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The Ubyssey Sep 28, 1976

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Array Housing head search back to square one
By STEVE HOWARD
After months of interviews and applications, the search for a new housing
head for UBC will start again from square
one.
The university board of governors, after
studying a "short list" of four applicants
for the job of head of the combined
departments of housing and food services,
decided against hiring any of them.
Instead, they are going back to their old
system of separate housing and food
services departments, and start all over
again the search for a replacement for
former housing head Leslie Rohringer,
who resigned suddenly in September, 1975.
The short list of four was the result of
months of work by a hiring committee,
consisting of administration officials and
students who pored over 90 applications
for the job last spring before making their
recom menda tions.
Those making the short list were acting
housing head Michael Davis, who said
Thursday he is applying for the re-opened
job competition; food services head
Robert Bailey; Canadian Forces
brigadier-general D.W.J. Carr and J. F.
Daviault, administrator from the
Universite de Montreal.
But the board of governors didn't seem
impressed.
"After considerable thought about the
whole matter, taking into consideration
the people who applied and the job as a
directorship, the board and the administration decided to search for a
housing head only," student board
member Basil Peters said Monday.
A new selection committee will be set up
under the auspices of the administration
president's office and the board of
governors.
The selection committee is an advisory
group, reporting to the administration
president, who makes recommendations
to the board of governors. The board
makes the final decision about the appointment.
Peters said he expects a new selection
committee will be set up soon, as the board
considers the selection of a permanent
housing head an important matter to get
settled.
He thinks the selection committee will
be composed of new members, as the usual
practice is to disband such committees
after they make their recommendations.
The main reason for this is that committee
members become biased after a while, he
said.
The joint student-faculty-administration
selection committee was set up last October. It made its final report to the administration president in June.
Michael Davis has been acting director
of residences since September, 1975. Davis
said Thursday he expects to remain in the
position until a permanent head is
selected.
Davis said he hopes to reapply for the
permanent position when applications are
invited again. Davis was former housing
head Rohringer's assistant for a number of
years.
Peters said the board had a discussion
~ about advertising only locally this time
and reconsidering the former applicants.
Last time the competition was advertised
internationally.
Peters said he thinks a lot of the same
•people will apply again.
Illiteracy not
UBC's fault'
Vol. LIX, No. 7       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, T976     '-^ls   228-2301
By DEB van der GRACHT
The provincial education
department should try to improve
the training of high school students
to meet university language,
standards, a UBC English
professor said Monday.
Johnathan Wisenthal said the
education department should
ensure better working conditions
for high school English teachers.
Wisenthal   was   part   of   the
secondary English curriculum
development committee which met'
periodically from Sept. 1975 to May
1976.
The committee appointed by the
provincial education department,
came up with four main recommendations: that 20 per cent in-
steadof the current 10 per cent of a
school curriculum be devoted, to ■
the study of English, that no more
than 100 students be allotted to any
given teachers specifically trained
in English be allowed to teach it,
and that something be done about
the teaching of English as a second
language.
"The department of education
wants to be careful that it doesn't
tyrranize over individual school
districts, but it could secure good
conditions for teachers," he said.
Wisenthal said the education
department is slow to implement
changes as a result of their stand
on decentralization.
"The B.C. Teachers' Federation
See page 2: DECENTRALIZATION
Nurses to get
more time in
clinical training
By HEATHER WALKER
UBC nursing school director
Muriel Uprichard said Monday she
agrees with students who say the
program does not provide enough
clinical experience in its first two
years.
"Students who graduate from
the program are not always
completely comfortable with their
nursing skills," she said. "We're
working on changing the program
for the first two years so that it will
include more clinical time."
Uprichard said she did not know
how much more clinical time the
program will include.
"We might increase the number
of hours of clinical time in the five
days," she said. "Or we might
include a clinical week in
December, or another week or two
in April."
Students currently have 12 hours
of clinical experience in their
second year.
Clinical time is time spent in
nursing labs as well as hospital
time.
Students learn procedures in
labs, but need a great deal of
practise in these procedures to
See page 2: RNABC
— geof wheelwright photo
INDIAN MASK  is part of special display of North American Indian     week. Admission to students is free today but not on other days so why
artifacts at UBC Museum of Anthropology. Exhibit continues to end of     not spend lunch hour (or even that boring 1:30) at new museum?
Cutbacks hit three more faculties
By HEATHER WALKER
The faculties of education,
sciences and engineering are all
facing cutbacks because of a
university-wide austerity program.
"All the deans met with administration president Doug
Kenny and were asked to cut back
on established positions," Fritz
Bowers, assistant dean of
engineering, said Monday.
Bowers said the faculties were
asked to cut out one per cent of
their total budgets.
Ray Bentley, assistant dean of
education, said Thursday the
education faculty lost 10 faculty
positions because of the cutbacks.
"We also had to reduce the
number of classes and sections,
and so we've ended up with large
classes," Bentley said.
Bentley said the education
faculty's enrolment increased by
approximately four per cent this
year, and this increase also contributed to an increase in, class
size.
He said the faculty positions
were lost because of retirement of
faculty members and because the
faculty was not able to hire as
many people for one of their
programs as they had intended.
The program involves hiring
teachers from schools on one-year
appointments.
"For the past few years we've
been leaving faculty positions open
so we can bring people in from the
classrooms," Bentley said.
"Since thepositions are left open
they can be dropped easily. But we
think this program is very important, it brings practical people
into the faculty, and their experience is very useful to students,
so we have continued the
program," he said.
Bentley  said  the faculty  had
hired 17 teachers on temporary
appointments for the program.
He said he was uncertain how
great a difference there was
between this year's budget and last
year's, because the loss of faculty
positions and a special grant to
continue the Native Indian
Teachers Training Program
(N1TEP) had complicated the
figures.
NITEP was begun three years
ago to train Indians to teach in
native schools.
"Students will be able to start
teaching at the end of this year, so
it would have been catastrophic if
we lost that now," Bentley said.
Associate science dean Cyril
Finnegan said his faculty had to
reduce section numbers.
"You begin to wonder where the
fine line is between the quality of
the degrees you offer," he said.
Finnegan said the budget cuts
could be especially troublesome in
a faculty "which depends so much
on laboratory instruction, where
the results could be more immediately felt."
He said the faculty had not yet
had to cut out any faculty positions,
but if the tight budget position
continues, he expects to have
problems replacing professors who
retire.
Bowers said engineering
departments had lost "some
faculty, some teaching assistants,
and some technical people.
