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The Ubyssey Mar 3, 1972

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Array Grad class executive flayed
By SANDY KASS
UBC's graduating class
Thursday overthrew its
executive's proposals for gifts to
the university.
At a noon meeting in the SUB
ballroom, a majority of about 300
graduating students protested the
screening of applicants for grad
class money and asked the
executive to detail the criteria
used in the screening.
While executive members
maintained the proposals
recommended were most
beneficial to the campus as a
whole, a number of speakers
questioned what they termed the
arbitrary nature of the decision to
eliminate certain groups from
requesting money and to reduce
the monies requested by others.
The class also invalidated the
two categories into which all
money applications are placed:
One category goes toward
purchasing a material gift for the
university, the other provides
funding for groups.
In the material gifts category,
an $8,000 sculpture by Vancouver
artist Lionel Thomas, telephones
and vending machines for
Sedgewick library costing $7,720
and braille printing equipment for
the Crane library costing $4,600
were recommended.
In the groups category, a major
complaint from class members,
was that all of the amounts
requested by groups were cut, in
some cases by 50 per cent, before
being placed on the ballot.
Students said they would
prefer to vote on total amounts as
requested by groups rather than
have to choose between partial
funding and providing UBC with a
material gift.
An executive spokesman said
amounts of some group projects
were cut to exclude salaries,
which the executive claimed the
class shouldn't be paying for.
The hardest hit under this
ruling was Speakeasy, which
originally applied for $5,840, but
was cut to $2,600.
A Speakeasy spokesman told
The Ubyssey the monies cut from
its request would be used to pay
Opportunities For Youth types of
:
■
^ Vol. LIU, No. 57
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
a^^s.48
228-2301
salaries to persons working over
the summer to set up winter
programs.
Speakeasy is staffed on a
volunteer basis during the winter
months.
ECO's request for $6,000 was
also cut to $3,000 to exclude
salaries.
The day care group, which
originally wanted $5,000 to build
a second campus day care facility,
had its grant cut to $3,500
because according to a spokesman
the executive "feels the centre
only benefits a small segment of
the university community."
The engineers' urban vehicle'
project originally wanted $10,000
to test the vehicle and send it to a
Detroit competition this summer.
The group's request was cut to
$6,000 for undisclosed reasons.
The Women's Studies program
request for $6,000 was cut to
$3,000, also for undisclosed
reasons.
The Mental Patients
Association request was cut from
$5,000 to $2,500, even though, a
spokesman said, his group was
told by the executive their request
would not be screened or reduced.
The class also voted against an
executive recommendation to
subsidize the graduating dance.
The $4,000 asked by the
executive to go toward dance
costs will be added to the amount
to be spent by the class for gifts.
A total of about $20,000 is
now available to go to any person
or group requesting money.
The executive previously
denied applications for funds by
the Burrard food co-op, a
women's rights booklet, Women's
Place and Frontier College,
claiming these groups do not
benefit the university community.
The class, which voted 145 to
105 in favor of rejecting the
executive's proposals, also voted
to hear a spokesman from ECO
whom the executive ruled out of
order because he is not a
graduating student.
Wren Green then explained
how last year the class voted
preferentially on all requests made
for gifts. He criticized the
executive for not following the
same procedure.
The class voted to hold a vote
March 15 on all applications for
money received before Thursday
by the executive.
Polls will be set up from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at regular polling
stations. Ballots will include the
name of the group requesting
money and the original amount
requested.
Statements from groups
requesting money will be accepted
for publication by The Ubyssey
on or before March 10, and are
limited to 200 words.
'Birds win
The UBC Thunderbird
basketball team advanced to their
second Canadian collegiate final in
three years with a 117-84 point
victory over the Windsor
University Lancers last night.
The Lancers, a young but
strong team were no match for
the more experienced 'Birds and
Ron Thorsen who notched 43
points for the UBC team.
The nationally televised final
against the Acadia University
Axemen, last year's champions
will take place on Saturday at'11
a.m.
See story and photo page 14.
—garry gruenke photo
THE WALTER ZUBER ARMSTRONG jass quartet let loose with free form jazz in the SUB auditorium noon Thursday. Unfortunately only
about 100 persons listened to the fine performance. But then, silence is the music of the gods, they say. iamiliiiii»»^^
Despite probes med money will be cut
By VAUGHN PALMER
Fourth year medical students will probably not
receive hospital work stipends when the program begins
on March 20, a student representative on one of two
committees looking into the question said Thursday.
Ray Menzies, a third year medical student and
member of the provincial health department's medical
manpower committee, said he doubted whether his
committee or one set up by the UBC senate at its Feb. 23
meeting would take action.
Cut off of stipends came when provincial health
minister Ralph Loffmark recently announced a $250,000
slash in Vancouver General's house staff budget.
It was from this budget that students were paid
$1,800 grants for their work within the fourth year
clinical clerkship program.
Student senator Svend Robinson brought the
problem before,last week's senate meeting and the result
was a resolution that President Walter Gage appoint a
committee to look into the matter.
Dr. John McCreary announced at the meeting that he
was, asking Loffmark to have the medical manpower
committee investigate the matter.
Menzies said students are now expected to work at
the hospital without pay for five days a week, one out of
three nights and every third weekend for the full 62 weeks
of the program.
"In addition to which, they have to pay $657 in
tuition fees and living expenses.
"This program has been a great financial aid to the
hospital. When it began three years ago they laid off 20
interns to give us something to do," he said.
Menzies said there were other problems in the
program. "No guidelines have ever been given as to how
much classroom instruction should be provided."
"As a result, some departments give none and instead
depend on the instruction given by residents at the
hospital."
Ken Piter,  third year medical students president,,
agreed with Menzies' assessment and said things are going
to get worse.
"We depend on the residents at the hospital for much
of our instruction since the departments give so little," he
said.
"Now with Loffmark's slashes, there will be a 20 per
cent cutback in residents leaving us fewer teachers and
perhaps more work to do," Piter said.
Piter said he didn't expect action on the cutoff either.
McCreary said he had written to Dr. D. M. Longridge,
who Loffmark designated to convene the first meeting,
urging him to get moving at once.
Longridge, contacted in Victoria, said he would meet
Monday with advisors to discuss possible dates for the
first meeting.
Appointments to the senate committee, which is
scheduled to make a preliminary report at the March 22
senate meeting, have not been finalized, Gage said
Thursday. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3,  1972
OFY officer told, It's not enough.'
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Opportunities for Youth
program will help increase
democratization of Canada, a
parliamentary secretary told a
predominantly young and hostile
audience Wednesday.
Hugh Faulkner, parliamentary
secretary to secretary of state
Gerard Pelletier, told a Citizens
Forum audience at the Vancouver
Public Library that OFY, the local
initiatives program and certain
citizens branch programs are
important signs of resources going
to the, people in communities.
The long-haired, 38-year-old
MP said the programs are
expanding decentralization in
Canada and increasing community
decision-making.
His statements were met by
loud jeering from many members
of the audience and shouts of
"It's not enough, baby!"
Vancouver alderman Harry
Rankin told the forum OFY is
"buying off articulate youth with
summer bribes."
He said the program serves
middle class youth who are more
articulate, more motivated to
think up projects and who "know
the (application form) jargon
better" than working class youth.
"Any kid who comes to me
with an application, I'll sign it,"
he said. "But there is no
possibility   that   this  program  is
any more than a band-aid trying
to fix a compound fracture and
I've never seen a band-aid do
that."
He received loud applause from
most of the audience for the
assertion.
"It's really no more than a
means of stifling rising social and
political agitation in this country.
It dulls the edge of that agitation.
It's no more than a sop and a
bribe," he said.
Faulkner replied: "It's patent
nonsense to suggest the
government ever said OFY was
going to solve the problems of the
country. And if the revolutionary
forces are going to be dulled by
$90 a week for four months then
they are not the group to look to
for change."
Faulkner said the program is
mainly directed at students, 94
per cent of last year's workers
were students and anyone
permanently' out of work is
looking for a permanent job.
He said although unemployed
youth are allowed to work with
OFY, the thinking in Ottawa,
which he admitted sounded
shallow in light of unemployment
figures, was that this group should
work through Canada Manpower.
A member of the Joshua
recycling project complained that
community groups are not eligible
for grants, even though they are
providing a community service
and employing youth.
Faulkner said OFY applicants
may work with groups such as
Joshua but they are eligible for
money from other areas. Rankin
concurred, adding that these
groups do not provide real jobs
but merely "clean each others'
laundry and at the end of the
week wind up broke with clean
linen."
The Joshua member walked
out in disgust, muttering "Christ,
you're both in the same bed."
An audience member then
raised the question that provoked
the most spirited outbursts. He
asked Faulkner to define the OFY
clause which says partisan
political projects are not
acceptable.
Faulkner said no projects
directly allied with any political
party will be allowed but
interpreting "political" in the
broader sense will cause "many
agonizing decisions this summer."
Rankin: "What that means is
you better reform your ideas if
you want a grant."
The audience cheered.
A member of the audience
then went in front of the
speakers' platform to tell how as a
LIP welfare rights worker he was
prohibited from attending any
confrontation demonstration even
if it was unconnected with his
work. He charged such restrictions
border very closely on social
control.
Faulkner then asserted
"political" primarily means
publications and that nothing says
political activists can't work on
projects.
Rankin agreed, saying: "He
who pays the piper calls the tune.
Why should the federal
government pay for
demonstrations against itself? I
say take the money for four
months then do what needs to be
done."
To angry charges from
members of the audience that
there is not enough, if any,
community control of OFY
Faulkner said the present system
is   the   only   one   which   allows
applications to be received March
8 and grants allotted by April 15.
He said with 20,000
applications to process in that
time even limited consultation is
difficult.
Rankin had a last admonition
for the jaded audience: "These
things are being studied to death.
But young people will see through
that. Do the projects and work,
don't feeload, then go into
political action."
Commenting after the
discussion on his reception by the
audience, Faulkner said: "I've
never seen an audience like this. I
just came from the Jack Webster
show where I got shit from the
rednecks. Then I come here and
get this."
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RESIDENTIAL FRENCH LANGUAGE
BURSARY PROGRAM— SUMMER 1972
The Centre for Continuing Education of the University of
British Columbia is offering two residential programs in French
as part of the Secretary of State Summer Language Bursary
Program for Canadian students.
SESSIONS: MAY 22 - JUNE 30
and JULY 10 - AUGUST 18
Bursaries will cover tuition fees, as well as the cost of room and board,
for the duration of the six week program. Students must pay their travel
expenses.
Students who wish to apply for bursaries should write to:
LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
CENTRE for CONTINUING EDUCATION
University of British Columbia Vancouver 8, B.C.
The injury or death of a child
is a terrible price to pay for believing
that you could drink and drive
with safety.
You can't.
As soon as you have more
alcohol in your bloodstream than your
body can use up, it interferes with
your ability to think, act, and see
properly. Your reactions slow down.
You can't stop as quickly or steer
your car as efficiently as when
you're sober.
You risk the lives of yourself,
your family, your friends, and
anyone else who is unlucky enough
to be along for the ride or travelling
on the same road.
The next time you stop off at
a bar or go to a party:
1. Don't drink an alcoholic beverage
if you intend to drive.
2. If you drink, take a taxi or let a
sober driver take the wheel.
3. If you think you can drive as
efficiently after drinking as you
did before, think again - it
just isn't so.
If. If you excuse your behavior by
saying, "Itcan't happen tome,"
remember that it can happen,
and it only has to happen once.
