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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1968

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 Vol. L, No. 17
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1968
228-2305
— gordi. long photo
"HERE WE GO MARCHING two by two into the depths of an overcrowded library, hope
we find a place to sit." Our photographer found a place to sit, in the $160,000 bell tower.
Too bad there's no shelves and books there.
Political committee
SUB opening
to include
Smoker botch
now annual
science event
By FRANK FLYNN
Alma Mater Society president Dave Zirnhelt condemned
the science undergraduate society for holding its annual smoker
in SUB.
The SUS held the smoker in the SUB ballroom Wednesday
night.
"We don't want smokers in SUB," said Zirnhelt. "We don't
want people getting arrested for activities in our building.
"Furthermore, smokers don't help our image."
The smoker, a regular SUS function, featured stag movies
and a band. Strippers were slated to appear but did not.
Although a spokesman for the SUS denied they had sponsored the event, the ballroom was booked by science.
SUB management committee member Al Wait said Thursday the committee does not condone and had no knowledge of
the smoker.
"Such activity endangers our chances for getting liquor
permits for future legitimate activities."
(The SUS had no liquor permit for the smoker.)
Wait said no group will be issued a permit for a smoker of
any kind if the SUB committee has knowledge of plans.
A science student who helped to organize the smoker, but
would not allow the use of his name, explained to The Ubyssey
the events that led up to Wednesday night's smoker.
Last spring a dummy club was set up by Science under the
name The Young Businessmen's Club, he said.
Late last week a liquor licence was obtained for Wednesday
night for the Alpen Hall at 37th and Victoria.
Earlier last week a deposit was left with the owners of the
hall to rent it for Wednesday, claimed the organizer, and again
the name Young Businessmen's Club was used.
"If we hadn't used a false organization, we would never
have been able to get a liquor licence. The authorities were very
inquisitive when we said we were from UBC, and wanted to
know if we had ever had this sort of function before," the
spokesman said.
"Naturally, if we had told them we were from the SUS
they would never have approved, because the Vancouver police
have busted two of our smokers in the last three years."
The spokesman went on to outline how films, strippers, and
a band were lined up.
"When the tickets were sold, the students were told to meet
here at UBC and they would be transported to the location of
the smoker. Only four people knew the real location until late
Wednesday."
Ticket holders were taken over to SUS with the understanding that they would be picked up there by buses. They
Continued on Page 3
See: SCIENCE
SFU council fires
set to evaluate CUS   open house       broadside at CUS
UBC's parliamentary council Thursday set up a com
mittee to evaluate the relevance of the Canadian Union of |
Students to UBC students. I
The committee is to report to the parliamentary coun- g
cil as to whether or not CUS policies reflect the aims of the *
majority of UBC students. |
Stuart Clark, arts 3, said the move was in reaction -
to external affairs officer   Tobin Robbins' ruling that the I
head of the CUS sub-committee must support the aims of ;
CUS.  The  sub-committee  was set up to implement  CUS
policy at UBC.
"We feel that the pro-CUS sentiment that elected Rob- '
bins is no longer in the majority here," said Clark.
"The conservative elements on campus are frustrated
by the present control of and adherence to CUS policies
which they feel reflect a minority opinion in Canada.
"If the committee's  findings bear  this  out,  then the .
council will sponsor a move to have UBC withdraw from i*
CUS." «
Clarke said the parliamentary council, which consists
of members of campus political clubs, was not taking an
anti-CUS stand but was rather evaluating it.
SUB will 'be officially opened
in the third week of January.
The SUB formal opening
committee meets Mondays at
noon in SUB 224.
It is an open committee
which anyone can join, said
committee spokesman Chuck
Campbell.
Campbell said the formal
opening will include dances,
tournaments, a Gordon Light-
foot concert and a sports car
rally.
At the bridge, bowling, billiard, and ping-pong tournaments, there will be experts
in attendance.
Open house will prevail in
the evenings all through opening week, with all clubs taking
part, Campbell said.
Simon Fraser University student society council Thursday passed a motion to withdraw from the Canadian Union
of Students.
The decision now goes to SFU students for ratification
in a referendum to be held next Thursday and Friday.
"We are concerned with the expenditure of at least
$6,000 which SFU would have to spend to remain in CUS,"
vice-president Chris Dumfries, who the presented the motion, said Thursday.
"I don't think CUS has done anything that justifies
spending that much money. After all, education is a provincial matter, we've to to deal with Bennett, not the federal government."
President Rob Walsh who also supported the motion,
said CUS has never shown itself relevant to SFU students'
concerns.
"CUS is an unrepresentative body of an unjustified
expense," he said.
CUS president-elect Martin Loney, former SFU student
president has been invited to speak to the student body
before the referendum. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968
ENGINEERS were at it again, this time Thursday noon in SUB conversation pit.
Vut-ori edition taken off
streets, cops seize copies
MONTREAL (CUP)—Logos,
the often - hounded Montreal
underground newspaper, was
seized by police Wednesday-
after distributing a take-off
edition on the Montreal Gazette.
The paper was in regular
Gazette drop boxes and sold
on the streets by vendors.
Logos managed to distribute
over 600 copies before police
moved in and confiscated all
the paper they could find.
They broke into the Logos
office and took stacks of the
papers away.
Police arrested one Logos
editor, Alvin Cader, who was
arraigned Thursday for public
mischief) and comes to trial
next Thursday for preliminary
hearing.
The paper appeared, in regular Gazette format, just before
the regular newspaper hit the
stands. It carried a banner
headline saying Mayor Jean
Drapeau had been shot by a
"dope-crazed hippy".
All names in the article are
misspelled and the Gazette
logo was changed slightly.
Vendors of Logos were arrested last summer for selling
the paper without a permit
though city hall refused to
give them one, saying it was
unnecessary). The case against
the vendors was recently dismissed in city courts.
Logos used a hippy to "kill"
Drapeau because of Montreal's
summer  vendeta   against   city
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— John frizell photo
TERRY AND SUSAN JACKS of the Poppy Family drew a large crowd to their concert in SUB
Thursday noon. Wonder if the crowd came to see the guy?
Ombudsman  just helpful,
politics not part of job
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ubyssey Council Reporter
You've got someone on your side now.
The Alma Mater Society's first ombudsman,
IJob Gilchrist, runs an office on the main floor
of SUB, opposite the information desk, devoted
to hearing, and hopefully solving, student beefs.
"There are an amazing number of things
that students find wrong with the university,
but don't know where to go to ask about them,''
Gilchrist said when interviewed Thursday.
"Or else they have imaginative ideas and are
afraid to go to council with them," he said.
As Gilchrist sees it, students should involve
themselves more with the office of ombudsman.
"If a student comes in with a problem and
I do all the work, it doesn't help him much.
Students should take part in finding the solution."
His position, he thinks, should be an organizational one, he said. The more interested students we have working in the office, the more
problems we can solve."
MORE RESPONSIBILITY
According to Gilchrist students must take
more responsibility if the position is to be
effective.
"It's so easy for the AMS to set up a committee to look into something, but that doesn't
involve the average student."
"I've been trying to see the heads of food
services, the registrar's office and the traffic
-office, but if we had more people in the office,
we could share the various problematic areas."
Gilchrist thinks the ombudsman's office
should be able to implement student ideas.
-SUB IMPERSONAL?
"Students should be doing more in SUB,"
he says. "If we can't do something ourselves,
SUB is going to be an impersonal thing."
That's why the  "Groovy Gardeners"  club
got started.
"Lots of people are coming in asking for
plants in SUB, and I don't see why we should
pay great sums for someone else to do it, if
we can do it ourselves."
Above all, Gilchrist doesn't want the position of ombudsman to become political position
or base: "This office shouldn't be involved with
politics, but with students.
"We don't want to get into any political
scraps. Maybe it's a good thing we're situated
so far from the other AMS offices."
BLUE BLAZER REPS GONE
Gilchrist wants to see more students attending council meetings. "Students should realize
that the days of the blue-blazer AMS representatives are gone."
"Councillors aren't gods."
"If students come to the meetings, they'd
see what a mess council has made of things."
He's particularly upset that finance committee  meetings  are  closed.
"It's so hypocritical for the AMS to demand
open senate meetings, and then close their own
committee meetings."
And he's also looking for constitutional revisions with regard to his position.
"As ombudsman, I'm allowed to attend any
meetings of AMS subsidiary organizations, but
as the constitution stands now, I can't send anyone in my place."
"Simon Fraser University's ombudsman can
send other people in his stead, so I think it
reasonable to ask for a constitutional revision
on this question."
Quebecers hold out
to support demands
MONTREAL (CUP) — Defiant students continue to hold
six Quebec CEGEP's and a number of other post-secondary
educational institutions despite threats from administrators to end
the semester if they don't return to school immediately.
Representatives of Quebec post-secondary schools in the
province were scheduled to meet in Quebec city Thursday night to
discuss further action.
The schools occupied as of Thursday noon were: CEGEP's
(Colleges d'Enseignement General et Professional) Vieux Montreal, Maisonneuve, Valleyfield, Lionel Groulx, Chicoutimi and
Eduoard Monpetit, as well as four non^CGEP colleges.
The faculty of social science (except economics) was occupied
in L'Universite de Montreal and there were isolated occupations
at Laval and Sir George Williams Universities.
The only violence in the week-long protest was at Mont La-
salle where a group of parents visiting the occupied school tried
to rush the students and throw them out. The parents broke win-
downs and injured four students before police came in and ended
the battle.
The students got unlikely support Wednesday frdm Real
Caouette, leader of the Quebec Creditistes. He said he "didn't
blame" the students and thought their grievances were just.
Among the grievances are over-crowding, lack of employment and a shortage of French universities in Quebec.
Meanwhile Education Minister Jean-Guy Cardinal moved
closer to a dialogue with the students as he reiterated his promise
of a second French-language university in Montreal by September
1969.
He added that plans were underway for three additional
universities in the near future.
The minister issued a 25-page report late Wednesday night
and announced the creation of committees designed to bring students closer to the centre of decision making.
He said the economic and education planning department
of the government were willing to arrange "round-table" talks
with students, industry and labour unions to discuss job and
economic development problems.
At the same time he created a "student program of socioeconomic action" designed to bring students into studies conducted by the government on economic, educational, employment and
vocational problems.
Such a scheme, he said, would allow students not only to
find solutions for problems, but also to "learn for themselves"
what the "real issues" facing the government are.
He said overcrowding at universities was due to heavy student preference for pre-university training, a preference that disregarded the demands of the labor market. The jobs are there, he
said, students had only to search them out.
Science smoker
Continued from Page 1
were taken to the ballroom and found there the facilities waiting
for them.
"Security was very tight," said the organizer. "All liquor
was spiked into soft drinks and the bottles were recapped. Had
the police arrived, we were prepared to lock all the doors, and
thus delay them until we had a chance to dispose of the evidence.
"Everything was going smoothly until about 11 p.m. The
students present obviously enjoyed the band and the master of
of ceremonies. A number of stag movies were shown.
"Our luck ran out when it came to the strippers," he said.
"Apparently one of them was picked up by the police early in
the day for some other actions. She refused to come tonight and
the other girl wouldn't appear alone.
"When we announced to the crowd that the strippers weren't
coming, several became very vocal and demanded their money
back.
"It has been decided to refund three dollars of the five
dollar admission price to those that would not take a free ticket
to the Science dance later this term.
"During the uproar, AMS president Dave Zirnhelt came in
to investigate the noise. He was very upset when he found the
smoker in progress."
Zirnhelt attempted to address the sciencemen but disorganization prevented him.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968
THI UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 18, 1968
EDITOR: Al Birnie
City    Paul Knox
Managing    Bruce Curtis
News  John Twigg
Photo    Powell   Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page  Friday   Andrew  Horvat
Sports  Jim Maddin
Thursday was a bad page in Ubyssey
history as staff eagerly awaited what
Friday would bring. S<ex was the issue
of the day, particularly in the southeast corner. Newsside carried on re-
gardlesex. Andrew was horrified into a
vat of shame, but wasil wasn't really
that lewd as she skiid. Flynn was very
Frank about the evils of smoking, Frizzell sizzled on the same subject, but
didn't bring any of "those" pictures.
The hole Issue melted icelandic Bryn-
jjoollffssoonn    (that    right    Erik?)    but
UK**^'       '      ,      y   '   -
Elaine could have dug a well and hid
for shame. James conked out at the
thought. Button brought a pic and was
careful to point out where the puck it
was. Gordie Tong got into the act by
taking pics of Ladner's last erection.
Others disrobing to work included Rob
Tyhurst and John Gibbs. Dale came in
but kept her coat on; Susan came, but
late. She said she'd come Monday.
Here's hoping she, and others who've
skipped out, do come. It was old editors
day too, as Grey organized WRCTJP at
the last minute. (By the way it's next
weekend.) Finlay was in, and Fred told
jokes about how he'd been in. Peter
thought he was stretching the point
though. Newsdesk got more paperclips,
curtisy of our new ME, Bruce. Otherwise, things were normal; Knox was
appaulling, Twigg didn't have time to
visit the John, and we think big Al
birned.
Education
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re Ladner's interview with
the 75-year-old magistrate.
This article clearly states the
major cause of student unrest.
It is the "breakdown in communication that has led to all
the unrest and violence in our
society".
Surely if it's time a shit-disturbing drunken engineer like
myself can recognize this fact it
is time to enact some concrete
program to re-establish communications.
I have talked to adults who
have been so worried about
violence on this campus that
they have suggested a paid
secret police to be put on campus to infiltrate the ranks of
the' so-called 'radicals' and one
by one scoop up the 'bad guys'
and throw them to jail! !
Man, does the older generation need educating.
In any situation where there
LETTERS
is misunderstanding the only
way to solve a problem is to
bring out the truth on both
sides and hash it out. Because
of the thought of violence the
'establishment' might now be
willing to listen. The student
council should consider an
Establishment Education Program as a very basic start to
minimizing violence and unrest in this society.
TONY HODGE
applied science 2
Communicate
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I had a really funny thing
happen today. I went to a graduate seminar in the dept. of
education. I joined eight people,
most of whom looked to be
nearer forty than thirty, almost as old as I. The teacher
talked for approximately 2V&
out of three hours. Any comment by another person was
immediately drowned in his
words.   He  passed   out   sheets
of "statistics" — nothing but
compilations of numbers. I
looked at a sheet, saw that it
held no interest for me and-
put it back. He insisted I should
read it, I said I had, another
student — I should say pupil,
got up and pushed the sheet
toward me. The scene then reassured him. I was holding a
paper in my hand like all the
rest. I had made it clear that
I was not interested, and no
one cared or thought it worth,
asking why. They just knew
that I was not "behaving". *
At last 7:30 came. I told
"teacher" that this was not a
course for me. I did not collect
facts without regard to theory
and I had no theory within
which these facts were relevant. He became really angry
and red and shook his finger
at me and moved really close
as if he were trying to frighten
me. He said, "Now, I'm really
going to lay down the law. If
you can't take this course you
Continued on page 5
NIGERIA*   the wall has two sides
A lot has been read and heard in this country
lately about the situation in Nigeria. Most of the
material is insipid, asinine and, to say the least,
downright prejudiced. Every day we are inundated
with news of thousands of people dying of starvation
and unsubstantiated charges of genocide. One has
yet to see an article in a Canadian newspaper that
objectively analyses the events leading to the war or
gives an unbiased coverage of the war.