"There's also been less money
for graduate students and faculty
assistants," he said.
Bowers said civil engineering
lost one professor because of
retirement, the dean's office lost a
secretary, and metallurgical
engineering lost two technicians.
See page 2: BUDGET Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 28,  1976
RNABC to review nursing program
From page 1
actually   feel   comfortable, with
them in a hospital setting, she said.
Uprichard said the program uses
all the hospitals and clinics between White Rock and Abbotsford
to train its students.
Two nursing students told The
Ubyssey Thursday the program
did not include enough clinical
time for the students to learn and
practise all the nursing skills they
would need to work as registered
nurses after they graduate.
They said the Registered Nurses'
Association of B.C. was also
concerned about a shortage of
clinical time in the program, and
had threatened not to allow second
year students to write their
registered nurse exams in August
unless the program was changed.
Uprichard said the RNABC had
expressed concern about the
amount of clinical time in the
program, but only because the
nursing school told the RNABC in
its annual report they thought the
program needed more clinical
time.
Budget cuts
'not disaster'
From page 1
"It's not a disaster, but it is belt-
tightening," he said.
Both Bowers and Bentley were
concerned about the effects of
budget cuts on new programs the
faculties had planned.
The mineral engineering
department was hoping to launch a
program on coal gasification,
Bowers said.
"B.C. has large coal deposits,
and the uses of coal, particularly
turning it into coal gas and using it
in place of natural gas, are increasingly important to the
province."
Bowers said mineral engineering
had left a faculty position open and
hoped to fill it with someone who
could teach coal gasification, but
instead had to eliminate the job.
"They said, 'If you're concerned,
then we're concerned too,' "
Uprichard said.
Uprichard said the RNABC must
approve all nursing programs in
B.C. before program graduates are
permitted to write RN exams.
But she said she did not anticipate any difficulty in UBC's
school   obtaining   the   RNABC's
approval.
In a statement she made to all
nursing students Uprichard said
the RNABC's committee on approval of schools of nursing would
review UBC's school this year. And
she said, "The program of each
school must be approved before its
Decentralization policy
From page 1
thought the government had too
much authority. The government
has declared decentralization its
policy, and they're trapped by that
decision.
"The department of education
tends to suggest policies rather
than tell schools and school
districts what to do," he said, "and
in these basic areas they should be
assertive."
Robert Jordan, UBC English
head, said the result of this
decentralization is a discrepancy
in student skills from school to
school.
"Some students come to us with
very good marks in English 12, and
they may not be able to compose a
sentence. There is no agreement
from one school to another on what
should be taught."
The UBC English department
currently copes with this
discrepancy through a diagnostic
test given in September to all
English 100 students. Those who
fail to meet competency standards
are placed in remedial sections
where emphasis is to improve
composition and grammatical
skills.
But the UBC senate, at a meeting
April 21, decided . . . "school-level
instruction in basic English
composition is not a proper function of the university," so that the
current remedial classes will be
phased out by August, 1979. Only a
small program will remain "for
students whose work in subjects
other than English is demonstrably
outstanding."
"ASK THE CHAPLAIN"
One of the most interesting and colorful persons on campus is
Bernice Gerard," U.B.C. chaplain and moderator of two open-line
radio broadcasts. Each Sunday on CJOR Bernice enters into a
verbal exchange with listeners at 9:05-10:30 a.m. on
"ENCOUNTER" and at 11:10 p.m.-l :30 a.m. on "SUNDAY
LINE". Both programs deal with topics of current interest and
often  of a  controversial nature. Guests on the program have
included Dr. Dick Nann of
the U.B.C. School of Social
Work; Dr. Philip Ney,
psychiatrist and author ;-Willa
Dorsey, internationally-
known singer and many
others. In addition to the
foregoing programs, Bernice
also has a broadcast entitled,
"ASK THE CHAPLAIN",
Monday to Saturday on
Station KARI at 12:00 p.m.
She is also an aldermanic
candidate in the forthcoming
civic election on Nov. 17.
A graduate of U.B.C. with an M.A. in English, Bernice has worked
with the campus chaplaincy since 1962. Her interest in students
resulted in the formation of a student club, now known as the
Charismatic Christian Fellowship. Working on campus with
Bernice is Geraldine Fordyce, who received her Master's degree
from the U.B.C. School of Social Work in 1973.
The Charismatic Christian Fellowship, an AMS club, offers an
opportunity for students to share faith and fellowship. Weekly
meetings will be held on Tuesdays at 12:30 in SUB 205 and on
Thursday evenings at 7 :30 in the Lutheran Campus Centre, 5885
University Blvd.
Those interested in meeting Bernice Gerard and learning more
about the Charismatic Christian Fellowship are invited to a
"GET-AQUAINTED DESSERT PARTY"
in the Lutheran Campus Centre
at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 30th.
Information about this and up-coming events
can be obtained by phoning 263-8219.
Just what "demonstrably outstanding" means, WisenthaJ
couldn't say.
The senate also decided that,
beginning in September, 1979,
admission to first year will be
limited to students demonstrating
basic competence in English
composition or those who show
excellence in some other area. The
task of determining effective ways
in which to assess such competence has fallen to the senate
admissions committee.
Although the committee has
made no formal recommendations,
it is very probable that some sort of
test will be written in the spring to
determine whether or not a student
reaches set standards.
graduates are permitted to write
registration examinations."
Uprichard told students the
school submitted a progress report
to the RNABC in July, 1976.
In her announcement to the
students, she said the committee,
after reviewing the report, "expressed concern that students who
graduate from this programme
after two years may not have
sufficient clinical skills to function
as registered nurses in a hospital
setting. This is a concern which has
been expressed also by some
students and faculty of this
school."
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r-
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Full details are
in your free
personal telephone directory
available at your
campus bookstore.
IN THE
LONGDISTANCE
SWEEPSTAKES.
Trans-Canada Telephone System Tuesday, September 28,   1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Blind students learn
with help from special library
Ruth Bieber, arts 2, has some sight but for
all intents and purposes she is blind.
For Bieber and 50 other blind students at
UBC the focal point of campus life is the
Crane Library at the north end of Brock
Hall.
"Sometimes life is a pain in the ass,"
Bieber said Wednesday. "If Crane weren't
here I couldn't manage."
Bieber took a three-unit course this
summer and is taking four courses in winter
session to complete her second year.
"It's all studying and work all day,"
Bieber said. "I record all the lectures on
cassette and re-record them onto a machine
at home each night. It's time-consuming."