For more information, mail litis coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of "What You Should Know
About The Use And Abuse Of Alcohol."
Name	
Address _
„  GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
£   COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
■*■'* Hon. P.L Brothers, QXL, Minister of Education-Chairman Friday, March 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
UNSUSPECTING  HOBITON  LAKE  lies peacefully pondering the jumping trout and
occasional   ripples   of   paddles.   Wildnerness   lake   on   southern   Vancouver   Island   is
threatened by logging operation which has a road within one mile of the silent shoreline.
This operation will upset the ecological balance of the whole valley.
Fighting
with WACky
for some
wilderness
IDy the end of this month the
provincial government will have
made up its mind about what to
do with 50 miles of wilderness
forest on the west coast of
Vancouver Island.
As in  the  past, it's probable
that   the   government's   decision
By JOHN TWIGG
and PHIL VIAUD
will favor the forest industries and
ignore the people who are
interested in the forest as a place
to live and play.
The  50  miles in question is
known  as the West Coast Trail,
which in March, 1969, became
Phase III of the Pacific Rim
National Park.
The trail was included in the
part only at the insistence of the
federal government and as a
compromise the boundaries were
left to be decided upon by April,
1973.
Right now the boundaries of
Phase III are 50 miles long and
only an average of half a mile
wide.
But negotiations are taking
place to enlarge the original
boundaries by including lands
currently under tree farm licence
to MacMillan Bloedel and B.C.
Forest Products.
The negotiations are centered
around two issues, the
enlargement of the park width
and     the     inclusion     of    the
Hobiton-Tsusiat lakes valley. (See
map this page.)
The Sierra Club, which has
followed closely the development
of the park, is presenting a slide
show on the controversy today at
noon in SUB auditorium.
The club advocates that the
park should be enlarged to include
the lakes because they have a high
recreational value.
Within the lake area is a canoe
circuit and trail system that, as
the slides show, takes one through
some of the most beautiful
scenery in southern B.C.
Amlthough presently untouched,
the area is under tree farm license
to B.C.F.P., which has announced
plans to begin logging in the area
within about one year.
Already the company has a
road thrust through the wilderness
to within one mile of Hobiton
Lake threatening to upset not
only the wilderness but also the
ecological balance of the whole
valley.
The valley is the last one on
southern Vancouver Island still
untouched by industrialization.
Its recreational value is further
enhanced by the fact that it is
only a iFew hours drive from
populated centres.
With the crowding of the
Bowron Lakes canoe circuit, the
Sierra Club says the Hobiton
system could also become a
popular canoe circuit.
But those possibilities can be
Boundary agreed 1970
Initial Sierra Club demand
Modified Sierra Club proposal
B.C.F.P. Tree Farm License No. 27
M.B. Tree Farm License No. 21
abandoned if the forest industry
lobby is successful in its campaign
to convince the provincial
government that the area has a
recreational value considerably
less than its timber value.
Ihe forest companies obtained
their tree farm licenses from the
Social Credit government in the
1950's, about the same time
forests minister Robert Sommers
was convicted of accepting bribes
for the granting of tree farm
licenses.
Before that, the area had been
set aside as a possible park since
the 1920's.
Now the Socred government is
in the position of having to undo
their actions of the Fifties, but
according to federal government
sources the negotiations over the
park boundaries are deadlocked.
The provincial government is
determined to compensate the
forest companies if any of their
tree farm holdings are included in
the park.
But at the same time the
government insists it has no land
available to give to the companies.
The forest companies are
particularly concerned because
they see the West Coast Trail case
as a test case for other proposed
parks in B.C.
strip to withstand the strong
winds coming off the open ocean
which often blow down- large
sections of forest.
Evidence of what wind can do
is about half a day out of Port
Renfrew on the trail. There, in the
middle of nowhere, is about 500
yards of jumbled trees snapped
off like matchsticks.
The devastation, however, is
nowhere near as bad as the
familiar B.C. sight of bald
mountainsides that could
confront West Coast Trail hikers if
the boundaries are not enlarged.
S«lr1*MMil«
I hey feel that if the
government is successful in getting
back the West Coast Trail tree
farms the government will try to
get back other tree farms.
Thus the companies are
fighting hard to retain the farms
even though the lumber on the
farm is, comparatively, not that
valuable.
As well as arguing for the
inclusion of the 13,800-acre
Hobiton triangle, the federal
government is also trying to have
the boundary width enlarged to at
least one mile and one and a half
miles up creek beds.
There are three reasons for
enlarging the boundaries:
Half a mile is too thin a
corridor to keep out industrial
noise at some future date;
Half a mile is too narrow to
control run-off;
And half a mile is too thin a
NATURAL FOREST stands
listening to itself think about why
no one asks the trees. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3, 1972
Grad class victory
Members of the 1972 grad class did the
proverbial Right Thing in voting Thursday to
reject grad class executive methods in favor
of holding an open vote on money
allocations.
Such a vote will be held on the basis of
information available on all the projects and
groups applying for grad class money —
rather than just on the basis of the screened
and trimmed set of requests originally
presented to the class by the executive.
The class further distinguished itself by
voting against the $4,000 grad party. It's
good to know there are people who
recognize that thousands of dollars should
not be spent on trivia which will only gratify
the whims of a tiny group.
The decisions made at Thursday's
meeting constituted  —  as we hoped they
would — a decisive and principled
repudiation of the back-room antics of the
executive.
The executive occasionally objected
that it had, after all, been elected to "carry
out the wishes of the graduating class."
It ignored, however, the fact that any
elected group is always accountable to the
people it claims to serve and that it had
not adequately publicized meetings to
discuss methods of allocating funds.
On M„arch 15, campus-wide grad class
voting will take place on money allocations.
Summaries of the gifts and projects asking
for funds will appear beforehand in The
Ubyssey.
Having dealt with the unjust methods of
the executive and decided on an open vote,
members of the grad class will now be able
to make their choice of priorities.
The Young Doctors
Never a great favorite with the medical
profession in this province, health minister
Ralph Loffmark is now unlikely to be in
very high standing with medical students.
The minister's recent cuts in the staff
budget of Vancouver General Hospital will
probably leave senior medical students
without even the pittance grant they have
come to expect in exchange for hospital
work done in the context of their senior
years in medical school.
All of which would be at least partially
acceptable if these doctor$-to-be were not
involved in a break-neck senior program that
does not permit them time to take a few
months off to make some money in order to
get through their training.
Medical students have been up in arms
for some time about the demands this
program makes on them, and about its gross
deficiencies. But at least there has been a
little money in the arrangement, which has
made it at least bearable.
Loffmark did not, of course, make the
VGH budgetary cuts with the specific aim of
striking out at UBC medical students.
His decision is, however, just another
example of his total lack of sensitivity to
British    Columbia's    health    needs.
This insensitivity, coupled with
Loffmark's apparent desire to succeed in
becoming Czar of Medicine in B.C. have
made him notorious in medical circles.
The strong-arm tactics he has
continuously employed with the medical
profession, his threats against doctors who
have spoken out about their communities'
medical needs, the shady attempts he has
made to see that his doctor pals get favored
attention — all of these combine to produce
a picture of a man who should not be
tolerated in government by any thinking
individual.
There are good signs, however, that the
usually reactionary, and often
money-hungry medical profession is
beginning to stand up to Loffmark.
It is our hope that medical students will
also take a stand — that they will not take
this whipping quietly and that they will
begin to fight for proper medical training
and medical administration in B.C.
Letters
Exist
In your Feb. 29 editorial you
exhort your readers for not being
able to read (R-E-A-D). I think it
only fair that in return we can
expect you to learn how to spell
(S-P-E-L-L).
Anytime I've come across the
word "existence" in The Ubyssey
it's spelled with an "a". I hope
from now on you can remember:
"existance" doesn't exist.
Gordon Hilliker,
Arts 2
For every Ubyssey staffer who
doesn't know how to spell
existence there is at least one
letter writer who doesn't know
the correct use of the word
exhort.
(And the typesetters say thank
you for not blaming us unsung
heroes.)
Muster
7»f UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
David Schmidt sold his saxophone for a pittance but remained
impervious to the brooding Berton Woodward who moaned because he
wound his woodwind around Lesley Krueger's castanents. Jan O'Brien'soboe
only tuned into solos so she sold it because she wanted to sing along with
Paul Knox's xylophone. But Mike Sasges smashed it because no one could
hear his foul flute and Sandi Shreve said her drums were the only good
sound around which forced the flute to beat the sticks to a pulp. Kini
Macdonald had visions of violins but Garry Gruenke got her a guitar
instead and In a rage of musician's fury Mike Gidora strung the strings
through Leslie Plommer's piccolo. Vaughn Palmer's piano ran away
because Sandy Kass wanted to tune her cymbals that broke Gord Gibson's
jug. But the band played on . . . and on . .. and on .. .
An open letter to Donald
Brothers:
Our deputy president assures
Mr. Capozzi (of the legislature
standing committee currently
conducting tenure hearings) that
no more than five per cent of
UBC's faculty is incompetent.
What is his "straight guess" on the
percentage that is unqualified?
In Slavonic studies, five out of
12 tenured faculty can't pass
muster.
Furthermore, members of the
standing committee have been
misled if they believe the tenure
question is solely concerned with
a group of venerable old
academics whose skills are now
defunct. Don't you believe it!
Such a suggestion implies that
the problem is on the wane and
will resolve itself in the natural
course of time as the greybeards
are put out to pasture. Not so.
Be assured that the tenure
problem is alive and well and
living vigorously, among other
places, in Slavonic studies.
Take that last accolade in SS,
granted less than a year ago. The
teacher in question, on the basis
of a degree in economics, vaulted
'in a democracy we must learn to stand up for our rights"
From The Sheaf
swiftly and gracefully from
lecturer to instructor to assistant
professor to associate professor
where he now rests, secure and
sinecured, teaching
undergraduates the Russian
language.
Here is no senior citizen
accepting his gold watch on the
eve of retirement. Here is a
vigorous and dynamic person in
middle age who has squeezed out
of a modest degree in economics
all the mileage possible for honors
and bucks in language.
Now, let us hasten to add,
lofty academic credentials do not
a teacher make and teacher he
may be. But a modern language
teacher, today, should surely
know well the literature of that
language and have at least a
passing acquaintance with its
linguistics. Such is expected of
English language professors. It is
expected of Russian language
graduate students. Why is it not
expected of Russian language
professors. Would this professor
be able to pass the exams which
face the Russian language grads
this spring? We think not.
But look again at the defence
of tenure in the Faculty
Association brief: "tenure creates
a body of established academics
who can provide impartial and
critical assessments of the
scholarly performance of other
academics whose worth must be
determined."
Whose ''scholarly
performance" is this tenured
professor qualified to asses? How
the hell did he get invited into the
"club"?
Look closer, Mr. Brothers.
Grad student,
Slavonic studies
Nepotism
A correction to the letter from
the Twenty-fourth Student in the
Feb. 24 Ubyssey, which spelled
out the qualifications of staff in
Slavonic studies' undergrad
Russian language program:
Assistant prof Irina Reid (the
equestrienne) possesses not an MA
in linguistics, as reported but in
Slavonic studies. Inspection of her
UBC MA thesis reveals that Irina's
topic was chosen from Polish
history. Her thesis presents the
historical background and
summarizes one of the works of
an eighteenth-century Polish
political and pedagogical theorist.
Further research shows that
this same Polish reformer had
been the subject of the PhD thesis
offered   to    the   University   of Friday, March 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Cracow by William J. Rose,
professor of Polish literature and
history at the University of
London and the man called upon
by UBC in 1946 to found a
department of "Russian and
kindred studies".
