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The Ubyssey Oct 8, 1971

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Array Frats sell out to developer
By MIKE SASGES
Two UBC fraternities have sold
an option on their property to a
Vancouver contractor who plans
to build a "Habitat-like" complex
on the land.
The option to buy the frats —
Phi Delta Theta, 2120 Wesbrook,
and Phi Gamma Delta, 2130
Wesbrook — now belongs to
Frank Stanzl Construction Ltd..
which must come up with
$130,000 for each lot by April.
1972.
"In effect our property has
been sold," Jack Eliot, Phi
Gamma Delta alumni secretary,
said Thursday.
"In the land registry office we
still hold title to the land and the
purchaser has until April to come
up with the purchasing price,"
Eliot said.
The company also holds the
same type of option on the
second   frat,   the   construction
Options on these frat houses are now held by a Vancouver contractor.
BYSSEY
Vol. LIU, No. 12 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1971
228-2301
AGGRAVATING AGRICULTURE SCULPTURE poses for Ubyssey photographer outside UBC's aggie building. Is it a coolie picking a plant
or a physical plant workman planting a grenade? Only your sculptor knows for sure.
Union forbidden campus meeting
By JOHN ANDERSEN
The UBC administration is actively
attempting to prevent unionization of its
employees.
This was shown Thursday morning when
the administration abruptly withdrew written
permission for university employees to meet
at 5:15 p.m. that evening in Buchanan 106 to
discuss joining the Office and Technical
Employees Union.
The permit was withdrawn despite the fact
the university had re-confirmed the booking
at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
The employees said they were told by
administration bursar Bill White that it is
contrary to university policy to rent meeting
facilities to employees for the purpose of
discussing union affairs.
The administration was then asked to
contact departments throughout the
university to tell employees of the
cancellation. This request was refused.
The administration move follows a strike
Monday by 950 office and technical workers
at l'Universite de Montreal.
In an unprecedented gesture of solidarity,
almost all students and faculty of U de M are
respecting the strikers' picket lines, thus
effectively shutting down the university.
However, the Montreal strikers belong to
the Canadian Union of Public Employees, not
to the OTEU.
A university employee, who does not want
her name published for fear of losing her job,
told The Ubyssey that the union had been
allowed to hold a meeting Tuesday at the
UBC medical school at Vancouver General
Hospital.
She said nearly 100 per cent of the eligible
employees of the medical school attended the
meeting.
She said she did not know the number of
UBC employees eligible to join the union.
In a letter sent Thursday to university
employees, OTEU business representative Bill
Swanson said: "It is difficult to understand
why an institution of learning would refuse
employees the right to openly and freely
discuss the subject of unions."
The meeting of the UBC employees has
been re-scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Thursday at
the Ironworkers Hall, 2415 Columbia.
University employees with questions or
comments about unionization are asked to
phone 874-5201 or to go to the union office
at 100-146 East Broadway.
firm's lawyer told The Ubyssey.
"We are looking at an
innovative housing complex like
Habitat — but not as elaborate,"
company president Stanzl said
Thursday.
Habitat is the futuristic living
area built for Montreal Expo 67.
And, Stanzl said, the proposed
complex on the 60,000 square
feet of land would be "in tone
with the campus environment."
"The housing should be able to
accommodate people on campus
and people who are interested in
university activities," he said.
He said final plans would be
drawn up in four or five months
after the development's
marketability has been
established.
The land must be rezoned for
housing by a provincial
order-in-council, Robert Murdoch,
university endowment lands
manager, said Thursday.
Murdoch said the development
must fill a university need before
he would recommend a zoning
change to lands and forests
minister Ray Williston who is
responsible for the endowment
lands.
"Both the university's board of
governors and administration will
be   looking   at   the   plans   and
making recommendations to me.
See page 5: CROWN
Witnesses
to border
clash sought
By BERTON WOODWARD
A fourth-year math student
who was arrested after being hit
by a truck at the Sumas border
demonstration Sept. 24 is seeking
witnesses to the incident.
The student, who asked not to
be identified because of the
impending court case, said
Thursday the charge of
obstructing a highway was made
under the Criminal Code although
he could have been given a lesser
charge under the Motor Vehicle
Act.
He said he was very surprised
at the speed with which the
decision was made to charge him
with the criminal offence.
He said the driver of the
pick-up, a resident of Washington
state, was charged with driving
without due care and attention.
(Under Canadian law the U.S.
driver does not have to appear in
court on the charge. Had the
RCMP seen fit to do so, he could
have been arrested under the
Criminal Code on the more
serious charge of dangerous
driving.)
The student said he was
charged after a white pick-up
truck tried to push its way
through the crowd blocking the
easternmost area of the border
crossing, about 75 feet from the
main border crossing.
See page 6: STUDENT
The Ubyssey staff has declared
Monday a public holiday. There
will therefore be no Tuesday
edition of The Ubyssey as the
campus spends a day in drink and
debauchery in deference to the
holiday pronouncement by its
favorite newspaper. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971
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Dr. Schwarz
and the dizzy dope-smokers
In which Maria Cassils and others tell a tale of research into marijuana . . .
Dr. Conrad Schwarz, the consultant
psychiatrist at UBC Health Services who
recently ignited the spark of controversy
regarding marijuana research on campus,
delivered a lecture Thursday morning on
"A Toxic Theory Linking Acute Cannabis
Intoxication and Regular Use." The lecture
was presented at a departmental
conference in the lecture theatre of the
Health Sciences Centre Hospital and was
attended primarily by psychiatrists,
psychologists, pharmacologists, et al.
Lead by Dr. Marcus, acting head of the
psychiatry department, and followed up by
Dr. Pat McGeer, this discussion revealed
some out-of-sight glimpses into current
marijuana research conducted throughout
North America.
The lecture consisted of a verbatim
reading of the paper Schwarz presented in
Oregon last August at a conference on drug
problems. He claims the paper was
"well-received" there. In essence, the paper
was a literature survey coupled with
Schwarz's personal observations of
patients, mainly students.
The hypothesis of the theory presented
at the conference is that the "biologically
',0V-'- •      ..■*■
active   ingredients   of   cannabis   can   be
postulated as a common link between the
acute state of intoxication and the general
condition of the regular user."
Support for this hypothesis was
generated from the observations that: 1)
"regular users of cannabis show
psychological and physical symptoms
similar to those of the acutely intoxicated
individual; 2) the effects of cannabis can
persist beyond the acute state of
intoxication; 3) the symptoms in regular
users show marked improvement on
discontinuation of cannabis; and 4) the
major chemically active ingredient of
cannabis and its metabolitesjDersist in the
human body for quite prolonged periods of
time after exposure."
Schwarz revealed that the patients,
upon whom he based his observations,
often consulted him for complaints
unrelated to cannabis use. These patients
would insist that marijuana was not
impairing their general functioning but,
eventually, they would acknowledge the
possibility of some connection between
marijuana use and their psychological
complaints.
The regular user was not defined clearly,
but it seems to be one who smokes grass
once or twice a week.
Schwarz pointed out the similarities
between the acutely-intoxicated individual
and the regular user, including such
observations as "a marked impairment in
immediate memory, together with
attention and concentration," a euphoric
state defined as a "well-being, contentment
and self-satisfaction in the absence of
external stimuli" and a "prominent"
paranoia revealed by the typical response:
"Of course I'm paranoid — isn't
everyone?" Schwarz quoted another
researcher's comment that such a
relationship rendered this clinical
impression "organic".
Comparable physiological features were
discussed also. It was noted that, because
of its dehydrating effects, marijuana could
be a diuretic and that the chemical
ingredients of cannabis remain in the
human body as long as one week.
Published reports of the persistent
effects of marijuana leads Schwarz to
believe that such descriptions of "sensorial
impairment and confusion are strongly
suggestive of a continuing toxic process."
He also notes a disappearance of the
"persistent effects" when the drug was
discontinued because his patients claimed
to feel much better.
The   open   discussion   following   the
lecture, led by Dr. McGeer, covered such
topics as. physiological studies currently
being pursued at UBC (the perennial rat
studies), philosophical polemics concerning
marijuana use, and psychological
comparisons of other mental disorders to
those described in the lecture.