Generally, she said, profs are very
helpful. But because she waited until grade
12 to learn braille, she said she was not very
proficient at it.
Bieber told of her first hassle at UBC:
' "There was this English prof in first year
who realized I was weak at braille. The prof
told me to take a year off and study braille,
but she knew nothing about it."
Bierber said she transferred to another
prof at Christmas. "She would have failed
me for my spelling errors," Bieber said.
"But otherwise profs have been terrific. My
essays are recorded on cassettes now and
handed in."
Bieber is supported by Aid to Handicapped (ATH) a B.C. government
program. She said the disabled are paid to
go to university, but only if ATH thinks they
have potential to succeed at university.
Besides paying university fees, the
program provides Bieber with a $250 a
month living allowance.
The only stipulation is that she continue at
school and maintain a passing average.
Bieber had a high second-class average last
year.
"High school was much easier. I just
listened or had a book read to me. Now I'm
bugged by work overloads. But I suppose
I'm only bothered as much as anyone else
is."
Bieber said some people expect too much
from blind students, "People figure that if
you're lost in the eyes you've gained in the
mouth. But it sure didn't make me a
scholar."
She left home three years ago at age 17.
She now shares an off-campus apartment
with a friend, so mobility is important to
her.
The Canadian National Institute for the
Blind provides a free bus pass, renewable
each year, to Bieber and other blind people.
"You have to do it yourself," Bieber said,
"even if it means falling down a flight of
stairs."
Nancy Smith, head secretary at Crane,
says the library serves more than the blind
and near blind. Dyslexics (people who have
trouble reading), spastics and anyone else
needing the library can use it.
"Unfortunately, the library adminstration
has imposed a $6 fee on each title for inter-
library loans to other libraries," Smith said.
"It makes borrowing of Crane material too
expensive for most libraries."
About 24,000 books, tapes and other
materials were borrowed from Crane in the
winter session of 1971-72 but this figure has
since more than doubled to reach 48,000
during the 1975-76 season, Smith said.
Eric Ellington is the only technician at
Crane. He and four volunteer book readers,
each of whom has passed a voice* audition,
read books requested by blind students onto
tape cassettes.
Ellington says Crane needs more
technicians and more professional readers.
He says there is already a backlog of work.
The key is money.
Story by Charlie Micallef
Pictures by Matt King
The braille literature and Ellington's
tapes are only two examples of the many
special aids to the blind found at Crane.
For the visually impaired there is a closed
circuit television and a camera for
magnifying print.
The totally blind read by means of an
Optacon, a machine utilizing vibrating
needles which spell a word into a person's
fingertips.
A computer linked machine, the Spellex,
is a modified typewriter which verbally
sounds a letter as it is punched.
Reed Poynter, arts 4, is totally blind. But
he said he has few outstanding problems at
UBC.
He said mobility isn't a problem after the
first year of getting familiar with the
campus, except if it snows. The blind rely on
landmarks, especially sidewalks, and after
a snow, they can't distinguish between grass
and concrete.
"Something that really pisses me off is
when students, especially those in
Buchanan, sit on the hallway floors or on
stairways," Poynter said. "Sometimes
when I run into them I kick a little harder
than I have to," he said.
Poynter is also supported by the ATH
program. In addition to his UBC fees hels
granted about $265 a month for living expenses. He maintains a second class
average.
"But I'm behind in my work," Poynter
said. "Blind students take three to four
times longer to read a book or do an essay
than a sighted students."
Poynter said most professors have helped
him, but he has had confrontations with
some.
"I've had profs who've refused to narrow
work loads but I've had only one genuine
dink," he said.
Poynter said one English professor would
not allow him to record her lectures.
"She just didn't like the sound of her voice
on tape, she told me, so I transferred out of
her class."
Poynter went blind at age 11 from an
ELLINGTON . . . with tape console
inherited eye disease. He stayed at Vancouver's Jericho Hill School until grade 10
and says most of the blind at UBC also came
from Jericho.
"I'd be here even if it weren't for Crane,"'
Poynter said, "but it would be much more
difficult for all of us."
Robert Gilchrist, arts I, lives in Place
Vanier residence. He has been blind since
birth.
Gilchrist is supported by funds from the
B.C. government's Handicapped Persons
Income Assistance and receives a monthly
income of about $265 as well as his
university allowances.
Life as a blind UBC student is a matter of
being organized, he said.
"I'm pretty well oriented physically,"
Gilchrist said, "but it's important to get to
know the profs. You have to talk to them
about your special needs. My profs have
been great."
Gilchrist's only complaint about campus
life is against cyclists.
"They're less helpful than others. I'll ask
directions when I get disoriented and they
won't even stop. And I wish people knew that
the blind work in straight lines when they're
giving directions. Consider that next time,"
Gilchrist said.
Exams for blind students are written in
the Crane Library using the braille
typewriters. The work is converted from
braille to print by the staff for use by the
professors.
BIEBER ... using tape facilities
Blind
library
cramped
UBC's Crane Library for the handicapped is perhaps the best such
university facility in Canada — but library
staff say budget restrictions are impairing
their work.
Nancy Smith, the library's head
secretary, said Thursday there is not
enough space in the library. The library's
two small rooms are filled almost to
capacity with books, she said.
And assistant secretary Nancy Smith
said the large size of braille books, which
make up most of the library's collection,
creates serious space problems.
Hunt said a magazine like Playboy, the
first magazine to come out in braille, is
three times as large in braille as in print.
UBC head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs
said he knows about Crane's space
problem but he can't do much about it. "It
(space) is a hard commodity to find on
campus and the problem is by no means
limited to Crane," he said.
And the Crane staff agree there are not
enough staff to do the work at the library.
The library supplies blind students with
taped transcripts of books but the
production of the tape cassettes usually
lags behind the requests because there are
not enough people to read the books onto
tapes.
Blind student Reed Poynter, arts 4, said
"academically, the availability of taped
text books leaves a lot to be desired. The
tape output is not in keeping with the
student demand."
Poynter said the library needs more
readers to speed production of the tapes.
And Smith said the library needs more
money to buy expensive braille books.
Another blind student, Robert Gilchrist,
arts 1, agreed the library needs more
funds, currently supplied by donations and
the UBC administration.
"There is a need for more money for
Crane and more staff. It's obvious to all us
blind."
But Stubbs said the library, opened in
1968 and consisting then of the personal
coDection of the late Charles Allen Crane,
is the best of its kind in North America.
"In terms of North America they (UBC
blind students) have the best deal
anywhere. We are pioneers in this kind of
program."