For the headship, Dr. Rose
recommended an acquaintance,
one James St. Clair-Sobell, a
former wing commander from
Australia, supervisor of Polish and
Czech outfits in the RAF, who
had "done some work in
philology".
This is how Slavonic studies
acquired its first head and in 1951
that head signed the MA thesis of
our assistant prof Irina Reid.
Glancing at those qualifications
listed on Feb. 24, anyone can see
that the only names a university
department worth its salt would
even look at are Reek's and
Beardow's.
Not Slavonic studies. Nepotism
reigns. Last hired — first fired.
Name withheld,
Slavonics
Festival
I hope this letter will answer
the question of what happened to
this year's Festival of the
Contemporary Arts. To
understand that requires going
back to the festival's origins some
dozen years ago.
At that time the creative and
performing arts were in their
infancy at UBC. Music was
operating out of some old wooden
buildings, and much more
restricted in its range of offerings
than it was to become. Theatre
was a very young department,
with no film production courses.
Creative writing was a small
committee within the English
department. Fine arts had no
studio courses.
When professor Bert Binning
proposed a first arts festival, he
was expressing for a number of
persons a deeply-felt conviction
that the creative-performing arts
needed to be developed at UBC.
The festival, aside from showing
what was new, was meant to
dramatize this conviction by
focussing campus attention on the
fine arts. It meant the enthusiastic
involvement of large numbers of
faculty and students who had a
common goal.
As the fine arts offerings
within the arts faculty became
more extensive, a major motive
for continuing the annual festival
naturally weakened. Also, the
extra-curricular arts events had
become more and more extensive.
As a result, last year's festival was
almost entirely the work of a
single department. The question
arose: why a festival of arts?i
Habit Divertissment?
Last spring I conceived the idea
of staging a Political Carnival,
using the carnival format but
endowing it with political
content. A number of instructors
and students thought this was a
good idea. I then asked dean
Kenny whether the festival budget
could be made available for such a
project, providing the
creative-performing arts and other
groups on campus were
enthusiastically involved. He
agreed.
In the fall I discussed the idea
further with representatives from
creative-performing arts
departments and from the AMS.
After  a  series of meetings, we
were reluctantly forced to decide
that the kind of support necessary
to carry out a Political Arts
Festival wasn't present at UBC.
There were several reasons.
Some politically-oriented
individuals who wanted to help
could not because they were
already too busy with other
political activities.
Some departments within the
creative-performing sector were
too busy with their regular
programs. The campus political
clubs failed to respond to my
personal invitation to send
representatives to our meetings.
(On Clubs Day I asked the NDP,
Progressive Conservatives, Young
Liberals, Young Socialist League,
Action Canada. I could not find
the Young Socreds. I also asked
the UBC photography club, by
the way. They didn't send
anyone, either.)
Our committee finally had to
throw in the sponge. On its
behalf, I wrote to dean Kenny,
informing him of our decision. I
said that no festival could succeed
without some clear and urgent
goal, and without enthusiastic
involvement by faculty and
students. Finally, whenever such a
condition was met, our committee
hoped that the festival budget
would be made available. Dean
Kenny concurred entirely. And
this is where the matter stands.
Jake Zilber,
Creative Writing dept.
General
In the Feb. 25 issue of The
Ubyssey, the editorial writer
makes reference to the fact that
this institution has grown in size
"much to the delight" of
department heads in the arts
faculty.
I do not know these people but
I think that you would discover
on enquiry that the majority of
them do not find any delight in
the absolute size of this
institution. I have in fact heard
some speak facetiously of trying
to find some way of diverting part
of the flow of students to the
other provincial universities:
This, of course, immediately
raises the possibility of "elitism".
The people of whom I speak
could not be accused of that
crime since it would be their
earnest endeavor to have as
complete a cross-section of
students here as wish to attend.
Until recently the question was of
admission to UBC or exclusion
from university level education
within the province. You will,
perhaps, acknowledge the fact
that students do not speak with a
single voice on this topic — some
are in favor of admission to
university-level education of any
who wish to attend, and
presumably,   therefore,  feel 'that
the numbers at any institution are
immaterial.
The opposite point of view is
put forward by those who deplore
the size of an institution such as
this and the consequent difficulty
in maintaining personal contact
between staff and students.
The question could be gone
into extensively but I realize that
you are encountering size and
space difficulties of your own —
suffice it to say that it is a
sweeping generalization to claim
"they asked for the big university
and they got it."
, J.H. Wallis,
Assistant to* the dean,
Education
P.S. I have just read today's
(Tuesday's) reasonable editorial
and the letters which comment on
the issues raised by the Feb. 25
material.
Pool
I feel that UBC is in dire need
of an indoor swimming pool.
An indoor pool is required in
order that PE 230 (which is
compulsory for all PE majors and
PE concentrations) be taught
effectively. A year-round pool
would also be a worthwhile
addition to the recreational
facilities of the university.
The case for an indoor pool has
been made in past editions of The
Ubyssey. View the facts and
decide for yourself. If you are in
favor of an indoor pool at UBC
please sign one of the circulating
petitons to that effect.
Those students graduating this
year should seriously consider
what the graduating gift to the.
university should be. Perhaps the
gift could be the start of a trust
fund for a UBC indoor swimming
pool.
Cherie Mansell,
Education 3
Students
During the current session of
the provincial legislature a
committee is reviewing the
implications of tenure of office of
the teaching staffs in our
universities.
As a member of that
committee, I welcome the views
of students on this subject. In
particular I would appreciate
receiving the written opinion of
any student as to the quality and
energy of the instruction he or she
is receiving.
Evan Wolfe, MLA
Vancouver Centre,
c/o Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C.
Readers who have any
intention of responding to Wolfe's
eleventh-hour call for personal
written opinions should get them
to him by Monday, as today's
page 12 story indicates.
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE ELECTION
for Student Members of the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
* Nominations are invited for three positions on the Board.
* Nomination forms are available at the Centre Office.
* Nominations close Tuesday, March 14, 1972 at 5:00 p.m.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3,  1972
GRADS1
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Tke saga of a prist
Independentist Puerto Rican student
Humberto Pagan Hernandez held in
Ottawa's Carleton
County jail for five
months has seen
behind the liberal
facade of Canada.
By ROBERT CHODOS
Last Post News Service
OTTAWA - On March 11, 1971, a battle
between police and students broke out on the
campus of the university of Puerto Rico in San
Juan. Such clashes had occurred frequently over the
last couple of years, sparked by the induction of
Puerto Rican youths into the United States Army,
the presence of a Regular Officers Training Corps
(ROTC) squadron on the university, and the
growing sentiment among Puerto Ricans, especially
younger ones, in favour of independence from
American tutelage.
The university had become a centre of the
independentist movement, and the police were
particularly wary of any trouble there. On several
ocasions, students had died from police bullets, and
dozens more had been wounded.
In the months leading up to March 11, ROTC
cadets had been prohibited from entering the
campus in uniform in an effort to avoid
provocation. But on March 10, the cadets marched
onto campus wearing their uniforms and carrying
the Stars and Stripes. The situation grew extremely
tense. The next day, students, police and cadets all
massed on campus.
Bullets flew from both sides, and in the
pandemonium three people were killed. One was an
ROTC cadet, and the other two were policemen,
including Lt.-Col. Juan Mercado, the chief of the
Puerto Rican riot squad. Soon afterward, the police
began a mass round-up of students and
independentist leaders in retaliation.
■ he information in the preceding paragraphs
comes from Humberto Pagan Hernandez, a
twenty-year-old Puerto Rican student who since
September 30 has been held in Ottawa's Carleton
County jail. He was one of those hauled in by the
police net after March 11 — seized in his home town
of Aguadilla, where he had fled from San Juan in
fear for his safety, taken to police headquarters,
offered his freedom and a reward to turn state's
evidence, beaten and tortured when he refused, and
finally charged with Mercado's murder and released
on $30,000 bail.
He was well known to police as an
independentist leader on campus. He had been
active in the independence movement for several
years, had been a member of the student council,
had — along with many of his fellow students —
burned his U.S. draft card, and had been arrested
i* *,_%&■**
for his role in a previous demonstratioa He
belonged to a wing of the independentist movement
that advocated socialism as well as independence,
and had done political work both off and on
campus. His father had been involved for many
years in independentist activities.
The charge against him was serious enough, but
it was not only danger he faced. The right-wing
vigilante organizations which operated with the
approval of police and, according to Pagan,
numbered policemen among its members, did not
wait for the slow processes of justice. After Pagan
was released on bail, there were two attempts on his
life.
At the end of August, Pagan left Puerto Rico
and went to New York, where he got in touch with
a Mennonite Church organization that helped draft
resisters. Then he entered Canada illegally and came
to Ottawa. Page Friday
Women's Week
Women & children
Mon. March 6
Day care in B.C.
An open seminar by Vancouver day care organizers Marcy Cohen, Ann Harley and
Carol Sayre at UBC in the SUB ART GALLERY at 11:30 a.m.
Organizing mothers
A talk by Sarah Spinks, Toronto day care organizer and author of Sugar 'N' Spice,
Hogtown Press at UBC in the SUB BALLROOM at 12:30 p.m.
Women in teaching
An open seminar with Reva Dexter, teacher and social worker at UBC in the SUB
ART GALLERY at 1:30 p.m.
Displays
Information on day care centres, alternate schools and health clinics.
Library  corner  —Advice on non-sexist children's literature by library student
Janine Lukak.
Children's art and writing.
Tapes  -   the   Socialization  of Children,   a CBC   radio  documentary  by  Vera
Rosenbluth. Video tapes of children at schools.
Women &
social change
Tues. March 7
Women in China
Slides and discussion by Joyce Marvin, a recent visitor to China and Ann Harley,
China specialist at UBC in the SUB BALLROOM at 12:30 p.m.
Women & socialist theory
An open seminar with NDP-Waffler Hilda Thomas, sociology professor Dorothy
Smith and others at UBC in the SUB ART GALLERY at 2:30 p.m.
The women's liberation
movement in Canada
A discussion by Sandra Foster, eastern Canada and Maggie Benston, western Canada
at THE CANADIAN WOMAN: OUR STORY, UBC, the SUB BALLROOM at 7
p.m.
Women & work,
Wed. March 8
Women & unions
A talk by Madeleine Parent, Quebec labor organizer involved in the recent Tex-Pak
strike in Brantford, Ont. at UBC in the SUB BALLROOM at 12:30 p.m.
To join or not to join
A staff debate on the current UBC union drive at 5:15 p.m. in the SUB
BALLROOM.
Teach-in across campus
Students and faculty in all departments are invited to devote their class time today to
discussion of the status of women in Canada
Resource people will be available. Call 288-2082.
Women & the arts
Thurs. March 9
Women in concert
Everyone is invited to two hours of readings, dance and song performed by women
artists: actress Jackie Crossland, novelist Alice Munro, poet Judith Copithorne and
others at UBC in the SUB BALLROOM from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Lunch will be provided by alternate food service for 35c per person at 12:30 p.m.
Experimental workshop
Women through history by Crista Preus. Part I - 10:30 - 12:30. Part II - 2:30 -
3:30 at UBC in the SUB ART GALLERY. Interested participants should phone
228-2082.
Paintings, sculpture
Paintings, sculpture and pottery of women artists will be on display in the SUB
ART GALLERY at UBC all week.
Meet and talk
Women artists are invited to meet and talk all day in the SUB ART GALLERY.
Bring your own work.
