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The Ubyssey Mar 6, 1973

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Array 1973-74 budget out $7,000
TK UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 40       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1973
48     228-2301
—kini mcdonald photo
GIDDY ADMINISTRATION PRESIDENT Walter Gage prepares to defuse loaded bran muffin found in his
office Thursday. The muffin bomb had been delivered by a mysterious anarchist in leather boxing shorts who
apparently thought Monday was Wally's 68th birthday.
Students on housing board
By MICHAEL SASGES
Residence students are now
working on a plan to organize a
new housing administration
with student-administration
parity.
"We want to get student
representation to avoid in the
future the confrontation
currently in front of us," said
Derrick Booth, head of the
Acadian Park tenant's society.
Booth said Monday all five
student residence action
groups will discuss the
proposal, passed Thursday at a
general meeting of all
residences.
"We want to get an overall
plan that will unify all
residences," said Booth, ed 5.
He said residence students
would have no objection to the
current housing head, Les
Rohringer, staying on any new
board or administration.
Rohringer started the
housing controversy when he
proposed  to   the   board   pf
ROHRINGER...
meets with students
governors Feb. 6 all residence
rates be raised 9.75 per cent.
He said the action groups
plan to have their proposals
ready when they go before the
board of governors to get
information on the proposed
rent increase.
However,      Booth      said
residents' representatives are
meeting with Rohringer,
bursar William White and
other members of the housing
administration at 10:30 a.m.
today in the senate and board
room of the old administration
building.
"This meeting probably
means the administration
recommendations (on the
recent increase) are ready for
the board of governors," said
Booth. "We expect that some
of the information we've
requested is, therefore, forthcoming."
(The action groups have
been demanding the relea'se of
information that would justify
the proposed rent  increase.)
Brian Loomes, Alma Mater
Society president-elect, said he
supports the student
representation proposal.
"Any proposal for student
representation is progressive
and good for this campus,"
Loomes said Monday.
By LEN JOHNSON
A projected deficit of $7,000 in the Alma Mater Society
budget for 1973-74 may force a cut in expenditures for The
Ubyssey and certain extracurricular activities.
AMS treasurer-elect John Wilson said Monday
expenditures are $151,000 while income is estimated at only
$144,000.
The AMS obtains its money
from the $24 fee charged to
every student, $15 going
toward paying the mortgage on
SUB and the remaining $9
going to the AMS.
Wilson said in an interview
the AMS has a certain number
of expenditures it is legally
required to make, such as
administration, SUB
management, and the accident
benefit plan.
He said the only items on
which expenditures could be
cut were The Ubyssey,
intramural sports, the
proposed National Union of
Students fee and the
mandatory money grant to the
different undergraduate
societies, known as the Palmer
Plan, based on their respective
enrolments.
Wilson said the largest single
expenditure        was on
administration, $66,000, while
the second largest was $32,000
for The Ubyssey.
He said even though this
more than one-to-one
spending ratio between
programs and administration,
once the allotment for The
Ubyssey is subtracted the
expense for administration
could not be cut and in fact the
estimate was probably
conservative.
"It is the treasurer's job to
see that the AMS maintain a
sound financial basis, and that
means not running a deficit,"
he said.
Wilson said because the AMS
was committed to spend
money on certain things, cuts
would have to be made on other
things in order to avoid
running the projected deficit.
The Ubyssey might be one of
those things.
He also mentioned no funds
will be available for special
events next year and less
money for intramural sports,
although president-elect Brian
Loomes said the AMS was
currently looking for outside
sources for money for special
events.
Wilson said income might be
even less than hoped if student
enrolment drops more than is
expected next year.
He said if the students would
agree to an extra $3 being
added to the AMS fees it would
allow enough money to cover
all programs and allow a small
margin as well, although he
considered a fee increase
unlikely because the last 10
requests for fee increases had
been turned down by students
and he had no plans to
introduce a motion in favor of
one.
Current treasurer Dave Dick
attributed the proposed deficit
to rising costs. He said the
AMS has had to cut expenses
on extracurricular activities
every year for the last 10
years.
Strike ends
at UQAM
MONTREAL (CUPI) —
While bouncers armed with
baseball bats patrol corridors,
students at the Universite du
Quebec at Montreal returned
to classes Monday in the wake
of a concerted offensive by the
administration to break their
five-week strike.
The students, faced with the
threatened cancellation of
their school year, voted at a
general assembly Sunday to
return to classes and to
continue their battle against
the administration and its new
fee policies along different
lines. The new fee policies
would force the expulsion of
many students unable to pay.
Despite an injunction against
the strike obtained two weeks .
ago by the administration, few
courses were held last week.
Students and teachers
boycotted classes in protest
against the injunction.
- But, threatened with fines
and salary cut-offs, the
teachers voted Thursday to
return to classes.
The administration, at the
same time, announced that the
school year was extended until
May 25, and that any courses
not resumed immediately
would be cancelled.
This tactic, it was pointed out
in Sunday's meeting, would
divide students course by
course, activity by activity.
To ensure the university
remains 'open' and that
classes are held, the
administration went so far as
to hire professional bouncers
— reportedly at $150 a day — to
patrol the halls and deal with
'disruptions'. Students claimed
that some bouncers carried
baseball bats.
Despite all these
intimidations and threats,
however, more than 1,500
students from UQAM, U de M,
and several CEGEPS,
demonstrated Friday in a
march to the Palais de Justice.
Meanwhile, inside the court
buildings, Judge E. Martel
agreed to prolong the
administration's injunction
until Monday night. He also
refused to hear the pleas of the
teachers' and workers' union
against the injunction until_
they were presented in writing.
The unions maintain that the
injunction, directed against not
only 11 students and COPE, the
students' strike co-ordinating
committee, but also 'all non-
designated persons' who
support the strike, is a flagrant
violation of their right to
strike.
The resolution the assembly
finally accepted took into
account the "university and
the government refuse to
recognize COPE and the
general assembly because they
fear the recognition of a
militant student movement
which can disturb their 'social
peace' and 'the state cannot
allow the students to organize
on an autonomous base and
ally themselves with the
workers' and teachers'
movements." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
Survival plan revealed
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Ecology. Women's
liberation. Class struggle.
Not isolated entities but
parts of a unified system, says
anarchist and author Murray
Bookchin.
This unified system was last
achieved in "primitive"
society which was basically
egalitarian, Bookchin told 250
persons Monday in SUB
auditorium.
"The unity of the individuals
within the primitive groups at
the same time was extended to
the eco-system. The breakup of
these early societies into
hierarchies and eventually
classes resulted in a
hierarchical view of nature."
