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The Ubyssey Mar 1, 1974

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Array Jordan after prof reprimand
ByRYONGUEDES
English head Robert Jordan has
asked Carleton University
president Michael Oliver to
reprimand Carleton professor
Robin Mathews for attacking
Jordan's hiring policies.
In a Feb. 6 letter addressed to
Oliver and Evelyn Moore, the
Canadian Association of University Teachers president , Jordan
charged Mathews with setting up
"an utterly irresponsible publicity
stunt designed to discredit the
practices of this department in its
recruitment of teaching staff and
to arouse suspicious insinuations
about the academic integrity of my
colleagues and myself.
"Mr. Mathews' insinuations are
baseless and unscrupulously
misleading," the letter said. "I
would not expect a public apology
from Mathews — he has never
apologized for past excesses of the
same kind — but I think he
deserves a severe reprimand, to
say the least."
Jordan wrote the letter in
response to a Jan. 24 letter
Mathews and Mary-Jane Edwards,
both associate professors in
English at Carleton, sent to UBC
administration president Walter
Gage and education minister
Eileen Dailly.
The letter referred to the English
department as a "department very
heavily controlled by non-
Canadians and Canadians of recent
citizenship" and charged Jordan
with anti-Canadian hiring policies.
The letter said Jordan and two
other department professors held
interviews for a vacant position in
the   department   at   a   Chicago
Modern Languages Association
meeting in December 1973, nearly
a month before an advertisement
for the position appeared in
University Affairs, an academic
journal published by the
Association of Universities and
Colleges in Canada.
Jordan wrote a follow-up letter to
Oliver and Moore Feb. 7 after
discovering Mathews and Edwards
had been quoted in the Toronto
Globe and Mail.
The letter charged Mathews and
Edwards with trying to "attract
nationwide attention to their
"cause", regardless of the incompleteness and inaccuracy of
their facts" and committing a
"serious impropriety and violation
of academic and moral integrity."
Jordan declined Wednesday to
comment on the letters, but
criticized Mathews' nationalism
and dismissed it as irrelevant.
"It is very foolish and self-
defeating to close Canadian society
and insulate it from foreign influences," the American born and
educated Jordan said.
He said in departments such as
sociology and political science it
would be important Canadians
belong. "Even there, other
nationalities might be better," he
said.
A March 1971 decision by UBC
senate recommended vacant
faculty and administration
positions be advertised nationally
in at least one Canadian
publication in addition to
University Affairs, and that notice
of the vacancies be sent to every
Canadian   University   offering
More teachers
needed
One teacher for every 17 students in B.C. within three years?
That's what education minister Eileen Dailly says the government
will achieve, but UBC's education dean John Andrews doesn't think it's
that easy.
It will require B.C. universities' doubling education enrolment, Andrews told The Ubyssey Thursday.
"The existing output of teachers in B.C.'s universities is 1,300 per
year," he said. "It will require an extra 1,200 per year to get enough
teachers."
Dailly made the proposals in the
legislature Feb. 20. She said the
current ratio is 21.5 and the
government plans to reduce it at a
rate of 1.5 students per teacher a
year for three years.
The ratio is actually higher than
21.5 since school officials such as
principals and counsellors are
counted as teachers even if they
teach no classes.
Dailly said returning these
people to the classroom will be a
matter for teachers and school
boards to decide on.
By JAKE van der KAMP
She said the government will
give supplementary grants to those
school districts with high student-
teacher ratios.
Andrews said he saw three
major problems in training the
required number of teachers.
The first one, he said, is simply
finding enough money.
"The university does not have
the funds after the salary increases
See page 9: ANDREWS
A-G wants press control
Attorney-general Alex Macdonald reacted to press coverage
of the New Democratic Party
government by calling Thursday
night for the formation of a
voluntary press council.
Macdonald told a B.C. Civil
Liberties Association meeting in
International House that a press
council may be needed to protect
the rights of people newspapers
harm.
Both Vancouver dailies have
been especially critical of the
' government, breaking stories of
political patronage and reacting
negatively, in the government's
opinion, to most NDP legislation,
notably Autoplan, the compulsory
car insurance scheme, and
proposed mining legislation.
"We should have press councils
where some people, aggrieved at
their treatment at the hands of the
press, can have some recourse,"
he said.
Macdonald, a founding member
of the association, referred to the
situation in New Brunswick where
all the newspapers, he said, are
See page 3: LIBERTIES
available personnel in the concerned disciplines.
Reporting to senate in May 1971,
Gage said the board of governors
had decided UBC should advertise
in accord with CAUT regulations.
CAUT regulations call for compulsory advertising only in
University Affairs.
Jordan said Feb. 4 he offered the
job to a Canadian at the December
MLA meeting, but was refused.
Jordan said he subsequently hired
another Canadian at the end of
January.
Arts dean Doug Kenny said an ad
was submitted Nov. 27, 1973 to
University Affairs for an assistant
professor in the English department, but said he did not know why
the ad appeared Jan. 22, a month
late.
A University Affairs spokesman
told The Ubyssey Wednesday the
ads deadline for the publication is
the     twenty-seventh    of     the
preceeding month. The spokesman
said the UBC English department
ad arrived Nov. 29, two days after
the deadline for the December
issue.
In a Feb. 14 memo to department
profs Jordan said he had submitted
the ad Nov. 23. He told The
Ubyssey Wednesday he did not
know me deadline was Nov. 27, and
said he submitted the ad to Kenny's office for approval.
See page 2: AD
—greg osadchuk photo
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BoG claims record but changes needed
By MICHAEL SASGES
Although most members of
UBC's board of governors say they
believe the university has a high
record of community involvement,
they also admit the record could be
improved.
And a Ubyssey survey Thursday
of board members indicated improvement can be expected.
Premier Dave Barrett, when he
brought down his 1974-75 budget
Feb. 11, said B.C.'s three
universities will have to find more
efficient ways of operating and
better ways of serving the community before the government will
give them more money.
Barrett has only increased last
year's operating allotment of $100
million to Simon Fraser University, the University of Victoria and
UBC by $10 million. UBC received
$62.7 million of last year's allotment.
The board will meet Tuesday
evening and it is expected UBC's
response to the government's
budget will receive high priority.
"I   look   on   the  budget   as   a
challenge to the university and as a
challenge to the board," said board
member Paul Plant. "I think the
premier has thrown down the glove
to the board."
The timber broker said the
university has two ways to meet
the premier's demand for change.
He said the university must
increase its public relations
program "to better demonstrate
creative, imaginative programs"
and must find ways to better meet
the needs of a changing society.
"The   problem   is   that   the
university has to think of new
exciting programs," said Plant.
"But if the guts of the university
are not financed properly to begin
with, then all we're going to get is
band-aid assistance."
He said the library, a good staff
and the physical plant form the
basis of the university.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs has said he wants to increase library floorspace by more
than 180,000 square feet by 1980.
The money for this would come
See page 3: BUDGET Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1974
Anti-union course dropped
HALIFAX (CUP) — A course
advising businessmen how to keep
the unions out of their plants has
been dropped from the Dalhousie
University curriculum.
Following a  barrage of  complaints   from   Maritime   union
leaders, the course was dropped,
from  the  special  program   of'
Ad mailed
From page 1
Kenny said the ad would have
been immediately mailed to the
publishers of University Affairs in
Ottawa. He blamed the seven-day
delay on the post office.
UBC information spokesman
Jim Banham told The Ubyssey
anyone submitting an ad'
University Affairs would
presumably have to read its ad
submission instructions. He said
every faculty member receives a
copy of the monthly publication.
When asked Wednesday if he
would be more careful in the future
while hiring profs in his department, Jordan said he would not.
"I'll be just as careful as I've
always been," he said. "No more,
no less."
management courses offered in the
winter session.
A brochure describing the course
stated "managers have a
responsibility to do everything
legally possible to keep their
organization as a non-union entity."
Robert Street, course instructor,
a business consultant, has resigned
as a part time assistant at the
Dalhousie advanced management
centre.
The Dalhousie institute of public
affairs, an intermediary between
labor and management in Nova
Scotia, is particularly embarrassed about the brochure
because its reputation revolves on
its neutrality.
Gy Henson, director of the institute and chairman of the joint
labor-management committee of
Nova Scotia, said he was "shocked
and concerned" by the wording of
the brochure. Henson said
managers have "no such thing" as
a responsibility to fight
unionization.
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Enrolment hike
Deputy president Bill Armstrong has accused premier Dave Barrett
of "not putting his action where his mouth is" by demanding an increased enrolment of medical students.
