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 JANUARY 19,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXIII
LICKING ABSSINCE1918
HOUSING OFFERS RESPONSE
ON PONDEROSA
ADVICE: HOW TO ASK OUT
YOUR CLASSMATE
DIANA
BANG
Andrew Parr, managing director
of SHHS, says they are improving
Ponderosa conditions.
Natalie gives tips on dealing with
homesickeness and romantic
interests in the classroom.
UBC alumna and The Interview
star sits down with The Ubyssey
to discuss her role.
P3
P7
P9
t
I UBYSSEY
WINTER CLASSIC Record-breaking hockey game was a success in every way but on the ice.   PIO
The Right Honourable
KIM CAMPBELL
From Brock Hall to Parliament Hill // Page 2
EVENTS        '/ THIS WEEK, CHECK!
TUESDAY ' 20
ARRANGED SCREENING AND DISCUSSION
6:00-9:00 P.M. ©VICTORIALEARNINGTHEATRE/1KB
Sponsored by the UBC Muslim Students Association, St Andrew's Hall and
Hillel BC, this film tells the story of a friendship between two young women: an
Orthodox Jew and a devout Muslim, and the commonalities they discover. Free
WEDNESDAY ' 21
from tk creators af The Clean Bin Project
JUST EAT IT: DOCUMENTARY SCREENING ^
4:00-6:00 P.M. @ UBCGLOBAL LOUNGE
Common Energy UBC is kicking off their 'Chew OnThis' campaign with a
screening ofthe documentary, Just Eat It'. Learn about the effects of food
waste on the environment and what you can do to make it better. Free
WEDNESDAY/ 21
UBC CHOIR PERFORMANCE
7:30 P.M. @ BARNETT HALL (MUSIC BUILDING)
This performance by the U BC chamber, men's and women's choirs features
music by such composers as Faure, Debussy and Dufay. The choirs will be
led by UBC graduate students. Free
ON
THE
COVER
The last of many ideas, this cover
was one to lose hair over.
-Illustration Nick Adams
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                    JANUARY 19, 2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXIII
EDITORIAL
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OUR CAMPUS//
axmn     felallfclsml
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO AUSTEN ERHARDJ7THE UBYSSEY
Brett Gilley is using his position at Vantage College to try out innovative teaching and grading methods.
Vantage College prof Brett Gilley is transforming classroom learning
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
In an ideal world, professors
would be passionate innovators,
researchers and dedicated
teachers, with the ability to
give students motivation to look
forward to finals week. At UBC,
Brett Gilley is turning this ideal
into reality.
A professor on the tenure
track, Gilley teaches at UBC in
the department of earth, ocean
and atmospheric sciences (EOAS)
and at Vantage College. His time
as a student was spent entirely at
Simon Fraser University, where
he completed his bachelor's and
master's degrees, and went on to
earn a doctoral degree specializing in sedimentology, his thesis
focusing on the sandstone bedrock that lies beneath Vancouver.
People seem concerned
about the huge capital
investment of the
building, but the
building wont be
only used by Vantage
College, it will be used
by everybody"
Brett Gilley
EOAS and Vantage College prof
Gilley started teaching courses
during his graduate degrees, and
became an instructor at Douglas
College, where he was involved
with teaching workshops. From
there, he joined an initiative to
improve teaching in the science
departments, and found himself employed at UBC, where
he has spent the last eight years
improving teaching methods and
instructing courses such as EOSC
114. The next step in his career is
Vantage College.
"Last year there was a position
open at Vantage and I applied for
it," Gilley said.
Gilley was hired and has since
become an integral member of
the faculty.
As a Vantage College faculty
member, however, Gilley has recently had considerable criticism
thrown his way. Announcement
that a new $127 million building is being erected for Vantage
College has sparked intense
debate, with some castigating
the use of 'Canadian Money' on
international students. To quote
a CBC article, "while UBC pours
money into Vantage College and
its 1,000-room tower, it faces a
student housing shortage with
5,200 people on the waiting list.
Students are also looking at a
20 per cent increase in housing
fees."
Gilley believes that much of
this criticism is ungrounded and
self-contradictory.
"Buildings are expensive.
EOAS just had a new building
built and it was in that ballpark
[$100+ million]," Gilley pointed
out. He understands that such a
large investment geared towards
international students is upsetting news to many, but points out
that the new building will serve
the whole community.
My big class [EOSC]
114 has 700 students,
so you don't want to
try new things there.
But I have another
class with 29 [Vantage
College students], so
I can try these things
with 29. And if it works
with a small group, it
can work with a large
group."
"People seem concerned about
the huge capital investment ofthe
building, but the building won't
be only used by Vantage College,
it will be used by everybody," said
Gilley.
Gilley points to the current
number of Vantage College students to validate his point.
"[The] integrated residence at
Vantage is for everybody, and this
year, we have something like 160
students."
Although this number is likely
to increase when the project is
finished, the new Vantage College
with its 1,000 room tower will be
a net increase in the availability
of campus housing.
Second, Gilley argues that
Vantage College is a project
engineered for the joint benefit of
international students and ofthe
whole campus community.
Students who enter the college
meet the university's academic
requirements, but do not have
the necessary level of English
proficiency for direct entry. Some
criticism has been directed at this
admissions system, as domestic
students who meet these requirements are not able to enrol.
"The trick is, if they're a domestic student, they're probably
not going to want to pay the
international student rates," Gilley
said.
Tuition at Vantage costs
$33,000, five times what the
domestic first year student pays.
Add another $20,000 for living
costs, and any domestic student
would balk at the price. "Vantage
is run on a cost-recovery basis. So
the money that the students are
paying in tuition is what's paying
for Vantage College."
The college offers immense
educational value to UBC as well,
since it serves as a testing ground
for innovative teaching methods.
"My big class [EOSC] 114 has
700 students, so you don't want to
try new things there," Gilley said.
"But I have another class with 29
[Vantage College students], so I
can try these things with 29. And
if it works with a small group, it
can work with a large group."
The best example of this to
date is the two-stage exam.
"They're really cool. The
students write their individual
exam, just like normal. They then
hand that exam in, and get into
groups of four. And we give them
the exact same exam again, but
they write it with three friends,"
said Gilley. "It's the same thing
that students do in a hallway after
an exam, but we're just formalizing that, and it's primed people
for really good discussion. The
[increase in] retention is huge."
Two-stage exams already
feature in physics and geology
courses. Due to the method's
success, students can expect to
see more widespread use of two-
stage exams in the future.
Professor Gilley's work has
already improved teaching standards at UBC and our campus
can look forward to many more
contributions from this gifted
educator in years to come. 31 // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 20
REZ»
Housing responds to student concerns about Ponderosa maintenance delays
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
Student Housing has sent out an
email to all Ponderosa Commons
residents addressing their role
in the new residence's ongoing
maintenance issues.
Andrew Parr, managing
director of Student Housing and
Hospitality Services (SHHS),
spoke out to The Ubyssey about
his apology in the email on
behalf of the SHHS staff, as
well as further comments on the
recent article on the Ponderosa
maintenance concerns.
The article "brought to light
that [SHHS was] under-communicating with the students at
Ponderosa," said Parr.
