UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 7, 1969

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128498.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128498.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128498-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128498-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128498-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128498-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128498-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128498-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128498-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128498.ris

Full Text

Array out of 21
THE UBYSSEY
IS
rep by pop?
Vol. L, No. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1969
228-2305
CLENCHED FISTS upraised, a crowd of 800 engineers and gun oficionados
cheer as the Waterloo-era nine o'clock gun is replaced Thursday afternoon by
UBC engineers. Jack Bush of the Crippled Children's Society received a cheque
_ dick button photo
for $2,000, raised by concerned citizens to ransom the old navy 12-pounder
when deputy mayor Hugh Bird said he wasn't amused by one of the engineer's
most original stunts in years.
Four students in 21 to pick president
The UBC board of governors
has established a special committee to assist it in its search
"tor a new president, and students have a voice on that committee.
Four of the 21 members are
to   be   students,   but   whether
* students accept that number
or regard it as tokenism remains to be seen.
BoG   President   Dr.   Walter
Koerner has done as promised
* and made it "broadly" representative of the university
community. It consists of:
• three members of the BoG
• three members of the
senate
• four members of the
faculty
• three deans
• four students
■-    • three members of the
alumni association
• one member of the non-
academic administration.
The board's purpose is to
recommend to the BoG a list
of criteria on which a president should be selected and to
nominate certain persons they
feel will fit these criteria.
-* Alma Mater Society secretary Isobel Semple said when
asked about the committee, "I
am pleased four students got
on, at this moment you can't
expect more. It's a good start."
The general student concensus  of opinion seemed to be,
*\, "I don't know anything about
it."   Although   other   opinions
ranged from Bill Doran's "I
just read about it, an improvement don't you think?" to a
student who refused to be
identified who said he thought
it was slightly off-balance, in
favor of the faculty.
Stan Evans, the alumni association president, said he was
generally happy with the committee set up and he was glad
"all concerned were represented."
Of the four students on the
committee one will be the AMS
president, two will be students
appointed by council, and one
grad student chosen by the
Graduate Students Association.
The four faculty members
will be chosen by the joint
faculties committee.
The three deans will be appointed by the committee of
academic deans.
Of the three alumni members
one will be the president of
the alumni association.
The three senate members
will be appointed by the senate.
The administration member
will be university bursar William White.
The BoG will be represented
by the chancellor, John Buchanan, who will chair the committee meetings, Dr. Walter
Koerner and Donovan F. Miller.
AMS president David Zirnhelt, Buchanan, Koerner and
White were unavailable for
comment.
The committee that decided
on the appointment of Dr.
Kenneth Hare as administration president consisted of four
members of the BoG with some
advice from a four-man faculty advisory committee.
It is expected to take two to
three weeks before all committee members can be assembled for a meeting.
Disturbing deal from Les
greets SFU 114 in court
By JOHN TWIGG
Wheelings and dealings between lawyers
for the 114 and government officials as high
up as attorney-general Les Peterson have
brought results — the 114 have had their
charges lowered.
More than half of the 114 students arrested
at Simon Fraser University for occupying the
administration building appeared in Burnaby
court Thursday morning to face charges of obstructing the use of private property.
That charge carries a maximum penalty of
five years in jail or a $10,000 fine.
However, lawyers and the attorney-general's
department agreed to reduce the charge to
"creating a disturbance", which carries a maximum -penalty of six months in jail or $500,
provided the defendants agree to plead guilty.
The latter charge is non-indictable while
the former charge is indictable. (Indictable
means a criminal record, which would restrict
those charged from running for public office,
becoming a lawyer or being bondable.)
Those pleading guilty wil still have a criminal record in the eyes of the public, but not
in the eyes of the court.
However, six of the 114 intend to plead
"not guilty" to avoid setting a precedent for
future confrontation with administrators ^on
Canadian campuses.
Among the six are five Young Socialists
and Lyle Osmondson, president of the Vancou
ver City College chapter of SDU. They will be
remanded until Feb. 21 to plead not guilty.
Thursday's proceedings were marked by an
air of insolence among the defendants and the
many spectators in the courtroom.
About 45 people were each asked, "Are you
<name)? Have you,consulted legal advisors? Do
you understand the charges against you? Are
you prepared to enter a plea? How do you
plead?"
One defendant answered drearily to each
question "yes", including the last one. However, the judge alerted him of his error and
asked again how he pleaded.
John Mate caused a commotion when he
pleaded "guilty technically, innocent morally"
but the judge refused to accept his plea saying
it was either guilty or not guilty.
Another incident caused some concern when
the judge asked an RCMP officer to quiet the
courtroom. He failed to get any response on
his first attempt, and after the second attempt
muttered, "This is a court of justice, not a
laughing stall."
Near the end of the proceeding people started appearing in groups of five to finish faster.
The whole event took one and a half hours.
The rest of the 114 will appear in court
this morning. The women pleading guilty will
be remanded to March 5 and 6 for sentencing,
the men to March 7 through 11. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7, 1969
TONIGHT
V>«St
Wiggy Symphony and Painted Ship
SUB BALLROOM
9:00 -  1:00
Guys $1.50 Dolls $1.00
SPONSORED BY PERFORMING ARTS
FILMSOC  presents
<£|      far Three Men
\\T1ie CivilWar Wasn't Hell.
"~    It Was Practice!
LEEVAHC1JEEF
10 WALLACE
THE GOOD.
THEBADS
THEUGIY"
mi
Screenplay by     I Uirecled by I   Music bv ENHIOttORRICONE      ^"~M
LUCIANO HKtVW  ShKh H Nr U p - »-*■*>«» ierapee  {flpH
andStRGlOtinK   lUUUJIU LLUIlL I Associate Rome )S—4,
TECHWSCOrt TECHHKOlOr •••«{■
TUESDAY,   FEBRUARY   11th
3:00 - 6:00 - 9:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
Racism
Over at International House
things are happening. Thursday noons people are getting
together for a series of discussions about racial and interracial problems.
Yesterday, the topic talk-in
■was about Black Power.
Conversation surged around
such questions as: Should
whites try and help blacks by
going in among them or should
they help only by working
among other whites, letting the
blacks work for themselves?
Was Martin Luther King controlled and financed by moderate whites or did he originate
and follow his own philosophy
regardless of the money coming in?
Feb. 13 the topic will be
Mixed Power: inter-racial marriages.
SF State
A professor from San Francisco State College is coming
to UBC to speak on the problems facing that institution.
Prof. Andree Martin, a striking French professor who describes himself as "not a rabble
rouser", will speak at noon
today in Bu. 100.
Among the topics he will
cover are the reasons why
faculty members are on strike,
relationships between the student strike and the faculty
strike, and the effect of police
on campus.
India struggle
Hardial Bains will speak on
People's Struggles in India to-
THE PIT
HOURS OF BUSINESS:
FEBRUARY: Tues. Feb. 11
Fri. Feb. 14
Tues. Feb. 18
Wed. Feb. 19
Tues. Feb. 25
Wed. Feb. 26
Fri. Feb. 28
MARCH:    Mon. Mar. 17
Tues. Mar. 18
Wed. Mar. 19
Mon. Mar. 24
Tues. Mar. 25
Wed. Mar. 26
Thurs. Mar. 27
MARCH:
Mon. Mar. 3
Tues. Mar. 4
Thurs. Mar. 6
Mon. Mar. 10
Tues. Mar. 11
Fri.      Mar. 14
APRIL: Tues. Apr. 1
Wed.. Apr. 2
Thurs. Apr. 3
Fri. Apr. 4
Thurs. Apr. 10
Fri.      Apr. 11
Hours: 4:30 - 11:00 P.M.
MEMBERSHIPS
The memberships will be sold for the last time on the following dates in the cloakroom
at the main lobby in SUB.
Wed., Feb. 12 from 12:30 - 2:30
Thurs., Feb. 13 from 12:30 - 5:00
PIT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
Applications are being accepted for those who wish to work on this committee for the
development of the permanent facilities for next fall. Those interested please leave a letter
of application at the PIT MANAGEMENT OFFICE, Rm. 210, in SUB ... of see Sean
McHugh or Gary Smallenberg.
ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION
One student• any year, or faculty, is needed to sit on the judging committee for the Architectural Competition to decide the final interior design for the permanent PIT. Please
leave a letter stating reasons for seeking the position in Room 210 in SUB.
day at noon in Ang. 104.
The lecture is the first in a
series of lectures and symposiums entitled Liberation
Struggles.
Admission is free.
Mardi money
Mardi Gras raised $10,000
for the B.C. Paraplegic association, according to a Greek
letter society spokesman,
through its weekend promotions.
"The financial success was
surpassed only by the sparkling
performance of the floorshow," —-
a   statement  said.   Tom   Gove    %
and Lynne Pomfret were chosen king and queen.
Medics meet
An all-day symposium on
Medical Education for Tomorrow will be held Saturday at
the Vancouver General Hospital Christmas Seal auditorium
beginning at 9:30 a.m.
Topics will be student finances and curriculum and
teaching method  reform.
The symposium is open to
all.
A Flower in a Concrete Plant
Do you have any kind of a
problem concerning UBC? If
you do, put it in writing and
send it to Flower in a Concrete Plant, Ubyssey office,
SUB, or leave it in the ombudsman's office, in the main SUB
foyer.
Q.: I refuse to eat or lounge
in such a pigsty as SUB has
become. There is dirt and garbage of all kinds everywhere.
It's a disgrace to the university
to have a building of such potential so badly abused. Is
'there anything that can be
done about this situation?
A.: We have received many
letters on this topic in the last
few weeks. There is really
nothing that can be done about
this except to appeal to students, to keep SUB tidier. The
janitorial staff is at a reasonable level, so it's up to you.
Stow it, don't throw it.
Q.: What we need in SUB
is a post office, or at least a
stamp machine and a letter
box. Is there any chance of
something being done about
this?
A.: SUB now has a stamp
machine and a letter box. The
stamp machine is located by
the information desk in the
main foyer, while the letter
box is outside the north entrance. The reason it is outside
is so the mail truck can get
to it easily.
Q.: Is there any way of getting some new records in the
listening room? It's a really
great service, but the record
selection leaves something to
be desired.
A.: The listening room can
only afford to buy a certain
amount of records, but there
is a suggestion box on their
desk which is used in deciding
which records will be bought.
Also, you may bring your own
records and listen to them, if
you wish.
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating    Al   Birnie
News       John  Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff. Peter Ladner
Managing      Bruce  Curtis
Associate   Paul Knox
Wire       Irene   Wasliewski
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports  Jim Maddin
Photo      Fred   Cawsey
Ass't News    John Gibbs
It was turnabout day at The Ubyssey
as Gibbs jumped into his maiden job as
news ed, while Twigg did likewise as
city ed. and Knox played editor off and
on. Ladner and Volkoff took a powder so
to speak, but managed to make the scene
at the printers after dinner.
Today was a heavy day for reporters,
and they did some heavy work. Forsooth
. . . Les Plommer (bless her heart) waltzed in innocent and fell under Knox's
spell and did three hours typing. Nick
Orchard slaved and finally got his story
to appear—although it was hacked somewhat. Maurice Bridge was off smelling
posies and turned in a tainted effort.
Nate Smith worked, along with Peter
Kennedy, Nader Mirhady, Elaine Tarz-
well, Charlie Hulton, Norm Gidney, Jack
Emberly, Erik Brynjolffson and John Andersen, Bill Ding donged 'em as a fledgling reported while Flynn was flyin'
downtown.
The jocques were hard at it, Tony
Gallagher and Rik Nyland told Madden
where  the puck it's at.
Photogs were Dick Button, Bruce
Stout, John Frizell, Dirk Kisser and
Gordie Tong. Wowee zowee. Friday, February 7,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
k^****-. &i'^p-W'*'$%$&£„"'"' '.:)*$$%'■'
ii*.* . s*.
-j   **•*•...'-
on the prairies
OTTAWA (CUP)—The Canadian Union of Students lost
two more referendums Fri-
-. day when the University
of Winnipeg voted to withdraw
from the union and tiie University of Alberta decided
overwhelmingly to stay out.
At Winnipeg, CUS lost by a
scant 13 votes — 507 to 494,
a turnout that represented 43
per cent of the 2,700 students
' eligible to vote. The decision,
which came afer three weeks
of intense campaigning, is not
binding on next year's student
council (to be elected Feb. 7)
and the final decision on the
school's status in CUS will be
decided by the new council.
University of Alberta students rejected membership in
OUS for the second time in
three years. Of 7,000 students
who voted, 6,267 voted to stay
out, while only 1,754 approved
the union. There are 15,000
students at the school.
Alberta pulled out of CUS
in August of 1966, the first
school in English Canada to
do so. That decision was upheld by referendum in March
1967.
The double defeat left CUS
with 24 members and eight
referendums to come.
and at Waterloo
WATERLOO (CUP) — The
Canadian Union of Students
Monday lost to University of
Waterloo, home campus of
CUS president Peter Warrian,
by 17 votes in a referendum
settled after five ballot recounts.
Only 28.6 per cent of 8,772
eligible voters turned out to
reject the union by 1,173 to
1,156 and leave it at 23 members -with several referendums
coming up soon.
The campus election for student council president, held on
the same ballot, returned moderate John Bergsma over Larry
Burko, in a dull campaign during which Bergsma refused to
take a stand on CUS.
Voting was held Wednesday
(Jan. 29) but ballots weren't
counted! until Monday because
of computer problems. '
Engineers voted almost three
to two for withdrawing from
the union — they accounted
for 28 per cent of the voting
turnout — while math and
arts opted for remaining in
CUS and other faculties split
closely.
Waterloo had! been considered a CUS stronghold and the
campaigning was low - key.
Bergsma commented that "the
results are inconclusive — it
shows students feel there is a
need for a national student
union, but there are organizational or other weaknesses in
OUS."
The referendum was called
by former council president
Brian Her in October, a month
before Bergsma beat Her in a
special election.
Although some campus radicals -were disappointed, former
council vice - president Tom
Patterson commented:
"My concern is the creation
of a revolutionary movement,
something a consensus organization like CUS cannot be. I
see no real loss in the defeat of
OUS at Waterloo."
Ranks closed  in
Regina fee-fight
REGINA (CUP)—Students here Tuesday began consolidating
their attempts to fight the University of Saskatchewan board of
governors in the student union fees fight.
A meeting of 1,300 students voted to organize leafletting
and educational measures such as speaking to public meetings,
extending research for analyzing the role of the university in
society and putting out a mimeographed daily paper to kepe up
.. with developments.
More militant motions to boycott the campus and to picket
the homes and businesses of members of the board of governors
were defeated. A motion of non-confidence in the student council,
whose negotiations with the board in the dispute broke down
again the day before, was also defeated.
The meeting followed overnight strategy talks on the campus
- as an extension of an all-day teach-in held Monday while students
boycotted classes.
Students also approached the council-board negotiating session with an invitation for a board member to speak to them.
~ When the board refused about 1,000 of them gathered in front
of the negotiation headquarters, remaining in two lines when
board members left so they had to run a "gauntlet" to reach
their cars.
Nearly half the 4,000-student campus took part in all of
Monday's sessions and initial confrontations with the board.
Elsewhere Tuesday, the throne speech in the Saskatchewan
legislature promised that a "firm hand" would be taken with the
university and hinted at possible reprisals against campus
"agitators". A cabinet minister also condemned the disruptions
that have plagued the Regina campus since the board of
governors announced that it would not collect student union
dues this term because of the attitude of The Carillon, the student
newspaper.
Student-board negotiations, which have been virtually stale-
', mated since they opened two weeks ago, were to resume again
some time this week.
MARDI GRAS queen Lynne
Pomfret smiles beneath
cedar boughs Thursday.
Chosen to reign over annual
charity ball. Miss Pomfret of
the Kappa Kappa Gamma
sorority defeated seven
others for the role.
Committee plans
Arts-Science I
for early 1970
By NATE SMITH
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
An integrated first year arts-science program, a form of
Science I, may be in operation as early as 1970.
That is the opinion of Fred Buckwold, science 2, chairman
of a student-faculty committee discussing that and other possible changes in the science curriculum.
"We have been discussing the general idea of an integrated
program and concrete ideas are now beginning to form," Buckwold said Thursday.
He said the program would probably consist of a nine or
ten unit integrated science program and a five or six unit '-mini
Arts I" including, among other subjects, the philosophy of
science.
