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The Ubyssey Oct 31, 2013

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Array CMP LINK
SPRING ASSAULTS
Weekend attack reported as police
connect April and May gropings
ALL HALLOWS' EVE
Parties, last-minute costume ideas,
smart horror movies and more  _   _
I»1YJ
SIZED
Campus building capacities will
shrink — and so will campus parties
k,
UBC's basketball teams are out ■»  »
to trick their opponents and treat  fQ
themselves to some victories // Page 2
WHAT'S ON // THIS WEEK, MAYWE
THURSDAY/31
We'vescouredonlinefor(almost)
all of Thursday's parties so you can
maximize the night.
HALLOWEEN BASH
9 P.M.-l A.M. @ SUB PARTYROOM
The AUS, EUS and SUS come
togetherfordrinking, dancing and
glowsticks. Talk to your faculty rep
fortickets.
$5,19+
FADED
9 P.M. @ THEAKOERNER HOUSE
The CVC hosts an all-ages dance
with a 19+ bar and two dancefloors.
Contact byronm@ubccvc.com
fortickets.
$20-25
FRIGHT FEST
6 P.M.-10 P.M. @ INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
The International Students Association and Jump Start boast a pumpkin
carving contest and a haunted house.
Snacks and drinks provided.
Free
RAD DAZE HALLOWEEN
8 P.M.-2A.M.@BILTM0RE CABARET
DJs, live bands Jaguar and FunkDirty,
F as in Frank costume contest, a
photo booth and more. Co-hosted by
TheCalendar.ca.
$13
FRIDAY ' 01
RECHOWLATTHEMOON
7P.M.-2A.M.@SRC
Test your team's v-ball skill in this
all-night volleyball tournament.
From Friday night to the wee
hours of Saturday, see if your
co-ed team ends up on top. More
info at http://intramurals.ubc.ca/
events/volleyball/.
$34
SATURDAY ' 02
TEDX TERRY TALKS
9A.M.-4P.M.@LIFE
SCIENCES INSTITUTE
Based on the TED Talks model,
UBC's version features students
and alumni speaking on what
they're passionate about. Expect
lots of intelligent conversation
over coffee. Go to terry.ubc.ca
fortickets.
$11-12
ON
THE
COVER
We already had great photos ofthe men's and women's basketball
teams on their own, but we wanted to get them together and have
some Halloween fun on the cover. Photo by Mackenzie Walker.
f!JifT
^|THE UBYSSEY
3CTOBER31.2013 I VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEX
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
ochow@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
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Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
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Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
oaper of the University of RritKh Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUl
dons Society. We are ai i autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
oroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when sub-
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The Ubyssey reserves the right to
sdltsubmlssi'i- length anclclar-
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noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
t is agreed by all persons placing display orclassified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
oublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
naid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponsible for slight changes or ty-
nographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
PHOTC
Unlike his tie, David McArthur doesn't wolf down wine but carefully sips it to taste the different notes.
David McArthur's wine
science course a winner
Mormei Zanke
Contributor
David McArthur knows a thing
or two about wines.
Teaching a course called
"Introduction to Wine Sciences,"
the Land and Food Systems prof
has managed to balance between
the enjoyment and academic
pursuit of wine.
He was offered the teaching
job in 2001, but McArthur says
he was initially unsure if it would
be merely a drinking course or
if there was scientific analysis
involved.
McArthur completed his
undergraduate and master of
science at UBC with a focus in
horticulture — the study of plant
cultivation — and continued on
to receive his doctorate from the
University of Alberta in plant
physiology and agriculture sciences. Ultimately, it was his passion that convinced him to accept
the position and teach FNH 330,
a course he has developed and
tweaked for over a decade.
McArthur wanted the course
to be both informative and fun.
"It should be [a course] where you
can walk out ofthe lab ... and buy
something from the wine store
and not just pick a wine that has
a kangaroo on it because it looks
cool," he said.
"It gives you a real perspective."
Taste attributes, how the
grapes were grown and processed
and the best food pairings are just
some ofthe factors McArthur
takes into consideration. "Either
in the lab [or] if I buy some for
myself to enjoy off the job, I still
use my sensory training to evaluate them as I sip," he said.
McArthur says many students
seem to enjoy the course. One of
his most memorable moments
happened at a UBC alumni wine
event when a father approached
him, gave him a hug and relayed
how both his son and daughter
had taken his wine sciences class.
"For many people, wine is
something that is applicable to
everyday life," McArthur said.
"Wine often appears at their
meals and social occasions. It's a
topic of conversation.
"Wine is about the land,
people, the art and science of its
making and how these all come
together."
McArthur talks like a man
who has found his niche — someone who truly loves his job and
respects wine as an art form.
After talking to him for just a few
moments, it becomes clear that
he approaches life much like he
approaches wine: "I like a wine to
surprise me." XI
MCARTHUR'S QUICK
GUIDETO WINES THIS
AUTUMN
For Halloween: B.C. VQA
Okanagan Valley's Moon
Cursor Vineyards: Dead of
Night red and Afraid ofthe
Dark white —try localVQA
Wine Stores.
For cooler weather in the
fall: I enjoy red wine especially. Margues Casa Concha
and CoverDrive blend (about
$27/bottle). The Seghesio
Zinfandel from California ($33/
bottle).
Cheaper fall option: Calona
Vineyards' Artist Series Pinot
Noir is very good for only $14.
His take on boxed wine:
They can make a decent
sangria. Economy wine picks
are the B.C. VQA Calona
Vineyards Artist Series wines
(often guite good, $13-14/
bottle), or the ConoSur wines
from Chile (some are good,
$ll-14/bottle) or the Gallo
wines from California (for
camping, $9/bottle).
,:OM
BREAD MOULD
^ 'ANTIBIOTICS.
DISCOVER THE STORY OF MEDICINES
An interactive exhibition exploring the role of pharmacy and pharmaceuticals in human health.
IUBC       a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences Building, 2405 Wesbrook Mall
Open 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Guided tours on request.
WWW.PHARMACY.UBC.CA/ABOUTUS/SOM // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
SAFETY»
RCMP investigating 6 related campus assaults
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
At a press conference, RCMP Sgt. Peter Thiessen said the Major Crimes Unit believes one man is responsible for a string of six reported sexual assaults on campus.
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The RCMP are now investigating
six reported sexual assaults that
occurred on campus over the
past seven months. They believe
one suspect is responsible for all
six assaults.
At a press conference on Tuesday hosted by UBC and the RCMP,
Sgt. Peter Thiessen ofthe Lower
Mainland RCMP said an additional sexual assault occurred early
Sunday morning, when a young
woman was walking alone from
Gage Residence on Student Union
Boulevard around 1:30 a.m. He
also said RCMP are now including
two sexual assaults reported in
April and May in the investigation. The Ubyssey also reported a
NEWS BRIEFS
U BC study: rats playing
slot machines
A UBC study found that drugs can
be used to treat problem gambling.
