UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 12, 1975

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128391.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128391.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128391-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128391-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128391-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128391-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128391-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128391-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128391-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128391.ris

Full Text

Array CITR radio sucks for bucks
By LEN MacKAVE
UBC radio CITR has terminated
dealings with a company that used
"questionable methods" to raise
money for the financially troubled
student-operated station.
Alma Mater Society general
manager Bern Grady said Thursday that CITR employed Bryon
Lawes and Associates to raise
money, but recently ended the
agreement due to the company's
methods of operation.
As a result, CITR will approach
AMS budget committee for some
$6,800 to help finance its operation.
Five thousand dollars would be
used for the station's operating
budget and $1,800 would be used to
pay for new equipment.
Grady said the company is a
professional fund raising business.
But, he said, "they used
questionable methods."
"Upon further inquiry, we found
the agency would use the name of a
charity and over the telephone
would contact large business
corporations and state that the
'proceeds' would be going to a
certain charity."
•    In actual fact, however, a certain
percentage of the money raised
would   go   to   finance   CITR's
operation, Grady said.
"Everyone   agreed  to   raise
—peter cummings photo
PRIOR TO OUST . . . Jim Crone, Jennifer Morgan, Mike Arthur, Sheila Wells, Dianna MacDonald and Gordon Caulder relax.
Co-eds in Gage quad split
ByMARCUSGEE
Residence authorities ejected
four female UBC students from a
Gage Towers quadrant Tuesday
because they shared the quad with
four males.
But the first floor north tower
quad has been co-educational ever
since Gage was built, quad
resident Jim Crone, commerce 3,
said Wednesday.
"After three years of coexistence, this year, after
everyone has moved in, all of a
sudden they (housing administration) turn around and
change their policy," Crone said.
"We are disappointed in their
(housing's) lack of respect for our
level of responsibility."
Gage residence attendant Dave
Newton said Wednesday he knows
females were living in the quad
last year.
"This year is not last year,"
Newton said. "This year there are
more males. It was just a little
physical error that the girls were
there."
Dianna MacDonald said Wednesday res attendant Diane
MacRae told her and the other
women in the quad last Friday they
had to move to the south tower.
"I don't think they trust us,"
MacDonald said. "There was a
door between the guys and us. Like
someone said, they think this is
1875, not 1975."
Acting housing administration
head Michael Davis said the
women were assigned to the north
tower quad by an administrative
error.
"The university policy is that
men and women are not allowed to
co-habit," Davis said.
Davis   said   Gage   area   co
ordinator June Johnson told him of
the alleged mistake and advised
him the women were there against
university policy.
Another of the ejected women,
Shiela Wells, said Johnson told her
the women should not live in the
north tower quad because their
privacy was interrupted there.
"If they had  moved us   right
away it would have been alright,"
Wells said. "But I don't like being
shuffled around.
"We  were already  settled  in
when they told us to move."
money through this agency and we
knew that a charity name was to be
included, but it was the methods
they used to obtain is-. The
technique was not desirable," he
said.
Company president Bryon
Lawes said Thursday that the
arrangement proposed by CITR
was "very unrealistic."
"We looked at the proposal and
rejected it," Lawes said.
CITR operated on a budget of
$6,800 last year and expected costs
to increase to $13,000 this year,
Lawes said.
"The main reason for our
rejection of the CITR proposal was
due to CITR wanting a guaranteed
budget of $13,000, which was too
high to obtain this year," Lawes
said.
CITR approached council twice
during the summer for $6,800 but
council did not act on the request
for lack of a quorum.
At its meeting Sept. 3, council
told CITR to follow proper channels and make its request to the
AMS budget committee.
Both CITR president Richard
Saxton and AMS treasurer Dave
Theessen refused to comment on
the matter and said everything will
be aired at the AMS budget
committee meeting next week.
But CITR staffer Roger Ward
said: "The AMS lawyers recommended to us not to deal with them
(Lawes)."
Saxton said Ward is an
"unauthorized spokesman" for the
station and added that release of
any additional financial details of
CITR's operation "could hurt our
cause" when it attempts to obtain
money from the AMS.
Lawes admitted that his company is a professional fund raising
operation. A check with the
Vancouver Better Business Bureau
indicated that the bureau has no
records of any complaints lodged
against Lawes' company.
CITR broadcasts to a few
campus locations via carrier
current, which can only be picked
up by radios in the immediate
vicinity of the carrier current
transmitters.
However the small number of
listeners attracted by the method
of broadcasting have made it
difficult for the station to obtain
advertisers.
The station, which has about
$50,000 worth of equipment in its
SUB offices, is attempting to obtain an FM broadcasting licence.
Another admin face resigns
By MARK BUCKSHON
UBC's chief academic planner has resigned
as part of administration president Doug
Kenny's wide-ranging restructuring of the
university's decision-making hierarchy.
Robert Clark's late August resignation was
announced Thursday by Michael Shaw,
Kenny's new vice-president of university
development.
Clark's successor William Tatlow indicated
Thursday the academic planning office will
be changed from a policy-making to data-
gathering organization.
Kenny, upon taking the reins of UBC's
administration during the summer, hired
Shaw and two other vice-presidents to assist
him and William White, formerly the only
deputy president, in formulating policy.
Shaw's office description overlaps Clark's.
In a telephone interview from Penticton,
Clark declined to discuss specific reasons for
his resignation but said, "every president
taking office has a different idea of the
policies he wishes to emphasize."
Clark will remain at UBC as a professor of
economics and his salary will remain the
same. He will retain his senate post and
continue working as a member of a provincial
commission examining municipal taxation.
(He was in Penticton Thursday for a Union of
B.C. Municipalities meeting.)
Clark was the second high-level administration official whose resignation was
made public this week. But an administration
spokesman said there is no connection between Clark's resignation and that of housing
administration director Les Rohringer Sept.
5-
Tatlow said the academic planning office
and other university departments were asked
to explain their plans to Kenny last summer
and Clark's resignation took place after a
series of meetings with Shaw, where policy
and plans were discussed.
Tatlow said his office will now provide
documentation for the administration to
make policy decisions which can be sold to
outside bodies, such as the B.C. Universities
Council.
"My experience in this (planning) has
been, if you want to get anything in terms of
results, you have to document your case,"
said Tatlow.
He said the Universities Council,
established last year as a co-ordinating body
for B.C.'s three public universities, needs
documentation of UBC proposals; not ideas
"just pulled out of the hat somewhere."
Shaw indicated Clark's office had a set of
terms of reference which became outdated.
"I just don't think it was completely consonant with the reorganization of the top of
the administration," he said.
"I think all I can say at all is we have a new
set (of officials) up there."
Clark said he was satisfied with his
achievements in 10 years as academic
planner.
"When I came to office 10 years ago there
was not even a part-time secretary," he said.
Now the academic planning office is a
major operation in the old Administration
Building and Clark had several assistants
before his Aug. 31 resignation. The
resignation was accepted in a letter from
Kenny Sept. 8.
"What we were able to do of importance
was not only start up a system of statistical
analysis . . . (but) take part in a wide variety
of analysis of policy questions," he said.
Clark said one of his most satisfying
achievements was the hiring of part-time
environmental planners, who he said helped
make new UBC buildings more attractive and
functional to students and profs.
He also said the planning office became
recognized as one of the best in Canada, and
said it was able to contribute to research in
national and international circles of planners.
Tatlow, who worked under Clark as
associate director of the academic planning
office since 1970, said he expects his office will
be expanded to meet its new data-gathering
functions.
But he said Shaw and Kenny haven't yet
decided how many new researchers or
planners will be hired.
Among the first responsibilities of Tatlow, a
specialist of institutional research, will be
attending a budget meeting between
Universities Council members and senior
UBC officials next week.
Tatlow, Shaw, Kenny and other senior
officials will explain in private how much
money UBC wants next year for academic
and non-academic programs and new
building construction.
See page 2: PLANS Page 2
Hot flashes
Free law
for folks
As laws increase in their
quantity and complexity, one
result is that few people can
understand   our  judicial   system.
In an effort to combat
confusion, the Vancouver
People's Law School is offering a
series of free law courses starting
this week with a course on co-op
housing and the law.
A three-day course on women
and the law will start Monday at
7:30 p.m. at Charles Tupper
Secondary School, 419 East
Twenty-fourth. For information
call 681-7532.
New high
To elevate your lunch hour to
a   new   high  the  departments of
theatre and classics are holding a
free film and lecture presentation
called theatres of the classical
world.
Speaker will be professor
Audrey Stanley of the University
of California, Santa Cruz, who
will be on hand Monday noon in
the Freddie Wood Theatre.
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
Internationally Traine_d
Hairstylists
Open Tues. - Sat.
9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
4605 W. 10th AVE.
NNO
228-9345
'Tween classes
TODAY
MY JONG  KUNG  FU CLUB
Demonstration, noon, SUB
ballroom.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
215.
UBC   ROWING  CREW
Rowing display, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., main floor, SUB.
UBC  LIBERALS
Clubs day display, 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. main floor, SUB,
September party, new and old
members welcome, 8 p.m., SUB
212.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Public meeting on working class
political action in Canada; speaker,
Steve Watson, 8 p.m., 1208
Granville.
MONDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
First meeting of the year to discuss
Egypt   trip,   noon,   Buchanan   tower
1126.
UBC   FENCING  CLUB
General meeting, 3:30 p.m., gym
E, Winter Sports Centre.
TUESDAY
LSA LEGAL ADVICE
Free    legal    advice,    noon   to    2:30
p.m., SUB 234.
UBC GOLF TEAM
Organizational   meeting,   noon.  War
Memorial Gym, room 211..