"We've been applying for funds to build clinical centres on campus
and it appears that's not going to happen," Armstrong said Wednesday.
The centre will instead be located in Shaughnessy hospital as part of
the B.C. medical centre.
Associate medicine dean William Weber said Wednesday 160 first-
year students will be able to enrol in the centre, instead of the current 80
who enrol at UBC.
Although the first-year enrolment at UBC is low, associate medicine
dean Donald Graham said the faculty's facilities are used year round.
Academic planner Robert Clark said the clinical aspects of medicine
are also taught year-round.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
'SC hasn't anything to say'
By SUE VOHANKA
Alma Mater Society coordinator-elect Lynn Orstad said
she thinks secret meetings held by
the society's new executive have
been unproductive.
"Most of the time they have a
meeting and then have nothing to
say,"   Orstad  said   Thursday.
liberties
violated'
From page 1
owned by a single company, the K.
C. Irving concern.
He said this kind of press
monopoly is a violation of civil
liberties and transgresses the
people's right to know.
Macdonald balanced this off by
saying freedom of the press must
be severely abused before he is
willing to contemplate any action.
"The value of freedom is such
that abuse should be tolerated.
"Censorship of any kind should
only be employed if there is
positive and significant harm
happening to someone," said
Macdonald.
Throughout the speech, the attorney-general said defining civil
liberties is difficult.
Macdonald also justified using
force to gain legitimate ends,
though he was quick to condemn
terrorist actions like the murders
during the 1972 Olympics in
Munich.
Supporters of the Communist
Party of Canada (Marxist-
Leninist) heckled Maconald as he
entered the building.
The hecklers carried placards
asking the attorney-general to
explain his actions which party
supporters said was "fascist".
"The NDP government is a
social in words, fascists in deeds,"
said spokesman Al Soroka.
Macdonald said the press council
should be a voluntary organization,
but was vague on how it should be
established.
He excused his vagueness by
saying he was not prepared to
deliver a speech and was speaking
informally.
"I'll put my brain in neutral and
let my tongue roll along," he said.
"They have meetings to prove to
themselves that they're doing
something constructive.
"I disagree with so much of this
garbage. It's got to stop
somewhere."
Minutes obtained from secret
meetings held Feb. 11, 13 and 18
seem to support Orstad's
viewpoint.
Although the new executive
members insisted the meetings
were to develop next year's policy,
minutes from these meetings show
specific issues have been
thoroughly discussed, but little
general policy has been developed
so far.
The dominating issues have been
Recreation UBC and a student
appointee to the board of governors. Decentralization of the AMS
and arrangements for a dinner
where new executive members are
to meet board members were also
discussed.
Executive-elect members have
insisted the content of the meetings
be secret until the new executive
—hilary pitts photo
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■>S~X^«^i!. »„iw*H,
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Budget spurs reassessment
From page 1
out of the government's capital
allotment, which will increase this
year.
"There is a paradox in the
province," said Plant. "Let's face
it. The action isn't in the Vancouver Club, but in the beer parlor
on Saturday night and in the legion
bingo.
"These are the people who knock
the university for failing to do a
job, yet these same people want
their children to go to this
university, to get the best
education."
Plant said the only times
provincial governments have ever
responded to the university's call
for money were during the Great
Trek of 1922 and the Bac Mac
campaign of 1963.
At both times students held
marches to protest the government's reluctance to increase
grants to the university.
Board member Richard Bibbs
agreed with Plant that public
relations must be increased and
the university should look to more
community involvement.
"The challenge to the university
will be to get itself better known
among legislators," said Bibbs, a
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. vice-
president. "One comment passed
to me was that it was not appreciated that a wide number of
people are involved in study at
UBC."
Bibbs said he expects the board
will decide at its Tuesday meeting
that further representation should
be made to the government.
"We want to give, we want to be
appreciated for it and we wish to be
recognized for it," he said.
Chancellor Nathan Nemetz
agreed with Bibbs, but said he will
try to avoid a confrontation.
"I think the university's involvement over the years has been
buried," said Nemetz, B.C.'s
Supreme Court chief justice.
"This is a good time for
assessment and for looking
around," he said.
Board member Beverly Field
said the board should be able to use
the university's continuing
education program as an asset in
seeking more money.
"It's a marvellous challenge,"
said Field, the Alumni
Association's immediate past
president. "We must move along
with it. It's our government and we
must move with it."
Board member Ben Trevino said
he believes the budget is unfair
criticism of the university.
"I am not sure he (Barrett) fully
understands the degree to which
the challenge is already being
met," said Trevino, a lawyer.
But Trevino said he does not
believe the university has been
involved as much as it could be.
"It's really a problem of
budget," he said. "The government is not going to give money to
do things (new programs) because
they will say we haven't done these
things in the past."
He said the agriculture faculty is
especially involved in community
programs.
The animal science department
gives a six-week seminar each
spring and fall on beef cattle to
"gentlemanfarmers," department
chairman Warren Kitts said
Thursday.
Kits said the department also
works with swine and dairy
producers on feeding, reproduction
and stock management.
Board member Beverly Lecky
said she was "distressed" with the
budget and believes that the
university is beginning to lose its
autonomy to the government.
She said she hopes the university
will not have to go to the government for approval of new
programs and more money.
"We can't be sure that funds will
continue for operation of a new
program in the future," said
Lecky.
She said certain new programs
must continue, notably the
program in nursing, which Plant
called  "probably revolutionary."
The program was decreased to
four years from five years and
will run for 11 months of the
academic year, instead of eight.
Board chairman Allan McGavin
and members Chuck Connaghan
and Thomas Dohm were out of
town and unavailable for comment.
Provincial court judge Les
Bewley, whose term on the board
ended in October but has not yet
been replaced, declined comment.
The chairman of the Alumni
Association's government
relations committee said Thursday
he hopes the association's
executive will explore ways of
getting increased allotments from
the government.
"I hope we can push the NDP
caucus, then the cabinet that UBC
plays a great part in the province,"
lawyer Ken Brawner said in an
interview.
"I also hope to lay on a highly
structured program and invite ail
the MLAs and the cabinet to the
•campus and ask them just what
they want to see," said Brawner.
takes office March 7. They had
planned to hold a press conference
then to outline their policies.
"I don't think the meetings are
really secret," AMS president
Gordon Blankstein said Thursday.
"It's not fair to the present
executive to release the information until we take office."
Minutes of the Feb. 18 meeting
largely deal with a proposal
concerning the procedure of
student appointment to the board.
According to the accepted
proposal, interested students
would submit a formal application
to the AMS executive, who would
select a suitable person to
recommend for ratification by the
full council.
Once ratified by council, the
candidate's name would be forwarded to the minister of
education.
In a meeting with several
executive-elect members this
week, education minister Eileen
Dailly would not say if a student
would be named to the board.
Orstad quoted Blankstein as
saying at one executive meeting
that the only student with the overall knowledge of the AMS and the
university needed in a board
member is the society president.
When Blankstein was asked if
this statement meant he wanted to
be a board member he said there
were both advantages and
disadvantages in the society
president sitting on the board.
"I haven't really thought about it
for myself," Blankstein said.
Blankstein said the tone of the
meetings so far has been cooperative and the executive has
worked well together.
Action before
words in
new report
A senate committee on increasing enrolment of UBC women
undergraduate and graduate
students will be concerned with
action rather than another status
report, if member Gene Errington
has her way.
"I'm personally against going
through statistics. We know the
facts. Any more studies would be a
waste of time," she said.
The committee was approved by
senate Feb. 20 after English
professor and senator Helen
Sontoff proposed it in response to
complaints from women students.
Errington, a member of the B.C.
Status of Women Council,  is an
, NDP   government   appointee   to
senate.
Individual complaints of
discrimination are examined and
ruled upon but nothing has been
done to translate these rulings into
a general policy, she said.
"Women students are often
treated so badly that it's quite
painful. Many are forced to withdraw because of such treatment."
Errington admitted she was
"quite surprised" at the senate
agreeing to set up a committee
aimed at increasing the enrolment
of women students.
She attributed the senate approval to Sontoff's deliberately
"innocuous" and "inoffensive"
wording of the motion.
Other members of the senate
committee include: forestry dean
J. A. F. Gardner; W. J. Hudson of
rehabilitation medicine; oral
biology head Leon Kraintz; and
student senator Sandra Smaill.