Bookchin said modern
society regards the parts of
eco-systems as relatively
superior or inferior.
"Ecology should allow no
hierarchy in the eco-systems.
The notion that man is destined
to dominate nature stems from
the idea that man is destined to
dominate man."
The reduction of women to
the status of objects coincides
with the introduction of this
hierarchical view of nature,
said the author of Post-
Scarcity Anarchism.
He said the reasoning is that
"women are smaller and
weaker, therefore they are
inferior."
He said modern capitalism
has raised the discord between
man and his environment to its
highest level.
"What unites most in the
bourgeois market place is
competition. He that does not
expand his capital and devour
his competitors is eliminated.
"A society that is based on
production for the sake of
production is inherently anti-
ecological."
Bookchin predicted
capitalism, if unchecked, will
eventually cause
environmental collapse.
"The present choice is
limited," he said. "Either we
create a viable eco-system or
we go under as a species."
Said Bookchin: "Natural
ecology will be meaningless if
we do not develop a social
ecology that is relevant to our
time.",
"This system has to be done
Reps elected
Most undergraduate
societies at UBC have elected
their executive for next
September.
President-elect of • the
engineering undergraduate
society is Greg Williams.
External vice-president-elect,
John Haythorne; secretary-
elect, Janet Calder; treasurer-
elect, Sonny Carruthers.
Forestry undergraduate
society president-elect is Ron
Judd. Vice-president-elect,
Larry Atherton; secretary-
elect, Pete Afflect; treasurer-
elect, Bob Conroy.
Commerce undergraduate
society president-elect is Gary
Powroznik. Vice-presidentelect, Lyn Oakley, Rob
Sinclair; secretary-elect, Rob
Livingston; treasurer-elect,
Gary Zikie.
Agriculture undergraduate
society president-elect is Bill
Aumack. Vice president-elect,
Bill Rutley; secretary-elect,
Heather Biffle; treasurer-
elect, Doug Rutley.
Science undergraduate president-elect is Gerry Mitchell.
Vice-president-elect, Burtha
Hall; treasurer-elect, Steve
Haber.
away with and replaced with a
society that will regain the
balance between man and
nature."
He labelled the ideal society
"anarchical communism."
Bookchin argued for the
establishment of eco-
communities fusing such
aspects of human life as
industry and agriculture.
"I'm not suggesting here we
abandon technology and return
to a Palaeolithic food-gathering society. I am arguing that
technology is not advanced
enough."
He said the eco-community
would utilize what he termed
eco-technology to produce
products designed to fit in with
the ecology. He said so-called
modern concepts such as built-
in obsolescence will be
eliminated.
Bookchin said he and others
hope to set up an eco-
community in southern
Vermont. He said the location
is near enough to metropolitan
centres such as New York and
Boston so that large numbers
of people will see the benefits
of such a community.
He said people who recognize
the totality of the problems
capitalism causes should
organize and inform the public
as to what is happening.
He said projects damaging to
the ecology should be actively
opposed and alternatives like
eco-communities be organized.
"The attack will finally be on
the social system itself," he
said. "One must continually
draw ecological consciousness
into revolutionary
consciousness."
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE ELECTION
for Student Members of the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
c Nominations are invited for three positions on the Board.
• Nomination forms are available at the Centre Office.
• Nominations close Tuesday, March 13, 1973 at 5:00 p.m.
rrw rr
ExportA
CANADA'S FINEST CIGARETTE
WARNING: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health
increases with amount smoked.
GENERAL GRAD CLASS
MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1973
Rooms 207-209 SUB
PURPOSE — To hear presentations of groups desiring grad class
funds and to VOTE on the projects YOU think
should receive grad class funds.
VOTING -       Thursday March 8, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Friday March 9, 10:00-5:00 p.m.
in the main foyer of SUB
1
Study In Israel
THE UNIVERSITY OF HAIFA IN ISRAEL ONE
YEAR PROGRAM IN ENGLISH, JEWISH,
ISRAELI AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES
OCTOBER, 1973-JUNE, 1974
For additional information and applications write to:
THE AMERICAN FRIENDS OF HAIFA UNIVERSITY
500 Fifth Avenue - Suite 802, New York, New York 10036
J
A.M.S. Co-op Bookstore
Closes April 30th
CONSIGN BOOKS NOW
FOR SEPT.
Discover Yourself
In ISRAEL This Summer
COLLEGE AGE PROGRAMS
All college programs last seven weeks. Student can select at no extra cost,
an open ticket to stay on in Israel and/or stop over in Europe for as long as
they wish up to one year.
Summer in Kibbutz—($660)
5 weeks living and working on a
kibbutz.
2 weeks. seminars and field trips
throughout the country.
Israel Summer Institute—($960)
2 weeks living and working on a
kibbutz.
2 weeks seminars in Jerusalem.
1 week nature field school,
extensive organized tours.
Fold Dance Workshop-($999)
2 weeks organized instruction in
dance.
2 weeks living and working on a
kibbutz.
2 weeks seminar in Jerusalem.
1 week nature field school.
Art Seminar-($960)
3% weeks art seminar
3% weeks organized touring.
Drama Workshop-($1,075)
3 weeks intensive study on
technique, training for repertory,
speech and movement.
Attendance at performance of
Israeli theatre, and informal
social gatherings with Israeli
actors.
2 weeks on a kibbutz.
2 weeks extensive touring.
University Study Groups—($975)
4 weeks courses at Tel Aviv
university, in English, or
intensive Hebrew language
course. Eligible up to 6 credit
units.
3 weeks touring, seminars, and
working on a kibbutz.
Archaeology Seminar—($799)
2 weeks lectures at Tel-Aviv
university.
3 weeks digging at Tel Beersheva
(eligible for 6 credit units).
2 week intensive tour throughout
the country.
Medical Summer Work at hospitals
for medical students.
Social    Summer   Work   at   social
service agencies for social work
students.
The prices above based on round trip from Montreal.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
Israel Program Centre
950 West 41st Ave., Vancouver 13, B.C.
Phone (604) 266-5366
Due to circumstances beyond our control the film
"Silent Running" is not available.
SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS
THREE
IN THE
CELLAR
Starring
Joan
Collins
Lester
Stern
"This film has nothing to do with
'Three in the Attic',
but it has lots to do
with student revolution -"-Brilliant Satire!!
"A young student poet decides to ruin the reputation of a right
wing university president by using his daughter."