KUNG  FU CLUB
Organizational      meeting     and
demonstration,      noon,     SUB
ballroom.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Meal and discussion on Lutfier's
table talk, 6:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,    nobn,    SUB
212.
SHITO-RYU KARATE
Demonstration,      noon,     SUB
ballroom.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
organizational   meeting, noon, S'UB
213.
DEMOLAY
Organizational      meeting,     all
members welcome, noon, SUB 213.
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS1
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
on every bicycle
POINT
reus
3771 West 10th Avenue
224-3536
Welcome to
ST. ANSELM'S
AND UNIVERSITY HILL CHURCHES
on University Boulevard
Minister: Rev. Luis O. Curran
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m.        Holy Communion at St. Anselm's
11 a.m.       Worship and Church School at
both churches
All planning, programming and group work are a SHARED
MINISTRY at St. Anselm's Anglican and University Hill United
Churches.
For further information, phone office, 224-7011
WEST POINT GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
4509 WEST 11th (corner Sasamat & 11th Ave.)
WELCOMES YOU TO:
9:45 a.m. A variety of adult seminars.
11:00 a.m. Worship — Speaker, Bernie Smith, Calgary
7:30 p.m. Series on "The Foundations of Community"
Dr. J. Ernest Runions, F.R.C.P. (Psychiatry)
Principal, Carey Hall
I u the ran   campus  ministry
5885    university    blvd.
phone:   224-1614
Opening Worship, Sunday, 10:30
A community for students, faculty, and people
of other stripes to gather to offer thanks and
encourage each other in the task of following
the Christ.
\   Do you want to buy
some used books?
Thousand of  Texts  & Paperbacks
Hey
and .
AND WE CARRY THE LARGEST VARIETY OF REVIEW NOTES AND
STUDY AIDS IN CANADA - COLES NOTES - MONARCH NOTES
- STUDY  MASTER  NOTES - SCHAUMS OUTLINES - AND OTHERS.
I
BETTER BUY
BOOKS
4333 W. 10th AVE. - VANCOUVER, B.C.
Ye Olde
Alma Mater Society
PUBLIC
NOTICE
Hear Ye! Hear Ye!
The Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia is pleased to
announce openings on the
following committees:
PRESIDENTIAL COMMITTEES
1. Traffic & Parking
2. Bookstore
3. Food Services
4: Master Teacher
5. Safety, Security & Fire Prevention
6. Charitable Donations
7. Men's Athletic Committee
AMS COMMITTEES
1. Elections
2. Eligibility
3. Student Court
4. Speakers
5. Special Events
6. Restructuring of the AMS
7. Housing
8. War Memorial Gym Trust
Advisory
N ominations for the above positions close Monday, September
15, 1975. Applicants are asked to submit a short letter, stating
their name, address, telephone number, past experience and
reasons for their application. Please contact AMS Secretary
Ellen Paul, SUB 250, 228-2050 for further information.
N.B. Those students who have previously applied for these
Committees in the spring are now asked to reapply as
some applications were lost.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.00; additional tines 25c.
Commercial - 3 tines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 &'35c.
Class/fted ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable m
advance. Deadline t$ 11:30 a.m„ the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241, S.U.8., UBC, Van. B, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
SHUTTERBU6SI Want some great
paper, film & accessory buys? Come
to our birthday sale, September 13-30.
Ampro Photo Workshops, 117 West
Broadway. Phone 876-5901.
DARKROOM COURSES. Color, black &
white, or Cibachrome prints from
slides. Students 10% off. Enroll at
Ampro Photo Workshops, 117 West
Broadway. Phone 876-5501.
CAMPUS WIDE DANCEI Rock with
"Zingo" Fri. nite, Sept. 10th at Sub
Ballroom, 8:30-12:30. S2 each. Tickets
on sale Monday at AMS office. (Two
tickets per student card.
MUSICIANS
Join the West Point Grey Community Centre Concert Band Wed.
evenings,   7:30 p.m.
LORD   BYNG  SCHOOL,
393* W.   Hth
Phone  224-0710  for further  information.
10 —For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
1972 RENAULT SS. Rally prepared.
Modified engine. 30 M.P.G. $1,600.00.
Roger,  985-7018  or 987-5138.
1964 SUNBEAM ALPINE substantially
restored No rust. No bumps. Hardtop.
Soft-top tonneau wires. Will need
engine work shortly $S99 OBO —
929-1088.
1?«8 DATSUN 1400, 4-dr. sedan. New
battery, 7 good tires, 81,000 miles.
$750 o.n.o 988-3676.
30 —Jobs (Continued)
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and night*.
Phone 681-9816 for  appointment.
MARKET RESEARCH — No experience.
Part-time. Car asset. Evenings .Weekend work. Phone 298-4867.
TYPIST/CLERK required for 2 hours
per day Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays.   Publication  Office,   S.U.B.   Ml.
35 - Lost
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
BEER & WALLBANSERS NITEI Boogie
to Zingo"! Fri. nite, Sept. 19. SUB
Ballroom, 8:30-12:30. Tickets: S2 per
person — at AMS office Monday.
UBC BOWLINO LEASUE desperately
needs more bowlers — especially
women — to bowl Monday nights,
starting September 15. New bowlers
welcome. We're a handicap league.
To join or for more information call
Walter  at 228-8225.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
PECS  PLACE  POTTERY  SCHOOL
2710 Alma at 12th
Fall clases start Sept. 20. Morning
and eveninp classes for wheel throwing. Tuesday afternoon children's
class. Phone and register now —
73<-»12.
30 - Jobs
ROOM AND BOARD plus, $75.00 a
month for assistance to faculty family
in preparation of evening meal and
some supervision of children, 9 to 14.
Mostly between 3:15 and 7:00 p.m.
Ten minutes from campus. Non-
rnnnker: 224.5056.
70-
Services
80-
Tutoring
85-
Typing
90-
Wanted
BABY
days
area
SlfV          SERVICES  required  3
a wej      Vhone 733-8327 — Kits
99-
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT: London (Central) England.
Luxury furnished flat with balcony,
twb bedrooms, fully-equipped kitchen,
dishwater, deep freeze, linen 100 yds.
Kensington Gardens, £200 (sterling) a
month. Available for 18 months. Contact Currie, 12 Elm Road, Hereford,
England or phone Weybridge, England
42817 (evenings). English failure rate preset
The English department is
funnelling 15 per cent of all
students who wrote last week's
Enlish 100 diagnostic exam into
special remdial workshops — no
matter how many students "fail"
the exam.
Last Christmas, only 55.3 per
cent of English 100 students passed
an exam designed to check
whether first-year students had an
acceptable level of English writing
skills.
Jonathan Wisenthal, English 100
program chairman, said Thursday: "We have to set the standard
according to the places available.
It is an arbitrary standard, and we
have to set it fairly low or else the
cost of running the workshops
would be too expensive."
The remedial workshops were
approved by senate in January and
designed to offer help to students
who fail the diagnostic exam.
Senate requires those students to
take the non-credit workshop along
with English 100 and pass the
workshop before they get credit for
English 100.
The workshop requires two hours
work per week and teaches English
sentence structure, conventions of
standard English usage and basic
principles of expository writing.
In previous years, students who
failed the composition test were
transferred to English 100 sections
concentrating on composition but
were not required to attend extra
composition sections.
Wisenthal said 20 workshops
concentrating on composition will
be set up this year, with space for a
total of 400 students.
He said another 10 special
English 100 sections will be
available for "people whose
acquaintance with English is quite
limited." The special sections will
accommodate 200 students, he
added.
Wisenthal said there are about
4,000    English     100    students
registered this year.
"We are hoping many people in
the workshops will be able to
complete them by Christmas," he
said.
Wisenthal said if some students
were able to "catch up" to the
standard of other students by
Christmas, they would no longer
have to attend the workshop and
could be replaced with other
English 100 students needing extra
composition instruction.
New AMS constitution.
$6 fee increase eyed
A $6 Alma Mater Society fee
increase could result from a
proposed new AMS constitution to
be presented to council early next
week.
AMS treasurer Dave Theessen
said Thursday the increase is
necessary to offset inflation.
Students currently pay the AMS
$34 a year. The last fee increase
came in 1972 when students began
paying $5 a year for the covered
pool.
Theessen said if a cost-of-living-
adjustment clause is attached to
the AMS fee it could be another 20
years before students are again
asked to pay a real increase in
their AMS fees.
AMS vice-president Dave van
Blarcom has been working on a
new constitution since MarcUr It is
expected the new constitution will
suggest weakening the AMS
executive and strengthening of the
various undergraduate societies.
After it is presented, council
would make whatever amendments it deems desirable. The
proposed constitution would then
be put to a student referendum
possibly as soon as Nov. 15.
Theessen said the AMS will
record a deficit of $60,000 this year,
mainly because of inflation. He"
said about $40,000 could be covered
with money from budget surpluses
of previous years but without increased fees the deficit would be
much larger in 1976-77.
He said even if the new constitution never goes to a referendum there will have to be a
referendum on the fee increase this
fall.
He also said there are two
alternative proposals for a fee
increase formula. One is a $6 increase without the COLA clause,
which he said would forestall a
further fee increase for 10 years.
The other is a $3 increase which,
according to Theessen, would only
take care of next year and would
mean another fee increase would
be necessary the following year.
The referendum would have to
be before Christmas, said
Theessen, because "people vote in
the fall. They do not vote in the
spring.
"In spring the doldrums set in,"
he added.
—peter cummings photo
NDP MEMBER RADIATES confidence as she sits before portrait of mentor Thursday. Display is part of
many clubs day booths on main floor of SUB that are open for business — and members — again today.
Faculty, admin to negotiate
Negotiations between the
university administration and the
faculty association on a first
collective agreement could begin
in January, association president
Don McRae said Thursday.