Sontoff, originally appointed to
the committee, has asked to be
removed because she plans to take
a leave of absence next year. A
replacement will be appointed next
week.
The committee has been directed
by senate to have an interim report
ready by October. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1974
Jordan rapped
Carleton University president Michael Oliver has
written UBC president Walter Gage asking him to reprimand
English head Robert Jordan for attacking Carleton prof
Robin Mathews.
Oliver charged Jordan with setting up "an utterly
irresponsible publicity stunt designed to arouse suspicious
insinuation about the academic integrity of one of my
university's upstanding professors.
"Mr. Jordan's insinuations are pointless self-
aggrandizement, obviously brought on by his attempt to
cover up his being caught in an exercise of witless
cronyism," said Oliver's letter. "I sincerely wish Mr. Jordan
would lay off Mr. Mathews and go back to interviewing his
American buddies."
Oliver wrote the letter in response to a Feb. 6 letter
Jordan sent to him asking he (Oliver) reprimand Mathews
for attacking Jordan's hiring policies.
Jordan's letter referred to ....
The above article is, of course, based on events which
haven't taken place — yet.
It is interesting to note, however, how insecure
English head Jordan is about his supposedly reputable hiring
practices.
As reported in our Page 1 story Jordan wants Oliver
to reprimand Mathews simply because Mathews committed the sin of implying UBC hiring practices favor
Americans.
Interestingly enough Jordan replies to charges that he
favors cronies and Americans by saying there is nothing
wrong with favoring Americans.
In any case, hopefully Oliver will ignore Jordan for
the little man he is.
\\V   ■
M^dWO/flA1 IH
Ubyssey pin-up No. 1
Letters
Pragmatism
Re "New Dean sees no
discrimination" The Ubyssey,
Feb. 14:
It's certainly wonderful to
witness pragmatism riding high
again in high-level decision
making at UBC — that the new
dean of women, Margaret Fulton,
fulfills the major requirement of
her office: like any good administrator, she knows when to
disbelieve a report, no matter what
its factual content or diligent
preparation. Dr. Fulton should fit
in perfectly with the prevailing
tone of opinion with regard to the
Report on the Status of Women at
UBC, since the implication of the
brief interview quoted in The
Ubyssey is that she would prefer to
believe the impressions gained on
a visit to the campus (no, Dr.
Fulton sexism and social
discrimination doesn't festoon
from the trees or sprawl like a
smelly carcass on the library steps
here — or anywhere else), no doubt
under careful tow, rather than any
amount of documentary evidence.
In fairness, Fulton may have been
advised by her future colleagues
not to take the report too seriously
— following their own example —
and to wait and see. Do they have
confidence that she will not look too
hard and close at the campus
situations when she is in a position
to do so? Or can we expect that her
reticence merely signifies that the
report isn't hard line enough for
her taste, that Dr. Fulton will blast
further?
Somehow I doubt it. Fulton's
resorting to jaded biological
"wisdom" (by the way, Doctor,
what is our political course if there
are, as is sometimes the case,
more "girl" babies sticking around
to hold jobs than "boy" babies?)
and the old song-and-dance about
finding qualified women for
positions shows that she is far from
acutely aware of the social'
realities that face all women in
Canada, is not oriented toward;
discovering those facts, but would
rather establish herself as — oh
no! — yet another liaison-person on
campus, a role sufficiently
nebulous and ineffectual to ■
guarantee that the importance of
the Status of Women Report will
fade away even further in official
consciousnesses. Dean of women?
What dean of women?
Mark Madoff
graduate studies
Julie Davis
education
Security
So it has finally come to this.
About 300 of UBC's faculty came
forth and showed their true colors
Feb. 14. What galvanized these
usually supine faculty into taking
to the barricades? Was it concern
for the academic standards of the
university? Was it their consciences troubled about the quality
of education provided students at
UBC? Was it worry over the under
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Fringe benefits include free 'tween classes notices for friends and
unlimited space for phoney letters-to-the-editor. Apply in writing to
The Ubyssey, SUB 241-K, or post particulars on office bulletin
board. Applications will be accepted until March 7. Choice will be
announced March 11. Approved for veterans and anthropologists.
No hippies or people named Doug Brock or Jim Banham need
apply.
funding of the library? Was it
anxiety over some deep issue
facing the local community? No
such luck. It was simple preoccupation with the security of their
pocketbooks.
Could it be that the faculty,
hardly notorious for their working-
class sympathies, suddenly want to
play the class-struggle-casting
themselves, perhaps, in the role of
the downtrodden and exploited
worker? Or is it that the faculty
wish relief from the easy-going
tempo of their profession? Do they
really wish a labor union, or just a
pay raise? It might be a pleasant
change to have the lax members of
faculty in their offices five days a
week, seven hours a day;
required to publish a number of
substantial articles a year; above
all, required to teach to a standard
approved by the consumers (i.e.
the students). And no more
relaxing sabbaticals and the four-
month summer vacations some
faculty take!
But surely the most important
thing these new members of the
"working" class will demand is the
removal of that old vestige of
upper-class academe: tenure. The
length of a contract is a bargaining
point, so life-long contracts will
have to go. (Will academic
freedom be negotiable?)
Do the faculty seriously wish to
throw away all their privileges,
abandon the idea of a true
academe and, join the high-
pressure rat-race that represents
the real world? Not bloody likely.
They want their cake — and to eat
it too.
Piers Bursill-Hall,
sciece 4
Nancy Dower,
science 3
Arts
Chalk up another one for
registrar Jack Parnall. Being
under the apparent delusion for the
last few years that we were all
students in the arts faculty, we
looked forward to participating in
the election for arts reps with
dripping democratic chops.
Imagine   our   horror   (gasp!
,gasp!) when we discovered that
our   "reps"   had   already   been
"elected", sans our participation
in the voting "procedures". We do
not, therefore, feel truly represented (as if we ever could be),
since we were denied the pleasure
of ripping up our ballots and
sending them to J. P. Octopus.
Kathy Ford
Graham Nicholls
Gordon Would
Sadonie Ball
arts 2
Orest Kernycky
arts 4
Kathy Simard
arts 1
Clean minds
Why do you insist on printing
disgusting words like "asshole"
and "pissed off" in your letters to
the editor? This campus is also
inhabited by those with clean
minds and thoughts. Surely proper
etiquette should be able to prevail
over such dirty use of language. If
you do not refrain from print such
abuses, I will stop reading your
column. There may be a place for
this kind of language, but surely
not in the newspaper that I help
finance.
please sign me,
Poindexter Pommelhauser
Dear Reader:
We are pleased to announce a
new   letters   policy.   Too   many
readers are asking us to give them
pen names for no good reason.
From now on, readers who want
pen names will go by their initials
— for example, this writer will be
known by his initials, John
Bronowski, a former UBC student.
Culprit
On Monday somewhere between
11:30 a.m. and 12:30 a.m. a culprit
lurked in the main library. This
thief made off with a very fine and
well-used umbrealla and $1.50 in
change from a red Buxton wallet.
Why didn't you take the wallet and
the totebag too? You could have
hawked them for more than a buck
fifty.
A body must be pretty desperate
to rip off a student. Students are
scrounging to make ends meet and
even keep part-time jobs.
But the joke is on you THIEF. In
your mad search through my
belongings you overlooked $10
stashed in one of the many compartments of the wallet. So next
time, forget the umbrella and take
the whole totebag! You'll be farther ahead.
Utterly Pissed Off,
commerce 1
THf UBYSStY
MARCH 1, 1974
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn-Palmer, Michael Sasges
Three announcements to jot down in your handy dandy reporters'
notebooks. Editorial nominations are open until March 7; voting takes
place from March 7 to 10. This year's goon (satire) issue will be Acquire, a
satire of Esquire. Info is available from Vaughn, Lesley, Mike, Alan and
Ryon. A news writing seminar will be held in the office noon Friday.
Vaughn and Boyd and Gary and Mike and Marise and Ryon and Jake and
Sue and Lesley and Doug (sickie) and Eric and Geoff and Bernie and Ralph
and Alan and Rick and Greg and Cam (Mr. President) and Pemme would all
like to thank Graeme Vance for the free beer. Page
Friday
JLt'W   'l  ■'        »  ","    ' *    i
v    .'   "■      »    -     '.   ^«t _     '
- -     r - "if        *.