Thurs. 7:00 - No Show on Friday
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30 - Sun. 7:00
■    ■   ■
SUB ADV. 50'
■   ■  ■  ■  I Tuesday, March 6, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Birnam Wood comes to Freddy Wood
By VAUGHN PALMER
Donald Soule's production
of Macbeth, on at the Freddy
Wood until March 17 is a fast-
paced, unpretentious
interpretation of the play and a
surprisingly well-engineered
application of theatre in the
round.
Soule has adapted and
abridged Macbeth, producing
a play which though two hours
long, (without intermissions)
passes very quickly. The
atmosphere, sinister and'
eerie through creative use of
lighting and sound, captures
fully the violence of the play
and the physical direction; set,
timing and action, reproduce
the drum-beat rhythm of
Shakespeare's work.
It is a production that
borders on escapism, charging
along with robot-like precision,
violent and sinister — in short
a production for those who
don't normally like
Shakespeare as well as those
who do.
However, those not
familiar with the text will not
come away knowing much of
what Macbeth is about.
Like many modern
adaptations of the play
including Macbird, Richard
Ouzounian's musical and
Roman Polanski's movie
Soule's production
concentrates on the violence
and supernatural aspects of
Macbeth.
This abridged version of
what was already
Shakespeare's shortest
tragedy removes the empathy
we should have for Macbeth,
the occassional moments of
humor as in the drunken porter
scene, some of the intense
passion and more importantly,
the overall sense of cosmic
unity        pervading all
Shakespeare's work.
Unlike Shakespeare's
play, Soule's version maintains
violence and discord until its
sinister fade-out, instead of
restoring the natural order at
the end.
Soule also exploits the
supernatural elements of
Macbeth. Unmistakeably, the
witches in his production are
witches;   not  harmless  old
MURRAY BOOKCHIN
—kotaro tanaka photo
, eco-communities needed to prevent ecological collapse. (See story, page two).
hags, or on the other extreme,
not the three fates.
By exploiting these aspects
of Macbeth, however, the
story's sense of reality is
sacrificed and instead
approaches escapism. The
literary value of Soule's
production is low — it is not
great in that sense.
But it is great
entertainment.
Except for some toying
with mirrors, an unfortunate
cliche used in far too many
productions of Shakespeare,
the play is almost
oversimplistic in its lack of
pretentious symbolism.
Shakespeare wrote his
plays largely for the stalls,
one suspects most Elizabethan
theatre companies played to
them, and so, commendably,
does Soule. Perhaps realizing
the limits of the acting talent
available, Soule has produced
what is a competent, enjoyable
production, rather than a
literary interpretive one.
However, some competent
performances did surface in
the production, more
especially Janet Wright's
chilling Lady Macbeth and
Matthew Walker's Macduff.
Notable also were Lome
Kennedy as a tough, pragmatic
Malcolm, and Kenneth Ryan's
grim Banquo.
The eerie atmosphere of
violence maintained from the
beginning by the witches, the
ghostly descent from the
ceiling of the branches of
Birnam Wood, the
melodramatic re-appearances
of the ghosts of Duncan and
Banquo, and the frightenly
sinister suicide of Lady
Macbeth all add to a
classically entertaining
production.
The real star of the show is,
of course, Richard Wilcox's
set. Basically it consists of an
outer rim of elevated catwalks
and platforms, built around a
centre stage and connected to
it by two movable
drawbridges. The progression
of action around the rim and
the ghostly appearance and
disappearance of the
characters on the mini-stages
increases the speed of the play
and events.
Incidentally the best
location to make sure you don't
miss anything is to stand on the
floor space between the rim
and the centre stage.
The concept of audience
involvement supposed to be
produced   by   this   sort   of
Exposure
production simply doesn't
happen but this, isn't really
Soule's fault. Most people
would as soon merely observe
but in this production where
they aren't asked to
participate and often shoved
out of the way, involvement is
at a minimal level.
But the removal of the
physical separation between
audience and stage and the
using of a complete three-
dimensional set, does enhance
the action of the play, which is
a much better application of
this concept, than in most
experimental productions.
Soule seems to have
learned from Richard
Shechner's Tooth of Crime
production exactly what not to
do in any experimental effort
of this sort, and has produced
something which suggests in a
modest manner that formal
ways of performing
Shakespeare        are        not
necessarily the only ways.
Soule tends to load the
reaction of critics of his play
by, in the program
commentary suggesting
anyone rejecting his
production considers
Shakespeare's plays "sacred
cows" or "comfortable
classics."
This is as ridiculous as
Soule's suggestion that
violence is what Macbeth is
about.
Macbeth is about a number
of things, and a producer
making a play based on such
narrow interpretation of
certain aspects of a
Shakespearean play is bound
to be validly and justly
criticized by serious students
as is anyone daring enough to
alter his lines, particularly
when the abridgements involve
such important passages as
Macbeth's soliloquy, on the
death of his wife or the
poignant scene where he asks
the doctor to cure him of his
madness.
On the other hand one
sympathizes with any
producer trying to do
something new and different
with Shakespeare's works,
which to many may seem to
have been produced to death.
Soule has tried something
different and regardless of its
literary drawbacks his
production of Macbeth has
integrity, dynamism, is well
within the realistic limits of
any local company, and most
importantly is two hours of fine
entertainment.
By ART SMOLENSKY
Latest word from Victoria concerning the two
education commissions (one post-secondary, one
elementary and secondary) is that each commission
is slated to have five members.
Although the student to sit on the post-secondary
commission has not yet been named, there is a
strong possibility that student senator Svend
Robinson will be placed in the position despite
probable objections from the B.C. Association of
Students.
Meanwhile there is considerable concern among
UBC faculty that commission head John Bremer has
so little B.C. experience that it may seriously
interfere with his ability to analyze the present
educational situation.
# * *
It is most surprising that the B.C. government,
whose premier is an anti-nuclear advocate, has not
been jumping up and down about the new $550 million
Trident missile base to be built near Bangor,
Washington.
The Puget Sound base will serve as the home for a
fleet of 10 Trident submarines armed with 6,000 mile-
range missiles. These are scheduled to replace the
older type Polaris submarines which are equipped
with a 2,800 mile-range missile.
Because of the military formidability of a mobile
missile launcher such as the Trident, a premium is
placed on its supply centre. By destroying the supply
centre two purposes may be achieved:
First, in a protracted nuclear war (yes, Virginia,
it is possible) the advantage goes to whoever has a
viable "second strike" capability. If you are able to
destroy or at least make unusable the supply centre
or launching area of the enemy forces, then while
they may have sufficient surplus warheads they may
not be able to get them off the ground to destroy
whatever you have left.
Second, in a 10-ship fleet, at least two and
probably more of the submarines will be in or near
home port at any given time. The complexity of a one
billion dollar machine (price includes missiles)
means a great deal of servicing and maintenance
must be performed on it.