But no matter what agreement is
reached, it will basically be a
gentlemen's  agreement   because
Loans urged for part-timers
REGINA — Provincial education
ministers have asked the federal
government to immediately
provide student loans to part-time
students and students enrolled in
short-term courses.
B.C. education minister Eileen
Dailly was elected chairman of the
Council of Education Ministers of
Canada here at a three-day conference which ended Wednesday.
In a press release, the council
said it is requesting "immediate
amendments to the Canada
Student Loan Act to take effect
before the 1976-77 academic year."
"These amendments would
enable part-time students and
students taking short term courses
to receive student loans," the
council said.
Dailly, in Victoria Thursday,
would not comment on the
recommended amendments or
discussions   about   alternative
Plans change
From page 1
Clark said he understands the.
resignation   wasn't   accepted   or
announced earlier-because Kenny's office had a heaw work* load
in the first week of      5 pnber.
A statement proved by the
university administration says
"the office of academic planning
functions will be integrated with
other developmental functions to
provide academic support to the
administration, the senate budget
committee, and the board of
governors.
student loan programs when the
current student loan program is
reviewed in 1977.
(Proposals reported being
discussed by a special federal-
provincial task force on student aid
would require students to pay
additional tuition fees and get into
debt with loans of as much as
$15,000.)
"The council will also continue
its study of alternatives to the
Canada Student Loan Plan to
enable it to recommend the most
desireable form for a national
student assistance program when
the current program is reviewed
by the federal government in
1977," the council release said.
The council also discussed
"future arrangements" for funding of university research
programs, but its release did not go
into details.
the faculty association has voted to
seek a collective agreement
without being certified under the
B.C. Labor Code.
As a result, any conflict between
the two sides would not be subject
to outside arbitration.
Representatives of the two
parties are currently discussing a
framework agreement setting out
the rules and procedures of the
negotiations.
McRae, who succeeded Meredith
Kimball as faculty association
president in" April, refused to
comment on the progress of the
negotiations until he had given a
report to the association at its
general meeting next Thursday.
Also under discussion are
amendments to the Faculty
Handbook concerning tenure,
promotion and hiring procedures,
and the addition of a new section
establishing   appeal   procedures.
There is currently no recourse
for a faculty member who wishes
to  appeal   a  decision  involving
tenure, promotion and hiring.
Earlier this year, faculty
association members voted by an
overwhelming margin to seek a
collective agreement with the
university, but also voted by a
narrow margin not to seek certification under the Labor Code of
B.C.
McRae said when an agreement
for a framework for negotiations is
reached it will be submitted to the
faculty association membership
for ratification.
Representing the faculty
association in the preliminary
negotiations are McRae, a law
professor, D. L. Williams,
assistant dean of graduate studies
and law professor Joseph Smith.
Representing the administration
are law professor Charles Bourne,
Michael Shaw, vice-president of
university development and
economics head Ronald Shearer.
And now some campus news briefs
The board of governors has
awarded a contract for the construction of a $3.1 million building
complex to house research animals
in comfort.
The $2.7 million contract — with
a $3.1 million limit — for construction of the 59,500 square feet
building was awarded to Van
Construction. The complex,
located north of the present animal
science site, will be ready for
occupancy in late April.
The four-section building will
house rats, mice, cats, dogs,
guinea pigs, cattle, sheep, pigs and
wild animals. The animals will be
used in research by the faculties of
agriculture, medicine, dentistry
and pharmaceutical sciences.
The heated buildings have been
designed with the animals' comfort
in mind, according to animal care
co-ordinator John Gregg.
"Centralizing the buildings
would have reduced costs but
would not be in the best interests of
the animals," Gregg said.
The   complex   will   include   68
indoor dog kennels and outdoor
runs plus 30 rooms and runs for
cats. All indoor quarters are
heated and equipped with sprinkler
systems.
There are also outdoor paddocks
for animals such as deer, caribou
and mountain sheep.
But humans will not be forgotten.
The complex includes two
laboratories, technicians' offices, a
first aid room, a library and
seminar rooms.
"If  you  look   at   the   present
, facilities," said Gregg, "you would
see that anything would be an
improvement."
*       *       *
The new library processing
centre may be slated to be built on
C lot but the man in charge of the
lot, UBC traffic & security head
Hugh Kelly, says he knows nothing
about it.
"I have nothing to say until the
matter becomes official," Kelly
said Thursday.
The board of governors decided
Sept 2 to place the building on C lot
on the recommendation of the
physical plant planning committee. The committee had earlier
considered building the centre
near SUB and had apparently
decided last March to place it in
Brock Hall.
When asked what effect the C lot
decision would have on UBC's
parking situation, Kelly said "You
had better contact the physical
planning committee on that
matter."
Winter session enrolment at UBC
is up this year, associate registrar
Ken Young said Thursday.
"We're anticipating that when
the dust settles we'll have a total of
23,000 daytime graduate and undergraduate students," Young
said.
He said last year's total
enrolment was 22,035 students,
2,666 of them grad students.
Young said that as of Wednesday
night, 19,000 undergrads and 1,731
grad students had registered   He
added he expects at least another
1,000 grad students to register and
that counts of late undergrad
registrations haven't been
finalized.
Stew Savard resigned Wednesday as Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer because he
was refused readmittance to UBC.
But Savard, who has attended
UBC for four years as a part-time
student and full-time political
hack, said in an interview he will
remain a member of the AMS
housing committee and continue to
work for the UBC housing registry.
Savard said he received word
Wednesday that his readmission
appeal had failed. He failed all his
courses last year. Savard said he
will enrol at Vancouver City
College.
Savard has been known for his
activities in the Arts Undergraduate Society and AMS council,
and his participation in assorted
campus controversies Page 4
\J    0     ■     v
1 I ■ IVIVt 1
WELL, THIS   EXPLAINS
THE    ZXTIOA    SPECIAL  LOU
P*.Ke   Or j  THE   U$$OAS:
Zht
\
Talk first, act later
The   notion   that student   the    university's    supreme
senators are as loosely knit
as a bad bladder is facing a
challenge.
For    years    the    few
students  elected   to  senate,
body on academic decisions,
were never together or
aware of what the other guy
was doing.
And    once    they    got
Free housing if. . .
Since when do furry little
animals rate more
than students?
It is well known there is a
serious housing problem for
students. Shacks, tents and
open-air camping are just
some of the humble abodes
currently being used.
Yet the administration is
playing an ongoing
volleyball game with various
government and education
officials  about  who  should
build student residences and
where they should go.
But if you're a pesky
animal at UBC, the housing
problem is over.
The board of governors
plan to spend upward of $3
million on a dormitory for
animals. The money will go
to "the breeding and
housing  of various animals.
For them it's a good deal.
They don't even pay
tuition fees.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 12,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
"You're fired!" yelled autocrat Dough Rushton at grinning Chris
Gainor, who had just cracked one of his godawful groaners. "And what's
more, you are going to announce your resignation for personal reasons
forthwith," Rushton screamed at Gary Coull. "I get the feeling the purge
has just begun," whispered Len MacKave to Gisela Reubsaat. "And you
will resign on the pretext of getting a higher post somewhere else,"
Rushton told Ralph Maurer as newcomers Charlie Rendina, Larry Hill
and Greg Thompson quivered in fright.
"Who could possibly be next in line," panicked Mark Buckshon, as
the man with the power stalked around the crowded room, looking for
trumped up excuses with which to shaft people. "I don't like your
name," he growled at Eric Ivan Berg. VAnd I don't like the way you
spell your name," he shouted at Bob (Root) Diotte, as Ron Binns and
Cedric Tetzel looked on in disbelief.
Even Boyd McConnell looked uneasily at Matt King and Peter
Cummings. The only one of all the crowd who wasn't awed was Marcus
Gee, number three of you know what, who bravely walked up to
Rushton, looked him in the eye and asked: "Who the hell do you think
you are anyway? Doug the thug?"
elected, they fade away with
the  rest  of  the  bores until
they   either   quit   or   faced
re-election.
But now with the news
that student senators are
organizing "regular, informal
meetings" perhaps things
will be different.
The student voice at
senate has frequently relied
on several strong, eloquent
individuals to hold up its
end. Student senators
haven't acted as a group and
this is the only way
increased representation will
reap benefits.
Hopefully the meetings
will continue and students
will be encouraged to
attend, ask questions and
give advice to the alleged
politicos.
Back to
1875
Childish games are being
played in residences — but
not by the students.
In one of the sillier moves
in recent years, the housing
administration has ejected
four female students from
their quadrant in Gage
Towers.
The reason — because the
two sexes lived
co-educat ionally. The
situation had been like that
for three years. Now the
administration decides to get
moral.
What a laugh.
This move by the student
senators should also wake
up AMS councillors and the
two board of governors
members to the fact that
joint action and
communication on all three
levels is essential.
There is really none now.
The odd backroom
discussion or the rumor mill
are prime sources for each
level knowing what the
other is doing.
Student politicians at all
levels should recognize the
importance of good
communications and move
to set up a meeting system
to guarantee it.
It should be every hack's
promise upon election to
meet regularly in open
session with each other and
the student population.
Follow the lead of
student   senators and  do   it
now.
Letters
Pony express
registration
The story goes like this . . .
around the beginning of June my
boyfriend decided to transfer from
the University of Calgary to the
University of B.C. His marks were
good so we figured that there would
be no problems. Transcripts were
obtained and sent in and we settled
back to await the happy news.
Around the middle of July, we
began to wonder what was happening. I phoned the registrars
office only to be told that there was
an evaluating period, and that we
would just have to wait.
Eight weeks passed with still no
word, so my friend semi-registered
with Calgary "just in case", but we
kept hoping that we would hear
from UBC soon.