"The bachelor of science degree is currently a technician's
degree," Buckwold said, "there is a need for a broader education.
"A number of students are transferring out of the faculty
becaused they are bored by a program more or less the same as
a technical school."
Computer science prof J. R. Dempster, a member of the
curriculum committee, said the idea of an integrated program
deserves full consideration.
"I just don't know if you can teach scienee that way but
it is worth investigating," he said.
A separate proposal for a Science I program has also, been
drawn up by a committee headed by philosophy prof Ed Levy.
Levy's proposed curriculum deals primarily with the philosophy and history of science and "the relation of science to
modern poitical and social structure".
Buckwold said the Levy proposal is inadequate and is basically a second Arts I program with a slight inclination towards
science.
Continued on Page 16
See: "SCIENCE COURSE"
Artsman, engineers   bigwig  run
for president, secretary acclaimed
Horswill or Hodge; that's
your choice for next year's
Alma Mater Society president.
Engineering Undergraduate
Society president Fraser
Hodge, Eng 4, and AMS political education subcommittee
chairman Les Horswill, Arts
6, were the only two candidates left when nominations
for first slate elections closed
Thursday noon.
Kelvin Beckett, Arts 3, had
also been nominated but withdrew in favor of Horswill. "I
wish to deny here and now the
rumor that I am running for
vice-president," he said. "If
nominated I will not run,  if
Where was
your blood?
The Red Cross blood donor
clinic, which ends today, has
again failed to reach its goal
at UBC.
By noon Thursday, only
2,192 pints of blood had been
collected. The goal was 4,000
pints.
The donor movement was
termed "pretty slow" by Miss
Pat Puppyen, donor registrar.
She said the highest daily total
had been 330 pints last Tuesday.
Over 26,000 transfusions
were given in 1968.
An average of 100 donors
per week was required to meet
open heart, highly specialized,
and emergency needs, he said.
He also expressed thanks to
students for their support of
the clinic.
So get out this afternoon,
and BLEED!
elected I will not serve."
Ann Jacobs, Arts 3, the only
candidate for secretary, wins
the position by acclamation.
Nominated for Internal affairs officer were Ken Collier,
Social Work 4; Dave Gibson,
Arts 2; and Dave Mossop, Law
2. Gibson has been acting internal affairs officer since Ruth
Dworkin resigned last month.
The internal affairs officer is
the public relations officer for
the AMS.
The two candidates for coordinator, who is responsible
for booking all AMS functions,
are Dave Graham, Arts 4, and
Hanson Lau, Arts 3.
Horswill, Lau, Jacobs and
Gibson are all backed by the
Reform Union.
Full statements from all candidates and seconders will be
printed in Tuesday's Ubyssey
if they are turned in, typed,
75 -100 words, by Monday
noon to The Ubyssey office.
First slate elections are on
Wednesday, Feb. 12, one day
before nominations close for
Vice-president, Treasurer, External Affairs Officer and Ombudsman.
—. dick button photo
WOODEN CANNON fooled Vancouver for a week, as engineering students hefts phony shooting iron. It was a decoy
to lure the scent from engineering students who had the real
149-year-old nine o'clock gun. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7, 1969
;/&&■ j   %■     'j^JS*
THEUBYSSEY     Telling tales
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor. 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.    #
FEBRUARY  7,   1969
Scholar, teacher
not the same thing
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
I would like to comment further on the Harger controversy.
It may be that the department's side of the story is not
told. For the record, I would like to repeat what zoology department head W. S. Hoar1 told me when I went to see him before
Christmas. I expressed wholehearted support for the combination of Dr. Robin Harger and his philosophy of science course
and asked why such a wonderful teacher was being fired.
I might state here that Dr. Hoar was angry at my presumption and regarded my concern as uncalled-for meddling in matters that do not concern me.
Relevant quotes from Dr. Hoar:
"This department needs good teachers and it needs good
research. It's absolute tommyrot to say they don't go hand in
hand. They do, usually.
"Eight senior men in the department made the decision. It
was decided after discussion at great length on two occasions."
On being asked if student opinion would have effect on
reversing the decision: "No, it's been made after careful consideration."
"He'll be here for another year, and a half. Why don't you
just get on with your training? It's not your place to worry
about the future. You know nothing about the organization and
administration of a university.
"We take young men on a two-year probation period. Some
are in the status of postdoctoral fellows. And some do not get
renewed contracts. What other way is there to find out what
they are like?"
And finally, the germ of the problem:
JUST HIGH SCHOOL STUFF
"We may have to go to a position where we don't have
good scholarship, good research — we may have to give training
that's just high school stuff. But I hope not."
It is also worth pointing out that UBC has many good
ecologists. Dr. Dennis Chitty, now on sabbatical, has done plenty
of famous research and is a really superior teacher. Others in
the department have established solid reputations. So not much
money is left over for non-working ecologists.
Naturally Dr. Hoar feels that a man who has lost interest
in what he is doing and will not do much solid research plunges
the university into the danger of churning out pablum taught
by uninspired .hacks.
Unfortunately, in the words of several students and professors I have spoken to, the department has more than one
man who are good scholars but just terrible at teaching. Dr.
Hoar is not really insistent on the all-round man. He'll hire poor
teachers.
Also, what Robin Harger is no longer doing pales away to
insignificance compared to what he is doing. Fired with enthusiasm for research in the philosophy of science, he has given the
students of Zoology 4*00 an experience which in many cases is
the pinnacle of their eductional lives. Ask anyone in the course.
Compared to this opportunity for genuine learning, does the loss
of four papers on clam populations on wharf pilings matter
that much?
It's said that Dr. Harger has never been overly careful at
minding his tongue, and perhaps he did give the department
cause for distress. Dr. Hoar has good reasons for not wanting
him as an ecologist.
HIRE HIM AS PHILOSOPHER
But in view of the wave of student support, not so much
for Robin himself as for what he gave them, the department
should change their minds and hire him as a philosopher.
Since Dr. Chitty, who took the course last year, taught very
differently, I feel that the problem of Dr. Chitty's return is a
mere quibble. There is room for two courses, one in Dr. Chitty's
excellent approach (history of scientific theories) and one in Dr.
Harger's visionary and exhilarating one.
One more point, The science faculty feels it has no money
for1 such adventures. It does, however, find money for all sorts
of teaching assistants who need it for graduate school support,
but who are sometimes little or no good at teaching.
I refer especially to those whose grasp of English is very
poor. Perhaps they could try to find some other way of supporting graduate students, through government aid or what have
you, and spend the money saved on really worthwhile scientists
and .teachers like Robin Harger.
on your council
Elections for the first slate of student council
executive happen on Wednesday. Candidates
statements will appear Tuesday in The Ubysey.
As a helpful guide to these and other propaganda, The Ubyssey here reprints the statements
submitted last year by members of this year's
council executive.
Students are invited to compare the statements
with the councillors' performances this year as a
measure of how much faith to put in the statements
that appear Tuesday.
dent affairs,  and  concerned  enough to  listen
to the problems of all students on this campus.
Dave Zirnhelt,
president
I propose vigorous action by council on:
• effective participation in decisions affecting students, e.g. curriculum and housing
committees;
• leadership in academic reform;
• envigorating the B.C. Assembly of Students as a provincial lobby, e.g. against enrolment cuts and fee increases;
• initiating task forces to promote needs
of higher education throughout the province;
• the executive taking student government to the students by rallies on important
issues and undergrad general meetings;
• streamlining council procedure;
I have expressed support of all faculties
and encourage your support to unify students
behind student council.
Carey Linde,
vice-president
First of all, I want you to know I am not
associated with the present AMS executive and
I do not have nor do I want its support. Nor
have I been associated with any campus political group.
Instead I have involved myself this year
with local work in the faculty of law where I
originated and edited the law journal and organized a course evaluation survey.
I propose to bring needed change in practice and personality to the office of vice-president. I shall put culture and education back
on the list of priorities, and work hard for
greater student control in the bookstore, housing, traffic, food services and the library. If
politics is needed it shall be directed towards
Victoria, and not towards fellow students.
The issue is clear — we vote for a meaningful change or else we perpetuate the reign
of ineffectual good intentions.
Donn Aven,
treasurer
I believe I can successfully fulfill the
duties, as they are now stated, of AMS treasurer.
Further, I propose that a study of present
bureaucratic methods be undertaken, with a
view to eliminating some of the red tape that
presently entangles students who actively participate in student affairs.
This is not an idealistic "human government" approach, but rather one designed to
eliminate on a practical basis one of the major
complaints that students have about the AMS.
I am strongly in favor of decisive action to
be taken on the present housing survey, and
in conjunction with this idea, that The Ubyssey
be more fully utilized by the AMS as a communication medium. Too few students are
presently aware of the work presently being
done by the AMS, and I would certainly be in
favor of a more complete, co-ordinated information source.'
To summarize: my experience speaks for
me and I ask you as students to consider me
capable of rational decisions, interested in stu-
Isobet Semple,
secretary
I believe in responsible student action, the
type that brought the winter sport centre, the
new student union building, open senate, joint
faculty-student committees at the department
level.
I believe in the kind of student action that
launched the Back Mac campaign, the  Great *
Trek which established  the university on its
present site, and which has led to relaxed regulations regarding liquor.
I do not believe in strikes or sit-ins.
If you do, then feel free to vote for my
opponent.
Jill Cameron,
co-ordinator
Co-ordinators have been administrators for
too long. As a voting member of council, he
must make his political views known. I support: student involvement in decisions which
affect them; an emphasis on academic problems, a greater variety of campus events, a
personalized, unstructured style of government.
Specifically, as a co-ordinator my policies
■will be: future decisions concerning SUB based*"
on student opinion, learned by holding general
meetings, and talking with them personally;
impartial booking of facilities; publicity of
available facilities and events billboard.
I will use imagination and understanding
of our problems to make  SUB a place that   *
answers some of the needs of this campus.
Tobin Robbins,
external affairs
If you're hung-up or fed up with student
government we're  on  the same  wavelength.  -
As external affairs officers my areas of concentration will include: t
• widespread publicizing of Canadian
Union of Students activities and responsibilities. The CUS information monopoly will be
utilized not simply as wallpaper.
• effective   lobbying   channels   must   be"
established with the provincial government;
• efforts must be made to end bookstore
featherbedding.  A student co-op may be  initiated, and emphasis will be placed on the im- »
portance of SUB as a focal point for student
action.
If you agree with the preceding points,
then we're communicating. Once the lines of
communications   are   open,   changes   can   be,
made.   Demonstrate   your   desire   for   change.
Vote Robbins.
Ruth Dworkin,
internal affairs
Students have the right and the responsibility to participate in the decision-making process of the university.
I would like to  see  these  policies  imple-_
mented:
• students on departmental curriculum
committees,
• closer co-operation between the AMS
and student senators,
• a weekly column in The Ubyssey to inform students of the progress in academic affairs,
• the investigation of a Science I and
Education I program,
• a small-scale (at first) co-op bookstore
handling books for about 50 courses and selling them at cost,
• the honest presentation to the public
of the aims of university.
AMS representatives should make progress,
not mark time!
i'   *'. /      .*• vestry '%&'•• < **•*.. ^ i i -jf^fl^s^KSrfv/ - . '^v^v^ *• *■ Friday, February 7,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
The premium on
not speaking French
In his Boll Weevils column in the
Daily of October 13, 1967, John Fekete wondered aloud why the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Bicultur-
alism had not submitted its report
and suggested that the report had been
delayed because it might be "too hot
to handle."
When the report finally did come
out two months later, it turned out
to be a compendium of cliches, vacuous optimism and recommendations
that should have been implemented
100 years ago. Much closer to the
issue, however, was a survey taken
for the Commission by three economists, Andre Raynauld, Gerald
Marion and Richard Beland and submitted in August 1966. The survey
traced the relationship between ethnic
origin and social and economic position. It was never published by the
Commission. In fact, it was never
published at all until thts month,
when a summary of it appeared in Le
Magazine Maclean. The following is
a translation of that summary:
"The salaries of French Canadians - non agricultural,
male - are 80 per cent of those made by Canadians of
British origin, in Canada as a whole.
"The salaries of French Canadians in Quebec are 65
per cent of those of English Canadians in Quebec.
"Also, in the matter of occupations, French Canadians
are found at the bottom of the list, immediately above
Italians, both in Quebec and in the rest of the country.
"We think French Canadians perceive the differences
in income (and in standard of living) and in occupation
that distinguish them from Canadians of British origin.
"We think, equally, that such division of income along
ethnic lines exercises a profound influence on the prevalent thinking about the future of Canada".
In these terms, three economists put their finger on
the connections between the famous constitutional debate
and "bread and butter" issues.
Why are French Canadians poorer? Is it education?
Regional disparity? Discrimination? The answers will
have a profound influence on the political and social positions of the communities in question.
In Canada, the factor which carries the most weight
in explaining the unequal distribution of income, is regional disparity. People are poorer in Abitibi and Newfoundland than in Montreal and Toronto.
But this doesn't explain the differences in salary be
tween ethnic groups living side by side in the same economic region.
Above and beyond regional factors, ethnic characteristics remain very, very important. Canadians of British
origin have incomes 10 per cent higher than the average
in every province, except Quebec, where they earn 40
per cent more than the average.
In Quebec, if one arranges ethnic groups in descending order by salary, one gets the table you see on this
page, where it is found that French Canadians, Italians
and native Indians are the only groups which earn less
than the provincial average.
These statistics refer only to the labor force. If one
took account of demographic factors in each group, women, aged, children who don't work and calculate the per
capita revenue of each ethnic group, one finds the French
Canadians are even poorer.
The French Canadian population being younger, it
. makes up the majority of children and young workers; its
level of work is the lowest in Quebec.
Education is one of the most important factors in the
determination of salary. The various ethnic groups have
quite different levels of education. The French Canadians,
with an average of 7.08 years of study, come right ahead
of the Italians, with 6.05 years.
Jews lead with 10.05 years and the English have 9.43.
The economists point out that the English in Quebec are
better educated than the English in any other province
except British Columbia.
If the advantages of education are analysed, one concludes that "French Canadians derive the least from education." When a French Canadian passes from elementary through to university, he profits less, financially,
than Canadians from other groups.
Studying ethnic groups according to occupation, the
report concludes: "The respective status of English
Canadians and French Canadians is absolutely systematic in all provinces. If occupations are divided into ten
categories, one finds that the English Canadians are over-
represented in the first (and wealthiest) four categories
and under-represented in the four lowest (and poorest).
"French Canadians are the diametric opposite: under-
represented in the first four, over-represented in the
poorest categories."
Is the situation getting any better?
On the contrary. "Since 1941, while the English, Jewish and 'other' groups were progressing strongly on the
occupation scale, the Italian and French were dropping
just as dramatically.
In the case of Italian Canadians, the reason for this
disparity is unquestionably their recent immigration
(new arrivals generally have the least money) but in the
case of French Canadians, the drop cannot be explained
away."
Beyond that, on equal work, the salaries of French-
speaking people are again lower than those of the English,
and the gap increases with time, so that the French Canadians appear clearly handicapped in their ability to
advance in their careers.
In the last analysis, says the report, "it is not a matter of indifference whether one has an English name or
a French name in the matter of occupation."
In-depth calculations by the authors of the'study allow
them to conclude that if education and occupation count
for much, the "ethnic factor" still explains 49 per
cent of the difference in wages between English and
French Canadian in Montreal.
Thus, English managerial personnel earn $6,234 more
than English workers, whereas French Canadian managerial personnel earns $3,308 more than French Canadian
workers.
Passing on to the presumed advantage French Canadians are supposed to have - bilingualism - the report
discovers that "the salaries of bilingual French Canadians are clearly lower than those of bilingual English
Canadians.
Bilingual French Canadians earn an average of $4,-
350 while bilingual English Canadians earn an average
of $4,758. If one wants to earn higher salaries, then, it
is better to be English than to become bilingual."
One might have believed that bilingualism would be
profitable at least in Quebec. According to the economists, "the answer is overwhelmingly negative. Uni-
lingual English Canadians earn as much as bilingual
English Canadians while French Canadians who speak
only English (the assimilated) earn considerably more
than bilingual French Canadians. And bilingual French
Canadians earn considerably less than unilingual English.
Average incomes of
salaried males
in 14 ethnic
groups, Quebec, 1961
In dollars
Index
General average
$ 3469
100.
British
4940
142.4
Scandinavians
4939
142.4
Dutch
4891
140.9   .