Stubbs said he does not know the size of
the Crane library budget but he said it is
large enough "to do the job for UBC
students." Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 28, 1976
Salkeld and
other senators
irresponsible
Responsibility is apparently a rare and elusive quality
among student representatives, judging from the recent
actions of several UBC student senators.
Three of them — Brian Higgins, Dave MacKinnon and
now Bob Salkeld — have resigned recently.
All three of them were elected in late January for
one-year terms which began last March.
During the summer, Higgins and MacKinnon decided
to resign because they weren't coming back to school.
Their seats are now vacant.
Last week, Salkeld decided to resign, saying that his
academic pursuits were taking up all his time.
And that's another seat on senate which is vacant.
It's shoddy, disgusting and downright ratty that three
of the 17 student positions on senate are vacant. Students
have fought for many years to get that much
representation at the level where academic decision-making
takes place. So what happens? The students they elect
decide for some reason or other to resign.
It's irresponsible.
The responsibility of student senators is to represent
students' interests to the senate. Needless to say, there
can't be effective representation if the seats are vacant.
And that brings us back to Higgins, MacKinnon and
Salkeld. It's not just that they've been irresponsible in
resigning — since Higgins and MacKinnon are no longer
students they can't represent students' interests and had
no choice but to resign.
Their act of irresponsibility happened when they
decided to run for positions they weren't even sure they'd
be around to fill.
They had no business even submitting their names to
the list of candidates unless they were prepared to live up
to the responsibility they took on when elected.
That's also true in Salkeld's case. Anyone who even
considers running for senate must realize, if they have
anything but fluff for brains, that it takes a certain amount
of work if they are going to be able to do the job.
There are committees they're supposed to be sitting
on, meetings to attend, and issues they're supposed to be
bringing up to senate, which they should research.
Salkeld must have, or should have, realized that when
he submitted his name to the list of candidates.
When he says now that his academic commitments
are too great to allow him to continue on senate, he's
being irresponsible. He should have thought more about
his academic commitments before he ran.
As usual, the real losers in all of this are the students.
Students who won't have the full complement of student
senators voting on issues that concern them. Students who
won't have as many people to present their side of the
story to senate.
In other words, students who won't be as effectively
represented as they should be until three new and possibly
inexperienced student senators are elected to replace the
ones who've left.
All we can do now is make sure that when those
replacements are elected they assure us all of their
commitment and responsibility to students. And that they
live up to it.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 28, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Hey?" said Sue Vohanka as a paper clip flew in one ear and out the.
other, "what's the big Idea." Ralph Maurer grinned flendfshly.as he hurled
an Underwood Five across the room and Charlie Micallef, Sue Vohanka,
Marcus Gee, Chris Gainor, Doug Rushton and Shane McCune ran for cover.
Heather Walker was too slow and she caught the flying typewriter squarely
on her willowy gams; Ian Currie, Gord Robertson, Mike Bocking, Amanda
King, Deb van der Gracht and Steve Howard laughed at her misfortune
only to be caught In a hall of comfy cushions tossed by John Cartwright.
Bruce Constantineau, Matt King, Mike Miller, Geoff Wheelwright and Tom
Barnes cheered as Tobias Fisher clobbered Jean Randall with a table leg.
Paul Wilson and Ken Pontlfex looked on the display of childishness with
disgust. ,
to ' *
—don chang cartoon
Yes, Mildred, I agree. There's too much violence in hockey. Why, you can almost feel it.
Opinions, please
It's been said before.
Opinions are the lifeblood of The
Ubyssey.
We want to know what people are
thinking — and why.
To that end. The Ubyssey will soon
begin turning page 5 into an opinion page.
On that page, we'd like to hear from all
kinds of people and what they think of
issues that affect the campus and the
university community.
What do you, as students, professors,
support workers or administration types,
think?
What do you think about tuition fee
hikes-to-be, education minister Pat McGeer's
views  on   the  role of the  university,  the
so-called literacy crisis, entrance exams, the
way tenure is granted here and the Canadian
way?
Or the way the Alma Mater Society is
operating, the B.C. Students' Federation, the
upcoming Canadian Labor Congress Oct. 14
day of protest and pocket fluff?
Tell us what you think and why.
The Ubyssey has a top-level backroom
sub-committee currently trying to dig up a
name for this soon-to-be opinion page.
If you have suggestions for a name, bring
them up to SUB 241K.
The page will be inaugurated sometime
next week. And we want to have some
opinions to run on it.
Letters
Murray
defended
Everybody seems to think that
Rick Murray should resign his seat
on the board of governors.
The Ubyssey has reported
various opinions to this effect, and
has editorialized the idea.
Now, the Alma Mater Society is
getting ready to pass a resolution
based on a legal opinion, calling for
Murray's resignation.
The prospects of a little bloodletting can and do tend to bring out
of mothballs normally hidden
ideals in people such as principles
and scruples.
In the fervor of such a purge, it is
unfortunate that other considerations of greater sanity, but
less piety, such as common sense
and objectivity are overlooked.
The issue at hand is effective
student representation at the
highest university levels. This was
a right that the students of UBC
fought for and finally won.
And it is curious that that very
victory is now about to be cast
aside in the name of technicality.
Rick Murray has been a student
at UBC for many years — he has
served at a multitude of decisionmaking levels on this campus, and
is able, as a result, to take to the
board of governors, on behalf of all
of us, that most valuable of com-
modoties that cannot be taught or
imparted or bestowed — experience.
Such experience is vital to effective representation, even
though in some minds it is a
magical quantity of 15 units of
courses that is of paramount importance.
Certainly there must be criteria
for eligibility to hold any office; it
would be foolish if there were not.
But this quest for conformity to
the letter of the law should not
overshadow one's primary objective which, in this case, is
having somebody who is able and
qualified to represent students on
this campus, and at this moment.
It will be impossible to hold a by-
election at this point in time, and
the board of governors will not stop
meeting, just because student
representation has been cut in half.
By all means, clarify for
posterity any definitions of a bona
fide student representative that
may seem appropriate, but on this
first unusual occasion, let us. not
cut off our noses to spite our faces,
or else people will surely have
reason to suspect that more than
our noses are missing.
Brent Tynan
commerce 1
Publicity
Friday's Ubyssey contained a
picture of a young lady and myself
clothed in splendid Renaissance
garments.
We were said to be members of
the Medieval Club. Actually, we
are members of the UBC Historical
Dance Club and are interested in
the reconstruction and performance of Renaissance and
Baroque dances.
This is a new club and needs all
the publicity it can get.