The study assessed rats
engaged in slot machine-style
gambling. It found drugs that block
dopamine receptors can inhibit
problem gambling.
"Pathological gambling is
increasingly seen as a behavioural
addiction similarto drug oralcohol
addiction, but we know comparatively little about how to treat
problem gambling," said study lead
Paul Cocker.
The study found similar behaviours between rats and humans
related to problem gambling.
"This study sheds important
new light on the brain processes involved with gambling and gambling
addictions," said Cocker.
UBC to offer first local Open
Online Course
UBC is offering a local open online
course (LOOC) on digital literacy.
The course is open to all
UBC students.
"A LOOC is a way of attaching this
phenomenon of massive learning to
UBC's large, global and thoroughly
excellent existing community," said
David Vogt, graduate advisor for
the master of education technology
program, xi
seventh assault last week, which
has not been reported to police to
date.
"These attacks seem to be
crimes of opportunity, where the
suspect is specifically targeting
lone females in secluded areas,"
Thiessen said.
One journalist at the press conference pointed out that the attack
this weekend happened while
many additional security measures
were in place.
"UBC is a city within a city,
so it's no different policing here
than it would be policing in a large
metropolitan city," Thiessen said.
"Our resources can't be everywhere all the time."
Thiessen said the Major
Crimes Unit ofthe RCMP has
the capacity to provide as many
TOOPE»
UBC president
addresses
assaults
at press
conference
Will McDonald
News Editor
UBC president Stephen Toope
addressed the recent sexual assaults
at a press conference today.
Toope said UBC is doing all they
canto keep students safe in the face
ofthe environment of insecurity
currently felt on campus.
"I have kids who live on campus
and I am every bit as concerned
about their safety as any parent.
I can reassure parents across the
world that we are doing everything
in our power to ensure the safety of
their children."
Toope said the university has
already increased both lighting and
security patrols on campus, but
questioned adding security cameras
due to privacy concerns.
"That's going to be a longer term discussion," he said. "I
certainly am reluctant to make a
commitment at this point that the
entire campus would be subject to
surveillance."
resources as necessary to investigate the assaults.
The RCMP have also increased
patrols at UBC, and have engaged
other units including the RCMP
Bike Patrol, Lower Mainland
District Integrated Police Dog
Services and the Lower Mainland
District Integrated Emergency
Response Team. Behavioural scientists, criminal and geographic
profilers are also working on the
case, alongside crime analysts,
forensic artists and operational
psychologists. The RCMP are also
coordinating with the Vancouver
Police Department.
The RCMP are also using tools
like the Violent Crime Linkage
Analysis System, a national computer program that looks for links
to previously identified suspects. A
composite sketch ofthe suspect is
being created.
"I don't recall a similar set of
circumstances at a university or
educational campus in this province," Thiessen said.
Thiessen said that the RCMP
will have special strategies
in place for Halloween this
Thursday, but would not give
specific details.
The current description ofthe
suspect the RCMP are working
with is a Caucasian male with a
slightly darker or olive skin tone.
He is possibly tanned, and is in
his mid- to late 20s or early 30s.
The suspect has a thin build and is
somewhere between 5-foot-8 and
6-foot-2. He has a long, round chin
and face, a straight nose, a broad
forehead and short, dark hair.
This weekend, the RCMP
knocked on hundreds of residence doors on campus and
spoke to 300 people to get
additional information on the
assaults. RCMP have received
30-40 tips from the public and
they are following up on all of
them, Thiessen said.
"We urge anyone with information, however insignificant it
may seem, to contact their local
police department. You may
have noticed something ... that
could potentially lead to identifying a suspect or [the] location
of where that person may be,"
said Thiessen.
UBC President Stephen Toope
released a letter today about the
recent assaults. "I am grateful to
the RCMP who have made this a
top priority," he wrote. "Their investigation is critical to restoring
the safety of our campus.
"In the days to come, until the
alleged perpetrator is apprehended, I ask you to be extra
vigilant," Toope wrote. "The
ultimate choice is yours, but the
RCMP [are] advising you not to
walk alone after dark."
UBC VP Students Louise
Cowin also announced that the
university is increasing security
at campus residences. Starting
tonight, one male and one female
security guard will be patrolling
each residence. There is also
a new service called Rezwalk,
which will escort students from
residence commonsblocks back
to actual residence buildings.
Cowin said UBC is also ramping up access to UBC counselling
services.
"This is a time to rally support
for one another, look out for each
other and stand up against sexual
violence," said Cowin.
Anyone with information
about the attacks is asked to call
the B.C. RCMP Major Crimes
Section's tip line at 778-290-5291
or toll free at 1-877-543-4822.
UBC also has a new website,
http://news.ubc.ca/stay-safe,
which provides safety tips and
resources. XI
UBC President Stephen Toope said UBC is doing all they can to keep students safe on campus.
PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
He said a working group has been
formed to discuss issues such as the
merits of adding cameras and the
possibility of adding more lighting
on campus.
"What I can tell you is that we are
putting [in] the resources that are
necessary to keep this campus as
safe as we can. Frankly, we are not
counting pennies right now."
Toope also commended students who have banded together
in organizations like Safewalk in
the wake ofthe sexual assaults.
"This is a moment for community building. This is a
moment to resist fear, to push
back at a person who is making
our community feel vulnerable,"
he said.
Toope emphasized that the new
security measures are a temporary response to the recent sexual
assaults. The president said that
the working group would look at
longer-term security plans.
"This is one ofthe safest campuses in North America. There is
not normally a climate of fear of or
insecurity on the campus." XI NEWS    I   THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013
REGULATION »
Abdul Ladha, other buildings cut capacities
Fire capacity changes will limit size of student events
Brandon Chow
Senior News Writer
Recent capacity reductions on
buildings around campus will
limit party sizes at event hotspots
such as Abdul Ladha Science
Student Centre and Meekison Arts
Student Space (MASS).
Vancouver Fire and Rescue
Services captain Rob Renning says
that up until recently, incorrect
occupancy loads were being used
for buildings on campus.
"They realized they were
supposed to be following the B.C.
fire code ... and not the Vancouver
bylaw," he said.
Renning is unsure of which
specific buildings will be affected, and the UBC Fire Prevention
office in charge ofthe new changes
declined an interview request. Renning said the discovery stemmed
from a recent function at UBC
where fire investigators responding to an emergency call found the
building to be "grossly over-occupied."
"One ofthe inspectors couldn't
get over how crowded it was and
when they started looking, they
realized that the wrong occupant
load had been assigned to the
building."
Several student societies across
campus who host functions in these
buildings will be affected financially due to these changes.
Science Undergraduate Society
(SUS) president Aaron Bailey said
capacity for Abdul Ladha has been
reduced by approximately 35 per
cent to 133 people in total.
"We are still able to hold events
and parties, albeit ones that are
smaller than normal," said Bailey.