'- «.'* -■   ■'•*■-'
■■V v *•*■'
1 i .*•   ■ - ■ ■-
Christian martyr
time
in
Battering Ram
as Rekert nails Chillcott
to a different cross Festival
Singers
of Canada
"Electrifying"
-FINANCIAL TIMES, LONDON
"Among Ihe world's
leading choral
institutions"
-TORONTO STAR
Wed. March 6
8:30 P.M.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
TICKETS:
$5.25, $4.75, $4.00, $3.25,
Students: $1.00 off
Vancouver Ticket Centre,
630 Hamilton St.
(683-3255)
A DAVIO Y.H. LUI PRESENTATION
jr
TONIGHT AND
TOMORROW NIGHT
STREET CORNER
SYMPHONY
Starts Tuesday
SONNY TERRY ft
BROWNIE McGHEE
Also Sherman Hayes
2 Shows Nightly
9:00 and 11:00
THE EGRESS
739 Beatty St.    687-4613
PF
O
O
reviews
o
City
Niatits
CANADIAN PREMIERE
"We Should Always
Part Much Wiser"
A Feature Film With Music, Conceived By And Starring
RICHIE HAVENS
Sunday,March 3-$l .25   City NightsTheatre
ONE SHOW ONLY - 2 P.M.
Director Gary Keys will be present.
1132 Davie 689-5925
"uniformly first-rate. . .
catches terror more effectively
than 'The Other' " - Variety
"hauntingly beautiful"
Arnold Edinborough
—The Financial Post
Pia Shandel
is the prisoner of time in
THE VISITOR
Eric Peterson — Scott Hylands
Eves. 7:00,6:45,10:30
Sunday matinees 2:00, 3:45
cirteinci
STARTS TODAY
1
BLUE MOVIES
AT MIDNIGHT
FRI., SAT., SUN.
Her Odd Tastes
WANDA
WARNING: Completely concerned with sex—B.C. Dir.
Handicaps
and handicaps
spotlighted
by Freeman
Battering Ram
by David Freeman
directed by Bill Millerd
at the Arts Club
There are handicapped people,
and then again there are handicapped people. The first sort
you can spot in any crowd. They
walk with canes, or hobble with a
crutch or coast along in
wheelchairs.
The other sort is more
surreptitious, and more difficult
to perceive. Their handicap lies
within.
But don't be misled into
thinking they are any less handicapped. Freeman, a physically
handicapped person himself,
makes this point clear in his
uncompromising portrayal of the
crippled, twisted people who live
in Battering Ram.
Freeman, the author of
Creeps (which appeared last
season at the Arts Club), is a
cerebral palsy victim. After
many wasted years of stacking
cardboard cartons in specially
run programmes for palsy victims, he turned to writing to
relieve and express his long
accumulation of frustration and
anger.
He writes: "Being a genius is
not all it's cracked up to be.
Especially when for years
everybody around you is quite
content to think of you as the
village idiot, and then all of a
sudden, they find this spastic
Shakespeare on their hands."
Beneath the contorted exterior
Freeman presents to the public
exists the searing acumen of
writer   and   social   critic,   a
playwright who sharply depicts
the cruelty and pain of life.
Irene (Doris Chillicott) is a
middle-aged widow who is intent
on becoming the latest and
greatest Christian martyr.
Superficially magnanimous and
charitable, Irene reveals a
ruthless and perverse distortion
of human nature. Nora (Susan
Wright), her daughter, is a
castrating bitch, who can
vascillate between savagery and
sympathy to manipulate the
people around her. Into their lair
comes Virgil (Wiston Rekert),
whose intense desire and passion
for life and love is imprisoned by
a paraplegic body.
Millerd directs a small cast,
but a strong one. Chillcott,
Wright and Rekert are a tightly
knit unit. Millerd paces them
well, and tension is subtly
balanced with humour and wit.
In the first act, the taut anxiety
and undercurrent of hostility and
tension is quickly established and
firmly felt by the audience.
Freeman's strength is the
dialogue spoken between the
lines, and Millerd does a fine job
in making us hear it.
Redg Reynolds' set is impressively realistic for the
apartment setting, and conforms
well to the needs of the script and
the dimensions of the Arts Club.
Battering Ram is not an
elegant play. Judging from these
two scripts, I would say neither is
Freeman an elegant writer. His
message is too strident, too
brutal to be couched in
mellifluous tones, and perhaps it
is his purpose rather than artistic
temperament which determines
his style. If he is crude, it is to
attain his goal of reaching the
audience, to hit hard in order to
hit home.
Steve Morris
Join the
B.C. STEREO GLUB
now being formed
THE ONLY STEREO CLUB IN WESTERN CANADA
Compare and evaluate different sound   systems
Bring in and test your equipment
Be first to hear about and listen to new equipment
on the market
Discount on stereo components, cartridges, cleaning
devices etc.
TELL US YOUR OWN SUGGESTIONS OF WHAT YOU
EXPECT OF A STEREO CLUB AND HOW YOU WOULD
LIKE THE CLUB TO FUNCTION
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL DEAN AT 687-1445 (days)
Member of Society Audio Consultants
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1974 it Battering rams
it Nattering kings
it And Petering Pans
Feudal and
dissipated was
Ludwig — and
the movie too
Mad Ludwig of Bavaria
Directed by Luchino Visconti
Screenplay by Luchino Visconti
and Enrico Medioli
Photography     by     Armando
Nannuzzi
English dialogue
Ludwig of Bavaria was
probably one of the more interesting of the eccentric minor
kings of modern Europe. His
fame rests in his feudal approach
to absolute power (in 1880) and in
the string of incredible and expensive castles he built.
It is hard to imagine how such a
critically acclaimed director as
Visconti, dealing with such a
potentially fascinating historical
character could have created
such a boring movie.
It goes on and on and on from
pointless scene to pointless scene
and it is with considerable relief
that we see Ludwig finally drown
himself.
But it isn't over yet. In the
finest documentary tradition a
message flashes onto the screen.
It seems Ludwig didn't drown
himself, the bullet holes in his
back are one of the greatest
unsolved and covered-up
mysteries in Europe.
Visconti apparently thinks this
is an important point.
But with the brain numbed by
three hours of excruciating exposure to the stiflingly close
atmosphere of German kings and
queens and countesses and
footmen it is more than a little
irrelevant. Who cares?
The plot is very simple. Sensitive and 18, Ludwig becomes
King of Bavaria. His true love,
the Empress of Austria, laughs at
him. His dream of surrounding
himself with the cream of
cultured Europe dissolves as he
is forced to expel the composer
Wagner who becomes hopelessly
embroiled in scandal. Ludwig
suffers for a while, then decides
to make good with a political
marriage to please everyone.
However the darker aspects of
his dark soul prevail and he
develops a taste for beautiful
footmen, frenzied travel and
living the more lugubrious
moments of the stage.
He builds fantastic castles and
leads a quiet life of debauchery.
His lean aristocratic face
becomes yellow and puffy and his
flashy white teeth turn rotten and
black. This seems to be a
metaphor both for madness and
debauchery for we see only
glimpses of the one and the
possibilities for the other.
Finally a delegation of his loyal
subjects toil up to his mountain-
top fairyland (in darkness and
rain of course) to inform him that
he has been deposed. The party is
over and they take him to Munich
for medical treatment.
If we assume that Visconti is
developing his character in a
conventional manner then all the
important reasons behind
Ludwig's actions are buried
under countless entrances, exits
and studies in pure esthetics.
If, however, Visconti is
developing a neo-realist study in
which an inclusion of all aspects
of Ludwig, however seemingly
unrelated is valid, then the film
still doesn't work. Its lack of
penetration, concentration on
description and choice of theme
put it in its own unsuccessful
category.
It is unfortunate that Mad
Ludwig of Bavaria suffers from
such a poor script because the
photography is elegant and
beautiful. A close attention to
color betrays Visconti, the former painter. The wealth and
privilege of the regal class is
conveyed by an evocative and
delicate use of light and shade.
There is never a misplaced color
in Visconti's leisurely but
pointless exploration of the
baroque splendor of gilt and
ormolu.
At one point Ludwig says that
he wishes to remain an enigma.
Perhaps he is an historic enigma
but the impression this film gives
is of a character trapped
historically by his surroundings
and cinematically by too much
footage and too little analysis.
Ed Cepka
SUB cines
with Peter Pan
(How could it?)
The Dizzy Pan Gang Again!
It was way back when in the limberlost daze of childhood
nostalgia and you were only a little elementary swaddler when you
clutched that sweaty two bits in your mitt and marched on down to
the Saturday matinee with the rest of the bunghole gang to watch
your hearts delight, Walt Dizzy's latest magic lantern show.