Vancouver Art Gallery
The work of women artists will be shown all week in the upstairs gallery plus these
special events:
Monday, March 6 — Performance Evening, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 8 — Video and Film Night, 7 p.m.
Friday, March 10 - Experimental Workshop: Women Through History by Crista
Preus at 10:30 a.m. Interested participants should call the gallery.
Sexuality
Fri. March 10
Information table
Birth   control,   abortion   and   sex   information   available   at   UBC   in   the  SUB
CONCOURSE at 11:30 a.m.
Female sexuality
A discussion by Arts I instructor Shelagh Day and law student Dianna Moore at
UBC in the SUB BALLROOM at 12:30 p.m.
Three short stories
Written by Jane Rule, read by Helen Sonthoff and Shelagh Day at UBC in the
BLUE ROOM of the Arts I BUILDING at 2:30 p.m.
Liberated graffiti
Photographs of graffiti from campus washrooms in SUB ART GALLERY all day.
Free babysitting all week at UBC in
SUB 205 from 10:30 a.m. — 2:30 p.m.
TRAVELl
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Women and art
Explaining why she and
her sisters used the sexually
ambiguous pseudonyms of
Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell,
Charlotte Bronte wrote:
"Without at the time
suspecting that our mode of
writing and thinking was not
what was called feminine, we
had a vague impression that
authoresses are liable to be
looked on with prejudice. We
notice how sometimes critics
use for their chastisement the
weapon of personality and
for their reward a flattery
which is not true praise."
Women novelists, poets,
painters, sculptors — all
women artists - have heard
this kind of attitude from the
critics. Too often, instead of
concentrating on the work
before them reviewers are
obsessed by the fact that it's
creator is a woman.
If her work falls anywhere
within the accepted confines
of what is feminine, that is if
the work is delicate, gentle,
demure or perhaps coy, one
can practically hear the male
reviewer sigh with relief. Ah,
just what I expected, nothing
to be said here. ("Miss So and
So's novel, though by no
means any great literary
work, is however perhaps just
the thing to bring home to
the wife or to give to that
serious young lady in your
life.")
But faced by a novel or
painting by a woman which is
undeniably good, which
meets all the "standards of
critical excellence" the same
reviewer balks and hurriedly
trots out a whole new set of
critical values against which
to measure this particular
aberrant female. Is she
attractive? Is she happily
married? Is she a good mother?
No to any of these? Aha, that
explains it. (One can only
wonder, had she enjoyed the
normal rewards.of a happy
marriage and family life, if
Miss So and So would have
produced such an unusual
and disturbing series of
paintings.)
Or if anywhere in her
work she has even so much as
suggested that she is not
entirely enthusiastic about
the male sex, the matter is of
course easily settled. ("One
needs say no more than Miss
So and So hates men.")
There have even been
times, although thankfully
not recently, when critics
have simply solved the whole
matter by concluding that the
inspiration came from a
husband, brother or father
and that Miss So and So was,
as it were merely some kind of
spiritual medium through
which the work was realized.
In the case of the Brontes
some critics have gone to
great length to prove that it
was their brother, Bramwell
Bronte who wrote his sisters'
works. Bramwell Bronte was
weak, sick and an alcoholic,
but at least he was a man.
Underlying all this of
course is the implicit
assumption that women are
not creators. That they
cannot and should not give
birth to anything but
children.
And so women are dealt
with in the world of the arts
not simply as talented
persons but as aliens who
have mistakenly wandered
onto a forbidden planet.
The woman artist is
subjected to tests which in
any other sphere (and were it
other than a woman involved)
we would not talerate. She is
judged not by the terms
applicable to her medium,
but by the degree to which
her work is properly female.
But of course that too is
the final irony: If she toes the
correct "feminine" line, she
gains nothing from that effort
except a kind of humourous
toleration - "her work lacks
strength and real passion".
However, if she breaks away
from the traditional female
stereotype or trys to honestly
investigate the roles her sex
must play, she is immediately
accused of not being a "real
woman" and her work —
"too harsh, too masculine" is
summarily dismissed".
Either way, the woman
artist can't win.
Women & tvorh
Madeleine Parent is 53
years old and has been
involved in the Canadian
Trade Union Movement for
30 years. She is
secretary-treasurer of the
Canadian Textile and
Chemical Union and active in
the strike. She was in
Vancouver in August, and
Dara talked with her.
The first organizing drive
she was involved in was at the
Dominion Textile Plants of
6000 workers in Valleyfield,
Quebec. In 1946 a strike was
called. In those days, the
women of Quebec were so
strong and militant that it
was not necessary to set up
an independent women's
group within the union. No
one questioned their ability.
When goon squads and the
Quebec Provincial Police tried
to attack men on the picket
lines, women and children
appeared and thwarted the
attack. A few days before the
final votes were to be cast
Kent Rawley, a union
organizer, was arrested and a
warrent put out for
Madeleine, She went into
hiding in order to arrange
bail, to be able to negotiate
and ensure that" ballot boxes
were not stuffed. During the
negotiations 500 women
marched through the streets
singing and banging pots and
pans. The strike was won,
including an equal pay for
equal work clause, for the
first time in Quebec.
In 1965 she moved from
Quebec to Brantford,
Ontario. "In Quebec, women
had always been involved but
in Ontario they had no
background of militancy and
though they were still active
it was much more difficult."
In Madeleine's union there
is a woman president and
several female officers so the
women feel quite strong
although there are still many
problems to work our
regarding male domination.
"It is only the very
experienced, class conscious
male worker who understands
that women being used as
cheap labor are a threat to
them."
Women can never afford
to let down their guard,
because  as soon as they do
they'll get it in the teeth.
There must always be women
on the negotiating team to
ensure that discriminatory
deals aren't made. "Never
trust a man to do it, no
matter how enlightened he
may seem to be." The women
on union boards must also be
elected by women workers.
Often men appoint women to
a token position which, in
practice, does nothing for the
women employees.
Madeleine has found that
employers always expose
their sexism when negotiating
over maternity leaves. In one
case the boss maintained that
"if women want to indulge -
they have to pay the price."
Madeleine responded by
asking "How many times
have you lost your job for
'indulging'?"
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3, 1972 Organizing women
For some months now the
staff at UBC have been
involved in a campaign for
Office and Technical
Employees Union (OTEU)
accreditation, which has
shown encouraging progress
despite harassment and
intimidation by the
administration.
While the organizers of
this campaign realize that
unionization is essential for
the women workers involved,
they also realize that much
more is at stake. Once
organized, these women will
have to deal with the realities
of a male-dominated union.
In fact, membership in the
OTEU is 75 to 85 per cent
women, but the
decision-making apparatus is
predominantly controlled by
men.
As a result of this, women
in the OTEU (and many
other unions) are not in the
position to institute policies
that directly affect their
working lives. Thus issues
such as day care, equal pay
for equal work, sexist job
classification and procedures,
paid maternity leave,
unionization of part-time and
temporary clerical workers,
sex discrimination on the job,
etc., are at best neglected and
at worst ignored.
The trade union
movement has helped to
perpetuate the myth that
women are not serious
participants in the labor
force. Were this not so, would
the women workers at
Sandringham and Hoskins
have suffered year-long
strikes with only a minimum
of support from otherwise
very powerful unions? We
think not!
The campus organizing
campaign needs both staff
and student support to help
ensure its success.
—garry gruenke photo
—garry gruenke photo
Sexuality — defensiveness
Why a day on sexuality?
We were sitting in a group talking
about Women's Week and I was
wondering, "Why a day on sexuality?
What is to be done with that?" Then Ann
asked, "Have you got any ideas for the
day on sexuality?" My first response was,
"Pornography. We could have a Showing
of Danish pornography in the art gallery.
Then maybe I could get hold of some
dirty movies." And we all laughed. But
there was an edge to our laughter that
sounded a bit embarrassed.
Why a day on sexuality
I
think     about     it,
a   pretty   flippant
Now that
"pornography" was
reply, defensive even, like I couldn't be
straight about sexuality. So, that
defensiveness, and the edgy laughter is
precisely the reason to have a day on
sexuality. For, through that kind of
laughter, I faintly hear the same
snickering and giggling that I heard and
felt as a kid, when we talked about "tits"
and "dinks" and "doing it". I hear the
same kind of snickering and giggling
though more sophisticated, on TV
talk-shows, in toothpaste ads, walking
down the street getting a wolf-whistle or
a "Hey chickie". It's the kind of nervous
laughter that goes a long way back, and
exists  all   around in half-acknowledged
daily incidents. And it's saying, "Hey, I
make it through again. The sky didn't fall
on my head when I broke the taboo." It
has a lot of power, this sexual taboo.
But it is mostly suggestions, nothing
said explicitly. In relationships, sexual
power and attraction, is usually only
implied. That's hard to deal with. It takes
a lot of straight talking to get to some
real, grasped explicitness about sexuality
— like what I feel about you, you feel
about me, we feel about them. Yet even
sexual words are charged with taboo
power, and often with anger and
hostility. How can we talk about sex,
loving, that power of touch, when words
like "fuck" are so misused?
What is to be done with that?
Women, and men, will never be free
until sexuality is taken out of the
puritanical, locked-up state it's in and
made open, able to be talked about
freely. If you believe, like I believe, that
sexual unopenness is intricately
connected to power relationships and
thence to the whole political-economic
system, then this society has a great
vested interest in keeping sexuality
incommunicado, in making relationships
awkward, in relegating awareness of
sexual power to a bit of wit on toilet
walls and apprehensive snickers at genitals.
But if you also believe, like I do, that a
tremendous energy is rooted in sexuality,
then hopefully, by opening up areas for
sexual expression, without locked-in,
puritanical up-tightness, that energy
will be free to use. Essentially, by making
a place for fears and fantasies and needs
to be brought out into the open, an
anxious importance will taken off
sexuality, and we can get on with
whatever it is we do.
And that's why a day on sexuality. To
start to open things up a bit.
But what's to be done with it?
Pornography obviously is not a good
choice, being an expression of some
fantasy that gets its fancy tickled by
domination and subjugation. It's a big
source of snickering. What did come up
was the idea of taking graffitti out of the
local washrooms and putting it out in the
open. This could be a real source of
communication between men and
women, like saying, "Here are my real
feelings about sex and people and
whatnot that I keep locked up in the
can." The rest pf the day, with Shelagh
Day, and Dianna Moore, and Jane Rule,
talking from personal voices, exploring
areas of sexuality, with imagination, I feel
to be a positive way of opening up the
field. For this is where the openness is
beginning, with women speaking from
themselves, finding new ways of knowing.
And that's what the day on sexuality's
about.
George & Berny's
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PREGNANT
If you've missed your period,
get Predictor, the new
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Friday, March 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Women in action
The women's movement
sees liberation not, in the last
instance as an individual
enterprise, but as taking place
in the context of human
society and thus requiring
group action.
Group action ranges from
talking with individuals and
making them understand
their prejudices to fighting a
guerilla war. In Portuguese
Africa and in Southeast Asia
women are active in military
struggles and enjoy relative
equality.
Concerted effective action
for women's liberation would
effect basic changes in the
structure of society. Since
women are going to have so
much impact it is a good idea
for them to study existing
social and political theory in
order to spend their energy in
the most efficient way.
We should be familiar with
the Marxist theory about
social change whether or not
we embrace it. We should
study history to re-discover
our own history as women.
Dealing with abstractions
is not the only possibility. We
can also look at the gains and
disillusions of women in
nations where politics has
dramatically altered the social
structure. What better
example than China? Only by
critically examining both
theory and practice cart we
effectively change our social
environment.
r—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE	
THE
DUCHESS OF MALFI
by John Webster
MARCH 10-20—8:00 p.m.