Accordingto Parr, maintenance concerns are a regular issue
at UBC residences that SHHS
will work to better address.
"When you're operating
the number of buildings we're
operating — almost 10,000 beds—
there's going to be maintenance
issues that arise, [but] we've
committed to ensuring that
we're communicating on a more
consistent and regular basis with
students."
Parr also mentioned that one
reason for the delayed response
to maintenance issues such as
broken elevators and entrances
is mainly due to the slow service
of third-party operators that
provide the parts and materials
necessary for proper repair.
The email, sent out by both
Parr and Amy Stewart, the
residence life manager of SHHS,
clarified the current status ofthe
situation on those maintenance
issues that have been prolonged.
"The good news is, a new elevator motor has arrived, work has
begun and we are hopeful repairs
will be completed next week," said
Parr in the email. "We are also in
the process of addressing inconsistencies with house door entry performance at Ponderosa Commons
but, again due to delivery delays of
required parts, we anticipate this
work will not be complete until
early March."
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSU WHE UBYSSEY
The Ponderosa residence complex has been seeing regular maintenance concerns ever
since its initial opening.
Accordingto Parr, it is not
uncommon for new buildings
like Ponderosa to experience a
transitional period of a series of
deficiencies, but he assures all
students that the initial con
struction-related issues are being
corrected and that the building
is safe.
When asked about a point
brought across from Jake Mullan
in the previous Ubyssey article
regarding students' complaints
ofthe quality of service received
from SHHS with respect to the
amount they pay to live in Ponderosa, Parr suggested that the
pricing structure comes instead
from "the newness ofthe facility,
the proximity of the facility to
the campus core and the amenities that are available in that
venue."
Parr emphasized the commitment of Housing to improve ultimately good service
and communication.
"When I hear articles like this,
it disturbs me — not because it's an
unfair article," said Parr.
"It disturbs me because we've
dropped the ball a little bit, and
[shows us] what we need to do to
be a little better with that; that's
very much embedded in our vision
and our goals for students that
reside with us. It's communication,
and actually, as a result ofthe article, bringing a sort of heightened
awareness that we need to take a
more proactive position in corrective action as well." 31
CONSTRUCTION »
Underground bus loop plans cancelled
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNffHE UBYSSEY
The current bus loop was meant to be a temporary facility until construction on the underground loop could begin.
Amanda Bamford
Contributor
Plans for a new bus loop in the
construction-heavy Gage South
area are now under review
after a previously proposed
underground layover has
been cancelled.
Accordingto a 2012 Board of
Governors proposal, the plan
was to have an "at-grade passenger pick-up and drop-off area"
beside the War Memorial Gym,
and "an underground bus layover
facility," below the relocated
Maclnnes field in place of the old
Aquatics Centre.
However, after consultation
with TransLink, more space was
required to safely accommodate
the buses underground; these
technical requirements pushed
the new estimated cost to $27
million — $6 million over the
previous estimate.
"We started looking at at-
grade options below the proposed Gage South student residence facility," said John Metras,
managing director of UBC
Infrastructure Development.
The student residence is still
proposed and would rest over the
layover area ofthe underground
loop, on the south side ofthe War
Memorial Gym.
Since excavation is a significant cost, an ground level option
could limit the expense.
Detailing the current plans,
Metras said "the drop-off and the
layover facility would be where
the current bus loop is now. The
buses would loop in just north
of War Memorial Gym and that's
where they would have the pick
up facilities."
The current bus loop was first
established in 2004, and was only
meant to be a temporary structure while a new terminal was
created, accordingto Metras, "in
an underground facility beneath
where the current new SUB is
located."
Those plans were re-evaluated in 2009 when TransLink
had to pull out ofthe project due
to an inability to support their
funding contribution.
Unlike in the past, with the
previous two designs for the bus
loop, no portions of it will appear underground now. Having
everything above-ground also
eradicates the possible noise disturbance from buses accelerating
up and down the access ramp to
the underground.
Construction on the new bus
facility cannot begin until the
new Aquatics Centre is completed in the fall of 2016. After this,
targeted completion ofthe loop is
set to be around late 2017 or early
2018. Both dates, however, are
dependent on everything sticking
to the current schedule.
"There will still be significant
construction in that area," said
Metras; this could potentially
cause setbacks.
While this new plan is still
going through the consultation
process, Metras and his team are
"hopeful at this point that [they]
have a very workable and cost
effective solution."
Accordingto Metras, this solution should work with TransLink,
Student Housing and Hospitality
Services and most importantly,
the campus community. 31 NEWS    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 19,2015
THE RIGHT I Canada's nineteenth and
HONOURABLE I FIRST FEMALE PRIME MINISTER
KIM CAMPBELL
From Brock yall toxParliainent Hill
by Veronika Bondarenko
Before she was to climb her way^
up to Parliament HilTin 1993, Kim'
Campbell,  Canada's  only  female
prime minister, had been a UBC
student whose
early interest^ in
global affairs and
women's rights
would eventually
lead her to a career that has been
marked by major milestones for
women in Canada.
Campbell,
whose parents both
served in the Canadian military in
World War II, was
born in Port Alber-
ni, B.C. and began
her education at
UBC in 1964. At
the time, the university had only
12,817 undergraduate students and held Saturday
classes, which was the only time in
the week when girls were allowed
to wear pants to school. Campbell
also remembers students smoking in class and Brock Hall being
the only Student Union Building
on campus.
Campbell's interest in politicsal
affairs also started blossoming
during her time as an undergraduate student, when she first joined
UBC's Alma Mater Society as a way
of getting more involved with the
campus community. She served as
Frosh president in her first year and
later went on to become the society's second vice president during
her third year.
In fourth year, Campbell went
into Honours Political Science
and chose to give up student pol-
"When I go
to reunions,
people are
like, oh
yeah, she did
something
else after she
went to law
school."
ifes to focus on
her grades. After
doing a year of
graduate studies at UBC in
order to qualify
for a scholarship in England,
she came to the
London School
of Economics,
where she studied Russian and
Soviet Studies.
According to
Campbell, her
early choice of a
political science
major stemmed
from an interest
in World War II
and global affairs rather than Canadian politics at the local and federal levels. The thought of a political
career wasn't something that she
had seriously considered until she
came back to UBC as an instructor.
"I was much more interested
in the broader, global issues," said
Campbell. "It wasn't until I came
back and taught political science
that I began to think that politics
might be a way of trying to make a
contribution."
In 1973, Campbell was invited
to teach at UBC as a Soviet specialist, but only held the job for three
years, as the university already had
a full-time faculty member with
the same specialization. She later
decided to refocus her career and
applied to UBC's law school, graduating in 1983.
"At law school, I was best known
for writing and directing the law
reviews that we put on every year,"
said Campbell. "So it's very funny
when I go to reunions, people are
like, 'oh yeah, she did something
else after she went to law school,'
but what was important was the
law review."
During the early 1980s, Campbell decided to run for a position
at the Vancouver School Board.
Nathan Divinsky, a popular UBC
math professor and Campbell's
husband at the time, had formerly
served on the school board for several terms and was running for a
position for Vancouver City Council. Both Campbell and Divinsky
were elected, but Campbell was
the one who ended up receiving
more votes.