All this points to the fact that the naval torpedo
station near Bangor which at the moment probably
rates no more than a leftover Russian A-bomb, will
be retargeted with a much heftier weapon, in all
likelihood at least two high yield H-bombs (the
second one, should the first one fail).
The implications for both Vancouver and Victoria
in the event of any Soviet-American, or in the future,
Sino-American conflict are of course disastrous.
Centre to centre it is 105 miles and 60 miles from
Vancouver to Bangor and Victoria to Bangor
respectively. The immediate damage range of a 5
megaton (medium sized) H-bomb is 130 miles.
While the first Trident isn't- scheduled for
completion until late in 1978, the $550 million base
will be ready considerably in advance of that date.
Perhaps it is time Barrett manifested his anti-
nuclear attitude by doing something about the
potential environmental danger nuclear-powered
submarines constitute to our coastal waters as well
as the danger to B.C.'s two major population centres
in the event of a nuclear war. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
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Edit No. 44
So they're trying to carve up The Ubyssey again.
The new executive couldn't wait, could they? There's
more than a week to go before they officially take office
and they're already trying to slice up our 1973-74 budget.
That's what the noises presently emanating from the
AMS executive offices seem to indicate.
The present speculation says The Ubyssey will have to
be cut back to one issue a week next year. This compares
with two issues a week this year and three issues a week last
year.
They claim this is necessary because of a lack of
money.
We agree that financially the AMS is in more
difficulty than a tuba player with the runs. But the reason
for this is a bureaucracy almost as ungainly as this
unfortunate simile.
The bureaucracy is a result of the mistrust which
seems to be an integral part of the AMS finance system.
This mistrust results in approximately $66,000 a year
being spent to administer $85,000 in funds.
What this basically means is that every time a club or
an undergraduate society wants to spend $1 for new
crayons, the AMS business office spends about 75 cents for
the half dozen invoices and a share of the truck rental to
haul the daily supply of red tape to UBC.
There is an easy way out of this ridiculous situation.
How? Eliminate the red tape. Decentralize the AMS
business office and put the responsibility for financial
transactions directly in the hands of the clubs and
undergraduate societies.
Surely the leaders of these organizations are
responsible enough to keep track of spending.
There is no need to maintain the present bureaucracy,
particularly at a time when spending cutbacks are
threatened. We have suggested this before and we suggest it
again. So far we have been-ignored.
This is why we get a bit upset when The Ubyssey's
budget is made a target for budget cuts.
Letters
THIUBYSSEY
">J
MARCH 6, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
The Ubyssey it had a staff, ee yi ee yi oh. And on this staff there was
a slug, ee yi ee yi oh. With a Gary Coull, Linda Hossie, Vaughn Palmer,
Mark Hamilton, John Andersen, Art Smolensky, Simon Truelove here, and
a Lesley Krueger, Steve Brown, Ryon Guedes, Kent Spencer, Roger
MacNeill, and Kini McDonald there, here a slug, there a slug, everywhere a
slug-slug, the Ubyssey it had a staff, ee yi ee yi oh. Sorry, Kent, but your
masthead wasn't in good taste.
V.
Hiking
Well, there we were. We'd got
the old Hillman running again,
and things were all fine, save for
the muffler that wasn't there, and
other minor defects that hardly
affected driving. Nice to have a
car in Vancouver, since hitchhiking hardly is what it used to be
in the old days. So, we drove out
to the university to pick up "some
application forms and talk to the
people in the departments where
we were planning to continue our
education, next fall. We even
found a free parking spot, out on
Wesbrook, and the rain stopped
for a little while, too. We had a
1,000 reasons to smile.
Well, we did, until the rain
started all over again, and we
stopped on University Boulevard
to load the car up with hitchhikers. Thanks, they said, hitchhiking sure is not what it used to
be. When the last rider pressed
himself into the backseat with the
other two already there, officer
Tom Maley of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police (university detachment), revealed his true identity if not personality, and once
again brought the old Hillman to a
full stop. Hello, officer Maley,
how do you do. I take it you have
nothing better to do than hassling
people who pick up hitch-hikers.
Well, officer Maley didn't, and
since indeed I did violate section
127 of the Motor Vehicle Act
(specifically by disobeying a traf-
' fie control device, the device being
the sign that tells you not to stop,
not even to pick up a load of
hitch-hikers who cannot afford
outrageous bus prices), we got
nailed for two points. Cops 2,
students 0.
Thanks, officer Maley, I'm sure
you're the hitch-hikers best
friend. And mine.
Anonymous
Champion
It has come to the attention of
some students who are concerned,
that the Alma Mater Society has
taken upon itself to champion the
cause of "underprivileged employees of Denny's Restaurants."
It may be acceptable to send a
telegram to labor minister Bill
King and it may be acceptable to
ask students to support picket
lines but it is not acceptable for
this council to donate $50 of the
students money to a cause that
has nothing to do with the students.
This is the first formal motion
passed by this new council. If this
is going to be allowed to continue
one wonders whether the AMS
will have any money to conduct
student business next term. Our
fees were not meant to be used as
hamburger fodder for any and
every schlock restaurant dispute
in this city.
Granted, we feel that the employees of Denny's restaurants
have legitimate complaints and as
such deserve our sympathy and
support, but on an individual
basis.
Now that a precedent has been
set, the door is open for, say,
oppressed workers at the Chick
and Bull to come crying for monetary support to aid their cause.
That same $50 could have gone
a long way towards improving the
quality of food service on campus.
What we're getting at is that
the AMS should concern itself
primarily with the improvement
of campus facilities (clean up your
own back yard) rather than using
fees for a slush fund to support
various causes (no matter how
deserving) which are completely
divorced from campus affairs. In
other words, AMS, mind your
own business.
D. R. Lewthwaite,
commerce 1
C. W. Barton,
commerce 1
Thom Hardern,
art 2
David Clemens,
commerce 3
Meszaros
It may be of interest to
members of the university
community that the minister of
manpower and immigration wrote
to me recently:
"I have been asked to
answer your representations
concerning Dr. Istvan
Meszaros.
"Because Dr. Meszaros
gained entry to Canada by
misrepresenting himself to
be a visitor when in fact he
intended    to    reside   here
permanantly, he was
ordered deported. After he
withdrew his appeal against
the order of deportation to
the immigration appeal
board his deportation was
effected when he returned
to England.
''Dr. Meszaros
subsequently applied for
return to Canada as an
immigrant. The honorable
Robert Andras reviewed his
case and gave his consent
for his return.