Direted by JOHN BROCKINGTON
Setting & Lighting Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Costumes Designed by KURT WILHELM
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE-Thursday, March 16-12:30 Noon
Student Ticket Price: $1.00
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE  •   ROOM 207
______^ —— Support Your Campus Theatre.
High Qualify
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
Campbell
studios
m  NATURAL
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Visit our Studio
736-0261
2580 BURRARD ST.
at 10th Ave.
ARTS
UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
ELECTIONS
FOR POSITIONS OF:
1 PRESIDENT
1 VICE-PRESIDENT
For
Term
1 SECRETARY
Through
1 TREASURER
Next Year
5 AMS REPS
Nominations are now open. Forms may be picked up in
Buch. 107 anytime on the table just inside the door.
Nominations close March 10th at 12:30. The election
will be held in the Buchanan Building Wednesday,
March 15th. Campaigning may begin when the
nomination form is accepted, and must end by 4:30
Tues., March 14.
INCOME TAX
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327-0461
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3, 1972 Friday, March 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
iter of war
FREE
He was housed here by some people who often
put up draft resisters and deserters. They found him
different from their usual guests - more politically
conscious, more self-assured. Others who met him
while he was free in Ottawa were also struck by the
clarity of his goals and the firmness with which he
pursued them, but no one got to know him well
because his precarious position made him reluctant
to make friends.
It is now known that, for much of that time, he
was being followed by the RCMP. On September
30, he was surrounded by four police cars, arrested,
taken to Carleton County jail, and charged with
illegal entry into Canada.
The illegal entry charge was dropped in
December, but Pagan still faces a deportation
hearing March 8, and, as a result of a request by
American authorities, an extradition hearing March
29.
While in jail, Pagan has been questioned by
agents who refused to identify themselves and
whom he suspects were either FBI or CIA. They
kept asking him about the state of the Puerto Rican
movement and about whether it has ties with Cuba,
he says, and why would the RCMP be interested in
that?
If he is sent back to Puerto Rico, he faces a
possible life sentence on the murder charge. But he
suspects he would never be brought to trail, but left
instead to the more efficient methods of the
vigilantes. "They don't have any evidence against
me, and the reason they don't have any evidence
against me is that I didn't do it."
Only one witness came forward to identify him
as Mercado's killer — Mercado's deputy at the riot
squad. An important policeman had died, justice
had to be seen to be done, and Pagan was a likely
scapegoat.
Both Cuba and Chile have offered him political
asylum, and he is asking to be allowed to go to the
country of his choice. Among the lawyers working
on the case are Toronto civil-liberties attorney
Clayton Ruby and the well-known American radical
lawyer, William Kunstler. Pagan's Puerto Rican
lawyer, Roberto Maldonado, was in Ottawa recently
and spoke at Carleton University in an effort to
bring his case to public attention. It is felt that
Canadian public opinion will be an important factor
in determining whether or not Pagan is sent back.
A defence committee for Pagan has been
formed around the nucleus of the informal support
group of people who had been trying to arouse
public sympathy for him, visiting him in jail,
exchanging letters with him, and helping in any way
they could.
#^merican tourists returning from Puerto Rico
report that they aren't quite as welcome as they
once were, the natives aren't quite as friendly, their
vacations aren't quite as pleasant.
In Carleton County jail, Humberto Pagan's
spirits remain high, and he .has much to tell a visitor.
"Canada signed the 1960 United Nations resolution
condemning colonialism," he says, "but now it is
co-operating with colonialism in Puerto Rico.
"It also signed the Geneva Convention
regarding the treatment of prisoners of war, and
that is what is going on there — a war, a war of
liberation. It is being conducted on the political
level and not the military but that doesn't make it
any different.
"The liberal facade in Puerto Rico has been
stripped away. They were liberal toward us when we
did not threaten them but when we started to
threaten them they revealed themselves as fascists.
"In my experience in prison I have seen behind
the liberal facade in your country too."
PAINTINGS WANTED
We wish to purchase paintings of quality by important
Canadian and international artists. Particularly the Group
of Seven, Carr, Coburn, Colville, Cullen, de Tonnancour,
Fortin, Fripp, Gagnon, Grandmaison, Gissing, Henderson,
Hewton, Hughes, Krieghoff, Lansdowne, Lemieux, Milne,
Monahan, Morrice, Pellan, Pilot, Riopelle, Robinson,
Shadbolt, Smith, Suzor-Cote, Thomson, Town, Verner,
Watson and Weston.
PLEASE CONTACT
T. V. KRISTIANSEN
(604) 738-3510
2956 Granville St.
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♦"Design and Word Trade Marks in
Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd." Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3, 1972
Power shifts to unions
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Are the freedoms provided by collective
bargaining worth the costs involved?
This was the question UBC commerce professor
Bill Stanbury put to about 50 people at noon
Thursday in Angus 110.
Stanbury and Paddy Neale, secretary-treasurer
of Vancouver and District Labor Council, presented
labor's view in a panel discussion on collective
bargaining.
Among those presenting the management view
were Ray Wilson, MacMillan Bloedel industrial
relations manager and brigadier-general J. W.
Bishop, Amalgamated Construction executive
director.
"The balance of power has shifted away from
management toward the unions," Wilson charged.
"Management works with employees for 168
hours per month and the union meets only two
hours per month, yet employees turn to the
unions," he said.
Both Wilson and Bishop called for more
frequent meetings between union and management.
"As long as we keep shooting at each other
during negotiations, we are hurting each other," said
Wilson.
Neale said he pays no attention to people who
say unions will drive primary industry out of the
province.
"The resources are here, so business is here.
What are they going to do, move the trees and the
ore and the fish and replant them in Bermuda?"
He said the Social Credit government has
constantly , eroded union strength with bills
restricting their power to organize and spread
information about strikes.
"People aren't joining organized labor because
of the unions' lack of power," said Neale.
In answer to a question from the audience,
Bishop said: "management has not been able to
restrain wages, prices and profits because of strikes.
It is the public's responsibility to keep wages and
prices down."
"We'll look at wage controls if you look at
everything else: rent, interest, prices, and profits,"
said Neale.
CIS
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INSURANCE, No. 96 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C., 872-7454.
NOMINATED FOR
3 ACADEMY AWARDS
THE
LAST
INCLUDING BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR
SHOW TIMES:
12:30,2:45,5:00
7:15,9:25
Coronet
S51   GRANVILLE
6(5-6121
PETER BOGDANOVICH
Warning: FreqtJent use of cocse
language. R. W. McDONALD, B.C. DIR.
Fishermen still seek rights
GEORGE C.SC0TT
THE HOSPITAL'
Nominated
For Academy
Award as
BEST
ACTOR
Last Post News Service
OTTAWA — The long struggle to win collective
bargaining rights for Canada's fishermen is still far
from over.
A six-member delegation of the United
Fishermen and Allied Workers Union was in Ottawa
recently to seek amendments in Bill C-253, the
government's proposed new labor dode. The new '
code purports to include fishermen in the definition
of employees with collective bargaining rights, but
the UFAWU says the government's definition could
exclude 65 to 75 per cent of Canada's fishermen
who are employed on small boats. The union
reported little government support for their request.
Union leaders are also taking their case to the
government of B.C., where the UFAWU is based.
The B.C. government excludes fishermen from
provincial labor legislation and has tried "to take
away what little legislation for fishermen on the
provincial statutes already existed," according to
union president Homer Stevens.
Only two provinces allow fishermen the right to
bargain collectively. Nova Scotia amended its labor
code to include some fishermen after a seven-month
strike for recognition of the UFAWU in the Canso
Straits area in 1970, and Newfoundland gave
bargaining rights to fishermen as a result of a strike
at the Burgeo fish plant by members of the
Newfoundland Fishermen, Food and Allied Workers
in 1971.
Odeon
nt SRANVlLU
6(2-74««
PADDY CHIYEFMY
ADULT INTUTAINMINT
WARNING: Some swearing and frequent coarse
language. R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
SHOWTIMES:  12:00,  1:40, 3:35,
5:30. 7:30, 9:20
"BELONGS IN A CLASS WITH
'BICYCLE THIEF' AND 'SHOESHINE'."
— Cosmopoliton Magazine
vittorio l>t SIC vs Nominated
for  r\
Academy
Awards
including
124-3730^ English Subtitles "BEST FOREIGN
4375W.10th SHOWTIMES:  7:30, 9:30 FILM"
the Garden of the
Varsitu Finzi-Continis
224-3730*
Last call on tenure
The provincial government's tenure investigation is all but over.
Any remaining submissions to the legislature committee on
welfare and education should be in the hands of committee members
by Monday, MLA Herb Capozzi told The Ubyssey Thursday.
Submissions should be mailed to the committee at the
legislature buildings in Victoria.
Capozzi said the committee has to produce the first portion of
its initial report on the tenure hearings by next Friday — March 10.
He would not give any preview of what the committee's
recommendations on tenure might be but said he had "noticed a lack
of criticism of the present system" in the submissions presented so
far.
Capozzi said the timing of the hearings makes it unlikely that
there will be any legislation this session arising out of committee
recommendations.
However, he said, it is possible such legislation could come up
when the house goes back into session in January, 1973.
FRIDAY FOOD
SUB Cafeteria
now open til
10:00 p.m. Fridays
Hyland
KINGS'Y at KNIGHT
(76-3045
Nominated
for    6
ACADEMY
AWARDS
including
BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTRESS
Tickets Available at
881 Granville St., 688-2308
or at the Hyland Theatre
one hour before show times
T POINT
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BEAT
BICYCLE THEFT!
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CABLE   LOCKS
"MATCHED PAIRS" - USED BICYCLES
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3771 W. 10 Ave. 224-5356
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
NO WAY OUT
FOR CISCO PIKE!
He's trapped between
the crooked cop and
the impossible
deadline.
COLUMBIA PICTURES
co-starring
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
GENE HACKMAN
KAREN BLACK
KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
VIVA
HARRY DEAN STANTON
Produced by GERALD AYRES • Written and Directed by BILL L. NORTON • An ACROBAT
Warning:    Swearing,    coarse
language and drugs,
-ft w. Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
SHOWTIMES.: 12:25,2:35,4:45,6:50,9:00
Hear Kris Kristofferson sing:
"LOVIN' HER WAS EASIER''
'I'D RATHER BE SORRY'
■'PILGRIM: CHAPTER 33 7
"BREAKDOWN" *S'
Friday, March 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Pags 13
Hot flashes
planner
fo speak
Dr. George Povey of the health
care and epidemiology
department will speak on
Population Growth and the
Dynamics of Ecocide at noon
today in Buchanan 104.
Povey, a gynaecologist, has
acted as a consultant to family
planning programs in several
countries.
The meeting is sponsored by
the Environmental Crisis
Operation.
Penpals needed
International House is
sponsoring a 'reach out '72'
campaign to encourage students
to write to more than 300 foreign
students who will attend UESC.
next year.
Anyone interested in joining
the letter campaign and helping to
"bridge the cultural gap" should
register at I.H. any time Mondays
through Fridays.
State science
Alastair Gillespie, minister of
state for science and technology,
will discuss the Use of Science and
Technology in Pursuit of National
Goals at noon today in Hebb
theatre.
Gillespie will tour the
Tri-University Mason Facility
cyclotron and visit B.C. Research
before his talk.
JMuzac changes
A meeting has been called for
anyone with beefs about the
structure of the music lounge
area.