"I thought it would be a great
opportunity to see whether I was
suited to politics and politics was
suited to me," said Campbell. "You
never know until you try whether you have the temperament that
can take the criticism and all ofthe
things that go with being in public
life."
In 1984, Campbell's first taste
for local politics inspired her to
run for a spot in the provincial
parliament under the B.C. Social
Credit Party. Although Campbell's
campaign did not win her that spot
in the first election, she later ran
again and joined the Legislative
Assembly for the Vancouver-Point
Grey area in 1986.
After her time in provincial
politics proved to be both interesting and frustrating in its limitations for bringing forth major
changes, Campbell decided to run
in the 1988 federal election. She
served as a member of parliament
in Ottawa from 1988 to 1993, during which time she also served as
minister of justice and attorney
general and minister of national
defence. She was the first female
to hold both positions, with only MONDAY JANUARY 19, 2015    I    NEWS
■^^B
one other woman, Anne McLellan,
succeeding her as attorney general
since that time.
When Brian Mulroney stepped
down as prime minister in 1993,
the Conservative party chose
Campbell   as   his   successor   less
"So I say to young women, you have
to do it. You have the brains, you
have the integrity and you have the
perspective that must be there."
than a year before the next federal election. Campbell then servea
as prime minister from June 25
to November 4, 1993. Although
Campbell's approval soared during
her time as prime minister, she lost
the election to Liberal leader Jean
Chretien on October 25 1993,
in large part due to the Canadian public's dissatisfaction
with the Conservative party
that had skyrocketed during
the Mulroney era.
Some of the most salient
issues that Campbell focused
on during her time in office
included replacing helicopters
for the Canadian navy, negotiating
gun control laws and fighting for
greater focus on women's rights. She
brought forth a law that would provide more protection for victims of
sexual assault and spoke out against
the Conservative party's strict views
on abortion, although Bill C-43,
which she pushed forth during her
time as Attorney General, was criticized by both sides of the abortion
debate at the time.
Both before and after her time in
office, Campbell has been a vocal advocate for the rights of women and
their access to various government
positions. As the first woman to be
prime minister in Canada's history,
she is also no stranger to the biases
and difficulties that women who run
for public office face.
In particular, Campbell said that
one of the biggest challenges she,
along with other
women in politics,
have to deal with is
the pressure to represent all women in the
decisions they make.
"It doesn't mean
that every woman
[who goes into parliament] is going to
be perfect, but when
a man screws up
and is immoral or
a complete doofus,
we don't say 'well,
that's the last man
I'm going to vote for,"
said Campbell.
Campbell also said
that while there are
more women in parliament now than
there were during
her time in office, the
fight for more female
representation in positions of power has continued to be
the same uphill battle that it was in
her time..
That said, she firmly believes
the only way to change the public's
preconceptions on who makes a
good leader is for underrepresented
groups, including women, to continue running for public office in order to, in their own small ways, begin
to break apart the biases that make
up our society.
\,?Every woma|i who goes in and
gets the slings and arrows of gender
bias, nonetheless, does a service by
moving the goalpost," said Campbell. "So Lsay to youngvromen, you
have to do it. You have the brains,
you have the integrity and you have
the perspective that must be there."
After her defeat in 1993, Campbell
has taught democratic transitions
and gender and power at the Kennedy School of Business at Harvard
University and served^as Canada's
consul general in Los Angeles. She
also helped found two international
organizations, the Council of
Women World Leaders and Club
of Madrid, which aim to promote
women's rights and democracy
around the world.
But throughout it all, Campbell
credits the education that she received, whether it be in the classrooms of UBC, during her time
in Parliament Hill or through her
diplomatic work afterwards, for allowing her to continue advocating
for the issues that she has always
felt so strongly about — global affairs
and women's rights.
"I was a political scientist who
then had the opportunity to live a
political life at all three levels of our
government," said Campbell. "Now
being able to share those insights and
that experience in parts ofthe world
where people are trying to create
democracy is very valuable." 31
"It doesn't mean that
every woman [who
goes into parliament]
is going to be
perfect, but when
a man screws up
and is immoral or a
complete doofus, we
don't say Veil, that's
the last man I'm
going to vote for."
// NEWS    I    MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
EVENTS»
January is Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Mateo Ospina
StaffWriter
The month of January is full of
events put on by UBC Access & Diversity to promote Sexual Assault
Awareness Month. The goal of this
month is to create a culture where
dialogue regarding sexual assault
can be held openly.
The theme ofthe month is 'Let's
Start Talking.' Access & Diversity believes that education about
sexual assault will begin once the
student body is able to discuss
sexual assault openly and without
taboo.
Accordingto CJ Rowe, diversity
advisor for UBC Access & Diversity, there needs to be more education on what constitutes consent in
a sexual relationship.
"I think about the sort education that is given to students,"
said Rowe.
"There's a lot of education on
intercourse and how to be safer
but there isn't a lot on 'What is
consent?', 'How do you engage in
consensual relationships, whether
it's a friend or someone you want
to hook up with?'"
Access & Diversity wants to
clear the confusion surrounding
some of these questions about
the nature of sexual assault and
consent through events like their
Anti-Violence Ally Training day
on January 20. Ultimately the
goal of this month is to draw the
attention of students and create a UBC culture that is open
to discussion.
Accordingto Rowe, many
students might believe that
sexual assault is not an issue that
concerns them because they have
PHOTO COURTESF UBC ACCESS'S DIVERSITY
UBC organizations are hosting a series of events for Sexual Assault Awareness Month.
never sexually assaulted someone or been sexually assaulted
themselves. However, Access &
Diversity emphasizes the need
for enlisting the entire community to make meaningful cultural
changes and learn.
"How do we get our community members to be more present
and aware in those drinking or
party situations where people
are more vulnerable? I think
we can create much more of a
bystander community where we
begin to take care of each other,"
said Rowe.
On January 27, Access
& Diversity will be hosting
Strong Communities Make
Police Obsolete, a discussion on
community-based solutions for
creating safe spaces for victims
of violence, with Leah Lakshmi
Piepzna-Samarasinha.
Access & Diversity hopes that
the wide variety of events and activities will be easily accessible to
all students of UBC regardless of
their level of education regarding
sexual assault.
"We are hoping that people will
find their own way to engage with
the conversation this month whether it's going to an event, reading
an article, or having conversations
with friends," said Rowe.
Sexual Assault Awareness
Month is focused on including
all UBC students, with some of
the events also reaching out to
specific communities.
Some ofthe events will also
include a screening of Stalled, a
short film about the quotes found
on bathroom stalls across North
America, on January 20 and
the 'Start Talking' art show on
January 25.
January 21 will also be Wear
Denim Day, when people are
encouraged to wear denim to
express solidarity with victims
of sexual assault following a 1998
court ruling to overturn a rape
charge because the victim was
wearing tight jeans. 31
MEDICINE »
UBC study hopes to find whether former cancer
drug can be used to treat Alzheimer's
=HOTOE-MAGINEART/FLICKR
Saracatinib may be repurposed for use by Alzheimer's patients.
Joshua Azizi
StaffWriter
A new study at UBC is examining
whether Saracatinib — a decade-old drug once used to treat
cancer — can be effective in treating Alzheimer's disease.
