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The Ubyssey Feb 16, 2012

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Array WHAT
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^O 21 Page 2102.16.2012
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
1QTHU
PHYSICS»
The Intelligence Stairway & Planetary
Optimization: 7:30-8:30pm @ Buchanan A101
Jann Tallinn, the co-creator of Skype and Kazaa. discusses the physics
behind the possibility of computers and techology going above human
ability. Could computers alter natural selection? Check out this lecture
on guantum phenomena hosted by the Pacific Institute of Theoretical
Physics.
|7 FRI
DANCE»
Cycling Dance Party: 4:30pm
@ The Bike Kitchen
Are you hip. or have you ever
considered the hipster lifestyle?
Join the UBC Bike Kitchen in a
sunset bike ride along the beach
while getting your groove on
with a cycling DJ.
13 SAT
9
THEATRE»
19SUN
film:
PSA Film Festival: 3-6pm @
Global Lounge (Marine Drive)
Interested in foreign affairs? The
Pakistan Students' Association
is hosting a movie night at the
Global Lounge. The selection for
the night is the Bollywood comedy Mere Brother Ki.
The Vagina Monologues: 7pm
@ Frederic Wood Theatre
Have you ever seen the award-
winning production? If not. there
is no better time to catch the final
showing at Freddy Wood. Based
on V-Day founder Eve Ensler's
200+ conversations with women
regarding strength and sexuality
Tickets may be purchased online
or from the Theatre at UBC box
office for $15.
20MON
DESIGN»
Earthquakes and Architecture
Discussion: 8-9pm @ St John's
College
Seismic experts predict a major earthguake will hit BC and
Igor Gavric from the Faculty
of Forestry is discussing how
multi-storey timber buildings can
prepare.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
rebuary16,2012, Volume XCIII, Issue XL
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteditor@ubysseyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writer
Will Johnson   1
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca    *
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Accounts
Sifat Hasan
a ceo u nts@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@u bysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joel@ubysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@ubyssey.ca      I.Eflfll.
STAFF
Andrew Hood. Bi yee Warnes,
Catherine Guai i, uraviu i_iop
Jon Chiangjosh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria.
Peter Wojnar, Tanner Bokor
Dominic Lai, Mark-Andre
Gessaroli, Natalya Kautz, Ka
Jacobson, RJ Reid,Colin Chia.
Ming Wong, CJ Pentland,
Laura Rodgers
CONTACT
Business Office Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 we :   : -- - ■ iludeyour
phone number, student number anc
signature (notfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or dassified advertisinc
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the pr'^e paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>1
Matt Piva:
a reluctant
Canadian hero
Catherine Lai
Contributor
After returning home from his
summer courses last year, Matt
Piva sat down and wrote an essay,
mostly for fun.
The essay used Batman
and Superman to explain why
Canadians don't have many
national heroes, arguing that
the definition of a hero doesn't
necessarily have to be that ofthe
maverick fighting evil.
That essay eventually won
Piva, a second-year Science
student, the Governor General's
History Award, an honour
awarded for excellence in teaching Canadian history.
"I don't necessarily condone
hero culture," says Piva. His
version of heroism is more of an
everyday version.
"It makes me very happy when
you see somebody get up on the
bus to let an elderly person sit
down. In some ways, that makes
me more happy than seeing a
war hero come home after killing
Osama bin Laden."
In fact, Piva holds the opinion
that not having a defined national
mythology, or the jingoism ofthe
United States, is probably a good
thing for Canadians.
"I think it's good as Canadians
that we acknowledge the good
things that our ancestors have
done without idealizing them...
We are very much in tune
with the fact that Sir John A.
MacDonald was intoxicated a lot
ofthe time, and that becomes a
JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
Matt Piva finds the small moments of heroism in everyday life.
part of our history as well, so I
think the all-inclusive nature of
our history rather than focusing
on the best of people is actually healthy. If we don't hold our
heroes to be perfect, we can have
more of them."
Piva is a part ofthe accessibility working group at UBC Access
and Diversity, and a big believer
in diversity and multiculturalism.
"As soon as you [put people on
a pedestal], it ends up being a lot
of white guys...Instead of idolizing a few, we should celebrate
many."
His ideas of heroism come from
interaction with art, specifically
comic books.
"I feel as though comic books
celebrate a lot ofthe right things,
but they also celebrate a lot of
the wrongthings. The best pop
culture should make you feel
as though the author is talking
specifically to you. In order to appeal to every person, you have to
make your ideas fairly concrete,
and there has to be action. And I
think we lump that into heroism a
lot ofthe time."