Anyone interested in working
for structural changes is requested
to attend the meeting at noon
Monday in SUB 105B.
Citizens forum
UBC professor of community
planning Setty Pendakur, will
moderate a Citizens forum of
professionals on the question of
the Third Crossing Saturday at 1
p.m. in the Vancouver Public
Library auditorium.
Engineers and planners of the
proposed crossing and other
professionals in planning,
architecture and other fields have
been invited.
Zoology department head
Peter Larkin will talk at the
regular meeting of the Vancouver
Institute, at 8 p.m., Saturday in
Buchanan 106.
Larkin, one of the founders of
the Institute of Animal and
Resource Ecology, will discuss
resource management in Canada.
Admission is free.
.&*4&**\
'Tween classes
TODAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion of grade 7 social studies
in SUB 111 at noon.
SIERRA CLUB
West coast trail show at noon in the
SUB auditorium.
ECO
Dynamics of Ecocide by Dr. George
Povey of health care and
epidemiology at noon in Buch 104.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Closing night of exhibit Backstage
in the fine arts gallery at 8:30 p.m.
ANTHROPOLOGY AND
SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Dr. C. Borden speaks on the
Milliken phase and the Pasika
complex — discussion at 1:30 p.m.
in Wesbrook 201.
SATURDAY
UBC FENCING CLUB
B.C.      fencing      championship:
women/men   foil   at   9:30   a.m.   in
new gym B.
VOC
Ski-touring in Manning Park.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Movie Burn at  8:30 p.m.  in Hillel
house behind Brock. Admission 75
cents.
SUNDAY
UBC FENCING CLUB
B.C.   fencing   championship,    sabre
and epee, at 9:30 a.m. in new gym
B.
T BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Quickie club ride. Meet at SUB loop
at noon.
MONDAY
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Organization of future events to be
discussed at noon in Angus 24. All
members please attend.
ELCIRCULO
Election of next year's officers at
noon in I.H.
TUESDAY
HILLEL SOCIETY
Bet     cafe:     Kosher     meal     every
Tuesday   at   noon   in   Hillel   house
behind Brock.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian poet Dennis Lee reads at
noon in Buch 100.
TAI CHI
Joint hands practise at noon in SUB
205.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Important guest speaker at noon in
SUB 211. Also general meeting for
elections.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Talmudic — laws of marriage — by
Rabbi Marvin Hier at noon in Hillel
house behind Brock.
THURSDAY
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
Guest   speaker   at   noon   in   Angus
415.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Campus charismatlcs meet and eat
at   5:30  p.m.   in  Lutheran student
centre.
HILLEL SOCIETY
Talmudic     classes     on     laws     of
marriage   at   noon   in   Hillel   house
behind Brock.
FRIDAY FOOD
SUB Cafeteria
now open til
10:00 p.m. Fridays
Conversation Pit
Listening & Reading
Rooms.
How can they improve?
S.U.B. 105-B MON. 12:30
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality  Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs-and Painting-
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879-0491
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Campus - 3 lino*,  1  day $1.00;  3  days $2 JO
Commercial - 3 Urns,  1  day $1.25; addWotra)
linss 30c; 4 days pries of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and an payable
in advance. Deadline » 11:30 am, tha day baton paalteaaan.
Publications Ottfoe, Room 241 S.U.B., VBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
coming Dance and Party, March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
PAIR OF GOLD COLORED WIRE
— frame glasses in brown case.
Lost Feb. 25 in Buchanan. Phone
Garnett   at   224-9545.
Rides ft Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657 evea.
OLD FORT CAMPERS HOME-
coming dance and party March
4th. For information phone 224-
7383.	
ASIAN CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
Photo and Art Exhibit March
13th   to      18th.   SUB   Art  Gallery.
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE-
ness — 1 day introductory workshop    —   Individual        Groups.
Psychologist.    One    year    Esalen.
929-3662   morning's.	
DO     YOU     NEED    TO     BE     PUT
together   after  your   "Encounter"
or perhaps  you are  interested  in
a   meaningful  group   experience.
Call  Joyce  224-4662.
LOOK    HERE
3   FOR    S1.00
Why pay this much for your
prophylactics? We will mail you
24 Assorted Prophylactics for
only $2.00, by return mail in
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POSTTRADING
BOX  4002      VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Travel Opportunities
16
CAMPING TRIPS RUSSIA
Europe, India. Information meeting Friday 12:30. Bu. 3223. Rosa-
lyn   Peering  922-0644.	
LEARN HOW TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON A LIMITED BUDGET
A meeting will be held at 7:45
p.m. on Monday, March 20th in
the auditorium of Eric Hamber
School, 5025 Willow, Vancouver
33rd & Oak) to help all those
travelling abroad on a limited
budget. Bring along your questions and learn how to travel on
a   shoestring.
A panel of experts, Including a
qualified agent, who have travelled to all parts of the world
will be on hand to talk to you and'
answer all your questions on
foreign travel. Free checklist will
be   handed   out.
No admission charge — so bring
your friends who are interested
in travel and learn how to save
hundreds of dollars!
Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C., Telephone: 738-
3128.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
I960 VALIANT  STATION WAGON,
good    running    condition   $275.00.
Phone  Alan,  266-8906.	
1968   NOVA-AUTOMATIC  —   BEST
offer.    Phone   263-7259   after   5:00
p.m.  &  weekend.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Duplicating & Copying 34
Scandals
37
HENNEKEN ^AUTO IS PLEASED
to announce— free courtesy car
will be provided when we fix
any major problem now present
in your Mazda, Toyota or Datsun— Phone 263-8121 or drop by
8914   Oak   St.    (at   Marine).
A.SIAN CANADIAN EXPERIENCE,
Photo and Art Exhibit March
13th   to   18th   SUB   Art  Gallery.
ASK OUR FRIENDS & CUSTOM-
ers.they tell it like it is' at Cor-
ky's Men's Hairstyling, 4th &
Alma. 731-4717.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs        39
Typing
EXPERIENCED TYPIST; Manu -
scripts, essays, etc. at 250 per
page. Please supply own paper.
BEV  HARCUS   266-9837.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays and theses quickly
and accurately. Donna Peaker
266-4264   Kerrisdale.	
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING —
Essays, thesis etc. — — — —
Phono 327-8455.	
Typing—Cont.
40
TYPING OF ESSAYS ETC. 350
page. 'Phone 224-0385 after 5 p.m.
ESSAY TYPING 19th AND DUN-
BAR.   733-5922.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFES-
sional Typing IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone
Shari at 738-8745 — Reasonable
rates.	
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317.	
WILL DO TYPING MY HOME.
Reasonable rates. 985-8891. North
Vancouver.
ESSAYS, PAPERS TYPED 25c
page.  Barb,  732-9985 after 6.
ESSAYS, PAPERS. THESIS,
assignments, fast, efficient. Near
41st  Marine  Dr.   266-5053.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
SUMMER HELP ON INTERIOR
Ranch. Moving irrigation pipe
half day. Pleasure riding, swimming, hiking. Bachelor housing
supplied. Low wages, mosquitoes
free. Four bodies required. Bonaparte Ranch, Box 217, Cache
Creek.	
"INNER-CITY IS INTERVIEWING
NOW for summer jobs to begin
May 15th, pending Opportunities
for Youth grant. Please don't
apply unless you have a good
working knowledge of community
groups^ and/or organizing and
/or the cooperative movement
and/or research. Otherwise call
Sharon,    254-7166,    254-9776."
HOUSECLEANING: GIRL WANT-
ed. 2 hours weekly. $1.75 per
hour. Kerrisdale Apt. Ph. 261-
8834   eves.   5-9.
Work Wanted
52
REWARD $25 FOR INFORMATION
leading to a permanent JOB for
me at 500/mo. or more. Computer programmer/analyst, 6 yrs,
exp.,   no   degreee.   733-7973.
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT-POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3 register early. Limited enrollment.   G.   Alfred   261-47S4.
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT EXAMS? THE
UBC Tutoring Center has tutors
in nearly every course. Register
in   SUB   228   12:00-2:00   weekdays.
Tutors—Wanted
84
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FULLSIZE ELECTROHOME AM/
FM stereo — attractive Deilcraft
cabinet — excellent condition —
$200.   Phone  266-0129.	
ANTIQUES JAPANESE TEA SET
C1880 German bayonet, plus coins,
Victorian china, glass & books.
266-4293   after   6.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
■1
Room ft Board
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE
D.K.E. House. Large spacious
rooms, semi-private washrooms,
full laundry facilities, color TV,
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy
Road.   224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
APT. (5 RMS.) W LARGE SUN-
deck, near Locarno Beach, $145
p.m. to sublet May-August
friendly cat incl. Ph.: 224-6440 or
228-5181	
PRIVATE SEMI-FURNISHED
suite for one non-smoker available now. 263-8441. Near univ.
Quiet,   washer/dryer,   sep.   ent.
Unf. Apis.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. ft Unfurn.      86
2 BEDROOM HOUSE DUNBAR
full basement, fireplace, view of
mountains. Asking $26,900. Phone
228-9864  to  view.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3,  1972
Thorsen leads 'Birds to final
—garry gruenke photo
JOHN MILLS drives for two of his 18 points in 'Birds romp over the
Windsor University Lancers last night before 4,000 noisy UBC fans.
By MIKE GIDORA
It wasn't the refereeing, no
matter how bad it may have been
that did the University of Windsor
Lancers in by a score of 117-84 in
last night's first round game in the
CIAU championship.
It was the UBC Thunderbirds
and a gentleman named Ron
Thorsen.
Thorsen scored 43 points last
night as he led the 'Birds to the
win over the younger and much
less experienced Windsor team. In
addition to Thorsen's game
topping mark, four other 'Birds
scored in double figures. John
Mills hit for 18 points, Jack Hoy
12, and both Bob Dickson and
Bob Phillips scored 10 points.
But the story of last night's
game was Ron Thorsen.
Forty-three points is a lot, but
he could have easily added ten
more to that total had he not
chosen to set-up teammates for
easy baskets of their own.
It was a good thing that
Thorsen was as hot as he was,
because Windsor's star guard Peter
Mingay put the ball through the
hoop to the tune of 31 points last
night, high for the Lancers.
Before last night's game,
Windsor was rumored to be a
small, very fast team that did not
miss too many shots from the
outside. They were all of that and
then some.
They pressed UBC right from
the opening jump and burned the
'Birds badly with their fast break
early in the game.
They seemed to tire very early
though, and by the half, the 'Birds
held a commanding 57-41
advantage.
That wasn't the only advantage
they had either. By the half,
Windsor had committed 24 fouls
to UBC's seven and had four
players with three or more fouls
chalked against them.
The difference in the number
of fouls was the most striking
contrast between the two teams.
Windsor simply could not adjust
to the calls of referees Harold
Cronk and Mike Woods. "We
couldn't adjust to the refereeing,
J:hat was our problem" a subdued
Lancer coach Paul Thomas said
after the game. "They have
different referees in different
parts of the country and you
have to learn to adjust to them
wherever you play. We couldn't
do that and we lost."
'Bird coach Peter Mullins
remained characteristically cool
after the win that puts the 'Birds
into their second Canadian final in
three years.
"We played a sloppy second
half. They're not a bad ball club
by any means," he said.
About his opposition for
Saturday, the Acadia University
Axemen, Mullins said only that
they were a better ball club than
they showed last night against
McGill.
Acadia played a very sloppy
game in beating McGill 84-67.
Steve Pound scored 28 points for
the winners.
Six foot ten inch centre John
Naponick scored 25 for McGill.