War, that epitome of man's inhumanity to man,
is just as repugnant to we Nigerians as it is to anybody else. We don't like this war. It need never have
started (no war need ever start), but we have it and
we just have to face up to the realities of it. However, one must point out that the suffering has been
exaggerated beyond all proportions by people who
have not even been near the war zone.
Figures of ten to twenty thousand people dying
a day of deliberate starvation by Nigeria are given
in news bulletins. The war has been going on for 15
months. So by simple arithmetic, between four and
nine million people must have died of starvation by
now. Yet there are only twelve million people in
Biafra and already six million of these are now
behind federal lines and their lives are gradually
returning to normal. The same press agencies that
give figures of ten to twenty thousands starving to
death say also that five million Ibos are crowding
into the remaining one-tenth of the area that was
declared independent. These figures are in conflict
and go to show how very unsubstantiated and
baseless the charges are. Even Time magazine says
that "the visage of a Biafra slowly starving to death
is part and parcel of Ojukwu's cold-blooded strategy
for pleading the right of Biafra's secession to the
world." (Time magazine, August 23, 1968, page 27).
NO EVIDENCE OF GENOCIDE
More ridiculous is the charge that an act of genocide is being committed by Nigeria to wipe out the
Ibos. Several independent observers have expressed
opinions to the contrary after being to the war zone.
Among these is a U.N. mission which, a fortnight
ago, said it found no evidence of genocide. Dr. Peter
Lloyd, a sociology professor at Sussex University,
believes that the reports of genocide originate from
a $5 million propaganda campaign operated in the
U.S. Only last week, Dr. Robert Baird McClure of
the United Church of Canada said here in Vancouver
that he had received reports from missionaries In
Biafra and is not at all sure genocide is being practised. Yet two Canadian MP's can claim to have
returned from a thirty-eight hour visit to Biafra and
dispute these evidences. They did not bring back
any evidence to support their charges but when
interviewed said that they were told genocide is
taking place. Surely if anyone goes on a fact-finding
mission he should do just that and not just believe
what he is told.
The war has gone on this long because of the
desire of Nigeria to cause as little destruction and
loss of life as possible. The Nigerian armed forces
have sufficient men and material to have brought
the war to a quicker but even bloodier end. We did
not do so purposely because we have no intention
of destroying Biafra or its people.
The image of Nigeria one gets here is one of a
country of forty million savages trying to exterminate twelve million innocent people of Biafra whose
only crime is that. they desire to be independent.
Nothing of course can be further from the truth. The
people of Biafra were never asked whether they
wanted to be independent or not. Yet most reports
attempt to explain the situation by saying that the
Biafrans are a persecuted minority group in Nigeria
and had no choice but to secede. The few that care
to mention that the cause of the present situation
began in 1966, usually start in the middle of that
year and distort facts to suit whatever their purpose is.
STARTED WITH COUP
The present crisis arose with the assassination in
January 1966 of the federal prime minister, two regional premiers and a cabinet minister, all of non-
Biafran origin, by Ibo officers in the Nigerian army
in what must surely be one of the bloodiest military
coups ever. They also murdered their colleagues in
the army, most of them of higher rank than themselves, simply because they were not Ibos and refused to be part of the coup. From the January coup
on, these officers systematically set about to impose
a dictatorship of eight million Ibos on forty-eight
million other Nigerians. This no doubt arose from
their belief that they are in some way superior to
the others. One of their prominent leaders once said
"The god of Africa has created the Ibo nation to
lead the children of Africa from the bondage of the
ages." The riots of May 1966' in which thousands of
Ibos were claimed to have been killed were a reaction to what the people of Nigeria regarded as
an attempt to force a dictatorial system on them.
The counter-coup of July 1966 was another reaction
to the same dictatorship and an.attempt to return to
sanity.
The situation in Nigeria is explained, by people
who don't know, as the result of the hatred the Moslem Hausas of the North have for the more enterprising Christian Ibos. This is all nonsense. There
are only twelve million Hausas out of a population
of forty-six million Nigerians (excluding Biafra) and
there are just about as many Christians as Moslems
in the country. The ten million Yorubas and the
other smaller ethnic groups are just as involved as
the Hausas in the present war. The Nigerian attitude
towards the Ibo is not one of race prejudice as in
the U.S. or as in the case of the Nazi anti-semitism
in Europe. The Ibos are not racially distinct from us
and are much inter-married with every level of Nigerian society. Thus, to say that secession came because the Ibos are a hated minority is complete falsification of facts.
CARVING AN EMPIRE
The fact is, of course, that after failure to dominate Nigeria, the Ibos wanted to carve out an empire
and, as Newsweek so succintly put it, "By itself, the
landlocked Ibo homeland is neither economically nor
agriculturally self-sufficient; to survive, the Ibos had
to annex the coastal territories of the River Peoples
and others, with their ports, fisheries, and rich oil
fields. Thus, freedom for eight million Ibos involved
a degree of oppression for five million non-Ibos."
(Newsweek, September 30, 1968, page 41). If one
accepts the Biafran argument that, because they are
ethnologically different from the rest of Nigeria they
should be independent we will end up not with two
states (Biafra and Nigeria) but with more than 50
mutually hostile micro-ministates in both Nigeria*
and Biafra. Once this happens in Nigeria, of course,
an avalanche of these ministates will spring up all
over Africa since none of the African countries is
ethnologically homogeneous. Thus irreparable damage would have been to the African dream of emerging from neocolonialism into true independence.
Most African countries appreciate this and that is
why only four of them have recognized Biafra. This
is what we in Nigeria are fighting for, we are not
fighting to exterminate the Ibos. Neither are we
fighting to gain control of oil in Biafra. As pointed
out earlier, most of the oil is not in Iboland anyway. As a matter of fact, only about 4 per cent of
Nigerian oil is in that area. And up to the outbreak
of the war, oil has yet to become the main source of
revenue.
FOREIGN INTERFERENCE
However, foreign involvement in the conflict is
connected with the oil. France is mischievously
egging Biafrans into vain resistance for its own en-
branchment and political extension of Francophone.
We find it very difficult to understand why maiiy
Canadians are so vocal in their support of the rebels
in Nigeria bearing in mind the similar situation that
exists in this country. We feel that English Canada
will not hesitate to suppress, by force if necessary,
any attempt to break up this federation in the same
way that our federation was being broken up. This
we find especially plausible after the ballyhoo that
followed de Gaulle's "Vive le Quebec Libre" speech
in Canada last year. Other countries who have involved themselves in the conflict such as Portugal^
and South Africa do so in order to substantiate their
claim of the instability of independent African
countries and the Africans' inability to rule themselves.
What Canada and everyone else concerned, as
we are, with the plight of millions of innocent people
should do is to bring pressure on the rebel leaders
to give up their insane and futile resistance and join
us in building a better Nigeria. After all the Ibos
need Nigeria more than Nigeria needs them. As Mr.
Arnold Smith, the Canadian Secretary-General' of
the Commonwealth said, "influence that makes for
increased rigidity instead of increased flexibility has
from time to time prevented agreement and therefore prolonged the fighting, the killing and the starvation." Reluctantly we must conclude that anyone
who urges or encourages the Ibos to continue to resist must accept the responsibility for thousands of
deaths.
TUNDEY YUSUF
OLU SOWEMIMO
NIMBE ADEDIPE
PETER OGBANG
JOLA OGUNLADE
FOLU ALCINBODE
Nigerian Students at U.B.£^ Friday, October 18, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
70 THE  EDITOR
Continued from page 4
shouldn't be in university at
all," (as close as I can recall
his words.) I did not allow
myself to express my anger at
being treated as if I were several degrees lower than he, because I knew that my claim of
respect as a human being, my
assumption of being capable of
determining my own educational requirements in line with
my own interests, was a fighting stance and must be seen
by him as unpleasantly aggressive.
We then went through a little
ceremony in which he offered
to help me with my thesis and
I allowed him to save face by
saying, Thank you."
Brother I am ashamed. Again
I have failed to hold out the
hand of humanness in a way
that can be trusted. I allowed
you to retreat to a place where
your humanity and mine were
hidden and the only good thing
that can happen between humans was impossible.
This experience was especially strange to me because I
had just spent a week-end in
a program with Dr. Jack R.
Gibb, president of the American Association of Humanistic
Psychology. Jack, with years
of achievement and recogni-
behind him, never once acted
as "a superior person." He
never told anyone what to
think or what they should do.
He rwould have felt "put-down"
if anyone had treated him as
"an eminent psychologist." He
is just himself and that is a
gift. For one week-end I lived
like a hitman and knew it was
good.
Sincerely,
(Mrs.) RENEE  JACKSON
Fitness
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Sissies are no good for anything and my most basic suggestion for reform is to try to
regain a healthy attitude to
physical fitness. Not only capitalism is wrong but the whole
onanist - hedonist - pill-LSD society . of American decadence.
(Most Canadians suffer from
senility before they reach grade
seven, because in this society
nearly everything is mere hypocrisy and cowardness based on
a degenerate absolute craving
for pleasure and an absolute
fear of pain. People have no
higher overriding values and
even the young are more or
less incapable of any genuine
idealism. Physical decadence
usually brings about moral decadence too. And protest
marchers against the USA policy in Vietnam are not impressive if they are sickly youngsters one suspects to be afraid
of cold water. I regret this
very much for I do think
that this USA policy is totally
immoral and suicidally stupid
—probably even the Russians
would not have dared occupy
Prague if the USA had not also
lost her moral credibility by
their Vietnam policy—together
with much military strength.
But sissies are no good for
SOCK IT TO ME
THUNDERBIRD!
anything and drug addicts will
disintegrate morally, mentally
and physically within a few
years.
So let us try to find back
to sanity, vitality, and human
dignity. The one good thing
about our engineers is that they
have a sport medal. Let representatives of all student faculties meet to devise common
standards for acquiring a sport
medal. Let us have two programs with about ten conditions: one including 10 second
handstand and a simple header
from the 10 meter, the other
one minute handstand and a
somersault from the 10 meter.
I am thinking only of moral
obligation, of setting examples
voluntarily.
Let us  have a   competition
the last day the swimming pool
is open. Let the student faculties compete who can bring
most male students to jump the
10 meter. Header V_ point,
salto two points, double salto
four, etc. Girls get double
points and are free which faculty to join. So they will go
where they like the boys best.
It will be real fun. And if we
are fortunate, it will be snowing — the best weather to develop will power. By the way.
I have not been near any board
for about 12 years. But if you
invite me, old ugly grizzly
bear will do a header from
the 10 meter.
KARL BURAU
Village Restaurant
and DINING ROOM
The Ideal Place to Hold Your
Special Events
BREAKFASTS - LUNCHEONS - DINNERS
MON. TO SAT. - 8 A.M. to 11:30 P.M.
SUN. - 10 A.M. to 11:30 P.M.
Take-out Service
5778 University Blvd. 224-0640
INTERNATIONAL
FOLKDANCE FESTIVAL
Saturday, 19th October, 1968
Women's Gvm, U.B.C.
Workshop 1 -4 p.m. - $1.50
Festival 8-12 p.m. - $2.00
Juniors and audience - 50 cents
Sponsored   by   Vancouver   International
Dancers and School of Phys. Ed., UBC
bmush saemsis
TALK STRAIGHT WITH
Thinking of returning to the U.K. ? Get in touch with
the team of ICI scientists visiting your campus
shortly. They will tell you about jobs available now,
where these are, how much they pay and what the
housing situation is. If you've only just arrived, drop
in just the same for a chat about your future
prospects.
Id's recruiting team
will visit your campus on  Oct. 22, 23 — A.M.
Contact them through   Mr.  J.   C.   Craik
Office of Student Services
_<IMlt If you're hung up on your holiday break, without enough cash
^SfmfgtfL t0 9et away in style, listen to this: Anyone under 22 can fly
flEffatfls f°r hati fare — on a standby basis — to any Air Canada
^"■■"S^ destination in North America. All you do is get an I.D. card
($3) that says you're a member of Air Canada's Swing-Air Club.
(Your I.D. card will also be honoured, for fare discounts by
other airlines in North America, and for co-operative rates with many hotels.)
Get the details from your Swing-Air campus representative. For flight arrangements, see your Travel Agent. Or
call your local Air Canada office.
AIR CANADA ®
FOR SERVICE CALL-
Hagen s Travel Service Ltd.
2996 W Broadway — 736-5651
FOR ALL AIR CANADA TICKETS
World Wide International Travel
ON CAMPUS
5700 University Blvd. — 224-4391 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968
Yippie leaders mock congressional hearing
By TOM MILLER
Collegiate  Press Service
WASHINGTON (CUP-CPS)—Running parallel to
House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC)
hearings on subversion in Chicago was a sideshow
entitled Life's Little Circus.
Put on by local movement groups, the circus was
billed as an alternative to the more formal goings-
on.
Both George Washington University, focal point
of activity, and American University, held forums for
movement leaders in town for HUAC investigation
of the yippies.
It was the finest week for the yippies, born at a
party in New York city last Christmas.
Not only did the Congressional committee believe
the yippies actually existed, but even the myth-
makers — Jerry Rubin, Paul Krassner and Abbie
Hoffman — were beginning to believe it.
As Realist editor Krassner put it, "When I got to
Chicago I looked around and I wasn't sure who I
saw."
"They weren't hippies, they weren't straights, my
god, I thought, they're actually yippies."
A policeman named Pierson, who tailed Jerry-
Rubin in Chicago, told the committee with a straight
face the yippies planned to take over the country,
which was dutifully reported in the Washington Star
under the headline "Committee Told Yippies Plan
U.S. Takeover".
Back at the rally behind the GWU library, Rubin
and   Krassner   announced   plans   for   the   coming
months. Rubin talked of the fun in Washington on
inauguration day.
He said he hoped he'd be called to testify — he
wanted to present the HUAC with one of his "Fuck
Communism" posters and accuse them of being soft
on communism if they didn't accept it.
At one of his regular lunchtime press conferences
with about 25 newsmen, Rubin also expressed sorrow
that he hadn't been called to testify. "I planned to
tell them everything," he said.
He had the Washington phone book to submit as
the yippie membership list. He said this was the
second time in two years HUAC paid his way to
Washington only to not let him testify. "And I'm
getting pretty pissed," he concluded.
"Excuse me," came Krassner's voice from the
crowd of newsmen, "is that spelled p-i-s-s-e-d ?"
SPECIAL EVENTS PERFORMING ARTS . . .