Jewish
4851
139.8
Russians
4828
139.1
Germans
4254
122.6
Poles
3984
114.8
Asians
3734
107.6
Ukrainians
3733
107.6
Other Europeans
3547
102.4
Hungarians
3537
101.9
French Canadians
3185
91.8
Italians
2938
84.6
Native Indians
2112
60.8
From   census   calculations,   Dominion
Bureau of Statistics.
In total, ...unilingual English Canadians earn $5,502 while
bilingual persons earn $4,772. In short, it isn't the knowledge of two languages that is beneficial to the French
Canadian in Quebec, but rather the knowledge of one
language - English."
"In Quebec," the authors add, "as in the rest of the
country, it is better to be a unilingual English Canadian,
than a bilingual French Canadian.''
And they conclude the chapter: "English Canadians
have very little reason to become bilingual, even in
Quebec, while for French Canadians, bilingualism is a
prerequisite to income And even if bilingual, French
Canadians cannot hope to equal the salaries of unilingual
English."
—from the McGill Daily
Beach blues
. Editor, The Ubyssey, Six:
I wonder how many people
know that there is a lovely
two-lane blacktop wonder being built along University
Beach, all the way from Spanish Banks West to Wreck
Beach? In case you've never
been down there, indifferent
student, let me tell you something about it.
University Beach is a narrow strip of rocks and sand
that has survived the onslaught
of scenic drives and parking
lots along other Vancouver
beaches. A beautiful place for
*a quiet walk, a fine view of the
islands and mountains to the
north {do you look out of class-
_room windows, too), smelt
fishing, or a little fun on summer evenings. A last glimpse
of the B.C. coast as it used to
be around Vancouver.
ft
""  And now, in response to our
society's desire for taking the
LETTERS  TO THE  EDITOR
automobile anywhere and
everywhere, the Vancouver
Parks Board, UBC, and a federal agency have decided to
correct this oversij^ht in the
grand plan for abolishing legs.
What's that you say? You
weren't consulted? You don't
agree with making this world
a playground for automobiles?
Good!
Then consider also that the
beach is too narrow for both
cars and people. At high tide,
which is for most of the winter,
you'll have a new Stanley Park
Sea Wall down there, only
there will be cars instead of
people on the wall. Consider
the noise and fumes that will
be trapped by the tall cliffs.
Carbon monoxide and sulphur
dioxide mixed with sunlight
makes a delightful sun-tan on
the inside of your lungs. Consider that what bureaucracy
does to the beach is what it
does to your life.
So if you feel alienated, if
you are looking for a good
cause, if you are concerned
about influencing what happens to your world, then do
something to stop construction
of this mis-placed road!
How? Write to the people
concerned! Get on an open line
show! Make a sigh! Go lie in
front of a bulldozer. This is
your environment being ruined, and you haven't even had
a say in it!
NIELS F. VON MEYENFELDT
Cop capers
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I note with interest the heading on Page 4 of the January
24 issue "Police on Campus—
114 persons face criminal
charges because armed policemen intervened in an academic
dispute at Simon Fraser University in November." Accord
ing to the information from
the combined Ubyssey - Peak
edition of Wednesday, November 25, 1968 (Page 2), Inspector Gibbon of the RCMP said
that "the officers had not been
armed but declined comment
about any specific instructions
they received."
All of the information which
I recall from those unhappy
and tense days of November
indicate that the mounted
police were unarmed. Perhaps
if you have information to the
contrary, the record might be
set straight.
J. H. WALLIS
Assistant lo the Dean
Faculty of Education
(Ed. note: Reporters on the
scene said that while the police
actually making the arrests
were unarmed, others in the
area carried their regular side-
arms.)
Book Bumph
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Recently I was with one of
my profs in the bookstore. He
had a couple of books to buy
and as we got to the cashier
he produces a card showing
him to be a faculty member.
Upon seeing this the cashier
gave him a ten percent discount.
What kind of a deal is this
when our elite professors get a
discount from our so-called
"non-profit" bookstore and we,
the students, do not receive a
similar discount? Who is the
more affluent and who needs
the discount more? Is this not
another example of the bookstore taking advantage of students? Instead of protesting
loud and long about academic
beefs, why not protest a situation that hurts us in a much
more vital organ, our wallet.
DOUGLAS STARK
music 3 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7.  1969
MORE STUDENTS WEAKEN CONSERVATISM
By MARK WALDMAN
There are four student senators and 78 faculty
and alumni senators on the UBC senate. The students, by virtue of their small number do not play
a large part although they are effective in many
quarters.
More student representation is necessary for two
reasons: in order that students can fulfill their right
to fully participate in academic and administrative
decision making; and to provide senate with a
broader spectrum of student opinion.
Student senators participate in all the sub-committees of senate. As only one member of a committee the student senator does not have any
"power" over a decision; however, he does have the
opportunity to express the students' opinions and
thus temper the committee decisions in favor of the
students' interests.
There are gross differences between senate and
students on some educational and administrative
policies. The differences are a matter of values.
Senate is comprised, for the most part, of gentlemen
who have been through the system and who are
successful.
Students, on the other hand, are not "bound" by
"proven systems" and are more open to change.
Some students say that senate is too conservative
and that students must take matters into their own
hands for the betterment of the university. I agree
that in certain circumstances the senate has been
too conservative; however, those who opt for complete dissociation fail to appreciate a perspective of
what one is changing from while reaching for a goal
—* and changes can be affected even though senate
is obstinate.
A case in point is open meetings. Senate initially
decided against open meetings by an overwhelming
majority; yet after one year it reversed its decision.
Lobbying by the student senators and the AMS
council affected this change.
Students must have the opportunity to participate
on all levels of campus decision-making and although progress may seem slow, eventually students
will be on all committees in more than just token
numbers and have an open opportunity to structure
their educational environment.
In terms of academic policy-making, the situation
is not clear. The only absolute statement is: there
are as many different ways of educating students
as there are students on campus. This of course is
not practical from basic administrative and monetary points of view.
The lecture system is most efficient; however
there is a large but growing minority of people on
campus who feel that the self-structured seminar
method of teaching along the lines of Arts I is the
best method.
The conflict arises between students and senate
when this minority is frustrated in its attempts to
fulfill its aspirations. In terms of senate decisions,
the senate seems hesitant to initiate a large-scale
program of self-structured teaching, since the concept has not been proven wholly successful. Hopefully, Arts I will provide the necessary proof of the
concept.
For my part I am a member of the joint student-
senate committee dealing with the AMS brief, "Fair
Weather or Foul". The committee is discussing all
aspects of university life including student discipline, curriculum, student participation on campus,
and other matters raised in the brief. The committee
has made some fairly sweeping decisions and its recommendations will be coming to senate shortly. The
first recommendation — on student discipline —
will be coming to senate at its meeting in February.
In summary one could say that senate is conservative and that there is not sufficient student
representation. Hopefully with more students on
senate, the conservative posture of senate will be
weakened and it will become open for th necessary
rapid change.
Of senate^ committees and change
Student senators describe their effectiveness, inadeijuacies and frustration
'We're window-dressing
in a useless senate'
Resistance to reform
comes from faculty
By DON  MUNTON
Is having students on senate worthwhile? Is senate relevant to the re-
forms that students are seeking in the
university or to the means by which
they can be attained?
My short answer: No, not by itself.
Now let me explain why. There is a
general assumption among students
that the resistance to change in a university is centred in the administration, the "bureaucracy", or the board
of governors. This assumption is totally false.
FACULTY OPPOSE
The real opposition to reform can
be found in the totality known as the
faculty.
That such is the case should not be
startling — it certainly isn't to most
faculty members. Nevitt Sanford writing in The American College has said:
"There is no denying . . . hat when
there is a movement toward reform
in a college it is the collective faculty
who usually seem to be dragging their
feet."
Sanford  adds:
college and
university faculties, typically, have organized themselves in such a -way as
to make deliberate and concerted
change of any kind exceedingly difficult." One cannot deny that some individual faculty members have fought
long and hard for such measures as
Arts 1 and the Discipline and Discovery Report. They, however, are a
small minority.
The reasons why this is so and how
the resistance is mounted are too
lengthy to discuss he<re. The essential
point, however, is basic to my argument that students must not only look
to senate but to other bodies as well
for action.
COMMITTEES  CRUCIAL
That senate is the supreme academic governing body at UBC means
proposals come to it from the various
faculties, schools, and departments for
overall evaluation., Normal procedure
is for either a standing or special committee to review the matter and report
back to the senate as a whole with a
recommendaion for approval, amendment, or rejection.
To  Page  17:  DON'T
By STUART RUSH
It is difficult to decide whether to
be bitter or disillusioned with the student role in the senate. What are four
students capable of accomplishing in a
body of 82? What should they be accomplishing? Is their presence on the
senate of any use to the student body?
My impression, albeit strengthened
by only three months of first-hand experience, is that the student senators
are able to accomplish absolutely nothing and.consequently are of very little
use to the students. We cannot adequately protest student interests where
hey are being infringed upon. We cannot promote student demands and feelings when particular student issues
arise. Even on matters not directly related to the students, we are passed off
by inferences of unfamiliarity with
the subject matter and amateurism.
The reasons for this situation are
many. To begin with, there are too few
students on the senate to present a
strong and commanding voice on university issues. At the general meetings,
the deans and senior faculty effectively
drown out the student position (unless
"safe" points are made) with their
weighty and persistent arguments.
Their polished  articulation and confi-
'My voice can be effective'
By BILL FERGUSON
There is more work for students to do on senate than
can be handled by four student senators. The present
solution of having Alma Mater Society appointees on
senate committees I favor only as a temporary measure.
As soon as possible I hope to see the number of student
senators increased by 10 or 12.
My voice has been effective. At times when my views
have not found allies it is not because! I am a student but
because other factors have revealed better solutions.
The following will give you an idea of the work I am
involved with.
I am a member of the academic building needs committee. The five-year capital grant will not be enough to
meet the requirements of the university. The task of
deciding which new buildings have priority in regard to
urgent need and future growth falls on this committee.
Hopefully the recommendations that go forth after all the
briefs have been studied and committee agreement reached,
will be acted upon by the senate and the board of gov
ernors. If that will be the result a reasoned and justifiable
decision process will replace the mysterious method of
the past.
The admissions committee of which I am also a member has no great responsibility until the summer when
decisions on individual appeals, have to be made.
The third committee, a very active one, is not a senate
committee but one created by Dr. Ken Hare when he was
president. Our task is to examine all the information available on different proposals of university government. The
president's advisory committee on external and internal
aspects of university government, as its name suggests,
exists at the pleasure of the president. It may be unwanted
by the next preident but if this representative committee
(three students, one alumni (sic), two faculty association
members and some senators) can isolate areas of consensus
and put forward workable solutions, many internal conflicts may be alleviated.
At present there is a need for better exposure of all
views on the campus. In the future The Ubyssey should
find the time to interview all the student senators regularly.
dence very often turn the wave of
opinions against other sensible alternatives. Furthermore, it is always claimed that they have a better grasp of the
student viewpoint than the students
themselves do.
Neither do the senate committees
encourage a more decisive student participation. The student senators are
spread out over 12 committees (about
three each) with one student each. It is
the policy of the senate to divide the
students up as much as possible among
as many committees as possible. This
process tends to make the effective expression of the student position all the
more difficult. This situation may be
slightly alleviated, however, by a trend
in the senate to co-opt students onto
the committees, usually from the Alma
Mater Society, without granting full
voting and participating rights in the
general meeting.
STUDENT VIEWS  DEBUNKED
Secondly, even when the student
view could be forcefully presented, it
is politely listened to but seldom considered in the process of decision-
formulation. Great pains are taken to
assure that a sudent voice is available
to the senate, yet when it is expressed,
it is very often debunked as being unreasonable, impractical or unrepresentative. The student senators really
serve the deans and senior faculty instead of the students. They are used as
window-dressing for collective decisions purporting to contain the student
view.
Thirdly, in most decisions, the key
actors are the same people, namely
the administrative heads and a few
senior faculty members. The deans,
registrar, and the president play a decisive role in the issue formulation,
committee discussion and final resolution. It is almost impossible for the
students to break through this power
mechanism. Through various means,
i.e., deans as chairmen of most key
committees, and executive action to
obtain a consensus on every issue, this
group of individuals is able to control
and direct the will of the senate.
To Page 16: JUST PAGE
FRIDAY
Perverted veterans
and pardoned actors
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
Rod Langley's new play, The Veterans, hits the Arts Club Theatre
next Monday, in a privately financed production, directed by
George Plawski. Rod hails from Australia and, after spending some
time in eastern Canada and in Europe, he has now settled down
in UBC's Creative Writing Department.
He has seen admirable success. His first play, The Station was
performed in Montreal, and at UBC last year and he hopes to
see a French translation produced soon in Paris.
Langley sees himself as an instinctive writer. Working on inspiration (which usually hits him at night) he latches on to a scene
which he sees in his head, imbues it with certain characters,
and then sits back to let the play write itself. He said that for
him, writing is an obsession, and not always a pleasant one. And
when the piece is finished, he is at a loss to explain it in great
detail, or even to know exactly what he has written.
Langley's plays are also about obsession—the obsessions of little
people with the myths they have constructed around the little
cage-like worlds in which the playwright imprisons them. A
kind of perverted spirituality evolves as the characters unleash
psychological holocaust upon each other and extend the territorial imperative to the realm of dreams. George Plawski terms
it gut-level writing, a supra-philosophical exploitation of a micro-
cosmic human situation—and no questions are answered. One
can easily relate Rod's plays to the idiom of such current British
theatre figues as N. F. Simpson, Joe Orton and especially
Harold Pinter. The same kind of grotesque psychological pro-
- jection, which never quite becomes absurdism is at work here—
although Langley contends that Pinter's game therory idea does
not go far enough.
In The Station Langley "wanted to see what happened when
people get off trains and ask station attendants for directions."
The territory here is the train platform and the attendant's myth'
is cleanliness. In The Veterans we move to the ward of an army
hospital where a paralyzed officer and an orderly are in deadlock over their respective dream-plans for the room's third inhabitant, a human vegetable hidden from view and kept alive by
.machines. The myths here are dreams of greatness, past and
future, which of course, are both centered in, and in grotesque
Continued on pf 2wo
Poetry iit public
Semi-coherent
musings on the Muse
— Breasts by Robert Browniohn
Friday, February 7,  1969
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Ammunition tor your next
diatribe against generalisations
Ilt probably had something to do with
the Romantics, or perhaps the Victorians. The stress, I mean, on poetry in
private— the "slim volume" which you
read to yourself while curled up in a chair.
Poetry used to be public. Bards made a living
at it, proclaiming their skills in the courts of
ancient (and parsimonious) kings. People wrote
lyrics to be sung, not read; Shakespeare's plays
were spoken to the box-office crowd. But all
sorts of shifts have occurred, things aren't the
same. If I was McLuhan, I would blame it all
on the invention of printing.
And today, poetry in public is decidedly a
dodgy business. For one thing, people's ears
just aren't trained anymore. You read a couple
of lines of poetry aloud and they can't even
THE     UBYSSEY
tell the difference between an iambic pentameter and a dactylic hexameter. After half-a-
dozen lines they've lost the thread. Try a logical argument and they'll start taking notes.
Talk longer than ten minutes, and most of them
are fast asleep (even though their hands continue to write the notes.)
Shakespeare's audiences were accustomed to
listening to things. They got their news from
town criers; they listened to sermons two hours
long and loved it.Rhetoric was a live art with
an audience-full of knowledgeable critics. And
they spoke fast — to a modern ear, Shakespeare's actors would sound as if they were
gabbling their lines at an atrocious speed.
Television also has something to do with it.
I am old enough (grey hairs!) to remember
radio dramas, worlds of imagination built on
words alone. But I can't do it anymore: I listened recently to a CBC radio version of Con-
Continued on pf 5ive
pfage   1ne Veterans continued
contrast to, the reality of the ward. When an ex-army sergeant
with his own set of myths enters to present a third element, both
parties, of course, try to enlist him to their cause. Destroy the
myth and you destroy the man. A series of pseudo-alliances ensue,
but ultimately the characters destroy each other—and thereby
also their combined raison d'etre which is the room itself.