Saracatinib was developed in
the 2000s with the aim of treating cancer patients, but researchers found that it had little effect
on mitigating the disease.
Still, the drug was effective
in blocking a protein that is
associated with the damage of
brain cells. Under this premise,
scientists are hypothesizing
that Saracatinib could possibly
slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
The study has received a $13
million grant from the National
Institute of Health, and will take
place in about 20 laboratories
throughout North America. Vancouver is the only Canadian city
involved in the study.
Over a year-long period, the
treatment of 152 participants with
mild Alzheimer's disease will be
analyzed. 76 ofthe participants
will receive Saracatinib, while the
other 76 will receive a placebo.
In analyzing the differences
between the two groups, scientists can examine how effective
the drug is in blocking the progression of Alzheimer's.
Since most ofthe research required to prove the safety ofthe
drug has already been completed,
the study can progress at a much
quicker pace than that of a newer
experimental drug.
"We will have done something
substantial in a short amount of
time," said Haakon Nygaard, one
ofthe study's main researchers,
in a press release. "It's really unheard of to go from zero to trials
in three years."
Nygaard, who recently joined
UBC from Yale University, was one
ofthe researchers hired by the university after a $9.1 million donation
from Canadian diamond magnate
Charles Fipke helped expand the
Alzheimer's research program at
UBC. Nygaard has years of experience in the field of neurological
treatment, having done much of his
research on Alzheimer's disease
while at Yale University.
Effective treatments for Alzheimer's are currently scarce: scientists have struggled to discover
a way to prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease while treatments
to ease the disease's symptoms are
also not very effective.
Nygaard hopes that the findings of this study will lead to an
important medical breakthrough.
"Just as Mr. Fipke persevered
in his quest to find diamonds in
North America, we will work
tirelessly towards an effective
therapy for people living with
Alzheimer's disease and other
dementias," said Nygaard.
On a larger scale, the study
is being administrated by Yale
University and the Alzheimer's
Disease Cooperative Study. 31
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ADVICE »
LAST WORDS »
Ask Natalie: On post-break homesickness, partner complaints and
asking out your classmates
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
The weeks since I went home for
Christmas have really made me
home sick.
I miss home, my family, my
friends, everything I left to
come here. I didn't feel this way
in September, why am I feeling
this now?"
You have left the honeymoon
phase. Like any relationship,
you've grown and the excitement
of a new city, a new school, new
friends have worn off. You've gone
home, seen your friends, eaten your
family's homemade food and you
felt secure.
Now you're thrown back into the
wild without even the familiarity
ofthe classes and profs you have
become used to. Now you have
new classrooms, new TAs, new
subjects, but without the sense
of excitement.
So it makes sense that now you
feel homesick. But you should persevere. Or at least try. You seemed to
have liked UBC before you came
back, what's changed now?
Maybe you didn't do as well
as you thought you would, or you
don't like your friends or roommate
as much, or you actually went to
somewhere with snow and now
you're frustrated with Vancouver's
"winter."
Another good idea is to get
involved in something new. Focus
these bad feelings into creating
good ones. Clubs, teams, rec and
aquatic classes, new events, and new
programs are all available for you if
you find them.
Maybe it is not specifically UBC
that you're no longer interested in.
Answer this carefully because this
is serious. Dropping out of university now may make it a lot harder to
enter again later.
Just because you were accepted
once doesn't mean they'll accept you
a second time.
Before you drop out or transfer
look into colleges, internships, jobs
and anything else you might be
interested in. Have something set
up if this is the path you decide to
go down.
Take at least two more weeks
to really think about it. You do not
want to be stuck without a plan.
In those weeks look into other
programs here at UBC. If it's a
future of engineering, nursing or
accounting that's really killing
you slowly, see if you can transfer
your credits to something else.
Even if they only count as elect-
ives, the tuition wouldn't be going
toward nothing.
If necessary, talk to your
faculty advising about taking a semester or two off. UBC does make
accommodations for students to
take a year off of school without
forcing them to to reapply when
they return. In general, though,
make sure that you think carefully about whatever you want to
do. A lot of the time, one semester
off turns into a year, and a year
into two. Make sure that you don't
end up in that situation unless it's
what you really want.
"So I like this girl in my class but
is it weird to ask her out? She
seems really cool but what if she
says no?"
Welcome to dating. Yes, of course
you can ask her out. And in my
personal opinion it's much less
weird to do so because it seems
to me you've been talking and
are friendly.
If you have indeed been talking
to her, you should know a few
things about her. Is she taken?
Is she open to starting a relationship? Or at least starting to
see someone?
Asking her out is not weird, but
like any time you ask any one out
be prepared for her to say no. But
honestly, that's the worst thing
that would happen.
If she says no, sorry that sucks,
but don't make it weird. You haven't been (I'm assuming) hitting
on this lady constantly (if you have
been and she's clearly not responding, stop now) so don't start now.
Once you've clearly asked her
out on a date, she knows you're
interested. You do not need to keep
reminding her.
If both of you want, you can be
friends, but don't see a friendship
as a way to sneak into a relationship. Don't be that guy.
If she says yes, Congrats. Still
don't make it weird. If it doesn't
work out that's also fine. If every
first date worked out there would
be no break ups ever and I think
we all know that's not true.
If it does work out and you end
up getting married, I fully expect a
invite to your wedding, much 2014
was the worst. Get out there and
think about how great 2015 will be.
"Dear Natalie,
My girlfriend is complaining
a lot about various things. I'm
usually okay with it but it's been
too much lately. Advice please."
Just talk to her. Tell her in no uncertain terms that you love talking
about her day, but her constant
negativity is something you're
having issues with. Ask her if there
is anything you can help with in
her life. If she keeps complaining, spell it out to her even more
clearly. There is a huge difference
between discussing your lives and
just being a bitter person. Tell her
when she complains about her day
constantly you feel bad and think
poorly about your own or whatever
you feelings are.
She may just be a complainer,
which sucks, as it would make it
much harder for her to change
or you to be happy. Chances are,
though, that just talking to her will
help a lot.
Need advice? Write to Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions
answered in an upcoming issue of
The Ubyssey. 31
The 'Birds put on a poor show at UBC's Winter Classic, but Hewitt made up for it with his first shutout Saturday night.
LLUSTRATIONJUUANYU/THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
WINTER CLASSIC WAS
NEW TERRITORY FOR UBC
ATHLETICS
UBC's first ever Winter Classic
was a disaster on the ice, but a
decisive success in every other
way. The Calendar, partnered with
the AMS Events team, put on a
marketing campaign that clearly
worked — they played on students'
oft-hidden feelings of Canadiana
and enticed them with "UBC's
largest EVER hockey game!"
The goal from the outset was
to beat the previous attendance
record at Doug Mitchell Stadium
of 1,012. They crushed it. 3,049
students came out to cheer for the
Thunderbirds, making Friday's
game the second most attended
sporting event in UBC history,
bested only by this year's homecoming football game (which
ended in similarly disappointing
fashion.)