"Yours sincerely
Daniel Coates
executive assistant"
One would be inclined to agree
with the authority: it is not nice
to hide one's real intentions.
Actually, as we very well know,
professor Meszaros was denied
landed immigrant status, well
before his arrival at the airport,
because he was regarded a
"security risk," being, as he
admitted without any disguise, a
Marxist scholar.
The government — probably
with an eye to the then upcoming
elections — wanted to show a
strong hand against '.'dangerous
elements" and critical
intellectuals. The minister
admitted that there was a political
decision involved and promised to
review that... nothing of this
was hinted at in the letter.
Lesson no. 1: look twice — and
more — at government statements
regarding "criminal" or "illegal"
activity, before you dismiss the
possibility of political dissent,
artificially veiled by bureaucratic
formulations.
The second lesson is more of a
civic character. It is often said
that letters of protest,
representations to ministers,
demonstrations and other forms
of expressing dissatisfaction with
actions of the authorities are in
vain and ridiculous.
In this case it is quite obvious
that the government of Canada
would have "got away with" a
political-intellectual
discrimination against a famous
scholar, had the academic
community not made it clear that
they cannot be fooled by
procedural excuses. I do not think
it is important now to reply to
this letter — although one would Tuesday, March 6, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
wish to tell the executive assistant
that his officialese does not do
justice to the case. But lesson no.
2 remains: it is worth while to
keep the gunpowder dry.
JJVl.Bak
history department
Election
I am writing concerning a grave
breach of the democratic system
at Totem Park. As some readers
may already know a slate called
"team of independent Totem students united for progress" ran for
the positions on council.
During the election certain
breaches of democracy could be
observed. The candidates of this
slate were all observed to have
ominous TlTs in red after their
names. Now would you vote for
someone with a TU after his
name? These candidates were also
arbitrarily assigned to the bottom
squares on the ballot. This you
must agree is stooping very low.
The names of the election "winners" were immediately posted
minus election tallies leaving some
to doubt whether these ballots
were actually counted.
Prior to this election a small
council clique were upset because
this slate did not ask for their
approval if they could run. One
can only assume that this small
clique desires that the reins of
government should only be turned
over to those who are in sympathy to their views.
Some in this clique have even
gone so far as to pressure housing
administration for the removal of
these candidates from their preferred floors at Totem Park. Needless to say many of these
candidates have become entirely
disgusted with the way Totem
Park is being run and have considered not returning. Alas this
small clique have succeeded again
in returning those council members who won't rock the boat at
Totem Park.
Stephen Weir,
geology 4
Letters
We are the "privileged"; we
have the key to all doors out here,
punched right into our AMS
cards. Ad Mortuum Sequitur. But
we have been created in order to
be serviced. I may be crippled
inside, but I resent being used as
someone else's crutch. There are
20,000 of us here, a small city,
constantly. being raked, emptied,
patrolled and lectured; hustled in
our own SUB by the hooker, the
fakir, and candlestick maker;
renovated, denotated, enumerated, referendummed; parked,
postered, toasted, and boasted
about; projected at overhead,
solicited, and graduated with
essays, TA's, BA's and b.s.!
I don't dream of changing the
REAL world, I just want to know
Myth
UBC — a myth exploded.
The myth says we come to this
university in order that we may
learn to manage our lives and the
future of the world. But it would
seem that while learning we are
not supposed to know (or care)
who controls our own world: i.e.
this university. Who runs this campus? Stand up if you have seen
them. Raise your eye-brows if you
know their names.
But somebody must know why
SUB had to undergo a facelift,
why there has to be labelled hitching posts on Wesbrook, and a
book (crook) store that rips you
and me off every year. If we are
the chancellors of tomorrow, then
we are also the physical plant
men, the Best Cleaner boys, etc.
People don't come here to
learn. They come here to work.
UBC provides a place of "suitable" employment for people who
like to rake leaves, guard dormitories, and wipe your face after
lunch. Without us they would
have to hire somebody to keep
this place dirty! I mean, a lot of
people would be out of a job if we
the STUDENTS had enough pride
in our campus to keep it clean.
who keeps screwing up the one we
have - UBC.
Universities are not meant to
be someone's pet construction
site, and especially not with student funds. We have a lot going for
us now but what is it going to be
next after the new pool? "Need"
is a state of mind. Change does
not equal progress in terms of the
quality of education around here.
I resent being treated like a part
of a captive consumer market.
There are days when I would like
to see that massive, phallic ding-a-
ling of a clock tower screw itself
into the newly manicured pit-
come-study haE and end it all
with one mighty orgasm.
Thorn Hardem,
arts 2
Ash Wednesday Service
Tomorrow 12:30 Clubs Lounge SUB
Service of Repentance
for the Affluent Canadians
CAMPUS  MINISTRY
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
JEWS ON JUDAISM
TUES., MARCH 6 - Bob Rosen
WED., MARCH 7 - Rabbi H. Rubens
THURS., MARCH 8 - Seymour Levitan
—discuss The Jewish Woman, Law, Social Justice, Prayer, Charity
from movements within Judaism.
ALL EVENTS AT 12:30 AT HILLEL
campus invited
COME IN TODAY!'
PISCES
(Feb. 20-March 20)
HOROSCOPE
FOR YOUR
INCOME TAX
Do you feel like a fish out
of water when Income tax
time    rolls   around?    Let
H & R BLOCK help put you   COMPLETE
back   into   the   swim   of    RETURNS
things.   . We'll     prepare,
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return   for   accuracy.   Try
us. You'll thank your lucky
stars.
ELmOBQQDS
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If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or in-
terest, we will pay only that penalty or interest.
H*R
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3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST.
3519 E. HASTINGS
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1685 DAVIE ST.
J
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT. NECESSARYi
327-0461
NOTICE
OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday, March 15,
1973, at 12:30 p.m. in the Ballroom at the Centre.
ALL MEMBERS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
The Board of Directors will recommend that By-Law 37 of the
Constitution be amended to read: "A quorum for any meeting shall be ten
per cent of the ordinary members. If a quorum is not present within the
time set for the meeting, the meeting will be adjourned by the Chairman to
a place and time set by the Chairman not more than 30 days following the
meeting. A quorum will then be the number of ordinary members present
at the reconvened meeting."
•Sljoe !5f)0ppC!5
2 AND 3 TONE COMBOS IN
GREAT NEW FASHION COLORS
by BRAYCO
ONLY,  $23.00
Open Thursday
and Friday Nites
C.O.D. orders accepted
Credit and Chargex
ORBfTSHOES PCX(fHE ^££5^ cards honored
VILLAGER SHOE SHOPPES LTD.