PRESENTS
OCT. 22
San Francisco Mime Troupe
Old Auditorium
2 shows
12.30 - 75 cents
8 p.m.-$1.25    students
$1.75  others
COMING ATTRACTIONS
AFRICAN BALLET ALI AKBAR KHAN
NOV. 15 CLASSICAL INDIAN CONCERT
THE COLLECTORS
CASEY ANDERSON
NOV. 7
JEUNESSES MUSICALE EM^rbT8RARV WAS $UIET AS  OSOAL,  AND ALMOST
SLOWLY r TURNED hff HEAD
I .Looked away instantly- but  not
BEFORE   I'D SEEN  HoW HANDSOME  HE WAS /
SUPPOSE    HE  TRIES TO   TALK TO
ME?   WHAT SHALL I Do? WHAT
SHALL I    SAY??
I FELT the  ©LO  FAMILIAR
PANIC "RiSiNQ INS«D£   ME,
And suddenly.
X THOUQHT ABOUT HIM ALL NEXT
DAY;    TORMENT INC,    MYSELF J
[l^HADN'r RUN  Av/AV; HE^AlQHl
IHWE COME ove«>   QH-J^nr DID
' HAVE to      — ^^ '
"RUN 11
B@ pS 2WO
By PETER LADNER
(The facts and figures in this article are based on three studies:
Kinsey, Pomeroy and Martin: Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948);
Kinsey, Pomeroy, Martin and Gebhard: Sexual Behavior in the Human
Female (1953); and two unpublished papers by Parvez A. Wakil, Dept. of
Sociology, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon), (1966 and 1967).
The pitfalls of all the statistics used are obvious: 12,214 males, 8,000
females (Kinsey) and 86 students—male and female (Wakil)—can't possibly represent all of us at UBC. Besides that, statistics reveal nothing of
the human drama, the tears, the surges of emotion, the hours of pondering
and dreaming, and the myriad human interpretations of the words used.
I have neither used footnotes nor have I explained all the aspects of
the statistics used for lack of space. If you don't trust me, don't read the
article, or else look it all up for yourself in the library.)
You aspire to the free heights, your soul thirsts for the stars.
But your wicked instincts, loo, thirst for freedom. Your wild dogs want
freedom; they bark with joy in their cellar when your spirit plans lo
open all prisons. To me you are still a prisoner who is plotting his
freedom: alas, in such prisoners the soul becomes clever, but also
deceitful and bad.
—Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zaralhuslra
Nearly all males at UBC are either at the peak of their sexual
capacity (late teens) or just past it (early 20's).
In spite of this, of all single males, the ones who have the lowest
frequencies of total sexual outlet are those at the college level, and of all
women at UBC, four out of five of them are virgins (if they're average
college women).
That's a lot of stored-up sex and a lot of virgins.
(Granted, women do not reach their sexual peak until they are
between 30 and 40 years old.)
So what does the average college student do for sexual jollies?
Masturbate. Statistics show that until marriage, masturbation remains the
chief source of sexual outlet for males who go to college.
And of the 52% of all college women aged 16-25 who reach orgasm
by any means, 56% of them do it by masturbation. The next most popular
outlets are intercourse (18%) and petting (11%). (See chart)
Do you need anybody,
I need somebody to love.
Could it be anybody,
I want somebody to love.
Oh, I get by with a little help from my hands.
This sort of pulls the mattress out from under the "free-loving,
wildly promiscuous college kids" myth. The tameness of the following
figures is also interesting: A study at the University of Western Ontario
in 1962 found only 15% of the women and 35% of the men had ever
engaged in premarital intercourse. This compares with a 1966 study
at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon) that showed 35.3%
of the females and 74.2% of the males had done the deed.
Before anyone starts spotting trends, a 1965 study in the United
Kingdom showed that only 17% of female and 34% of male 19-year-olds
had had coitus.
The statistics leave us pretty much up in the air, considering they
will vary from area to area, class to class, time to time, faculty to faculty.
But of those who got down to it, both male and female at U. of S.
agreed that their first reason was to find security, warmth, and emotional
satisfaction. The second reason was for physical satisfaction, and thirdly
they considered premarital love-making as an aid to their future sex lives,
especially since the Pill and other methods of contraception have reduced
chances of pregnancy.
In most studies students agree that as friendship and intimacy
increase, it's OK to go further sexually. In the Saskatchewan study, 94.1%
of all students thought an increase in sex should accompany an increase in
acquaintanceship with dates, mates, or lovers.
In spite of this feeling, more than half (53%) of the women interviewed at U. of S. said they would not have welcomed coitus even if they
were deeply in love and engaged. 85% of the men said they would have.
Among the reasons given for not indulging in deepest sex by the
women in Kinsey's sample, "moral objections" came first. (89% listed this).
The next highest obstacles were lack of sexual responsiveness (45%),
fear of pregnancy (44%) and fear of public opinion (44%).
Are these objections warranted? Women who know say no. For
example, 80% of unmarried virgins wanted to continue abstaining, but
among unmarried non-virgins, only 30% didn't want any more. 77% of
all women questioned after marriage saw no reason for regret in having
had premarital mating. And referring back to the women at U. of S. who
wouldn't have bedded down with a loved spouse while engaged, only 9%
of females questioned by Kinsey seriously regretted previous premarital
intercourse with their spouses.
It is interesting that regret is directly related to religious devoutness:
the more devout the single girl, the more she regrets it when she is, alas,
no longer a virgin.
As for fear of pregnancy, Kinsey et al. conclude that of all the cases
of coitus they studied, pregnancy only resulted in one out of every 1,000
impregnations. But now with the pill . . .
The Pill makes woman a bomb. She creates a new kind of
fragmentation, separating sexual intercourse from procreation . . .
Watch for traditions to fall.
—Marshall McLuhan and George Leonard
Furthermore, if a woman has reached premarital orgasm, her chances
for orgasm in practically all coitus during her first year of marriage are
nearly doubled.
Moral objections (listed by 62.5% of males questioned) were also
the big reasons for single college-level males resisting the temptation to
slip in the sausage. They were also held back by lack of opportunity (51%),
fear of pregnancy (28%), fear of VD (25%) and fear of public opinion (21%).
What is interesting here is the difference between the practices of
College males and those with only high school education. College males get
three times as much outlet through petting to orgasm than lower educational
level males. But to fill the gap, the high-school-educated men get almost
three times as much outlet through intercourse.
Kinsey and buddies suggest the reason college-level males get less
intercourse is because they can better visualize erotic situations and be
stimulated by far less than the real thing. Notice how the stud in the
"What kind of a man reads Playboy?" ads always looks very collegiate?
What seems odd with all this is that most students agree that there
is a double standard: (including 60% of the males and 74.5% of the females
in the U. of S* study) that is, chastity for women, fertility for men. Kinsey's
study found that 50.7% of college-educated men wanted to marry a virgin.
(One can only assume that many of these same men would be willing and
eager to sleep with whomever they can lay their bodies on.)
But at the U. of S., even more (74.5% of females, 86.2% of males)
agreed that the future sex code would be "permissiveness with affection"—
sexual intercourse approved of if the couple is in love or strongly attached.
So the question is: What is holding us back from greater freedom of
sex, which would mean presumably, if one can believe statistics, greater
Cotinued on pf 3hree
see: SECURITY
100 I—
90
SO
70
60
?50
i- 40
50
20
10
0 *-
AD0L-I5      16-20
21-25       26-30
AGE  GROUPS
31-35       36-40
Figure 114. Percentage of total outlet: sources of orgasm,  among single
females of college level
Masturbation
*-**• I Coitus
Nocturnal orgasms
[jllill Petting
Homosexual
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 pf Shree
Thai me
CI. down,
sport
By  PETER  BELL
"Christmas. You'd think an intelligent, red-
blooded, white, church-going non-communist like
I, with my genius for great salesmanship, would
avoid ending up in the nude. After having cleverly
connived his way into the afore-mentioned unbelievable position, that is, I mean the colored
prostitute (paid) and her swank apartment (fantastic). But, as it turned out, that's what happened.
Nude, I mean, I ended up in the nude." Robert
Gover's one hundred dollar misunderstanding,
from which the quotation is drawn, describes the
weekend a fraternity boy spends in the local
whorehouse and ends up with a 14 year old negro.
The book is bitterly incisive in its revelations
about the morality of white American males and
their deep Puritanical hyprocrisy towards sex.
Our western culture also abounds with fantasies about negroes and orientals; and it is interesting to see how these work out in practice in contemporary Southeast Asia and the human effects
of the recent "boom" in night-life brought about
by the spill-over of the Vietnam war.
Imagine the scene: you are on five days Rest
and Recreation from carnage, mosquitoes and an
all-male world in Vietnam, you are in Bangkok,
"Land of the Smiles" as the guide books say. You
are staying in an R and R hotel located on The
Strip—a mile long road of massage parlours, bars,
and night clubs which caters exclusively for the
recreation of military personnel. On what was five
years ago marshland, now stands a string of neon
signs announcing the bars — The Thai Heaven,
the Rhapsody, Holiday Garden, San Francisco,
G.I. — which vary widely in size and quality but
not in services. The largest may have as many as
150 'hostesses' sitting around or dancing with
each other to a deafening rock-and-roll band. They
can be invited for a drink ($1) and taken out for
the night ($12 payable in advance to the bar 	
the girl gets a ticket which next day she can refund for $6, her 'share'). For the good-looking
girl, the choice of customers is wide and she will
leave only with someone whom she likes.
Thus you enter a bar, usually escorted by a
taxi-driver who will get his cut on the night's
operations both from the G.I. and the bar, and
you are hit on the head with noise and with female
shapes in darkly lit corners. The girl can be taken
back to your hotel, (although this is not permiss-
able in the main tourist hotels), or to wherever the
G.I. wants to take her. She brings a change of
clothes in a brown paper bag so as not to have to
put on her evening dress next morning.
The phenomenon of most interest in terms
of the interaction patterns of these bar-girls and
the military is what it reveals about the Western
morality and sense of values. The men soon transform this into more like a dance-hall pick-up 'back
home', indeed in many ways the situation contains
Securities
continued from pf 2wo
security, warmth, and emotional satisfaction, a better future sex life, and
less frustrating substitutes like masturbation, petting and Playboy.
Besides the church (at U. of S. and Western most students did not
think the church's guidelines were realistic or satisfactory), Ann Landers,
and inherent resistance to change, what are some of the more subtle re-
inforcers of our present, frustrated ways?
Some would say that people in our mass society are out of touch
with one another. For example, we apologize for accidentally touching
someone. In one study, Sidney Jourard, a psychology professor at the
University of Florida, watched men and women together in cosy cafes.
In Mexico City, couples touched each other an average of 180 times
an hour. Paris averaged 120 times an hour. In London, the score was zero.
Jourard adds: "As touchers, I would rate Canadians approximately the same
as the British." He concludes: "In a society which fosters the alienation of
person from person, I can think of no more direct way to get in touch
than by touching."
As a result of hiding ourselves away out of touch, one writer (Ernest
G. Schachtel) says we see attractiveness and beauty today as no longer
based on alive expression and the flux of human feelings, but on a series
of poses (e.g. the "beauty" of fasion models). These features of beauty are
a more simple formula and more 'purity' than the
average high school dance in North America.
Many of the military have a desire to redeem
their chosen women, whom they see as warm,
very feminine and mostly unprofessional creatures, who have just recently been drawn into
the city and The Strip for the chance of an easy
fortune, better living, or to help their families
in the countryside, just as many teenagers used to
dream of making it in the streets of Hollywood.
Their hopes rest not in the cut they get from the
bar but in the possibility of extra income in the
form of gifts, new dresses, monthly cheques in
return for promises of fidelity and a new life
whilst the military man is back in Vietnam. And
one undeniable attraction is the promise of a good
time — dancing, movies, visits to the sea side,
goods  from  the  P.X.
If the G.I. had any of the common fantasies
regarding Eastern eroticism he will be sadly disappointed. Tbe pattern he himself imposes uporr
the situation is the interaction pattern of his own
culture, which is characterised by "dating". He
usually spends all of his five days with the same
girl and spends, on average, about $300 in those
days.
Interaction takes place in other forms also —
in massage parlours and night clubs, but these
cater as much, perhaps more, for the Thais themselves. The format is different, the service offered
is, with small variants, the same as in the bars.
The Thais are not newcomers to night life. Recently a bigamous society, the tradition of mistresses
still lives on. The striking difference between the
night life imported for R and R personnel is the
sense of morality attached to it which involves
Western-style "guilt" and is the cause of so many
psychological problems.
Thailand is a shame but not a guilt society.
Night life, the buying and selling of sexual services, is as normal to them as daily commerce and
the life cycle. Major public figures are known to
enjoy large numbers of mistresses and former
Prime Minister Sarit, who died with a private
fortune of £150 million, had an estimated 130
mistresses whom he personally supported. Such
revelations bring more admiration than shame to
Thais.
Who are these women ? Case study One: Her
name is Noi, aged 17, she moved to working in
The Strip after a girlfriend in the poor section
where she lived (which has no lighting, water supply or sanitation) told her of the possibility of
fortunes to be made. She left her job ($18 a month
as a factory worker) bought a dress and some
cheap make-up and moved into a new house in
one of the areas adjoining The Strip. She has
worked for 2% months in one of the largest bars,
in that time her perspective has changed slowly
from making a quick fortune to a settled career
as a bar girl. Prostitution itself does not particularly worry her or cause any psychological problems
although she cannot tell her parents about it for
fear of their anger and shame. She cannot save
money though because of the increased costs
of her higher standard of living.
Case Study Two: Her name is Daew, aged 25,
three children, each from a different military
father, only one lives with her, the other two are
looked after by her father in another house. She
began when a friend invited her to live in her
apartment and she got money from Americans for
allowing herself to be photographed. In seven
years in the business, she has not managed to
save at all and in another three years her pospects
are dim.
The amount of human suffering caused by the
booming night-life is hard to estimate. Leaving
aside the nature of the services provided, R and
R has resulted in some real income distribution;
at the same time it has brought into being a class
of people totally dependent for their living upon
the existence of transitory military personnel who
will find it difficult to adjust to another life when
the bubble bursts, as it surely will. Yet Bangkok
as the centre of night-life in Southeast Asia will
not die with the end of the Vietnamese involve*-
ment. The Western taste for these phenomena
is visible throughout the underdeveloped world.
Indeed in exploitative societies like those of Thailand and other countries, prostitution is often a
more dignified pursuit than many other ways of
selling one's labour. Yet it provides no more real
freedom than working in the fields since it leads
to a different series of relationships which are
imprisoning in just the same fashion.
cut off from the essence of the person and worn as a mask, protecting and
defending against all comers.
Perhaps in a very important sense, as D. H. Lawrence charged,
we have lost touch with our passional selves: we have lost the ability
to know each other at the nonverbal level, looking at each other's eyes,
touching each other's hands and feeling each other's presence and
responding to each other—rather than to each other's titles.