Obviously, UBC sports are gaining traction and popularity among
students, and that's in no small
part thanks to The Calendar. The
university's student-run hub for
social events is a promotional Goliath, able to lure UBC's population
into record-breaking attendance
and pump up school spirit to the
breaking point.
It's clear that if UBC and the
AMS wants to continue this
upward trend of game attendance,
connecting with them on a more
personal and relevant level — as
The Calendar has helped them do
— is the way to go.
Though UBC didn't perform
up to par on Friday, the team
obviously has talent — goalie Matt
Hewitt had his first CIS shutout in
their 5-0 Saturday game. It's just a
matter of getting them to use it.
CAMPBELL PROVES AMS
EXECS AREN'T ALL JUST
HACKS
Last week, one of our editors had
the incredible opportunity to
interview Canada's only female
Prime Minister — Kim Camp
bell — about her time at UBC.
While Campbell immediately
came across as friendly, intelligent and above all, inspiring,
the thing that struck us the most
was that, back in the mid-1960s,
she was a student just like all
of us. A student who was trying
to settle into university life and
joined the AMS simply because it
sounded fun.
It is no secret that, in Vancouver, many of us often feel
disconnected from federal politics and view our local levels of
governments slightly boring and
trivial. That said, Kim Campbell's
experiences in Canadian politics
show us that we shouldn't scoff
at AMS and student politicians
too much — you never know who
will become Prime Minister
one day.
(Note the insistence ofthe
'too'. We will, of course, not stop
making the occasional good-natured jibe at the AMS' expense
for as long as this paper is in
existence.) 31
Public Open House - January 28
Thunderbird Park Precinct Plan
UBC is upgrading the facilities at Thunderbird Park. The upcoming changes will
include both new facilities and the relocation and improvement to existing facilities
Please join us at a public open house to learn more about the proposed changes and provide your feedback
on the final draft plan
Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015      Time: 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Place: MBA House Commons Room, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
Refreshments will be served.
Can't attend in person? A quick online
questionnaire will be available from
I   January 26 - February 4 at planning.ubc.ca
To learn more about Thunderbird Park go to:
sportfacilities.ubc.ca/thunderbird-park/
For additional information on the project,
contact: Aviva Savelson, Senior Manager,
Consultation, Campus + Community Planning
at aviva.savelson@ubc.ca or 604-822-9984
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
a place of mind
campus+communrty planning II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
MONDAY, JAN
THEATRE»
NETFLIX »
The Bacchae 2.1 questions societal norms Bo?om °fthe <?ueue: outpost:
Black Sun
Thomas Elms plays the role of Dionysius in UBC Theatre's production of The Bacchae 2.1.
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
"How do you transgress boundaries? How do you dismantle polarities? How do you manoeuvre
a system that's being operated
by opposing poles?" These are
the questions Dennis Gupa, MFA
directing student, is seeking to
discuss in his production of The
Bacchae 2.1.
Gupa's production brings this
reimagining of Euripides' The
Bacchae, adapted by Charles Mee,
into context for a contemporary
audience.
A dynamic, physical piece,
Bacchae 2.1 draws on Gupa's
Filipino roots, and his views on
equality, spirituality and testing
the limits ofthe body.
"I react to contemporary
issues, but am guided with my
traditional spiritual practice,
and my values are very much
traditional," said Gupa on the
juxtaposition of Greek and
contemporary theatre.
Through rehearsal, the actors
have focused on the contemporary issues and polarities through
themes of excess and movement.
"It has led me to the conclusion that this is a play about emotions, it's a play about feelings,
and it's a play about excess," said
Thomas Elms, who is playing the
role of Dionysius, on the exploration of both Greek tragedy and
Gupa's style of directing. "It's
about making people feel things,
and it's about the connection that
kind of transcends language."
Ghazal Azarbad is playing the
Orange Woman, a member ofthe
traditional Greek chorus. The
individuality of the women in the
chorus is something unique and
different from Greek tradition.
"I think it is an ensemble
piece," said Azarbad. "It requires
a lot of group mind, a lot of group
decisionmaking, especially
when it comes to furthering the
story along and making sure that
the focus is in specific places.
It takes a lot of generosity from
everyone."
In Mee's version, however,
the Greek tragedy is made much
more anachronistic, sexual and
perhaps more feminist. "We
discussed a lot about the individuality of each of the women in
Bacchae," noted Helena Fisher-Welsh, the BFA acting student
playing Agave. "There's qualities to them that are not really
quite human, but they do take
on human qualities. Much ofthe
rehearsals were finding out how
we move, because it's such a big
part of who the women are."
The separation ofthe women's
individuality is brought to light
largely through the innovative
costume design of student Kiara
Lawson.
"They have a certain anonymity to them, because they are all
[initially] looking the same, and
that's kind of what a Greek chorus
does to its members — they're one
entity," said Lawson. "So as the
play progresses, they remove that
costume and underneath you find
these crazy, wacky costumes that
don't have any particular base in
period or time or place."
Lawson has been designing the
costumes since the summer, and
Sam Fruitman
StaffWriter
If you like the Nazi zombies game
mode in the Call of Duty video game
series then Outpost: Black Sun is for
you.
The film follows Lena, an investigator of some sort, on the hunt for
a Nazi war criminal, whose inquiry
leads her behind the enemy lines of
a battle between NATO forces and
an army of invincible Nazi zombie
storm troopers. With the help of a
fellow Nazi hunter and a squad of
NATO soldiers, she must fight her
way to the source ofthe undead
army and put a stop to them. Seems
to have potential, right? Assuming
that you're the cheesy-action-horror
type, that is.
The film is pleasantly surprising
concerning the good-looking cinematography and the initial hook in
the first scene. The plot gets a little
convoluted at points, but it regains
LLUSTRATIONMING WONG ITHE UBYSSEY
its balance in the third act, and
there's an interesting (albeit somewhat derivative) little twist at the
film's climax. Character-wise, all of
the usual stereotypes are accounted
for. The wisecracking soldier who
questions his superior's every order?
Check. The Indiana Jones-rugged-
type with all ofthe plot-forwarding
answers? Yep. And of course, there's
the unfortunate group of expendable soldiers that you know aren't
going to make it through to the end.
Despite these stereotypes, there
is a very off-putting Nazi witch
character that definitely breaks
the mold, while at the same time
chilling you to the bone with
her weird cackling. As with any
horror-action, there are a lot of
jump-scares throughout, so if
these aren't your thing, consider
yourself warned. As far as gore
goes, for a zombie movie, it was
decidedly underwhelming. 31
=HOTO COURTESYTIM MATHESON
has relished the freedom and creativity with this position.
"It gave me a lot of opportunity
for creativity and designing things
from my mind as opposed to
conforming to a specific period,"
said Lawson when asked about the
originality of her designs.
Like in many Greek tragedies,
the essence ofthe play lies in the
tension between opposites. Gupa
questioned throughout the process "how do you dismantle that,
how do you understand man and
woman... I feel that this play will
give me an opportunity to breathe
a new knowledge into these two
opposing systems."
The production is layered with
live music stemming from Gupa's
Filipino heritage, influencing the
movement ofthe actors. Azarbad
noted how the use of movement
and music ensures the actors rely
on more visceral stimulation, rather than deep analysis ofthe text.
