetics, bath and beauty accessories, and gift cards. Customer must present current University or
College student card at time of purchase to receive discount. High school student cards will not be accepted. Valid only at the Joe Fresh located at 540 Granville Street, Vancouver. 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,2012
Crossword
1
2
3
'
1
'
6
7
a
'
1
"
11
12
13
14
"
,,
17
IS
"
20
■
22
23
m
■
■
27     1      ■
29
30
31
32
33
■
35     1       ■ 36
37
■ 38
su
■ 10
41
42
■ 43
■ 44
AS
46     1       ■    .
4S
■ 49
50     1       H51
52
53
54
55
56
57     1       ■    8
59
1
60
61
62
63
1
"
65
66
-
Across
1-Torn clothing
5- George of Just Shoot Me
10-Icelandic epic
14-Zenoof__
15- Run away to get married
16-Lively dance
17-Plan skillfully
19- Iridescent gemstone
CROSSWORD PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
20-Clothes
21-Denying
23-Looking closely
25-Protection
26-Silly
28- Pertaining to skin color
31-Artist Chagall
34- Pops
36-Dull surface
37-Menu words
38-Arbor
40- Aurora's counterpart
41-English royal house
43- Director Riefenstahl
44- "What I Am" singer Brickell
45-Key with no sharps or flats
47-Organization
49-Syrian president
51-Arranged in order
55-Weakness
58- Mischievous person
59- Scott of "Charles in Charge"
60-Variety of melon
62-Aviation pioneer Sikorsky
63- a time
64-Remnant
65-Accent
66-Knot again
67- New Orleans is The Big __
Down
1-Chart anew
2-Having wings
3-Beau__
4- Like Don Quixote, e.g.
5-Sing for
6- Common street name
7-Enter
8-Sleep disorder
9-Account book
10-Blue books?
11-Placed
12-Costly
13-Associate
18- Brockovich
22- Brightly coloured lizard
24- Knot
27-Peripheries
29-Yours, in Tours
30- majeste
31- First name in spydom
32-Grad
33- What roentgens measure
35-Loudness units
38-Plain writing
39- Able to read and write
42-Like lighthouses
44-Incident
46-III will
48-Russian range
50- Cheers waitress
52-Legend maker
53-Ribbons
54- Reflection on death
55-Slightly
56-Starch used in puddings
57-Work without __
61- Mai
T
R
A
>
*s
F
E
"a
•«
1
■6
L
1
'b
A
1
M
E
E
L
E
s
E
A
0
N
E
L
A
1
R
S
A
R
E
s
T
0
R
N
t
T
s Ia
S
5
0
C
1
A
T
1
0
N
Y
A
S I'll | VI
A
k H H
0
L
E
L
Y
Ia 1 E
r He
N
T
R
E H
S
N
olwl'A 1 r
T
1
s
T H A
E
S
L
A
N 1 K FaH 0
A
t Ha 1 vi 1 p
L
E
Y
E
a Hi
E
s
T
E 1 l Ha 1 R
0
N
Ho
B
E
Y
S H S
s In H
*
A
M
B
A
r||p
A
i 1 n It
E
R
p
R
E
S
T
1
C
1
0
U
s H .
A
E
R
E
T
■
1
■t
L
0
1
T
1
A
R
A
A
C
E
1
s
0
N
s
E
L
D
E
R
T
A
R
s
1
w
E
E
R
E
E
D
5
1
5
2
9
3
6
3
6
1
9
9
1
3
8
4
3
6
5
6
9
3
8
5
6
6
8
1
7
4
9
2
5
1
9
6
4
8
2
=UZZLE/KRAZYDAD.COM
DO YOU LIKE OUR GAMES PAGE?
WHY NOT LIKE US ON FACEBOOK? facebook.com/ubysseY
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
10 September Vancouver Campus roy barnett recital hall
19 September Okanagan Campus university centre ballroom
11:30 am Reception and light lunch served 12:00 noon Town Hall

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128871/manifest

Comment

Related Items