—S. I. Hayakawa
Economic pressures could also have some influence on our frustration. The rule of the market-place today is to buy but never be satisfied
(or you might stop buying—the supreme sin). So we see painted-up babes
walking around the campus and on billboards with miniskirts on to look
sexy, but who have no intention of satisfying themselves or any males.
Many of our sexual screwups come, as we have seen, from unnecessary
fears (fear of pregnancy, fear of sinning, fear of public opinion). These in
turn grow out of ignorance, which, sexually speaking, comes from lack of
sex education. In the U. of S. study, 84.8% of the male and female students
said the amount of sex education they received was insufficient. Which
suggests we need more sex education in high school, especially if we are
serious about making our education relevant to our lives.
And so, in closing, I call on the esteemed Lester A. Kirkendall, of
the dept. of Family Life and Home Administration, Oregon State U.
The first requirement in attaining sexually responsible behaviour is for our total culture to reassess and reappraise our attitudes
towards sex in light of our present knowledge and current conditions.
Friday, October 18, 1968
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Heigh-ho, Onanism—Away!
By WENSLEY MOLE
I have discovered why we are in this
inflationary period, with the economy
crumbling and the Irish Nationalists giving
us so much trouble. The cause isn't political.
No, don't speak to me of left wing and
right. The trouble lies smack in the middle. I speak of self-abuse, the habit that
has millions in slavery.
Untold miseries arise from the pollution
of the body. Self-pollution or onanism is
one  of  the  most  prolific  sources  of  evil,
Mr. Mole became interested in masturbation when at age six he was accidentally
enmeshed in a wringer washer. Now, forty
years later, almost blind, impotent, suffering from general debility of his generative organs, and calluses, he advises his
readers against self-abuse.
since it leads both to the degradation of
body and mind. It is practiced more or less
by and on members of both sexes, and the
habit, once established, is overcome with
the greatest difficulty. It is the source of
numerous diseases which derange the functional activity of the organs involved, and
eventually impair the constitution. This
vicious habit is often practiced by those
who are ignorant of its dangerous results.
Statistics show that insanity is frequently,
perhaps always, caused by masturbation.
It not infrequently happens that a
child, such as I once was, is born with a
vigorous mental organism which promises
a brilliant future, but manhood finds him
incompetent, debilitated, and totally incapacitated for mental or manual labour.
This is the havoc caused through touching
oneself, carnage made even worse by the
effects of a pernicious literature which inflames the imagination, tramples upon reason, and describes to the youth a realm
where the passions are the ruling deities.
The health of the reproductive organs
can only be maintained by leading a temperate life. The food should be nourishing
but not stimulating. Lascivious thoughts
should be banished from the mind, and a
taste cultivated for that literature which is
elevating in its nature, and the associations
should be refining and ennobling.
The abuse of the conjugal relation produces the most serious results to both
parties, and is a prolific source of some of
the gravest forms of disease: prostatorrhea,
spermatorrhea, hypochondria, consumption,
scrofula, and a thousand other ills to which
mankind is heir.
The ancients regarded courage as the
principal virtue. By myself, now, purity is
so regarded. It is too late for me, but I ask
you to understand, dear reader, that moral
purity is an essential requisite to the
growth and perfection of the character.
Foot-in-mouth disease
By JACK ALBERT KERNE
This is ridiculous. Positively and completely absurd.
Everytime I open my
mouth, I always manage to
end up with my foot in it.
It all began when I first
met that girl. It's a day I'll
never forget. I was just getting out of The Ubyssey office when she stopped near
a cigarette machine and
asked if I could change her a
quarter. The next day we
exchanged hi's as we passed
each other in the SUB
lounge.
This mild relationship continued for a week, and then
it happened.
I had gotten up on the
wrong side of my bed that
day (I always do that, since
the other side faces a wall),
feeling low about impending   mid-terms.
On my way to a lecture
in Buchanan, we met. All
of a sudden, I was speechless.
I just stood there with my
foot in my mouth, looking
silly.
Needless to say, I could
never face her again. I mean,
how can you, after such a
scene?
Now things have gradually
gone from bad to worse. My
shoes are all ruined, and
everytime I buy a new pair,
— Stephen scobie photo
the salesman asks why one
of my shoes is all chewed
up.
"My crocodile isn't house-
broken yet," I usually reply.
And last time I went to
the dentist, he told me I had
the most unusual cavities.
"You'd better change your
diet as it's spoiling your
teeth," he suggested.
The other day I couldn't
stand it any longer, so I went
to a head shrinker and told
him about my problem.
"Doc, you gotta do something!" I pleaded. "I keep
getting my foot in my
mouth."
"Nonsense, my boy. That's
only a figure of speech," he
said.
I showed him my shoes
and cavities, and he was
taken aback.
"My boy, this is remarkable! You've arrived at new
heights in psychology! I
don't even have a name for
your trouble."
I don't know her name
either," I groaned.
Finally, he suggested I go
back and face my problem
right in the eye, and apologize for my behavior.
Next time I saw her, a
strange thing happened.
Nothing happened.
I was cured!
Damn.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 *Kj£
p£ sive
The perils of pilling
By NATALIE  DUNDAS
You thought it would never happen to
you or perhaps just never thought about
it. You've seen your sister, your best friend,
and your boyfriend's little sister go through
it and suddenly it's your turn: just how do
you feel ?
It's not really a big deal — everyone
and her dog takes the pill these days. You
just get on the phone and say, "Doctor,
I'd like an appointment for next Tuesday"
and for the rest of the week you rehearse
answers to any questions he might ask.
Maybe you go to the family physician.
But if you think that will raise its own
set of problems you ask a friend or pick a
name at random from the phone book. And
you wonder, what if he says no ? What if he
asks a lot of -personal questions ? And despite yourself you're just a little apprehensive.
But after all, it's nothing unusual. You
wouldn't be doing it if you didn't think it
was right. I mean, you're a student and
can't afford to risk pregnancy at the height
of your scholastic career. And there's really
nothing wrong with it — you're in love,
and anyway, who wants to get married
without a fair sample of what's to come?
There are too many sexually frustrated stu
dents on campus anyway, doctors vouch for
that.
So you make an appointment, and there
you are sitting in the tidy little waiting
room checking the rest of the waitees for
wedding rings and wondering if they're
all there for the same reason.
Then the starched and smiling nurse
ushers you into the inner sanctum where
the judge sits in all his medicinal splendor,
stethescope in hand.
"Well, miss, what can I do for you ?"
"I want a prescription for birth control
pills, doctor."
There. You've said it. Why doesn't he
seem more surprised ? Where are all those
questions he was going to ask ? How can
he just sit there talking calmly about function and dosage, possible side effects and
degrees of reliability ?
Gee, doctor, you're human !
He may suggest an internal examination. It will be brief and painless. Some
days a doctor may see as many as twenty-
five girls with regards to various methods
of contraception. It's all part of the routine
to him.
So off you go clutching your prescription in your happy little hand, wondering
why no one ever told you that doctors were
hip to the needs of the modern woman.
Someone just did.
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Friday, October 18, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY pi 6ix
Paul, Genevieve, and Isabel
THE THEME OF FEAR
Isabel is a film about fear, on different
levels; the growth of young girl through
the pressures of fears, and how she arrives
at some kind of resolution (which shocked
a lot of people I think who were expecting
a more conventional ending). Although it
has been compared to Hitchcock and Polan-
ski, it's not the kind of suspense they use.
It's a suspense film only in the sense that the
fear is the pressure that causes other things
to happen within her, and this fear arises out
of her own experiences. So it's a very internal film, written for her and the Gaspe.
In a sense I feel that fear lies at the root
of many inhibitions. Fear is a repository for
all that which keeps you from doing what
you want to do. In a way people, especially
like Isabel, on the verge of becoming women,
all have to face certain kinds of fears before
they can grow into being women. In a city
atmosphere you call them insecurities, I
call them a basic kind of fear . . .
An interchange* held at UBC with Canadian director Paul Almond whose first
feature, ISABEL, stars his very sweet,
very magnificent wife, Genevieve Bujold. —Transcribed by K. Tougas.
The fear at the root of all fear, of course,
is the fear of death. Other fears manifest
themselves in different forms and the different manifestations of these fears run
throughout Isabel. Her background, the influence of the men in her life on her and
how, not their images or phantoms, but shall
we say their "presences" remain with her.
Until those "presences" can be allayed you
cannot arrive at any kind of understanding
of yourself.
Isabel was shot on location in a special
house which on the surface looks like just
an ordinary nice farmhouse, but when you
get inside and know the significance of the
rooms and the people that live there and
what qualities the house has, it changes and
becomes a different house altogether — just
as people on the surface appear to be one
thing but inside are different.
So the film was written for that house,
for her, and that locale and is a complete
unity. I think that films have to be a total
unity,  the  work  of one person.
DIRECTION
I think as a director you should know
everything. I'm not easy to work with, and
they always say I'm getting my fingers into
everything. I believe that I should know
more than anyone else about every job that
they do, but I don't think that is necessary
for others.
Actually one of the key things a director
has to do is bring things to a boil at the
right moment for each shot. In a sense Genevieve is only really good in her first take.
When that camera turns on for the first time
it's like a love affair — suddenly something
happens that's magical and it'll never happen
again . . . You have to bring everything to
a boil so that everything is just ready, and
when that take comes it's all caught on
camera. The art is to transfer what might
happen in real life onto the screen.
IMPROVISATION
In terms of the dialogue, many of the
"characters" in Isabel were real people, and
so the scenes with these had to be improvised
because real people can't act words, they
have to act situations. I had to give them
situations in which they would improvise.
The problem is that there are certain key
phrases that I had to get in— there is only
one way to say a certain plot point unless
you take an hour, you've got to get it over
and get along with the show. So the problem
was to arrive at ways of getting them to
say precise sets of words within improvised
situations. It was very stimulating for Genevieve because she had to be dead real when
she was playing. The minute she was Genevieve the scene would go, so she had to be
Isabel completely. In this situation she was
forced even more into herself because it's
an internal film. When she played with real
fishermen and real farmers, they had to
honestly believe that she was Isabel asking
for certain things. In that sense it was difficult, a challenge.
THE POLITICS OF CINEMA
Of course you've got to have something
to be engage about, and in a sense it's easier
to be engage about a political situation. In
French Canada'you have cinema engage because of the Quebec situation. I don't know
what you've got out here, everything seems
so nice and clean .  . .
Basically in my cinema I feel very much
out of the wind, because Isabel is a very
internal film, it's not a film of an individual
against society, it's an individual in relation
to herself. The characters only relate to
Canadian society in the sense that they are
real human beings, the real people on the
Gaspe coast.
COMING ATTRACTION
We're going to be making another film
in January or February in Montreal. I just
finished the script two weeks ago, and I'm
meeting with a French star whom I want to
be in it with Genevieve . . . I'm afraid it will
be more costly, not just because one gets
bigger ideas, but it's a film with a lot of
music in it. One of the central things is an
anthem which is sung by three church choirs
(which is 150 voices) and Genevieve is one
of those singers. So the music budget is quite
high. Again, the problem when you don't
have much money: I do want to get the best
people and unfortunately they have to earn
a living, they do have to be paid, so I think
the next film has a budget of roughly $400,-
000.
I grew up in the English-speaking residential district of Westmount and Genevieve
grew up in the French, East end of Montreal
—the next film deals with the area and the
atmosphere in which I grew up, although it
isn't at all a social film. Its setting catches
the flavor of a certain time and place.
CANADIANA
Maybe we are changing as a country.
Most of the directors, writers, actors all go
away. As soon as you get any kind of
maturity, any kind of technical facility you
leave, that's what always happens. Until you
get a situation in which people can be recognized and you have stars that are Canadian
and are recognized as such, people will
leave. As long as people keep leaving you're
not going to have any kind of excitement
going on here. Basically it's a problem with
our country, and there has to be a change
of attitude. I find it coming.
People find a pleasure in having something here that is good, that something we
can do is accepted and liked. The more that
happens, the more we will get on and make
other things and the more people will stay:
it's a snowball, but it has snowballed the
other way. Just whenever anything got to
be good it was knocked up here (all the
critics in Toronto hate everything usually).
By K. TOUGAS
Speaking of his wife, Paul Almond said, "she finds
everybody in Canada has a great inferiority complex:
they hate their own artists. She finds everyone very
negative, that people kind of worship failure in this
country rather than success — in America they worship
success perhaps too much, but here it's the reverse. In
order to be a success you really have to be a failure."
And so, reading a review of Isabel in Canada's Take
One, I discovered that not only do Canadians not recognize
their own talent, but they are also absolutely inept at
even panning a film (and any dolt knows how easy that
is).
Thankfully, such is not my intent. I don't consider
Isabel to be an exceptional film in the sense I ascribe to,
say, Godard, but nonetheless the quality of Paul Almond's
work deserves recognition. Every aspect shows remarkable control (powerful music, taut editing, superb photography) and it is an impressive film hindered by only
minor faults.
Isabel suffers mildly from overstatement. When I
view a Hitchcock film, I feel that every note of music,
loud or soft, is in its place, that every effect comes at
exactly the right instant, and is held for just the right
length of time. In Paul Almond's film, that sense of pre-
ciseness occasionally falters.
The movemented musical soundtrack is sometimes
just a shade too vigorous, or comes in a little too soon.
The impression is of exaggeration: the visuals aren't
strong enough to support the barrage of sound. Or again,
in a "stopped clock" sequence: when the time-piece starts
ticking again, the soundtrack blends expertly, like heartbeats, with the images defining the disquieted search of
the heroine. Yet an extra shot insists on showing the
pendulum's lugubrious flow.
Minor points however ... If you insist on a "theme"
then Almond's propositions are sufficient. Naturally, however, what makes a film like Isabel or Polanski's Repulsion effective is its electric bond with the audience. Both
films at root are case-histories of a psychological nature,
but it is their reality of shock, horror, involvement and
emotion that raise them above simple platitudes into a
gripping, explosive existence. Paul Almond's film succeeds entirely in clutching that volatile essence.
While a constant referral to the "familiarness" of
Jason is somewhat forced, the interplay of the single
young woman amongst a hoard of men provides a lively
plot-line and cleverly illustrates her character.
Some persons have been confused with the last
tumultuous sequence, but on reflection it seems understandable. Throughout the film, the excitement of shock-
cuts and the majestic Canadian outdoors combine with
the plot to communicate both fear and suspense. The deep-
rooted emotion involving all of the male characters does
not take a prominent place in perspective as a thematic
build-up to that final scene. Nonetheless, even barring
any inkling of significance, it is impossible to deny that
the climax has a tremendous impact, an upheaval almost
as powerful as the death of Clyde and Bonnie.
Finally, when the young man is alone, Almond
interjects the most effective representation of "thoughts
of anticipation and imagination" that I have seen on film.
From the first introductory scene on the train flashing
through the Canadian countryside, through to Isabel's
mental wanderings while sitting alone in her bedroom,
the process is used with talent unmatched even by La
Guerre est Finie (though probably inspired by Resnais).