"We've just allowed the text to
be in our bodies and through our
voices, so the rehearsal process
has almost been reversed."
As a production with endless
levels, The Bacchae 2.1 is not something to be missed.
"We're still trying to decide
what this play is really about," said
Azarbad. "There's so many different things to think about, which is
what makes this play so dynamic
and incredibly rich to work on. It
will just keep unravelling and will
never have an end."
The Bacchae 2.1 opens on
January 22 at the Frederic Wood
Theatre. Tickets are available
online and at the door. Xi
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£7= MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015    |    CULTURE
FILM»
BFA acting program produces
their first feature film
■
Mercury Falling revolves around Jerry, who
Kaylan Mckinnon
Contributor
The UBC theatre and film department is premiering their first
feature film created by the BFA
acting program titled Mercury
Falling, right here on campus at
the Norm Theatre.
"Normally we do a season of
four plays that our BFA actors are
in and this was the first year that
instead of one of the plays in the
season we decided to make a feature film instead," said director
Tom Scholte.
Both Scholte and MFA production alumnus Bruce Sweeney
first began working together
over 20 years ago, where they
first made a film together called
Live Bait, which was the surprise
winner ofthe Best Film Award of
the Toronto International Film
Festival in 1995.
The movie is about Jerry,
played by BFA actor Nathan Cot-
tell, who comes into ownership
of a bar. The ensemble comedy
portrays Jerry and the host of
characters who come into his
life — the characters themselves
playing a prominent role in both
the film and the production
process.
"Tom asked us to bring in
characters based on real people
that we knew, and inevitably the
most interesting people were
people that were pieces of work,
so I think that's what's really fun
about this film," said Cottell.
The film took approximately
five months to complete, with re-
PHOTO COURTESY SHAN FU
comes into ownership of a bar.
hearsals beginning in early September, 11 days of filming back in
November and with sound and
colour corrections being done
just in time for the premiere.
Normally, you would expect
a film to have had a script ready
so the actors can just memorize
their lines and shoot. However,
Scholte had a different method for developing this film. He
instead goes through the process
of improvisation. During the
writing process the actors would
show up for rehearsals, choose a
character and improvise different scenarios. These sessions
were videotaped and used to create the dialogue ofthe scenes.
"It was unlike anything I've
ever done. I got my first taste of
film last year when we did film
with Tom and we worked with
scripts, but then he came to us
with this idea of doing a fully
improvised film," said BFA actor
Demi Pederson.
"It'll be interesting to see how
it plays to a campus audience, it
does risk offending people, not
anymore that what goes on in the
mainstream cinema out there,"
said Scholte, "I hope there's a
lot of laughter and I hope people
don't take themselves too seriously when they come and see
it too, and that they're sort of
willing to go for a ride."
Mercury Falling will be showing at 7:30pm on both January 26
and 27. Tickets can either be purchased at the doors ofthe Norm
Theatre or online. Xi
Diana Bang plays the role of Sook in The Interview.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
ALUMNI»
Diana Bang on her growing acting career and The Interview
her involvement with local sketch
comedy group Assaulted Fish.
"It's a creative outlet," said Bang,
thankful for the freedoms offered by
the group.
Working in an aesthetically-driven industry, issues of ethnicity are
impossible to ignore. An unfortunate reality ofthe North American
entertainment industry is that the
majority of films and television
shows are often designed with
homogeneity in mind, which means
that roles for non-Caucasians can be
scarce.
Over the past few years, Bang
has detected a definite shift of this
paradigm.
"It's getting better," she said. "I
feel very fortunate and excited to be
in this time of change, where people
are embracing [diversity] more."
Being on the set of The Interview
was especially heartening for Bang,
who was overjoyed to be part of a
film that showcased so many talented Asian-American and Asian-Canadian actors.
Randall Park, who plays Kim
Jong-Un, is working on a new
show called Fresh Off The Boat, an
Asian-American family sitcom. Bang
said it's about time. "It's the first one
since All-American Girl, which was
20 years ago!"
Race is not the only barrier facing
aspiring actors. Bang recalls a UBC
theatre professor who told her not to
bother pursuing acting.
"Don't let things like that stop
you from doing whatever it is that
you love," she said, emphasizing the
importance of valuing one's own
unique perspective. With the internet granting independent artists
direct access to potential audiences,
Bang believes that it is more possible
than ever for creative individuals to
claim their piece ofthe entertainment market.
Her next role is in a web series
called Paranormal Solutions, Inc.,
which is scheduled for release on
February 24th. 31
ChloeLai
Contributor
While the movie The Interview
may feature slow-motion helicopter
explosions and classic Goldberg
and Rogen toilet humour, Vancouver-born actress and comedian
Diana Bang, who studied psychology and geography at UBC before
becoming a professional actor, is
anything but farcical in real life.
A unique combination of West
Coast geniality and old-school work
ethic, Bang takes a straightforward
attitude toward surviving in a notoriously challenging industry.
"You have to work your ass off,"
said Bang. "Otherwise, it's not
worth it."
The choices that Bang makes in
her portrayal of her Interview character Sook — North Korea's chief of
propaganda in the film — are rooted
in extensive research. Countless
documentaries and TED Talks by
and about North Korean women
helped her distinguish audible
differences between accents ofthe
North and South, while providing
sociocultural context. Bang also
studied footage of female military
leaders to find examples ofthe sort
of body movements that might be
appropriate for someone in Sook's
position.
"Women in the military... they've
got that very strong gait," said Bang.
"And I knew that my character, if
she's in the government, that means
she's been trained in the military."
Being of Korean descent herself,
Bang took advantage ofthe valuable
resources that existed closer to
home. "I got a dictaphone, and I got
my mom and her friends to record
my lines," she said.
It wasn't all homework and vocal
exercises, though.
"My favourite scene to shoot was
... the one where I got to shoot!" said
Bang, laughing as she relives Sook's
machine-gun-wielding moment
of glory. Though her slow-motion
battle cry was muted for cinematic
effect, she cheerfully confirms
that she was, indeed, screaming
throughout the entire shot.
Her comedic instincts have been
honed over the past decade through
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES y3fey3fey^
Culture Vulture
OR 19 BLUE
WHALES
This week on campus, UBC Theatre will premiere their first theatre production ofthe term, The Bacchae 2.1. In this reimagining
of Euripedes' Greek classic The Bacchae, the tensions caused by
opposites is a prevalent theme throughout the performance. For
more information, visit archive.theatre.ubc.ca
Tickets are available online and at the door.
When: January 21-February 7.31
Cover the events that you want.
You can make a difference
and create a green, ^s\
zero waste campus: (^
USE RECYCLING STATIONS TO J
SORT YOUR FOOD SCRAPS AND \~ _
RECYCLABLES INTO THE PROPER BINS. 1	
RECYCLABLE
CONTAINERS
ubc sustainability
culture@ubyssey.ca
Sort it Out.
fca/soHitout // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDAY, JANUARY 19,201!
'
L
THE FIRST EVER
UBC
WINTER CLASSIC
3-4 wr%:
>'C-J
The 3,049 fans at the game smashed the previous attendance record.
JackHauen
Sports and Rec Editor
The atmosphere was electric
before the game even started.