Finally, in August, after a
number of phone calls to the
registrars office, I got in touch with
one clerk who told me to phone the
admissions office, where they
would at least be able to tell me if
he had been accepted.
Happily the admissions office
was able to confirm that he had
been accepted into the Science
faculty; but the waiting wasn't
over yet. We still didn't have any
"official" word.
Near the middle of August, the
University of Calgary sent my
friend a notice that if he didn't pay
his fees immediately, he would not
be accepted for Fall term. He still
had no word from UBC, and since
he is trying to get into medical
school, he decided that he couldn't
afford to take the chance on losing
a year.
He is now at the University of
Calgary. His UBC registration
forms arrived during the last week
of August.
Surely there must have been a
better way of handling the
situation. Couldn't the registrar's
office devise some way of
notifying accepted students in
better time?
E.K. Akrigg
Education 5
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.  musicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmu
Tired horn sounds great
By ROBT. DIOTTE
Flutist Paul Horn is upstairs at
Oil Can's all this week with a group
consisting of Ron Johnston on
keyboards, Mike Hendrikse on
drums, Jim McGillveray percussion, and Neil Swainson, bass.
The show is part of Oil Can's
continuing weekly jazz productions
which are designed to present good
jazz to Vancouver's night scene.
Oil Can's has a special jazz club for
the shows which reduces admission prices for members.
Horn — perhaps, best known for
his albums Inside, recorded inside
India's Taj Mahal with a flute, a
cassette recorder and the many
reverberations; and Inside II,.done
before an audience of killer whales
— is a basically sound jazzman as
the show at Oil Can's illustrated
admirably. As a session musician
he has worked with Chico
Hamilton, Miles Davis, Duke
Ellington, Nat King Cole, Ravi
Shankar, Frank Sinatra and Tony
Bennett. His solo work with the
Victoria Symphony Orchestra
earned him two Grammy awards
for the set Jazz Suite on the Mass
Texts. I understand he has also
completed an 18-week series of
half-hour TV shows featuring his
own ensemble and assorted guest
artists which will be aired on the
CTV network.
The music on Wednesday night
reflected   Horn's   broad   music
• • •
*
• • •
Staff wanted
As you are reading this part of
The Ubyssey, Page Friday, and
being transcended to the depths of
euridite criticism and comment,
wouldn't you like to be part of its
staff?
Aside from the fun and partying
you experience in the newsroom,
you get freebies to see interesting
items on campus and in Vancouver.
So we'll see you at 12:30 Tuesday
in The Ubyssey office, SUB 241 K.
People who ride bikes are
very quiet, don't mess up
the air, and stay skinnier
and sexier. So ride a
bike. We'll peddle
you a neat one.
-the Peddler.
620 E. Broadway
874-8611
peddler
bicycle centre
background. The esoteric and
mystical flavor of his most recent
albums, the Inside productions and
Visions, did not dominate the sets I
saw as I had thought it might. The
group demonstrated a competent
command of their jazz traditions
working a be-bop number a la
Charlie Parker with Horn playing
an alto sax. They did several tunes
composed by Tom Scott as well. A
Latin American influence was also
noticeable with McGilliveray's
work on the congas and a tune
composed by Luis Specia.
But, as might be expected, it was
the gentle flute playing which
carried the show. Backed by Ron
Johnston on Fender Rhodes
electric piano, Horn played several
numbers illustrating the ethereal
brevity and lightness of the flute as
a solo instrument. These included
some of his own recent compositions in addition to the Tom
Scott numbers. The piano balanced
the flute beautifully, and tied it
down with its harder, more
traditional tones, restraining that
spiritual side of Horn's music so
that it didn't get carried away with
itself, becoming self-indulgent.
Flute and piano carried on some
interesting dialogues, alternating
solo spots in the same composition.
The newest member of Horn's
quintet, bassist Neil Swainson, was
especially prominent. Apparently
he is a Victoria product. Swainson
came, up with several interesting
solos on his stand-up bass, utilizing
its full range. He also.indicated a
basic facility and understanding of
his    instrument.   At   only   19,
Swainson may be one to watch for.
The show on the whole was good.
It was mellow and Horn kept it
varied. Yet, the second and final
set was bothered by an undercurrent of fatigue, emanating
chiefly from Horn himself. The
quintet topped the night off with a
number Horn called Abstraction
which should have been a grand
finale. The group took the scale
apart, individuals soloing and
picking out themes that the others
could pick up on and develop, the
entire process  concentrating  on
directions and potentialities. There
was some good music coming out.
However, Horn was visibly tired
and confessed as much at the end
of the number. Whether it was the
heat -in the room, his own work
schedule, or whatever, the group
behind him seemed to have a bit
more energy than their leader. The
CAMPUS WIDE DANCE
 2 BANDS'	
Flair & Zenith
Time: Friday Sept. 12
8:00- 12:30
Place: S.U.B. Ballroom & Sub Party Room
FULL FACILITIES
duthie
books
The Collected Books of Jack Spicer, $5.00
Zen and The Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance, $2.25
Vancouver Hd. by D. Gutstein, $6.95
919 Robson 684-4496       670 Seymour 685-3627
Paperbackcellar   681-8713        1050 W.Pender 688-7434
4560 W. 10th      224-7012        Arbutus Village Square   266-0525
GRAND VIE W HO TEL
PRESENTS^.
Cameron Molloy
Box 4374 Stn. "D" Vancouver 9, B.C.
Canada (604) 879-7255
result being that Abstraction,
while ostensibly offering the
audience the surest insight into the
group's stuff, was perhaps the
most frustrating part of the night.
When the number ended; terminating rather blindly, there was
clearly a desire for more which
Horn didn't and wouldn't satisfy.
In fact, if the evening had one
major   flaw,   it   was   this   basic
fatigue. Not a listlessness but a
discernible reluctance to get
outside the compositions,
something which should have
happened with Abstraction.
Still Horn's superb work with the
flute and the sax, some fine piano
playing and Swainson's bass gave
a good deal to the jazz people.
Maybe the group was saving itself
for the bustling weekend crowds. I
understand the latest Paul Horn
album was recorded at a local
night spot live. It's called Special
Edition and it should be just that.
HORN
saving energy
c
a NEW concert series FOR YOU by the
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
ttufttolfy
hosted by Harry Adaskin
4 evenings at the Symphony
octC -oct17«nov19«dec13
^
special introductory
series prices
$18, $15, $12 or $9
extra-low student series
prices
.      $12, $10, $8 or $6
' a new concept in programming!
KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA conducts an evening of Impressionist music (Saint-Saens, Ravel, Debussy) with pianist
LEONARD PENNARIO.
(AMES CONLON conducts 3 favourite works inspired by
"Romeo and Juliet".
THE ROMEROS play lutes, vihuelasend guitars. Music that
spans the centuries — Vivaldi, Bach and a world premiere!
SIMON STREATFEIID conducts.
MEREDITH DAVIES conducts Hoist and Elgar, talks about
Tradition in music, and introduces Britain's piano whiz
\PAUL CROSSLEY. >
PLUS a lively, "in-a-nutshell" commentary at the concerts by distinguished
musician-broadcaster Harry Adaskin.
For a flyer with full details, call the Symphony at
689-1411.
FOR THE BEST SEATS: Hurry to the Vancouver
Ticket Centre on Hamilton Street. Or charge to
your Eaton account by calling 683-3255.
This series is generously CPAir
sponsored by CP Air.
VANCOUVER SyfViprlONy ORCHESTRA
H
Page Friday. 2
T HE
UBYSSEY
Friday, September 12, 1975 recordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsrecordsreco
Dylan's "basement" light
Bob Dylan and the Band,
The Basement Tapes.
Columbia.
BY RON BINNS
The Basement Tapes are a
legendary collection of Bob Dylan
songs recorded by Dylan and the
Band back in 1967.
This was in the period when
Dylan went into retreat from the
world after his motorbike accident.
Since then only two of these
songs have been officially released
("You Ain't Going Nowhere" and
"Crash on the Levee") but in different versions.
Other of these songs have been
made famous  by  other  artists,
in the savagely bitter "Dirge," "I
hate myself for loving you and the
weakness that it showed." The
next and most recent album Blood
on the Tracks was generally
welcomed as the first sign of Dylan
moving back to crack-up themes
which losers and lovers could begin
identifying with once again.
The Basement Tapes take us
right back to the agonized edges of
those old Blonde on Blonde days of
speed and roses. These songs are
raw and pained, in a continuum
with the best of Highway 61
Revisited and Blonde on Blonde.
Dylan is at the epicentre, providing
a collective vision of an America of
madness  and  laconic   suffering,
DYLAN ... The Basement Tapes could well be his best. Reporter
Binns feels this effort by Dylan and The Band is the alter-ego to
Dylan's Blonde on Blonde.
notably The Band, "Tears of
Rage," The Byrds, "Too Much of
Nothing," Julie Driscoll, "This
Wheel's On Fire," and Fairport
Convention, "Million Dollar
Bash."
As Rolling Stone magazine
remarked earlier this year, the
non-release of these songs, among
the finest recordings Dylan has
ever done, has been one of the
biggest mysteries of his career —
though bootleg copies have circulated.
These songs embody that phase
in Dylan's career which the Blood
on the Tracks album released
earlier this year reached out for
with a pained nostalgia. This was
the period before Dylan came out
of his enforced retirement to
release John Wesley Harding. That
album was like nothing he had ever
done before, and .has been
described as "a penitent's album,
ridden with shame, guilt and desire
for atonement — Dylan's "Ash
Wednesday" as surely as
"Desolation Row" was his "Waste
Land."
The route mapped out on that
album was followed by increasingly mellow albums —
Nashville Skyline, Self Portrait,
New Morning — celebrating . a
simple, pastoral, almost cloying
style of life and love.