The McGill Acadia game
provided a contrast in philosophy
of sport if there ever was one.
Last year the administration at
McGill decided to disband
inter-collegiate athletics, so at the
beginning of the year McGill had
no basketball team.
Then along came Sam
Wimisner.
Sam decided that there were
some people at McGill who would
enjoy playing some basketball, so
he formed a team.
After some digging he came up
with $1000 from the alumni and
with some hard work and a hell
of a lot of fun turned out a team
that eventually won the Quebec
basketball league.
Compare that with the
high-pressure, all-American style
approach of Acadia, and it's not
hard to understand why the
Redmen were the crowd's
favourite in that first game.
But the big one goes Saturday
morning at 11 a.m. when Acadia
comes up against a very hot and
hungry UBC team
There will be some very
interesting match-ups in that
game, probably the closest
watched one will be that of UBC's
Ron Thorsen against Acadia's
super shot Steve Pound.
$ffi«
Js£
^-\   "Angels of the highest order* ■ /~*^
CLASSICAL RECORD SALE
SB 3739—Voughon   Williams.       "A
Sea Symphony." London Phil. Sir
Adrian Boult, cond. Sugg, list
SI2.98, 2 LPs. OUR PRICE      $6.98
SDL 3774—Verdi Don Carlo. Domingo Caballe. Giulini, cond. Sugg.
list $25.98, 4 LP's.
OUR   PRICE
$13.49
SB 3778—Sibelius   Kullervo   Op.   7.
First  recording,   Bournemouth  Symphony   Orchestra.   Paavo   Bergtund.
Sugg,   list  SI2.98.  2 LPs.
OUR   PRICE       *>*."•
SCL 3742—Verdi Otello. McCracken,
Jones and Dieskau. New Phil. Orch.
Borbirolli, cond. Sugg, list $19.98,
3 LPs. OUR PRICE     $9.99
SB 3757—Verdi   Requiem.   Caballe',
Cossotto,   Vickers,   Raimondi.    New
Phil.    Orch.   and   Chorus.   Barbiroli,
cond.   Sugg,   list  $12.98,  2  LPs.
OUR   PRICE        $6.9t
SB 3763—Bach. The Four Suites for
Orchestra.     Klemperer,    New    Phil.
Orch.   Sugg,  list $12.98, 2 LPs.
OUR PRICE       $6.91
Explanation of Prefix Codes
B—2 LP» C—3 LPt
LPs E—5  LPs
35025
JS46I
350« 671
Ste-
3336 B
Tosca    (La   Scala/Callas/Di
fano/Gobbi/De Sabata
Dinu Lipatti: Last Recital
S 3SS9 C/L Rossini:    The    Barber   Of    Seville
(Callas/Gobbi/Alva,      etc./PhilA/
Galliera
S 3563 D/L Der Rosenkavalier (Schwarzkopf/
Ludwig/Edelman/PhilA/Karalan)
S 3S99 EL '• S. Bach: "St. Matthew Passion" (Complete) (Phil. Orch./
Klemperer)
$3604 C/L Pucrini: Madam Butterfly —
(Complete) (Jussi Bjorling/Vic-
torla   de   Los   Angeles/Other)
$3413 C/L Biiet: Carmen—(Complete) (Nikolai   Gedda/Others)
$361$ C/L Bellini: Norma (Complete) (Franco   Corelli/Others)
$3622 C/L Gounod: Faust — (Complete)
(Gedda/Christoff/de Los Angeles/
Others)
$ 3623 C/L Verdi: la Traviata — (Complete)
(Victoria de Los Angeles'Others)
Beethoven: "Fidelio'r (Complete)
(Phil. Orch./Klemperer)
J. S. Bach: The Complete Brandenburg- Concerti (The Philharmonic  Orchestra/Klemperer)
$ 3649 BL Verdi: Requiem Mass (Ludwig/
Gedda / Schwartzkopf / Philharmonic/Carlo   Maria   Giulini)
$ 36S1 C/L Mozart: "The Magic Flute" (Gedda / Schwartzkopf / Ludwig /
Berry/Frick, Others/The Phil. Orchestra/ Klemperer)
Handel: Messiah — R. Tear, R.
Herincx, J. Baker, others, English
Chamber   Orch.  — Mackerras
$ 35726
S 35724
SCL 3625
$ 3627 B
$ CL 3705
Beethoven:    "Moonlight"/'Pa thetl-
que"  (Gieseking)
Music  of  India  (Album  2)   (Various Artists)
S 3550$ Rimsky-Korsakov "Scheherazade"
Symphonic Suite, Op. 35, Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra. Conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham, Bart.,
CH.
$35607 Offenbach: Gait* Parisienne; Rossini: William Tell; Gounod: Faust
(The Phil. Orch./Karaian)
$35614 Tchaikovsky: Overture 1812, Op.
49   (The   Phil.   Orch./Karajan)
$3563$ Prokofiev: Peter & The Wolf;
Haydn; Toy Symphony (PhilA/
Von Karajan)
Chopin Waltzes (Malcuzynski)
Chopin: Six Polonaises (Piano solo
bv Malcuzynski)
S 35814 Bizet: Carmen — Highlights —
Sir Thomas Beecham, Nicolal
Gedda, Victoria de Los Angeles
$ 35S21 Puccini: Madame Butterfly —
Highlights — Victoria de Los Angeles,  Jussi   Bjorling
$35122 Verdi: La Traviata"— Highlights
— Tullio Serafin, Victoria de Los
Angeles
$ 35(43 Beethoven: Symphony No. S in
C Minor, Op. 67; Overture, "King
Stephen" (PhiI./Klemperer)
$ 35453 Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 In
E Flat Major, Op. 55, "Eroica."
(Phil./Otto Klemperer)
S35S77 "The Four Seasons" (Virtuosi 01
Roma "Collegium Musicum Italt-
cum" Cond.  by Renato  Fasano
$ 35881 Mendelssohn: A Midsummer
Night's   Dream  Incidental Music
Many, Many More On Sale!
MAIL ORDERS:
Mail orders promptly tilled: Just tick
off the records you want, enclose your
list with remittance, plus 5% Tax ond
postage, and we'll get your order away
promptly. First record 35c—each additional record 20c postage and handling charge.
$ 35922 Sibelius: Symphony No. 5 in E
Flat Major, Op. 82 Finlandia,
Symphony Poem, Op. 26 (The
Phil./Karajan)
$35923 Brahms: Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53;
Wagner: Liebestod From "Tristan
Und Isolde" (Act. 3) Wesendonk
Lieder: (Christa Ludwig/Phil. Orchestra / Klemperer)
S 35951       Russian    Orchestral    Masterpieces
(Borodin Orch.); Rimsky-Korsakov
and Glazounov (The Royal Phil.
Orch./Georges Pretre)
S 35974       Faure:   Requiem, Op.   48   (De  Los
Angeles/Fischer Dieskau,  etc.)
$35977 Debussy: La Mer Nocturnes (The
Philharmonia Orchestra Conducted
by Carlo  Maria Giulini)
$ 35983 Chopin: Mazurkas (Piano Solo by
Malcuzynski)
$ 36031 Beethoven: Concerto No. 5 In E
Flat Major (Emil Gilels, Piano,
Cleveland Orch. 'cond. George
Szell)
SFO 36032 Brahms: Double Concerto in A
Minor, Op. 102 (David Oistrakh,
Mstislav Rostropovich, Cleveland
Orch., cond. George  Szell)
SFO 36033 Brahms: Violin Concerto In D.
Op. 77 (David Oistrakh, Cleveland
Orch.  cond.   by George Szell)
SFO 36038 Berlioz: Romeo and Juliet — the
Orchestral Music (Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Carlo Maria
Giulini  Cond.)
$ 36044 Schubert: Symphony No. 9 (Great
C-Major) (The Cleveland Orchestra, George  Szell  Cond.)
$36044 Dvorak: Cello Concert & Silent
Woods (Jacqueline De Pre/Chicago Symphony / Daniel Barenboim  Cond.)
S 36047 Mahler: Symphony No. 1 in D
(Chicago Symphony Orchestra/
Carlo Maria Giulini Cond.)
S 36048 Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A
(Chicago Symphony Orchestra/
Corlo Maria Giulini Cond.)
$36123 Berlies: Harold in Italy, Op. 16
(Yehudi   Menuhin,   Violin)
$36129 Mozart: Symphony No. 38 in D
Major, K.504 ("Prague"); Symphony No. 39 in E Flat Major,
K.543 (Philharmonic Orch. Cond.
by   Otto Klemperer)
S361S3 The Boroaoe Concerto (Oboe, R.
Zanfini/ Flute, P. Risplli/The Virtuosi Di Roma/Cond. by Renoto
Fasano)
$36173 Handel edited by Be.fcna: The
Water Music (Bath Festival Orch.
directed by Yehudi Menuhin)
$3618$ Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G
Minor, K.550; Symphony No. 41
In C Major, K.551 ("Jupiter")
(Philhormonie Orch. Cond. by
Otto  Klemperer)
S 36247 Mozart; Serenade for Thirteen
Winds — London Wind Quintet &
Ensemble/Otto  Klemperer
S 3o34f Sdmaertt The Trout ond Other
Songs — Fischer-Dieskou, 4r.
Moore
$36403
$36413
Pomp and Circumstance
Morches — New Pnithormantc —
Sir  John BarbtroJli cond.
Otreakack: Tales of Hoffman
(Highlights) — E. Schwarzkopf,
N. Gedda, E. Bkme, V. de Los
Angeles, others, Orch. de las Society du Conserv. — Cluytens
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. Friday, March 3,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
SPOR TS
Highlights
Hockey
The JV hockey team takes to
the ice Saturday in the finals of
the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate
Hockey League.
The league Braves take on SFU
in a best two-of-three series to
decide the championship. The
first game will be played Saturday
at 8 p.m. at the Thunderbird
Arena, with the second game
being held on Wednesday, and the
third, if necessary, on Thursday.
The Braves ended the season
with 15 wins against two losses,
their only two losses coming at
the hands of SFU. Leading the
team are their league-leading
scorers Chris Fera (17 goals, 13
assists) and Brian Bourassa (16
goals, 14 assists).
The Braves and SFU clashed
four times during the season with
the series ending with two wins
and two losses each. SFU is
currently riding a winning streak
so the playoffs should promise
exciting action.
With the JV's relying strongly
on their excellent goaltending by
Rob Smith, and their scoring
punch up front, coach Frank
Carney is confident of winning
the series.
Admission is free to the games
with your student's card.
Curling
The UBC women's curling
team, composed of Robin Klasen,
Leslie Clarke, Mary Saunders and
Linda Watson and coached by
Charles Kerr, returned victorious
from the WCIAA curling
championships held in Victoria on
the weekend.
After   all   draws  in  the  five
university round-robin
competition, UBC's Klasen rink
was tied for first in the standings
with the University of Alberta's
Stelter rink. UBC had beaten
Alberta 12-3 in the final draw to
force a playoff which saw the
UBC girls post an 8-5 victory to
take the women's Western
Canadian title.
Volleyball
Playing in the Western
Canadian intercollegiate finals in
Calgary the UBC women w,on six
games straight in round robin
play, defeating the, Universities of
Calgary, Winnipeg and Manitoba
two straight games each.