The atmosphere in the lecture room was
one of hearty approval: one professional
stated that it was "refreshing to find such
fine clinical research" and someone else
equated Schwarz to Freud and other
harbingers of established psychological
concepts. Schwarz was praised for his
"willingness to stick his neck out" acting in
the "best traditions of the medical
profession" and for teaching us a lesson
that young people won't learn.
And, of course, we witnessed the
inevitable exposition on the biases of
marijuana research. But, as Schwarz was
quick to point out, he made a "cautious
attempt to consider all the angles". There
was no doubt of the invaluable therapeutic
position he maintains on campus.
At the start of the lecture, Schwarz-
thought of changing the title of his lecture
to "The Hazards of Discussions on
Marijuana Research". By the end of the
conference, it was evident that he had
managed to find most of them.
-'rffiS
"# Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Food services claim in doubt
By VAUGHN PALMER
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Sue
Kennedy has called into question a UBC
food services claim that Lyle Osmundson's
alternate food service has affected SUB
cafeteria sales to the extent that some
employees could lose their jobs.
Bill Morrison, president of Canadian
Union of Public Employees Local 116, said
Wednesday UBC food services is
threatening to fire employees because of
revenue lost to the alternate food service
which has been operating irregularly out of
a bus parked on the SUB plaza.
However, Kennedy said Thursday she is
shocked by claims by food services head
Ruth Blair that Osmundson's small
business could have a major effect on sales
in the SUB cafeteria.
"I plan on asking her for some figures
on the subject at next week's meeting of
the food services committee," Kennedy
said.
Blair said Thursday that the SUB
cafeteria serves about 5,000 people a day.
Osmundson's business serves about 250
people a day.
"I'm not sure what our exact action will
be," Blair said, "but it will probably
involve cutting back the cafeteria's hours
of operation."
Blair said she isn't sure how many
employees would lose their jobs because of
a cutback, "but it wouldn't be more than
one or two. It may only involve cutting the
hours of several of them."
Morrison, of CUPE said Thursday while
he  is  opposed to the Osmondson food
service because it does not employ union
help, he did not plan any legal action
against them.
"My main concern is that none of my
people suffer as a result of this service. If
they do, then I suppose we'd have to ask
Mr. Osmundson and his workers to join our
union, or leave the campus," Morrison said.
"I don't know whether his small
operation could have an effect on SUB
business or not, but I don't want any
CUPE members to lose their jobs because
of it," he said.
It's our faculty guide,
says administration
For the first time in recent memory, the
Alma Mater Society has encountered
difficulty in getting copies of the faculty
and administration directory.
The AMS has been asked to give the
administration a list of who would use
directories supplied to the student society.
The AMS normally receives 20 to 25 of
the directories, which contain an
alphabetical listing of campus and home
phone numbers and addresses of university
departments, faculty members, staff and
administrators.
The AMS then distributes copies to its
own offices and subsidiary student
organizations.
This year's request by AMS general
manager Brian Robinson was answered by
the office of John McLean, director of
personnel, labor relations and ancillary
services. It requested a list of the people
receiving the directories and their reasons
for needing them.   .
Robinson quoted the letter as saying the
directories were at "a premium" this year.
The list requested has been submitted to
McLean's office and Robinson is expecting
a reply or the directories within the next
two weeks.
"I'll be making further inquiries if
nothing happens," said Robinson.
Copies are generally received by the
third week in October.
D. K. Rumsey, administrative assistant
to McLean, claimed the distribution of the
directories is being closely regulated
because faculty members have complained
about salesmen using information from the
directory.
Rumsey said about 4,000 of the
directories will be distributed this year.
"Each faculty member receives one and
the staff receive about one per telephone,"
she said.
Two profs in trouble
Ed Mint, John Sydor.. . survey erosion
—david phillips photo
Out of six profs up for tenure or
termination of contract in the
anthropology and sociology department, at
least two are in trouble.
Despite a tight security blanket on the
department, The Ubyssey has learned that
the two sociologists — Matthew Speier and
Ron Silvers — were granted tenure Tuesday
by a slim majority amid many abstentions
by members of the department's
promotions and tenure committee.
The report of the committee now goes
to the tenure and promotions committee
of the arts faculty. However, it will be
accompanied by a separate report from
department head Cyril Belshaw, in which
he will make recommendations about these
two marginal decisions.
The other three professors who were up
for tenure or termination, and whose cases
appear more secure are George Gray, Bob
Ratner and Robin Ridington.
A  sixth   prof,  Robert  MacDougall, is
believed not to have been recommended
for tenure at all, though graduate students
in the department who were earlier asked
, to individually submit their views to the
department committee claim they were
never informed that MacDougall's case was
up for a tenure or termination decision.
The grad students have already held two
meetings to discuss the current tenure
proceedings and their possible results.
Jim Bledsoe, chairman of the anthrosoc
grad students association, has called a
meeting of grad students for today to
discuss the results of the committee's
decisions.
Huelga! in SUB
A film on the history of the California
grape workers' strike since 1965 called
Huelga! will be shown today, 12:30 p.m.,
in SUB 215. Admission is free.
Drainage ditch washes away forest
By JOHN SYDOR
A drainage ditch off Chancellor
Boulevard in the West Spanish Banks area
has caused the erosion of 750,000 cubic
feet of endowment land soil, a former
geophysics PhD student said Thursday.
Ed Mint, now in law 2, first noticed the
erosion several months ago after the winter
rains, at that time it was just a small gorge
several feet wide.
. The gorge is now 100 feet deep by
about 40 feet wide and full of mud, sand
and toppled trees, said Mint, who with
several other students has formed the
Society for Environmental Education to
combat such environmental abuses.
The ditch is located about 200 yards off
Chancellor in an area where there are many
forest trails.
The ditch begins on the side of one trail
and runs toward the northwest, it is
impossible to tell where it was supposed to
end for it gets progressively larger as it
moves into dense forest undergrowth, said
Mint.
"Then the ditch ends abruptly in the
middle of the forest, and you find yourself
staring down into a monstrous gorge.
"That little ditch and the water it
transports has eroded away at least
750,000 cubic feet of forest soil by my
calculations," he said.
"Who dug the ditch and why, I do not
know; but this is a vivid example of what
can happen when people try to change an
environment without making an effort at
first understanding it."
The basic objective of SEE is to bring
together students from varying
backgrounds and have them contribute
towards a group understanding or
environment.
It is hoped that this group will extend
the sense of environmental awareness to
the campus.
"By having people who understand and
know how to use the media, we hope to
make students aware of environmental
problems," said Mint.
"Communication will be in the form of
a lecture series, films, slides, pamphlets and
video television."
People within the group will analyze
specific environmental problems and these
will in turn be used by the communication
people in their productions.
The first of these productions will be a
video television show dealing with the
environmental abuse on and around the
UBC endownment lands, to be shown in
SUB within a week.
"Many of us with SEE believe that a
good portion of today's environmental
problems would be non-existent if the
masses had some understanding of what
was involved," said Mint.
"But what often happens is that a
breakdown    in    communication    occurs
between the technologist, scientist and the
layman.
"As a result we have a population using
pesticides, synthetic materials, concrete,
asphalt and even drainage ditches without
full realization of what can happen with
such technology.
"By finding ways of communicating
with people we hope to overcome disasters
such as the eroded gorge on the
endowment lands," said Mint.
The ultimate aims of SEE include
changes in the structure of the university.
Environmental education is not simply a
matter of informing people about
ecological balances, but an attempt at
interconnecting the variety of disciplines
which are taught at the university, said
Mint.
"When man becomes fully aware of his
natural and synthetic environment, long
lasting solutions to the present
environmental dilemma will be found." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1971
Urp
For several weeks an alternate food service has
been operating outside the SUB cafeteria.
We approve, from both an economic and a
gastronomic viewpoint.
However. Rumblings are coming from the direction
of administration food services director Ruthie Blair.
And it seems the noise is not the result of a dose of
SUB-standard food.
Rather, it seems Ruthie is concerned about the
effect the alternate food service is having on sales of her
ersatz food.
She is apparently so concerned that she is making
threats against the jobs of food services employees.
Unfortunately, it seems our friends in the local
local of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, which
represents the cafeteria workers, are believing her.
This distresses us even more than Ruthie's
offerings. We will therefore make a few comments and
suggestions, which follow.