When thinking about his future career path, Piva takes it for
granted that he should want to do
something that benefits others.
He says that it is a tough decision
between becoming a doctor or a
hardcore artist.
With what seems to be characteristic modesty, Piva admits,
"I'm probably goingto end up
playing it safe and going the general medical route. It's the most
direct and concrete way, and you
could say it's selfish because you
get to see how you help people
firsthand, and that's a wonderful
thing." 13
Public Consultation
Gage South & Environs Public Open House - March 1
During the Land Use Plan amendment process, students asked UBC to revisit the future
land use for the Gage South area, which consequently became an 'Area Under Review'.
On March 1, UBC will hold a public open house to present the preferred layout for the Gage South area,
based on public feedback and further technical analysis. This area will be home to a new aquatic centre,
a transit diesel bus facility, and an open air recreational space like Maclnnes Field. Consultation will also
include further discussion on the possibility of non-market housing for faculty, staff and students in the area.
Thursday, March 1, 2012 4:00pm - 6:30pm
lerosa Centre, 2071 West Mall
Place:
West Mall
f
Lower Mall     /
Meeting
Location
)L_
r
During the open house, the public will have an
opportunity to learn more, offer feedback and ask
the planningteam questions.
Online consultation will run from February 27 to March 7.
For more information or to participate online, please visit:
www.planning.ubc.ca/gagesouth
For more information, contact: gabrielle.armstrong@ubc.ca
°1 -f-^lfe^frfr^ST Xlfe*A*f^iL7}l-ol $lwM4.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
UtHf*,-fe^#.SHn£ • mim&mrHfc ° fifKA^MW
campus + community planning News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
02.16.2012 | 3
LOBBYING »
" Where's the Funding" campaign sends Valentine cards to province
R J Reid
StaffWriter
The AMS is trying a different
approach to lobbyingthe provincial government—they're sending
Valentine's Day cards.
The Where's The Funding coalition (WTF) launched its first
campaign on Tuesday, sending
thousands of cards to the provincial
government in order to lobby for
changes within provincial post-secondary funding. The coalition joins
students from universities across
BC in the ambition to eliminate the
student loan interest rate, increase
capital grants funding for post-secondary education and re-establish
needs-based grants for students.
Katherine Tyson, VP External for
the AMS and the coordinator ofthe
UBC end ofthe campaign, said they
ad thousands prepared, "boxes upon
boxes with stories on them."
The campaign took a humourous approach to lobbying. One of
the cards reads, "Let's not dragthis
out...I want to break up with interest
rates on student loans."
Tyson, along with current AMS
President Jeremy McElroy, incoming President Matt Parson and incoming VP External Kyle Warwick,
delivered the cards on February 14
to the provincial legislature with
representatives from other schools.
There they attended meetings with
members ofthe provincial government in addition to holding a press
conference on the coalition and its
objectives.
"So far, reception with the province has been very good on both
sides," said Tyson. "Both the BC
Liberals and the NDP seem to be
very supportive and a lot of what
we're asking for are things that we
have a lot of facts and data to back it
up and we'll go in there with that."
The WTF Valentine's Day campaign is the second major student-
driven funding campaign to occur
this month, although the only one
focusing purely on the provincial
government. On February 2, the
Canadian Federation of Students
(CFS) held their National Day of
Action, which the AMS did not take
part in as a non-CFS member.
Zach Crispin, chairperson ofthe
CFS in BC, was heartened by the
provincial-level activism. "I think
that the message ofthe WTF campaign is very good," said Crispin,
"that now students across all
campuses across the province have
adopted our central campaign goals.
We're happy to see that and I think
it's an important step forward."
Tyson hopes the campaign puts
WTF on the map as a lobbying
group. The group will be working
towards more lobbying and awareness events in the months to come. 13
UBC FARM »
Sustainability college in the works
Andrew Bates
Senior Web Writer
It's not quite raising a barn, but
they'll take it.
UBC is planning to construct
two new buildings on the UBC
Farm in South Campus: a replacement for the Farm Centre and a
new residential college focused on
sustainability.
"We've seen rapid and exponential growth for the Farm's programming since it started up in its
current form in 2000 and have thoroughly outgrown our current facilities and really can't accommodate
all the demand for use," said Amy
Frye, the Farm's acting director.