With Planet Waves the cracks in
the facade began to show, notably
populated by freaks, tough ladies
and losers.
Though many of the lines in these
songs are deceptively simple,
there is a dark sinister edge to
them.
"It was January 30th and
everyone was feeling fine," Dylan
sings casually at the beginning of
"Clothes Line Saga," in a voice as
deep and croaking as Leonard
Cohen's. The saga unfolds as a
portrait of a sleepy provincial
America where absurdity is the
order of the day.
Have you heard the news
he said with a grin
The Vice-President's gone
mad
Where? Downtown
When? Last night
The neighbour's reaction to the
news is, oh well, "it's just
something we're gonna have to
forget." A vision of a mad America
perhaps, but one that has been
reinforced by all that has happened
south of Blaine in the last eight
years. "And then I shut all the
doors,' tne singer concludes with a
sinister leer.
And who, we might ask, is the
mysterious Tiny Montgomery in
the song of the same title? All we
are told is that he intends visiting
certain people, and from the tone
of the song they aren't going to
enjoy it much. A figure, perhaps,
like Yeats's rough beast, slouching
towards Alabama to be born.
Many of the songs on this double
album are about love failed (including one fine, aching song by
the Band, "Katie's Been Gone").
Some have the jeering tone
which Dylan has often put into his
singing, as though to distance
himself from too openly confessing
emotion.
The structures of the songs often
revolve around paradox. In "Tears
of Rage" Dylan appears completely gutted of the anger implied
in the title. In "You Ain't Going
Nowhere" the singer's jubilation at
the arrival of his bride on the
morrow seems negated by the slow
run-down drawl of his voice, and
the implications of the sneering
chorus, "You—Ain't—Going-
No—Where."
On "Yea Heavy and a Bottle of
Bread" we are in a tangled world
of drums and pipes and bottles, and
the invitation "take me down to
California, baby" is more like a
cry for help than any invitation to
love or permanence.
At one extreme we are offered
ritual incantations to love:
'Under that apple-suckling
tree oh yeah
under that apple-suckling
tree oh yeah
under that tree there's just
gonna be you and me
The song convinces by the
genuine cry of ecstatic expectation
in Dylan's voice. *
But at the other end of the
emotional spectrum is the downer
side familiar from Blonde on
Blonde, but stripped of poetry.
In "Please, Mrs. Henry" Dylan
is very clearly drunk out of his
skull, jeering:
I can drink like a fish
I can crawl like a snake
I can bit like a turkey
I    can    slam    like    a    drake
The song   is  packed-out   with
double-meanings, including the
sardonic confession that Dylan's
bladder isn't any different to
anyone else's ("If I walk too much
further my crane's going to leak").
The raw mood conjured by the
lyrics is reinforced by the unpolished gutsy arrangements and
the crude recording equipment
used, making the album much
more satisfying to hear on a cheap
stereo than on an expensive one.
The songs seem to be almost all
to do with pain or an escape from
pain. Dylan's relationships with
women always seem to end with
him "on the waters of oblivion,"
with, as the title says, "Too much
of nothing."
The three outstanding tracks on
The Basement Tapes are "Goin' to
Acapulco," "Tears of Rage," and
"This Wheel's on Fire." On
"Acapulco" Dylan refers in a voice
of total desolation to a life where he
is able to "drink my rum, and then
go on home and have my fun," like
it was an invitation to his own
crucifixon. Acapulco and the
mysterious Rosemary of the song
become places where the singer
dreams of fleeing to for comfort,
but the mournful wailing singing
makes it sound like an escape
doomed from the start.
On "Tears of Rage" Dylan
seems to reach the edge for the
expression of naked emotion. The
voice singing
Tears of rage, tears of grief,
why am I always the one
who must be the thief
is a voice full of grief, purged of
discontented rage, left only with
&
W\
Restaurant
&
Delicatessen Ltd.
Authentic Hungarian Specialties
Full Dining Facilities
Open: Monday - Saturday - 9 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
Sunday - 12:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
3605 W. 4th Ave.
733-8038
vulnerability and naked confession
of suffering. The song deals with a
nameless, somehow monstrous
betrayal,
And now the heart is filled with
gold
as if it was at first
but oh what kind of love is this
which goes from bad to worse.
"This Wheel's On Fire" works
with similar emotional material,
but anger and bitterness have
begun to replace vulnerability.
"If your memory serves you
well," Dylan cries, with the implication that the woman's
.memory is a fallible, selfish instrument, "we were going to meet
again in a while." There seems to
be an assertion of the uniqueness of
his love in the face of the woman's
rejection: "no man alive will come
to you with another tale to tell."
It's a deeply ambiguous song,
and the incredible thumping
drumming builds up the polarities
of the lyrics. On the one hand the
singer threatens to explode with
grief and anger.
He threatens to win her back by
the violence of his longing: "After
every plan had failed you knew
that we should meet again." But on
the other hand the emotions
threaten to turn against the singer,
becoming self-destructive, even
suicidal (why else should he be
crying, "Please notify my next of
kin"?).
The Basement Tapes is like the
warped drunken alter-ego of the
Blonde on Blonde double album. It
could be the best album to appear
this year. If you like Blood on the
Tracks you'll like these songs, but
be prepared for the shock of the
ragged arrangements. And have a
whiskey sour or a few beers first to
get into the right mood.
izza
free
Campus Delivery
I PHONE j
224-1720
I 224-6336 |
4450 W. 10th AVE.
and
Fully Licensed
Pizza in 29 Styles
Choice of 3 Sizes
Special Italian Dishes
STEAKS - SEA FOODS
Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. - Sunday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
HOURS:
Mon. to Fri. - 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m.
Saturday - 4:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.
Sun. & Holidays - 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
4444 WEST 10th AVE.
Welcome back
UBC Students
from the
Front Quarter
STEAK HOUSE
Dine Out
At Reasonable Prices
FULL FACILITIES
WE SERVE ONLY
GRADE A
ALBERTA BEEF
228-8718
Friday, September 12, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
T*aaet>  TPrirla^   % imsfttmsfilmsfUmsfilmsfilmsfilmsfilmsfi^
Hennessey puts down Irish
BY RON BINNS
Hennessey is the Day of the
Jackal in disguise, with the Queen
of England starring as the
assassin's target. Though the
ending is predictable the movie
certainly manages to provide
enough action and suspense to keep
you chewing your nails all the way
to the, uh, explosive climax.
That is, if you can really get very
worried about victims like the
Royal family, who appear in the
movie like a bad scene from Monty
Python (Prince Charles is a
scream), and their entourage of fat
boring British politicians like
Edward Heath and Harold Wilson.
But if you have any kind of
emotional or political feelings
about what is happening in Northern Ireland today then Hen'
nessey is perhaps best avoided,
since it is merely a slick attempt to
cash in on the tragedy.
The opening scenes of the movie
are superbly realistic, but it
quickly slides towards the crass
stereotyping with which the
commercial cinema always seems
to fall back on when called upon to
deal with political or terrorist
related activity. '
Thus Hennessey is portrayed as
the all round nice guy who will
have nothing to do with the Irish
Republican Army.
Only when his wife and daughter
are killed accidentally by British
troops does he put his skill with
explosives to use by embarking on
a one-man revenge mission to blow
up the state opening of the British
parliament.
The movie has a zero grasp of the
reasons behind the scenes it portrays. We see Belfast teenagers
egged on by their hag mothers
stoning plucky British .troops, who
come over as decent young lads
doing an unpleasant job in difficult
circumstances. In this movie when
the British soldier machine-guns
the crowd it really is an accident.
Compared to the reality of Northern Ireland this is just a sick
joke, since the British army isn't
any different than any other when
it comes to terrorizing a colonial
population.
Hennessey
Starring Rod Steiger, Lee Remick
and Richard Johnson
Showing at Park Theatre and West
Van Odeon	
Similarly the IRA come over as
stereotyped figures, seedy
Irishmen in scruffy clothes, who
gasp with maidenly shock when
they discover what Hennessey's
target is.
The chess game is completed by
the wooden figure of Lee Remick,
starring as the woman who knows
Shit mountain
By ERIC IVAN BERG
Thick blue pus oozes out of a neck boil, bloody sparrows flutter out of
the ribs of a student protester recently gunned down by the Mexican
militia and a Christ-like figure is crucified covered with bloodsucking
insects — yes startling, shocking, surreal images. It's obviously the
resplendent gore again of Alexandro "El Topo" Jodorowsky attacking
both your senses and sensitivities. Now the way out western, "El Topo's"
sequel is playing at the Varsity Theatre under the occult title of The Holy
Mountain.
' Yes it's Jodorowsky again, the Mexican madman of contemporary
international film making. He's trying to thematically pick up where the
body count of the blood saturated sensation "El Topo" left off. The
seemingly similar surreal and eternal quest for the higher spiritual
planes of being, of understanding all cosmic consciousness and of the
search, the perfect master to conquer the body are still Jodorowsky's
thematic mashed potatoes. The new film is an imagistic and surrealistic
barbecue of close shot proportions with a wonderfully macabre morality
play. Yet it is filmed with very little illuminating morality of its own.
The HolyMountain
Directed by Alexandro Jodorowsky
Screenplay by Jodorowsky et al
Starring Jodorowsky et al
Music by R. Fragatani & D. Cherry
Varsity Theatre
Jodorowsky's rather meandering follow-the-leader plotline has a
Christ-like figure attaching himself to the Alchemist — to the perfect
master and guru —played stoically by Jodorowsky himself. Then the
industrialists and political dogma mongers, all come barking to this
master's door. They conspire to obtain immortality and so submit
themselves to his leadership in order to be so blessed.