Bailey said the capacity restrictions will affect funding for other
SUS events like Science Week
and Science Grad, which receive
The Abdul Ladha Science Student Centre has had its capacity cut by 35 per cent, which will limit future party sizes.
money from social groups such as
TheCalendar.ca and the Chinese
Varsity Club (CVC), who book Abdul
Ladha for their own events.
Rae Barilea, president ofthe
CVC, says she understands why the
capacities were lowered, but that it's
an unfortunate circumstance that
will affect their club's revenue.
"It sucks to have to tell our
members that we're sold out already
because of reduced capacity,"
said Barilea.
She said their dances — which
are often held at Abdul Ladha — are
their main source of revenue, and
that reductions will make a huge
difference to their ticket sales.
"We've had to look at a lot of
off-campus options, which is kind of
difficult for us considering that most
of our members are commuters,"
Barilea said. "There aren't a lot of
spaces close to SkyTrains or buses
that will accommodate our size,
so it's quite stressful to go through
this." She added many of their
events are all ages, so booking a bar
or club venue is out ofthe question.
MASS, another popular space for
parties, has undergone reductions
as well, although the details on the
changes are still unclear, according
to AUS president Sebastian Silley.
"This worries me in terms of
affecting the general campus cul
ture here at UBC. [The restrictions]
propagate the so-called 'war on fun'
that students have coined as negatively impacting the social culture
here," said Bailey. He is currently
trying to set up a meeting with the
fire marshal through the AMS to
work around this issue.
Rob Morton, founder of
TheCalendar.ca, shares a similar
opinion. "This is the epitome ofthe
'war on fun.' Young people want
to hang out together and dance.
We have literally been doing it for
thousands of years, and will continue to find ways to do it even if the
capacity of every student space is
reduced to zero."
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
He said their annual Halloween
dance party booked at Abdul Ladha
was forced to relocate following the
changes, and they were forced to
increase the price ofthe tickets due
to a more expensive location.
Morton emphasized what the
capacity changes mean for campus
life.
"To think generations of students' money was spent paying
architects and engineers to design
a building that was legally allowed
to hold 260-plus students, signed off
and up to code, extra fire doors and
all, only to have the capacity slashed
years later is extremely frustrating,
and a sad day for student culture." XI
TECHNOLOGY»
Signals of the apocalypse
UBC student proposes solution for clogged cell networks
Maura Forrest
Contributor
UBC graduate student Mai Hassan has developed a technology
that may prevent cellular network
overload.
Hassan has found a way for
cellphones to use television and
radio channels when cell networks get too busy — even when
those channels are already being
used by radio or TV stations.
"I switched the frequency of
transmission to the range of TV
or radio, the same way you would
switch channels on a radio," said
Hassan, a PhD student in the
department of electrical and computer engineering.
Hassan's goal was to use these
channels without interfering
with TV and radio broadcasts by
directing the cell signal toward
a receiver and away from people
listening to their car radios or
watching the news.
Jahangir Hossain, an assistant
professor of engineering at UBC's
Okanagan campus, supervised
Hassan's research alongside
Vijay Bhargava, a UBC profes
sor of electrical and computer
engineering.
"One possibility is that you can
ask nearby transmitters [other
cell phones] to help you," said
Hossain. "You can collaborate
and direct the signal toward the
receiver."
Hassan's solution applies a
technique called "beamforming,"
which is a way of directing wireless signals. One way to understand this is to picture two pebbles dropped into a pool of water.
Where the ripples meet, some will
join to form larger waves, while
others will cancel each other out.
Similarly, wireless signals
emitted by the antennas in
cellphones can overlap to form
stronger signals or to block each
other. In a study published in
the journal IEEE Transactions
on Wireless Communications,
Hassan controlled this overlap
to change the direction ofthe
cellular signal.
"If you have multiple antennas
together, they are going to interfere with each other," Hassan
said. "They can block each other
in the direction of the original
owner ofthe channel frequency
and they are going to reinforce
each other ... in the direction of
our cellular receiver."
This means that cellphones
would work together to transmit
calls over a TV or radio channel
without interference if the regular cell network were pushed to
the limit.
"It would have great importance
in case of emergency and crisis,
when people are trying to use their
phones at the same time," said Hassan. "But also it can be used in the
case of a film festival, for example,
or a soccer match."
The technology is not yet ready
to hit the market, though Hassan
said it should not be hard to implement. Cellphones would need
a software update to allow them
to switch to radio and television
frequencies when necessary, but
the update could be applied to
any cellphone.
Hossain said telecommunications companies should not be
negatively affected, as long as
interference is kept to a minimum. "They should not have any
concerns," he said. XI
PHOTO RICKV ROMERO/FLICKR
The technology aims to prevent cell networks from overloading during emergencies. // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIESCADDEN
HOW-TO »
Fighting dirty at UBC REC's self-defence class
Catherine Guan
StaffWriter
Fish hooking, eye gouging and
groin shots: these are moves so
cheap they will invite the reproach ofthe most grizzled MM A
fighter, hits so dirty they have
been outlawed from the free-for-
all thrashing inside the UFC's
octagonal cages.
Senseis Louisa Weitzmann
and James Chartier, however, are
advocates of cheap shots. On Sunday, Oct. 27, these two instructors
from Hit and Run Self Defense
facilitated a women's self-defence
workshop offered by UBC REC,
where they taught participants
how to deliver hard and dirty hits
on attackers.
With multiple black belts
between them, both Weitzmann
and Chartier are well-versed in
traditional martial art disciplines
such as karate. "In self-defence,
the styles that we teach are
krav maga and combat jujitsu,
which are military-based,"
explained Chartier.
"Unlike traditional styles where
you have forms and katas, we stick
to things that we can do in a duress situation that are quick, functional and get you out of trouble
fast. What we would consider the
dirtier, nastier moves, those are
the things we focus on."
A common mistake women tend
to make when they are attacked
is to initially freeze. "Those first
few seconds are what counts the
most," said Weitzmann.
"You are not pacing yourself
for a five-round match, where it's
like, gotta have some energy for
the twentieth minute ofthe fight,"
Chartier added. "It's all up at
the front.
"Particularly for women, we
need them focusing on throat,
eyes, ears and nose.... We want
The author, left, practices self-defence techniques with sensei Jame Chartier of Hit and Run Self Defense.
=HOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
them to focus on things that men
can't build up at a gym."
The eyes are an important target in self-defence situations. Even
hardened muay thai fighters have
to take a pause when they suffer
a hit to the eye, to check whether
the eyeball is still intact and in the
socket where it belongs.
The instructors recommend
striking with a hand that has the
thumb folded towards the palm
and the remaining four fingers
extended. It is almost impossible to miss the eyes with this
four-pronged attack.
When the assailant is in mid-
range, the principle to remember
is use soft against hard. "We try
to use anything soft in our bodies,
like palms, against something hard
like a head," Weitzmann said. "We
don't recommend punching a head
as there are 27 little bones in your
hand and you will break them."
Hard against soft also works.