The show was the animated plastic classic Peter Pan with the
cute little Identikit Kids (plus surplus Freudian teddybear),
s'wunderful Wendy sexless but exciting, tiny chroma-keyed
Tinkerbelle the jealous sleep-dust fairy, Jimmny Cricket (im-
presserio insect, with his one gold platter 'When You Wish Upon A
Star') croaking, Captain Hook, the ha-ha heavy gloating with
meathook, Smeed the first mate fall guy, the pesky yellow-bellied
parrot, Hook's cum-uppence crocodile (smackin' lips;, smackin'
lips), and green flight fairy superstar Peter Pan himself (Mary
Poppins in elven girth).
This weekend Sub Cine takes you back to those glory hole pre-
pubescent daydreams of your long lost youth with the old gold
animated epic Peter Pan on a trip to Never-Never Land that you
have likely never never forgotten when you first saw it (released
circa 1956). Griffith, Wright, & Bosworth have conspired at
Filmsock to relive their infantile filmic fantasies once again and
bring you this day-glo gem. Maybe they should be congratuated for
cutting down on their usual high kowality kissy-kissy-kissy-gang-
bang routine, the same sexually violent du rigeur all the expensive
downtown commercial parlors push.
Peter Pan is, as you will probably all remember, the halycon
flagbearer of the Disney sterilized sweetness and light freak
middle class morality ship.
All that is nice, and safe, and clean, and all too goody-goody for
carefully programmed cute suburban kiddies goes into this 24
frame per second fairy tale. Any dose of grimy reality, anything
that does not conform to Walt's sunwonderful suburban morality
syndrome gets wiped out ("white wipe") in the contact printer
before the film is released.
The erstwhile fan dandy fantasy simply reeks of virgin niceness
and high flying moral conduct.
Its mellow-yellow dramatics are hyped with the hidden symphony orchestra and the comforting mythical axiomatic that "the
good guys always win, kiddies" and the bad guys always "get it"
(in this case, Hook finally kisses the croc ) in the end.
Despite its fanzine fantasy morality the epic does stand for the
Disney "never-never land" imagination at its height. It is mar-
velously appealing to the kid in all of us despite its age. Peter Pan,
all punctuation aside, is probably the American Graffiti nostalgic
classic of all the animated films. It perhaps should be seen if not
simply to remember all those pre-war American dream virtues
that were simply massacred at Mai Lai, et al, when the kiddies
grew up and were given guns. Peter Pan is a fun film romp in
reminisce, even if you can't stand the creaky tenor cricket, see the
Sub Cine ad for showtimes.
Eric: Ivan Berg
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE PRESENTS 2ND ANNUAL
INTERNATIONAL
EXTRAVAGANZA
Saturday, March 9
8:30 P.M.    Old Auditorium
TICKETS:
Advance
At Door
Students
$1.00
$1.75
General Admission
$1.75
$2.00
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
f	
MUSIC WEEK
Back, by popular request! The Music Undergraduate
Society presents "Music Week", March 4 - 8, featuring informal noon-hour recitals to accompany
your lunch-time munching. All kinds of music, in all
kinds of places, for all kinds of people. Come! Bring
your lunch, your friends, your dog, to the SUB
Conversation Pit, the IRC Lounge, International
House or the Music Building Recital Hall at 12:30 P.M.
daily during the MUS "Music Week", March 4 - 8.
S.VV.v>>.VV>.W..V>>.VV»»»»..v.«»»»MM*»M»!
!!
*'\*Sf+^¥¥Z-*&>&&*&&¥li*^l¥&i*i*i*SWS&&&i+**
3»»C$C8$S«3CS»SSMattWgttW«C»g
socrv,*
<        Disney's       *A
Peter
IA?
°C
Pan
-A
Ol
join pete, pixie, & Capt. Hook tonight
TONIGHT &
SAT.
7:00 & 9:30
in SUB Aud.
50c
Sun.
7:00
added feature — 'How to be a detective'
MARCH 4 TO MARCH 9
Ends Saturday ,
SAM & DAVE &
. SOULMAN BAND
KEGO CLUB OA5TOWN
ReOWIOFIS- 687 8761
Friday, March 1, 1974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 MUSICAL CONCENTRATION, director Elmer Iseler concentrates on score as he leads Festival Singers
of Canada. Famed Toronto choral group will perform at 8:30 Wednesday in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre. Critics called last tour of 36-member group superb.
Opening up Adolf
The Mind of Adolf Hitler.
Walter C. Longer.
Signet. 1973 pp. 286, $1.50.
Hitler heard voices, saw visions, but did not
believe in astrology.
The voices saved his life in the Great War, the
visions told him he would make Germany great.
He saw himself as a Christ driving Jewish
moneychangers from his temple. This is the book
that shows Hitler as the demon he was. If you've
been in stasis since 1939, this is the book for you!
Langer, a psychiatrist, was asked by Allied
intelligence to do a study of Hitler to find the most
expedient ways to make the world safe for
democracy.
Langer and his staff collected incidents,
demanding from witnesses — "What exactly did
Hitler say? What else did he do on that occasion?
How did he act? What was his attitude? Was there
anything unusual in his manner? Were there other
occasions when he behaved in this way?"
The answers, despite hazards of second hand
analysis, proved fruitful. The report was written,
and makes for interesting reading (like old
newspapers) once you become accustomed to the
"let's hang Hitler" slant.
Langer analyzes der Fuehrer from six angles:
As Hitler believed himself to be, as the people saw
him, as his associates knew him, what he knew of
himself, a psychiatrist's view, and an attempt to
predict his probable behavior in the future. While
the book shows all sorts of perceptions of Hitler,
through its eyewitness interviews (yes, Langer
knew Hitler, too) it ignores the political reasons
for Hitler's actions, i.e., Versailles, Poland, the
Rhineland and the German economy.
What gave Hitler the driving force necessary to
win power? Who would elect a man who looked
like "a travelling salesman for a clothing firm?"
Perhaps he sold his soul to the devil. Langer might
well agree.
Langer goes out of his way to mark Hitler, in his
early days, as demoniac. At the same time he is
shown as being ever so ugly and unimpressive.
Wide hips, narrow shoulders, flabby muscles,
short, thin legs. "He has a large torso and is
hollow-chested to the point where it is said that he
has his uniforms padded," says Langer. The U.S.
government paid for this? Sounds more like a
tailor's report than a psychiatrist's. But his public
image was built up through newsreels and posters
until Langer says: "The physical Hitler most
Germans know now is a fairly presentable individual."
of the tail'when he says, "his speeches were sinfully long, badly structured, and very
repetitious." But such was his cunning, that
women often fainted when he spoke. There is a
slanted suggestion of spiritual evil — "He was a
man transformed and possessed, we were in the
presence of a miracle." Where was the exorcist
when folks needed him?
Despite his conclusions on Hitler's madness,
Langer realizes that removal of the Fuehrer will
solve nothing. . ." "the madness of the Fuehrer
has become the madness of a nation, if not of a
HITLER  . .  .
incredibly ugly
large part of the continent." Langer blames the
German people for Hitler's evil. Hitler alone did
not create "German madness, but it was German
madness that created Hitler." Therefore, every
German, according to Langer, is to be condemned
for Hitler's actions.
This sort of statement seems intended to relieve
guilt which arises from a total war between the
people of Germany and the people of the world. It
establishes the ethics which make it right to bomb
civilian populations. The Germans are insane says
Langer.
They have an insane leader. They do evil
because they are insane. Therefore, we are right
to punish them through the same methods they
use. That is what Langer implies. To Langer,
Hitler is not a "personal devil, wicked as his actions and philosophy may be but ... the expression of a state of mind. . ."Hitler, insane as he
was, represented only a greater, social insanity.
The war was between sane and insane cultures.
And that is why you should hate Hitler and the
Germans, and be happy to drop firebombs on
Dresden. At least that's the way it was in '43.
Its polemical, propagandizing nature aside, the
book does make a sincere attempt to explain,
"why Hitler acted the way he did".
But putting Hitler in the crowded box labelled
"neurotic, bordering on schizophrenia" is not
important. What he does, that matters, is to
provide a case history, with clear patterns of
behavior, which may alert psychiatrists to important facts in other cases. I mean, who else
could read Hitler's attitude toward his mother
through "the curious way he feminizes certain
German neuter nouns".
Peter West
A WINNER!