We dispute that the 250 customers the alternate
food service gets daily are enough to make a dent in
Ruthie's budget. Especially when you consider that the
SUB cafeteria alone has 5,000 customers daily.
However, the problem will be more serious when
the alternate service expands, which will likely take
place in the near future.
At this point, enter the good ol' Alma Mater
Society.
The AMS at present is planning to build an
alternate food service, bar and entertainment lounge in
the basement of SUB.
The facilities will need workers and, barring a
drastic change in AMS policy, these workers will be
unionized.
The obvious solution to the problem would be for
the AMS to hire the workers laid off by the
administration.
One more suggestion.
We recall that the contract between CUPE and the
administration contains a clause which allows employees
to refuse to work with materials which pollute.
Many things fitting this description are found in
the SUB cafeteria. Included are the plastic cutlery, the
paper plates and the styrofoam cups.
While we do not claim to be experts on the
intricate ecology of the plastic fork, we do know that
the materials mentioned are not bio-degradable.
Therefore, they become pollutants at the moment
of dumping.'
We suggest that the union members refuse to work
with the aforementioned materials. This would force the
administration to revert to real cutlery.
Our calculations show this would provide two jobs
for unionized dishwashers.
Such a move by the union might also be the first
step in the proverbial worker-student alliance, as most
students would welcome the chance to eat off real
plates with real knives and forks.
The only thing needed then would be real food.
J.A.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 8, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;
229-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plcynmer
So you want a masthead you miserable bumbling imbeciles well okay,
here's your masthead- Mike Sasges and John Andersen and Berton
Woodward and everyone else who's ever spent a minute bugging me, you
two-faced, lily-livered creeps like Jan O'Brien and Vaughn Palmer and
David Bowerman and everyone else who's trying to sneak telex time
behind my back. I'll count every pencil in this goddam place, so take that
Ian Lindsay and John Sydor. As for you, Dave Schmidt, I bet you're the
creep who stole my cat.
I'll show you, Gord Gibson and Kent Spencer. You guys think you're
neat but I'll break your typewriter ribbons, and worse even. And Paul
Knox and Kathy Carney, wait 'till the day you're down to your last paper
clip, you won't get any help from me John Twigg and Maria Cassills and
company. So take that grimy Gary Greunke and Greg Deacon. No more
new lenses for you Dave Phillips, you're all a bunch of slimey rats and if
anyone got left out, forget it or I'll belt you in the mouth.
-/
This is a Walt Disney true life adventure.
Letters
Hair
The best place for girls to get
long hair trimmed (really
trimmed) is downstairs in the SUB
barber shop.
For the sum of $2 (not the
regular $4 in the beauty parlor)
they will give you a blunt cut
exactly to your specifications.
It's worth the startled looks
from the passers-by, if nothing
else.
Julie Monkman
Education 3
Dope
In your Tuesday issue I found
the advertisement comparing
Premier Bennett to a pusher quite
tasteless.
It is indicative of an immature
Ubyssey staff who, through a
rather warped perspective, find
and treat the issue of drugs as a
big joke.
I am truly sorry that people
such as yourself find the drug
problem so funny. That anyone
could take such a casual attitude
is a sad reflection on today's
plunging values.
I can respect your opinion but
I   can't   appreciate   it.  I  would
suggest that The Ubyssey's
viewpoint is not representative of
the student body in the field of
drugs.
Rob Phillips
Artsl
Gender
Dear Mr. Plommer:
Your editorial of October 7th
refers to an exchange between Mr.
Colin Portnuff and myself. It
reads as though you wish to make
out that I am paranoic and afraid
of large-scale upheaval, and that I
off-handedly demanded a
retraction from Portnuff. Since I
am reasonably sure that most
students are interested in fairness
and objectivity I can assure you
that your analysis is far from the
mark.
What I am concerned about is a
baseless and irresponsible
accusation which reflects upon
my colleagues. Tenure discussions
in the department to date have
taken place with a genuine
attempt by all participating
members of the department to
understand each other's academic
view and to arrive at serious and
balanced decisions.
My letter to Mr. Portnuff was a
request for information, if he had
any information which would
show me to be wrong. I then did
suggest that if he had no such
information he should retract his
allegation. Is this not reasonable?
I can assure you that all
faculty, and the graduate students
with whom I have had contact
both collectively and individually
in connection with this' matter,
have behaved with exemplary care
and fair-mindedness. I am-proud
to be associated with them.
Cyril S. Belshaw
Professor and Head
Dept. of Anthropology
and Sociology
Dear Miss Belshaw: Thank you
for writing. -L.P.
Pusher
The Oct. 5 Ubyssey
successfully equated "The
Premier" with "The Pusher".
Congratulations!
The newspaper should be
commended for its effort to
eliminate status in British
Columbia.
R.Olson
Grad Studies Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
—greg deacon photo
FIDDLIN' AN' PICKIN' their way through SUB, Bill Cheatam, Molly Hore and Sally Goodin string out set
of hot licks for the benefit of Joe Student Thursday. Musicians are members of the Second Hand String
Band.
SFU professor anticipates
more battle in Bangla Desh
The current struggle in Bangla Desh (East
Pakistan) is just the beginning of a very protracted
battle, a Simon Fraser University prof told about 50
people in Angus 110 Thursday.
SFU political science, sociology and
anthropology department member Hari Sharma
spoke at a meeting sponsored by the Friends of
Bangla Desh and centred around the history of
Bangla Desh and the current national liberation
struggle.
Bengal was the most advanced nation in the
world before its conquest by Britain and since then
it has been systematically plundered first by British
and western imperialists and now * by American
imperialism, said anthropologist Kathleen Aberle.
"Bengalese resources have been distorted by the
needs of western imperialism," she said. "It is now
used only as a raw materials resource area.
"Even though they produce 70 per cent of
Pakistan's goods, they only receive 25 per cent of
the money," Aberle said.
Dr. Chimna Bannerjee said: "This disparate
economy has caused tremendous bitterness among
the Bengalis and has led to their struggle."
Riots broke out in 1968 forcing former dictator
General Ayub Khan to resign and hand over the
government to General Yahya Khan who promised
elections in 1970 which he said would return the
government to civilian rule.
Because Yahya insisted on unity, many
Bengalese parties boycotted the election, Bannerjee
said. However, the Awami League, composed
primarily  of the  Bengalese petit bourgeoisie, did
contest the election and won a majority on a
demand for Bangla Desh autonomy.
Bannerjee said because the military is based in
West Pakistan but depends on the exploitation of
East Pakistan to exist, it could not afford the
Bengali victory.  <
"The Awami League is partly to blame for the
current struggle because it didn't see the political
reality," he said,"Even while they were talking
with Yahya, the junta was planning to move the
military in and take over."
The junta banned the league on March 25,
saying talks were at a deadlock and the massacre
began, aimed especially at those who supported the
liberation movement.
"The Awami League now finds itself in the
leadership of an armed struggle which it is not
competent to lead," Bannerjee said.
"They have a lack of the right type' of
leadership," Sharma said. "The communist and
progressive parties have all been banned.
"The Awami League thought it could quash the
military, but this didn't happen, and now it is losing
control of the liberation struggle."
He said guerrilla warfare is already deeply
entrenched, and that the U.S. is supporting the West
Pakistan military and may continue to do so. The
U.S. is already sending in 'advisors', he said.
"It's a Vietnam in the making."
Sharma also predicted a crackdown on the part
of the Indian government in West Bengal (situated
in India and now housing many of the Bengali
refugees).
In Canada
Art union
setting up
WINNIPEG (LPNS) - Nationalism, unionism, and the painter's
art are an unexpected combination anywhere, and particularly in a
country whose attitude toward its own artists has generally been a
less-than-benign neglect.
But a national artists union, geared to protect the Canadian
painter from exploitation by galleries and exhibitions, is in the process
of being set up, and it won't be long before its broadside attack is felt
in Canadian museums.
Twenty-four delegates attended the convention of the
newly-founded Canadian Artists Representation here recently, and
among the most powerful currents was nationalism.
The convention limited CAR membership to Canadian citizens
and landed immigrants, and passed a motion of support for an 85 per
cent Canadian quota at Canadian universities.
One of the new union's first acts came at a recent Montreal
exhibition, where $2,000 was offered as a first prize among entries
and $1,000 as a second prize. Entering artists agreed that this $3,000
should be divided among all entrants instead.