We have, therefore, a basic existential situation, in which the
people involved must make something of the geography in which
they find themselves . . . but they cannot.
j Langley and director Plawski have taken great pains to preserve
the realistic basis of the play. To be effective, this type of drama
must be thoroughly believable and its characters must be completely real. Many vignettes are based directly upon the playwright's own experiences and his concern for neurotic obsession
stems directly from his experiences some years ago at a fundamentalist Bible College in Vancouver. The props are authentic
loans from the Shaughnessy Veterans Hospital and even the
peach (image) is a direct import from Langley's homeland.
Plawski, whose M.A. Thesis Production of Joe Corton's Entertaining Mr. Sloane we saw here a few weeks ago, began working
with Langley last year when Plawski directed the campus production of The Station. Writer and director work extremely well
together, with one interpreting what the other senses. Plawski
will stress the basic humor in this tragicomedy: "I want the
audience to leave the theatre knowing that they have laughed
and enjoyed themselves . . . and to then scratch their heads."
The humor, he says, is not a series of gags. It is something that
grows out of the characters themselves. The characters do not
communicate directly, they implant seeds in one another, and
fu.it IVyc-J.™.     .-.,
the humor grows out of the seriousness with which they play
their resulting assumed roles.
The important set for this production is designed by Ellis Pryce-
Jones who also did the set for Sloan. The cast will consist of Ted
Stidder, Derick Ralston and John Gretton. The play runs from
February 10 to 15.
And more dept.: Jace Vander Veen's production of Arden's
Royal Pardon, which I previewed last week, premiered on Wednesday and proved to be hilarious, interesting and delightful.
Vander Veen took on a difficult job in this fantasy of much
action and subtle allegory, and, for non-professionals, the cast
pulled off the character roles and multi-level action very well.
In many ways, Arden's piece stands exactly between the two
concepts I spoke about above. Although the play itself is structured and intricately composed, the play-within-a-play reaches its
climax in complete improvisation as an ostensible non-actor and
a "real-life" police constable impress the king and influence
politics with their show.
This month's hilarity award goes to William (whom everyone
knew as David Peterson), for his portrayal of St. George and
Mordred. The best musical score award goes to Robbie King and
the Papa Bears, but it will probably not be available on an
LP recording.
One plug. The Metro Theatre will present the Dominion Drama
Festival Award Winning Play, I'll Remember You Love in My
Prayers by John Kelly, directed by Frank Curry, from February
14 to March 1.
Pf Music
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Coming up at the Vancouver Symphony concerts this weekend and two weeks from now is
The Return of Dietfried Bernel, possible successor to Meredith Davies two seasons from
now. In their programme booklet, the Symphony Society raves about Bernet, saying,
"After an electrifying performance last year
with the VSO, Bernet was given a standing
ovation." This doesn't seem to me that extra,
ordinary, except that his ovation-earning version of Beethoven's 7th had the fastest last
movement  on record.
Also, standing ovations at VSO1 concerts are
pretty commonplace events, with old ladies
springing up out of their wheelchairs at the
sound of orgasmic final chords of pieces as if
they were at some kind of a musical revival
meeting. As well, besides Bernet, standing
ovations were given last year to Pierino Gamba,
Gina Bachauer, Byron Janis, James Oliver
Buswell IV, and Vladimir Ashkenazy.
However, go and see Bernet anyway. He's
conducting a Viennese Night at the Symphony
with lots of Strauss waltzes, Richard Strauss'
Rosenkavalier Suite, songs and other goodies
on February 15 and, as mentioned, the subscription concerts, where, among other works,
will be featured Bruckner's hour-long Seventh
Symphony and that top-ten classical hit, Beethoven's Fifth. Two bits says Big Ludwig's
Number  Five   gets  a   standing  ovation.
r
Vancouver Province music critic Lawrence
Cluderay last week wrote disparagingly of the
performances of American composer Morton
Feldman's music last Friday by Mr. Feldman
and members of the UBC Music Faculty. Of
the piano music, he commented that "each
proved to be an essay in nothingness, an interminably uncertain quivering on the borders of
sound and silence" and that "As for Projection
I, cellist Wilson was called upon to produce some
most uncommon noises from his instrument,
but I couldn't perceive any relationship between those noises and the art of music."
Continuing, he said, "This piece — and also the
piano works — drew a few giggles from the
audience which otherwise seemed largely interested in being interested in something new.
Maybe Feldman is a real whizz. All I can say
is that . . . his stuff didn't do much more me."
I am convinced that all this musical-verbal
poop goes to show that Mr. Cluderay is somewhat clued out over the subject of modern
music. Perhaps his hang-up was the lack of
"melody" in the Feldman pieces. But then he
might consider what UBC composer Lloyd
Burritt said in a Ubyssey interview last Novem
ber: "... what is melody? Melody is what
we're told was a certain line in past forms, but
today melody takes on a new shape entirely,
and, it is a shape that is expanded from merely
a linear process into a completely sculptural
effect." Harry Adaskin of the music department
touched on this subject in his music appreciation class earlier this week, when he spoke
of the etherial quality of Feldman's music.
It seems to me somewhat incongruous that Mr.
Cluderay can give praise to the recent Sounds
of the Century concerts and pieces such as
Ginastera's Estudios Sinfonicos — "... it
is a work with a very solid core to it, notwithstanding all the external brilliance. It is, in.
fact, the sort of stuff which jumps out at the
listener and hits him in his emotional centres."
All of these I'm sure were pretty "unmusical"
as far as Mr. Cluderay's criteria go. His attack
then, on such recent contemporary works as
Burritt's Assassinations for Orchestra and
Electronic Tape and John Tavener's The Whale
— "I don't predict much of a life for this mammal after a temporary bask in the sun," — is
somewhat inconsistent.
What can be the reason for this confused
approach to musical criticism? Has The Province been getting countless phone calls from
symphonic old ladies threatening to withdraw
their subscriptions to the paper unless all locsi
ventures into contemporary music are panned ?
Or is the clued-out Mr. Cluderay just a musical
conservative at heart ? If the latter is the case,
I hope that when he retires, The Province gives
him a watch that chimes themes from Tchai-.
kovsky's Sixth Simphony every hour on the
hour.
ifnay b©_ iiiusiccile
pfage 2wo
THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, February 7,  1969 Tuss mania
Persky's primer for educational bliss
Persky's primer for educational bliss
Persky's primer for educational bliss
By STAN PERSKY
Joseph Tussman will speak publicly at UBC on Thursday,
February 13 in Hebb Theatre at noon . He will conduct an
evening seminar with the Teach-in Study Groups Thursday
at 8 p.m. in the Blue Room of the Arts I Building.
Experiment at Berkeley is one of the few "important" books
about education that actually is important. When it's published
this month (Oxford U. Press), it's going to stir up a long controversy. It has things to say people don't want to hear. Its
author, political philosopher Joseph Tussman isn't an armchair
theorist, but the head of the University of California's Experimental College at Berkeley. (My point is, for example, if a
person's "for free speech", that's nice, but we always find it
a little reassuring if he's also out in the world doing something
about civil liberties.)
Tussman is rare, then, in two ways: at a time when some people
use a rhetoric to mask their emptiness and others rave and
rant to cover up their confusion, Tussman has some ideas. And
while most people interested in education are talking, Tussman
is testing his theory by practice — he's educating.
Experimenting at Berkeley is an unusual book. A lot of current
books about education limp to the finish line with something
like, "at least we've clarified the problems so that now we can
work on them." And the books ends. Tussman attempts to
clearly answer the questions, "What is the function of the
University? What's the difference between a college and a
university? Why is that important ? What should we teach ?"
not only in theory, but also with a record of what happened
when he applied those answers to an actual teaching situation.
In an earlier book, Obligation and the Body Politic, Tussman
laid the groundwork for his present statement: "A body politic
which gives to each of its members a share in the governing
process rests its fate upon the quality of participation. It commits itself not only to universal education but to education of
a special character; not only to education for the private life
but to education for the public role. And the theory which must
serve as the foundation of that education is the theory of political obligation."
That is, in a democratic system, the theory of state can't be
separate from the theory of education. That theory of state —
a systematic and political answer to the question, "How are we
going to live together?"—provides the basis for answering the
question, "What are we going to teach ?"
Tussman says that during some period in the student's career
there ought to be an education that is essentially political-moral
in character. In Experiment at Berkeley, Tussman argues that
one of the major functions of the educational system (and
particularly, these days, higher education) is to initiate people
into membership in their society. We're born into our families,
our institutions, our cities, and in that sense, membership isn't
voluntary, but a feature of the human condition. The task is to
raise that notion of membership to consciousness. This education,
this initiation, avoids becoming indoctrination or brainwashing
because at its heart is the commitment to cultivate in its students a critical spirit.
The Experimental College, in itself, is fairly simple. The faculty,
having agreed in a constitutional way that their job has to do
with creating citizens (an old-fashioned word), devise a curriculum supportive of that understanding. Seeing that presently
the student's time is hopelessly fragmented by courses and advertisements for disciplines, the Experimental College breaks
through the course problem by a unified program that takes
four-fifths of the student's time for a period of two years, and
it breaks through the discipline or departmental question by
going non-disciplinary and setting itself to examine such themes
as Freedom and Authority.
Grades, overcrowded classes, exams — the issues which stir
up all the dust at present — are replaced by pass-fail, six teachers to a hundred or so students, and papers which are dealt
with in conference. Tussman dealt with that whole issue ten
years ago (in Obligation) in a characteristically terse way:
"We can turn 'learning' into competition for grades; but we
should not be surprised if the victims grow into competitors
without a love for learning.,"
While the university has a majors program for selecting a
vocation, and a graduate program for professionalism, the first
two years are little more than a supermarket, which would be
fine if the aim were to turn out consumers. This is where the
lower division program or college comes in. While "the university is the academic community organized for the pursuit of
knowledge," the college, Tussman writes, "is a different enter,
prise. It does not assault or extend the frontiers of knowledge.
It has a different mission. It cultivates human understanding.
Friday, February 7,   1969
The mind of the person, not the body of knowledge, is its central
concern. This, I am sure, is the heart of the matter . . . The
university for multiplicity and knowledge; the college for unity
and understanding."
Tussman's idea is simple and deep. How does his program relate
to the present "crisis"? Tussman writes, "It is so fundamental
a departure from the current educational pattern that most of
current educational controversy and agitation seems altogether
superficial and irrelevant. Arguments about how to improve
courses sound quite unreal and remote when you have simply
abolished "the course" altogether. We recognize that people are
still taking and giving courses. They have our sympathy, but
we cannot regard their quarrels, their politics, their participatory gestures, their ad hoc concessions and innovations as very
important. Why get excited about educational battles with insignificant stakes ? When all the dust has settled things will
look very much the same. Only some names will have been
changed to confuse the Innocent. The experimental Program
goes deeper and reduces, current battle cries to triviality."
Beneath the political-moral curriculum of the Experimental
College and its cooperative structure, is the recognition of a
fundamental political principle. One might almost call it a
discovery .
"The Teaching Power," Tussman points out, "is the crucial
missing-link in our general theory of government." He goes on,
"We are the inheritors ... of a constitutional tradition which
makes explicit mention of only the Legislative, Executive and
Judicial powers — as if exhaustive of the list of governmental
powers.''
We are left "all too often with an individualistic theory of
education and with an external theory of the state, seriously
impoverished by our failure to see the teacher as the paradigmatic public official . . . But all this is a transient error; the
public school is not a permanent anomaly. The theory of education will merge with the theory of the state and our understand-
Tussman smoking a pipe.
ing of the state will be deepened when we see it not only as
commanding and enforcing but as acting most fundamentally
through the school.
"The development of the concept of the Teaching Power as an
inherent constitutional power will, I believe, mark a significant
turning point in modern political and educational theory . . .
"As the Legislative Power is the authority to make laws, the
Teaching Power is the authority to cultivate or develop the
mind of the young. That authority is expressed, for example, in
compulsory education laws and in provision for schools and
colleges. It is vested, in complex ways, in the teaching institution. It is exercised by teachers whose claim to attention rests
ultimately on the right of the state to provide for its continuity
through tutelage."
I like that passage particularly because it gives some idea of
the depth of content in Experiment at Berkeley. Tussman, of
course, doesn't have answers for everything. He says little about
inter-personal relations, he's not concerned with making a radi.
cal critique of society (though his savage attack on "marketplace democracy" in Obligation might suffice); he's not explicit
about ownership (that private property may be inimical to
public interest, is perhaps implicit in the logic of his theory
of democratic political obligation). However, he does have
something relevant to say to every student, teacher and administrator about what a university should be.
THE     U BYSSEY
Why Wait,
RESPOND
FEB. 11  . 18
An Attitude Survey Student's Assembly
Sunday Matinee
2 p.m. Feb. 9th
starring in Verdi's
La
Traviata
TECHNICOLOB"
Vmitu
224-3730V
4375 W. 10th
SUNDAY
FEB.   T6  -  2  p.m.
HENRY V
GIVE TODAY
-YOUR
LAST CHANCE
•
The Red Cross
Needs
Your Blood
Do Your Part!
mmmmymmmmmmm®
UBC CLINIC
2nd FLOOR
SUB
9:30-4:30
GIVE TODAY
LAST DAY-TODAY
pfage 3hree «a,. ( \n can c.Vn can CA|i can CAN ca|i CAN can can can can
can
By LEA TOSCANELLI
"Monsieur wishes to be naughty?"
With an invitation like that, how can anyone miss
Mussoc's production of Cole Porter's  Can-Can this
year?
In its first big-name show, UBC's musical society
manages to pull it off with all the flair and sex it
deserves. Even the orchestra, usually noted for its
poor performances has greatly improved this year
under the excellent direction of Karl Kobylansky.
The lively story takes place in Paris in 1893, where
under the threat of strict censorship, a Montmartre
carbaret called the Bal du Paradis still provides the
illegal Can-Can. Pistache, the shrewd proprietress,
has managed to keep her establishment out of
trouble, but then meets up with a dedicated judge
named Aristide Forestier. At first it appears she
will be unable to bribe him, but when he falls in
love, Forestier realizes justice isn't necessarily always what's written in his books.
Pistache,   played   brilliantly   by   Gloria  Bondereff,
carries the whole show. It's hard to believe that not
only is it her first Mussoc production, but that she
never had any formal training. Hers is a very demanding role, calling for a wide vocal range and
forceful character, and with her large, beautiful
voice, she carries it off well. The way she sings I
Love Paris is enough to send shivers down your
spine.
If you can take your eyes off Gloria, notice Ken
Irwin as the dedicated "judgie". In his second leading role with Mussoc, he sings with the confidence
of an accomplished player.
But by far the most convincing actor is Peter Syml-
ski, who plays the part of an unsuccessful Bulgarian
sculptor named Boris. Actually, it's a good thing he
acts so well, for his words are very hard to understand, and if it weren't for his expressive actions,
the comedy of his lines would be lost.
But he isn't the only one with that malaise. That
is a fault that lies with the cast in general. One can't
blame  the  audience for  getting  a  little  frustrated
when much of the dialogue can't be heard. This is
probably due to several reasons, prominent among
which is the poor qaulity of the theatre. Realy, the
old auditorium has to go.
Boris has to watch his fellow depraved artists
if he doesn't want them to steal the show. The same
trio that hammed it up last year in Half a Sixpence
are back to make you laugh, led by a skinny unpublished poet.
Can-Can is obviously a dancing musical, and
Grace Macdonald has provided more dancers than
ever. Near the end of the first act is a long ballet
set in the Garden of Eden. This is a fabulously conceived scene telling the story of the Garden, complete with a well-portrayed snake. The theme also
provides excellent excuse for bright costuming.
The biggest problem there is the meagre lighting
which is the poor quality of the theatre. Really, the
is going on.
The   sets,   although   relatively   simple,    are   quite
Continued on pf 7even
By FRED CAWSEY
An exotic new trip for Vancouver play-goers begins Sunday
at the Riverqueen on Davie.
That's the start of a two-week Canadian Art Theatre presentation
of Jack Gelber's controversial play, The Connection. The play
is about heroin addicts and jazz music, and features about 30
minutes of live jazz in each of the two acts.
First performed in 1959 by the Living Theatre in New York,
Gelber's play was immediately bludgeoned by the daily press
drama critics. People began taking a second look, however, and
soon some very prominent magazine critics and other such ilk
began to find some very good things to say about it.
In 1960, Kenneth Tynan wrote of the play: ". . . Its theme is
akin to that of Waiting for Godot; and it tackles the same social
problem as Hatful of Rain. Starkley yet unsensationally, compassionately yet unsentimentally, Gelber's play deals with a subject that the theatre (or cinema, or television) hardly ever approaches except as a pretext for pathetic melodrama."