Something felt like it was on the
line in this game. The beer-soaked
and record-breaking crowd
cheered at every opportunity,
giving the T-Birds the energy to
rack up a seemingly unsurpassable three goal lead late in the
game. But momentum works in an
exaggerated way in this league;
when a rookie-filled Saskatchewan
team notched their first goal of the
evening at 8:46 ofthe third, something clicked. From that point on,
the home team could only watch
their dominant game unravel.
3,049 was the exact number
of people packed into the Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird Sports
Centre, and it sounded like it from
the moment the puck dropped.
The 'Birds took notice, and wasted
no time in throwing their weight
around, causing a serious headache
for the visitors in their own end and
in the neutral zone. Within the first
minute, Luke Lockhart had hit the
crossbar, ampingup the crowd even
more. UBC net-minder Eric Williams traded long-distance blows
with Saskatchewan's Ryan Holfeld
to keep the game scoreless through
19:59 ofthe first period.
It was that last second in which
Nick Buonassisi blew past the
Huskie defender and caught Holfeld
moving the wrong way to open
the scoring with a buzzer-beater
— exactly what the crowd needed
to ramp up the excitement from a
deadlocked period.
"The other team actually had a
wide open net," recalled Buonassisi.
"It was fortunate that he missed it,
and I was able to pick up the puck,
and I saw their D -man kind of stutter-step and it was kind of an instant
play. I saw the goalie go left so I
tried to go right, and lucky enough it
went in for me."
The Thunderbirds came into the
second period confident. They had
most ofthe chances during the first,
and were justly rewarded at the tail
end. The thousands in the stands
were no less energetic. David Robinson felt he needed to establish a
tone early on, and gave Holfeld a bit
of a snow shower, which drew some
Huskies behind the net for a bout of
face-washing and headlocks.
The second looked better than
the first for the 'Birds — the only
time the puck crossed their defensive blueline was when it was iced.
Bardaro took the puck right off a
=HOTOCOURTESFLOUISGRONICK
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIC^HE UBYSSEY
defender's stick and very nearly put
it in from the slot. Fleming caught
a rebound from a wraparound
attempt and fired it so convincingly
that the red light flashed to signal a
goal. The man with the best view in
the house and the red stripe on his
arm, however, disagreed.
Not to be stonewalled for the period, the 'Birds would add another.
Jessi Hilton and Luke Lockhart
sprungup on a 2-on-l opportunity
and made no mistake with their
textbook finish. 2-0 'Birds. From
there, Saskatchewan turned up the
heat a little bit, but Williams stood
on his head when he needed to.
So it went to what everyone in
the stands hoped would be the final
frame. At 6:51, Robinson buried
a huge rebound top shelf to put
the home team up by three, and if
you asked the person next to you
whether there was any chance of
a comeback, you might've gotten a
funny look. It just wasn't plausible.
But it happened. It started with
a bad penalty. Ben Schmidt took a
roughing call to put the visitors on
the powerplay, they crashed the
crease and banged one in over Williams' shoulder. They'd climb within
one just 33 seconds later, as Jesse
Ross fired home a wrist shot that
beat Williams' blocker side.
"I think we let our nerves get
the best of us in the third period,"
said Buonassisi. "We took a couple
penalties we shouldn't have. We
were playing on the edge, letting our
emotions get the best of us."
The crowd's worst fears would
be realized five minutes later when
Huskie Connor Cox beat the UBC
defence from almost the same spot
Ross had.
A nail-biting four-on-four overtime period solved nothing, so the
game turned to three-on-three for
the next five minute, sudden-death
period. That's when things really
opened up. The amount of clear
ice was almost comical; every rush
was odd-man. Williams kept the
'Birds in it with a few solid saves,
but in the end even he couldn't stifle
the close-range backhander from
Craig McCallum.
"We're still real positive looking
forward," said Buonassisi. "We're
really aiming for home ice [during
the] first round in the playoffs, and
it's definitely within our reach. We
have to hold onto leads and get two
points from here on in."
The 'Birds bounced back Saturday
night to take a 5-0 victory over the
Huskies to clinch a playoff spot in the
Canada West conference. Xi MONDAY, JANUARY 19,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
BASKETBALL»
Thunderbird men make it six in a row
Conor Morgan (9) blows past the Bobcats defence.
Jacob Gershkovich
Senior StaffWriter
The UBC men's basketball team
looked to start 2015 off right
with a couple of wins over the
struggling University of Brandon
Bobcats. Winners of four straight,
the Thunderbirds were on the
cusp of posting a record above
.500 for the first time this season.
At 5-5, they entered the weekend tied for seventh place in the
Pioneers Division.
BASKETBALL»
Brandon proved to be more
dangerous than their dismal 1-11
record would have suggested. Early
in Friday's tilt, the visitors jumped
ahead to a 9-0 lead. A quick time-out
by UBC head coach Kevin Hanson
— who had some interesting things
to say for the lapel mic attached to
him during the game — and things
settled down a bit. Still, after one
quarter of play, Brandon held onto a
tenuous 28-27 lead over UBC.
The 'Birds managed to pull
ahead in the second quarter by
=HOTO SOFYTSAIFTHE UBYSSEY
exploiting their size advantage over
the visitors. There wasn't a Bobcat player on the floor that could
handle UBC's David Wagner. The
6'9 fourth-year forward dropped 10
hard-fought points in the half, all of
which came from inside the paint,
and led UBC into the locker room
with a 57-47 lead.
"The last month we've really been
trying to emphasize pounding the
ball inside," said Hanson. "We think
that's a big advantage over a lot of
teams that we play."
In spite of their size, the Bobcats would not fold. Beginningthe
second half much like the first, the
visitors cruised to a 58-57 lead after
a quick 11-0 run to start the third
quarter before an alley-oop thrown
by UBC's Andrew McGuiness to
Connor Morgan stopped their roll in
emphatic fashion. UBC pulled back
in front, holding onto a slim 74-68
lead before the fourth quarter.
The Thunderbirds proved to be
the team that wanted it more in the
final quarter of play. UBC systematically shut down the Bobcats,
with six of their players finishing in
double figures in the scoring department. The final score read 97-82 in
favour ofthe home team.
To those who didn't watch
the game, the scoreboard might
have been deceptive in telling the
evening's narrative. For most ofthe
game, this fast-paced Bobcat team
seriously threatened the Birds'
winning streak.
"They're a very athletic team.
We had problems guarding the ball
screen tonight," said Hanson. "We
just didn't get down in our defensive
stance. We just have to remember
to stick to our game plan, which got
away from us a little tonight. We
have to stick to the principles that
we've worked on all week."
The fight in Brandon's game carried over to Saturday. Playing like a
team with nothingto lose, the Bobcats continued to dictate the pace
early in game two, jumping ahead to
a 25-19 lead after one quarter of play.
Morgan helped pull the 'Birds
back into the game in the second
quarter. The 6'9 forward, now in his
second year of play, was fouled on
a successful three point shot. After
hitting the free throw to convert the
four point play, and knocking down
multiple subsequent three-pointers,
Morgan finished the half with 16
points, and the 'Birds led 48-42.
Facing a feisty Bobcats team
that refused to shy away for the
second night in a row, Hanson had
some work to do with his players in
the interval.