Instead of using kicking with the
feet, she recommends striking out
with shins instead. "The groin
is soft and the shin is hard and
wedged like a hammer."
While they don't usually
recommend biting, the concern
being contagious diseases, it can
be an option in desperate situations where the attacker is in
close range. Rather than chomping down, the trick is to take a
small bite with your canines, then
twist and pull. Then growl, for
good measure.
Showing your attacker a lot of
his own blood will make him go
into shock, and the growling will
remind him of his precarious position on the food chain.
"Some ofthe women we teach
have already been through
scenarios already and some
of them are being proactive,"
said Weitzmann about her
teaching experience.
For Brit Sochting, a second-
year Land and Food Systems
student, it was about being
proactive. "I signed up for this
workshop in September before
the incidents on campus, because
I've always wanted to take a
self-defence class.
"While the blame is definitely
on the men behind these attacks,
I think it is important for girls to
know how to take care of themselves and learn the techniques
to fight back," she said.
In the three-hour workshop,
the instructors began with
techniques on how to avoid and
defuse potential attacks. They
then put the ladies through their
paces with exercises like extrication from choking grips and the
proper way to slap — not the kind
that debutantes give to cheeky
suitors, the kind that could bust
someone's eardrum. The session
ended with practice scenarios for
unarmed and armed assailants.
Sochting came out ofthe
workshop feeling more empowered, but for her, this was only
the beginning.
"I will be going back to practice
these moves with my brothers." XI
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
OCTOBER STARS
Hockey
RICHARD
MEISTER
Soccer
DAVE
SCOTT
Football
1. Who was your favourite athlete as a kid?
2. What's your go-to pregame meal?
3. What's the best Halloween costume you've
everworn?
That would have to
be Bobby Orr. Best
defenceman of all time.
My dad used to make
me watch videos of him
playing.
Usually chicken and
rice.
Oh that's a tough one... I
was once a ninja.l liked it
so much I wore the same
costume the next two
years in a row.
Michael Jordan.
Oliver Kahn.
Brett Favre.
Steve Nash.
Pedialyte and oatmeal.
B.A. Baracus[Mr. T's
character from The
A-Team] in the 11th
grade.
Anything except for
eggs and Tim Hortons.
Anyone who was on the
Lethbridgetrip knows
why.
Luigi.
Anything high-carb two
and three days before.
The night before is
team dinner, wherever
the boys decide.
Travis Barker in 2011.1
drew on Sharpie tats.
The next day was
rough.
Lots of pasta — unless
it's an early morning
race, then just a piece of
toast and some fruit.
Oneyearl wentasa
shower, like the kid in
The Karate Kid d\d.
4. Who's your scariest team member?
5. A quote you live by?
NadineBurgessforsure.
flinch everytime she
makes a move around
me. She's notorious for
throwing a punch when
you're not expecting it.
"Do, ordo not. There is
no try." — Master Yoda
Rudy Uhl. He knows
why.
"The future comes to
those who prepare for
it today." — Malcolm
Little
[Coach] Mike Mosher
if he catches me at
McDonald's. [Or] Harry
Lakhan if he goes more
than five minutes without
touching the ball.
"It's not whether you
get knocked down; it's
whether you get up." —
VinceLombardi
BenBahrami, hands
down. Terrifying beard
and he hates fun. [He
has] a strict zero-fun
policy.
"Pain heals, chicks dig
scars, glory lasts forever." - The Replacements
Wacko Jacko [Jack
Williams].
"Life's like a garden: just
dig it!" SPORTS + REC    I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013
WELCOME
TO THE
JAM
WORDS BY CJ PENTLAND
AND NATALIE SCADDEN
PHOTOS BY JOSH CURRAN
The UBC basketball teams treated theirfans to
thrilling playoff games back in February and
March, giving rise to the #OccupyWarGym
movement, and seeing the men's team capture
a Canada West championship on their home
court. However, the offseason brought new
faces and a plethora of injuries. There may be
some struggles early on, but Thunderbirds
fans have reason to be excited about these two
teams come this year's playoffs.
CIS
PRESEASON
RANKINGS
8
2012-2013 STATISTICS
REGULAR
SEASON
RECORD
PLAYOFF
RECORD
FIELD
GOAL %
SCORING
MARGIN
18-4
4-3
0.445
11.8
~.
Stress fracture in the foot. Plantar
fasciitis. Knee surgery to remove a
tumor. Disc issue in the back. Meniscus surgery. MCL strain.
All this equals one big headache for
Kevin Hanson.
Heading into his 14th season at the
helm ofthe UBC men's basketball team,
Hanson has never had to deal with this
many injuries at one time. Nine different
players have started games in the preseason, and at this point it's tough for him
to even have enough healthy guys to play
five-on-five in practice. Right now, it's
tough to tell what exactly this team has
in store for the 2013-14 campaign.
"There's been a lot of pressure on
these kids, and with the injuries, we just
haven't gotten into a flow yet," Hanson
said last Friday. "Every day we're trying
UBC MEN'S RECORD
ECOI
UBC WOMEN'S RECORD
to get into a flow and a different guy will
be gone or missing or hurt, or different
news comes out, so it's been a very trying
situation."
The Thunderbirds are coming off a
year that saw them blend a mix of young
and old to carry them to a Canada West
championship and a berth at CIS nationals. While the end ofthe year saw the loss
of only two players — guards Doug Plumb
and O'Brian Wallace, key components
ofthe UBC roster — this season's team
showcases a roster that will feature many
new faces come opening night. However,
looking at their roster right now, it's
tough to find the depth that helped make
the 'Birds so successful last year.
You can start with the three rookies
who stormed onto the scene last year and
played well beyond their years. This year,
Conor Morgan, a 6-foot-8 forward with a
smooth shot from the arc, won't be back
until January with a stress fracture in his
foot. Isaiah Soloman played the point and
provided stifling defence, but is suffering
a back injury and needs an MRI to determine the severity ofthe damage. Jordan
Jensen-Whyte has avoided significant
ailment so far, but he'd better not be
walking under any chandeliers.
Brylle Kamen, the Parisian who
stormed onto the scene last year with 11.3
points and 10.4 rebounds per game in the
regular season, will also be back, but he's
at about 60 per cent health. He underwent surgery after last season ended to
remove a tumor from his knee and spent
the summer rehabilitating. With injuries
reducing the lineup so drastically, that
rehab was cut short. However, Kamen
iTOTALCANWEST
CHAMPIONSHIPS
++4-^7
10
T TOTAL CIS
CHAMPIONSHIPS
-6-
2-
I960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013    |   SPORTS + REC    |   7
at 60 per cent is still better than most players in the conference, and he
realizes that his team relies on him as a leader.
"I have to refine my game, because I used to [just] outrun people and
jump higher than people," said Kamen, who still averaged 8.5 points per
game in the preseason. "For me, it's tough to understand that I have to
find new ways to play and new ways to help the team, but hopefully it
won't be too long... to get back to what I used to be."