The addicts "see themselves neither as victims nor as heroes,
but merely as absentees from the daytime universe," wrote
Tynan.
The Connection offers a play-within-a-play in which a promoter
gathers together some real junkies to put them on display and
talk about the experience of being an addict. Like a lot of jazz,
the play-within-a-play is all improvisational (but scripted into
Gelber's play), and the whole thing seems to jump back and
forth from one reality to another. Some of the scenes are so
intense that the audience begins to wonder whether, indeed, the
actors on the stage are real heroin freaks.
Three prominent local jazz musicians are taking part in this
production. They are: Mike Taylor, on piano; Ernie King, on
trombone; and Tommy Henderson, on drums.
These three and the seven other actors in the play are directed
by John Stark, one of the founders of Canadian Art Theatre, a
local professional company which has also produced The Iceman
Cometh, Electra, and Pygmalion, all of which received wide
acclaim.
The Connection runs every night except the second Sunday, and
curtain time is 8:30 p.m. Admission is two bucks.
It marks the first time a production of this kind has been produced in the Riverqueen, which is primarily a jazz club, and,
according to Stark, the first time a play of this sort (combining
jazz and drama) has been produced in Vancouver.
pfage 4our
The Editor, Page Friday
Dear Sir:
We wish to reply directly to
the comments of Mr. 'Norman
Stanfield, Music Undergraduate Society president, in the
January 31, 1969 Ubyssey. All
the quoted statements are Mr.
Stanfield's.
Mr. Stanfield states that music
students "are so engrossed in
their technical training, (that)
they've lost its relationship to
themselves and people." In
seeming conradiction, he also
states that "this is one of the
best music departments in
Canada . . . because the training we get here is so good."
Mr. Stanfield neglects to add
that this is because there is
a very close rapport between
students and faculty, it is never
necessary to make an appointment to see a prof, and the
classes are small. Our youthful
profs are hardly "out of touch
with the younger generation"
— one of them conducts a stage
band. They sing or play alongside us in concerts, they oppose
us in sports at the yearly picnic, they dance with us at the
annual Gronk, and in what
other faculty would a prof invite the whole department to
his Christmas party?
Our profs are willing and capable to work along with
change, but successful change
occurs gradually, by not tearing down the old until something meaningful is discovered
for its place, and by not re-
THE     U BYSSEY
signing if "shakedowns" don't
happen overnight. As music
students, we have a free choice
of non-musical art subjects, and
we can easily take five courses
in general philosophy and/or
sociology, relating to music on
our own.
After three brief years on flute
performance, having "wasted
years taking Music 100, 200",
how can Mr. Stanfield judge
the worth of the existing profs?
Certainly the music program
is heavy — it requires much
time for practising, rehearsals,
composition, and other assignments — but it doesn't mean
that we sit in our "little cubbyholes without thinking." Before this new building, we had
classes all over the campus —
in the barn, huts, and the present Arts I building. We gave
our concerts in Brock Hall,
Buchanan, and the residences.
Now it is a delight to play our
recitals in a good hall.
Our department is purposely a
training school, where students
are prepared for teaching —
university, school, or privately
—or for playing professionally.
As well, we can take Theory
400, a course in which we may
study any subject relating to
music, with any prof. (For example: electronic music, music
theraphy, teaching methods,
any theoretical or historical aspect, or perhaps even "philosophy and sociology of music").
We feel that our department
adequately  accommodates the
students who wish to take up
music as a profession.
JOYCE BAKER, Music IV
ALMA COLK. Music IV
Miss Colk and Miss Baker,
Thank you for taking the time
and effort to reply to the comments I made in the interview.
I'm sure most music students
would agree that your letter
illustrates "the other side of
the coin."
I feel there is no contradiction
in my statements about training. I understand training to
mean a process by which a
person may acquire a particular skill, whereas education is
a process by which a person
may leam how to creatively
apply his skill to his particular
environments. (For example,
the "environment" of a music
educator would be the classroom or community.) I stand
by my statement that the music
faculty is probably one of the
best technical faculties in Canada, if not in North America.
This statement is not meant to
sound sarcastic, or derisive —
it's a fact which is the result
of a lot of careful and successful planning. But technical skill
is NOT enough. The conditions
of our society show this to be
a fact also.
As far as the music profs are
concerned, we must not confuse personality with teaching
abilities.   Every   one   of   our
Continued on pf 7even
Friday, February 7, 1969 Continued from pf lne
rad's Heart of Darkness, and it merely sounded
ludicrous. Television fills in all the gaps; it
substitutes a studio backcloth for the listener's
imagination. It destroys the aural response at
the same time as it brutalises the visual.
Recently there have been various attempts to
restate the public nature of poetry—something
to be performed, to be listened to, to be publicly proclaimed. For instance, the whole change
in the lyrics of popular music in the era of Bob
Dylan — the demand that you listen to
Desolation Row, a poem eleven minutes long
—and hence to Leonard Cohen or even (ahem)
Gordon Lightfoot.
But it is entirely a coincidence that on Judy
Collins' new LP Who Knows Where The Time
Goes? far and away the best track is the stunning modern setting of the traditional ballad
Pretty Polly?
The sight ot music
As Capulet remarks, Romeo andJuliet,
Act 4 Scene 2, line 29, "This is as't
should be."
2
Franco Zeffirelli's film Romeo and
Juliet (opening today at the Strand) is, in one
word, brilliant. It has the life, colour, energy,
imagination, and emotional power which the
» play itself possessed once, long ago, before
high-school English teachers got hold of it.
It is full-bloodedly and unashamedly romantic,
but never sentimental. Its lovers hurl the-m-
selves  at  each other with  the  vehemence of
- stars in collision — Zeffirelli's whole visual
treatment enacts precisely the mood of Shakespeare's imagery, the doomed and star-crossed
lovers, the impetuous haste, the desperate
brevity of the time  they have togther.
~ Usually, actors playing Romeo and Juliet look
as if they might indeed die upon the morrow —
but only of old age. The death that destroys
these two mixed-up kids in this film comes as
a shocking blasphemy on their youth.
The one thing, of course, that Zeffirelli loses,
or ignores, is the "music" of their verse: the
rhyhms of some of Shakespeare's loveliest
poetry spoken as poetry. But to get this par-
_ ticular grace across to a modern audience
would involve slowing the pace right down,
getting the characters to talk slowly, to e-nun-
ci-ate. The Elizabethans accepted verse at a
much faster rate — nor would they be put off
(as a modern audience would) by the artificiality of verse. For them, good verse and rhetoric
were arts to be enjoyed, not barriers to communication. But nowadays, you would be as
well to put the lines up on the screen and
bounce a little ball along the words.
But what Zeffirelli discards in the sound of
verse he compensates for in other -ways, in his
own imagery, in, as it were, the sight of music.
John McEnery (a brilliant Mercutio) may not
speak the Queen Mab speech as the recitation
piece it normally is, but Zeffirelli's images
proceed vividly from the close*-up shots of the
flickering torches to his final eerie isolation
in the moonlight. (And note, in passing, the
astonishing theatrical reversal of Mercutio's
■* death scene played before a jeering crowd who
see it only as another of his jokes.)
But most of all, Zeffirelli releases the mean-
-■ ings of the words. Romeo's final speech over
Juliet's body is more genuinely moving than
I ever supposed it could be; and his cry after
the death of Tybalt — "Oh I am Fortune's
fool!" — is screamed in hysterical anguish
which echoes round and round the emptying
square.
Romeo and Juliet is a brilliant film which will,
I hope, corrupt the morals of Vancouver's 14-
year-olds by encouraging such unorthodox passions as sex and poetry.
Posters will be prosecuted
3     Another way to get poetry back on the
streets,   where   it   belongs,   is   through
posters. In New York you can dial-a-
poem   as   well   as   dial-a-prayer.   That
would be fun to do here — or hire advertising billboards all over town and stick up poems
.   instead of cosmetics ads. Poetry is part of the
advironment. Live with it.
One of the nastiest things about poetry books
is that they spend most of their time shut. Stick
- a poster-poem up on your wall where you can
see it all the time. And everybody else sees it.
Friday, February 7,  1969
Put it in your window for the heroic Province
newsboys to read. Slick it in front of the John
for purposes of meditation.
Very Stone House has just released a series of
seven poster-poems by Seymour Mayne, Patrick Lane, Joe Rosenblatt, and Marya Fiamen-
go, all available in five different colours, and
illustrated with some striking drawings by (I
believe, though no credit is given) Chuch Carlsen. Of the poems, I like Marya Fiamengo's
best, but Seymour Mayne's wicked, obscene,
satyric, licentiously playful word games are
indubitably the most fun. They remind me a bit
of Edwin Morgan, whose latest book is entitled
Gnomes. "Gnomes" is exactly the right description for the words in this kind of poetry—
active, mischievous, and unpredictable, turning upside down and inside out the elements
of language.
This kind of "play-activity" was recognized
by Eugen Gomringer as an essential part of
the whole concrete poetry movement, though
I feel that the best parts of concrete poetry
(as exemplified, say, in Gomringer's own Book
of the Hours and Constellations, newly published by the Something Else Press, and a truly
beautiful book of poetry) attain levels of calm
beauty, contemplation, and formal perfection.
The whole range of concrete poetry, the most
exciting and unclassifiable of modern poetic
movements, will be on display at UBC's Fine
Arts Gallery in March, in an exhibition which
promises to be the most exciting of its kind
ever put on in Canada. I'll have more to write
about that when it opens — but meanwhile
everybody with unusually hideous wallpaper
should get one of Very Stone House's posters
to cover it up with.
Exotica and erotica
4 And then there's always poetry readings. You know — some guy gets up to
read poems and* after six or seven lines
you stop to scratch your ear, or he says
"deter" **(nd you suddenly remember the detergents you forgot to buy, and you lose track of
SEYMOUR MAYNE'S "the gigolo teaspoon"
the poem, wait for the next one to come round,
and do the same again. At the end you politely
applaud, but really, the effort of following an"
unfamiliar poem as it is read aloud is something that nothing in your education has prepared you for. Reading poetry is a difficult art,
but listening to it is far more difficult.
Jackson MacLow's reading on Tuesday, as part
of the Contemporary Arts Festival, was at
least unusual. But then, MacLow is an unusual
poet. He relies to a great extent on the operations of chance, and on simultaneous readings,
and on abstract sounds. The latter two are
often identical: half-a-dozen people reading at
once tend to cancel each other out, with only
the   occasional   word   or   phrase   making   it
Continued on pf 7even
THE        UBYSSEY
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION  PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393   W.   10th  Ave.
224-4144
u£? »49-50
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us . . . AND REALLY SAVE !
gji
A OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES
Complete from $9.95    Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
VANCOUVER
677 Granville        —        Opp. The Bay
681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale 987-2264
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Order of Elections
SLATE 1 — Nominations for President, Internal Affairs
Officer, Secretary and Co-ordinator closed yesterday.
Election  is Wednesday,  February  12.
SLATE II —■ Nominations opened Feb. 5; nominations
close at noon Feb. 13; election will be Wednesday, Feb.
19.
1. Vice President — who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least
two years.
2. Treasurer — who shall have successfully completed
his second year or its equivalent.
3. External Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
4. Ombudsman—who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Nomination and eligibility forms and election rules and
procedures can be obtained from the AMS offices in
SUB and are to be returned to the Secretary's Office,
Room 248, SUB. before 12 noon on days of closing of
nominations.
Grad Class General Meeting
Wednesday, February 12. 1969, 12:30 noon, Henry Angus
104. Agenda will include:
—selection of grad class gift or gifts
—selection of honorary positions
—Treasurer's Report
—Social Report
The Grad Class Council urges all grads to attend.
pfage 5ive DANCE
WICKED ORANCE
Place Vanier — Sat., 8
9-1
NOW ON CAMPUS
cole/porter's
CAN-CAN
the musical that
stormed Broadway
student performances
Wed., 8:30 p.m.
Thurs. noon
75c
old Aud.
7ke
SoCctaize
at iU 6e&t
0. B. ALLAN'S
Jraditiovial S^ollL
aire
from $250 to $1,000
%&.&amm
LIMITED
Granville at Pender Sine* 1904
Don't
Just Sit There
Do
Something
Part-time Advertising Salesmen
Are Wanted For The Ubyssey
This is an excellent opportunity to gain sales experience
and to earn worthwhile commissions for part-time work.
The Publications Office needs two second or third-year
business-minded students who! will work hard for 8-10 hours
a week during February and March and return to the job
next September.
If interested  apply to the
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
Room 241,  Student Union  Building
"
Rielly
Strange
Empire
By AL BIRNIE
Any one wishing to understand the stature of Louis
Riel as a fighter for human
rights and independence will
find ample documentation in
Strange Empire. Although
centering on Riel as the
most colorful figure in
the   Canadian   west   of   the
Strange Empire: The story
of Louis Riel, by Joseph
Kinsey Howard. Swan Publishing Co, Toronto. $1.25.
1800's, the book is actually
a well-documented history
and description of the life
and people of the prairies,
before the infant nation of
Canada expanded westward.
The late Joseph Kinsey
Howard tells the tale, which
dispels forever the myth that
Canadian history is uninteresting and colorless. He
writes not from the viewpoint of a comfortable academic historian, but from
that of a man born on the
prairies and who grew up
with the events and way of
life of the early pioneers
still vivid in the memories
and everyday stories of his
elders.
As a child, he played out
the story of Riel with his
friends, and Strange Empire
loses none of the zest and
imagination of a childhood
tale.
Louis Riel was the embodiment of the philosophy and
way of life of the Metis and
early white settlers. His
background was typical of
the majority of the non-
Indian inhabitants of the
prairies, and his rise, struggle, and eventual fall parallel's the changing fortunes of
his people.
Howard precedes and interrupts Riel's life story with detailed biographical sketches
of various secondary personalities concerned with the
developing country. He also
describes the two revolts of
1869 and 1885, and gives
colorful accounts of differ,
ent facets of life in the early
west such as buffalo hunts,
life in a whiskey post, and
the tragic degeneration and
extermination of the Indians.
Howard narrates how Riel
was propelled into the leadership of the provisional
government of Rupert's
Land by the Red River re
bellion of 1869 which was
established with the overwhelming support of both
the Metis and the -white
settlers.
The settlers feared that
the new Canadian confederation, wishing to expand its
territory by adding another
western province, would not
respect their culture and
laws of land ownership, and
were angry that their appeals to the Canadian and
British governments for
such assurances, and a share
of the money being paid to
the Hudson's Bay Company
for Rupert's Land, were ignored.
Riel, despite heavy pressure
from American agents in the
area wishing to add the territory to the U.S., preserved
loyalty to Britain and Canada, and negotiated with Sir
John A. Macdonald's government to bring Rupert's
Land into confederation on
the settler's terms. Macdonald replied with treachery
by dispatching an army to
quell the 'bloody rebellion',
(notable by the fact that
only one person was killed
during the whole nine-month
affair), and Riel was forced
into his long exile.
A vivid example of the racist foundation of the country,
the basis of Quebec's present
unrest, is shown by Macdonald's blatant appeals to the
antiJCatholic feelings of the
English population to gain
support for his military campaign against the Catholic
Metis, and his vow later to
hang Riel "though every dog
in Quebec bark in his favor."
Hunted over the length
and breadth of the American
west for 15 years by Canadian bounty-hunters, in 1884
he was called to what would
become Saskatchewan, to
head a rebel government of
whites, Metis, and Indians
who were disturbed for
much the same reasons as
the people of the Red River
were in 1869.
There, half-mad with the
mystic and religious fervor
of a people caught between
two cultures and histories,
Riel, his Metis, and the tattered remains of the independent Indian bands made
a final stand.
Other little-known heroes of
the rebellions are dealt with
at some length in the book:
the white settlers W. B.
O'Donoghue and Will Jackson; Metis military leader
Gabriel Dumont; and Indian
chiefs Poundmaker, Big
Bear, and Wandering Spirit,
representing the various
forces allied with Riel for
the common cause, freedom
and self-determination.
Strange Empire is the story
of an independent, agricultural people fighting against
the encroachment of an
emerging industrial state on
their way of life. It was a
fight doomed to failure, but
as a part of Canadian history, it is still rich and revealing, put into fast-flowing
easily-read words by a talented author.