A meeting will be held today at
noon, and the location is in Tween
Classes.
Those wishing more information
can phone me at 224-7771.
Ian Cahill
grad studies, commerce
Buses
I would like to comment on your
article of Thursday, Sept. 23 entitled Bus Passes Sought.
I agree that the Alma Mater
Society and the B.C. Students'
Federation should push "hard" for
bus passes for university students.
Hopefully, the meeting on Sept. 30
with B.C. Hydro representatives
will prove worthwhile.
Bus passes at $30 a term are a
very good investment for students
who must travel to and from school
each day. If University of Victoria
students get passes, then UBC
students should get them too or at
least have an option.
Alexandra Carrea
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Tuesday, September 28,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Parking lot housing proposed
By BRUCE CONSTANTINEAU
The university should erect
student residences over existing
parking facilities a Vancouver
architect Roger Kemble said
Monday.
In a proposal submitted to the
task force on future use of the
University Endowment Lands,
Kemble also called for the creation
of six new neighborhoods in
currently wooded areas, and for a
"linear" park stretching from the
UEL to the proposed Chinese
Cultural Centre near Main Street.
"It is possible to accommodate
Old board ruling
cuts off students
Food services has started
collecting the commissions from
vending machines formerly
collected by students because the
machines were encroaching on
"out-of-bounds" areas, foods
services head Robert Bailey said
Thursday.
Food services invoked an old
board of governors regulation
during the summer to take over the
revenues formerly collected by the
arts, commerce and home
jconomics undergraduate
societies on machines in the halls
rf the Angus, Buchanan and home
economics buildings.
"It's a matter of principle,"
Bailey said. "The board of
governors regulation has been in
jffect for a long time."
The regulation states food services is supposed to collect all the
commissions from vending
machines outside lounge areas.
The board passed the regulation
because of fears the halls of
university buildings would become
cluttered with vending machines.
But the undergraduate societies
affected say the food services
takeover will leave them without
an important source of revenue.
And neither the commerce or
home economics undergrad
societies can afford to move the
machines into a lounge area, they
say.
Bailey said the commerce undergrad society was only allowed
to have machines in the halls
temporarily and now the temporary period has expired.
He said food services will collect
about $3,000 a year from commissions on the machines.
another 4,000 to 5,000 students on
campus by building over existing
parking lots," he said.
The subsequent shortage of
parking space would be offset by
existing parking facilities at
Spanish Banks used in conjunction
with a shuttle bus service to the
university.
"The Spanish Banks facilities
are practically unused during the
university's year," Kemble said.
Kemble's proposal also
recommended the development of
six high-density communities
between Sixteenth Avenue and
Marine Drive. Each community
would have a population of about
5,000 and would include a shopping
centre, an elementary school a
commmunity centre and some
small businesses.
"University people would inhabit
these neighborhoods, that is, those
people who have business being out
there," Kemble said.
When asked about the ecological
impact of the 350 acre development, Kemble said that "in this
particular area there are no vital
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hundreds of slavering dogs and old
age pensioners surrounded this
tiny island kingdom today, waving
placards and burning admonition
president Dog Kennel in effigy.
Dog rep Sulky Robeld said dogs
were protesting Kennel's mission
to save dogs from eating table
scraps.
'Give notice'-U.S.
Canada should give more warning before it begins
ederal projects that might have environmental
mpact on the United States, U.S. ambassador to
!"anada Thomas Enders said Saturday.
Enders said an improved assessement procedure
or projects such as oil drilling in the Beaufort Sea
rould give the U.S. more time to consider what ef-
ects Canadian projects might have on the U.S.
Enders added that the U.S. is annoyed with the
hort notice the Canadian government gave before
"lowing drilling in the Arctic Sea.
He was speaking at a lecture at UBC sponsored by
he Vancouver Institute.
The drilling began in August amid violent op-
osition from environmental and native groups.
Enders also said exporters of nuclear energy
hould place stricter controls on the use of the
;chnology they sell to other countries.
He said he knows of no safe method of regulating
the use of the plutonium produced as a by-product of
nuclear reactors.
"One of the largest tasks of the international
community is to recapture the control we thought we
had over such materials," Enders said.
"We are a long way from the solution."
Enders also defended the construction of "the
Trident nuclear submarine after a member of the
audience accused the U.S. of altering the world
"balance of terror" by building more new nuclear
arms.
Enders said the only known way of controlling
nuclear arms is by maintaining a balance of power
among the world's nuclear nations.
"No friends of ours would urge us to unilateral
disarmament."
ecological qualities to preserve."
The major thrust of the proposed
development is to provide a 24-hour
living environment for the
"university people" with
recreational, cultural, and work
activities centred within the UEL,
the architect said.
Kemble stressed there should be
no more building on undeveloped
land at UBC.
"All future building should take
place over top of existing parking
facilities and there should be no
further giving over of good open
space to parking lots or to new
buildings," he said.
The Dr. Frank Buck Memorial
Park,   a   1,066   acre   ecological
reserve, would remain as it is
except for the institution of long
term maintenance program to
ensure that the amenity is not lost.
Kemble's linear park proposal
calls for a park system connected
by walkways joining the UEL with
Jericho, Kitsilano, the new False
Creek development and the
proposed Chinese Cultural Centre
near Main Street.
The recreational advantages of
the UEL must be made available to
all residents of Greater Vancouver, Kemble said.
"We must hear from the entire
public on this issue," he said, "and
not just from Point Grey
residents."
DR. BUNDOLO
FIRST SHOW OF NEW
SEASON
S.U.B.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
12:30 p.m.
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
CBU 690
Make an
appointment
with us today
And start your
RK hair routine
HIS & HER SPECIALISTS
APPOINTMENT
SERVICE
731-4191
3644 WEST
4th AVE.
AT ALMA
MP
KIT
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ONLY
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Irish sijnnq
Hi;iri:u
$7.50 APPROXIMATE VALUE
his kit
LIMIT-ONE PER STUDENT
$6.25 APPROXIMATE VALUE
NOW AT YOUR CAMPUS BOOKSTORE
the bookstore
the bookstore
the bookstore Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 28,  T97c
Opposite
o# gravity?
They're back! Dr. Bundolo and
his faithful followers will be
exposing themselves noon today
in SUB auditorium.
Dr. Bundolo is a radio comedy
taped live most Tuesdays and
admission is free. The broadcasts
can be heard on CBC radio.
Hot flashes
To make matters worse. Dr.
Bundolo will also become a
television series this fall. The first
two shows will be taped Oct. 5
and 6 at 11:30 p.m. at the CBC
studio, 700 Hamilton.