Presently, buildings on the Farm
include the Harvest Hut, where
Farm-grown food is processed and
sold during Sunday Farmer's markets, and the current Farm Centre,
which contains offices, a kitchen
and one room described by Frye as
"our small makeshift classroom that
is kind of our only meeting space."
"It's pretty much time for something new, because there's a lot of
competition for space," said Anelyse
Weiler, communications coordinator for the Farm and president of
Friends ofthe Farm in 2009.
"A positive way of looking at it is
you learn to share small spaces and
small resources."
"We're doing the best we can to
fit courses in, but for example, we
get many course requests [from
people] who want to come out to do
even one session at the Farm and
we don't physically have the indoor
space to house them," Frye said. "It
would really allow us to do so much
more than we're already doing."
The Farm's 2009 planning document, Cultivating Place, calls for the
development of a Farm Centre and
News briefs
Faculty member wins CAIR
award
UBC faculty member Steve Beerman
has received recognition for his work
in medicine.
On February 11. Beerman received
the 2011 Derek Puddester Award
for Resident Well-Being from the
Canadian Association of Interns and
Residents. Beerman. site director
for the UBC Faculty of Medicine
Postgraduate Family Residence
Program, has been working for
25 years to improve conditions
and work-life balance for medica
residents.
"Doctors who are well-rested
and have good work-life balance...
take better care of patients."
Beerman said.
Now zoned as Green Academic, the Farm will be home to a centre focused on sustainability
GEOFF LISTEmHE UBYSSEY
Sustainability College. The Centre
would include classrooms, dry and
wet labs, offices, kitchens, processing space, an area for the Farmer's
market, a small retail space, cafe
and student study spaces.
"One ofthe mottos ofthe Farm
and the sayings is that 'no one thing
does just one thing.' That's what we
use to describe a lot ofthe field activities that happen on site but also
related to the buildings," Frye said.
"The idea is that they'll be kind of
multifunctional facilities that integrate a whole variety of uses."
The Sustainability College is proposed as a residential college similar
to Green College and St John's
College, aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and
Two UBC students reach finals
in ad contest
Students Christopher Larryant and
Veronica Yeungchave have been
named as phase one finalists in the
Canada's Next Top Ad Exec contest.
The student-run but sponsor-
funded contest is centred around
developing marketing and communications strategy for the 2013
Chervrolet Spark subcompact
hatchback.
Phase one of the contest required students to create a two-minute presentation about a marketing
concept. Of 191 submissions. 25 were
chosen as finalists. The phase one
finalists will prepare and present a
larger marketing strategy in Toronto
on March 26-27.
visiting scholars. "The idea is that it
would be a place where...[students]
could really immerse themselves in
a sustainability-themed academic
experience," said Frye.
The college would involve a dining society, scholarly events and
"finding a way to incorporate the
residents in hands-on meaningful practical participation at the
Farm," Frye said. "Kind ofthe idea
of an intentional community around
sustainability."
The buildings passed through
the first of six pre-construction
UBC planning phases last summer,
and the second stage is planned
for early summer this year. Both
buildings are in the package, but
the Farm Centre is planned first.
Android app added to existing
UBC iPhone app
UBC has now released its mobile
app to Android users.
The iPhone application, launched
last year, allows prospective students to create a Campus Wide
Login, view photos of the campus,
gather information on UBC and access the Place of Mind blog.
The app also contains features for
the campus community, including
event listings and an interactive campus information map.
The Android app will have the
same features and is free on the
Android Market. Since its launch
last year, the iPhone application
has gained over 17.000 downloads
worldwide.
Funding for the package could
come from the Start an Evolution
campaign, as the plan is one ofthe
Faculty of Land and Food Systems's
priority projects.
The plan represents a change
from the Farm's fortunes in 2008,
when plans were in place to replace
the Farm with residential housing.
That met with a letter-writing campaign and eventually the zoning was
changed to Green Academic.
"We want to keep the momentum
up and keep people involved at the
Farm, and this will be a good way
to keep that happening," Frye said.
"It's really an indication that the
Farm has a bright future and is being valued bythe university, bythe
students, bythe community." 13
Campus to return to the stage
for UBC's Got Talent
UBC's Got Talent is returning for another year and will be produced by
the UBC Bookstore.
Audience members will be
given a ballot to rank performers
in exchange for a donation to the
United Way. The top three performances will be given prizes from the
Bookstore.
Auditions for the variety show are
open to students, faculty and members of the UNA. and performers are
able to upload videos in any genre or
medium.