The artists said they didn't want to compete against each other:
"If we don't stand together and help each other, no one else will."
The convention passed an agreement among the attending artists
that they would "boycott all shows that do not treat an artist fairly."
Ralph Allen, curator of Kingston's Etherington Gallery, said: "We
have the situation where in Edmonton, Calgary, Lethbridge and so on
you have a large number of university jobs for artists.
"But the vast majority of art-history posts, fine-arts courses, and
art-college jobs are going to non-Canadians while Canadian artists are
in need of revenue.
"Canadian artists who are absolutely capable of teaching
part-time in order to get extra revenue to support their painting are
unable to get jobs because the departments are building up almost
completely non-Canadian faculties."
Artist John Boyle argued that "Canadian interests" in the artistic
field include seeing that Canadian artists can actually afford to be
painters; only thus will Canada develop a strong national art. "It is
ultimately an economic issue,"he said.
"A lot of Canadian artists are becoming more and more
nationalistic," Boyle added. "It's a defence mechanism against the
flood of American culture, because we're so deluged that Canadians
won't pay attention to Canadian artists."
These developments occur at a time when Canadian playwrights
are beginning to demand fifty per cent Canadian content in Canadian
theatres, and small Canadian theatres are demanding that the
government shift its financial support for drama from "museums" like
Stratford to smaller, local theatres.
Blast display in SUB
A detailed display giving background on the proposed Amchitka
nuclear test is now being shown in the AMS council chambers on the
second floor of SUB.
The Alpha and Omega Foundation has assembled a display
utilizing newspaper reports, scientific reports and various other
sources and are soliciting signatures on letters to the United Nations.
The display continues until Tuesday.
Crown land added   	
to housing project? RiP-°ff
More letters
From page 1
"And then we must make some responsible recommendations to
Williston's office," he said.
"We plan to keep everybody happy," said Stanzl, who is the
general contractor on the Walter Gage student residence towers and
the Buchanan extension.
Murdoch said he expects Stanzl also will be coming forward
with a bid on 40,000 square feet of vacant Crown land at Wesbrook
and University Boulevard.
"I would be very surprised if we don't get a purchasing request.
"It will certainly make for a better development," said
Murdoch.
Stanzl said he knew the land was available after hearing that a
local firm was trying to buy the frat property on behalf of an
unknown British development group.
However, last spring the board killed the proposed high-rise
hotel scheme on Wesbrook because of "considerable opposition on
campus to the scheme".
The sale will remove considerable financial pressure from the
two frats, Murdoch said.
In April, 1971 Phi Gamma Delta president Brian McGavin told
alumni members they should sell the frat house to cover increased
prices and decreased membership.
While walking through the
Sedge wick library, I saw that the
"You Who Steal" poster had been
stolen.
It was encouraging to notice,
however, that the thief had taken
the message on the poster
seriously, for, just as it had said,
he had left behind that which was
pf no value to him, namely the
four pieces of tape which had
been used to affix the poster to
the wall.
The library is to be
complimented on its success in
shaping the morals of the
university populace, by such
simple means as its ubiquitous
posters. Perhaps the provincial
government, upon hearing of the
library's success in the faculty of
morals, will transfer its
multi-million dollar anti-drug,
alcohol and tobacco pogrom to
the library.
Certainly a few thousand more
signs in the library would be
indistinguishable, and just think
of the moral standards which
could be so effectively altered.
Richard A. Cavell
Graduate Studies
Bitch
I am a student not in general
support of The Ubyssey or its
policies.
However, recently I had a bitch
about the advertising policy so
immediately I wrote a letter to
The Ubyssey expressing my
displeasure.
When on Thursday I found
that the letter had not been
published I talked to members of
The Ubyssey.
It was then I found that the
real ripoff artist was a man by the
name of Al Vince who is the
publications manager.
This is the man who sets the
advertising policy of The Ubyssey,
including the high rates and the
fact that one cannot change an ad
for any reason after it has been
paid for and an order filed.
When I talked to this man I
found that his attitude toward his
work for which he is paid $8,600
a year was one of total disinterest.
This man is, I would say,
looking at the far side of 60 and
living in the 1920's for to me he
seemed completely confident that
he would not lose his job for his
incompetent nature.
I would hope that in the near
future The Ubyssey, perhaps in its
Consumer Exposure column, will
print the entire story of this man
and leave it up to the students to
judge him. I personally feel that
he should get out of
semi-retirement out of The
Ubyssey (which like others he
devotedly hates) and go into
permanent retirement.
Dave Turner
Computer Science 3 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971
Student trips, charge laid
was knocked out of me and I was somewhat dazed,"
he said.
RCMP took him to the customs office after
allowing him to take the truck's licence number, he
said.
After questioning him for a short time police
took him to another room and told him he would
be charged under the Criminal Code, he said.
The summons delivered to his home read:
"(Name)    wrongfully   and   without   lawful -
authority, for the purpose of compelling another
person to abstain from doing something that he has
_ a lawful  right  to  do,  did unlawfully  block or
'lfrrSA#M£||IM   fflOGt   SQt   obstruct  a highway, to wit, the  Sumas border
ramp."
He said his lawyer was surprised at the severity
of the charge.
From page 1
"I was trying to move out of the way when I
tripped and fell," he said. "The truck was coming
straight for me.
"I was still trying to move out of the way but
at the same time I was trying to decide if I should
take the truck under the wheel or under the middle.
Then he hit me with his bumper on my lower right
ribs and either dragged me two feet or else someone
dragged me out from under the car.
"I don't remember that part too well. The wind
The UBC anti-war committee will hold a
teach-in Wednesday, to protest Canadian
involvement in the Vietnam war.
The teach-in will begin at noon, in the SUB
party room and the program will consist of several
guest speakers lecturing on Canadian complicity in
the war and its economic impact on Canada.
There will also be folk singing and possibly a
film of the G.I. movement in Vietnam.
Anyone wishing to help in the teach-in can
phone Nancy Knox, chairwoman of the UBC
anti-war committee at 688-5924.
The student was wearing a green shirt, a dark
green tweed jacket and jeans the day of the
demonstration. He asks that any witnesses to the
incident call him at 224-7326 or leave a message at
the AMS executive office to be given to AMS
treasurer David Mole who will be in contact with
the student.
The student said it is crucial that he be
acquitted as he wants to be bonded in the near
future.
a SUB Film Soc presentation -
"A beautiful and dazzling
ptoca of film making!"
~a&'
diary
of a mad
tiousewif*
a frank parry film
SUB THEATRE
50c
Friday - 9:30
Saturday - 7:00
&9:30
Sunday - 7:00
Sacked law student bags $8,600
FREDERICTON (CUP) - A
lucrative Opportunities for Youth
project here netted a University of
New Brunswick student $8,600
for only six weeks work,
according to a report prepared for
the federal government by the
co-ordinating agency for local
OFY projects.
The Community Opportunities
Providing Employment report
claims that Jonathon Marler, a
second year law student at UNB,
received $35,000 from OFY last
spring to carry out "an ecological
forest survey" in New Brunswick.
But instead of probing the
woodland ecology, the report
alleges, Marler rented a tree
harvester and chain saws and sold
timber and pulp wood to local
industrialists at cut rates before
complaints from his employees
cost him his job at the end of a
six-week period.
According to the COPE report,
Marler hired around 30 students
and paid them $1.25 hourly, but
did not inform them they were
working for an OFY project.
"Only when the students heard
their jobs was a Youth
Opportunities Project did they
become suspicious," the report
says.
'They complained to Marler
who retaliated by firing the entire
lot and then they complained to
Ottawa."
The federal government, the
report continues, dispatched OFY
organizer, Sheila Zimmerman,
who had approved the project in
the beginning to investigate.
"She was defensive and the
whole meeting was entirely
unpleasant," the report says.
But in the end, the report says,
Marler was asked by Zimmerman
to vacate his post. He did so
reluctantly, it says, but not before
he had pocketed $8,600 for
himself.
FROI
79
95 B.R.C., FALCON,
PREMIER, MONSHEE
WHEELER DEALER
CYCLE CENTER LTD.