4 CANADIAN FILM AWARDS
8Kt\M\\
Genevieve
Mjold
HP*
ACTRESS
GENEVIEVE
■«ST
Sffig"*
CAMILLE
BERNARD
?!es*        i
A*JJMl»CTI0l||
iXAUDE JUTRA'S
K\MOURASKr\
Adapted from Anne Hebert's prize winning Canadian novel
with RICHARD JORDAN    PHILIPPE LEOTARD    Photography   Michel Braull
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR at 30th
^"^^^ffiffl^Pn
Some nudity and
sex scenes.
—R. McDonald B.C. Director
STARTS FRIDAY
Shows at 7:30, 9:30
Matinee Sunday 2 p.m.
English Subtitles
"BEST PICTURE"-"BEST DIRECTOR"
"BEST SCREENPLAY"- "BEST ACTRESS"
.
INGMAR BERGMANS
Cries and Whispers
English Dialogue
Shows at 7:30, 9:30
Matinee Sunday 2 p.m.
STARTS
FRIDAY
Hyland
KINGS Y at KNIGHT
876-3045
, Elliott Gould
Robert Blake
Shows '
at
12:15,  2,  4. 6. 8. 10
.Sun. 2, 4| 6, 8, 10.
j Violence and coarse        isi granvTllT
^language.-r. McDonald 685-6821
I B.C. Director!
"busting:
Coronet
1%P*
Odeon
NOMINATED FOR 6 ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS
I BARBRA STREISAND - ROBERT REDFORD
MATURE |
881 GRANVILLE     SHOWS AT 12:30, 2:40, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30
682-7468 SUNDAY 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15
"JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR
Park
GENERAL—Shows 7:30, 9:30
Matinee, Sunday 2:00 "»J!'.'J
876-2747
[NOMINATED FOR 5 ACADEMY AWARDS
] INCLUDING BEST PICTURE,
BEST DIRECTOR'
Varsitu
224-3730 *»
. 4375 W. 10th
West Van
V22-634)
I GENERAL
SHOWS AT 7:30, 9:30.
MATINEE SUNDAY 2 P.M.
PS*"
Nominated for 3 Academy Awards Including
Best Actor—Jack Nicholson
Best Supporting Actor—Randy Quaid
SHOWS AT 12:10, 2:25, 4:35, 6:50, 9:05
JACK NICHOLSON
"*    THK LAST UKEUL
Vogue
Swearing   and   coarse -..„„„
language.  -R. McDonald "irnVTi^i
B.C. Director. ••*-*«»«
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1974 Friday, March 1, 1974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Andrews 'sure' of extra $
From page 1
this year. It's a stand pat year,"
The main reason behind a lack of
funds is Premier Barrett's insistence that the university serve
the community more and make
better use of its resources before it
gets more funds, he said.
Tn the throne speech, Barrett
said the grants to universities are
being frozen at $100 million with an
additional $10 million dollars to be
shared among the three universities.
But Andrews said he is confident r
the government will realize the
service to the community which
the education faculty makes and
give it more money.
"I hope the university will
submit an application for additional funds for faculties serving
pressing community  needs."
The second problem Andrews
said he faces is one of space.
"It is not possible to build enough
room for 1,200 (more) students
next year," he said.
Andrews said space is already
severely restricted in this faculty
and he has applied to the senate's
academic building committee for
an extension to the curriculum lab
of 28,500 square feet.
Social demand
UBC will offer a new bachelor of
social work program this fall to
meet Canada's demand for
qualified social workers.
The four-year program includes
two years of general arts and two
years of social work courses.
Social work head George
Hougham said in an interview
studies have shown that the
masters social work programs
given at a number of Canadian
universities was not producing
enough graduates to meet the
demand.
"In addition, the number of
applicants outnumbered the
available positions in our masters
program by a three to one ratio,"
he said.
UBC currently has a graduate
school program leading to a
master's degree in social work.
The new program will accept
about 40 students, who have
completed two years of general
arts courses, into third year social
work courses.
Hougham said a report on job
opportunities is now being
prepared and the outlook appears
good for the new program's
graduates.
Applicants must have at least a
65 per cent average and must apply
by May 30. The new degree
granting program was approved
by senate Feb. 20.
Program prerequisites include
at least three units work in social
issues and problems in contemporary perspective and three
units in dynamics and human
behavior courses.
The program will offer field
work courses at the undergraduate
level. A consulting and advisory
service is available for interested
students.
The curriculum lab is used by
education students to prepare for
their practicums in public schools.
Andrews said their preparation is
being badly hampered by the space
shortage.
He said he also sees a problem in
getting enough extra faculty
members in time but added that
this problem is not as severe as the
others.
The new teachers will all have to
come from the one year program
Education students can get their
degree either by taking one
education course every year with
regular courses or by completing a
degree in another faculty and then
enroll for one in solely education
courses.
Students getting; their degree by
the first method will obviously not
be finished in time, he said.
Andrews said he is certain more
students will be attracted to the.
expanded education program.
sturjant
4 haoma
■  ssruids
2158-Western Parkway
(above Mac's Milk) ph. 2281183
$3.50
Imported cheese and cold
meats, bread baked daily,
Danish doughnuts, muffins, turnovers ... plus a
variety of ready-to-go eatables. WHAT MORE
COULD    YOU    WANT!
BETTER BUY BOOKS
New and Used
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
CASH FOR BOOKS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. IOth Ave.       224-4144    Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
High School Teaching:
A Career For You?
Teaching In
B.C. Secondary Schools
An information session
will be held on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 1974
in the
SCARFE BUILDING-ROOM 100
from 12:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Information on present and
future opportunities for teaching positions and on the Programmes in the Secondary
Division of the Faculty of
Education will be given.
Directors and other Faculty
will be present to advise those
interested.
This is an invitation for you to
attend. The main talks will
start at 12:30 p.m., followed
by a question and answer session and individual interviews
About Your
HAIR
Newest Sasoon-style
cutting by
GRAHAM
Now at
Gabriel's
Village Coiffures
FREE INTRODUCTORY
CONDITIONER
224-7514
2154 Western Parkway
(in Village)
Today 12:30
Hillel House
"DAY OF JUDGEMENT"
##<
n
THE LAST WAR
Two films on Yom Kippur War made by students of
New Jewish Media Project.
—  Free Admission —
INTRAMURAL
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
All Day - Monday thru Thursday
IN THE MEMORIAL GYM
Final Game - Thursday 12:30
See you at the games!
BUY LOTTERY TICKETS
AND SUPPORT INTRAMURALS
CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORS
AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Three internationally-known scholars will give eight free public lectures at UBC this month. Their
talks will range from marijuana and hallucinogenic plants to a new theory of urban and community
planning and literary analysis.
The lectures are being presented through a gift from Dr. Cecil Green, a former UBC student, and his
wife, Ida.
DR. RICHARD EVANS SCHULTES,   «„.** of *. Bot^i
Museum at Harvard University,  is a leading ethnobotanist specializing in the study of drugs and
poisons of primitive peoples.
TUESDAY, MARCH 5 - "Hallucinogenic Plants of the New World," 12:30 p.m.. Lecture Hall No. 2,
Instructional Ftesources Centre.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 - "Plant Exploration for New Drug Plants from the Amazon." 12:30
p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre.
THURSDAY, MARCH 7 - "Cannabis: Friend or Foe of Mankind?" 8:15 p.m.. Lecture Hall No. 2,
Instructional Ftesources Centre.
UK. IVIIOrlAtL KlrrA I tKKt, chairman of the Department of French and
Romance Philology at Columbia University, is one of the few specialists in stylistics and textual
analysis.
MONDAY, MARCH 11 - "Du genre au texte: methodes de la critique actuella." 12:30 p.m., Room
106, Buchanan Building.
TUESDAY, MARCH 12 - "Structural Analysis in Literature: The Referential Fallacy." 12:30 p.m..
Room 106 of UBC's Buchanan Building.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 - 'The Structuralists Approach to Literature." 3:30 p.m. Salon C,
Faculty Club.
PROFESSOR IAN McHARG,
chairman of the Department of
Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania, believes that land
development should follow ecological and social patterns. He calls his new concept "human ecological
planning."
WEDNESDAY,, MARCH 13 - "A Theory of Man-Environment." 8:00 p.m., Old Auditorium.
THURSDAY, MARCH 14 - "A Case Study in Ecological Planning." 12:30 p.m.. Lecture Hall No. 2,
Instructional Resources Centre. Page   10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  1, 1974
Hot flashes
Gears vote to
pay increase
Engineering students have
agreed to an increase in their
undergraduate society fees to $4
from $3.