Applications are open until March
5 and the event itself will be held on
March 29 at the newly renovated Old
Auditorium. 13
TRANSIT »
Bus driver
hospitalized by
"huffer's" fumes
ANDREW BATES^HE UBYSSEY
Laura Rodgers
StaffWriter
A TransLink bus driver was sent
to hospital from the UBC bus loop
Tuesday after he was overcome
by fumes from a passenger who
was reportedly sniffing a harmful
substance.
At approximately 2pm today,
"[there was] a confrontation with a
belligerent passenger who...had been
sniffing a substance, and eventually
got off the bus," said Drew Snider,
TransLink's public information
officer.
Unconfirmed reports from transit
supervisors on scene claimed that
this substance was, or smelled similar to, paint thinner.
"The bus driver, by the time he
got to UBC loop, he was feeling
lightheaded, so he was taken by
ambulance to Vancouver General
Hospital," said Snider.
Before being taken to the hospital, the driver was given oxygen by
emergency services personnel who
had been called to the bus loop.
The incident occurred on board
one ofthe 99 B-Line buses which was
not full but still carried a number of
passengers. Emergency services personnel on scene said none ofthe passengers required medical assistance.
"Apparently, they haven't caught the
person [who was sniffingthe substance]," stated Snider.
He said the passenger sniffingthe
substance got off the bus "somewhere before the end ofthe line...
Allison or Sasamat or some place.
"The bus driver was still feeling
lightheaded at the time they pulled
into the loop, so itwas probably
close to campus."
At 2:45pm, the bus was inspected
by emergency services and transit
personnel. By this time, the interior
ofthe bus had no noticeable smell.
A transit supervisor said the bus
had been declared safe to drive, and
would resume service on the 99
B-Line route as soon as a new driver
was available. 13 4 I NeWS   02.162012
RADIO»
New policy won't affect CiTR
CRTC makes distinctions in order to simplify
New CRTC policy redefines campus and
community radio stations
Old policies
• Separate policies for instructional and
campus and community stations
• Distinct mandates for instructional
and campus-based stations
• 25 per cent of content for campus
stations must be spoken word
New policies*
NatalyaKautz
StaffWriter
Although revisions to campus radio
licensing regulations caused one
station to think it would have to
close its doors, CiTR doesn't expect
to make many changes.
The Canadian Radio-television
Telecommunications Commission
(CRTC) revised their licensing descriptions of Canadian campus radio
stations in July 2010, removingthe
distinction between community-
based and instructional campus
radio stations.
CiTR station manager Brenda
Grunau explained that despite
the new policy, the station's licence has yet to change from their
• Creates a single policy for campus and
community stations
• Instructional licenses will be renewed
as campus and community stations
• 15 per cent of content must be locally
produced spoken word content
• Policy comes into effect only when
stations renew their licenses
JONNYWAKEFIELD/THE UBYSSEY
community-based licence.
"Our licence runs out in 2014, and
when it's renewed it will be under
the new policy. We're still operating
under the old policy framework,"
she said. "If we wanted to switch
over early, we could put in a request
to do that."
As a community-based campus
station, programming at CiTR is
"produced primarily by volunteers
who are either students or members
ofthe community at large." Unlike
instructional campus stations, the
training of professional broadcasters is not CiTR's primary objective.
"We're required to serve students
and community members...There
are a few changes that impact us,
but they don't impact how we train
volunteers," said Grunau.
These changes include redistributing limits on advertising time,
spoken word requirements and
the percentage of third language
programming.
In their official policy, the CRTC
described that the differences between the two licences "no longer
appear to be relevant."
Patricia Valladao, manager of
media relations at CRTC, said, "The
only major difference now is that
they have to include people from the
community, as well as students." She
stressed that stations "can still train
students, but as volunteers, on air."
Nevertheless, the "only major difference" caused confusion for at least
one instructional campus station.
In response to the policy,
Red River College's Kick FM in
Winnipeg, Manitoba issued a web
statement. It claimed the new regulations removed their ability for the
"training of students for a career in
commercial radio," and that the station would have to "go off the air"
upon the expiration of their current
licence.
However, this was a misunderstanding ofthe policy. Kick FM
manager David Wiebe explained
that the station would be largely
unaffected, as it had already been
operating as "more than" an instructional station.
"[Kick FM has] been involved
with and offered air time to various
community organizations over the
years, and we'll just continue to do
that," he said.