2320 W. 4th 731-5531
Kids read Straight,
teacher gets fired
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2617 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
HANDBAGS, BOOTS -
both Men's & Women's
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE BETWEEN 10th & 11th - 738-9833
MOOSOM1N, Sask. (CUP) - A
school teacher in this small
Saskatchewan community has lost
her job after she recently allowed
her students to a read a
newspaper.
The paper in question is the
Georgia Straight and home
economics teacher Marjorie
Gordon, 24, was fired from her
job at the local McNaughton High
School after parents complained
W*^ - -. ■'-. ' ,f„ ^
Quilt made for
Devlin's baby
A woman's work is never done.
The Vancouver Women's
Centre has made a quilt for
Bernadette Devlin's baby Roisin
Elizabeth.
They did it because, according
to their press release, "she has had
her baby and retained her image
as an independent woman who
has a right to have and keep her
child, whether the father is
present or not."
To see the quilt and talk to
women who made it the women's
centre invites people to call in
today from 2 to 5 p.m. at 511
Carrall Street.
that she was allowing members of
her grade 9 class to read it.
The charge was "gross
misconduct" on the part of
Gordon, who is in her second year
of teaching.
The school board says the
paper, is "unsuitable for children
aged 14 to 16."
No reason is apparent for the
particular age group, for the
charge "gross misconduct," or
why the paper is "unsuitable" in
the first place, although school
superintendent James Ingram said
the issue in question contained an
article in which some "young
girls" described their sexual
experiences.
Ingram said the small
community of 3,000 on the
Trans-Canada Highway, 140 miles
east of Regina, is "in an uproar"
because the parents of some of
the students had caught them
reading the paper. It was
addressed to Gordon's husband.
Ingram said that when she was
asked why she showed the paper
to the students, Gordon said they
saw her reading it, asked to look
at it, and she could see no reason
for not showing it to them.
Graduate study in
Business Administration
University of Toronto
School of Business
Ph.D. in Business Administration
Master of Business Administration
Programs in Accounting, Business Economics, Finance, Industrial Relations,
Management Science, Marketing, Personnel and Organizational Behaviour,
plus Interdisciplinary Programs. Financial assistance available.
A faculty representative will visit the campus to talk to prospective students
on October 12.
Appointments can be arranged through your campus Placement Office.  IWARNIN6: SOMt NuWV.
STIMULATED SEX,V(OLEN<j5
JgRoTAL AMosuteEsnve
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"i 7>cr t*f UK!1*6 r*06^ «
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fs   ;    S
H£    |f4bOtfe£S   IM  Ar FEvJ
iNTlH^TTt     PMAMTASIES .
.Per ^i_06-
WMyT   e>M   E=A(?TH CAN
I THIS    fbS^l&U?    r\t£f\N?
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LADIES
NIGHT
every
MONDAY night
YOUR FATHER'S
MUSTACHE
Vanco uver's
First and Finest
Roaring 20's
Banjo Cabaret
Lunch is served Mon.-Fri.
from 11:30 til 2:30 p.m.
Open nightly Mon. thru Sat.
929 West Pender Street
687-1919
YULBRYNNER
Vogue
919 GR
6S5-3434
flDIOS
HME
SHOW
TIMES:
12:10, 2:25,4:35, 6:50, 9:05
COLOR
PLAY MISTY FOR ME
Coronet
an invitation to tenor...
• 51   GRANVILLE
6SS-6S2S
12:05, 2:05,4:00,6:00
7:45,9:45
Warning:    Some    swearing     .
_and_coarse language. —B.C  nirl
Odeon
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
7:30, 9:30
DOUBLE FUN WITH THE "CARRY ON GANG"!
CABBY ON AGAIN
3rd Week
DOCTOR
SHOW TIMES: 12:05, 1:35. 3:35,
5:35,7:35,9:35
Dalton Trumbo's
JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN,
"H Timothy Bottom. j.Mn Robard.
    Warning:    Donald Sutherland  ,
XAJVJt,*,,JJ,h     A DISTURBING PICTURE        <
876-2747 SOME SWEARING   -B c   Dir"
Haida
-pi WALT DISNEY'Sx.
rantasia
THE
ULTIMATE
EXPERIENCE
TECHNICOLOR*
KINGS'Y >t   JOYCE
435-3222
SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30
MATINEE 2 P.M. —Sunday & Monday
ANEW FILM EXPERIENCE INVOLVING HUMAN EMOTIONS
Producer: Irving Abrams
Executive Producer: Helen Winston
Director: John Gaisford
Session Supervision by:
PAULBINDRIM
Warning: a documentary
on psychiatric group
therapy with swearing,
coarse language, male and
female nudity.
—B.C. Director
Varsitu
224-3730V
4375 W. 10th
SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30
MUSSOC is changing its
tastes from the light to the
more contemporary, serious
musical drama, and this change
can be seen in the choice of
this year's productions.
The first of these, the rock
opera "Tommy" is in rehearsal
now and will be presented
from October 27 to November
6. The scenario has been
created by Jeromy Long, a
UBC M.A. graduate in Creative
Writing. The choreographer for
the student-produced show is
Lorraine King, artistic director
is Ed Astley, and musical
director is Marek Norman.
The second production, to
be presented in February, is
"Fiddler on the Roof which
has never before been done by
an amateur company in
Vancouver. Producer Nick
Orchard is looking for
enthusiastic people to work
with the show. Auditions are
October 17 in the SUB
Ballroom.
The UBC Theatre
Department will present an
M.A. Thesis Production of A
Cry of Players by William
Gibson at the Dorothy
Somerset Studio from October
13 to 16. The play, a portrait
of young William Shakespeare,
will be performed each night at
8:00 p.m., with a student
performance on Thursday,
October 14 at 12:30 p.m.
Student tickets are $1.00 -
available at Frederic Wood
Theatre.
As a feature of B.C.'s
centennial the Vancouver Art
Gallery will present, on
October 12, a small historic
exhibition. Displayed will be
works by Canadians Storm,
Sharp, and Kilpin, all of whom
were active in the early part of
the century.
Masthead
And a wild and wooly week
it was. Special thanks goes to
all who helped, especially the
nameless one who typed
blurbs. Also honorable
mention to Stan Persky, who
made    an    appearance    (and
disppearance)   at    the   sweat
shop.
There was no grapefruit this
time around, but tomorrow is
another week. Don't forget the
contest.
—Grant Dickin, Ed.
.     4444 W. 10TH
«*£      228-8933
<**      GENERAL
46     FICTION
%
NEW    V>       •
AND       7TjL
USED        *ZJL
TEXTS        TjgL
STUDY ifL\
GUIDES \p
POSTERS
GESTALT AWARENESS GROUPS
Beginning Sunday Oct. 10
4543 W. 10th Awe.
7:30 P.M.
FOR INFORMATION PHONE
ALLAN COHEN 228-9631
JOHN MATE 731-7971
COME THIS TUESDAY
8 weeks 7:30-10:00 p.m.
The Vancouver Lay School
of Theology
First Hour:
Father Albert Szigmond &  Rev.
G. Strotthotte
"The Messiah  in the Old & New
Testaments"
Second Hour Options:
1) Dr. John Ross — "Systems
Thinking and Theology"
2) Profs. W. R. Crockett & R. A.
Wilson — "Contemporary
Theology"
3) Rev. F. L. Sanderson & Mr. Bill
Herger — 'Action
Communication for Laymen'
4) Rev. A. Szigmond — "Biblical
Seminar"
Place: The Vancouver School of
Theology 6000 lona Drive
(off Chancellor Blvd., UBC)
Cost:
$10.00 per person $5.00 for students
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971 The majority of our urbanized society ride
to work, or play, on wheels of some sort or
another. Many spend weekends or vacations
locked in their metal conveyances.
Everywhere everyone exists in a near-wheeled
state. At the end a person's last trip, to the
grave, is made on wheels in a very slow
procession of black respectablities.
The hearse is the most elaborate vehicle on
four wheels but who really enjoys it? To the
protaganist in the drama, an extremely passive
figure, little gain is got from the ride. The
bereaved relatives and others are the only ones
to be impressed by the elaborateness and
splendour of the occasion, although the
middle-class, plastic, state-like funeral doesn't
really appeal to anyone, especially due to the
forbidding cost. One could, though, look
forward to being floated to final resting in
that tassle-fringed, velvet, wheeled outer
coffin if the ride could be pre-experienced.