Buses from campus to the
studio will be arranged for
students who want to watch the.
show being taped. More details
and tickets at today's
stomach-wrenching show.
cvtr
Print!
Need something to cover that
hole in the wall of your sleazy
basement suite?
Imaginus, a group of Toronto
entrepreneurs, is holding an
exhibition and sale of art prints 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. every day this week
in SUB 207 and 209.
HILLEL HOUSE THURSDAY LECTURE
Sept. 30f 1976 — 12:30 p.m.
RABBI YITZCHAKWINEBERG
will speak on
THE ORIGINS OF CHASSIDISM
Tween classes
TODAY
LAW STUDENTS'
LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Summary legal advice, noon to 2:30
p.m., SUB 234.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's    swimming:    heats    in    50m.
free, breast, back, butterfly, 100m.
free; noon, Empire Pool.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's soccer,  noon and  5:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Park.
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Registration   and   practice,   5   to   7
p.m., SUB ballroom.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-MED SOC
Film:    Medicine,    and   registration,
IRC 4.
KARATE CLUB
Self-defence  session,   7:30  to  9:30
p.m., winter sports centre gym E.
WEDNESDAY
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Organizational    meeting   and    rally
school   for   Sunday   rally,   8   p.m.,
SUB 213.
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Men's swimming:  finals plus 200m.
free,  medley  relays,   noon,   Empire
Pool.
POTTERY CLUB
Organizational        meeting,        new
members welcome, noon, SUB 251.
RECREATION UNDERGRAD
SOCIETY
General   meeting,   noon,   Armories
208.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Speaker   and   discussion   on   South
Africa's struggles against apartheid,
noon, SUB 212.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General     meeting    with    ski    film,
noon, Angus 110.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General   meeting,  noon,  SUB  party
room.
CSA
Choir practice (Chinese group), 7 to
9   p.m.,   International   House   lower
lounge.
NEWMAN CLUB
Luncheon    general    meeting;    new
members welcome, noon, SUB 205.
CUSO CLUB
Organizational meeting — everyone
interested in international issues
welcome, noon, SUB 209.
KUNG FU CLUB
Registration     and
party room.
UBC SAILING CLUB
First general meeting of the year,
noon, SUB party room.
ECONOMICS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"Liquidity   trap,"   7:30  p.m.,  SUB
212.
THURSDAY
GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTS
Organizational     meeting    for    TAs
concerned       about       pay,       noon,
graduate   student centre committee
room.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    7:30    p.m.,
SUB 213.
FILMSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 247.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
First general meeting; new members,
welcome, noon, IRC 1.
REJECT CLUB
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
212A.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Come  and   learn   to  square dance,
noon to 2:30, SUB 212A.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Get-acquainted dessert party; meet
Bernice Gerard, 7:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre lounge.
INTEGRITY WORLD COMMUNITY
Introductory      lecture,       8      p.m.,
International House.
HOCKEY TEAM
Meeting for all wishing to try out
for team, noon, War Memorial Gym
room 25.
practice,     SUB
Only CP Rail ferries have
to Nanaimo.
Sail from downtown Vancouver to
downtown Nanaimo aboard a Princess
ferry. Just pick a convenient time from
three sailings a day, any day of the week.
Then call and let us know you're coming.
On board you'll enjoy excellent
dining, a spacious lounge and
spectacular Gulf Islands' scenery from
the observation decks.
Leave
Vancouver
4:00 a.m.
Noon
8:00 p.m.
Arrive
Nanaimo
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Leave
Nanaimo
8:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
Midnight
Arrive
Vancouver
10:30 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
2:30 a.m.
Call 665-3142 for guaranteed sail-away service.
When we sail, you sail.
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
CANDIA
pizza factory
1 228-9512 I   or    I 228-95131
4510 W. 10th Ave.
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.i
WE CURE
ALL sick bugs
VOLKSWAGENS TOO!
U.B.C. STUDENT
DISCOUNTS
AVAILABLE
MOTORS REBUILT ^ I     C °)
12 Month Warranty \     V^^X
12.000 mites (Bugs Only)
$235.. For 36 H.P.
$265 For 40 H.P.
$295 .For A V.W. 1500
$305 For A V.W. 1600
S BUG STOP
1897 BURRARD     731 -8171 QQ
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
25 — Instruction
KARATE (Japanese Karate Associatioi
10 — For Sale — Commercial
Shotokan Japanese instructor: Accep
ing new members. Call: 224-4243 -
228-0438 — 876-6659 (days).
11 — For Sale — Private
35 - Lost
AM-FM   CAR   RADIO   (Blaupunkt)   and
speaker $60; TA"  skill saw $22;  Bob
at 261-8677 eves.
TO THE DORK that swiped my walle
from Sedgewick Photostating: Get :'
to a lost and found.
EARN $25 for 24 hours. Lying in a dar
room. Come to Henry Angus Built
ing, Room 13 basement on Frida:
October  1  at 12:30.
68 VW WINDOW VAN. Partly camper-
ised,    good    condition.    $1,600    obo.
688-2941 after S p.m.
DODGE   VAN.   Camperized.   1968.   Must
sell,      good      condition,      mechanics
especially.     Call    Jennifer     733-6003.
Good deal.
CREW MANAGERS WANTED. Orgai
ize student sales crews. Excellex
commission, over-ride on sale
Phone  873-5126 days.
TOYOTA   MARK   II.   1970.   Very   good
condition, standard 2-door, eats little
gas. Asking $1,330.  Janice 228-8541.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    SELECTRIC    TYPING    r
home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat, a
curate work. Reasonable rate
263-5317.
PAIR   Imura   wooden   skis   with   cable
bindings.    6'    long.    $18.00.    738-1037
after   8:00.
90 — Wanted
20 — Housing
PEOPLE WHO WANT to earn $100
$1,000   per   month  part-time.   Phon
879-3969.
COTTAGE NEAR UBC for $23.00 month;
semi-furnished In return for prepara
tion    of   evening    meals   and   some
child supervision. 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at
99 — Miscellaneous
smoker preferred. 224-5036.
BR   in   comfortable   3   BR   suite,    car
transportation to UBC available, $90
plus util.   876-9148  evenings.
MALE,   22,   needs   person   (non-smoker
EARN    $10.00    by    participating   in
psychology experiment. For more i
formation   call   228-2287   or   732-10
(evenings).   Involves   approximately
hours   completing   personality   asse!
ment  questionaires.
preferred)    to    share    two   bedroom
suite.   Large   kitchen,   living   room,
bright 15 minutes from campus. Call
Steve  eves.   327-3993.   $125.00  plus.