Like Castenada's Don Juan, Jodorowsky the Alchemist, leads them
through trial and error meditation and then on to Lotus Island to climb
See PF 6
JAZZ
NOW PLAYING
PAUL HORN
and his QUINTET
COMING ATTRACTIONS
SEPT. 15 - JACK DEJOHNETTE'S
DIRECTIONS
SEPT. 16 - FOR TWO WEEKS
"HEART"
IN THE BACKROOM
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW
RESERVATIONS
683-7306
from deep within her that violence
never solved anything, by Trevor
Howard as the police chief in
charge of defending Her Majesty,
an officer who performs his duties
with stiff-upper-lipped decency,
and by Richard Johnson as the
vicious plain-clothes detective who
gets his jollies by kicking Irishmen
in the genitals.
Hennessey himself is an equally
superficial figure, since the
psychology which propels his
mission is never dramatized as
anything but a simplistic revenge.
We never learn anything about his
past or the thoughts which tick
through his mind (except for flashback scenes of his dead family) as
he grunts his way to the end of his
mission.
The London locations add a good
deal to what authenticity the movie
does possess. The newsreel footage
of the Royal family is brilliantly
keyed in with the surrounding
pursuit of Hennessey in a far
superior way to the use of
documentary film in Executive
Action, the fact/fiction movie
about the Kennedy assassination.
There are also some hilariously
ironic touches, like when the head
of the IRA waves at the Queen and
gives her a sickly grin.
Another good reason for staying
away from Hennessey if you care
about Northern Ireland is the
audience participation. When I
went to see it the reactionary
limeys in the audience were just
about coming to blows with the
IRA sympathizers present, and the
tit for tat violence is enough to
whip up the emotions of anyone
who supports either side.
Of course the fact that the movie
only presents two warring sides is
another simplification in itself.
Protestant terrorists are nowhere
to be seen in this movie, and the
IRA is presented as a s.ingle body,
rather than, as is the case, divided
between the Provisional and the
Official wings.
Essentially this movie conveys a
simplistic and reactionary view of
the crisis. Its slick stereotyping
merely confuses a dark, complex
social reality, and distances it into
a kind of contemporary game of
cowboys and Indians.
The adverts claim that Hennessey is banned in Britain. This is
bullshit, since the film is currently
playing in Leicester Square,
London, only a few hundred broken
windows and mangled limbs from
the latest bombing. Although the
presentation of the Queen without
the usual state-TV controlled
format of unctuous commentary
may be mildly offensive to the
British establishment, there is no
reason to see this movie as being
any. more controversial or insurrectionary than Dean Kenny's
latest statement to UBC Reports.
The IRA blew up a pub where I
once used to have an occasional
drink, so I must admit they make
me kinda nervous. On the other
hand they also bombed the cinema
where I saw Love Story, so they
can't be all bad.
I suggest anyone who really
wants to get beneath the glossy
surface of Hennessy reads War and
an Irish Town by Eamon McCann.
You might follow that up by
reading My Queen and I by
William Hamilton. The Queen is an
enormously wealthy and selfish
women, and her assassination
wouldn't be a loss to anyone.
Here's to you, Guy Fawkes.
SUBFILMSOC presents
He sold his
soul for
rockn'rolL
—ofthe?	
>ARAD1SE
THURS./SUN.
7:00
FRI./SAT.
7:00/9:30
SUB
THEATRE
75*
Please show AMS cards
This year will In; Cinema 1 (i's sixteenth season as an integral
purl of I '.K.C.'s Film Society. Faoh \ par an unusual collection of people together with a select group of huirv thunder-
ers mutter among themselves and conspire to bring a variety
of totally excellent and modestly priced cinematographic art
to the silver screen.
The tall program will consist ot our traditional International Series alternating every second Monday with the
Gangster Series from September to December.
Our spring offering will have a Contemporary French
Cinema Series exchanging alternate Monday's with a Comedy Classics Series from lanuary to March.
MEMBERSHIP FEES
Admission is by series pass only. No single admissions are
sold. Members must be at least 16 years of age. Each member
of a series may bring a guest ONCE to that series.
Series pass to any ONE series
students and staff  $ 4.50
general public   $ 5.50
Complete Fall or Spring series i.e.
Gangsters and International Series   or
Comedy Classics and Contemporary French Cinema Series
Students and staff  $ 8.00
general public   $ 9.50
All FOUR series purchased at once
students and staff  $15.00
general public  $18.00
COMEDY CLASSICS
GANGSTER
INTERNATIONAL
CONTEMPORARY
FRENCN   CINEMA
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM
Duthie Books Stores —
919 Robson — 1050 West Pender
617 Seymour — 4560 West Tenth
Pauline's Book Store  — 1 105 Denman
The Alma Mater Society in SCB
Bv mail from our office and at the door.
SHOWTIMES:  6:00 pm and 8:30 pm all series on Mondays.
LOCATION:   All Cinema  16 presentations are held in the
Student Union Building auditorium. CBC.
INFORMATION:  Cinema 16
Box ;S5. SCB. t'BC
228-3697
EVirJ
a\r
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 12, 1975 PF   INTERV>
Reporter Bob Diotte accomplishes the impossible:
he gets usually reticent author Matt Cohen to talk .
BY ROBT DIOTTE
PF: You're a writing farmer. Or
a farming writer. How do you mix
those two occupations..
Cohen: There's no incompatibility in it.
PF: Do you divide your days up
at all? ... I guess what I'm trying
to say is when is it most productive
for you to write?
Cohen: I'm not a very scheduled
person. I write anytime. It just
depends how I feel that day.
PF: Your winters are free.
Cohen: Yeah.
PF: You don't get up in the
morning and drop into a chair and
say, well, I'm going to write now.
Cohen: No. Well, sometime I do.
I don't have a schedule.
PF: You once said that you don't
think of yourself as a Canadian
writer.
Cohen: Yeah. Times have
changed. What I mean was I don't
think of myself in terms of a public
persona the way some Canadian
writers are — when they are. It's
not that I don't think of myself as a
Matt Cohen is regarded by most
critics as the Canadian writer to
look for. He has written The
Disinherited and Wooden Hunters.
After finishing this interview,
reporter Diotte remarked, "I felt
that my talking to him revealed
more about myself than Cohen."
Yet, Cohen does react more to
some questions than others, which
comments on his character.
writer in Canada. That's still true.
It's always seemed to me that
Canadian writers, at least — I
mean not necessarily in detail but
in general — always have some
sort of public thing to say about
Canada and about Canadians and I
don't think that's true of myself.
PF: One of the things I found
though, and it kind of annoyed me a
little in a way, is that you seem to
enjoy little flippant tags. Like you
said once that Canada is Christian
and conservative.
Cohen: Sure. I'd say that again.
PF: Isn't that character lost in
our roots now? You're not particularly Christian and conservative and you're Canadian.
Cohen: Well, there are things
that are true about Canada in
general that aren't true about
every single person in detail. I
think that Canada is basically
Christian and conservative. What
do you mean it's lost in our roots?
PF: I mean that we're vastly
different today from what we were
even in the 50's.
Cohen: I don't think we are.
PF: Okay.
Cohen: I think we're vastly
similar. Why do you think we're so
different?
PF: Well for one thing we're
much more of an urban population
now.
Cohen: But that's just more. I
think Canadians still want to live in
families and enjoy a good material
life and have recreation like their
vacation every year and live a
pretty ordinary kind of life as
opposed to getting immensely rich.
It's a pretty conservative country.
We've had, well, most provinces
have had the same kind of
government for most of their
duration. The Liberal party which
is really conservative, the conservatives staying basically the
same, we elect the liberals year
after year. I don't think I'd take
that back actually. *
PF:Okay. Do you have an
awareness of fiction as a special
element apart from the society as a
whole?
Cohen: Well, I think it is in some
countries but I don't think fiction
particularly deserves it in Canada,
because the novel isn't really in-
diginous to Canada; and the novels
that are popular tend to be the
more conventional novels. The
idea of what is acceptable as a
novel hasn't really changed over
the last 20 or 30 or 40 years.
PF: You used that word conventional in another context. You
said that the 70s would be a time of
political oppression and fiction will
become more conventional as a
result. What do you mean by
conventional?
Cohen: It will tell stories about
people set in a place. It will tell
stories that are not necessarily
related to the political conflicts
that are happening.
PF: In what sense is that conventional though?
Cohen: Well because I think the
conventional novel is a story about
people set in a very definite place.
PF: A return to the novel of Jane
Austen then?
Cohen: Yeah, the novel of Jane
Austen is the conventional novel of
Canada. The 19th century novel.
PF: You also said that being an
experimental writer implies that a
writer  doesn't  know  what   he's
COHEN ... no writing pattern.
doing. For that reason you don't
want to be known as an experimental writer because you
always know what you. are doing.
But it's always seemed to me that
an experimental writer has to
know so much more about what he
;is doing than the conventional
writer.
Cohen: Well, you see, the way
the word experimental is used by
critics is that such and such a novel
is experimental because the writer
tried to do something without any
idea of what effect is will have or
how it will go. The word is not used
by writers. It's primarily a critic's
word.
PF: With The Disinherited you
moved away from your own early
experiments, and you went back to
the conventional novel. Does that
say   anything   about   your   own
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE3
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
SEPTEMBER 12-20
(Previews Sept. 10 & 11)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by John Brockington
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $6.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 10 - 20 MISALLIANCE by Shaw
Oct. 29 - Nov. 8 DOCTOR FAUSTUS by Marlowe
Jan. 14 - 24 SCAPINO by Moliere
March 3 - 13 SPRING'S AWAKENING by Wedekind
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
iSupport Your Campus Theatre.
development? This return to what
you call the conventional type of
novel?
Cohen: I think with The
Disinherited I was writing about
something that concerned a place
not just the consciousness of the
people. I mean I thought the
consciousness of the people and the
place were very integrated. I was
interested in conveying that. So I
was trying to write the novel to
show that.