The final two returners are Tommy Nixon and David Wagner, two
players expected to pick up the scoring slack. Nixon rivals Morgan and
newcomer Andrew McGuinness for the smoothest shooting stroke on
Cri3ll6nC|inC| yG3T in the  the team, but he also combines that with a physical presence in the
first P3ft. ObviOUSlV it'S OUT  paint —one that helped him rack up 9.8 points and 4.4 rebounds per
nr>3l tn riPt Ttn n3tinn3kl   game.Wagner, despite being just a third year, possesses a soft scoring
yudl LU y<=L LLU lldL UlldlbJ   touch around the rim, and should be the dominant scoring centre that
and Will It ... and every  the'Birds haven't had in years,
year it iS OUT QOal, but       Dynamic recruits play significant roles on many of Hanson's teams,
riaht now WP'fP SO   an(^ ^s ^ear w^ ^e no different, especially with even more being
, »» , needed from them due to the injuries. McGuinness transfers in from
lOCUSeO On tne prOCeSS,   Calgary and can extend the defence with his long-range shot, as evi-
This has been such a
and honestly, just getting
healthy.
Kevin Hanson
UBC men's basketball coach
denced by his .409 percentage from beyond the arc in the preseason.
Tonner Jackson also comes in after spending three years at Trinity
Western. A hard-nosed forward who averaged 16.1 points per game last
year with the Spartans, Jackson is working on his master of management at the Sauder School of Business, and the workload is causing
him to miss a few practices. He's also been forced to play an expanded
role, but not just because there are holes in the lineup.
The saying "it's not how your start but how you finish" will hold
very true for the T-Birds this season. Last year, they won 18 of their
first 20 games, and battled to win the conference title, but were
plagued by injuries come nationals and dropped their final two contests to finish seventh. This year, it will all be about coming together at the
end when it matters, and Kamen has no doubts about that happening.
"This year, if we get [to nationals], I think we have a better chance
than last year." — CP
COACH'S
CORNER
DEB
HUBAND
WOMEN'S COACH
19th SEASON (5) UBC
KEVIN
HANSON
MEN'S COACH
14th SEASON (5) UBC
OVERALL
RECORD
382-203
336-135
2012-2013 STATISTICS
REGULAR
SEASON
RECORD
FIELD
GOAL %
17-5
0.430
CONFERENCE
RECORD
246-127
210-63
PLAYOFF
RECORD
SCORING
MARGIN
0-2
♦9.5
CIS
PRESEASON
RANKINGS
When Kris Young missed a
three-pointer in the dying
seconds of UBC's 67-64 overtime
loss to the University of Alberta Pandas
in last year's Canada West playoffs, she
probably didn't realize that three ofthe
four other T-Birds on the floor at the
time were playing their last games in
UBC blue and gold.
Only Leigh Stansfield, the other of half
of UBC's one-two punch, was graduating in the spring. But when three other
UBC standouts — Tori Spangehl, Zana
Williams and Alyssa Binns — cut their
careers short due to injuries, head coach
Deb Huband was left with the challenge
of integrating new transfers and pushing
some youngsters into much bigger roles.
"It's a little bit of a different look this
year," said Huband. "At this point, we've
changed a few things that we're doing
offensively, and we haven't really found
our stride yet."
Huband will again rely heavily on the
consistent and versatile performance of
Young, who finished top 10 in the conference in all three ofthe major statistical
categories: points per game (16.9; sixth),
rebounds per game (7.5; ninth) and assists
per game (3.5; sixth). She was rewarded
for her efforts with the Canada West
Player ofthe Year award and recognition
as a first-team all-Canadian.
"[Kris] carried a tremendous burden
for our team and had to be one of our best
players on a consistent basis for the entire
season. And she did very well with that,"
Huband said ofthe fourth-year guard.
"We need her to be similar to what
she was last year, but I think she's going
to have more support on the court than
what we were able to do for her last year,"
Huband added.
The three new faces this year are all
forwards who should help strengthen
UBC's frontcourt, which will be missing
Stansfield's 14.9 points per game and 0.551
field goal percentage as well as Spangehl's
7.4 rebounds a game.
Incoming are transfers Harleen Sidhu
and Lauren Seabrook, as well as a true
rookie in Kamila Wojciechowski.
Sidhu was a B.C. high school standout who went on to play three years of
NCAA basketball at the University of
Nebraska. A dominant inside force, she
plays well with her back to the basket,
but can also hit three-pointers and drive
off the dribble. While she hasn't yet fully
learned the system at UBC or shaken off
the rust after two years without playing
competitively, Huband expects Sidhu to
be an integral part of her team this year.
In the most recent preseason game, she
led the Thunderbirds with 18 points and
17 rebounds.
"Harleen is somebody I had my eye on
out of high school," said Huband. "She
was a provincial team player since she
was about 12 years old, so she's a real
quality player and a real quality person as
well. She had some unfinished business
athletically, and she brings with her some
good experience, a good versatile skill set,
and lots of leadership."
Rounding out the starting five with
Young and Sidhu will likely be third-years
Cassandra Knievel and Adrienne Parkin,
and second-year Maggie Sundberg at
the point. All three showed flashes of
excellence last season, but Huband hopes
to see them bring more toughness and
consistency this year.
"We have to get grittier. We'll be
playing against some teams that may not
have tremendous depth or might not be
as refined skill-wise, but who will play
with grit and determination and effort,"
said Huband. "That's where someone like
Lauren [Seabrook] can help, because she
does that on a daily basis. She's a physical
player — a little bit rough and tumble, but
she's got good rebounding habits and she
guards tough."
The T-Birds finished with a 4-2 preseason record, but an 80-43 thrashing by
the University of Windsor, the three-time
defending CIS Champions, shows that
they still have a long way to go to get back
to the national final, where they were
runners up just two years ago.
"We have to be patient, and just be
resilient knowing that it might take us a
bit of time and there might be a few ups
and down, but we need to keep pressing,
because I think we will be a step above
where we were last year, and we need to
be."-NSXl II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
FASHION »
Cheeky, cheap and charming:
Last-minute Halloween costumes
At least once in October, someone will ask you what you are going to dress up as for Halloween. Whether you are an enthusiast
or not, you will probably attend at least one Halloween party — and as a student, buying an expensive costume you will likely
only wear once may not be an option. Instead of breaking the bank, let these eight lazy, but clever, ideas be your guide in taking
the "cost" out of "costume."
Text: Bailey Ramsay, staff writer. Illustrations: Luella Sun, staff illustrator.
Fork in the road
Take a relatively blank shirt
that you already own, and
some coloured tape. Once
you have taped the rough
outlines of a road onto your
shirt, take a kitchen fork,
tie it to string, and wear it
around your neck. Voila: a
fork in the road.
Life, giving
you lemons
Again, using a plain shirt and
coloured tape, spell out the
word "life" and proudly stick
it to your shirt. Locate either
a basket or a bucket lying
around your home and fill it
with just a few lemons. When
life gives you lemons, make an
inexpensive costume.