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent  cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves Tuesday, September 28,  1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
Thunderbirds romp to first place
By TOM B.ARNES
Greg Gardiner's 12-yard-
touchdown pass to tight end Evan
Jones with less than five minutes
remaining in the fourth-quarter
lifted UBC to a 30-26 road victory
over the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs Friday.
With the win the Thunderbirds
vaulted over the Dinos into sole
possession of first place with half
the Western Intercollegiate
Football League schedule gone.
The 'Birds also climbed in the
national     university     football
rankings,   from   ninth   to   sixth. Western Ontario hold down  the
Ironically two of the five teams first two positions and Ottawa is
rated above them, are WIFL rivals, fifth.
Calgary is rated third and the Friday   night   at   McMahon
University    of    Saskatchewan Stadium the Dinos took a 10-0 first
Huskies are fourth. Windsor and quarter lead. Don Siler hit Rick
Successful UBC rowers
get new head coach
This fall sees UBC with its fifth
head rowing coach since 1971 as Al
Morrow, UBC physical education
grad student and four time international, takes charge of one of
North America's most successful
collegiate rowing programs.
The varsity team enjoyed success this summer on its English
tour,   winning   the   Steward's
Challenge Cup for coxless fours at
the Royal Henley Regatta. Another
fine performance was achieved at
the Nottinghamshire International
Regatta where UBC finished
second in the elite eight behind
East Germany represented by
their national "B" team.
East  Germany has  dominated
internatinal rowing in recent years
Soccer 'Birds lose,
still tied for first
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team lost to the Italian-Canadian
Columbus team 3-1 at Thunderbird
Stadium Saturday.
In spite of the loss, the 'Birds are
still tied for first place with
Columbus in the first division of the
B.C. Senior Soccer League.
The game was poorly played by
the 'Birds. One of the Columbus
goals was scored by a hapless 'Bird
on his own net.
"We just weren't up for the
game," UBC coach Joe Johnson
said Monday. "On Wednesday we
played our best game of the year
against Cliff Avenue United, then
we follow it with this. Playing the
way we did any team in the league
could have beaten us."
Columbus received goals from
Sergio Zanatta and Mike McLeod
in addition to the 'Birds' gift
goal.
Ken Garrett picked up the
'Birds' lone marker on a penalty
kick. The goal was his second of the
year.
The 'Birds are scheduled to leave
Thursday for their annual U.S.
tour.
Johnson said "Probably the
team's minds were on the games in
the States rather than the one we
were playing. It has happened to us
before, the over confidence and
excitement, it's something you
have to deal with."
The 'Birds dropped a similar
game just before their U.S. tour
last year. The team they played
was relegated to the second
division at the end of the season.
The 'Birds tour starts with a
tournament at Brigham Young
University in Salt Lake City, Utah.
This is the first time the 'Birds
have entered this tournament or
played any of the teams involved.
The lineup includes teams from
Dallas, the University of San Diego
and the University of Wyoming.
The tour continues for several
games in Colorado and California
before the team returns home
October 14.
and their first eight were easy
winners at the Montreal Olympics.
Coach Morrow is expecting to
boat a crew this year that will be
competitive in the collegiate
season, a season which should see
clashes with major U.S. powers
from both coasts in races in
California in April and May.
The nucleus of the crew should
be the returning members of this
summer's touring team: Paul
Castner, Rob Hartvikson, Ken
Rea, Dave Wilkinson and Fred
Withers.
The two-year-old lightweight
crew program expects to continue
its rapid progress which saw it
take the coxed four event at the
Western Sprints (Western U.S.
Collegiate Championships) this
spring.
There will be a series of intra-
squad races at 9 a.m. on Oct. 2 at
the Vancouver Rowing Club on
Coal Harbour to kick off the new
season before the hard grind of
winter training begins.
As with most campus sports that
are somewhat out of the public eye,
inexperienced but enthusiastic
novices are encouraged to try the
sport by making contact through
the athletic office in War Memorial
Gym.
The Dinos went ahead 26-23 with
a field goal. UBC took over on their
own 35 then coughed up a fumble at
their own 40. But the 'Birds'
defense came up big as they held
on a third and inches to go.
Gardiner then took over and
engineered an impressive drive
that ended with his game winning
toss to Jones.
Both UBC head coach Frank
Smith and his Calgary counterpart, Mike Lashuk, felt the
game was one of the best they had
ever witnessed.
Without doubt the difference
between the two teams was
Smith's use of his two quarterbacks, backup Gardiner and
starter Dan Smith. It was the third
time in four games that Gardiner
had come off the bench, this time
late in the first half, to spark the
offence with his smooth execution
of the veer. The sudden change
from the drop-back style of Smith
to the triple option running of
Gardiner has been catching the
defenses off stride.
Prymack with a 50-yard touchdown pass to open the scoring and
Jim Hartley converted. Hartley
then booted a 20 yard field goal.
Gary Metz started the 'Birds
comeback with his first of three
field goals. Fullback Gord Penn
scored a touchdown on a five yard
run but the convert failed. Then
with two seconds remaining in the
half Metz hit from 42 yards to give
UBC the lead 12-10.
The Dinos came back early in the
third quarter with a 12 yard touchdown run by Darrel Moir.
UBC punter Al Chorney brought
the 'Birds right back when he
picked up a low snap and rambled
70 yards to the Calgary eight.
Penn then scored his second
touchdown of the evening and Greg
Gardiner hit Tom Riemer for the
two point conversion. But Gordon
Rath, filling in for the injured Skip
Wright, took off for 70 yards and a
touchdown and the convert left the
teams tied 23-23
CURLERS
HAVE YOU SIGNED UP TO
CURL THIS YEAR?
IF NOT
Phone Mike 224-6000
or Bill 224-4866
after 6:00 P.M.
UBC CURLING CLUB
WIFL standings:
W
L
Pts
F
A
UBC            3
1
6
97
75
Calgary      2
1
4
69
79
Sask.          2
1
4
70
62
Alta.           1
2
2
50
57
Man.           0
3
0
31
85
Precision Skate Sharpening
FREE!   .rfi-r poiNT
YO£S
3771 West 10th Avenue
224-3536
"Bicycle & Hockey Specialists'
U.B.C
SAILING CLUB
First general meeting is on Wednesday,
Sept. 29th at 12:30 in the SUB party
room (room 200). Everyone is welcome to
join the Club. There will be an
opportunity to pay fees and to sign up for
lessons on the weekend. Membership cards
are available and T-shirt orders will be
taken. See you there!