Grunau said the licensing
changes would either be beneficial
or not affect campus stations across
Canada at all. 13
y;_
L0L--L00K WHAT I RENTED
FOR THE WEEKEND!!! :-P
IX
,'ll
SECURITY))
Website helps owners
reunite with lost items
Campus security used to rely on the office alone to manage lost items.
3EOFF LISTERm E U BYSSEY
Evan Brow
Contributor
To efficiently manage over 1000
lost items per month, UBC Campus
Security is promoting their evergrowing "Lost and Found" website.
The site was launched on
Blogspot and moved to the UBC site
in January. It posts no names but
provides descriptions ofthe items
brought in, including brands and
colours.
"October was the basis of it starting and then we started to develop
it a little better after that," said
Emmet Russell, who heads the
Campus Security Central Lost and
Found.
"It's certainly surpassed any of
my expectations. It's become a full-
time job on its own."
The site received over 6000 hits
in January alone. Russell said the
site is a better system because it
allows people to see what has been
submitted. "We post everything
now. Clothes, books, doesn't matter.
We post a whole lot. And then hopefully people can hone in on it and go,
'Oh, I think that's mine.'"
Paul Wong, community relations
manager for UBC Security, believes
a major upside to the site is that it is
accessible at all times. "Two in the
morning, you're studying and you
realize something goes missing, you
can go online and you can search it.
"Sometimes it's only an hour
between lunch you've got time off,
so to have to rush over here and be
able to report something or to see if
something has been found is sometimes a bit challenging."
While the site has changed the
process for reporting and viewing
lost and found items, UBC Campus
Security maintains their "common
sense" approach in identifying owners. Usually a distinguishing mark
is left out ofthe description so the
identifier can prove that it is their
item.
"It's limited information that gets
put down," said Wong. "So...you may
say, 'Oh, I lost my Seiko watch,' but
you still have to come in and say the
strap was brown or it's a specific
model or it's got this on it."
Items that aren't retrieved are
sold at the end of the year, with proceeds goingto the United Way. 13
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FUNDING. DID ITS FOCUS ON SUSTAINABILITY DRIVE AWAY INDUSTRY MONEY? »
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02162012 | 9
MONTREAL»
Protesters forced to vacate provost office
McGill students end occupation of administrative building peacefully after six days
Erin Hudson
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP)-Nine
students who had occupied
McGill deputy provost Morton
Mendelson's office since February
7 were peacefully evicted Sunday
morning, February 12.
The group had been occupying the office space to protest the
administration's decision to invalidate the results of an existence
referendum that sought to continue support for the campus radio
station and the Quebec Public
Interest Research Group.
At 8:57am, one ofthe occupiers
yelled from the sixth floor window
to three students sleeping outside
the James Administration building
that police were going to evict the
students.
Initially, 23 students entered
Mendelson's office, but left at various points during the week. The
last student to leave before the
eviction exited the building at 4am
on Sunday morning.
In an email sent to all McGill
students and staff shortly after the
eviction, vice-principal of administration and finance Michael Di
Grappa stated that the occupiers were read a formal eviction
notice. Occupiers were informed
that police could charge them with
resisting arrest if they had to be
physically removed.
Accordingto Di Grappa's email,
the students were given five minutes to gather all belongings and
leave the building.
As to why Sunday morning was
chosen for the eviction, Di Grappa
wrote, "It became unfeasible to
enter another week without use of
the building to conduct the work
ofthe university. Members ofthe
senior administration decided that
activities at the James Building
should resume Monday morning,
and that a full day would be needed
to clean the building in preparation
for McGill employees to return to
work."
Seven police vans entered campus during the eviction. According
to one police officer on the scene,
two police divisions were present-
one to conduct the eviction, and
the other to secure the exterior.
The officer said about six officers from the Post de quartier
20, Service de Police de la Ville de
Montreal's (SPVM) neighbourhood
police division, carried out the
eviction.
The students who were sleeping outside packed up a tent and
McGill students occupied the provost office
supplies that had been amassed
there since February 7. McGill security agents and police remained
on the scene until all ofthe students had left at about 10am.
One officer on the scene said
that the SPVM were aware ofthe
occupation for several days. "Itwas
this morning that McGill decided
to end it, at 8:30am," he said.
Di Grappa's email stated that
for six days before being forced to leave
occupiers were offered first aid,
food and contact for counseling
services. He also noted that upon
the students' exit from the James
building, students presented security agents with a letter of apology.
The occupiers, collectively
known as #6party, issued a brief
statement in response to Di
Grappa.