Three-hole punched      Cereal killer
Inspired by the apathetic but
clever paper salesman Jim
Halpert from The Office, who
started a trend of cutting
three black circles of paper
and taping them to one's body.
This creates the inexpensive
illusion that you have been
"three-hole punched."
Did you do your recycling yesterday? If you have old cereal
boxes laying around from days
or even weeks past, tape them
to your body and carry around
a butter knife as an accessory.
Jellyfish
Let's face it: if you live in
Vancouver, odds are you
have an umbrella lying
around waiting to be used.
Take your umbrella and
tie streamers to the spokes
so they hang loose like the
tentacles of a jellyfish. If
you are feeling especially
theatrical, you also have
the option of taping glow
sticks to the spokes of your
umbrella to give it that extra
wow factor when it gets
dark on Halloween night.
Identity thief
Remember those awkward
name tags you wear on the
first day of an orientation?
Simply buy a packet ofthe
stickers from an office
supply store and write the
names of stranger or people
you know on them. Then,
put them all over your
clothes to show whose identities you have stolen.
The Paper
Bag Princess
Why buy a Disney princess
costume that a thousand other
people will be wearing when
you can be the spunky heroine
of Robert Munsch's classic
story, The Paper Bag Princess'?
Who wouldn't want to be this
fine feminist girl? And it's
easy: all you need is a compost
bag. Simply cut out holes for
your arms and head and make
a crown for your head as well.
Hawaiian punch
The minimum requirements
are a flower lei and a pair of
boxing gloves in order for
people to get the picture. If
you want to go all the way,
sunglasses, a straw hat and a
tacky floral shirt and shorts
combo are good for added affect. If you are worried people
still won't get the joke, feel
free to carry a carton of actual
Hawaiian punch — you might
be thirsty at the party, tl
PROCRASTINATION
STATION
SMART
HALLOWEEN
MOVIES
If you're a student of the bookish variety,
you may find the thought ofspending
Halloween amidst the boorish vices of
your academic peers to be particularly repugnant. That said, there's no reason one
should dispense with academia's favourite excuse for midterm insobriety in its
entirety; the opportunity to eat coma-inducing volumes of "fun-size" confectioneries is not one to be passed lightly.
Of course, one has to validate such
mindless consumption, lest one's studious facade be sundered, and there's
no better way to do this than to watch
genre films ironically. To aid you on your
enlightened consumption, consider the
following "thinking-man's" horror movies:
Funny Games (2007): In Michael
Haneke's English-language remake of
his 1998 subversive German horror flick
of the same name, a pair of polite young
men invade a family vacation home
and proceed to subject its occupants
to meaningless mental and physical
torture. The catch? As one of the villains
points out in a roundabout way, the film
is a rumination on America's demand for
mindless on-screen violence — implying that it's ultimately the viewer who is
responsible for the family's suffering.
Ginger Snaps (2000): One of very few
acclaimed Canadian horror films, Ginger
Snaps stars Brigitte and Ginger, two
teenage goth sisters who make a suicide
pact. Their plans are upset, however,
when Ginger is attacked by a werewolf;
gruesome transformations, violence and
death ensue. A complex analogy of a girl's
transition into womanhood, GingerSnaps
has generated a massive amount of
academic attention (famed UBC professor Ernest Mathijs is publishing a book
dedicated entirely to the film), as well as
several sequels.
The Cabin in the Woods (2012): Filmed
just a few clicks away in Squamish, Joss
Whedon and Drew Goddard's cult film
lies somewhere in the ambiguous space
between comedy and horror. Cabin takes
all the tropes of popular American horror
cinema — a group of inordinately attractive collegestudents, some redneck
maniacs and, of course, a cabin in the
woods — and turns them on their head.
Simultaneously a love letter and a critique
ofthe genre, Cabin isameta-horrorabout
horror movies.
Antichrist (2009): Widely regarded as
one ofthe most difficult films to watch
made in recent years, director Lars von
Trier's post-modern journey into the dark
recesses ofthe human psyche is both
beautiful and disturbing. After an unnamed man and woman (the man played
by the ever-unsightly Willem Defoe) lose
their child in a tragic accident, they travel
to a backwoods retreat in an attempt to
heal their suffering. Profuse, angst-driven
boning and mutilation follow thereafter.
Let the Right One In (2008): In this
Swedish art house horror, Oskar, a boy
chronically victimized by bullying, is
enamoured with the new girl who's moved
in next door. Of course, there's a catch:
she just so happens to be a voraciously
blood-thirsty vampire. As grisly murders
in the community become more frequent,
Oskar must try to reconcile his adolescent love with his humanity. Far from the
glittery S&M fantasies that have characterized the vampire genre in recent years,
Let the Right One In is a moving exploration of adolescent angst. xi THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013    |    CULTURE
GENERATION A»
Monsters that yawn in the night
Halloween parties are a staple ofthe college life, but many students
Jenica Montgomery
Contributor j
Jenica Montgomery
Contributor
University students can no
longer participate in the time-old
tradition of trick or treating, a
staple for Halloween shenanigans, without being heckled
or turned away. As such, we've
had to search for different ways
to celebrate the iconic holiday.
It's taken on a new form, among
university students and adults
alike, which has become disconnected from its original purpose
and history.
So the question is this: as we
grow out of childhood, do we
become more apathetic about the
meaning ofthe holiday? Surely
the parties, drinking and tomfoolery count as celebrating —
but such behaviour is so far from
the original purpose of Halloween that the night doesn't seem to
hold meaning anymore.
The origins of Halloween
come from multiple pagan celebrations, dating as far back as the
Roman Empire. In an interview
with the University of Colorado's
news centre, Scott Bruce, an
associate professor specializing
in medieval history and religion
at the school, said: "Halloween
comes from All Hallows' Eve,
and 'all hallows' refers to the
feast of all saints. By the seventh
century the feast was institutionalized on [Nov. 1].
"There's a sense, then, that
in late October, early November, the dead are afoot, the dead
PHOTO STEPHANIEXU/THE UBYSSEY
Amid the costumes, food, music and general debauchery of Halloween parties at North American colleges, there lies a conspicuous
absence of any real meaning.
are around, and your obligation
towards the dead is much more
acute than any other time ofthe
year."
"[The] original purpose of Halloween was [as] a precursor to All
Saints Day," said Devon Francis,
a student member ofthe UBC
Christian Ministry.
Few students today know the
true history of Halloween, how
ever. In particular, the origins
of trick or treating, an activity
many of us enjoyed up until our
early teens, remain largely obscure — though some still enjoy
the prospect of free candy.
Trick or treating has roots
at least as far back as medieval
times, according to Bruce. "Poor
people at the time ... would go
from house to house to house,
and there they could expect to
receive an offering of food, and
this was called souling," Bruce
said. "The giving ofthe food was
an act of alms giving that helped
the giver, and the eating ofthe
food was also an act that helped
the dead souls."