Referees Wanted
for Intramurals
FLAG FOOTBALL, SOCCER, SLOW PITCH,
HOCKEY, BASKETBALL
Please contact men's office room 308 War Memorial
Gym 228-4648 and women's office room 202 War
Memorial Gym 228-5326. (GOOD PAY)
Herbie Wilson and his
grandmother have one
thing in common.
(They both save20% when they
fly with Pacific Western Airlines.)
Herbie qualifies for Pacific Western Airlines' Youth Fares.
His favourite older person qualifies for our Senior
Citizen Discount. What it means is a full one-fifth off the cost of
flying from anywhere to anywhere on Pacific Western's routes
in Alberta, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.
It's one of the great deals of the ages.
We're with you ail the way.
PRCIFIC
IUESTERH
AIHUNEE
See your travel agent or Pacific Western Airlines for details and reservations. Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 28, 197
Gears gear up new electric car
■DECORA TE WITH PRINTS^
By STEVE HOWARD
A hard-working group of
engineers has brought a prototype
electric car near to completion.
The car is advanced in safety
and economy features, including
strong structural components in
case of accidents, project coordinator Basil Peters said
Monday.
Visibility out the windows is
excellent, and the head and leg
room is as good as a Honda Civic.
The car is the successor to the'
engineer's propane-powered Wally
Wagon, but improves on the Wally
Wagon in the use of a three-phase
AC motor, eliminating exhaust
emissions.
The electric car also has a
modified automatic transmission
to cut energy loss and a foam
sandwich under the fenders to
absorb impact. The electric car
has fewer components borrowed
from regular production cars than
the Wally Wagon.
The battery-powered car is now
running and about 80 per cent
finished.
"It will be substantially com-
PETERS ... with friend in car
Another senator quits
plete in summer 1977," Peters,
engineering 4, said Monday. .
"We are working on the interior,
the dashboard, the bumpers and
the computer in the dash which
controls the electrical input
parameters to the motor," said
Peters.
Work on the electric car, first
displayed at Habitat Forum, began
two years ago and at least 50
students have worked on it so far.
The engineers are now soliciting
funds to get the project through
this year. They need $10,000 to
$15,000. Donations are being
solicited from governments,
foundations and private industry.
Over a two-year period $130,000
has been invested in the car.
The B.C. Department of Highways and the federal government's
Transportation Development
Ageney have given large grants..
The provincial department of labor
has contributed $26,000, and B.C.
Hydro gave $25,000. Many small
grants have been received from
private firms.
The project has been a labor of
love, involving sacrificed Saturdays and all-night work. Little
academic credit has been given for
work on the project.
We wanted to show what was
possible with the existing state of
technology," said Pete van der
Gracht, engineering 4.
Sixty per cent of urban air
pollution is caused by
automobiles," said Peters. "The
batteries are in a closed system.
All the lead is recoverable.
The chief problem is battery
technology. The car will cruise at
highway speeds, but the range is
only 40 miles and so the vehicle
requires an overnight charge.
Peters said the car is still practical
because most city trips are less
j than 20 miles.
Researchers around the worid
Student senator Bob Salkeld has
resigned from the UBC senate for
what he calls "academic reasons."
Salkeld, science 3, said Monday
the third year of university is the
most important year and claimed
that he hasn't enough time to study
if he continues as a student
senator.
Salkeld was science represen-
tativeon the senate and member of
the senate agenda committee, the
senate curriculum committee and
two of its sub-committees, the arts
and the other faculties curriculum
committees.
He was also member of the
student representative assembly
on the SRA nominating committee
and chairman of student housing
committees, a member of the
student administrative commission's elections committee, and
member of the president's
bookstore committee.
Vendors
referendum
WILL BE HELD OCT. 1st, 1976, TO ANSWER THE
QUESTION OF WHETHER OR NOT VENDORS WILL
BE     ALLOWED     IN     SUB.     POLLS    WILL    BE
CONDUCTED AT 8 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ON
CAMPUS AT THE FOLLOWING TIMES:
General Poll
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1st, 1976
in the following buildings or areas
SUB McMILLAN BUILDING
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY BUCHANAN BUILDING
CIVIL ENGINEERING WAR MEMORIAL GYM
HENRY ANGUS WOODWARD LIBRARY
Polls will be open between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m.
ADVANCE POLLS-THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30th at
—Gage Residences
—Vanier Residences
—Totem Park Residences
Between 5:00-7:00 p.m.
BOB GOODWIN
Chief Electoral Officer
are working on improving battery
technology, but they are mainly
employed by large firms. That sort
of research cannot be done at
U.B.C, said Peters.
About 700 pounds of batteries
now contribute to the 2,500 pound
weight of the car. The batteries run
down the middle of the car, where
they are easily removed for
replacement. The battery system
is adaptable for the time when a
longer life battery is developed,
one which will expand the range of
the car.
The batteries in the car are the
same type used in electric forklifts.
Peters said educating the public
about electric cars is a problem.
"We want to demonstrate and
display it," said Konrad Mauch.
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311 \
(opposite Super-Valu) .
Art Reproductions [
Art Nouveau i
Largest Selection '
of Posters in B.C. i
Thoto Blowups .
from Negs & Prints \
Jokes - Gifts, etc. i
{DECORA TE WITH POSTERS}
APPLICATIONS FOR THE
POSITION OF COMMISSIONER
TO THE
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE
will be accepted at the A.M.S. Business Office, S.U.B.,
during business office hours.
No   applications  will   be  accepted  after  4:00  p.m.,
Friday, October 1, 1976.
Dick Byl,
Selection Committee Chairman
IMk£|NUS
EXHIBITION
AUD SALE
OF FINE ART PRINTS
SPONSORED BY
ALMA
MATER     SOCIETY
DME  SEPT 27- OCT 1
TIME Q-s
featuring the works of Chagall, Dali, Matisse,
Breughel, Cezanne, Van Gogh,
Homer, Klee, Monet, Magritte, Picasso, Miro,
Bosch, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth ,
Gauguin, Rembrandt,   Group of Seven, BHsh
and others.
PRICES
LARGE  PRINTS
$3.-EA3FOR$7.50
SMALL   PRINTS
$L5Oea3F0R$4.OO
^        SPECIAL .FEATURE:
North American Indian
PLACE SUB  207 & 209   E J Curtis Collection
Over 1200 different prints

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