What is one way of achieving involvement
in the scenario of the procession of death?
Well, you can try to convince an undertaker,
oops, Funeral Director, that you want to ride
before you decide. Perhaps with the incentive
of a contract he may accede to your wish.
Don't count on it though. I canvassed twelve
funeral homes and got absolutely nowhere,
not even as far as the display section. How
else could one test drive a hearse? Well, you
could impersonate a garage mechanic and
advise the parlour that during the hearse's last
mechanical checkup it wasn't road-tested
properly. I found it difficult to find a friend
who would drive while I stayed prone in the
back. Unbelievably they all shied away from
my scheme. Well then, you could try to ride in
the back during one of the real runs. But
wouldn't that somehow be impinging on the
fun of someone else who could still be around
in spirit? Getting a job with a funeral parlour
might be a solution. That seemed too involved
and would require that you spend some time
on inside work before allowed out in public
on the soft job. Why not buy a hearse? There
should be a few used ones around. Really,
after all, you just wanted a ride, not the whole
car. And too, bribing the driver wouldn't
work, as he would probably think that I was a
magazine writer doing an expose on funeral
places and their obscene methods.
What conceivable way was there? I was
determined not to be deprived of that
experience so that when the real thing came
along for me I could lie wholly satisfied that I
had successfully completed the test run.
Nader, you'd be proud of me.
This mind-monopolising idea slowly lost
prominence to other enterprising ideas such as
enlisting in the Foreign Legion to satisfy my
passion for dates. And travelling around the
world on a unicycle with a 200-lb. pack; or
preaching Billy Graham style and operating a
Playboy club on the side (the best of both
spiritual and temporal worlds). But the idea
was instantly brought back into focus one day
last week when an old second-hand
out-of-service hearse shopped in response to
my extended thumb.
"Where ya going?'
the front seat.
I asked as I slid on to
"Down to fourth", the long-haired freak
replied.
This news brought an essential bit of
information to my mind. I had 23 blocks, or
about 10 minutes, to achieve my now revived
burning aim.
"Uh, you got a weird car, eh?", I observed
gleefully.
"Yeah, I like to freak straights", he
muttered through his uncut moustache and
organic breakfast.
I turned my head to the rear and saw the
empty space. Heavy FM rock drifted from
the twin stereo speakers mounted on either
side of the padded ceiling. The thought rushed
to me that the last ride was not going to be
exactly like this, but take advantage of this
acceptable facsimile while it's available you
clown. Analogies of my similar behavior with
girls crept constantly into my mind where
they mixed with my overall feeling of
indecision.
Five blocks had quickly passed.
As the next block approached I muttered,
"Would you really mind if I rode in the back
for the rest of the way?"
"Help yourself," the driver offered,
wondering no doubt that it was either his
breath or his socks that was driving me back.
But I think he probably got this kind of
request every day.
I rolled over the front seat and landed on
the floor in the back and then looked out into
the world through the criss-crossed, red,
velvet, curtains now streaked with dust, and
dirt and smelling faintly of higher trips. So
this is what its like. It's not as bone-chilling as
I had thought it would be. Although I
couldn't quite convince myself to lie prone.
My eyes followed the passing cars, and people
on the street, and passing stores, which all
melted into one flash of urbanity.
"This is where I turn," the driver
interrupted.
"O year, well thanks.. . eh . .. I'll get out,
the back door, ok?"
"Yeah, push down hard on the door
handle, the ones on the inside are seldom used
so they get stiff."
"Thanks for the. . . lift . . . ah . . . trip," I
yelled as I slammed the door.
As I turned to step up on the curb an
astonished minister saw my smiling face and
frowned. Did he think that I was getting
away? Or did he feel that some irreverence
had been committed? His look couldn't dull
the nice feeling that I knew he wouldn't get
his money's worth when his time came for the
final North American ritual.
— Michael Gee
Beautiful
clothes. . .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"Is Where It's Happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
Clearing 7971
SUZUKI MODELS
500 CC     185 CC     120 CC
Varsity Cycles
4357W. 10th
A CRY OF PLAYERS
By William Gibson
(An M.A. Thesis Production)
Directed by Roger Dunn
October 13-16
8:00 p.m.
Adult Tickets - $2.00
Student Tickets - $1.00
SPECIAL STUDENT MATINEE -
Thurs. Oct. 14 - 12:30 Noon
Reservations: Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
SOMERSET STUDIO UBC
a SUB Film Soc presentation -
"A beautiful and
piece of film making!"
diary
off a mad
housewife
a frank parry film
SUB THEATRE
50c
Friday - 9:30
Saturday - 7:00
&9:30
Sunday - 7:00
MEMO TO CANADIAN STUDENTS -
FROM: INTERNATION HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL-BETWEEN NATIONS
Yes,    Virginia,    Canada    IS    a
nation!
It's also part of the world!
That means I.House is for you
too!
if . . . you're interested in meeting students from around the world
if . . . you'd like information about work, study or travel abroad
if . . . you dig foods from India, Greece, Italy, Russia, France, etc.
if . . . you groove on steelband and soul music
if . . . you like a tall, cool one on a Friday afternoon (yum)
if . . . you'd like to learn to speak conversational Cantonese-free
... or if you just dig vibes ...
DO IT AT I. HOUSE
(watch for our column in the Ubyssey every Tuesday)
OCTOBER PROGRAMS AT I.H. FOR EVERYONE:
* Conversational Cantonese lessons — every Thurs. 12:30 FREE
* Table Tennis Club — playing and coaching. Call Robert 874-6976
* International Hot Lunch — every day 12 to 1:30 — 85c
* Friday/Freshment (yum) - 4 to 6 p.m. every Friday
SPECIAL PROGRAMS FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS:
* Free English coaching by a U.B.C. student. Register at office
* Day Trip to Weaver Creek to see Salmon Spawning—Sign up at the office
before Oct. 13 . . . $2. for transportation
* Weekend visit to Penticton, B.C. as guests of local families. Registration
fee of $2. only charge. Sign up before Oct. 15.
* English Speaking Club — For students or wives who want to improve
their conversational English. Thurs. 7:30-9:30 (free)
SOUL IS COMING TO I. HOUSE ON OCT. 29
Watch For It!
Friday, October 8, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 •-—t
NEW and USED
BOOKS
$ Quality Paper Backs
• University Text Books
• Pocket Books r Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
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VANESSA REDGRAVE—OLIVER REED
IN KEN RUSSELL'S FILM OF
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Evenings — 7:15, 9:15
LOUGHEED  MALL Sunday — 5:15, 7:15, 9:15
CINEMA 1    937-3461 FREE PARKING
Surf's Up
(Again)
"Well we always take my car
Cause it's never been beat,
And we 've never missed yet
with the girls we meet..."
Oh yeah! Socially relevant progressive music,
no, but it was kind of oily to dance to back in
1963. I must admit I never took the Beachboys
too seriously, although their beautiful harmony
works on numbers like "She Knows Me Too
Well", and that powerhouse, "Why Do Fools Fall
in Love" really impressed me in my vaseline
years.
Suddenly I'm buying every one of their
available albums and pistol-whipping old men for
hard-to-get copies. It seems that while I snickered
the Beachboys dried off and developed into one
of the most sophisticated units in rock today.
"Pet Sounds" (Capitol (D) T-2458) was the
first real break with the surf image which
completely defined the group for so long. Brian
Wilson dropped out of the performing side of the
group and spent a year producing "Sounds".
Though the group had always produced albums
they could duplicate on stage, Brian now
designed a sound which depended largely on
orchestral and electronic effects for its success.
While "Wouldn't It Be Nice", "Caroline No",
"God Only Knows" and "Sloop John B"
received extensive airplay, "I just Wasn't Made
For These Times" held the key to the new
direction heralded by the release of the album.
With many other young people, Brian Wilson had
finally given up on the super "cool" Pepsi
generation: "Every time I get the inspiration to
go change things around/ No one wan is to help
me look For places where new things can be
found.*'
Forming a teani with Van Dyke Parks, of
"Song Cycle" fame, Brian used Si6.000 and
some very; sophisticated electronic equipment to
produce tie single, "Good Vibrations" shows the
terrific distance the group had moved from its
first period work. "Vibrations" and its lollow-up
single "Heroes and ViDains" were included m the
next album, "Smiley Smile" (Brother (S)
T-9001). There is a definite incomplete feeling to
this collection, with these two perfectly
conceived and executed thoughts thrown in with
some very relaxed production efforts. Without
"Vibrations" and "Heroes", the album might
have worked on a different level, but their
inclusion forms an undeniable tension which
drains its power.