The question remains: why
do we celebrate this seemingly
benign pagan holiday? The act of
are indifferent
trick or treating is no longer just
for the poor, nor is there a strong
sense ofthe dead being afoot in
contemporary times.
The answer: students simply
choose to see Halloween in a different light from that of its past.
"It's a holiday which can be
taken a lot of different ways
by a lot of different people,"
said Francis.
Indeed, contemporary motivations for celebrating Halloween
vary. "There's only one day a
year when you can dress up like
a kid and no one will judge you,"
said Philip Green, a fifth-year
Science student.
Along the same lines, fourth-
year anthropology student
Lianda Potter sees it as a callback
to childhood. "Its like playing
dress-up," she said. "People find
a release in costuming."
Celebrating the holiday has
evolved from saving the souls
of the living and the dead to
partying and multiple nights of
Halloween pranks and tricks. But
this isn't to say that Halloween
is meaningless. As Green put it:
"[It's an] excuse to do stuff you
can't normally do."
Of course, while many choose
to participate in this year's Halloween festivities, some will not.
Potter plans to "sit at home and
write an essay."
Regardless of how they will be
celebrating the spooky holiday,
one tradition is certain: many
students will be buying discounted candy the next day. tJ
FOOD»
Student Cooking: whip up some freaky tzatziki
"<3 UBYSSEY CULTURE
NOT TOO HIGH BROW
NOT THAT LOW BROW
MEETINGS TUESDAY AT 12:30 P.M.
CULTURE AT UBYSSEY DOT CA
Rachel Levy-McLaughlin
Contributor
When you're pressed for cash, it's
always satisfying to learn about an
easy, make-it-yourself foodstuff
that's expensive to purchase at a
grocery store.
Tzatziki is definitely one of
those. Buying it at the store is very
expensive, and the quality varies
drastically depending on the brand
and store. Making your own is fast,
cheaper and delicious.
The beauty of tzatziki is that it
is difficult to get wrong, so there is
no need to be precise. This recipe
should serve as more of a general
guideline for ingredients. Feel free
to add more of one ingredient, omit
others and cater to your own taste.
In light of Halloween, tzatziki
can also be twisted into "freaky
tzatziki" for any Halloween fiesta.
Add some green food colouring
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
to it, and you have just created a
spooky witch's concoction. Adding
colouring will make it look less
appetizing — but on Halloween,
this is totally acceptable.
Freaky Tzatziki
Ingredients (serves four)
Greek yogurt (medium-sized container, around 500 mL)
1-2 cloves of garlic
2 tsp. vegetable oil (optional)
Cucumber
1 tsp. dill (fresh or dried)
1/4 tsp. salt
Food colouring (optional)
Equipment
Frying pan (optional)
Fork
Sharp knife
Instructions
1. Chop approximately a third
of a rinsed cucumber into small
pieces, with the option to leave
the skin on or not. The skin gives
an added crunch.
2. Mince the garlic (chop into very
fine pieces).
(2.5 Optional step: the flavour of
raw garlic tends to be overwhelming. Frying the garlic beforehand
does a nice job of diluting the flavour so it does not overpower the
rest ofthe tzatziki. Add vegetable
oil to the frying pan over medium
heat and place the minced garlic
in the oil. Remove the pan from
the stove once the garlic has
begun to brown.)
3. Place the (fried) garlic and
chopped cucumber into the Greek
yogurt (you can even leave it in
the original container) and mix
together with a fork.
4. Add dill and salt to flavour. For
Halloween, add food colouring for
a suitable degree of freakiness.
Notes: Tzatziki is so much more
than a dip. It goes well with
cheese, crackers and vegetables,
but also can form a key component
of your meal. Using it as a spread
for sandwiches adds a tasty and
refreshing aspect. It also serves
as a tastier substitute for sour
cream on tacos or fajitas. Adding
it to spicy dishes will instantly
cool them down, and give them a
creamier, cooler flavour. If you are
in the mood for Greek-style chicken, dollop your tzatziki on top to
add extra flavours to your meat. tJ II Opinions
LAST WORDS w
Halloween^}
©ito^ffrwO
HP
^CAMOy
a#m
CAUTION NEEDED ON
CAMERAS
The decision of UBC administrators
to hold off on the installation of security cameras is being questioned by
some, but not by us at The Ubyssey.
UBC is a huge campus. We
already have security cameras
installed in most major buildings.
The number of cameras it would
take to cover every dark corner of
Point Grey is very, very large.
The amount of time it would
take to install all of these cameras is also very large. There
would be months of consultation,
followed by budgeting concerns,
shipping delays, and then a long
period of implementation.
Even if UBC had hundreds
of thousands of dollars sitting
around right now to buy them
and unlimited staff to install
them immediately, it wouldn't
happen tomorrow. Our guess is
that it would take over a year to
install them. By that time — we
hope — they'll have caught the
person or persons perpetrating
these despicable acts of sexual
violence. And then what will
happen to the cameras?
We'll be left with a campus
where every single thing we do
is monitored. This would invade
the privacy of students, especially those living on campus, for
years to come, and we don't want
to see that at UBC.
It can be difficult to make an
argument against surveillance
for security purposes, but as a
society, we've tacitly agreed to
allow mild forms of deviance,
and to eliminate that would be a
shame. Imagine no more painting ofthe cairn or engineering
pranks. Imagine no more bonding in the enchanted forest. Imagine no more romantic rendezvous in quiet corners of campus.
Imagine no more drunken romps
in the Rose Garden. Imagine no
more cutting through the landscaping to get to class in a hurry.
Imagine no more hiding out in
Toope's backyard. (Wait, what?)
And more broadly, if we agree
to be surveilled around campus
because we know we're not doing
As a society, we've
tacitly agreed to allow
mild forms of deviance,
and to eliminate that
would be a shame.
anything wrong, where does it stop?
Should the university or RCMP have
access to our social media accounts
so they know we're not cheating on
exams or using drugs?
In an age where the authorities seem more willing than ever
to compromise our civil liberties
in the name of security, it's reassuring to see Toope's reluctance to install cameras. We hope
the idea is firmly squashed and
that law enforcement finds other
ways to keep us safe on campus.
CUS REFERENDUM
DOOMED TO FAIL
It looks like the Commerce Undergraduate Society referendum on
whether to fund a $200,000 commitment toward "student counselling and education on sexual
abuse" is going to fail.
The commitment was coerced from CUS leaders by
Sauder School of Business dean
Robert Helsley following his
strong-arming of CUS president
Enzo Woo and VP engagement
Gilliang Ong to resign following
the rape cheer scandal.
It seemed a blatant attempt
by Helsley and the university
LLUSTRATION DAVID MARINO/THE UBYSSEY
to show the media that UBC
was serious about responding
to the scandal, but the problems
quickly became apparent — not
the least of which was that the
CUS didn't have the authority
to hand over $200,000 without
student approval.