PF: Hunters seems to show the
same kind of concern.
Cohen: Yes. That one is very
place oriented as well. I guess I
just went through a place phase. I
got very interested in particular
locations. Probably this reflects
my own travelling around and my
own concerns for my life.
PF: Are you still working along
the same lines?
Cohen: No. I think that Kor-
sonoloff and Johnny Crackle Sings
are quite different from each
other. And some people say that
The Disinherited and Wooden
Hunters are very different. So I
don't see myself as having a sort of
set pattern for writing. I'm just
trying to write each book
PF: Because The Disinherited
was such a success, did you get any
pressure to produce another book
right away? Is that why Wooden
Hunters has followed the other one
so soon?
Cohen: No. As you know there's
a big gap between writing and
publishing so Wooden Hunters was
virtually completed by the time
The Disinherited came out. I
wouldn't have minded waiting
another year to publish it (Wooden
Hunters).
PF: You were rushed then.
Cohen: Oh yea. I mean, they
wanted to put it outright away.
PF: The reason I ask is because I
was bothered by the CW Smith
chapter in Wooden Hunters. The
whole book is in a very low key and
in those terms it carries. But it
never really fits in with the first
part of the book. I just wondered if
that kind of thing was the result of
some pressure on you to get the
book out? I mean, the book doesn't
seem to hold together structurally.
Cohen: Well if it doesn't it's not
because I didn't think about it. I
mean if the book would have sat
around for a year I wouldn't have
changed it structurally.
PF: It was finished then as far as
you were concerned.
Cohen: Yeah.
PF: Another thing that interested me is your PhD in
economics.
Cohen: That's not true. I saw
that in the blurb and I told them
(McClelland and Stewart) it wasn't
true. I don't know where they get
their information. The fact is I
went to university, that's all.
JAWS
Thi terrifying
motion picture
from the terrifying
No. 1 best seller.
MATURE:
Some frightening
and gory
scenes.
—R. W. McDonald
Vogue
VIS GRANVILLE
685   5434
SHOWTIMES:  12:15,2:20,
4:45, 7:10, 9:30
DftAGON
Odeon
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
SHOW TIMES:
12:15, 2:15,
4:10, 6:05, 8:O0, 10:00
Frequent scenes of brutal violence
SEX
CLINIC
Also
"SCHOOL OF
EROTIC
ENJOYMENT"
Coronet
SCHOOL: 12:20, 3:05
6:00, 9:00
SEX: 2:00, 4:45, 7:35, 10:35
151   GRANVILLE
*<5-6S2a
SDNFfJUKS
UMARAWMKOR'
KMCTHWIUUMS
HATTI JACQUES
•OMAItDHfSSlAW
JOIN SIMS
KENNETH CONNOR
PnOUUTTBHWRTH
JACK DOUGLAS
CARRY
DICK
WHAT THEY DO TO
DICK TURPIN IS
HILARIOUS
MATURE
SHOWTIMES:
7:30, 9:30
CAMBIE »i 18th
876-2747
VERY rT
<
MALE HOMOSEXUALITY
HROUGHOUT
Dunbar
7:30, 9:30
224-7252 a
DUNBAR .1 30th      J
"A BRILLIANT,
DAZZLING GIANT
OF A FILM."
—Marjorie Rosen,
Ms. Magazine
J?' "■**.
|K       WINNER
<K INTERNATIONAL
\f      BEST ACTOR
V.   cannes rim
\ festal »  i»wr y *%
ENGLISH
SUBTITLES
Written and Directed by
UNA WERTMULLER
"BREATH-TAKING
FILM!"
—Paul D. Zimmerman,
Newsweek
"REMARKABLE,
SUPERIOR FILM!"
—Rex Reed. N.Y. News
ENGLISH SUBTITLES
—Scenes of nudity
and brutality.
—R. W. McDonald
Varsitu
7:30, 9:30
224-3730V
4375 W. 10th
Friday, September 12. 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
§4 ftl/f riA' A new Canadian film opens today
at the Lougheed theatre. It Seemed
Like A Good Idea At The Time,
despite its long title, is a hour and
40 minute long comedy set in
Toronto. With capable acting by
Anthony Newley, Stefanie Powers
and Isaac Hayes, it looks like more
than your average Can-flick. In
fact, it's better than The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz.
Frank Zappa should be here on
campus Oct. 1. Tickets go on sale
Tuesday in the A.M.S. Business
office, second floor of SUB.
Queen Elizabeth Theatre is
showing the film Argentina with
Clay Francisco. And on Wednesday, Chuck Mangione (the Joys
of Jazz) In The Queen E Playhouse
"Jacques Brel" Is Alive And Well
And Living In Paris has its final
show tonight. Then there will be
various musical items throughout
the week on 1975 CBC British
Columbia Festival.
The Actors' Workshop will interview people for their various
workshops, which will begin
Monday. Phone, 681-6636 for info.
Poets are invited to write for the
rules and entry forms for a poetry
competition which offers a $1500
first prize. Write: World of Poetry,
801 Pertola Dr., Dept 211, San
Francisco CA 94127. The contest
closes Nov. 30.
Berg  ...
them. You may be put off by the
of a metaphysical cop out. The film
is shot in English with distracting
French subtitles — which lets you
know how the Quebecois feel about
having to put up with a confusing
glut of English subtitles all the
time.
Jodorowsky's images are
unavoidably delicious, even if one
considers them mere shock
therapy cinema. The stunning sets
and incredible costumes of his cast
are always a treat. One remembers the scene where the colorful
model Mexican city populated by
plumed frogs is invaded by toad
soldiers dressed as Spanish
conquistadores. All are blown
apart in the scene's explosive
finale. Somehow he never had any
trouble with the S.P.C.A. Still such
memorable scenes are fascinating
despite their obvious excesses.
Indeed the outstanding color tint
of most of Jodorowsky's films is
blood red — a deeply Spanish and
machismo cultural ikon if there
ever was one. But if you in any way
managed to enjoy "El Topo" you
will find something in The Holy
Mountain to recommend it to you.
Its splendid images and
Castenadaized prophetic vision has
a brilliance of conception that is
perhaps hard to swallow at first
but one that's harder to find
anywhere else (except perhaps in
some younger Fellini films).
£*fc\  -M
stiUe^Hh'
i>
MK-U *mmmmW*P> "
mm&*~mmfkr*f        '
"wi
; &ta
VjmmWW
r
7>
THE
CHARLES BOGLE
PHONOGRAPH DISPENSARY
new
& used
records
4430 W.lOth
2240232
SATURDAY, MONDAY & TUESDAY
RECORD TIME SPECIALS
SEPT. 13th, 15th & 16th
We've been able to make some fantastic record buys . .. but in limited
quantities ... so we've decided to put them on sale EACH FOR ONE-HALF HOUR
ONLY as noted below! Limited Quantities Available!
c:jw .ji ^ii;.;
SATURDAY 9-9:30 A.M.
BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS
Mirror Image
v
SATURDAY 10-10:30 A.M.
POSITIVE VIBRATIONS
Ten Years After
SATURDAY 11 -11:30 A.M.
MOTT THE HOOPLE
SATURDAY 12-12:30 P.m.
LIVERHYMIN'
Paul Simon in Concert
2.66
2.66
2.66
2.66
• 99
Unless otherwise specified.
APLI 0933
TWO LANE HIGHWAY
Pure Prairie League
DXU 4009
GEORGE McRAE
DXU 4008
ROCKIN' CHAIR
Gwen McCrae
DXU 4010
GET DOWN TONIGHT
K.C. & The Sunshine
Band
ABCZ 758
CAN'T BUY A THRILL
Steely Dan	
APLI 0995
POWER IN THE MUSIC
The Guess Who
ABCD 888
COMING DOWN YOUR
WAY
Three Dog Night
ABCD 874
CHOCOLATE CHIP
Isaac Hayes
ABCD 891
HEAD OVER HEELS
Poco
ABCD 846
KATY LIED
Steely Dan
ABCD 835
PHOTOGRAPH'S
MEMORIES
Jim Croce
LCPX  1004
THE BEST OF THE
GUESS WHO
CPU 0998
YOUNG AMERICANS
David Bowie
CPU 0374
JOHN DENVER'S
GREATEST HITS
MASTERWOflKS
.99
Unless otherwise
specified.
KZ 33150
SURVIVAL
The O'Jays
KZ 33162
INTERNATIONAL
The Three Degrees
.69
Unless otherwise specif ied.
PR 33409
BLOW BY BLOW
Jeff Beck
PC 33100
CHICAGO VIII
PC 9914
BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED
WATER
Simon & Garfunkel
PC 33235
BLOOD ON THE TRACKS
Bob Dylan
PC 32400
CHICAGO VI
PC 33394
BETWEEN THE LINES
Janis Ian
PE 33454
ADVENTURES IN
PARADISE
Minnie Riperton
PZ 33536
THE HEAT IS ON
The Isley Bros.
PC 33480
IAN HUNTER
PC 33442
KOKOMO
gp 8 C.TOA.
Chicago
[2 Record Set] $5.99
C2X 33682
THE BASEMENT TAPES
Bob Dylan & The Band
2 Record Set $6.99
AND... THESE VALUES ON SALE DAILY
UNTIL THURSDAY, SEPTEMDER 18th
RCA
.39
Unless otherwise
specified.
SP 4529
JAMAICA SAY YOU WILL
Joe Cocker
SP 4519
CAT STEVEN'S
GREATEST HITS
SP 4533
STORM AT SUNUP
Gino Vanelli
SP 4527
DIAMONDS & RUST
Jaon Baez
SP 4539
DO YOU WONDER
Shawn Philips
SP 4530
Horizon
The Carpenter's
SP 4511
HAIR OF THE DOG
Nazarath
SP 77029
TOMCAT
Tom Scott & The L.A.