It's a pity Ulysses wasn't filmed by Almond.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 pi 7even
Virgin hunting
in the
concrete jungle
By BONITA LEE
What does a working girl think about sex?
Try Denise, 21, a secretary. "Virginity is irrelevant," she says. "It
makes no difference in your relationships with other people."
Or Mildred, 22, a secretary: "Guys don't care anymore how many
people you've slept with. They just care whether they're the last one you
want to sleep with."
Or 22-year-old secretary, Pam. "Losing your virginity takes care of
all the worries about losing your virginity. It's a burden trying to stay
'good' until you get married."
Shocking? Maybe. But a more accurate word would be "realistic".
Downtown, a 21-year-old girl who is a virgin is a surprise. People no
longer question whether the boy and girl seeing each other for longer than
four months are sleeping together, but merely assume they  do. A man
Boni Lee, a former Ubyssey reporter and assistant city editor, is now a
stenographer and rewrite girl for CBC-TV news. She plans to return to
university ("I'm not a typical working girl") after a year-long tour of Europe
and North Africa.
is expected to make a pass—and chances are good he'll succeed—with the
girl he is dating for the first time. Girls who are still virgins at 20 or 21
become frightened, and sometimes seek a sexual relationship to prove they
are physically women. The Pill has come to replace the daily vitamin.
But what about that working girl, that individual within a mass?
How does she really feel about sex? How does she react to the social-
sexual atmosphere around her?
Let's look at the typical working girl. The working girl of 19 to 23,
the girl who doesn't want to get married for a while, who wants to make
money, have a nice place to live, wear nice clothes, go out and have fun,
the girl who is attractive, but not smashing, who has a bright but not
dazzling personality . . . She complains when the gizmo in the car she
purchased a year ago with a credit union loan needs to be replaced. She
has usually not gone to university but is by no means unintelligent. She
does her job well, is mostly not attached to it, and is well liked by the
men, mostly married, whom she works with. She is likely to go home to her
parents at Christmas.
Let's take Denise again. Denise has been working since she graduated
from high school three years ago. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is a
tall slim brunette who works as a secretary in an eight-man office. She
is an attractive, unsophisticated, down-to-earth girl who thinks before she
speaks, and has a way of laughing that makes you want her to laugh
again. She has her own car, shares a two-bedroom suite in a house with a
girl she has known for years, and appears to have few concerns.
Denise likes to go out with guys one at a time. She describes her
social life as being fairly active and moving in spurts and starts. She says
she won't go out with someone just to get out and she refuses to date
"smart-alecky frat types". Denise considers activities like the Fifth Day,
a swinging social club for people over 21 and stag nights at local nightclubs as "crap".
"The kind of girls who attend these functions are usually 23 or
over. All their friends are married; they aren't and they're getting desperate," she explains. Denise's relationships will last maybe a month, and
she usually calls them off.
"Girls generally stop a relationship," she said. "A guy can keep on
going out with someone he's not in love with because of sex. But a girl
can't and will just stop it." Denise has found that most men don't want
to keep a relationship on a light level. "What do they want? They're
interested in sex."
Denise was interviewed in a small coffee shop not far from where
she works. She ordered a soft drink, and sat casually smoking a cigarette.
"What does your job mean to you?"
"Some girls use a. job as a stopgap between school and marriage.
Others look upon a job as an experience. They're running around looking
for experiences like working six months and taking off to Europe or
Hawaii but ultimately at the back of their minds they're looking for a
husband. I put myself in the second category."
"Do you have any plans for marriage, Denise?"
"Yes, I think so. But not for a while."
"What about virginity? Is it a good or bad thing?"
"It's not an important thing."
"Can you elaborate on that?"
"It just makes no difference and shouldn't make any difference in
your relations with other people. It's irrelevant. I know the double standard
is awfully hard to erase, but as far as I'm concerned anyone who thinks
he can sleep around and expect the girl he marries to be a virgin, I just
haven't time for."
She hesitated. "Maybe I shouldn't say this, but . . . well, the way
I lost my virginity ... it didn't mean anything. I wasn't a virgin anymore
physically but emotionally it was nothing. As far as I was concerned, I
was still a virgin."
"How do the girls you know feel about virginity?"
"None of the girl I know are virgins. By the time you're 21, you've
gone around with at least one guy seriously. Uusually it happens in high
school. And although none of the girls are virgins, none sleep around. Most
girls I know have slept with one or two guys depending on the seriousness
of the relationship."
"Would you teach your daughter to be a virgin until she marries?"
"I would try to teach my daughter to be morally good—because if
you have basic morals then you don't generally get into too much trouble.
I believe if you're in love it's not morally wrong to go to bed with a guy.
But I wouldn't want to know if my daughter were a virgin, and I certainly
wouldn't pry into her sex life."
"Would you be surprised to meet a 21-year-old virgin?"
"Surprised? Surprise is kind of a strong word . . . but yeah, I guess
I would."
"Would you be surprised to meet a 21-year-old working girl who
wasn't on the Pill?"
"No. I know there are groups where this happens all the time; where
it is unusual for someone not to be on the Pill but I wouldn't be surprised."
"What about the Pill? Has it made a difference in the sex lives of
working girls?"
"No. If you're going to go to bed with a guy, you're going to go to
bed with him. Whether you have the Pill or not."
Marilyn is also 21 years old and has been working three years. She
comes from a family of five girls, lived in London until she was thirteen,
then came to Canada with her family. When she started working, Marilyn
moved away from home and now lives in an attic suite. She's a secretary
to a television producer and is pretty proud of the fact that she has worked
her way up from being a telephone operator by taking night school courses.
She is modishly dressed, wears her hair in a short-cropped cut that
makes her long-lashed eyes the most striking feature of her face and has
a soft voice and a soft smile. She works very hard at her job.
"I like my job," she says simply. "It's interesting, absorbing and
challenging. It takes up a good bit of my life; whatever else I do comes
second. Thoughts of marriage are secondary."
"If the right man walked in the door right now, would you marry
him?"
"Right now? This very minute? If he was the right guy, yes."
Speaking with just a trace of a British accent, Marilyn talked about
her social life.
"I guess I'm fairly active; I'm out almost every weekend but during
the week after a hard day's work, I'm just too tired to do anything. I date
friends of friends or friends of co-workers. I have no objection to things
like the Fifth Day or stag nights at nightclubs but I wouldn't go alone,
only with a group of girls.
"The relationships I have usually last from four to six months. Then
they die out; we lose interest in each other. I don't agree that men are
interested only in sex. Sex is part of a relationship you build up with
a guy."
"If a man who is taking you out doesn't make a pass at you after
the third date, you think there's something wrong, either with you or with
him. Most men try once, but after you say 'No', it's accepted."
Virginity?
"Girls today don't want to get married until they're 25 or 26. If
they're virgins at 26, they're going to have a pretty frustrated 26 years.
The longer you have the phobias and the fears about sex, the deeper and
the more damaging they become. But if a girl wants to get married before
20 I recommend virginity."
"Would you be willing to discuss your sex life?"
"Like what?"
"Are you a virgin?"
"No."
"Did you decide to lose your virginity?"
Marilyn looked up at the waitress who brought her doughnut and
coffee. "Would you speak a little softer please." Her voice had a touch
of annoyance.
"Sorry."
"No, I didn't decide to lose my virginity. It just happened. And
afterwards I felt guilty. In our household, there were two things that were
never discussed: money and sex."
continued on pf 8ight
an initiation
to downtown social life
Friday, October 18, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY TREASURE VAN
OCT. 28 - NOV. 1
All interested in working
come to organization meeting
Monday, Oct. 21   -  SUB. Rm. 117
DUTHIE
BOOKS
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OUR   U.B.C.
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p£ Sight
more virgins
continued from pf 7even
"I talked to a girl like yourself, originally from New
Brunswick, who has been working as a secretary in Vancouver for two years. She said losing her virginity took
care of all her worries. She said she was afraid of losing
her virginity because she had always been taught that it
was very, very bad and very wrong to go to bed with
someone before you are married. She said she was glad
she had lost hers. Would you agree with this?"
"Yes. Virginity is a bloody headache when you've
got it and nothing when you haven't."
"What about the Pill?"
"It makes the inevitable a lot simpler, but if you're
going to do it, you're going to do it."
"Do men still want their wives to be virgins?"
"Men always will; it's part of their ego. Men like to
be the first; women like to be the last. They don't very
often get what they like."
The interview goes on, the next one starts and finishes. These are the nice girls, the ones who smile when
they ask you to wait one moment, please, the ones who
run the last twenty yards to catch a bus, the ones who
read 1984 or Lord Jim on their coffee breaks.
The questions are the same, and so are the answers.
There are a few exceptions. Like Andre.
Andre is a 30 year old bachelor from Montreal who
has been working in Vancouver for the last two years.
He has a quiet handsome face and gentle intelligent eyes.
"I would not be surprised to meet a 21 year old virgin. You can not make generalities about women.
"I would prefer to marry a virgin, but if I loved her
and she told me she was not, it would not change anything."
Or like 27 year old Moyra, a secretary who looks 23,
has been working for nine years.
"I wouldn't assume a guy and girl were sleeping together if they had been going together for over four
months. A lot of my friends wouldn't go to bed with a
man until they were married.
"In Toronto, two out of three of my friends were
taking the Pill. But that doesn't mean they all are."
Or the 19-year-old, with tawny skin, wide luminous
eyes and a figure perfect for modelling. A telephone operator, working less than a year, who comes from an industrial community on Vancouver Island. A girl who knows
what it is like to be without a boyfriend in Vancouver.
"There's no way of meeting people. So you get hungup. If you have to sit home and wait every weekend for
someone to call you're nervous. It makes you almost sick:
you get depressed. You ask yourself, if you have to wait
now for someone to take you out, will you have to wait
later when you want to get married? It's so much easier
if you have one guy to take you out every weekend. He's
security."
The Family Planning unit in Vancouver is a social
organization dispensing birth control information and
materials. Dr. Courtlandt Mackenzie of the UBC Wesbrook
hospital, has been director of the unit since it opened four
years ago.
Mackenzie doesn't believe the Pill has made any difference in the sex life of the working girl.
"The Pill is a very effective method, but it's not the
only method. We've had very good methods in previous
generations: condoms, diaphrams, foams and jellies.
Messier, perhaps, but just as effective," he said.
"The Sexual Revolution or the New Morality is not
new; it came during and after the First World War. The
tearing down of Victorian mores has been going on for at
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least three generations." Mackenzie said the clinic's patients are evenly divided between married and unmarried
women. There are women on file and approximately 350
new patients come to the clinic each year.
Of those unmarried patients, the mean age is 21, and
these again are divided into working and university girls.
"The unmarried patients are not a majority," stresses
Mackenzie. "They are rather a large minority. The girls
who come are fairly responsible girls; it's as if they were
married. They have relatively stable relationships with
their boyfriends and come before the fact with a certain
amount of planning."
Mackenzie refutes the belief that young people are
swingers in sexual matters. In fact, he firmly believes
young people don't know anything about sex.
"Of the young women I see and examine, quite a
number are virgins. I think 21-year-old virgins are in the
majority—don't forget the majority is only 51 per cent—
I think chances are greater that a girl will be than she
won't.
"With all their books and talk — young people are
very naive, a bunch of squares. A frightening number of
them are innocent in sexual matters."
But another doctor who deals extensively with young
people disagrees.
"I can't say whether more working girls today are
using the Pill or not. But there are three good reasons
why a lot of girls use the Pill," he said.
"Girls today want sex and they have every right to
it as a man does. They practice the right.
"Secondly, society demands that a girl have a boyfriend and often she will give into him because she doesn't
want to lose him.
'Thirdly, two people will enter an adult mature relationship in which they feel they love each other but
cannot afford marriage."
The doctor said girls know what they are doing.
"If they've been on their own and are supporting
themselves then they have every right to make decisions
concerning their own lives.
"It is far better and perhaps more morally right to
give a girl the Pill rather than have her bear an illegiti-
- W. C. McUidd* photo
At the Fifth Day
mate child. Since the advent of the Pill, the abortion rate
has gone down."
What about abortion and the working girl?
"It is impossible to estimate how many abortions take
place annually because there are so many cases we don't
know about," said Vancouver City Prosecutor Stuart Mc-
Morran.
"But a doctor would be in a better position to know
about abortion rates because he usually sees the women
after the abortion is bungled."
A 1967 brief on abortion by the Unitarian Church of
Vancouver states that the majority of women seeking
abortions are married and over 25 years of age.
But, says McMorran, at least three quarters and up
to 90 per cent of the reported cases are unmarried young
women.
"They're the ones who are frightened and frantic.
The ones who end up either in a hospital or dead," he explained. "We never hear about the other ones."
The Unitarian brief estimates abortions in Vancouver at between 5,000 and 10,000 a year.
Today's working girl apparently doesn't hesitate to
go out looking if she doesn't have a boyfriend. Night clubs
like Oil Can Harry's specialize in 'Stag-Nights' where
continued on pf 13irteen
Notice to -Graduating Students in
ARTS
A meeting will be held in Room 106, Buchanan Building
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Last Chance For
Your FREE Grad Photos
To Be Taken
Mobile Studio Location
TODAY to OCT. 22, BEHIND BROCK (South)
Arts Students Anytime — Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered  by  Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard 736-0261
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F1.4 Normal Lens   65.00
PI .2 Normal Lens   99.00
3 Lens CI. Upset     7.95
Polarizer        9.95
Star Filter     6.95
Pen F Copy Stand   82.88
Fitted Case   19.88
LENS from
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40 Exp. Slide Films for V_
Frame $3.19 inc. Proc.
20 mm Wideangle  86.88
100mm Autotele    86.88
55-90 mm Zoom (used) 109.50
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or Pen FV (used)   12.00
35 mm Schneider Componon
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V- Frame Mts. (40) 80
Table-top Tripods      4.88
Ace. Shoes     3.88
72 Exp. Slide Films for
Vi Frame, $4.99 inc. Proc.
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2170 W. 41st Ave.
266-8381
Serving West Vancouver
THE CAMERA SHOP
(West Van.)
1550 Marine Drive - 922-4921
Fridav, October 18, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY •
A Selection ot
Quality and Distinction
Importers from Spain, Germany,
France and Italy
frjUioptsum, ShosL $tote
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1968
with 2 Big Bands
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Dance:
Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968
SUB Cafeteria
$4 per couple
Ticket Sales
AMS Ticket Office, Brock
SUB Information Desk (Noons)
Jtea/uv to SpMtk.
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Matt Walton
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pf lOen
Like father
like monkey
By KEITH FRASER
In anticipation of Eric Nicol's new play, The Fourth Monkey, I've been
happy as a barrel of beer reading some of his past books and anthologies, all
outstanding contributions to Canadian humor for which he's won the Leacock
Medal numerous times. Quite delightful is the breadth of his awareness responsible for a pungent humor that is sharpened by the speargun style of self
deprecation. In an early book like The Roving I—an account of post-graduate
travel in Europe—Nicol's comic way is his own: "In a large department store I
linger while the record of my purchase is entered by a dignified person in a
dress suit, his script crawling across the page of a ledger designed for doomsday,
every dip of the pen into its bottle another banderillo into my impatience." Or,
njore laconic: "I feel like something out of a grade-B spy picture starring
Richard Dix."