Many Sauderites believe they
are being unfairly taxed for
a crime they didn't commit — after all, many commerce students
don't attend FROSH.
If there's a reason this shouldn't
pass, it's because the university
hasn't had time to do a thorough
analysis about how to best create
change before demanding a large
sum of money from students. What
guarantee do Sauder students
have that this funding will benefit
the faculty and the education of
students within the school, beyond
buying back its reputation?
With so many questions left
unanswered, it's no wonder
Commerce students have qualms
coughing up $52 over the next
several years — even if it could
hurt the school's reputation for
the referendum to be rejected.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
RESTRICTS PARTIES
Anyone who's been to an Abdul
Ladha Science Student Centre
party knows the building is
rarely, if ever, "grossly over-occupied," as the Vancouver fire
department has called it. Sweaty,
definitely. But it seems a little absurd to cut the occupancy by 35
per cent as the fire department
is demanding.
This is going to be a bummer
for the SUS, who will lose the
portion of their funding that
used to come from these ticket
sales. We're still waiting to hear
how the change will impact
other buildings.
Robert Morton, founder of
TheCalendar.ca, said that students will continue to party, even
if the capacity of every student
centre is reduced to zero. That's
the spirit!
A MISSING S80M FOR
THE AMS
At the Oct. 7 AMS executive
committee meeting, members
discussed a plan to make a
financial contribution to a rapid
transit line to UBC. The whole
plan was based around UBC
contributing $80 million to a
Broadway line. The committee
believed the AMS should levy a
student fee to help fund the line,
as as well as contribute to a bike
share program. The meeting
minutes end abruptly, but there
was considerable debate as to
whether students should have to
pay the fee.
However, there was one other
problem with the plan: UBC
never committed $80 million to
rapid transit.
Whoops, you mean the AMS
exec was planning their transit
budget on a premise that was off
by $80 million? Why yes, we do
mean that.
When asked about the plan,
VP external Tanner Bokor later
said the entire initiative was
scrapped because they received
false information about UBC's
funding commitments. We hope
the AMS, who is in charge of negotiating our U-Pass contract and
advocating on behalf of students
on transit, would be working
with accurate information. Recent events do not exactly inspire
confidence in the AMS.
WHAT NOT TO DO ON
HALLOWEEN
The costumes we cover in our
Halloween costume guide are
unmitigatedly cheap and, perhaps, dreary in their simplicity.
But at least there's a certain
charm to them. The same cannot
be said for 99 per cent ofthe
costumes that will be worn at
college parties tonight: outfits
whose relevance subsists solely
on fleeting pop culture references.
Such laziness, in our opinion,
does not reflect the ingenuity
and wit to which UBC students
should aspire in all their creative endeavours — granting, of
course, that some of us at The
Ubyssey are more likely than
most to use Halloween as the
flimsiest of pretences to get
absolutely smashed.
Nevertheless, as a public
media institution, it's our tacit
responsibility to take a stance
on trends that characterize our
society. We therefore condemn
the exploitation of any ofthe
following costumes:
• Anyone from Breaking Bad.
Yup, even Badger and Skinny
Pete. But you can if you are a)
one ofthe actors, or b) you can
do a really good season 4 finale
Gus Fring.
• Benedict Cumberbatch
as Julian Assange. Unless you
are Benedict Cumberbatch. If
you want to go meta, try being
Julian Assange going as Sherlock
Holmes who is actually Benedict
Cumberbatch. After all, they're
both on the search for truth and
justice, right?
• An NSA agent, or Edward
Snowden. Yawn.
• Miley Cyrus at the VM As.
Unless you are a morbidly obese
man, in which case, all power
to you.
• Vladimir Putin, unless you
can pull off a sexy Putin. Actually, he is sexy regardless. Never
mind.
• Lou Reed. Too soon.
• Tom Clancy. Not because it's
too soon, but because it's neither
clever nor subversive.
• Margaret Thatcher. If only
because a freak magical Halloween incident might cause her to
come back from the dead and
unleash a new era of gross privatization and power suits. XI // Scene
PIC OF THE WEEK
=HOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
If Thunderbird basketball forward Conor Morgan's wingspan doesn't impress you, his grip strength surely will. Our photographer used differently coloured gels on his flashes to achieve the blue-orange effect.
CANADA WE5T MEN'S 5DCCER
FINAL 5IX
THUNDERBIRDS
TOP GOAL SCORER: MARCUS JOHNSTONE [5]
G0AL5 FOR/GOALS AGAINST  E5/E2
UITH THE MD57 rELLDU CARDS IN THE FINAL
SIX. ALBERTA'S PHYSICAL STYLE COULD
EITHER MAKE OR BREAK THEN.
AB GOLDEN BEARS
GAME 1
THURSDAY. OCT. 31
a 1 P.M.
C-7-1
UFV CASCADES
idp goal scorer cdnndr macmillan [h]
goals forigoals against: 19/ez
uith the second wost corners in the
division, ufv's winders are ones to
watch out for.
WINNER GAME 1
TOP UAL SCORER: MILAD MEHRABI [11]
GOALS F0RIGDAL5 AGAINST: H7/B
AS DEFENDING CHAMPS, THE T-BIRDS ARE NO
UNOEHDDD5 IN THIS COMPETITION.
E5T FINAL
a
WINNER GAME 2
SEMIFINAL
FRIDAY, NOV. 1
■ K:3D P.M.
TOP GOAL 5C0RER: CAMERON 5T0KE5 [11]
GOALS FOR/GOALS AGAINST: HD/TB
VICTORIA LEAD5 THE SHOOTING PACK,
AVERAGING 1B.7 SHOTS PER GAME
VICTORIA VIKES
IU      J        I
GAME 2
THURSDAY. OCT 31
a 3:30 P.M.
E-E-B
CALGARY 0IN0
TOP GOAL SCORER: IZAK LAURENCE [7]
GOALS FDR/GOALS AGAINST: 18-33
ONE POINT ABOVE LAST-PLACED UFV OVERALL, THE DINOS ARE A DEFINITE UNDERDOG.
TOP DDAL 5CORER: BRETT LEVI5 [T]
GOALS F0R/GDAL5 AGAINST: EB/1B
AS THE HIGHEST STORING TEAM IN THE PRAIRIE
aiVlSIHN, THEIR tlB DO LOOKS BLEAK AGAINST
• UK AND SASKATCHEWAN RECIEVED BYES FDR WINNING THEIR RESPECTIVE DIVISIONS
> ALL GAMES PLAYED AI THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
' BRONZE MEDAL GAME TD BE PLAYED AT 11 A.M. ON SUNDAY, NOV. 3
First person to find Arno Rosenfeld gets 100 copies ofthe paper.
(Hint: he's not at Pie R Squared or in the office.)
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE: SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS 1
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PhD & MASTERS STUDENTS
(Qissertation/Thesis Interview Transcription)
OVER 25 TEAKS'EXPERIENCE
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