"We will prepare a longer
VICTOR TANGERMANN/THE MCGILL DAILY
statement after we have a warm
meal, but we do want to respond
quickly to DiGrappa's MRO
[email]; we were not offered
food or counselling services. Our
friends partying downstairs, however, have arranged for both," it
read.
As of press time, none ofthe
sixth floor students were available
for comment.
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Get it right. Opinion »
B RHitnr- Rrian Piatt
02.16.2012 | 10
if only UBC had continued its research on chickens.
NDIANAJOEL/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Start preparing for a possible
TA strike
On Wednesday, hundreds of TAs
met to discuss the state of contract negotiations with UBC. They
haven't had a contract for nearly
two years and haven't gotten UBC
to budge from their stance of no
pay increases.
So now, they're considering
striking. Accordingto our sources,
if they choose to strike, they would
force UBC's hand by having it take
effect during the final weeks of
classes and exams.
We're still finding the details of
when a strike vote might be called
and what it could mean for students. But what is clear is that the
TAs are serious about keeping all
their options open.
This means that everyone should
be prepared to not have their TAs
for a couple weeks at the end of
the school—and plan and study
accordingly.
A simple guide for how clubs
can stay out of trouble
The UBC Ski & Board Club had
to do some explaining to the
AMS Student Administrative
Commission recently. Ski & Board
had distributed posters for a
February 3 beer garden called
"Cavesluts and Dinowhores," featuring an impossibly buxom cave-
woman spilling out of her skimpy
cave-bikini.
So yeah, it broke a few rules
about respectful discourse toward
women.
One response to this could be
that it shows the AMS needs to
bring back a revamped equity program that teaches clubs how to promote positive discourse (the AMS
equity program was scrapped two
years ago). But it's not necessarily
true that this single event should
require a systemic change.
Every two years or so, it seems
a student organization gets itself
into trouble. In 2008, it was the
Chinese Varsity Club's video about
the "Honger" club. In 2010, it was
the Arts Undergraduate Society's
newspaper makingjokes about
"tramp stamps."
What's really needed here is just
a reminder to club executives to
keep an eye on those in your club
who are prone to doing blatantly
stupid things.
In fact, here's an easy-to-follow
guide to what should never appear
in your official club material.
1. Caricatures of sexually promiscuous women.
2. Jokes about racial stereotypes.
3. Derogatory comments about
sexual orientation.
There are other grey areas that
should probably be avoided, but
come on, people, it's really not that
complicated. Just keep these these
three simple rules in mind and you
can avoid a whole lot of trouble.
A sustainability college would
be good news for the UBC Farm
Everyone loves the idea of a farm,
even if they don't regularly interact
with it. This was proven in the
widespread support for saving the
UBC Farm from condominium development a few years ago.
Yet the lack of interaction is still
a problem. Outside of that campaign and a few events throughout
the year, few students are involved
with the Farm. It can seem like a
hassle at times to get down to south
campus when you're balancing
classes and struggling with exams.
Plus it rains for most ofthe academic year.
But with the prospect of a sustainability college being built on
UBC Farm, more people will actually have a chance to experience
one ofthe largest urban farms in
North America—even if they don't
have an affinity for physical labour.
This is a great step towards making
UBC Farm more accessible to all
residents in the Lower Mainland.
UBC film students should come
out of their shell more often
The "Harry Potter in 60 Seconds"
video, made by UBC film students,
was pretty amusing as viral videos
go.
But it was probably also the first
time you watched something created by a UBC film student.
The work of film students
doesn't have the same visibility as
their fine art brethren in the theatre and music departments. And
while part of this is due to the lack
of a high-quality viewing space like
the Chan Centre, it's also because
the department just doesn't seem
as motivated to share their talents
with the general university community—their poorly-advertised
film festival notwithstanding
Yes film students, we know
you're very busy. But we encourage you to get more involved in
the larger campus community.
Videos like this both further your
career and entertain your peers—
and can be made even without a
time-turner.
Campus Security suprisingly
sets the standard for web
presence
UBC Campus Security's decision to
make improvements to their online
Lost and Found service is great for
UBC students. As we get more and
more of our information online,
it's important to create effective
communication on the interwebs.
Other examples include Campus
Security's surprisingly quirky and
informative Facebook page, and—
hey, wait a second. How did it come
to be that Campus Security has
one ofthe best online presences at
UBC?
We don't mean to besmirch
Campus Security. They do a genuinely great job of realizing there's
more to communication than press
releases and vague UBC talking
points.