The latter scrap seems especially characteristic of Eric Nicol the playwright
whose Like Father, Like Fun visited Broadway a year ago only to close promptly
after the critics trotted out their own scraps of wit to disclaim it. Reported
Nathan Cohen, for instance: "Suggestive gags rise up like great white whales
from the stagnant water and then submerge in a flurry of self-indulgent pleasure."
Anxious to strike back while the harpoon was still warm, Mr. Nicol
included in his recent comedy an unnecessary excerpt reading of other reviews
that last year's play encountered. The unsuccessful playwright in The Fourth
Monkey is John Tittle (Patrick Horgan), a thinly disguised inheritor of the
author's own eastern misadventure. What happens to this resident writer of a
local gulf island summer home is the sort that befalls Nicol the self-effacing
narrator: he can't buckle down to write due to the intrusion of a Russian poet
who steals his girl friend; his seduction of a creative writing teacher is interrupted by the RCMP; and his tenure as writer is arrested by a soapstone-carving
Eskimo who replaces him in patron favor.
This Nicol play, the Playhouse season-opener, bounced from one situation
to another in rather lengthy and disjointed fashion that is foreign to his book
writing. The scrappy one-liners were there ("Just like a woman. You put two
and two together and get fornication.") but they were strung together in a kind
of comic karate that sacrificed the bout for the blow. They may well have left
a sore tummy, but not a full-rounded satisfaction because they did not come
together structurally in a well conceived play. Instead, the production whooshed
along like Spring Thaw where stage business is purposely disparate; the train
of action was often halted for the sake of squeezing one more clever scrap, so
that the play seemed minus a caboose.
The ending was unstrung because it arrived a half hour late with
characters who appeared attached to the script for a disrupting, rather than
integrating effect. Tittle is booted out of his island paradise, but the reason
for it doesn't really connect with the action that has gone before.
Not that the plot ingredients aren't there, they are, but more in recipe
form than crisp and under icing as in The Importance of Being Ernest, for
example, where repartee and event are woven with incredible balance.
The problem with the kind of humor which Mr. Nicol and Neil Simon
(Barefoot In The Park, The Odd Couple) write is that in competition with contemporary "absurd" comedy which attempts often to work with man's condition
at a level which is potentially tragic (ej». Jack Richardson's Gallows Humor),
it comes off as little more than superficial, unless there is something aesthetic
in the structure that informs it.
Mr. Nicol has yet to acquire this sense of dramatic structure wherein
the lines he writes so well may exist not as an end in themselves, but as means to
a sensitive whole. Director Malcolm Black must be faulted for not having compressed and unified the work of his protege by suggested rewriting, and for
not affecting a more alert staging.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 pi l lieven
(pAGpoAltionA.
towahdbu tha, bsuL
moUL thsL but
cuwwuL tPuL bsuL
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abovsL Um. bud
undeJL thsL bsuL
ore thiL bod.
into* Uul but
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By STEPHEN SCOBIE
^P'f^WW^M "*i**.* *
'w^^^-^w^m^^^"^'^w
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
' or BHITISH COLOM»l*
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fe<*iitai_ti&tei&_> .
SMORGASBORD DINNER
TONIGHT, 5 p.m.-7 p.m.
TGIF as usual 5 - 70:30 p.m.
Members and Guests Only
"WHAT ABOUT
RUNAWAY
KIDS?"
Cool-Aid, School of Social Work, and others
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20th
6 p.m.  - Cost Supper   —   7 p.m.  -  Fireside Discussion
The NOW Place
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd.
Just east of War Memorial Gym
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m.
A contemporary form and expression
ACADEMIC  ACTIVITIES  COMMITTEE  ot  the  AMS  PRESENTS
LECTURES <& DISCUSSION
Wednesday
Oct. 23
John Norris-History. U.B.C.
History of Czechoslovakia
Tuesday
Oct. 29
Manuel F. Neira
B.C. Rep. to National Committee of
Worjd University Service (WUS).
Political & Social Reforms
Tuesday
Nov. 5
Gideon Rosenbluth & Bruce
Hurt-Economics, U.B.C.
Economic Reforms
Tuesday
Nov. 12
Panel Discussion
Russian & Chinese
list Views
Tuesday
Nov. 19
Everybody
Open Discussion of the
Liberalization & Invasion
ALL LECTURES IN BUCHANAN 106 AT 12:30
KEEP THIS AD AS YOUR  PROGRAM
Friday, October 18, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY pi llwelve
The VSOund of Music
By MICHAEL  QUIGLEY
The first VSO concert of the season opened at the Queen Elizabeth Mausoleum two
weeks ago with a few new interesting items
added to  the repertoire.
To start, there was the Prelude for Snare
Drum and Theatre Seats (wierd aleatory
squeaking noises from the unoiled seats
filled the theatre as the audience rose for
the ostentatious entrance of B.C. Lieutenant-
Governor Jack Nicholson), followed by the
usual schmaltzy Melanchrino-ish versions of
God Save the Queen and O Canada.
Then, following a brief musical interlude, there was a tense drama in Row K, Centre Section, Lower Orchestra, entitled The
Latecomers, the story of two young lovers
trying valiantly, with the aid of an usherette,
to reach the seats which were rightly theirs.
After another very long musical interlude, the first concert concluded with the
much-overplayed Standing Ovation for Audience. The woman beside me, her part well
memorized, clapped her hands triple fortissimo   and   shouted   "Bravo!!"   con   gusto.
(rough translation: with about as much feeling as a slow fart).
Having spent an enjoyable afternoon, the
audience dissolved in a cloud of vapid
euphoria, leaving behind in the empty
theatre an odour of death and used programs
scattered on the floors . . .
For ZAP-minded, a fascinating tidbit:
Young Uck Kim won't be appearing with
Stephen Kates at the symphony this coming
weekend as Young Uck has an exposed nerve
ending in one of his fingers, which makes
playing his violin rather painful. In his
place we have the American violinist Austin
Reller, who comes accompanied by the usual
amount of laudatory quotes gleaned from
"important" newspapers.
The program of this week's concert is
pretty square stuff: Mozart's 32nd Symphony, Beethoven's Violin Concerto, and
Sibelius' 2nd Symphony.
But go anyway, and help lower the average age of the Vancouver Symphony-goer to
at least eighty-five. There's also always the
possibility of some excitement like the solo-
ists's violin string breaking or the roof of
the theatre collapsing . . .
PFoetry
by DALE WIK
Peace is an Unknown Continent is a collection of honest
thoughts translated into poetry.
Peace is an Unknown Continent by Helene Rosenthal,
Talon Books, Vancouver.
Her poetry is personal and introspective. It communicates.
There is no obscurity, no attempt to disguise and/or elaborate
on simple thoughts. There is absolute sincerity. She treats the
reader to an equal share of herself and gives a sense of intimacy
by writing of the poetry itself: "making poems / while I'm making supper." She expresses even the futility of self-expression:
"When love speaks / words are silent".
Helene Rosenthal's poetry is intensely emotional: "Yes,
yes the pain of / loving is more I than we can bear". Yet it
is always disciplined so that emotion does not spew, it flows.
The subjects are mundane—love, religion, war protest,
motherhood, death, yet as poetry they are fresh. Only once
does she degenerate into cliches, in an early poem: "held my
breath / tongue shy . . . stood awkwardly".
Behind the emotion, to enhance it, is a strong core of
common sense, a realistic approach: "love / but be successfitl"
"the gut needs to be fed / no nonsense". Helene Rosenthal has
reached a balance between the intellectual and the emotional
treatment of poetry.
Her words are intriguing because they have a natural
rhythm that makes their place in the poem seem inevitable.
Imagery is always lush and exciting: "the humped white world /
rolled back its age /to stream red wounds . . ."
Each poem is an experience, a relevant truth. After reading Peace is an Unknown Continent you will discover lines
returning to you to be thought again.
*.
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Come in and
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the new 1969
Renault, and win
a trip for two
to San Francisco,
California.
Last year "ROAD TEST" chose the Renault 10
as number one import under $2,000
Each year Road Test Magazine rates imported cars in the $2,000 PRICE
RANGE. Eight of the top selling imports were compared this year. They
were judged ir****5 categories: engineering, roadability, performance,
comfort and economy. When the points were added up, the RENAULT
10 came out on top again. Take the RENAULT 10 on a test drive and
you'll probably end up picking the same winner.
Village Motor are proud of their appointment
by Renault of Canada
Our ability to offer the finest possible service after the sale, enhances
our reputation of excellence. Our mechanics are factory trained by
Renault and are prepared to offer top quality service. In addition, we
have extended our parts department where we can be of service until
10 p m. Drop in and see us, we are convinced that Renault represents
the best dollar value, and we are sure we can convince you.
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HOUSEHOLD
WORD OF
THE WEEK:
The
"FRIAR"
restaurant extraordinaire
4423 W.  10th
224-0833
for fast, free delivery
Films and
a Dance at
International
House
Tonight 8:00 p.m.
25c Admission
ALL FOREIGN STUDENTS
WELCOME
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 Enjoy a candlelight dinner
at the
BAVARIAN
ROOM
Delightful  food —
Excellent service
in an
Intimate Atmosphere
s*        phone for reservation
MODERN   CAFE
Bavarian Room    —    3005 W. Broadway    —    RE 6-9012
OVERSEAS
AUTO  PARTS
Jfri   Al*K
Parts, Tools and
Accessories For
The Imported Car.
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To Students
2780 Alma
Need a Ha
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drop in and see us if
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needs a hand .... your
Alumni Association . . .
you'll find us in the Big
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it belongs to our
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and he uses it to
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HOMECOMING 1968
SALUTE TO THE OLYMPIC COUNTRIES
OCTOBER 21 - 26
MONDAY, Oct. 21
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 23
THURSDAY, Oct. 24
FRIDAY, Oct. 25
SATURDAY, Oct. 26
- Post Gome Dance
- S.U.B. Ballroom
-10:00-1:00
- Salmon Barbecue
- S.U.B. Patio
-12:00-2:00
- Pep Meet
- War Memorial Gym
-12:30-2:30
- Fashion Show
- S.U.B. Auditorium
-12:30-1:30
- Homecoming Ball
- S.U.B. Cafeteria
-9:00-1:00
POST S. F. U. - U. B. C. GAME
S.U.B. BALLROOM
10:00-1:00
ROSALIND KEENE AND THE APPOLLOS
p£ 1 thirteen
yet more virgins
continued from pf 9ine
people may come alone, and enjoy capacity audiences
every night of the week.
Frank Hook, 23, owner of Oil Can Harry's, tried to
explain the club's success.
"In any city it's hard to meet young people. The
average girl just won't go into a pub or hotel lounge or
some other night clubs in town alone because she'll be
considered a pick-up," he said.
"So we have a club, which is considered a 'nice' club,
and girls don't mind coming here.
"There are a lot of girls in Vancouver who want to
go out partly because there are more girls than guys in
Vancouver. There just aren't enough men around."
The Fifth Day Club is a swinging social club for single
people over 21. Operated by 35 year old Dru Burns and
31 year old Grayson Hand, it enjoys a phenomenal success. Fifth Day getting-to-know-you parties are held Friday nights in local hotel ballrooms and admit no couples,
only single people. There are drinks, tables spread around
a dance floor, live band, and a surprising number of attractive men and women.
What kind of people attend the club?
"This is not a lonely hearts club," Burns stresses.
"There are lots of swingers here. We have doctors, nurses,
school teachers, television announcers. The majority of
people that come are professional, white collar, self-sufficient workers." In operation just over a year, the Fifth
Day has over 4,000 members. As well as Friday night
parties, it offers charter flights to Las Vegas, trips to Hawaii and Mexico, weekend ski trips, Grey Cup parties and
a seemingly endless variety of other activities.
"I think the Fifth; Day is a great thing," said one 21
year old bank teller who looked as though she -would
have no trouble getting a date. "Working girls don't have
to go into bars to meet men. They can pay their own way
and are under no obligation to anyone to do anything.
They can dance, form a relationship or go home with no
strings attached."
The club has been so successful that its owners are
expanding into a 'singles only' high rise to be built in the
West End.
To hear the majority of young men talk, the working
girl is easy to get to bed.
"There's no question about it," said one 30-year-old.
"The Pill has been a major factor and society's attitude —
its focus on and encouragement of sex in all aspects of
advertising and entertainment — is another."
Danny Baceada of Oil Can Harry's offers this explanation. "In Vancouver the West End has done tremendous
things to a man's sex life.
"These high rises with literally hundreds of unattached
young people and no parents standing around pointing
their fingers at you have done wonders. You have two
guys living in an apartment and two .girls in another.
You have one guy going into the girls' and one girl going
into the guys' — just to watch television together. But all
sorts of things can happen and they do.
"Ten years ago when you saw a man leaving a girl's
apartment you took a double take; today everyone accepts
it."
"Promiscuity is no longer something to be frowned
upon," said a 22-year-old technical school student. "No
one expects the girl he marries to be a virgin anymore."
"People in glass houses don't throw stones," said*
another student.
Most working girls are quick to condemn promiscuity.
"If I meet a girl who's been going out with a guy only
a few weeks and I learn she's been sleeping with him, I
think she's a tramp," said Norma, a 22-year-old bank teller.
"There has to be some meaning and some emotion
in a relationship,"  adds a 21-year-old  clerk-typist.
Sex and the working girl: one can easily find the
questions to ask.
But the answers? They aren't as simple.
As one irate television cameraman pointed out: "It's
impossible to write on 'sex and the working girl'.
"Sex is so much the 'in' thing that people would be
afraid to admit what they're really doing. They are only
going to tell you what they think you think they should
be doing."
A 22-year-old English bank teller also noted: "In Canada, girls are more inclined to talk about their sex lives
and treat sex casually. In fact they're inclined to make a
lot out of nothing.
"Sex is the topic that usually comes up when people
don't know what to talk about."
Certainly the working girl today appears to be more
sophisticated and more sexually knowledgeable than the
working girl of your mother's generation. And it isn't easy
to find a 21-year-old virgin
But if the working girl is a little more sophisticated
and a little less chaste she is also a little wiser.
A comment from a 19-year-old bank teller sums up
the situation:
"When I lost my virginity, I wasn't sorry, but I wasn't
glad."
^Friday, October 18, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY p£ ...fourteen
PF presents: Backsides
Psychopathic jazz with a rock beat — that, music
fans, is the Mock Duck.
Psychopathic jazz? Well, you would probably have
to hear the Duck play — they're at the Village Bistro till
Monday — to understand the term.
But in 200 words or less, the four very competent
musicians in the Duck play a both hard and soft sound
that exudes a feeling of madness from the stage — the
type of feeling an audience feels at an absurd play.