542 Granville 435 W. Hastings
Le Chateau Branch 776 Granville
Guildford Town Shopping Centre, Surrey
1324 Douglas St. in Victoria
•"Design and Word Trade Marks in Canada of the
 Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."	 Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
Hot flashes
Original
muz air
Original compositions by UBC
music professors Eugene Wilson,
John Chappell and David Burger
will be featured in a free concert
by the university band, 8 p.m.
Thursday in the old auditorium.
Free recitals in the music building recital hall this week include
flautist Paul Douglas and Hugh
McLean on harpsichord, 8 p.m.
today; mezzo-soprano Viktoria
Spans and pianist Derek Bampton,
noon Wednesday; the university
singers noon and 8 p.m. Friday;
and the Vancouver philharmonic,
8 p.m. Saturday.
Papandreou
Exiled   Greek   leader Andreas
Papandreou   wrll   lecture  on  the
current political situation in
Greece, noon Thursday and 8
p.m. Friday in Buch. 106.
University of Alabama sociologist John Bruce will speak on
the role of mothers in the social
placement of daughters, 4 p.m.
Thursday in the home economics
building, room 109.
Discover the World on Your
SEMESTER AT SEA
Sails each September & February
Combine accredited study with
educational stops in Africa, Australasia and the Orient. Over 7500
students from 450 campuses have
already experienced this international program. A wide range of
financial aid is available. Write
now for free catalog:
WCA, Chapman College, Box CC40, Orange, Cal. 92666
'Tween classes
TODAY
AUCM
Eucharist and soup, noon, Lutheran
centre.
LCM
Pancake  supper,   6  p.m.,   Lutheran
centre.
SAILING CLUB
Film, noon, SUB 125.
CANOE & KAYAK CLUB
Elections, noon, SUB 125.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Political  prisoners,  noon, SUB 207.
WEDNESDAY
Ash Wednesday service, noon, SUB
clubs lounge.
VOC
Executive   elections,   noon,   Angus
104.
PRE-DENT SOC
Elections, noon, SUB 1205.
STUDENT LOSERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communications   workshop,   noon,
SUB 105B.
ONTOLOGY
A    commune
Buch. 216.
CCF
Evangelical
ballroom.
VCF
Carl      Armerding,      noon,      Gage
Towers.
NVC
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
L'ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Color films, noon, Buch. 102.
GERMAN DEPARTMENT
Zarathrustra's   Three   Metamorphoses:  Erich  Heller, noon, Buch. 102.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Elections, noon, SUB ballroom.
ALPHA OMEGA
Last   general   meeting,   noon,   SUB
215.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communications   workshop,   noon,
SUB 105B.
ANTHROSOC DEPT.
Male   and   female   roles   In   Middle
Eastern  society,  noon,  Buch.  219.
FRIDAY
WAG
General   meeting,  noon,   Ed.   1211.
GAY PEOPLE
Social evening, 8 p.m., blew room,
arts 1.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speakers    from     Marpole    training
centre, noon, SUB 105B.
SATURDAY
DANCE CLUB
Eleventh    annual    competition,    7
p.m., SUB ballroom.
that    works,    noon,
meeting,     noon,    SUB
THURSDAY
ABORTSOC
Meeting, noon, SUB 237A.
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
GUITARIST AND SINGER
KEITH COOPER
Of the West Indies
Thurs., Mar. 8 — 7:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTER
Charismatic Campus Ministries
GERRY, 733-7067
ALL WELCOME NO CHARGE
ss
r»A'V
'.tfUkiHMSSf^tt^fe' * WLmt^mmmmi'
58& .t	
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
Special Notices
IS
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/wk. Ph. 732-0174
eves, or before 8 a.m.
 PEOPLE NEEDED!	
for proposed extension of Arts I
program. Come to New Arts II !
Meeting, Arts I building, Monday,
March 12, 12:30 noon. Support Urg-
eently Needed!
DOCTOR BUNDOLO FLIES LOW
over the campus and drops two—
more shows, that is! Thursday,
March 8 in SUB Movie Theatre at
12:30. It's Free ! ! !
Special Events
15A
BRUCE COCKBURN AT U.B.C. ON
Saturday, March 17 in the SUB
ballroom. Two shows 7:30 & 10:00.
Tickets $2 at AMS office. Sound
by Kelly-Deyong. Buy tickets now
and avoid disappointment.
NOW $75 FOR 25c
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
BUY YOURS TODAY!
—  Bookstore and  SUB  —
Travel Opportunities
18
CONTACT AOSC FOR COMPLETE
travel services including scheduled
and charter flights, rallpasses, car
rentals-purchases, tours, International Student ID, etc. AOSC Rm.
100B,  SUB,  UBC.  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'71 FIAT 850 CONVERT., ONLY
13,000 miles. New engine installed.
Sell for $1900. Phone 524-2045.
BUNDOLOMOBILE: SLIGHTLY
used, but can still coast from coast
to coast in seconds. To view come
to SUB Theatre Thursday March 8,
12:30.   Ask  for Dr.  Bundolo.
1972 FORD CAPRI. EXCELLENT
condition, 20,000 miles. All options
(sun roof, interior decor package,
radials, AM/FM radio), $3,100 or
best offer. 112-462-9709.
Auto Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
Babysitting &
Day Care
32
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Photography
35
PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS
 By Ulli Steltzer	
Camera and darkroom work for
beginners and advanced. 4 two-
hour sessions, $25, four people per
class. 731-8322, 9-12 a.m. for information.  Classes start March 17.
<tt)e JLtnt ano gutter
Camera*
SPECIAL
TOSHIBA 707A
Automatic Electronic Flash
Takes all the calculation out of
flash photography, perfect every
time. Was $37.95 — NOW $29.95
SAWYER PROJECTOR-VIEWER
It's a Slide Projector — Slip the
lever, it's a Slide Viewer
Was $35.00 — NOW $29.50
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235 —
weekends and evenings, 263-4023.
YEAR ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
ten a.m.' to nine p.m. Quick service
on short essays. Reasonable rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced TheBls Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reasonable Rates. Mrs. Ellis, 321-3838.
ESSAYS, THESIS, PAPERS. FAST,
efficient, accurate. Near 41st and
Marine Drive. 266-5053.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
efficiently. 35c per page. Phone
224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—THESES,
essays, etc. Phone Mrs. Brown,
732-0047.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing, IBM Selectric — Days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745—Reasonable   rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Work Wanted
52
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room fc Board
82
Communal Housing
85
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.