"We talked about getting focused
defensively. We gave up 25 points
in the first quarter, and that wasn't
very good at all. We talked about
getting our defensive stops, our
missed rotations and the back door
cuts we were getting burned on."
Whatever was said, it worked.
Saturday was a night on which
the basketball gods smiled down
on UBC. Everything was going in.
UBC's Jorden Jensen-Whyte, for
instance, attempted to throw a half
court alley-oop pass to Morgan.
While the pass missed its intended
recipient by a long shot, it did not
miss the basket. Jensen-Whyte's
inaccurate lob ended up being the
longest three point conversion ofthe
game, and Jensen-Whyte, whose
countenance rarely betrays any sort
of emotion under ordinary circumstances, chuckled as he jogged back
on defence.
After the buzzer rang and the
cheerleaders stopped dancing, UBC
comfortably walked away with a
107-76 win, their sixth consecutive
regular season victory.
"Preparation is the key to success," said Hanson after the game.
"We're not in a position to take
anyone lightly. I thought we were a
little complacent today at times, and
we just can't do that. It's going to
be about hard work all week. We're
going to focus on ourselves, make
sure we're doing the right things,
and obviously we'll have to improve
our defensive effort." Xi
Mic'd up
See what head
coach Kevin Hanson
had to say during the
game Friday night
at ubyssey.ca
Women complete perfect UBC basketball weekend
Koby Michaels
StaffWriter
The Thunderbirds continued
an impressive weekend with a
decisive 87-46 victory over the
Brandon University Bobcats Saturday night. With a mix of finesse
and physicality the Thunderbirds
dominated the Cats for the second
night in a row, never giving up
their lead in the showdown. The
atmosphere may have been quieter
than Friday's Winter Classic, but
the women brought an intensity
the hockey team was lacking.
UBC drew first blood when
Cassandra Knievel scored an early
three-pointer. Within minutes
the Cats had called a timeout to
settle things down when they
found themselves trailing 11-4.
The Thunderbirds gave up several
points off of fouls but it paid off.
The Cats' clumsy offence could
find no holes in the 'Bird defence,
almost exclusively scoring on free
throws. Several steals and quick
counterattacks put UBC way up
and a last second Stephanie Bell
shot had UBC up at the end ofthe
quarter 16-7.
The Thunderbirds continued
their physical defence and quick
passing offence in the second quarter. Kris Young scored first, sinking
a jump shot after a hard drive. The
Cats were quick to retaliate and
the play was back and forth, but
inaccurate Brandon shooting put
the 'Birds up 20-9 after another
Young point. UBC's rough defence
cost them point after point, though
the score didn't reflect it, as the
Thunderbirds rarely had less than
double the Cats' score. Young
scored a free throw off of the Cats'
first foul ofthe quarter and then
handed the spotlight off to Harleen
Sidhu who had several steals, and
with some smart passing from
teammates, put the 'Birds 15 points
ahead at the half.
Brandon's lack of teamwork hurt
them, along with Sidhu's 15 points
and Young's seven. The players
filed off for halftime and the Richmond Youth Basketball's Hurricanes and Cyclones took the court
in an exciting and closely-matched
exhibition contest.
Knievel started the second half
identically to the first, sinking a
three-pointer in seconds. The Cats,
in somewhat desperate fashion,
were quick to foul, allowing Adri-
enne Parkin to hit nothing but net
on two free throws, boosting the
'Birds to a 20 point lead. Strong
defence shut down Brandon's
offence time and time again, then
Young beat the whole team to lay
up another, rounding out a 10 point
scoring streak to start the half.
The Cats finally fought back with
several free throws of their own
before Knievel made a three point
play after sinking a free throw.
Cherub Lum followed suit, drawing a foul on a breakaway, making
it 52-24.
After two and a half quarters of
total domination, the 'Birds eased
up and the Bobcats pounced on
 » >» ffi  «l
The 'Birds dominated Brandon in their own zone both nights.
their opportunity, scoring several
quick layups. Several more fouls
against Brandon allowed them to
lessen the gap, but strong UBC rebounding allowed them to finished
the quarter up 60-33.
In a desperate last attempt to
claw themselves back in the game,
the Cats started the final quarter
with a layup but were quickly
reminded ofthe 'Bird's dominance at War Memorial Gym when
Young came up with a huge block,
which Sidhu took advantage of, to
score again. Some fancy dribbling
from the Cats' lead scorer Alyssa
Montgomery (13 points) was the
last life for the visitors as Sidhu
handed centre stage to Young (17
points), Knievel (12 points) and
Lee (eight points) with significant
contributions from Parkin (12
points). Lee sank jump shot after
jump shot, regardless ofthe pres-
=HOTO STEVEN DURFEEFTHE UBYSSEY
sure while Young and Knievel took
turns stealing, breaking away and
scoring. Kamila Wojciechowski
came off the bench and scored four
to finish off the Cats, ending the
game 87-46.
The 'Birds 17 fouls, unbreakable
defence, fast-paced and teamwork-oriented offence and strong
individual performances from
Sidhu, Young, Knievel and Parkin
never gave Brandon a chance. Xi 12    |    GAMES    |    MONDAY, JANUARY 19,2015
Photo of tl
A view from Marine Drive last Wednesday.
PHOTO BENJAMIN COOK/THE UBYSSEY
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ACROSS
1- Tennis matches are divided into
these
5- Earthquake
10-Corrosion
14- Voice of America org.
15- Funny Anne
16- Romain de Tirtoff, familiarly
17- Hindu lawgiver
18-Arm bones
19- Capital on theAare
20- Exterior
22- Walks with long steps
24-Wrathful
26-The continent
27- Protective spectacles
COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM
JAN 15 ANSWERS
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
30- Everglades bird
65-1 could        horse!
8-Ladies of Sp.
41-Made a mistake
32-Sleep disorder
66-Author       Stanley Gardner
9-Very skillful
44- Improve in appearance
33-Airlinesincel948
67-Apply, as pressure
10- Revival
47-Most strange
34-       d'oeuvre
68-IRS IDs
11- Hives
49-The Greatest
38-Cry       River
69-Observed
12-Throat problem
50-Code of silence
39-He's a catch
70-Judicial rulings
13-Uptight
51-Confronts
42-By means of
71-Afternoon affairs
21- Relative by marriage
52- Dean Martin's "That's
43-Performs
23- Regret
53-Sheerfabric
45-Disturb
25-Shouting
55- Dizzying designs
46- Harvests
DOWN
27-Explorer Vasco da
57-Cab
48-Sausalito's county
28-Crude cartel
59-Jewel
50- Threatening words
1-Japanese wrestling
29-Midge
CD container
51-Femme
2- Son of Isaac and Rebekah
31-Scottish Celt
60-Sicilian peak
54-Private Pyle
3-Hue
33- "The Time Machine" people
61-Colleen
56- Person devoted to love
4-Wurst
35-Cameo shape
64-Shamus
58-Footstalk
5- Dirty mark
36-Tears
62-San Francisco's       Tower
6-Conger catcher
37-Freelancer's end.
63- Golden Horde member
7- 007 creator Fleming
40-Apprehended

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