But surely other groups on campus could follow their example and
give their department a little more
personality. Such efforts may not
make it any easier for us to find our
iPod, as Campus Security's does,
but it'd sure help raise their profile
among students. 13
The AMS puts a little
imagination to work
Editor's
Notebook
Brian
Piatt
The AMS has made national headlines over the past couple of weeks,
including stories in The Toronto
Star, The Huffington Post and The
Province. Consideringthe AMS's
recent history, this would normally
mean I'd be writing a column that
starts with a recap of a hilarious
and embarrassing scandal that has
swamped our student union.
But this time the buzz is good: the
AMS is planning a microbrewery for
the new SUB. Accordingto President
Jeremy McElroy and VP Finance
Elin Tayyar, it would be the first
brewery operated by a student union
anywhere in the world.
If we are to believe the feasibility
report that the AMS commissioned,
the brewery will potentially make an
annual profit of somewhere between
$500,000 and $1 million. It would
also provide students with a cheaper
source of alcohol at the AMS's bars,
and possibly give beer gardens a local
source for their kegs.
This all seems too good to be true,
and to a certain extent, it probably
is. I'll be surprised if the brewery
ever makes that much profit. But
examined within the larger context
ofthe AMS's ambitions, it doesn't
really matter whether the brewery
makes wads of cash, breaks even or is
a modest money-loser.
At the February 8 AMS Council
meeting, Tayyar laid out a plan to
have the AMS form a company to
manage all ofthe society's business
operations. That company would
have a more stable and knowledgeable (but still student-controlled)
board of directors, and would focus
on makingthe AMS's businesses as
efficient and profitable as possible.
Those profits would then flow back
to the AMS to be put into student
services.
The main reasons for this plan
are practical. The AMS's business
profits have been falling for years,
and they've also received unwelcome
attention from the Canada Revenue
Agency for being a non-profit society
with high levels of business income.
But think for a moment about the
path the AMS is embarking on. In a
few years, it will have a brand new
$103 million building—which brings
along brand new facilities for all of
its businesses. Its bars, which currently sit empty on most nights, will
likely be much fuller and will now be
selling pitcher after pitcher of AMS-
produced beer. This is growing into
quite the commercial empire.
A decade from now, when these
business profits are combined with
the interest produced from the
AMS's endowment fund, a substantial portion ofthe AMS budget will
be independent from student fees.
The AMS will be able to keep its
student fees among the lowest in
Canada while increasing student
service levels. It's brilliant.
The real question is: why are no
other student unions doing this? For
one thing, they tend to be suspicious
of relinquishing control over their
business operations; the result is
that student politicians with little
business sense maintain their food
outlets as poorly-run money pits. The
AMS has always been smartly focused on giving elected students the
final word on business operations,
but mostly letting professional staff
take care ofthe details.
The other reason, though, is that
other student unions simply haven't
dreamt as ambitiously about what
they're capable of with abit of long-
term planning. For this, the AMS
deserves a lot of credit. 13
On fluffy romanticism
Letters
Re: "Composer Matthew Emery an
early riser," February 2
I am responding to this passage:
"The life of a composer is an ascetic one...Music is admittedly all he
[Matthew] does. He runs in the same
circles as other music students...
There are disagreements over everything, between self-described purists
like Emery and more experimental composers who try to break the
form. And most of them don't really
know much about popular music
(the only modern artist Emery could
name was Adele)."
I am another student in the
composition program here at UBC.
However, regardless of my personal
style of composition, I am a firm
cynic ofthe fluffy romanticism that
surrounds the idea of what it means
to be an artist.
The way that the artist is portrayed in this article is someone
who locks himself away and completely devotes himself entirely to
the art. For whatever reason, our
culture loves to find ways to hold
high the true artist on a romantic
pedestal. This mode of exclusivity is
seen as a sign of pure devotion, love,
dedication, and so on, and we love to
see the resultant art as some sort of
transcendental manifestation that
expresses the personality and being
ofthe artist.
The way that you portray musicians here is something I encourage
people to think critically about. To
say that music is all he does, regardless of whether he said so himself
or not, is actually a very tall order
and is a profile to which I absolutely
refuse to conform.
Does this mean that I am any less
devoted to my art? I hardly think
so; if anything, in my experience
extra-musical influences are very
enriching to music. My master's thesis is a collection of pieces based on
works by Salvador Dali. My Catholic
background gives a lot of personal
meaning to the oldest written music
which was used in Catholic masses.