- Next up was the delightful "Wild Honey"
(Capitol (S) T-2859). The title song opens the
album with Brian testifying: "Momma let me tell
how she got to me so! It ain't funny, the way she
make me want to sing a little rock 'n' roll". And
that's all it is, the finest funkiest rock 'n' roll
mixed liberally with their usual, wonderfully
inventive harmony sidetrips. Neat little pokes at
the discotheque scene like "How She Boogalooed
It" highlight an album which draws its
sophistication from its inherent simplicity. My
only complaint with this work is that it always
ends too soon.
Around this time, the group was involved in a
warm relationship with the Maharishi. An
excellent release on Capitol, simply titled
"Friends" (Capitol (S) T-2895) appeared as their
involvement with transcendental meditation was
peaking. The title cut opens with the lead
.repeating: "Let's be friends, let's be friends" and
the harmony filling in voice by voice with each
repetition, as with the best of their work, their
sincerity overpowers any banality of lyrics to
create an essence so warm as to be irresistable.
I'll give ten free Black Sabbath discs to anyone
who can listen to this album and not enjoy it
This album is nostalgic in the sense that the
group had never achieved such a perfect feeling
of unity since their early days. Under the
influence of the Maharishi the group came
together again with its initial freshness. An
almost virginal quality, a joie de vivre, permeates
the whole album. Again, nostalgia is an
important facet with lovely country harmonica
work and some roller rink organ riffs drawing us
into the warmth of the past. As with many of
their later works, it is satisfying on more than
one level. Once again, listen to the production.
Although the effects used are dramatic, they are
always for a purpose and do not break the
surface of some of the smoothest flowing
popular music to be had, (and I mean smooth,
not saccharine.)
"20/20" (Capitol SKAO/133) was next, a
collection of masters intended for other albums.
Unlike the others this is not a "concept" album,
but the high quality of the cuts chosen and their
diversity make it in many ways their most
satisfying and effective effort. Included are
beautiful versions of "I Can Hear Music", and
"Cottonfields", in which they sound like a
thinking man's Lettermen. The rest of the album
is filled with perfectly produced Spectoresque
cuts and another Brian Wilson-Van Dyke Parks
contribution, "Cabinessence". "I Went To
Sleep", with its breathy vocals and wind chimes,
achieves an ethereal quality which places it
among the finest of the Beachboys' works. If you
like the group at all, you'll enjoy this album, as it
offers an eclecticism without sacrificing the
completeness associated with the later works..
Next came "Sunflower" (Brother/Reprise RS
6382). an unexpected disappointment. While it is
perhaps their best production job in regards to
technique, I find many of the selections
undeserving of serious attention. The etlort put
into the production is apparent when you
consider that Michel Columbier, who produced
"Wings", was brought in to arrange three of the
cuts. Seveial decent cuLs and some outstanding
stereo effects, however, do not constitute an
impoi tjnt effort for a group of their quality.
Finally we reach their latest offenng. "Surfs
Up" (Brother/Reprise RS6453). "Don't Go Near
the Water," a little • ecology number opens the
album. The plea to end water pollution is
especially effective coming from people who
have built their lives around their love of the
ocean. Two of their funniest songs ever (and
their subtle sense of humour is demonstrated at
least once on each of their later albums), are
"Take a Load off Your Feet" and "A Day in the
Life of a Tree". The salute to our soles in the
former, and the tree's profound narrative in the
latter work with "Disney Girls" in contributing a
surreal dimension to the total work. "Disney
Girls" is a fantastic cut with perfectly used echo
effects framing a dizzying piece of musical
nostalgia. The long held-up title cut closes the
album. "Surfs Up" is musically rich and
complete, and Parks's lyrics here seem a picture
of Brian Wilson as artist.
"Surfs Up" is one of the very finest of the
Beachboys' albums, and that fact alone qualifies
it as as important work. Perhaps with this album,
their gifts, so long dismissed through
short-sightedness and prejudice, will finally be
recognized. I only hope that those people who
are turned back on to the Beachboys by "Surfs
Up" will attempt to recoup their losses by
checking into those albums I have described.
Many of these excellent later albums are
deletes, and consequently are at ridiculously low
prices before they disappear from the racks
forever. But do me a favour. Don't buy them.
Mine are already wearing out.
—Rod Horner
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971 The UnMaking of the
Counter Culture
The vital optimism of the 60s
was the result of a phenomenon
now labelled by sociologists as "the
counter culture". A burst of energy
was directed at the establishment,
and pop music was its voice. When
Dylan sang and the Stones freaked
out, so the myth goes,
grandmothers were scandalized and
fat-cat bosses quaked in their boots
from the British Properties to Nob
Hill.
Now the dream, as the song
goes, seems to be over. The
counter-culture lives on as the ideal
of a few, but its existence is, at
best, marginal. All that happened in
the 60s, as Lennon has pointed out,
is that a lot of people grew their
hair. Little really changed. This is
certainly true of music. Music was
always a business. Musicians were,
and are people, who play for a
living.
Now, though, there's a
difference.
CORPORATE OCTOPUS
Pop music is becoming
establishment, big business. While
Tom Paxton was playing at the
Lincoln Folk Festival in England in
July, he announced that he is now
"owned by a parking lot". His
contract had been bought by the
Kinney Corporation, an American
conglomerate which got its start in
the parking lot business, and now is
busy wrapping its tenacles around
many of ,the major record
companies (Warner-Reprise,
Elektra, Atlantic, etc.) and a lot of
the major artists in pop. Their
musical goods and chattels range all
the way from McKuen and Sinatra
through the Rolling Stones, the
Doors, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and
Young, and the Faces to Judy
Collins, Joni Mitchell, James
Taylor, and Gordon Lightfoot.
POWER TO THE AD-MAN
Paxton's revelation should come
as no surprise. Creeping
establishment has been evident for
a long time. The grab-all-you-can
attitude of some musicians hasn't
helped much.
Knight's massive billboard blitzes,
countless full-page ads in
underground and music presses, and
open exploitation of the youth
culture through free concerts have
paid off with four consecutive
million-selling    albums    for    the
The Stones, who sang "Street
Fighting Man", now own mansions
on the Riviera. And the Airplane,
of "up against the wall" fame, own
split-levels and drive Mercedes.
Some people really are only in it
for the money, and the shortest
route to lots of bread lies, as
always, through uncontrolled
capitalism. The power of the
businessman in pop music today is
matched only by that of the
ad-man. On the other side of the
Gullibility Gap, in the youth
market, PR seems to work wonders.
An advertising genius named
Terry Knight has, through sheer
hype, made stars out of three
musical nobodies whom he has
labelled   Grand    Funk   Railroad.
tedious trio, "Mark, Don and Mel"
(first names only, please).
And this is far from an isolated
phenomenon. Almost any musician
of any repute suffers from
advertising overkill. Elton John has
been pushed so hard by his business
reps that everybody's sick of him.
The same thing's happening to
James Taylor. And Carole King.
And last month was — are you
ready — Crosby, Stills, Nash, and
. Young Month in local record stores.
That just happened to coincide
with the arrival in town of good ol'
C V N.
All this would be jes' flamin'
groovy if it were not for the effect
that the capitalist stranglehold has
on    musicians,    and    on    music
—Bill Storey
generally. Some musicians are too
big to be completely manipulated
by the faceless men in grey flannel,
and can still live and play as they
like, for what they like; Bob Dylan
and George Harrison, for example.
Their recent benefit for Bangla
Desh was possible only because
their status has set them free from
business controls. Lesser known
people, however, are almost
entirely dependent on the whims of
their PR man and the power of
their business agent. Many talented
groups are slipping into obscurity
because they refuse to place
themselves at the disposal of the
businessman, or because they
choose the wrong one.
RIDIN' ON A RAILROAD
The worst effect of the
"establishmentizing" of pop music,
however, is the stagnation which is
setting in. In the mid-60s, pop
music was vital, constantly
changing. Now that music has gone
establishment, a musician has to be
accepted by the businessmen before
he can break in. The industry is
deciding who they'll accept, who
they'll advertise, who they'll flog to
the radio stations, and
consequently who you'll hear."