The $1 increase, to be levied
for four years, will go into a fund
to bail-out the administration and
help pay for the new Civil-Mech
complex.
Due to inflation, the UBC's
building fund for the complex and
the extension to Angus fell about
$1 million short. Although the
board of governors knew there
wasn't enough money for the
extensions, it went ahead anyway
hoping to pick up the extra cash
elsewhere.
However, the board didn't so
now students are chipping in to
help them out.
Other faculties including commerce are being asked to help the
administration raise money to
build various campus buildings.
Tween classes
TODAY
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES CLUB
UBC history prof George Egerton
speaks on collective security in the
20th century, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
A panel discussion on inflation and
unemployment, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, IH lounge.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Meeting for first jump course, noon,
SUB 215.
SATURDAY
AALAPSAM
Conference on continuing struggles
of Indochinese peoples for national
liberation,   7:30   p.m.,   Fisherman's
Hall, 138 East Cordova.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Dance,   refreshments,   8   p.m.,   arts
one blue room.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Party-time,   7   p.m., front door of
the Oompapa Restaurant.
SAILING CLUB
Skating party, 9:30 p.m., Thunderbird winter sports arena.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Morning  worship, evening worship
and  discussion  on  gospel  and  personal   relationships,   10   a.m.,  7:30
p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
SAILING CLUB
"Zoom-schwartz regatta", to go to
Bellingham, meet at 7 a.m. at Oakridge shopping centre.
INTER-RESIDENCE
Molstar ski meet, prizes and party —•
bus leaves UBC at 9:30 a.m. Meet at
1:30    p.m.    at    the    Cut,    Grouse
Mountain.
MONDAY
MUSIC
Faculty recital with Eugene Wilson
on viola and Kathryn Bailey on
harpsichord, noon, music building
recital hall.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Browns  • Blues
• Grays • Burgundy
• Tux-Tails • Velvets
• Double-Knits • Whit*
.Parkin! at Rser
BLACK & LEE
fwnwl Wto Cantab
431 How. 688-2481
ASSOCIATED STORES
4410 KJnntwoy 415-11*0
2174 W.it 41st Am.. 241-2750
177 Uaghaarf Mall, Bby. 014-0220
1040 Austin, Caauttts* 027-151*
1M7t Culkffara Centra,
Surrey Ml-1722
1420 lantaele, N. Ven. 000-7*20
1040 tdgemant IM,
Nartn Van. 017-5121
1504 Marina, W. Van. 024-1011
765 Park Royal, W. Van. 022-4421
1527 Lensaala, N. Van.    005-4112
10% discount to UBC students
Public Meeting
ON THE UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
JOHN OLIVER SCHOOL
41st at Fraser
Wed., March 6       8:30 P.M.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 dsy $150; additional fines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 SMB., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 —Coming Events
COKE, ENJOY an informal Bible
study. Refreshments. Thursday,
7:30.   4659  W.   4th.   224-4090.
GRAPE AITS CHEESE Festival,
March 1, in Gage. Admission 250.
for any residents; 75* for nonresidents. Free cheese and en-
tertainment.	
THE CATHOLIC Women's League
of the Parish of Sts. Peter and
Paul will hold their annual rummage sale at the Parish Hall,
38th and Cartier, on Thursday,
7th  March,  from  6  to  9  p.m.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
UNITIMER
Electronic Dark-room Timer
Now In Stock
Also, the complete line of
UNICOLOR
products
trje Hensi ana gutter
Cameras!
3010   W.   Broadway 736-7833
Birthdays are only once a year,
but a birthday gift from us can
be a once-in-a-liftime experience
Central Africa Imports Ltd.
2264 West 4th       Phone 788-7044
DECORATE with prints & posters
from The Grin Bin. 3209 W.
Broadway (Opp. Liquor Store ft
Super-Valu).
SGXEITTXPIC CALCULATOR. Unicom 202SR, 30 functions including logs, trig, memory. Discount
price   1225.   325-4161   eves.
11 — For Sale — Private
'63 ALPIKE K.T. City tested, New
tires, good condition. Ph. 274-
79201 after  9  p.m.
15 —Found
20 — Housing
WASTED—April 1st: 2 or 3 bedroom house or suite. Paul Wag-
ler,   682-6226/733-6989.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
OCCASIONAL CASK. Good at
writing, graphics, photography,
research? Sporadic assignments
for those qualified. This year,
next. Get on the list. Phone 228-
3774  or  inquire  FWT  113.
35 - Lost
REWARD: Small silver & moonstone (opaque white) ring—lost
Monday,  Feb.   11.   921-9584.
LOST — Hondas, 3:30. Winter
Sports complex lot. Red Addidas
gym   bag.   Ray,   Room   310.    224-
9774.
40 — Messages
GATS, BrS: Meet others like you,
same sex! SHERWOOD FOREST
has been going strong for five
months and has over 200 people
— all ages; lots of teens, twenties. YOU CHOSE YOURSELF.
All the info, you need to know
about the people. As discreet as
you wish. Just phone Maid
Marian or Robin Hood for more
information. This is an ultra-
friendly helpful way for you to
brighten those drab school days
(or. nights). Be brave and let the
good times roll. Phone now: 731-
6743.
SKI WHISTLER. Rent condominium opposite lifts. Dav/week.
732-0174.
50 — Rentals
60-Rides
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
STUDENT ST/COME TAX SERVICE. $3.50 basic. Call 228-1183
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 2158 Western
Parkway   (above  Mac's  Milk).
80 — Tutoring
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
85 — Typing
EXPERT IBM Selectric typist.
Theses and essays. Technical
work. Equations. Mrs. Ellis. 321-
3838.
WILL; DO TYPING,  IBM Electric.
876-6485.
ESSAYS AJTDi THESES typed. Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.
PAST EPPICZEZTT TYPHTO. Near
41st   &   Marine   Drive.   266-5053.
90 - Wanted
$50   CASH    for   original    negative,
horse    in    specific    composition.
Phone   228-3774   or  inquire   FWT        *
113.
99 — Miscellaneous
oeooooooocoBooeooaoBoeo
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
oeoeeeeeeeeoeeoecoeoeeo Friday, March 1, 1974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Athletic department
selective, elitist
By CAM FORD
Canadian University Press
This is the last of a three-part
series discussion on how
professional sports should be on
campus. Ford is presently
discussing the situation at Simon
Fraser University.
The main focus of the
recreational department is
relaxation and fulfilling physical
enjoyment. It stresses participation on local levels and is
more interested in the enjoyment
of the now instead of the
development for the future. It
involves many students at
relatively low cost. Based on
population, the cost per student is
approximately $12 a year, for
recreation while in athletics the
cost would be $44.
If you compare cost per involved
student, the price for recreation
doubles while the cost of training a
varsity athlete climbs to approximately $2,000 per annum.
Simon Fraser athletics produce
athletes for professional sport. The
greater community benefits only in
relation to pro sport. The role of
pro sport is entertainment for the
masses but not by the masses.
The recreation department has
Women top
The UBC women's track team
retained the Canada West
University Athletic Association
Championship title for the third
straight year.
Thelma Wright, Caroline van de
Poll and Sheila Currie swept the
800-metre race with Wright winning in a new C.W.U.A.A. time of
2:15.3.
Van de Poll won the 1,500 metre
and Currie finished close behind.
The sprint team of Gail Turney,
Cindy Roberge, Janet Laughton
and Jean Sparling captured first
place and set a new C.W.U.A.A.
record by breaking their own
record.
potential for direct community
involvement whereas the Athletic
Department, in its present form,
has none.
A recreational department, such
as Simon Fraser's; using the
facilities available, could serve to
bring the community closer, to
help break down barriers between
students and workers. The
facilities of the university can be
used by the public and serve as
community centres. Programs
involving the younger and older
members of the community should
be introduced through the
university.
The student athlete in a program
such as Simon Fraser's is the
victim of the athletic program the
same as students are the victim of
other departments of the
university. He is an end product,
the same as we all are.
The student athlete fits into the
role of the highly specialized
technocrat. His role is to amuse the
public now and, if he "can cut it",
later on in professional sport, the
upsurgence of which discourages
mass participation.
The student athlete is referred to
only as male to reflect the attitude
of the varsity programs. Geared
mainly for men, there are few
sports which encourage female
participation. There is less of a
demand for women's sport of mass
appeal because of cultural conditioning.