In fact, one ofthe greatest movements in Canadian classical music
originated here in Vancouver and
was inspired bythe environment.
The path described in the article
suits Matthew clearly quite well, as
it leads him to write beautiful music,
but it would not have the same effect
for every composer. We are not all
the same, our art is not all the same
(think of how dull music would be!),
but society likes to make generalizations about the ideals of classical
music. It is this that I encourage
people to think critically about.
—Daniel Marshall Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
02.16.2012 | 11
STUDENTBODY»
Cradling your deepest, darkest fear
Happy
Healthy
Homy
RaevenGeist-
Deschamps
Ginette's gait is wider than it is
long. Her hair is a crinkled auburn,
tamed by too many high-heat drying and straightening sessions. She
wears a black, baggy, synthetic silk
vest with something like "Chinook"
or "Chilliwack" written on the
front.
She has a name I didn't think
anyone had anymore. I meet
Ginette at the integrative cancer
care clinic, InspireHealth, during
their two-day program, which gives
people with cancer (and their supporters) extra tools to cope with the
diagnosis.
I'm an intern there. A low echelon observer ofthe babies of war
and processed foods, and the cancers arising thereof. The program
has various components, from
holistic nutrition to emotional support. It has recently been picked up
as a pioneer model by BC Health,
which funds its practitioners and its
upcoming expansion into all of BC.
The emphasis is on the community and day-to-day support
for the cancer patient, rather than
a disease-focused approach to
healing where chemotherapy is extended as the cure.
On the first day, I sat with a support group and learned about storytelling. We've come to the end of
the second day and start addressing
the notion of honestly respecting
our boundaries in various situations. Though the talk is interesting, the healthy organic vegetarian
meal has me pleasantly subsumed.
I'm paying attention like a flea on a
monkey's back. Until Ginette.
Ginette starts by saying she has
two kids. One is 7, the other 11. She
is due for surgery next week. When
she asks, "What do I tell my kids?"
the leathery cracked skin around
her eyes dissolves into dimension-
less honesty.
The counselor says to validate
their emotions and tell them she
will always love them. Another person with cancer steps in and says:
"No, really, what I think she means
is that she is due for surgery next
week and she doesn't know if she
will survive. Do you tell them that?"
A blanket of silence falls on the
room. She continues, "When I told
my thirteen-year-old, we cried
together. But, you know, I said it
was okay, because it would be weird
if we didn't cry." The counselor
extends her initial response, but for
Being confronted with one's own mortality is terrifying-though it can be a cathartic experience
RON ALDAMAN/ FLICKR
some reason I find it impossible to
listen.
My chest is constricted, my eyes
are watering, I want to wail. I look
around the room and I see others
holding back. The hurt I empathize
with finds itself in my lower belly.
I'm not a mother, but I have womb
empathy. Or maybe, like it's been
said countless times, I'm just afraid
of dying. I'm so acutely aware of
my own mortality that I can't hold
in all the pain and all the joy that
these moments bring. These are
privileged spaces where people
have the courage to share without
the forbearance of social regret.
I cry more and more, dripping
damp, salty tears through the end of
the talk, during the break and even
lock myself in a bathroom stall to
try and release. When I come back
to the room, Ginette has the embarrassed gaze of someone who's given
the gift of their deepest, darkest
fear. But it is a fear that the entire
group cradled. 13
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Unreal opportunities.
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to leam more.
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=U Ernst &Young
Quality In Everything We Do 121 Games 102.16.2012
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16- Collar type
17- Temperance
19- Gaucho's weapon
20- Standards of perfection
21- Regent
23- Rare-earth metallic element
25- Eagle's home
26- Truman's Missouri birthplace
28- Falls-jumping fish
31- Animate existence
34- Children's author Blyton
36- Handle
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60- Sedative
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30- Iditarod terminus
31- Scandinavian
32- Brain wave
33- Anticipate
35- Toe or finger
38- Conger catcher
39- Winged staff carried by
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42- Arm coverings
44- Craftsperson
46- Having no distinct feet
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A VV6St6rn MBA# where making a difference inspires
 Critical Thinking
Drinks and snacks provided A      §l
A      I       \ /
Meet students and alumni
Q&A Session!
AACSB
\ ACCREDITED /
Western imba
(.; T O N   U N I V E R S I T Y
cbe.wwu.edu/mba
Information Session
Wednesday, February 22
@ 6pm PARKS HALL 441
ALL UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS WELCOME

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