It is a book about Canada
and its people, not Canada
as a colony and apologizing
for its defeatist outlook, but
Canada as a free and independent people struggling
against imperialist expansion to create a new and
better world based on the
best features of the old.
■m       ^^ypmmjmwr* or     y
3D a"$fe"* & tSbfts ■ "Montreal;
■*.'** LXfafsr Cigar MANufaoiurchs in ths*
i*.\ Tfcv -DOMtNIQM...
-Domini
The Royal Pardon
by John Arden
An M.A. Thesis Production — Director by Jace Vanderveen
FEBRUARY 5-8-8:30 p.m.
Reservations: Room 207 Frederic Wood Theatre
SOMERSET STUDIO - UBC
pfage 6ix
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7,  1969 Continued from pf 4our
profs are fine people who are
worthy of our respect. However, most, not all, of the profs
seem to be unaware of the dynamics of the new educational
processes. Our training is more
than adequate. It's our education that is suffering. Unfortunately, a lot of the older
music students are also committed to the axiom of "training for training's sake." (It is
Interesting to note that the
music prof who created the
stage band is leaving next
year.)
Today's pace in the world requires rapid change in order
to keep abreast of the times.
A slow, evolutionary change
only maintains a constant level
of  frustration   and   ignorance.
Within our lifetimes, we will
be faced with a new, massive
segment of society that will
have far more leisure time
than working time. And they
will want more than training,
they will want something to
fulfill their lives and make it
meaningful. The students you
teach in classrooms will prob
ably not work in the conventional sense of the word. Technology will be so advanced,
machines will be doing all the
work. What will you teach'
your students? Can you educate them as well as train
them?
NORMAN STANFIEL'D
President, M.U.S.
(Sic)   Dept.
The Editor, Page Friday,
Dear Sir:
Your issue of January 31 contains an article in which the
President of the Musical Undergraduate Society is quoted as
saying, "In Arts I you have
things like one group will do a
topic called 'The City' and an
other group will do a topic on
'Love'."
I wonder whether those in
charge of the Arts I program
are more pleased by such publicity or more embarrassed by
such syntax.
Yours truly yours,
GEOFFREY B. RIDDEHOUGH
Continued from, pf 4our
striking, especially when the curtains first open and
the audience gazes on a bright red courtroom.
Unfortunately, as the program shows, the scenes,
are many and varied, and the changes between them
are oftentimes lengthy.
A former lead in Mussoc's production of "How to
Succeed in Business", Hank Stinson provides good
competition for Ken. Unfortunately, he too suffers
from not being heard. As a wolf, though, he really
makes it.
But the main dancing attraction, of course, is the
final scene, where the audience is treated to a
demonstration of the Can-Can. It more than makes
up for not being able to hear some of the jokes.
Can-Can will be running tonight, tomorrow, and
next week. Tickets cost $1:50 on regular nights and
75 cents for student performances. That's a very
little price to be enticed.
Continued from pf 5ive
through to intelligibility. The result may be
interesting phonetically, but seldom semantic-
ally.
The point about chance-produced works is that
the chances are that they will be bad as often
as they are good, and boring as often as they
are fascinating. Unless you consider chance in
itself to be an aesthetic value (which seems at
best a rather limited idea) you must accept the
consequence that a good deal of what is produced by chance will be trash. Chance processes may produce the raw materials of art,
but seldom art itself.
Aha! you say — but what do you mean by art?
Aha! I reply — I mean the significant encounter of an infinite concept with a finite concept.
Work that one out if you can.)
Art, after all, implies selectivity on the part
of the artist. (Can there be art without an
arist? — that may be the central question.) The
chance artist applies this selectivity at an early
stage, when he chooses the elements upon
which chance will work: it is then up to the
audience to exercise its selectivity by saying
No when the results don't work.
Chance can also pander to the fatal idea that
anyone can produce a work of art just as well
as anyone else, which is garbage. "The premise
of art," John Osborne observed recently, "is
that somebody else can do something better
than you." You go to a poetry reading because the poet can do something better than
you can: if he can't, you've been cheated.
But whatever your opinion of chance as an
artistic principle, one thing which can never be
admitted as a virtue in and for itself, is length.
What finally killed MacLow's reading was the
inordinate length of the pieces. Particular
phonetic effects which were quite interesting
and even stimulating for five minutes began to
pall at the ten-minute mark, degenerated into
sheer boredom after fifteen, and drove you
screaming up the wall by twenty.
As I left the reading, I heard a chance acquaintance of mine, who obviously. liked MacLow's
reading less than I did, muttering, "Cacophonous crap. Cacophonous crap. Cacophonous
crap." She said it so often, it sounded like one
of his poems.
A more conventional poetry reading will take
place next Friday, February 14th, at noon in
Buchanan 100. This will be the Fourth Annual
St. Valentine's Day Reading of Erotic and
Amorous Verse. This merry romp through
some of the more entertaining, obscene, and
beautiful poetic tributes of poets to the pleasures of the bed will be performed by Jill Corner, Seymour Mayne, and myself. We hope to
keep your attention away from the detergents,
and instead to whet your other appetites. An
erotic time will be had by all.
Conclusions and confusions
5 1 started this article vaguely thinking
that there might be some connected-
argument running through it about the
public presentation of poetry. I'm not
sure that there is any such argument, just confused and contradictory ideas. But poetry itself more often -firings from ambiguity than
from certainty, which is one reason why writing or reading about poetry is so much less
fun than writing or reading poetry itself. As
one UBC prof is reputed to say," Let's keep
things vague, shall we?"
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
3000  GARMENTS
TO CHOOSE  FROM
• Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• Whit* * Colored Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe 688-2481
Friday, February 7,   1969
THE BIG MOTHER PRESENTS
TOMORROW'S EYES
dIus STEEL WOOL !£K?K "2^
THE     UBYSSEY
YWCA.OF CANADA
on campus Interviewing — Tuesday, February  18
at the University of British Columbia
• Positions to be available in mid year for General Group
program and Health and Physical Education Directors and
Assistants in YWCAs and YMCA-YWCAs throughout
Canada.
• Desired are young women graduating with specialization
in the Social Sciences, Recreation and Physical Education
. . . some significant volunteer or employed experience
desired.
• We are looking forward to interviews with students of
the University of British Columbia.
• Interviews will be at the Placement Office.
• Make appointments NOW!
(Miss) Cleta  Herman, for YWCA of Canada
571   Jarvis Street, Toronto  5, Ontario
SEMINAR ON
AID AND DEVELOPMENT
FEBRUARY 7 & 8
Fri.,   7-10   p.m.   (Speaker,   Chester   Ronning)
Sat.,   9-12   ci.m.   (Speaker,   Otto   Lang)
Sat., 1:30-4:30 p.m. (India Development Special)
BUCHANAN   Rm    104-106
question   periods
free  coffee  and   qoodies
SPONSORS:  CUSO and  India  Club
PLACE:
SPEAKERS:    CHESTER  RONNING
OTTO  LANG
g  Ambassa*
-v'ithout pctfolio
in Trade  &  Commerce
An East West Presentatoin
In Concert
THEODORE BIKEL
Folk Singer
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Wednesday, February 19th. — 8:30 p.m.
Tickets on Sale Now at
VANCOUVER   TICKET   CENTRE
630 Hamilton Street   —    683-3255
All  Eatons stores, Townhouse  Electronics in  Kerrisdale
FILMSOC PRESENTS
STATHIS GIALLELIS
in
ELIA KAZAN'S
FRIDAY & SATURDAY — FEBRUARY 7 & 8
FRIDAY: 12:30, 6:00, 9:00
SATURDAY: 8:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
pfage 7even tr 3 o
ON   S
pfage 8ight
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 7,   1969 Friday, February 7,  1969
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 15
SUMMER IN EUROPE
Have fun, earn a pittance
By NADER MIRHADY
There are organizations all over the world
to help you find a summer job at home or
abroad but watch out, you may discover you
spend more money than you earn.
One of these organizations, calling itself
the International Students' Information Service,
or ISIS, is set up to find European jobs for
North American students.
It does this and claims a 95 per cent satisfaction rate among the students.
At the same time the U.S. state department
has published a series of questions on the suitability and responsibility of ISIS and other
student work-travel agencies.
While ISIS answers several of these questions at least adequately other questions dealing with possible refunds after cancellations
are not and some are ignored.
Fort all of this ISIS appears to be one of
the better organizations in the business, as
they do say how much it will cost to get you
a job in Europe.
If you want to get a guaranteed job in
Europe for a summer or longer from ISIS it
will cost $180, payable well in advance, plus
your return transportation to Brussels and pos-.
sibly room and board the time you are there.
While in Brussels enjoying what ISIS calls
Manpower opening
summer job centre
Depair not, job seekers, the men with power
want to pull strings for you.
This year Canada Manpower is starting a
Student Placement Centre, separate from its
other operations, for the sole purpose of providing part-time, seasonal and summer jobs
for students.
It's open Monday, at 125 East 10th Avenue.
In previous "years, istudents have been
trooping off to Manpower only to be lost in
vast filing systems with thousands of other
unfortunates, and never heard of again.
This year, however, Manpower is centralizing its student operations, with a system that
includes province-wide telex. Job orders are
funnelled in from other Manpower centres,
including the Red Cross swimming posts, which
were handled by the Red Cross last year.
The jobs are then filled from the file cards
which are made about the students who apply
to Manpower. Summer jobs and university
studies are co-ordinated as much as possible.
It is early to say what the job scene will be
this year, but it looks better than it did at
this time last year.
Manpower stresses that this service does
not apply to students seeking careers. They
should see the Campus Placement Centre as
before.
Since most students have classes in the
daytime, Manpower Student Placement Centre
will be open some evenings. Hours are Monday
and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 8 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. If
you can make it in the daytime, do so, as you
will beat the rush and get better service.
the social and cultural advantages and the
benefits of cheap food and housing you may
also be working much longer hours than you
would in North America, for lower wages at
hard menial jobs.
Though, possibly exceptionally qualified in
some field of work and in the language of the
country you want to work in, you are a student,
young, and therefore considered unskilled. You
will be paid accordingly.
Europe is an interesting place to visit and
it's a good thing to meet people, but it would
be probably cheaper and certainly a more relaxing summer vacation if you went to Europe
and travelled on a Eurail pass instead of
working.
If you do want to work, ISIS offers nine
different job categories from factory and farm
work to camp counselling and hospital work.
They come in several different countries and
language groups.
ISIS also offers three days of orientation to
Europe and the job in Brussels, insurance, and
assistance  in  finding  housing.
You can get a complete plan including transportation to Europe for $475. Applications for
either the basic program or the one including
transportation must be in by Feb.  15.
Also available are books listing jobs in
Canada, the U.S. and abroad which appear to
be a good buy as they cost from $3 to $15.
Except that the jobs are for the most part at
the minimum wage in inconvenient locations
making it almost impossible to earn a living,
let alone save for next term fees.
The best way to get a job anywhere for a
good wage is still to know somebody somewhere or, failing that, apply everywhere possible. And hope.
IN DESPAIR over lack of copy to fill above
hole, editorial blorgs seek guidance from
heavenly muse.
in a JOCKular vein
By NICK ORCHARD
Athletics and I have been
at battle for most of my life.
Elementary school was the
first to try and put some shape
to my body as they dragged
me to P.E. in my floor length
shorts and sneakers with flapping soles.
My elbows and knees were
all set to make a star out of
me but my body wouldn't cooperate and I promptly failed
bean bag throwing 3.
Gymnastics in high school
taught' me that "skinning the
cat" was not what it sounded
like, and that standing on your
head for any length of time
will make you faint or throw
up.
It was with great unwillingness, then, that I paid my $5
athletic fee at the beginning
of this year, as I pictured myself being submitted to many
and various forms of torture.
Besides, I had to take the
money out of my cigarette
fund.
"The majority of the money
is spent on the hockey and
football teams," said the athletic director when I happened
to enquire where it all went.
This means that next year
if the athletic department gets
its wish to increase the fee to
$10 the Thunderbird football
team will be able to win twice
as many games. By my mathematics this still comes to zero.
At least they will be better
protected.
At present a survey is being
conducted to find out why more
people don't come out to
games.   "We  need   more   ath
letic supporters," said Fowl
Shott, originator of the survey.
I decided to conduct my own
survey to explore the possibilities of an expanded program. The results were staggering. Out of a hundred
people asked "What do you
feel about athletic events?" I
came up with 38 "What's athletics?" and one "What's an
event?" (I believe he -was an
engineer.)
Types of athletic events participated in ranged from "running to catch the bus," to
"chasing nurses around campus," and "walking fast past the
blood donor clinic."
The complete results of this
survey will be available in a
couple of months after I've recovered from a hockey puck in
the mouth.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
STATHIS GIALLELIS
in
ELIA KAZAN'S
FRIDAY & SATURDAY — FEBRUARY 7 & 8
FRIDAY: 12:30, 6:00, 9:00
SATURDAY: 8:00
SUB THEATRE
50c
ENGINEERING GRADUATES
Opportunities exist with Standard of British
Columbia for Engineering graduates (Mechanical or
Chemical) to train for Fuels and Lubricants Engineer
positions within our Marketing Department.
These positions offer the graduate a wide range
of opportunity to apply engineering principles and
technology to the promotion and sale of petroleum
products to industry.
Contact the Placement Office now for an interview appointment. On campus interviews will be
scheduled for February 11, 1969.
or write to:
Mr. D. W. Holme — Personnel Division
Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Limited
355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Telephone 681-4271, Local 290
Joining A European Charter?
WORLD WIDE TRAVEL offers
$210 for 20 DAYS
Frequent Departures From London
Call In tor Brochure
B.C.'s   LEADING TRAVEL  ORGANIZATION
5700 University Boulevard 224-4391
< Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7, 1969
>
THE BISTRO is pleased to have the MOCK
DUCK doing their thing all this weekend
on the stage. Man, just come on down
and groove. Bring the chick along too.
MOCK   DUCK   bistro  MOCK  DUCK  bistro.
Legend Reading Centre
NEW SPEED READING
CUSSES
Mon. Feb. 17, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
Tues. Feb. 18, 7 p.m. Bu. 3218
MEET INSTRUCTORS
WEEK OF FEB. 10
Mon.,  Wed.,   Fri.,   12:30-1:30
Bu. 3210
urn *5
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
THESES  -  PUBLICATIONS  -
ADVERTISING
Graphs,  Illustrations, Formulations,
Technical     Layouts,     Molecular
Designing   &   Building   Etc.
Phone    733-4506    (evenings)
Passport, Application and Identification
PHOTOGRAPHS
FULL PRINTS, $2.50
CALL
U.B.C. EXTENSION PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES
For Appointment—228-3228
DINNER
DANCE
Hotel Vancouver
7   p.m.   -   1   a.m.
TICKETS   $5.00   EACH  AT
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
BRING  A VALENTINE
£B\*
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
Vent-Air-lenses have no frames to slip or slide. They're virtually unbreakable while worn. They have four air vents for
better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMANDl-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you Will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today .. . you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
10%  DISCOUNT WITH A.M.S. CARDS
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. ubc
CALL SS«««J.    1030 W. Georgia Street 2/27/69
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
and the cost of invisible lenses.
Address-
BIFOCALS, TOO!
-Zone.
-state-
t^^^*^*i*^^^__^^^^mC|SJI«0OBH0IJT'-|.t.*. Mia CANADA      -
Non-Stop    Calypso
CARNIVAL DANCE
FRIDAY,    FEB.    21 ST
THREE BANDS
8:30    SUB    Ballroom
Tickets    I.H.   $2.00   per   person
Leotards, Tights
Dancing  Shoes
CARNIVAL MAKEUP
COSTUME FABRICS
Trim and Accessories
303 W Hastings St.
Vancouver 3, B.C.
684-9611
SKIERS
LOOK
FAMILIAR?
Get your Volkswagen
tuned-up now so you'll
really enjoy your ski trip.
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS - DINNER JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
10% UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
SUPPORT
THE
BLOOD
DRIVE
'Just tokenism'
From Page 6
For these reasons, the student role on the senate is reduced
to tokenism. Only significant structural and representation
changes will alter this state of affairs. There will only be an
effective student voice in university government when the
students are represented in the senate in sufficient numbers (50
per cent of the faculty) to allow them to participate equally and
freely in the deliberations of the senate. An increase in the
student voting power would definitely result in a greater freedom
and equality in these decisions.