86
HOUSE FOR RENT WITH LEASE
$395 month. 4675 West 6th. Available May 1.  224-0230.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, March 6, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Score card
SATURDAY
Women's Inter-collegiate
Basketball  Championship
UBC Thunderettes 50,
Man. Bisonettes 30
Men's Intercollegiate
Basketball Championship
St. Mary's 79, Lakehead 67
Rugby
UBC 34, Western Washington State 0
SUNDAY
Pacific Coast League. Soccer
UBC 3, Olympics 0
Victoria West 2, Victoria Gorge 2
New West Blues 4, Cliff Avenue 0
PCL Standings
Victoria West
New West Blues
Victoria Gorge
UBC Thunderbirds
North Shore
Inter-ltalia
In men's gymnastics
All-around title UBC's
rmm.
w
9
9
7
6
4
2
11  2
Pts
20
19
18
13
9
5
Inter-Collegiate Gymnastics
UBC men, all-round
Bill Mackie, 1st
Ron Hunter, 4th
Gord Mackie, Sth
UBC women, all-round
Janet Terry, Sth
Tami Martin, 6th
*-
RON HUNTER spent most of his
time at the bars in Winnipeg but
still finished fourth overall
Tomorrow the world
ByKENTSPENCER
The UBC soccer team has moved into a 4th place tie with
North Shore United in Pacific Coast League standings as a
result of a 3-0 win over Olympics Sunday at Empire Stadium.
Captain Wayne Larson of the Thunderbirds opened the
scoring at the 11-minute mark, heading Jim Quinn's corner kick
into the net, behind Olympic goaltender Jim Ritchie, who is a
local policeman.
Olympics pressed hard during the next few minutes, but
either missed or were shut out by UBC's fine goalie, Greg
Weber.
It was Weber's 4th shutout in 10 starts this year.
Chris Suzuki and Ed Soltysik picked up UBC's other goals at
the 35 and 50 minute marks, respectively.
Suzuki's hard shot deflected off an Olympic defenceman in
front of the Olympic goal, startling Ritchie, who had the original
shot covered.
Soltysik capitalized on a defensive error, intercepting an
Olympic cross-ball to score.
UBC coach Joe Johnson was happy with the win, one of the
four he was hoping for in the Birds' upcoming games.
He is entertaining hopes of closing more ground on league
leading Victoria West United, who are seven points ahead of the
Birds with 20, but have played 13 games to UBC's 11.
The Birds will get another chance at two points in their next
game Saturday in Victoria, against Victoria Gorge. However,
they're expecting a hard game.
The last time out against Gorge UBC built up a two goal
lead, lost it, and ended up with a 2-2 tie.
Johnson says it should be a one goal game — either way.
UBC's Bill Mackie won the
all-around gymnastic title at
the Canadian Inter-collegiate
Championships held Saturday
in Winnipeg, and also picked
up individual titles in the floor
exercises, pommel horse and
still rings.
He finished 2nd to Steve
Mitruk of McMaster
University in the remaining
events.
UBC's Ron Hunter placed 4th
all-around, finishing 2nd in the
pommel horse and rings, 3rd in
the parallel bars and 5th in the
rings.
Teammate Gord Mackie
placed 5th in the all-around,
rO.. ^H
\
vault and parallels, and 6th on
the high bar.
Mackie and Hunter made the
world student games team
because of their results in the
all-around.
Janet Terry finished 5th in
the all-around and uneven bars
in the women's division with a
3rd in the floor exercises and
6th in the vault.
Teammate Tami Martin
placed 6th in the all-around, 4th
in the vault, and 5th in the
beam and the floor exercises.
Terry and Martin are still in
the running.
There were no university
team championships, but
Ontario won both the men's
and women's conference titles.
The women have two more   &sw*7.*'-
qualifying   meets   for   the   ffr-*'K
student games team so both    '*"''-*-•
■<wx'7/I',W<d
TODAY AT N00N-FREE!
Room 207—Student Union Building
DON LUCE
Volunteer worker in South Vietnam since
1958 and member of the International
Committee -to Free South Vietnamese
Political Prisoners
will speak on
"Political Prisoners in
South Vietnam"
Sponsored by Speakers & Education Committee,
LCM, AUCM Campus Ministries
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS'
BRUCE
COCKBURN
SAT., MAR. 17
Two Shows
7:30 & 10
SUB
BALLROOM
TICKETS '2.00
at the
AMS Business Office
Sound by
KELLY DEY0NG
BILL MACKIE demonstrates the
form that won him first place
honors in the Canadian Intercollegiate gymnastic championships
LILIES 0FTOE
HELD WARE MOT.
Remember the lilies of the bible?
They toiled not. Neither did they
spin. As Dominican Sisters of the
Sick Poor we toil for the young
as well as the old, for the acute
as well as the chronically ill and
we cate not for their race or religion for all are of the kingdom
of God. Our feet carry us along
busy streets, up and down tenement stairs, in and out of homes
where illness, ignorance, discouragement and despair are sometimes permanent guests. Nursing,
counseling, helping to keep families together in their homes as
one loving unit. The Dominican
Sisters of the Sick Poor achieving the impossible every day of
the year.
To learn how yon can serve as a
Dominican Sister of the Sick Poor
write to:
Sister Marguerite Mitchell,
Vocation Director
Room 103
Mariandale, Ossining,
New Voi* 10562
DOWNKAN SISTERS OF
THE SICK POOR. Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
Hugh MacLennan
'Barometer Falling'
By LINDA HOSSIE
Hugh MacLennan's visit to campus last week
came as a sign that Canadian writers are no longer
as narrow as they used to be and it's a good thing, if
MacLennan is any indication.
MacLennan, winner of five Governor General's
awards and the Lome Pierce Gold Medal for
Literature, author of several novels including
Barometer Rising and The Watch That Ends The
Night delivered two lectures Thursday and Friday.
"Creative literature, imaginative literature is a
pretty reliable barometer of the evolutionary or
de-evolutionary condition of a culture and what does
this fact tell us of the present moment? Clearly it
tells us this: that in all the rich technological nations,
the ones with truly glorious literary traditions,
imaginative literature has become a barren travesty
of itself.
"Most of the good work of today comes from
small nations and ethnic groups previously ignored.
Does this mean, I wonder, that great imaginative
literature is always involved with a quest for
identity," he said in his Thursday lecture.
This last statement applies ironically to
MacLennan's position as a writer in Canada — which
in terms of its literature is a small nation involved in
a search for identity.
"I admit that I still wince when I am called a
Canadian writer.
"When the term 'Canadian writer' was pinned on
me by Toronto reviewers after the appearance of my
first novel, I inwardly groaned.