Express
SP 4313
TEASER & THE FIRECAT
Cat Stevens
SP 4502
PLUG ME INTO
SOMETHING
Henry Gross
SP 4518
CHASE THE CLOUDS
AWAY
Chuck Mangione
SP 7009
TAPESTRY
Carole King
SP 4396
RAZAMANAZ
Nazareth
SP 3654
IT'LL SHINE WHEN IT
SHINES
Ozark Mountain
Daredevils
MONDAY 11-11:30 A.M.
THE RISE & FALL OF
ZIGGIE STARDUST
David Bowie
$2.99
MONDAY 1-1:30 P.M.
RED OCTOPUS
Jefferson Starship
2.99
TUESDAY 9-9:30 A.M.
SUZI QUATRO
$2.66
TUESDAY 10-10:30 A.M.
QUATRO
Suzi Quatro
$2.66
SP3406
LOVE WILL KEEP US
TOGETHER
The Captain & Tennile
$3.69
Q&6sound
556 Seymour St., 682-6144
^w*
TU ESDAY 11 -11:30 A.M.
YOUR MAMA WON'T LIKE
ME— Suzi Quatro
Open Thursday & Friday until 9 P.M.
2.66 SPOR TS
Soccer 'Birds drop opener
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team dropped their season opener
3-1 to the Eldorado Glens Wednesday night at Capilano Stadium.
After getting on the scoreboard
first through a goal by Ken Garret,
the 'Birds fell back on defense and
gave up three goals within twenty
minutes.
UBC coach Joe Johnson said the
'Birds showed the same mistakes
that knocked them out of contention last season. The backs were
carrying the ball when clearing it
would have been easier and safer
and some midfielders were
dribbling when they should be
passing.
Despite the loss Johnson said he
is happy he found out the mistakes
early in the season so that they can
be ironed out before the team's
trek to the United States.
Johnson said some of the
veterans he felt he could rely on
simply "did not justify their inclusion." and "changes will be
made."
•••••••••••••••••••••I
The Pit
Presents
"CIRCUS"
-7 Piece rock band-
SEPT. 13
These changes will be tested next
Wednesday night at 7:30 p.m. at
Capilano Stadium when the 'Birds
take on the Royal Oak Astors who
were promoted from the second
division along with the Wesburns
when the Italians and the Sporting
clubs were relegated at the end of
the last season.
* * *
The UBC tennis team will hold
their tryouts Sept. 15,17, 19, 22, and
24 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. to
play inter-squad matches.
They will both be held at the
Winter Sports Centre tennis courts.
*    *     *
The UBC cricket team will wind
up its 5-month season this Saturday
Sept. 13th 1:00 p.m. with a game
against the Vancouver Rowing
Club at Connaught Park.
A win or a favourable draw will
8-1:00 A.M.
Advance Tickets
Available
at
Information Desk
A.M.S. Business Office
S.U.B. -2nd Floor
or at the door
••••••••••••••••••••
~J\inq of m>t
Let Lindy's
Cater Your
Next Party
COMPLETE banquet
FACILITIES
Menus Upon Request
DELICATESSEN-RESTAURANT
3211 W. BROADWAY
TAKEOUTS -   738-2010
LICENSED PREMISES
give the UBC team the Mainland's
League's 1st division title.
*     *     *
The UBC football team will try to
turn the win against University of
Manitoba into a streak when they
meet the Royal Military College
Saturday Sept. 13 at Thunderbird
Stadium at 2 p.m.
PANGO — PANGO (UNS) —
"Where have all the puce blorgs
gone," muttered Fosdick Pretzel,
the overworked sports editor of the
Daily Blah.
Poor Pretzel was trying to put
out a sports page all by himself —
and just couldn't understand the
seeming desertion of blorg Snarl
Vestpocket and the nonappearance of new sports minded
puce blorgs.
Pag* 11
S.U.B.
ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
If you are interested in organizational, committee and gallery
work,
Please submit an application to:
Art Gallery Committee
Box 23, S.U.B.
Giving particulars  on  your background and/or interest in
gallery work.
This is a working committee and will involve active
participation.
Love is
S?3
■sharing a shirt
T-Shirt Tree
CUSTOM SCREENING
&
IRON-ON TRANSFERS
OVER 400 DESIGNS
WE PRINT ANYTHING
Custom Designs For
Fraternities, Intramurals,
Teams, Clubs, etc.
27 W. Cordova 2^^,683-2933
"■
VASQUE CASCADE
glad you've got a boot
this good.'d) foam rubber padded top for
snug, comfortable fit. (2.) NICKEL PLATED EYELETS
won't rust or corrode. (3.) LITTLEWAY CONSTRUCTION with heavy leather insole.(4.)VIBRAM-' LUG
SOLE AND HEEL for traction. (5.) TWO STRONG
MIDS0LES for support. (6.) SPLIT LEATHER
UPPERS with reinforced ankle cup.
The lightweight boot is designed for
trail hiking with packs up to 25 pounds.
It is constructed of split leathers for
flexibility and comfort. For a professional fitting, see our experts.
I
Demonstration By UBC Paksing Futga
KUNG FU CLUB
Chief Instructor
MASTER RAYMOND LEUNG
16th Sept., Tuesday-12:30
in SUB BALLROOM FREE ADMISSION
mouer
tHe fuoutrtaui beotii
THE
GREAT ESCAPE
Hiking, Back-Packing,
Cross-Country Skiing
1790 West Georgia (at Denman)
nippon cvcic
BICYCLE SALES, SERVICE
RENTALS
One Block From Stanley Park
687-5337
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
AT THE
ROYAL BAN K
the helpful bank
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Charlie Mayne, manager
Audrey Budlow, senior loans officer
Tina Verveda, loans officer
10th at Sasamat — 228-1141 Page 12
Zappa concert slated
Dust off the python boots and the
old Sears poncho, Chester, cuz
Frank Zappa and the Mothers of
Invention are coming to UBC.
Tickets for the Oct. 1 concert in
the War Memorial Gym will go on
sale as soon as a contract is signed
between the AMS and Zappa's
promoters. Prices have yet to be
announced.
Gabbers shun UBC
Attendance at conventions held
at UBC convention centres fell
sharply this year despite increased
bookings.
Conventions manager Michael
Bowes said Thursday the convention centre "had more bookings
than last year but lower attendance."
He said 3,000 persons were expected at the Pacific Science
Congress in August, but only 1,500
attended the convention and only
500 stayed in residence.
"Generally, the groups booked
had lower attendance than we
counted on," said Bowes. He said
the university made a profit on the
conventions but said he doesn't
know how much money was made.
The booking is the result of
Special Events co-ordinator James
Conrad's $375, AMS-financed
weekend stand in Seattle to "renew
business contacts."
Zappa, who has reputedly eaten
human shit and blown a musician
on stage, is riding the crest of two
best-selling albums in just over a
year.
Zappa will be singing all his
biggest hits, including Billy the
Mountain, Dinah Moe Hum, Can't
Afford No Shoes, Willy the Pimp,
Apostrophe, Sex and Violence, It
Can't Happen Here, and You Owe
Us Four Free Tickets, James.
Co-operqtive Christian
Campus Ministry
is a group in which students and faculty can be
invqlved in Ministry at U.B.C.
is supported by the Anglican & United Churches and
the Student Christian Movement,
is located at the Lutheran Campus Centre, phone
224-3722.
invites you:
to be involved
to a barbeque at the centre Saturday Sept. 13 at 6:00
to a retreat weekend beginning Sept. 27.
Do You Talk
To Plants ?
If so, Come
Down and Talk
to Ours
PISTIL & CALYX
Finest Selection
of
TROPICAL PLANTS
POTTED FLOWERS
FRESH CUT FLOWERS
in Vancouver
Open EVERY day
of the year
STUDENT & FACULTY
DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
2325 CAMBIE
at 7th
874-7932
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
TEAM
TRYOUTS
1975-1976
1 l\ 1 VU 1 O
featuring
SPORT
DATE & TIMES
PLACE
Badminton
Mon. Sept. 15; 6:30 p.m.
Bym A&B
Basketball
Mon. Sept. 22; 4:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Wed. Oct. 1; 5:00 p.m.
Winter Sports Centre
Fencing
T.B.A.
Field Hockey
Sept. 8-10; 4:30 p.m.
Warren & McGregor fields,
Sept. 11; 12:30
south campus
Golf
T.B.A
Gymnastics
Mon. Sept. 15; 4:30 p.m.
Gym G
Skiing
Tues. Sept. 30; 5:30
Gym E
Swimming & D
iving            Mon. Sept. 15; 12:30
Room 25 Memorial Gym
Tennis
Sept. 16 & 18; 4:30
Tennis courts, south
Sept. 21; 2:30
of Winter Sports Centre
Track & Field
Tues. Sept. 23; 5:30 p.m.
Armoury
Volleyball
Tues. Sept. 16; 7:00 p.m.
Gym A
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Room 208 Memorial Gym - 228-2295
The First Canadian Bank
Bankof Montreal
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH
Your Canada Student Loan Center on Campus
We have an entirely separate department with exceileni trained personnel
who will be pleased to help you with all your Canada Student Loan needs.
e PROMPT SERVICE      • EXPERT ADVICE
CONVENIENCE
JUST A
REMINDER-
To students who already have a Canada Student Loan, and are not
obtaining a new loan at this time, you must provide the bank with
a Schedule 2 each Term, in order to continue your interest  free
status. Forms are available at the Student Union Building Branch.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH — TED HOSKINSON,
CANADA STUDENT LOANS MANAGER

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128391/manifest

Comment

Related Items