Each of the four group members knows his instrument, and plays as if he were alone on the stage. Hence,
a kind of jazz feeling similar to what some of the top
groups are exhibiting more and more these days.
And one can't help feeling the jazz sound must come
from the influence of the saxophonist organist, flutist Ross
Barrett — a hulking, bearded musician who looks like he
just escaped from a beat coffee house, circa 1957.
Barrett, a graduate last year of UBC's music school,
plays magnificently. On the keyboard, he gives a powerful, haunting lead to some members. On sax, he plays a
hard jazz sound very rare in rock groups.
His flute is unbelievable.
And Barrett — who plans a career in classical composition — does not need to stint his style when he plays
with the Duck.
Drummer Glen Hendrickson is one best around, very
articulate in his actions and capable of solos reminiscient
of Ginger Baker.
Basssist Rick Enns, while not attempting too much
in many numbers, demonstrates considerable skill In
solos.
And leader and guitarist Joe Mock plays a clear,
sharp sound, but just lacks the flamboyance of some of
the other lead guitarists in the city.
So what does the Duck lack. The answer to that,
Martha, is voice.
With a good lead singer — Mock's voice comes across
too faintly and Enns' is too grating — the group could be
on its way.
But their originality, versatility and competence with
their instruments is hard to beat. In short, they're good,
MIKE FINLAY
One night stands are the up and coming thing to see
at the QE Theatre.
Glen Yarbrough returns Oct. 27 and hopefully the
sound system will be adjusted to avoid the feedback
screech that made his last performance here so unnerving-
ly memorable.
"Constantly whirling forms, riots of colours, hypnotic
music ..." Sound psychedelic? Bless my disjointed hip,
Mathilda, it's Danzas Venezuela, a music and dance spectacular, appearing Oct. 31.
On Nov. 5 there's Vladimir Lancman, a Soviet violinist for those who dig red ragas.
Or you can take in the amazing virtuosity of the
world renowned Flamenco guitarist, Montoya, on Nov. 10.
The first performance of the QE Playhouse's student
series is this Tuesday night featuring Eric Nicol's The
Fourth Monkey. Don't panic if you've signed for tickets
and haven't received them — they're on their way. There
are about 30 seats still unclaimed; for information call
Steve Chitty, 684-5361.
Stage 2 opens its new season Oct. 23 with the controversial Canadian play Fortune and Men's Eyes; a bitter
and moving wprk centering on the brutal and degrading
lives of four inmates in a prison reformatory. The play
has been acclaimed as a harsh but realistic comment on
our prison system, and a profound statement on the abrasive feelings of four men trapped in a near-hell.
Acting in the play is Anthony Holland who has been
on the staff of the Haney Correctional Institute. The
actors visited HCI and had real inmates read their parts
in order to become more realistically aware of the roles.
Stage 2 is experimenting with total theatre this season using a special environment, created by Mary Brock
and adaptable to the four plays and six readings planned
for the current Stage 2 program. The aim is audience
involvement, so go and get involved.
A new-to-many West End stop-off for street wanderers is a basement at 1657 Haro where folk-singers and
poets have nightly hey-days. Might be worth exploring
next time you get rained off the beaches and harrassed
from the parks.
And don't forget the San Francisco Mime Troupe
appearing in the old Auditorium Oct. 22. If they cause
anything near to the ruckus of last year's performance
you'll be sorry if you miss them.
Metaphysical regards to Yrat Legne and his unfortunate diction.
VALLEY
PFosiscriptum
Several dissatisfied English graduate students with
teaching experience want numerous frustrated and unhappy English 100 students to meet for free tutorial and/or
rap sessions. Everyone welcome. 738-8432 to find out.
INTERCOLLEGIATE   FOOTBALL
2ND ANNUAL SHRUM BOWL GAME
UBC "THUNDERBIRDS
YS
SFU. "CLANSMEN
rr
MONDAY-OCTOBER 21st AT EMPIRE STADIUM
at 8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.50 or $2.00 Reserved Seat
(Advance Sale Only) on presentation of A.M.S, Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets
from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLY AT MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM AND STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UP TO AND INCLUDING NOON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th
MAGIC CARPET
Dance Light Show
MOTHER TUCKERS
YELLOW DUCK
THE PAISLEYS
SAT.
Oct. 19
SUB BALLROOM
EVERYONE WELCOME
9-1
$1.50
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968 Friday, October 18, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 21
Beckman
interview
to be shown
'A Little Learning' host
Lanny Beckman and a CBC
crew have just returned from
Mexico where they talked to
students who participated in
the recent revolt.
The interview will be shown
on Channel 2 Monday a 10:30
p.m.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Famous erg poets today gathered
around a camp fire to read quotations of chairman Els Id, who
died of obnoxious poisoning last week.
FALL and WINTER SPORTS
1968 SKI SWEATERS
PEDIGREE SLACKS AND SKI PARKAS
SPECIAL SALE  ON  C.C.M.   SKATES
25o/o Off Regular Prices of 79.95 - 23.95 - 29.95
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040
— gerdl. tong photo
BIRD CALLS are on sale all over the place, but mainly in
SUB. You can get them at the publications office next door
to The Ubyssey. Vouchers are only redeemable at the publications office though.
Youth resources society
plans campus program
The youth resources society
is now organized on campus
and they have set up a program
for the members.
In an organizational meeting
Thursday Ian Nichols, head of
the local branch of the society
told 20 students the group's
plan for the term.
Their function is to raise
money for the operational end
of the society. It would be
used to finance the two operating group living homes for
emotionally disturbed adolescents.
It will also be used to help
pay for down payments of four
further planned homes.
The money will be raised
through a number of dances
and concerts by pop groups in
SUB.
The Poppy Family is returning Nov. 7 to play in the aud
itorium, perhaps with other
groups to make it a two hour
event.
GIGANTIC POST GAME DANCE
Featuring
Rosalind Keene & the
APOLLOS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21,
10:30 p.m.
Sub
Ballroom
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
You will find
A THUNDERBIRD
in your basement ! ! !
For Action I
Personalized Service
Come to
Joseph for
HAIRCUTTING
and STYLING
TArnqwL
BARBERS
0144 WESTERN PARKWAY
In th. Village Shopping Plaza
(behind Unhmrsity Bouhvard)
'it's like working
with tomorrow'
Ron Murray, a senior programmer analyst with London Life
"When I was in university, I
often heard students say the
insurance business is dull.
You can toss that idea out the
window. At London Life, I
tackle a wide variety of business situations. My task—to
help London Life serve nearly
2 million policyowners faster
and more efficiently through
electronics. To do this I often
work with forecasted future
situations. And I have to keep
up with the lightning-quick
developments in the computer field. It's like working
with tomorrow."
Ron is a 1963 Queens University graduate in honors math.
As a senior programmer analyst, he analyzes new developments in information
systems to keep London Life
in the forefront of the insurance industry. To learn more
about the opportunities for a
varied and rewarding future
that can be yours to choose
at London Life, see your
placement officer. Or write to
the Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Co.,
London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada Page 22
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968
r
The Varsity Outdoor Club and
International House
present:
A HIKE TO HOLLYBURN
Sunday, Oct. 20
Bring Lunch and $1
Sign Up At The I.H. Office
Before Saturday
1
ORIENTATION
TO  COLLEGE
FOR  ADULTS
An Introduction to Effective Study
Saturday, October 26, 1968
9:30 a.m.   -  4:00 p.m.
Main Branch, Vancouver Public Library
Fee: $2.00
For information:
Conference Office — U.B.C. Extension Department
— dick button photo
JV HOCKEY TEAM ends a three-on-one break the right way, with the puck in the net. (Joe Pet-
retta 6; Ken Lemmon 16; Ron Mattison).
Hockey Braves win opener
In their league opener at the Winter Sport
Centre on Monday night, the UBC Braves
stung last season's cup winners, the Vancouver
Hornets 11-3.
In the Hornet game the Braves led 6-2 after
two periods of play and erupted for five goals
in the final twenty minutes.
Scoring for UBC were Larry Watts and
Warwick  Reid  with  three  goals apiece,   Ken
Lemmon and Joe Petretta with two goals each
and Rob Straight one goal.
In the previous years the Braves have concentrated on speed and agility and refrained
from hitting but "Big Bill" Dicks may be attempting to change this image as he has engaged in fisticuffs in the last two games.
The Braves next home game is on Oct. 28
against Ladner at the Winter Sport Centre.
SPECIAL DEMONSTRATION TONIGHT
Give us just one hour
tonight and well
show you how to
read three times faster!
Over and over again, people who have taken the Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics course in speed reading tell us they wish they'd started long
ago. Like you, possibly, they had read our ads but kept putting off
seeing a "tell-all" demonstration.
Just one short hour
These free demonstrations are short, and
very interesting. You invest just one hour
of your time. (If you choose a 7 p.m.
demonstration you can still go on to a full
evening elsewhere). You'll see a short film
showing Reading Dynamics being demonstrated on the Art Linkletter Show. You'll
hear other testimony from people who are
reading well over 3 times faster than before
they took the course . . . with equal or
better comprehension! You will see it done
before your very eyes. And you'll get
straight answers to your questions, so you
can decide whether this course might be
useful to you ... in school, or in your work.
Don't hold back
Haven't you delayed long enough? Isn't a
course which most people label "the finest
thing I ever did for myself" worth at least
one hour of your time to investigate? Of
course it is!
Special   Demonstrations  This   Friday
This Friday evening (October 18) we're holding two demonstrations at our new
headquarters at 1900 W. Broadway. Be sure to attend one of them.
7:00 p.m.     1900 West Broadway
9:00 p.m.    1900 West Broadway
Bring a friend with you. They will enjoy it, too.
Evelyn Wood.
Reading Dynamics institute
1900 W. BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, B.C. / TELEPHONE 732-7696
ibJaSS
Ladies WCIAA champs
Two UBC women's athletic teams were victorious last weekend in Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
action.
The tennis team, composed of Janice Tindle, Michelle Carey,
Susan Gager and Barbara Johnston, easily recaptured their title
by defeating teams from the Universities of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The golf team composed of Heather Munro who was second
overal, Jan Allison who was third overall and Georgia Ellis
easily defeated their opponents from the same WCIAA schools,
to "win their title.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for the Office of A.M.S. Co-Ordinator
In accordance with By-Law 25 of the A.M.S. Constitution, an election will be held for the position of A.M.S.
Co-ordinator.
To be eligible for the position, a student must have
completed his or her first year or its equivalent and have
achieved, in the previous sessional examinations, an
average of not less than 60% for 15 units or more and
not less than 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m., Wednesday, October
16th and close at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, October
23rd. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 30,
1968.
The duties of the Co-ordinator as outlined in By-Law
4 (4) (g) are as follows:—
"The Co-ordinator of Activities shall be responsible for
the co-ordination and booking of all Alma Mater Society
functions and events. He shall work in close co-operation
with the Treasurer to ensure the financial success of
the various activities of the Society. He shall act as
Brock Management Committee Chairman."
Nomination forms to be returned to the AMS Secretary,
Box 55, Brock.
Communications Commission
Campus communications are poor. People are needed to
do various exciting jobs such as on-campus coordination,
SUB publicity coordination, archive collecting and just
general jobs that are not demanding, but are a necessary
part of any bureaucratic Society such as the AMS.
Come around to SUB if you are interested and either
leave a note in the AMS executive offices or talk to
Ruth Dworkin, Internal Affairs, Rm. 254 any time this
week. Friday, October 18, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
Birds fare well in mud,
hold UPS for 14-0 loss
By STEVE MILLARD
Mud and rain were the real
winners of the football Thunderbirds' Saturday game against
the University of Puget Sound
in Tacoma.
A heavy rain bogged down
both teams causing a rash of
fumbles and miscues.
The Birds lot 14-0 to the
powerful UPS Loggers, but the
loss was actually a victory of
sorts.
The Loggers scored all of
their points in the first six minutes, on two converted touchdowns.
The Loggers used just nine
plays for their two touchdowns
and fans expected another 40-0
whitewash for the Birds.
After that though, the Birds
held their own, trading punts,
fumbles and the occasional
first down.
UPS had 11 first downs,
while UBC managed 7.
The Birds only fumbled twice
while UPS fumbled 11 times. A
tough UBC defense recovered
five UPS fumbles as well as intercepting one pass.
The Loggers, who have tre
mendous depth, also have the
fastest team the Birds have
ever played. For example, two
of UPS' quarterbacks can run
the 100-yd dash in 9.7 seconds.
Logger coach Bob Rj_an had
nothing but praise for the
Birds. He said, "UBC played
on the same field and only
fumbled twice, they were real
tough."
UBC head coach Frank Gnup
had no specific comments to
make, but was generally
pleased with the team's effort.
It was hard to single out any
of the Birds as stars because
the Birds were definitely over
matched. The defence deserved
praise though.
If the offence can improve
to match the defence, the Simon
Fraser game Oct. 21 could be
very interesting.
The JV football team was
beaten toy the Seattle Cavalier's on Sunday. They play
University of Puget Sound
"Loggers" this weekend in
Tacoma.
Winning form regained
UBC field hockey Thunderbirds regained their winning
form over the long weekend with a convincing 2-0 victory over
the Pitt Meadows A team.
Antonie Schouten and Lance Carey got one goal each for
the Birds.
In other field hockey action the Braves trounced North
Shore "A" 6-0; the Tomahawks defeated Grasshoppers "II" and
the Scalps lost 3-0.
This Saturday, all games will be on campus. The Birds play
Grasshoppers at 1:30 on Spencer field; the Braves take on Jokers
II at Spencer 3 p.m.; the Tomahawks play India II at Spencer
at 1:30; the Scalps play the Wasps at 3 p.m. on Wolfson.
Underground Films At Intermedia
575 Beatty
4 Films by Ed Emshwiller
6 Films by S. Clark, Senet, Smith
and others
Oct. 18-20    -    8 & 10 p.m.
$1.00 Donation
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393  W.   10th  Ave.
224-4144
WE   BELIEVE   IN  TEAMWORK!
... to give you the finest workmanship possible
and still at very reasonable prices!
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)
Phone 263-9181
"QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP   GUARANTEED"
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
o Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White & Blue Coats
• shirts & Accessories
• Mail Orders Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
PAUL'S
EAT-IN, PICK-UP
FREE DELIVERY over $2.50
3623 W.
BROADWAY
Phone 733-1617
TRY OUR SPECIALS
PAUL'S    SPECIAL
salami,   olive,   green   pepper,
mushroom
THE    FIREBALL
pepperoni,    onion    capocollo,
hoi   peppers
THE  SUPER
salami,   pepperoni,   onion,
green   pepper,  olive,  mushroom
SPECIAL COUPON OFFER
SIZZLING   HOT  PIZZAS!
Open till 1 a.m. Week-days
3 a.m. Week-ends
Regular $3:50
This coupon entitles the bearer to
purchase mouth-watering 1'4" Paul's
Special Pizza at our Special Price.