Athletic directors will argue of
the benefits of combining sport and
study, how sharp bodies help
produce sharp minds, combining to
form complete people, yet practice
selective, elitist, sexist policies by
building programs that cater to a
select few.
B'ball finishes
close but out
The season ended for the UBC
Thunderbirds basketball team
Sunday afternoon at the University
of Alberta gym in Edmonton.
It was a longer season for the
Birds than most people had expected. It was also a shorter season
than the Canada West university
athletic association expected.
Finally, it was a shorter season
than the Birds themselves were
hoping for — and their play against
the Golden Bears certainly showed
that.
The best-of-three series was to
decide the western representative
in the Canadian championships to
be held later this month in
Waterloo, Ont. But because of a
scheduling problem, the championships had to be moved ahead
one week, and the western representative had to be decided one
SOLEX
MOPEDS
are
here!
POINT
YClfS
#m
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th Ave.    224-3536
week earlier. The University of
Alberta prevailed over UBC,
winning the series two games to
one.
In the first game, offence carried
the day as the Bears outscored the
Birds 79-70 to take a one-game
lead.
Saturday night the Birds played
a much stronger defensive game,
and came up with a solid 66-62
victory. It was only the second
time this year that the Golden
Bears have lost a game.
In the third game, on Sunday
afternoon, the Birds played
another outstanding game on
defence, but it wasn't enough as
their offence just couldn't connect
after they had taken the lead with
seven minutes to go in the game.
Alberta won, 59-51.
The International Congress of Mathematicians in
Vancouver at UBC during August 19 - 29 requires the
services of
MULTILINGUAL
RESOURCE PEOPLE
to provide information and assistance to the participants. Language fluency, initiative and personality
are important. Application forms may be obtained
from the I CM office in Room 222C, Mathematics
Building. The completed forms should be returned by
March 15th, although a few late applications may be
considered. The rate of pay will be $3.00-4.00 an
hour depending on qualifications.
McMASi^R UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF ADULT EDUCATION
summer of
74
study abroad
DEGREE CREDIT SUBJECTS FOR
• Daytime Students
• Part-time Students
• Some listeners
FRANCE
(Paris) Fine Arts, French
ITALY
(Rome, Florence) Classics, Fine
Arts, Italian
SWEDEN
(Stockholm) Social Work, Sociology
23 & 45 day programmes July and
August
Related field trips integrated
into programme.
Full credit for students meeting
McMaster University admission
requirements or having a letter of
permission from another university.
For further information:
Tom Schatzky,
School of Adult Education,
McMaster University,
Gilmour Hall, Room 121,
Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8
Telephone: (416) 522-4971
(Ext 321)
—greg osadchuk photo
WHAT GOES UP MUST COME DOWN, or so hopes Ken Dohl. Part of
the tennis action happening in Armouries today, Saturday and
Sunday. Those willing to show up will probably see most of B.C.'s top
players as well as a smattering of Washingtonites and Albertans.
Action starts at 7 p.m. today and is all day Saturday and Sunday.
SKI SALE
ON NOW
Reductions
£0 /oand up
336 W. Pender St. 681 -2004 or 681 -8423
OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS UNTIL 9:00
PREE PARKING AT REAR OF STORE Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1974
CUPE presidenf charges
'York phasing out union7
TORONTO (CUP) ■— York
University has been carrying out a
policy of attrition to reduce the
number of unionized workers,
according to the Canadian Union of
Public Employees' local president.
This followed a move by the York
administration to contract out day
cleaning work at York's Glendon
College. In August, they contracted
out the night cleaning work.
John Gorton said nobody has lost
their job as a result but "retiring
employees are not being replaced
and Glendon workers are being
moved to the main campus, and
their jobs are being contracted
out."
The union has started a
grievance concerning the contracting of the night work and the
case is currently under arbitration.
Article 25-17 of the contract says:
"Three months prior to contracting out services normally
performed by the members of the
bargaining unit the university shall
discuss such matters with the
union and all relevant facts made
known."
ANGLICAN
WORSHIP
every Sunday
9:00 a.m.
Holy Communion
in the Vancouver School
of Theology Chapel of
the Epiphany, 6050
Chancellor Blvd.
Student participation is encouraged in a service which
seeks to express a balance
between traditional and contemporary forms of worship.
Everyone is welcome.
■DECORATE WrTH PRINTS1
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
|(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)^
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs& Prints
Jokes-Gifts, etc.
[DECORATE WITH POSTERS]
CAMPING
SALE
NOW TILL MAR. 16
All Items Reduced
10%-50%
Sleeping bags, tents, freeze-
dried foods, pack boards,
stoves, compasses, etc.
A.B.C. Recreational
YOUR BACK-PACK
& TENT SPECIALISTS
557 Richards (2nd FI.)
687-7885
1822 W. 4 731-4018
Norm Noddle, first vice-
president of CUPE, said no prior
discussion occurred. According to
Noddle the union had been contacted by director of personnel D.
J. Mitchell who only informed
them that contracting out would
occur.
"To Mitchell, sitting down and
writing to the union that there will
be contracting out of cleaning
services. That is a discussion."
But Mitchell said he met with
union representatives before the
three month period. "The whole
thing was thoroughly confused —
they didn't know what they wanted
to know," he said.
"We wanted to see the contract
and be satisfied that they were
really saving money," Gorton said.
The reason the administration
gave for contracting out was they
were losing money.
But Noddle claims the university
lost      money      through      bad
management. "Our people were
heavily supervised," he said.
"There was a ratio of one super:
visor to three workers, and they
had lead hands that didn't do any
work at all."
A. H. Bevan, administrator of
the workers denied the charge
saying, "We couldn't keep the
place clean with CUPE workers,
and under contract we are entitled
to this change."
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — The
Ministry of Agriculture cum
Defence announced Thursday that
a squadron of long-range Frisbee
jet interceptors has been ordered
for the Pango Pango Air Force.
Pilots will be trained on Frisbee
simulators at a secret location
where people armed to the teeth
with teeth will rip your helpless
quivering body to shreds should
you dare enter when hand-
launched supersonic test flights
are in  progress.
ALTERNATE ELECTIONS
Arts Undergrad Nominations
are open for
ARTS FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES
Bring nomination forms to Buchanan 107 by WED. MAR. 6 with
5 signatures and name of Department (23) or 1st or 2nd yr. on
the form. —A.U.S.—
New Salon For Men
NATURAL STYLING FOR
MEN ON THE MOVE
CLASSIC
715 Nelson (at Granville)
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
Telephone
688-1647
An Evening With
R. D. LAING
AUTHOR OF
"POLITICS OF EXPERIENCE" AND "KNOTS"
Friday, March 1 8:30 P.M.
British Columbia Ballroom Hotel Vancouver
Tickets available at
The Vancouver Ticket Center - 683-3255
and all Eaton's Stores and Outlets
Student: Advance $3 - At the door $4
General: Advance $4 — At the door $5
WHITE
& SPAGHETTI HOUSE
Steaks - Pizza - Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli - Rigatoni - Chicken
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
OPEN
Mon.-Thurs.
4:00 p.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sun,
4:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m..
DOWNTOWN - WEST END/*
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11:00 a.m. -4:00 a.m.
Sunday
:00a.m.-1:00 a.m.
688-5491
1359 Robson,
m
738-9520
or 738-1113
3618 W.Broadway!
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities -Take Out or Home Delivery
University of Toronto
SUMMER PROGRAMMES
in
EUROPE
The University of Toronto, in co-operation
with the Universities of Nice and Siena, is
offering degree courses in French language
and literature and Italian fine art, language,
literature and civilization during the months
of July and August.
Further information:
Woodsworth College
119 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario   M5S 1A9
(416) 928-2400
TONIGHT IS THE DRAW!
FOR THE 16 TICKETS ELIGIBLE TO WIN THE
Intramural Basketball Tournament
TTERY
First Prize: ONE YEAR'S SUPPLY of Pit tokens (200)
Second Prize: ONE YEAR'S PASS for 2 to the Pit Cabaret
Third Prize:   ONE ROLL of Pit tokens (50)
- NOTE: PRIZES MAY BE REDEEMED FOR CASH VALUE -
(    IS ALL IT     j
TAKES TO    |
WIN
TICKETS ON SALE
TILL 10:30 IN THE PIT
16 TICKETS WILL BE DRAWN FOR THE TOURNAMENT,
WHICH TAKES PLACE ALL DAY, MARCH 4-7 IN MEMORIAL GYM.
Each ticket drawn receives a minimum three cases of cheer!

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