A transformation of the structure of the senate must accompany the change in representation. For example, the senate should
be the supreme academic and financial decision-making body in
the university. It should be reduced in total number to 40 and
eliminate from its ranks non-academic people. It should meet
more frequently and perform only policy-making functions.
These changes, among others, would improve the effectiveness
of the body and serve to make the student role more meaningful.
My impressions of the senate are based on the first premise
that students should play a role in decisions affecting their lives.
If the students accept this as a desirable goal then hopefully my
criticism of the senate may be a jumping-off point for some
form of student action to alter the student role in university
government.
SCIENCE COURSE
, From Page 3
"It would be good in third or fourth year," he said, "but
you can't understand the philosophy of science without understanding the methodology.
"A student comes out of high school with no real knowledge of what science is all about."
Buckwold said the idea of the integrated program would be
to introduce students to both the techniques and philosophy of
science, as well as subjects of non-scientific content.
"It would also show the relationship between the various
branches of science and eliminate much of the duplication which
now exists in first year courses," Buckwold said.;
He said the committee is working on a proposal- for a curriculum which will be submitted to the faculty1 for study.
"We are trying to find out what kind of program students
want and are asking for ideas from everyone who is interested."
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities it may be necessary to
restrict the number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry.
oopoooeooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooeooeoooooooe
"Speakers" Committee
Present
Andree Martin
Striking Professor From San Francisco
State College
TOPIC:
THE  STRIKE
TODAY 12:30
BUCHANAN TOO
rr
FREE
FREE
oeooooooeoooeeooooeooeeooeeeeooeooooooooceoooooee Friday, February 7,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 17
'Don't ignore if
From Page 6
Because this committee stage is often crucial, and because
there are only four student senators (and thus each one has to
sit on at least three committees) we should not only be working
for more student members, on a body whose structure we have
seriously examined (something we have not yet done), but we
should also be involving more students in this stage of the
decision-making process in research, liaison and advisory roles.
One example should suffice here. At a recent senate meeting an extensive written submission was presented by the commerce faculty regarding a proposed new bachelor of accounting
degree. When I subsequently asked the president of the commerce
undergraduate society what his group's views were on their
faculty's proposal, it turned out that he had not even been told
about it!
INVOLVEMENT IN DEPARTMENTS
Yet this case is not unique. It is, on the contrary, the norm.
And it also suggests my next point. Students, all students,
if they want to gain reforms in their own educational environment and process, must involve themselves in the academic decision-making withing their own department, schols, and faculties.
These are the sources of the measures to which the senate
says yea or (sometime) nay. More importantly, these are the
levels where the resistance to reform on the part of faculty member can be met head on.
Nevertheless, the senate should not be ignored. Firstly, it
has a vital role to play in the reconciliation of opposing aims
within the university.
COMMUNAL RESOLUTION
Another example is perhaps pertinent. The faculty of agriculture recently proposed elimination of the English 100 requirement for its first year program. Now, my personal feelings are
that while English 100 may not be very successfully accomplishing what it was intended to, the last trend I think we should be
starting in the present overly technological age is one of putting
a blessing upon illiterate agriculturalists.
The senate should be the place where the entire university
community can discuss and ultimately resolve issues that are
important to all its members. The question above is one of these.
FACULTY CONTROLS MAJORITY
There is a second reason why senate should not be ignored.
To put the matter much too briefly, senate has been extremely
reluctant to exercise the powers that it has been legally given.
It could be much more active as an initiator of reform and as
a source of ideas.
Why is this the case? Certainly not the least of the reasons
is the faculty, the main resistance to change, is in control of a
vast  majority   on   the   senate.
As I said at the beginning of this article, senate, by itself
is not all that relevant to the process of reform. It can help,
and could do much more, but what is required is the extensive
involvement of students at all other levels of the decision-making
process.
Remus due!
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
"Due, due, remus due," cried
the participants in this island
capital's annual boat race, 22
miles around the island. Forty-
one blorgs finished the grueling race, 13 died of apoplexia
and nine exhausted themselves
by flogging their artichoke-
leaved paddles to a salty pulp.
FLOWERS
THIS WEEK
20%
OFF CORSAGES FOR
ENGINEERS
736-7344
2197 West Broadway
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,  DARK   SUITS,  TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
State Farm's
low insurance
rates for
careful drivers.
See me.
8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER 14, B.C.
261-4255
STATE FARM
MUTUAL
AUTOMOBILE  INSURANCE COMPANY
DIAN HEAD OFFIC
TORONTO, ONT.
GOOD STUDENT? 25% DISCOUNT
read   me
The FRIAR
4423 West 10th
In   the    heart   of   "university
heights"
"FLAMENCO   GUITARIST
ALMOST   EVERY   MON.   NIGHT
Spanish   Daily  El torro
"excellent,    a   truly   superb
musician  with   a   real   feeling
for the  guitar"
*PIZZA   SMORGASBORD
EVERY  WEDNESDAY
6-9 P.M.
All   you  can   eat
Men   12 Women  $1.50
*NOW   OPEN   AT   8  A.M.
MON.  JHRU  FRI.
The   Best   Breakfasts   in   Town
Juice   - 2  Grade  A   Large  Farm
Fresh   Eggs    -    2    Hotcakes    -
Hashbrowns   -   Toast  &   Jam   -
Coffee
$1.05
"DINNER  SPECIALS
EVERY NITE
FRI   SAT.   &   SUN.
French   Onion    Soup    -    Prime
Roast   Beef   -   Potatoes   -
Vegetables   -   Cole   Slaw   ■ '
Onion   Ring   -   Garnish   -
Ice   Cream    -   Beverage   $1.95
*WE  DELIVER
Special   every   Thurs.
in   Feb.   on   order  over  $3.00
Any Single (small) One Topping
Pizza $1
Any   double  (med.)   One
Topping  Pizza $2
224—0833
Open 8  a.m.  -  2 a.m.
Mon.   Thru   Thurs.
8  a.m.   -. 3   a.m.   Fri.
10 a.m.  -  3 a.m.  Sat.
10 a.m.  -  2 a.m. Sun
GROOVE
TONIGHT
SUB Ballroom
9:00 - 1:00
GUYS $1.50        DOLLS $1.00
WIGGY
SYMPHONY
PAINTED
SHIP
JEWESSES MUSICALES
Present
-MONTSERRAT ALAVEDRA, SOPRANO
TUES., PEB.  11, 12:30 -  SUB AUDITORIUM
-VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS
MARCH  26,  1(2:30 -  SUB  r   '.LROOM
-VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CONCERT
APRIL 13, 2:30 p.m. — Queen  Elizabeth Theatre
TICKETS ON SALE AT AMS OFFICE
Combined ticket sales — $1.00
Tickets at door tor SUB Concerts 50c
Sponsored by Performing Arts
Itlillfir* FINAL WEEK
*miU«| 9      ANNUAL
CLEAR-OUT   SALE
SELECTED
DIAMONDS 40% OFF!
Includes — Engagement — Solitaires — 3-5-7 Stone Clusters — Dinner and
Gent's Rings. All insured FREE (or one year.
WATCHES 40% OH!
Selection from ALL manufacturers—DONT HISS THIS ONCE-A-YEAR
OPPORTUNITY
JEWELRY , -, 50% OFF!
All Jewelry on Sale — Shop early!
CHINA and GIFTS 40% OFF!
Dresden — Giftware *■— Dinnerwaro — Irish porcelain mugs, cups
and saucers, mugs, etc.
TIMEX Watches models 20% Off
Personal   Shopping  Only  — All   Sales  Final
Easy Terms Available — Open Friday 9-9
655   Granville  St.,  Vancouver
683-6651
47 W. Hastings St., Vancouver
682-3801
622 Columbia St., New West.
526-3771
Mm
XJU3L
CENTERS.
FREE LICENSE
PLATES
JUST BUY 4 TIRES FOR
THE PRICE OF 3
And We Will Give You Your
1969 LICENSE PLATES FREE
See Your U.B.C.
ASSOCIATED TIRE CENTRE
3601 W. 4th Ave. - 732-7241
Or Our Other Eight Locations
6791   Kingsway, Bnby.
524-2255
275 Kingsway, Van.
874-4543
3765 Canada Way, Bnby.
433-1423
712 Marin Drive, N. Van.
985-8265
4811  Main St., Van.
874-8131
607 Victoria, New West.
524-2264
13654-104th Ave., Surrey
588-1266
B05 West'st Hwy., Richmond
278-5171
OTHER SPECIALS
WHEEL ALIGNMENT   5.55
SHOCKS 7.99
BALANCING   95c
Plus Weights
FLATS REPAIRED 50c Page 18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7, 1969
S&&
<*¥
14
DINNER
DANCE
Hotel Vancouver
7   p.m.   -   1   a.m.
TICKETS   $5.00   EACH   AT
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
BRING  A  VALENTINE
£B\»<
WHY WAIT...
RESPOND
FEBRUARY 11-18
An Attitude Survey — Students' Assembly
SFU - UBC
BASKETBALL
THIS SATURDAY - FEB. 8
PACIFIC COLISEUM
RESERVED SEATS - $2.00
NOW ON SALE AT MEMORIAL GYM
TO U.B.C. STUDENTS FOR $1.00
UNTIL SATURDAY NOON
Student Rush Seats
$1.00 — at Coliseum - $1.00
Blocks of tickets may be ordered by
Clubs, Fraternities, Undergraduate Societies
Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are enjoying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
545 SEYMOUR ST.
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates.
'lit*"
M«  ..*
fc**-*?.:.'   i*.
•*;.•»-•
•' '> '.
•*.   -.*.-■*•*••• ■.."•*•.**'    4ft.* ,!•***
*
■v
"    \  '*>$
• .-'i***,    ."'*,   * ■
■*
.&&dimMb&4M&&ik-''M& »iw' i
BIRDS TO WATCH
Saturday night the UBC Thunderbird Basketball team plays against the Simon Fraser Clansmen, at the Pacific Coliseum.
Both the Jayvees and the Birds will be playing against their opposites, from the hill and in
what, it is hoped, will turn into the intra-university rivalry talked about in the downtown press.
This year it seems to be a toss up as to who will win the total point series, with the Birds the
slight favorites due to their early season victory in  the  Totem  Tournament.
Bob Molinski is a starting' forward, due to the fact that he
is the best defensive player they have. He is no scoring slouch,
however, as his 9.8 point per game average is the middle on the
team.
Last year he made the WCIAA first string all star team as
a starting guard, but this year's addition of Thorsen has allowed
him to move up front where he is all that much more valuable.
Coach Mullins has assigned him to the odious task of checking Brian McKenzie, the Clans most dangerous forward.
From his past record this year, "the Duke" should have no
trouble.
Player award in the B.C. High
School Tournament two years
ago.
All is not peaches and cream
however, as he has the third
lowest -foul shouting record on
the team — hitting for a mere
54 percent of his charity shots.
His defensive play, which
has never been too strong according to coach Mullins, is
coming along well.
MOLINSKI
Ron Thorsen is the spark
plug that can turn the Birds
into a very hot team. His
shooting ability is superlative,
but more important, so is his
scoring ability. He is averaging 14.3 points a game, high
man on the Thunderbird squad
this year.
His most important past record  was  the   Most  Valuable
THORSEN
His first season of college ball has been a real success. Neil
Williscroft leads the team in rebounds, which is normal for a
center, but he is also the second high scorer of the team this
year, which is very helpful.
After playing both Senior amateur ball and being chosen
to play for Canada's national team in 1965, Williscroft has
developed into one of the best big men the Birds have ever had.
He is noted for his good lateral movement, which especially
shows in his cantastic rebounding ability.
Although his shots break all basketball rules, by being abnormally flat, they go in often enough to let him make first
string.
Bob Barazzuol graduated
from Notre Dame High School
and came to UBC many years
ago.
It was a good thing for the
Thunderbird basketball team,
as Bob now holds the all time
scoring championship at 20.2
points per game, an average he
set in 1965-66, and in the same
season  he   scored   another  all
BARAZZUOL
One of the starting backcourt men will be Phil Langley.
Phil graduated from West Vancouver Senior High and is known
to his opponents for his accurate outside shooting and his play
making abilities.
He has had two years' of varsity experience and was a
starting guard last year. He won his big block for his consistent
performances which were capped by a a place on the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association second all-star
team.
Phil will probably be Clansmen's super-guard, Bill Robinson, and it will turn out to be a real battle as this is his speciality.
W1LUSCROFT
time high of 44 points in one
game.
This year he is a team co-
captain and the Birds, when
the going gets bad, still look
to him for assistance. He has
earned two varsity letters playing for the team.
His natural ability and
hustle will make him tough
for the Clan to handle.
LANGLEY Friday, February 7,  1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
Weekend Action Box
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
DATE
SPORT                       OPPONENT
PLACE
TIME
Feb. 8-10
Feb. 8
Feb. 7
Feb. Gymnastics
Basketball                 Simon Fraser
Volleyball                  University of Washington
Swimming                 University of Washington
Gymnastics               University of Alberta
Coliseum
Seattle
Seattle
Edmonton
6&8 p.m
7:00 p.m.
Ski meet
The Intramural ski meet will
be held on Sunday, February
9 on the Unicorn run on Mt.
Seymour. The Varsity Outdoor
Club is hosting the meet.
There have been about 75
entries from twelve campus
groups.
The race will toe a giant slalom and is scheduled to start
at 11:00 a.m.
Basketball classic
Thunderbirds vs Clan
By TONY  GALLAGHER
The UBC Thunderbirds and the Simon Fraser Clansmen
meet for the second time this year on Saturday night, and if the
pre-game indications are correct, the sparks should really fly
at the Pacific Coliseum.
UBC's head coach Peter Mullins expects a win as his
chargers are finally completely healthy with the return of guards
Phil Langley and Ron Thorsen, both of whom have been out
for 5 weeks with injuries. Said Mullins on Thursday, "We are
t hoping to run against them and we'll probably go with our
usual man-to-man defense."
The Clansmen are expected to play their usual ball control
offense and a zone defense which often develops into a full court
zone press.
Their line-up will include sharp-shooting guard Bill Robinson, rebounding star Dave Murphy and freshman centre Mike
Charles who is one of coach John Kotnekoff's recruits from
San Francisco.
The game should also produce some great personal duels
which will include Phil Langley checking the classy Robinson
-and Bob Molinski trying to put Brian McKenzie in an air tight
bag.
The clash on Saturday should be an epic struggle completely
unlike the first match which the Birds won 103-78.
This time around, the game will be played on a neutral
court andj many strange things have happened since that affair
which was played back in November.
Since that meeting SFU has come alive by beating such
teams as UPS and Western Washington and have stretched
their record to 12 wins and 8 losses.
They have received great outside shooting performances
from Robinson and great rebounding from Murphy, as well as
consistent play from Mike Charles, John Drew, and Larry
Shlouster.
For the Birds it has been a story which makes many UBC
supporters break down and cry.
After Ron Thorsen got a thrombosis in his left subclavic
vein, Bob Barazzuol and Derek Sankey had severe cases of the
flu, and Phil Langley pulled some groin muscles. Peter Mullins
came up with a large headache.
But all that is over and it all boils down to a two game
total point series, with the second game at the Coliseum on
Monday night. There is, however, one important factor which
nobody seems to be taking into account.
That is the Birds have more experience, and it is this experience which will mean the difference, "I think the Birds by
ten on  Saturday."
Ice Birds optimistic
Bob Hindmarch hockey
" Birds take to the road again
this weekend when they travel
to Calgary for a pair of Conference games against the University of Calgary "Dinosaurs."
UBC will attempt to get back
EX-OLYMPIAN Shirra Ken-
worthy and her partner,
Pam Wyles are in Edmonton
this weekend along with
the rest of the Womens' Figure Skating team.
on the winning track after
dropping their last two games
against league-leading Edmonton. The Birds are presently in
third place in the league standing and will definitely have
to win both of these games if
they hope to move into second
place, currently held by Calgary.
The Birds will be without
the services of hard-hitting
Jack Moores and rugged Tom
Koretchuk, both of whom have
been sidelined for the rest of
the season due to injuries.
Roy Sakaki and Joe Petretta
have been called up from the
Junior Varsity Braves to bring
the club back to full strength.
Practices this week have
been very strenuous as Coach
Hindmarch put his charges
through the paces under the
watchful eyes of a member of
the Japanese National Team,
who is here at UBC to learn
more about the Canadian approach to hockey.