Good for delivery, take-out or in our
Store. •
Paul's Special Pizzas are made from
fresh dough, specially spiced tomato
sauce, mozarella cheese, tasty salami,
garden fresh mushrooms, & green pepper. Also black olives to give your
Paul's  Special  Pizza  Pizzaz.
Coupon Special
Price	
Good thru Nov. 15
40c
OFF EACH
Jhinhina of buuina
then tkinh of
millers
LADY TULIP $137.50
A Beautiful Modern Styling
in   14-18 K. Gold
Convenient   Terms   Arranged
and  Special  Courtesy Discount to
UBC   Students   &   Personnel
655 Granville St., Vancouver 683-6651
47  W.   Hastings  St.,  Vancr.   682-3801
622 Columbia St. N. Westr. 526-3771
a
.^Diamond .
lllillm
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
Tailored by
Cambridge
fry is
oft Shoulder
the most
comfortable suit?
Because it is lighter, more flexible
and fits better around the collar
and shoulders.
The lack of bulky padding allows the
jacket to be tailored more accurately
to your form resulting in a more
comfortable fit, a lighter feel and a
better appearance.
Tailored in the world's finest... Pure
Virgin Wool, your Cambridge soft
shoulder suit will fast become your
favourite, hold its shape longer, look
neater, slimmer, more fashionable.
Make friends with our soft shoulder soon.
LTD
2174 W. 41st. in Kerrisdale AM 1-2750
Look for the Woolmark on the label when you shop.
CSS-S-M _, Page 24
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 18, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ...
Strachan finished?
Berger tells all
Tom   Berger  speaks   today,
noon Bu. 106.
SCIENCE US
Sc. I. meeting, Hennings, 200,
today noon. Tuesday important meeting: Sc. 1 council being formed.
VCF
Bible: fact or fiction ? Mr.
Bentley-Taylor speaks today
noon, SUB party room.
CIRCLE K
General meeting today noon,
council:* chambers SUB 206.
New members welcome.
DESERT CLUB
Paul Hyde from Salt Lake
City speaks today noon, Ang.
214.
SUB OPENING COMM.
Meeting Monday noon, SUB
224. Clubs please attend.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Ride to Alouette Lake Sunday. Leaves SUB 9 a.m. All
bikes welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Cool-Aid and Children's Aid
Soc. speak: What About Runaway Kids. Supper at 6 and
discussion at 7 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre, Sunday.
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk mass, music room, St.
Marks College, Sunday, Oct.
20, 11:30 a.m. Refreshments.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General    meeting,   Monday,
noon,   council   chambers
SUB. Guest speakers.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting, today noon,
Bu. 322.
ARTS US
Talk on career jobs for graduating class, Tuesday noon,
Bu. 106.
CUSO
Workshop on India and S.E.
Asia, International House,
Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
free coffee. Speakers, film,
discussion.
LITERARY SYMPOSIUM
COMMITTEE
Meeting today noon, Bu. 223.
CROSSROADS AFRICA
Information on summer trips
to Africa. Tuesday, noon, Bu.
104.
UCC
General meeting of all clubs
to elect president and P.R.O.,
Tuesday noon, Bu. 204.
FILM SOCIETY
Rod Steiger, Sidney Poitier
in In the Heat of the Night,
old Aud., 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30. 50c.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
General meeting of undergrads, Monday noon, Bu. 106,
on formation of Undergraduate Committee.
FR. STUDENTS
Majors and honors, meeting
Wednesday, Oct. 23 noon,
Bu. 2244.
ARCHITECTURE I
Will host a presentation  of
Architecture    Workshop    I,
1968,  Monday,  8 p.m., first
floor Lasserre.
MUSSOC
Auditions for the production
of Cole Porter's, Can Can.
Those who have not auditioned, come to the Old Auditorium, 2 p.m., Sunday.
SUS
Student Placement service to
speak to grad class, Chem.
250, noon, today.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
CATGIF at 9:19 p.m. sharp
today. Address: 49th Ave.
and Granville Street.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Meeting and elections. Special Guest: Prof. Pulleybank.
8:30 p.m., 1975 Pendrell St.,
Apt. 408. Bring your own
refreshments.
DEBATING UNION
Canadians have no business
in American foreign policy.
SUB 205, noon, all welcome.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl (Burau, Nietzche's Zara-
thrustra   and   We,   Monday
noon, Bu. 100.
MARDI GRAS SOCIETY
Meeting today, SUB A, noon,
for all committee members.
UBC BOWLING CLUB
More people, especially girls,
needed for Monday night
mixed bowling league. Meet,
SUB lanes, 6 p.m., Oct. 21.
UBC SOCRED CLUB
Important general meeting,
today noon, Bu. 224. All convention delegates, please
attend. New members welcome.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting Monday noon, SUB
213, for Ukrainian University
students.
COMPUTER CLUBS
ACM chapter members, hear
J. H. Whitney talk on computer cinematography, today,
3:30 p.m., SUB M.
SCM
Study group starts Monday,
3:30 p.m. SUB B. Theology
And Revolution.
COMMERCE US
Pictures for yearbook taken
free, daily at noon 4th floor
Ang.
NEWMAN CLUB
The Autumn Leaf — Friday,
Nov. 1 SUB ballroom, 9-1.
UBC RADIO
General meeting, Thursday,
Oct. 24, noon, Council Chamber, to discuss constitutional
revisions.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Oct. 27: Yippie leader, Terry
Rubin, speaks: Chicago And
What  Next.   Hebb  Theatre,
noon.
Remember Those Far-Away Friends!
See our New Stock of
OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS CARDS
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
224-3202
CLASSIFIED
Rales: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.   731-4741.
DANCE FRIDAY WIGGY SYMPHONY
Oct. 18, 9:30-1:00. $1.35. Place
Vanier.
DANCE CLUB PARTY TONIGHT,
9-1 in S.U.B. Party Room (2nd
floor). Members 50c, 75c others.
Free   refreshments.
RELEASE YOUR FRUSTRATION
after the S.F.U., U.B.C. Football
game. Come to a post game dance.
S.U.B. Ballroom 10:00-1:00. Rosalind Keene and the Apollos. Just $1.
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST: GLASSES IN RED PLASTIC
case, lost Friday, Oct. 4 on way to
C lot. Phone Lynne 738-3569.	
LOST: WHITE WALLET. MUST
have rings back. Reward. No questions asked.  Ph.  224-0962.
DOST: BLACK SWEATER, GREEN
skirt in brown shopping bag. Fri.
Oct.   11.   Phone   Leslie   224-7929.
LOST LIBRARY BOOKS VICINITY
Empire Pool, Monday morning. Finder please call or contact Colin Godwin. 4540 W. 11. Phone 224-1741.
Reward.
LOST: A SILVER CHARM BRAC-
let at the Armouries in mid-September.  Call Lina,  985-4841.  Reward.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
I960   PONTIAC,   GOOD   CONDITION
new battery,  generator,  tires.  Must
sell.   Best   offer   from   $400.00.   926
400S.
'57 VOLKS, GOOD COND. $500. Cash.
685-2775 between 6-8. Ask for
Denny.	
'57 METEOR EXCELLENT TRANS.
6 Std. Good radio, brakes, tires.
$275  or  best  offer.  Call  224-0311.
1966 PONTIAC  6  CYL. AUTOMATIC.
Phone   434-6785.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED A RIDE TO CALIFORNIA
now. Contact Manvel 228-8035 evenings. Leaving early next week.
Share  expenses.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.                    	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
SMILE YOU '69 GRADS! TOUR
Grad pictures are being taken behind (South) Brock in the Mobile
Unit until October 22nd. You've already paid for this service in your
Grad fee so hurry before It's too
late! This Is the only time pictures
will be taken this year. •    *
LIFE INSURANCE
Students, age 23 — $20,000 (commuted amount). Reducing Term.
Includes 3 options. Premium $42.50.
Also New Fidelity Inflation Fighter
policy; first in Canada. Call George
Kalway. Fidelity Life Assurance
Co. — 681-7496.
NEEDED DRUMMER AND GIRL
Singer for Blues Band. Call Bryan
after  6:00  p.m.   RE  8-4736.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9422.
AQUA SOC — BOAT DIVE OCT. 26.
Anyone wishing to go, sign list In
Outdoor Club Lounge.
RELEASE YOUR FRUSTRATIONS
dance to Rosalind Keene and the
Apollos, S.U.B. Ballroom, Oct. 21.
Monday 10:00-1:00. $1. Homecoming
event.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Tentative   rate  reduction   to   students
UNIVERSITY   CAB   CO.   LTD.
has filed application with the Public
Utilities Commission for a 10% reduction in rates to University students upon presentation of Alma
Mater   Society   Card.
Signed:   Robert  Johnston
Managing Director
68-lnvitation-69
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She
Clothing (the Village). Canteens
in the Residences and the Information   Desk   at   SUB.   $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Infprmation
17
INSURANCE STALL. ANYONE
witnessing accident Monday, Sept.
16, 2:15 p.m. at 10th & Alma. '60
Olds,   '68  Chevy II.   Please  call  261-
7065.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 M.G. MIDGET EXC. COND.
Mech. sound. And extras. $850. See
on campus call M.W.  224-9769.
PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SOR-
row. 1961 Corvair, Auto., radio, excel, cond., $695 or best offer. John,
228-2377,   eves.:   684-7602.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
Home Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th —  228-9088
Complete  Record  Department
Scandals
37
FILMSOC PRESENTS "IN THE
Heat of the Night" today in old
Aud. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. Adm.
50c.
SUZIE CREAMCHEESE REALLY
makes it in University Cabs. Call
224-5024.
GAMMA PHDEGMA MASQUERADE
Shaker at Oil Can Harry's Oct. 31.
Tickets  $4.00  couple from members.
DANCE CLUB PARTY TONIGHT 9-1
in S.U.B. Party Room (2nd floor).
Members 50c, 75c others. Free refreshments.
DEAREST ? I'LL NEVER TAKE
your parking space again. Anything
but my daisies. 1 loved you then, I
love you now. R.S.V.P. with love
Lover
THE 12 MOVIE PASSES IN 68 IN-
vitation 69 are good during the 3
week Christmas Holiday. Except
for  the  3  legal holidays.
MARSHA COME HOME—YOU'RE
spending too much of your time
with the  Thunderbird!!
THURS. AFTERNOONS FREE?
Come to Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics from 1 to 4. Course guarantees to triple your effective reading speed. For more info, phone
732-7696.
Typing
40
GOOD EXPERIENCED HOME TYP-
ist available for essays, etc. Please
call 435-0882.
EXPERIENCED ESSAY TYPIST. 30c
a page (double-spaced). Phone 683-
2859. 	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—Experienced essay and thesis typist.  Reasonable rates. TR 4-9253.
FAST,      ACCURATE     TYPING     MY
home,
Phone   325-6637
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
WANTED GIRLS TO WORK PART-
time in an expanding business. We
offer an opportunity for rapid advancement plus choice of own working hours. Phone Heather, 321-3603
between 5-7 p.m.
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
MANAGER FOR WESTERN OFFICE
of Canadian Union of Students Travel Dept. at U.B.C. Entails selling
travel programs and charter flights.
Typing necessary, travel agency
exp. not essential. Salary $4,500 to
$5,000. If interested, Mr. Robert
Simond, C.U.S. Travel Director will
be conducting interviews at Room
250, S.U.B., U.B.C. from 9:30 a.m.,
Friday,  Oct.  18,  or call 228-3968.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone   733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAK MATHEMATICS, PHY-
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent tutors. Phone 736-1923.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
2 SNOW TIRES, 6.50x13 WITH RIMS
$34.  Phone 688-4073.
GIBSON ELECTRIC BASS EB-2
two pick-up. Good condition, cherry
finish.   Phone   Bruce 224-9888.
1 PR. 210 HEAD G.S. 1 PR. 210 HEAD
Standards. 1 pr. 195 Head 360's. 1
pr. size 12 Seal-skin after ski boots.
1 pr. size 12 Headerer ski boats.
224-627S.
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4' TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 252 coil single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West  Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
3-SPEED    C.C.M.     BIKE.    SIZE    10;
Bauer   skates.   Ph.   224-9946,   Peter.
FREE DESK — PHONE NUMBER
in last week's Ad wrong. Come and
get desk or trade something. Phone
732-7336.
68 DANGE SKI BOOTS, SIZE 10,
used less than 10 times. Also 66
Kastles, $50, and '67 Head Competition   G.S.,   $110.   Al,   988-8868.
BIRD CALLS
NOW AVAILABLE
at Bookshop & Publications
Office in SUB
On Campus, only 75c
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
NICE HOUSE-KEEPING ROOM FOR
male student. Prefer non-smoker.
Phone  325-9503.
SLEEPING ROOM,   MALE STUDENT
$45   per   month.   1750 Allison,   phone
224-1545.
2 MEN, LARGE HOUSEKEEPING
room, house privileges, $40.00 each.
733-8285.
MALE   ONLY.    SHARE   SELF-CON-
tained  ste.   $35.00.   733-8285.	
ROOMS ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M.) 2250
Wesbrook. Kit. priv., TV lounge, on
campus   parking.   224-0439;   224-9662.
BSMT. ROOM, PRIV. ENTRANCE
and bathroom, shower, male or female.  3005 W. 20th, 738-7984.
FURN. ROOMS — ONE SINGLE,
one double, $30 & $50. Some kitchen
privileges.    Near    U.B.C,    224-3833.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good food,
short walk to classes, quiet hours
enforced for study. Phone 228-9389
or 224-9841.
ROOM AND BOARD, EXCELLENT
meals; breakfast, lunch and dinner.
736-5036.
ROOM AVAILABLE (BOARD Optional) for senior professional married couple, in clean, quiet home, in
South Granville district. 224-3617 or
733-7181.
ROOM & BOARD FOR STUDENTS.
Quiet, warm, private home. Near
U.B.C.   Phone  224-4823.
FURNISHED ROOM, MALE. AVAIL-
able Nov. 3. Private entrance, kitchen privileges, bath. $60 per month.
Phone 733-8702.
WISH GIRL TO SHARE WITH
same, semi-furnished, one bedroom
apartment in West End. 683-3678;
alternate 685-2640.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MATURE MALE STUDENT WANT-
ed to share house with two businessmen, Kerrisdale area. Ph. 261-
9491   eves.
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE.
One or two male students. Private
entrance. Kits area.  Phone 731-1629.
BASEMENT SUITE, FURNISHED,
private entrance, washroom, shower,
light cooking. 1 or 2 quiet older students. 4615 W. 9th. Ph. 228-9448 —
5:00-7:00 p.m.
EAT, DRINK AND MAKE MARY
at Phi Kappa Pi. Delicious cuisine,
luxurious accommodation at prices
lower than residence. Phone House
Mgr.,   224-9667.
WANTED — A CHRISTIAN GIRL
to share basement suite, $40 month.
Call  733-2228.
MALE   STUDENT  —  PRIVATE  RM.
in   house  with   others.   Near   Alma
and   10th.   Immediate   occupancy.
224-3035.

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