Advancing to the finals against
the University of Manitoba, the
Thunderettes were not as
successful as they lost three games
to   the   Manitoba   teams.
intramurals
PHARMACY'S WINNING TEAM. Playing for the team are, front row (left to right), Jerry Swanney, Terry Backum,
Rod Anderson, Lyle Little, Mark Littler. Back row, Al Rella, Chris Lees, Terry Samartino, Doug Eaton, Court
Brewster, Graham Black, Bruce Nelson, DaveTagnotti, Jeff Wilson, Neil Orr, and Mike Delich.
When the Canucks are in a slump
(when aren't they?), there is always
the intramurals to turn to for fast,
hard hitting action.
Such Was the case Thursday when
pharmacy beat out the grads 4-1 to
take the division 1 championship.
The grads out-hustled the
pharmacy team in the opening
period, but only the sharp goal
tending of pharmacy's Rod Anderson
kept them off the scoreboard. Terry
Backum managed to slip one by the
grad goalie to give pharmacy the lead
at 8:40 of the period.
Jeff Wilson gave pharmacy a two
goal lead at 18:41 of the second
period, but the lead was short-lived as
the grads scored seconds later.
The third period belonged to the
pharmacy team as they managed two
more goals by Backum and Bruce
Nelson.
Final score: pharmacy 4 - grads 1.
Referee Bruce Hall had his hands
full throughout the game. "The game
was chippy and rough at times, but
what do you expect when both teams
are so fired up," he said.
Pharmacy is now looking for other
teams to conquer.
AWARDS BANQUET is to be
held on March 13 at 5 p.m. in SUB
ballroom. MCing the affair this year
will be Frank Gnup and Ray Herbert.
Letter
To the intramural office:
Witnessed the intramural 'Stanley
Cup' last Thursday between
London Drug Ringers (pharmacy)
and those "small but tough grads"
(who said that anyway?)
Pharmacy put the puck in the net
more frequently than grads, but
the latter team lost the battle and
won the war because pharmacy
used an ineligible player and
defaulted the game. May sound
like a sour grapes attitude on the
part of the grads but then, there is
more than one player on the grad
team in grad studies.
What might have been a fine,
rough, but not malicious game,
was ruined by extremely poor
officiating. Had dizzy, dopey and
friend been volunteers, or
recruited from the crowd, their
performance might have been
understandable. But the joke of
the matter is that these turkeys
were being paid for their
misinterpretation of the gamee's
basic rules. Scotty Morrison
would have been proud of the
new hand signals this dynamic trio
can produce under fire.
A suggestion to the intramural
office: Be a little more particular
to whom you hand those black and
white striped shirts out — 'else
hand out out solid black shirts to
match those complementary
pants, since the boys you're
sending out to do the job are
basically dead from the waist up
anyway. And in all smugness, be
forewarned Hall and Evoy (the
referees)     —     I'm     told    just
retribution    is    materially,   just
around the corner.
Name withheld.
You're right, it sounds like
sour grapes —if it wasn't maybe
you would have signed your
name. The player in question was
ineligible and every team that
played pharmacy knew this,
including the grad studies team.
And yet no team ever protested
this fact, preferring to concentrate
on playing good hockey rather
than on back-biting a team to
defeat. Grad studies agreed before
game time to let this player play
for the pharmacy team. And if
you know so much about the
rules, why didn't you sign up to
referee some games when the
intramurals needed men. Grad
studies had 24 hours to protest
the decision, but they chose to
accept defeat gracefully. So
should you.
Boink, boink, boink
The UBC tennis team members
had a large victory party
Wednesday night to celebrate
their outstanding wins in the first
round of the B.C. Open tennis
tournament.
The highlight of the second
round matches, played Thursday,
was the fierce fight between Koste
"Killer' Killas and Greg 'Beast'
Lee, both UBC team members.
Today sees the arrival of the
best players from the universities
of Washington, Seattle, Portland,
and Oregon.
Play begins tonight in the
armoury and continues through
Saturday.
' There is an unlimited standing
capacity at the armoury and no
charge to see the best tennis in the
Pacific Northwest.
Play ends Sunday with the
finals being held at the Vancouver
Lawn Tennis and Badminton
Club.
FRIDAY FOOD
SUB Cafeteria
now open til
10:00 p.ra Fridays
ASIAN CANADIAN
EXPERIENCE
Photo and Art Exhibit
MARCH 13-18
SUB ART GALLERY
INTERNATIONAL FAIR AND DANCE, MARCH 10 & 11
lnternational=Between Nations
Displays and "Goodies"
from:
AFRICA, CARIBBEAN,
CHINA, GERMANY, ITALY,
JAPAN, MALAYSIA-SING.,
PAKISTAN, and SPAIN
Times: Fri. 4 to 10 p.m.
Sat. noon to 5 p.m.
Students - .50c, Faculty - .75c
DANCE - SAT. MARCH 11
SERENADERS STEELBAND
STREETLIGHT (ROCK)
9 P.M. to 1 A.M.
DON'T MISS IT!
ONLY $1.50
special       CHUCHICHASCHTLI
I.H. LUNCH International Foods at I.H.
PROGRAM • Home made soups and salads — 25c
• Open Faced Sandwiches — 35c plus
k • Authentic East Indian Curries Fridays
• European D ishes Wednesdays
Going Away
This Summer?
COME
and
SEE US
For Complete Travel
I nformation — Charters,
Youth Flights, Regular and
Excursion Flights.
For Brochures — Call
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
B.C.'s
LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 3,  1972
- V^T'-'iS
AUA
By MALCOLM REID
Last Post News Service
QUEBEC — The Quebec crime
sheet Alio Police had an
eight-page spread in mid-February
under the headline "Three
Eskimos Killed by White Man's
Alcohol", which gave a glimpse of
life in Fort Chimo, chief town of
the Quebec Arctic.
"A coroner's inquest and two
quick trials gave Alio Police a
chance to collect some notes on a
little-known Quebec northern
region, Ungava.
"These three cases are typical
of the problems Eskimos have
known since the arrival of the
whites,' since they all originate in
alcohol.
"The coroner's inquest was
held to determine how three
Eskimos died after drinking
methyl alcohol of a kind usually
found only in hospitals and
laboratories. The two trials dealt
with two Eskimos who committed
assault and theft while drunk.
"Last week's inquest was an
unusual one. It was held in the
dining room of the sole hotel of
Fort Chimo. The coroner, also
owner of the hotel, Jimmy Grist,
presided jointly with coroner Paul
Magnan of Quebec. Rodolphe
Roy was the crown attorney.
"A few Eskimos attended the
hearings in impassive silence,
relatives of the victims. Several
witnesses were missing, far from
Chimo. For the moment let's say
simply that time and space are not
the same up there.
"The hearings went fairly
briskly thanks to interpreters who
translated from French to English;
and Eskimo. Eskimos who speak
French are rare. One of the three
victims, Ahoyak Kauki, was the
only one who expressed himself a
little in our language.
"The circumstances of the case
are briefly stated. And the
witnesses stated them very briefly.
Eskimos are taciturn. They speak
little to whites, replying with a
nod or a word. But they chat a lot
among themselves.
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HEMLATA CHATURVED
(SUB)
LUTHERAN CENTER
THUR. 5:30 P.M. MAR. 9
Methyl
alcohol
and the
Canadian
Eskimo
"We managed nevertheless to
learn that it was at a drinking
party at Ahoyak Kauki's place
that the dangerous poison was
absorbed.
"He had as guests Annie
Sekaluk from Iuvic, Makima
Markoosie of Povungnituk and
four other friends.
"Kauki's sister Mary was a
witness to the drinking, but didn't
notice when the bottle of methyl
entered the house.
"At the beginning of the
evening, she saw everyone
drinking ordinary Liquor
Commission alcohol. Later she
was in the kitchen and her brother
and friends began drinking
methyl.
"Everyone was sitting around a
side of caribou, eating it the
traditional way, dipped in raw seal
oil.
"The effect of the terrible
poison was not long in coming. At
11:20 on January 13, another
Kauki sister, Lucy, called Andre
Huot of the Quebec Northern
Directorate and social worker
Francine Tremblay. Seven people
were sick at the Kauki house.
"The three Quebec Provincial
Police in Chimo, Ronald Martin,
Jacques Marcotte and Patrice
Vadeboncoeur, were alerted. They
Jvlrws ft
WE HAVE MANY
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came, but too late. Kauki and his
friends were writhing in pain.
Annie Sekaluk was already in a"
coma, and died as she arrived at
the local hospital. Next day
Markoosie died. The others were
transferred to Schefferville and
Seven Islands, but Kauki, a
colossus of unusual resistance,
died on the plane. The others
were saved, but one is temporarily
blind.
"Dr. Richard Authier's autopsy
showed the deaths were due to
acute effects of meythl, which
causes death after its secondary
properties have attacked nervous
centres and optic nerves. Dr.
Authier testified that this poison
is rarely on the market in pure
form, though it is found in
hospitals and labs and is sold in
drugstores. So how did Kauki get
it? Here was the question the
inquest had to answer to know if
there was criminal responsibility.
"It was a lab technician of the
small Chimo hospital who took
out the bottle in question to give
it to a friend. Louise Dumas could
not have known what would
happen when she gave it to
Marguerite Chouinard, a teacher.
She gave it to her to use as a fuel
for a fondue heater. And the
teacher gave the fondue heater
and alcohol to Ahoyak Kauki, a
gift for small services he had done
her.
"Like any other white in the
region, Mrs. Chouinard knew well
that, unfortunately, an Eskimo
will often do anything for alcohol,
but she was careful to write
poison in red letters on the plastic
bottle.
"Kauki knew French, thus
knew very well what poison
meant. One friend, Peter Sekaluk,
warned the others that this
alcohol was poison, and went to
bed after eating caribou. His
testimony, written because he
could not attend the hearing, was
read in French and translated into
English and Eskimo. It, with Dr.
Authier's, would have sufficed to
justify the verdict.
"It was coroner Magnan who
rendered the verdict of accidental
death: 'In spite of certain obvious
errors of judgment, we cannot
render a verdict of criminal
responsibility,' he said..."
The' story goes on to tell of
Arthur Kudluk and George
Johannes, who got a six-month
keep-the-peace requirement and
four days in jail, respectively, for
stealing movie tickets and hitting
a sister. Both had been drunk.
Judge Andre Chaloux was
"understanding", Alio Police said.
This reporter knew Ahoyali
Kauki. He was a big man with a
big smile and he worked for the
Quebec government. In his house
there was flowered linoleum on
the floor and guns on the wall.
Makima Markoosie too, I am told,
was a luckier-than-average
Eskimo; he was an officer of the
co-op in his home town, the
beginning of Eskimo competition
for the Hudson's Bay Company,
and he had worked on an Eskimo
radio drama series.
Generally the world of methyl
poisoning is a less lucky world.
Generally Chimo Eskimos live in
shacks with slop pails while whites
live in bungalows with running
water. Generally they have to buy
from the Bay, and generally they
can't afford the plane-shipped
liquor this life makes you want.
Alio Police moralizes much about
these "overgrown children who
always seem to be having fun",
but asks one good question: What
the devil are we doing there?
AA. B.A.
PROGRAM
UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA
A two-year masters program is offered for graduates^ in any
discipline, or holders of P. Eng. or C. A. designations,
interested in a career in management.
Courses are available in accounting, finance, general
business, marketing, public policy and quantitative
methods.
Dr. M. Dale Beckman will be interviewing at the campus
placement office on Tuesday March 7 to discuss the program
and to answer enquiries.
Make appointments now!
GAMPUS PLACEMENT OFFICE
(Office of Student Services, West Mall)
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
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in any accident In the past five years?
Yes □ No □ (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
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license been suspended?  	
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Date current policy expires .
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work, train or bus depot,
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of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
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