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th
224-0828
DUTHIE  BOOKS
Now 4 Locations to Serve You
OUR  U.B.C  BRANCH
4560 W.l Oth AVE.   -   224-7012
and   at
919 ROBSON   -
1032 W.HASTINGS
670 SEYMOUR ST.
684-4496
688-7434
-   685-3627
DUTHIE BOOKS
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE
TUESDAY
12:45-2:45
WEDNESDAY
2:00-3:30
7:30-9:30
FRIDAY
3:00-5:00
*7:30-9:30
♦Except Feb. 14
SATURDAY
*3:00-5:00
7:30-9:30
•Except Feb. 15
SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
7:30-9:30
Tues. Wed.
Aft. Aft.
STUDENTS  15c 25c
ADULTS       15c 25c
Fri., sat.
& Sun.
Aft.
35c
60c
SKATE RENTAL OR
Ev.„. SHARPENING — 35c
50c For information phone
75c    224-3205 -~- 228-3197
U.B.C.  THUNDERBIRDS
ICE  HOCKEY  FEBRUARY  HOME  GAMES
(Fri., 8 p.m.) (Sat., 2 p.m.)
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA - FEBRUARY 14    FEBRUARY 15
—    FREE  ADMISSION   FOR  UBC  STUDENTS    —	
FREE  — The  Arena  8.  Curling   Rinks  are  available  FREE  through  the  P.I
programme 4 hours per day, Monday-Friday  inclusive   (U.B.C. students).
SENSITIVITY
—sound off
— A sensitivity Training
lab for young adults
Ages 18-21
-Alma YMCA
(10th & Alma)
-Wed., Feb. 19th (eve.)
Sat. Feb. 22 (all day)
Wed. Feb. 26 (eve.)
— Trainers:
Larry Goble—
(Central Y)
Dave Roxburgh—
(Alma Y)
— Limit — 10 students
— Cost  $10.00  per  3
sessions
-Call 224-3282 **&*<.
Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 7, 1969
aqua soc
-   Sign up now for mid term dive, Feb.
20-21 aboard Argo II.
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Thunderbird   presentation  party,  Saturday in  SUB  party room,  9-1  p.m.
Tickets, SI  per person.
COSA  AND  CHINESE   VARSITY
Sports night, war memorial gym. Saturday, 8 p.m.
PERFORMING ARTS COMMITTEE
Meeting Monday noon.
MARDI  6RAS
Mardi Gras meeting, noon today, SUB
room 230.
GERMAN CLUB
Skating party at Thunderbird arena,
Sunday 7:30 p.m. Film on removal
of Asswan Egyptian art treasures,
Tuesday noon. IH.
DEBATING  UNION
"Freedom is necessary for progress",
Bu. 217, noon today.     **
LEGAL  ADVISORY   COMMITTEE
Free legal advice, noon Monday. Wed*
nes and Friday, AMS Veep's office.
UBC
General meeting, noon today, Bu. 223.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting Monday noon, SUB 430.
EL   CIRCULO
Nick Collins talks on Lorca, I.H. 402,
noon today.
KARATE  CLUB
Saturday meeting 8:30 p.m., women's
gym.
COMM.  US
Council   meeting,   tonight   8:30   p.m.,
SUB  L, M.
'tween
classes
ANTHROPOLOGY   AND   SOCIOLOGY
UNION
Workshop: ethics in social science,
Tuesday noon in Brock, old Ubyssey
offices.
AUS
Look for Arts Week, five days on the
idea of the university. Feb.  10-14.
CHINESE   VARSITY
General  meeting, Feb.  11, noon, Bu.
205.
SOU
Marcuse. father of the new left? Debate between Brett Smiley and Bob
McKee. Tonight  7:30 club's lounge.
Good News!
PROPOSED CHARTER FLIGHT
TO JAPAN FOR EXPO 70.
ONLY $350.00 RETURN
How many are interested?
CALL
Jock Copland at the Society office,
879-4671
Scholarship and Bursary Awards
Cheques now available at Cashiers Wicket in the Accounting
Office.
Students are requested to call at the Accounting Office to
collect their cheques, or to endorse their cheques to apply
against unpaid fees.
CASH
PRIZE
$1000.°°
GO-GO-THON
GIANT MARATHON
ENDURANCE CONTEST
GO-GO-GO!
PENTHOUSE GOUHtOOM _ ,.„ „„*,„„
Any Girl 18 Years of Age or over may enter
this  exciting and novel  contest.
Full particulars may be obtained by applying In person.
to   Contest   Director   at   1019  Seymour   St.   on   or   before
Feb.  14th, 1969 between 7-10 p.m.
«£fr
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glasses
» for that smart look in glasses ...
i look to
|   Plesciiption Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
UBC   LIBERALS
Film:    Trudeau,    Six   Months    Later,
noori today,; Btt. -M6. . members free,
others, 25 cents.
CIRCLE   K
General   meeting   noon   today,   SUB
211.
SDU
Forum  on  Herbert Marcuse  and the
New   Left,   7:30   p.m.   tonight,   SUB
clubs lounge.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS!
Meeting   noon   today,   upper   lounge.
IH. Party at 6161 Cambie Street, Saturday, 8:30 p.m.
CIASP
Meeting today noon, SUB 105-B, para
hablar espanol.
FUS
Last day to give blood today:
ACE
Panel of children discusses school in
Ed 1006 noon Monday. Non-members,
10 cents.
SPEAKERS   COMMITTEE.
Andree     Martin,    striking    professor
from   San   Francisco   State   College,
speaks on the strike, noon today, Bu.
100.
SUS
Last  day  for Crystal  Ball tickets on
sale math annex 1119 or AMS offices.
$11 a couple.
PROGRESSIVE  CONSERVATIVES
General meeting Monday noon in SUB
council  chambers.
ASIA  SOCIETY
Chinese  Drama,  a  talk  by  professor
Ch'en 8:30 p.m.  tonight, SUB council
chambers. BYOB.
TFVS
Annual  general  meat tonight  at the
Austin on constitutional revisions. Remember  proof  of eligibility.
EdUS
Education-jock    week    festivities    all
next week: Monday, leg auction, Ed.
100   noon.   Tuesday   noon,   dance   in
Ed. lounge and in SUB ballroom, gymnastics   display.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
Meet  and  exchange  idea  with  Christian Science Organization at St. Marks,
Sunday, Feb. 9, 8 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:   Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ATTENTION ED.-P.E. STUDENTS:
Tickets for formal Feb. 14 on sale
in  Ed.   Building.   $4.50  couple.
SCIENCE "CRYSTAL BALL" DIN-
ner, dance and boat cruise. Sat.,
Feb. 8. 9 p.m. - 2 a.m. Dress: semi-
formal. Tickets A.M.S. or Math
Annex 1119. $11.00 per couple. Advance Sales Only.
CAN-CAN IS THE ONLY DANCE.
Wed., 8:30 p.m. Thursday noon,
Old Aud.  75c.
THE   CRYSTAL   HORIZON  IN CON-
' cert  in  Education  lounge  for  dance
Tues.,  Feb.   11,   12:30.
DANCE TO THE WICKED ORANGE
Sat.,   Feb.   8  at  Place   Vanier,   9-1.
C.V.C.-N.V.C. PRESENTS CARL
Graves and The Soul Unlimited on
Friday, Feb. 14 in the SUB Cat.,
8:30-12:30.
TONIGHT IN SUB BALLROOM
groove to Wiggy Symphony and
Painted Ship, 9:00-1:00. Guys $1.50.
Dolls   $1.00.   Performing  Arts.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE PRE-
sents the International Ball, Vancouver Hotel, Feb. 14. Dinner and
Dance, $5 a person. Tickets at I.H.
DANCE TO SOUND OF SPECTRES
at Pt. Grey's "Bayshore 69", Feb.
15,  Tickets: $4.00.  BU 232 noon.
Valentine Greetings
12-A
BE ORIGINAL — SEND VALENTINE
Greetings to your friends with a
Classified ad in the Feb. 14 issue.
Make arrangements in the Publications office, 241 SUB. Deadline 11
a.m.   Feb.   13.
Lost   &   Found
13
LOST: OR POSSIBLY MISTAKENLY
picked up at Mardi Gras Bazaar,
transistor tape recorder. Any infor-
mation please  phone  731-7586.
LOST ON TUES.: A SILVER CHARM
bracelet. Sent, value. Reward. 261-
5306.	
LOST A SILVER WRAP-AROUND
ring with a green stone last Wednesday.  Call  732-6325.
FOUND: ONE OVERCOAT AT
Mardi Gras — Fri. nite. Owner
claim by identifying. Phone Brian
731-8625.
FOUND: GIRL'S CAMEL DUFFLE
coat at Mardi Gras Bazaar. You
have  mine.   Phone   Margot   266-2705.
LOST: TURQUOISE ENAMEL PEN-
dant between Educ. and Village.
Sentimental value. Also pearl ring
in Rduc. parking lot. Please call
228-2141,   local   154,   daytime.
Rides  &  Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30's. ALSO
ride needed from UBC approx. 9:30,
3 or 4 nights per week. Larry,
253-0042,   First  and  Commercial.
Special  Notices
15
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
FREE WIG OR HAIRPIECE FOR
having a Wig Party. Trish 266-7923
evenings.
10% Discount
to UBC Students 4 Staff
Top Stylist from Toronto
Colonial Lady Beauty Salon
3743  W.   10th
Phone  224-7844
LEGEND READING CENTRE —
Speed reading experts — new
classes. Feb. 17 & 18 — Phone Mike
Kvenich,   254-4557   (eves.)	
MALE MODELS FOR HAIRSTYLING
course. Phone Mr. Skeates at 874-
7473 after  6:30 p.m.	
ROOM TO SPARE? CHILDREN'S
Aid Society needs short-term accommodation in Vancouver for
transient-teenagers, mainly boys,
arriving in the city without adequate plans. For further information, please call Homefinder, C.A.S.,
Mon.-Fri., 9-5, 733-8111 or evenings,
weekends  683-2474.
BUY A SIDE OF THIGHS FOR
lunch at Leg Auction, Educ. 100,
Mon.,   Feb.  10,  12:30.
Special Notices (Cont.)
15   Work Wanted
CHINESE VARSITY CELEBRATES
"Year of the Rooster": February
14th, SUB. Carl Graves — Soul Unlimited. 16th—Year End "Progressive Dinner". 17th—New Year Day
Coke Party.	
"FOR THE BENEFIT OF MR. KITE"
a Variety Show, Educ. 100, 12:30,
Thurs.   Feb.  13.   10c.
DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM FEB.
7, 7-10 p.m. and Sat., 9:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m.  Guest  speakers.  India special.
MANUSCRIPT EDITING — FORMER
Toronto Globe & Mail education
writer available for stylistic and organizational advice on articles,
theses, book-length manuscripts, etc.
Contact  Box  34,   AMS,   SUB.
LARGE AMERICAN CAR WITH
dark paint job parked in Fred
Wood lot Wednesday evening receiving scrape or dent on driver's
door.   Call  Jane  733-5684.
Wanted Misc.
18
STAMP      COLLECTION      WANTED.
Phone  263-6485  after  7  p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE — 1962 Corvair. Good
shape. New clutch. 224-9017, Room
412. New paint. Winter tires.
$500.00.	
■67 CAMARO, 3-SPEED STICK, 327
h.p. V-8. 17,000 miles, radio, tach.
$2,600.  Ph.  434-8223 eves.	
AUSTIN WESTMINSTER O.D. MUST
sell.  Best  offer  to  $900.00.  732-5642.
POWER!     470     H.P.     FORD.     MUST
sell. Best offer to $1,200.00. 732-5642.
Autos  Wanted
22
Automobile—Paris
23
Miscellaneous
33
STUDENTS, GET PROFESSIONAL
help with your income tax form.
$4.50 per T-l short.  Phone 228-9407.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
WANTED: WILLING COUPLES TO
join Roman-type orgy; alias "The
Crystal Ball". Bread wine and song.
Tickets A.M.S. or Math Annex
1119. Dress: Semi - formal. Boat
Cruise,   Sat.,   Feb.   8.
ST. VALENTINE'S MASSACRE: A
car rally starting at SUB loop, 12:30.
Feb.   12.
DANCE TO THE WICKED ORANGE
Sat.,  Feb.  8 at Placet Vanier,  9-1.
B. I. A. F.  (R. A.)
FEBRUARY   10  IS   JOYCE   DAY!
TURN ON TONIGHT, WIGGY SYM-
phony and Painted Ship. 9:00-1:00*.
Ballroom.   Guys  $1.50.   Dolls  $1.00.
HEAR SPANISH SOPRANO MONT-
serrat Alavedra in SUB Auditorium,
Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 12:30. Admission
50c.
VENUS OF LOVE, BACCHUS OF
Wine, together at "BAYSHORE 69",
Feb. 15. Ticket: $4.00. Bu. 232, noon.
Sewing & Alterations
38
SEWING, ALTERATIONS AND
mending. New dressmaking — all
expertly  done.   Phone   224-7141.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable  Rates —  TR  4-9253
ESSAYS AND SEMINAR PAPERS
expertly typed, 25c per page, 5c
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.
I.B.M. SELECTRIC TYPIST. Experienced all types university work.
987-0062.
ESSAY     TYPING.     REASONABLE
rates.   Phone  683-2859.
ESSAYS    TYPED.   25    CENTS    PER
page.   Call June  at  261-4122.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
LIFEGUARDS, CITY OF KAMLOOPS
Dept. of Parks and Recreation, 112
Lorne Street. Applications due bv
March  1,   1969.
54
INSTRUCTION
Music
Special Classes
Tutoring
J52
J53
64
SCIENCE    AND    MATHEMATICS     ■*
first  and   second   year.   By  Science
and   Engineering   graduates.   Phone
731-3491   or   732-8058.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRDCALLS
75c
Publications
Office
241—SUB
BOOKS OF INTEREST FOR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"M o n t h 1 y Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Vanguard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville. 	
MUST SELL! BUNK BEDS, BEDRM.
suite, kitch. suite. Phone Dave,
876-2019.
S A N U I 1000A PROFESSIONAL
tuner amplifier. 100W R.M.S. turntable, speakers. $750.00 value. Must
sell.  One   month   old.   Best  offer   to
$500.  732-5642.
GRESVIG      SKIS,      200CM      POLES,
bindings.   $30.  266-4971.
MUST SELL — SACRIFICE! SACRI-
fice! Vox professional guitar, cost
$315 new, $140 takes. Has triple
toggle tone control, triple pick-up
and St. George amplifier, cost $135
new, $85 takes or both for $200. A
steal! Man's 10-speed English racing bike $92, new, let go for $50 —
4 month old only. Electrolux $25.
Ladies' golf clubs & bag $20. Plus
others.  Call 596-1123.
FUN FUR! COATS AND JACKETS.
Blue and silver fox, lynx-cat, kid
and pony skin. New and used. $25.00
to  $65.00.  224-4597.
RENTALS &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
IN PRIVATE HOUSE, ARBUTUS &
West 14th, for single man. Ref. rea.
$40  mo.   Call  738-5824   eveninga.
ROOM-ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M)
Parking, T.V., kit. priv. 224-9662
2259  Wesbrook.	
ACCOMMODATION FOR MATURE
student. Private bath and entrance. No cooking. Phone 263-9546
after 6 p.m.      	
PRIVATE ROOM FOR UNIV. STU-
dent. Use of kitchen for breakfast
and lunch. $50 mo. 3680 W. 13th.
Call CA 8-8000.  	
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Vicinity 6th & Cambie. Own room.
Furnished transport, most mornings.
Phone   Kris 872-2315. 	
REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
available for two students. Close
UBC.   Call 224-4294.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS—
$85 a month, at Delta Upsilon Fraternity House; good food, short
walk to classes, quiet hours, phone
228-9389   or   224-9841.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS. ENFORCED
quiet hours. Good food and congenial
atmosphere. All available by calling
Jim at 224-9986 or stopping in at
2280   Wesbrook   Cres.
Furn.   Houses   &   Apts.
83
MADE GRAD OR OLDER STUDENT
share with same West-End Hi-Rise
soundproof Apt. from March. $63.50.
Phone  685-3187.
MALE OVER 21 TO SHARE WITH
4 others. Warm, beautiful, 5-bed-
room house, W.W., etc. No restrictions. All found except food. $75.
228-8040.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128498/manifest

Comment

Related Items