'Canadian diminutive'
"It was such an unconscious Canadian
diminutive. It implied two things: that anyone who
set the scene of a novel in Canada had deliberately
opted to compete in a very minor league indeed and
that Canada was a country from which only the most
minor and localized writing could emerge," he said
in his lecture on writing in Canada over 30 years.
MacLennan seems to have lost touch with the
current Canadian scene. He is reading older
Canadian writers like Robertson Davies whose Fifth
Business and The Manticore he cited as two novels of
exceptional stature in Canada.
He seemed unfamiliar with the work of younger
writers like poet and novelist Margaret Atwood, and
unaware of the determination of many young
Canadian writers to write about Canada, in Canada.
"The major difficulty we writers had in those
days was the old one of recognition — the essential
recognition on which fction and drsfma must always
depend," he said Friday.
"There was still another crippling element in the
Canadian writer's situation; it still exists, and critics
seem generally unconscious of it. I would call it the
territorial resistance extended into literature.
"There is an instinctive unwillingness on the
part of critics and readers in established cultures to
yield a place in the sun to artists on the periphery, or
to admit that they really can meet the competition."
MacLennan himself thinks there is no reason
why Canadians can't meet the competition and join
"the universal culture".
From a writer who seems to be apologizing for
his Canadianism this statement comes a little late.
Canadians 'unresponsive'
Thirty years ago many writers, including
Mordecai Richler and Morley Callaghan, left Canada
for greener fields. Neither money nor recognition
was to be found in Canada. Canadian writers feared
their work would be buried by unresponsive
Canadians and by a literary world not particularly
interested in Canadian work.
MacLennan, while he lived and wrote in Canada,
published in the United States.
"To write out of the Canadian particular in order
to join the universal culture which had so long
nourished us — 30 years ago it made us proud even to
try to do this and to be welcomed into the fellowship
by reviewers and critics from international
standards in publications like the New York Times
and Saturday Review", MacLennan said.
However MacLennan seemed to attach more
MacLENNAN ... on campus
value to outside acceptance than to the "Canadian
particular" or to Canadian acceptance.
In an interview Thursday MacLennan said
Callaghan returned to Canada because "he couldn't
make it in the States" and Atwood, although "a very
talented young lady" couldn't make in the States
either.
Women are more attracted to a novel with a
more limited scope, he said. Men prefer a broader
spectrum of character and action.
This attitude is as narrow as his ideas about the
future of the novel.
"The novel need not be dead, not even now. The
public will flock to it, as they proved with The
Godfather if it is conservative enough to tell a strong
story and big enough to deploy a wide range of
characters in action over a large canvas."
A very neat definition, but unfortunately it
excludes half the novels already written.
MacLennan set his first novel in Europe and his
second in the States. Neither of these was published.
MacLennan's first wife, writer Dorothy Duncan,
showed him why his first two novels failed, he said.
Noveis lack authenticity
"They were not authentic. The innumerable
sense impressions, the feeling for the country, the
instinct for what is valuable in a human being —
these things were all colored by a Canadian
background I had not accounted for, which neither
an American nor a European would accept without
an explanation that was an inherent part of the
story."
In a letter to a friend in 1941 MacLennan wrote:
"I came to the conclusion that a Canadian can't write
authentically about the American scene. Nor is
Canada important enough — yet — for a Canadian
point of view of Europe to be important.
"The Americans would not care, the English
would not be able to distinguish it from American.
"I am sure no artist can possibly write of any
society — as a base — than his own. Therefore,
without benefit of any background or tradition
beyond what I succeed in making for myself, I seem
doomed to continue.
"The novelist must have the most intimate
possible authority over his background material,
otherwise he will lose credibility. Secondly, such
intimacy is thoroughly acquired only when the writer
is young and absorbs it into his subconscious.
"Conclusion: I had no choice save to write of
Canadian material, but at the same time with a kind
of double vision — as it appeared to the characters
themselves and their Canadian communities, and as
these would appear to outsiders," MacLennan said in
his Friday lecture.
Explaining Canada
So MacLennan's self-appointed mission seemed
to be, as Robert Cockburn wrote in his introduction to
his book Hugh MacLennan, "to explain Canada" to
itself, and to the rest of the world, in terms of reality
or, as he puts it, self-knowledge." Whether Canada
can be explained to Canadians by a man who
publishes in the United States is a matter for
conjecture.
MacLennan's lecture on literature and
technology left less reason for complaint.
He described the lecture as an "attempt to
understand the nature of the schizophrenia which is
the product of our present stage of evolution with its
two very different systems of values."
The lecture provided an over-view of the history
and nature of these differences.
MacLennan said he sees the split essentially as
that between the older religious idea of the natural
process of things and the new technological
"religion" which assumes, like the 18th century
rationalists, that "pure reason will solve any
problem and that God himself thinks like a
mathematician and functions like a super-
mechanic.
"In such a religion, problem has finally become
the all-purpose word.
"Even sex, the last stand of poetry, has become
technologized.
"As the essence of any problem is that it can be
solved, so we can now solve even the problems of sex
by techniques in mechanical engineering, which we
can learn from the manuals available at any drug
store.
'Satan refuses to die'
"The old Satan of our past refuses to die. He
keeps whispering to 14s the devilish heresy that life is
not a problem to be solved but an experience to be
lived, and that is why the breach between the old
literary consciousness and the new values of
technology has become a Grand Canyon."
In the classical world, "the poets and dramatists
performed what may well be literature's supreme
service. They made man recognizable to himself.
"They endeavored to show him that he really did
have a home in an orderly universe.
"They studied with awe, pity and humor the
fearful and often ridiculous conflicts in the human
soul and by bringing them out of the dark of the
subconscious into the light of the mind, they purged
the people of some of the pity and terror of them.
"Today a man of letters cannot help looking back
with nostalgia to the century which preceded the
invention of the steam engine. There was no breach
at all between science and literature in those days.
"It was the mentality of technology's first
entrepreneurs, their greed and callousness, which
caused literature's first attack on industrialism.
"But in the 19th century few people criticized
technology as such, only the abuses caused by its
entrepreneurs. It was not until the hot and cold wars
of our century, with the technological atrocities
associated with them, that the literary conscience
began to question the values of technology itself.
"For a century and a half the literary conscience
has been protesting technology's spoliation of the
environment and it might just as well have saved its
breath for all the effect it had.
"But a few years ago, just as happened at the
end of the Middle Ages, suddenly it found itself with
allies from the camp of science itself. This time the
allies are the growing new life sciences — a
reformation movement, perhaps, within what used
to be a universal scientific church?
"To myself, who was never under the illusion
that the literary way offers much promise if it is
isolated from the communal efforts of mankind this
new partnership has given a feeling of real human
hope."

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