Their criterion is "will it sell"? If it
will, hype it; if not, junk it. The
music businessman has set ideas,
largely rooted in the conviction
that what has sold before, will
again. Consequently, pop music,
particularly the top^MD variety, is
standing still at a rapid rate, and
any musician with new ideas is
dismissed as "non-commercial".
There seems to be little that the
individual can do to fight the
ossification of our culture. In
reality, there are some out left.
Here's a few:
1. Fight "hype" - don't
believe everything you read (not
even this article). Listen, and make
up your own mind,
2. Stamp out top-40 radio — if
you don't like "Chirpy Chirpy
cheep cheep", turn it off, or better
still, switch to FM.
3. Support your local
musicians — this area has some
great musicians (Chilliwack, where
are you?). Check the Straight for
time and place, and get out and
listen.
Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
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Lion
in
Winter
After seeing The Lion in Winter at the Arts Club, it
is difficult not the think the worst of the author, James
Goldman. After he is granted his skill at writing
devestating Neil Simonese one-liners, Goldman stands
barren of any gift for meeting the dramatic potential of
the situations he has chosen to examine. The result is a
play which frustrates while it excites, making the
evening a theatrical blue balls experience with a
perverse pleasure at best.
Director Bill Millerd attempted to follow the
author through the maze of his confused intentions,
helping to lose us all in the end. Giving each scene the
benefit of many doubts about how it is meant to fit
into a whole, we are left with a collage of moods which
consume each other and, ultimately, our desire to be
involved. Although the writer is basically at fault, a
heavier hand on the part of the director might have
helped to carve out the richer experience the play
promises but fails to provide. At least, the evening
would have been less frustrating if someone could have
assumed the writer's neglected responsibility of
deciding whether the play aimed towards profundity or
fun.
Without that clear decision, the actors faithfully
followed the script as written, frequently achieving a
potent dramatic electricity which they frequently
castrated with cheap ha ha lines and slapstick
metatheatre: "Of course we have knives. This is 1183
and we're barbarians!"
The first impulse is to blame the actors for leading
us through small pockets of feeling which keep turning
into straight lines for a music hall game of chess. Like
Goldman, the actors were unable to develop a
consistent approach to the characters: different styles
of acting were appropriate to the characters at
different times; a case of style diluting effect.
As an acting exercise, The Lion in Winter could be
done as if it were a subtle transformation play, where a
diversity of characterizations of a single character
might be the main objective. As a play to be performed
for an audience, Goldman has invoked a castle and
built a shack, and the actors should not be blamed if
they trip on Albee, Wilde, Shakespeare, and William F.
Buckley in a sincere attempt to find Goldman.
Michael Ball played a cocktail party sort of Lion
with cocktail chatter attitudes royally declaimed or
gagged off as the occasion demanded. Daphne Goldrick
as Eleanor came closest to commanding with
command, sometimes giving the play more than it
deserved. Of the three model sons, Jace van der Veen
(as Geoffrey) oiled his way best through the machine
of the play, although Glenn MacDonald pouted a good
John. Tricia Sawyer was decorative enough as Alais,
the French Princess, but should probably restrict
herself in the future to non-speaking roles. Stephen
Katz's set was a Shakespearean thrust, Stratford style,
which, like many other good things in the production,
was often cheapened by the play itself.
Lion in Winter will move you to occasional
laughter: if you want to be moved anywhere else,
better wait for Little Murders, next at the Arts Club.
-Barry Friesen
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971 Decline of the Hot Dog
Music is, like food, basic to our survival.
As Shakespeare says: "If music be the food
of love, play on." Hence, it was a delightful
experience to be one of the unfortunately
few present at the Headstrong/Randy
Herman concert where one could enjoy both
very basic rock and equally honest food at
moderate prices. The latter was provided by
the Moose Tempura Collective, a group of
ten or so people who run what, in the trade,
used to be called a truckfarm in Delta where
foodstuffs ranging from vegetables to dairy
products are prepared without chemicals.
The connection between such food and
music should not be taken lightly. In my
own experience, it was a rocksinger from
Boston who recounted an anecdote that
made me terribly aware of how what we so
fondly termed "shit food" has its darker
aspects. In order to keep it together, as they
say, this fellow was reduced to working for
Nebco Meats, which produces — among
other delectables — the notorious hot dawg
with which we have all probably had a
love/hate relationship at some point. Nebco
provided each worker with a hopper whose
flashing red light and bell went off when the
hopper was not chock full of beef.
Employees were advised not to throw
certain items into the hopper - such as tails,
hooves, bones, etc.
However, for various reasons that can be
grouped under the heading of Efficiency, the
timing device of the hopper was speeded up
at certain intervals. Tougher matter proved
to be most effective in slowing the process
down. I leave the rest to your imagination.
Suffice to say I have never eaten hot dawgs
or baloney since.
The point of the Moose Tempura boils
down to this: for the first time, many of us
had the opportunity to sample excellently
prepared food we could actually depend on
to be Pure. Foodstuffs prepared by sincere
and conscientious people who love what
they're doing. Honest-to-God food. Excuse
me if I wax poetic, but one member of the
Collective, Scott Lawrance, is a bonafide
poet in his own right whose book, Should
Stick to Carrying Water, has a genuine Zen
politics-of-experience charm. Good Lord,
who could resist apples that Frost had
picked?
In all events, the Moose Tempura seem to
be very concerned with returning us to The
Source via food. They are anxious to open
an alternative restaurant in the basement of
the SUB sometime in January and I feel
that, for students who are - more or less
literally - sick of cafeteria food, such an
alternative should be highly welcome and
encouraged.
Perhaps not so incidentally, Randy
Herman, besides being into organic food,
blew some mean licks. Headstrong, after a
few hassles due to lack of audience response
and rapport, proved to be an extremely tight
band who could fuse an ass-shaking basic
rock beat to some very subtle and mellow
jamming.
—Tony the Flautist
Igor Oistrakh go home!
Why did you decide to return to
our fair city, Igor Oistrakh? Was it the
beautiful mountains surrounding it, or
was it something in you that made you
want the hero-worship that you get for
little enough effort from our
"sophisticated" audience. Whatever
the reason, it wasn't good enough
because it did not inspire you to
perform up to your billing or your
reputation.
True enough, you gave a solid
respectable showing, even a Vancouver
audience would have known if you
had not, but the weakness in Sunday
afternoon's concert was boredom. It
was created because you
underestimated the value of more
simple passages in favor of the more
difficult and exciting third position
parts. It is most fortunate that you did
this because it seemed to be only
during the really difficult passages that
you held the audience's rapt attention.
If you could have kept up the standard
set in the simple parts at an average
with that of the hard parts then we
could have just discounted you as
another overrated "guest star", but for
a man of your calibre to slip into bad
habits at easy concerts away from the
main circuit demonstrates a lack of
concern for the audience.
Part of the fault may lie with the
symphony, for they lacked balance in
tone and perhaps in ability. The choice
of material on the program was theirs
so they must bear full responsibility
for choosing works that were
technically beyond their capability.
However, a great deal of the fault is
yours to share with Simon Streatfield,
who may be unaware that something
went wrong.
I am not going to go over the
individual movements of each piece
because I doubt if you need me to tell
you where to improve. After all, I am
just a bored little peon in a native
village whom you were amusing. This
may sound a little bit like an open
hate letter to an arrogant master. To
all intensive purposes it is, for the
following reasons. First, it was a
matter of a love-hate relationship that
started the last time you were here.
Throughout your last concert I was
completely at your mercy. At times I
loved you and at other times I
despised you but this time all you
aroused in me was a nearly
uncontrollable desire to yawn.
May I suggest that the next time
you come to Vancouver you
re-evaluate the audience?
-Bruce Wilson
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Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 The Pig and I
"Pig and I", the crude erotic
parody of Yul Brynner's biggie, has
opened at the new Avison Theatre in
the West End. Written by Gyorgy Sola
(the off-off Broadway playwright who
established his reputation with
"Warhol Nude", a choral ensemble
piece), "Pig and I" is surely destined
to cause some controversy in
Vancouver.
Examining animal-hurr.aP. sexual
interactions is as old as "Futz", but
Sola's personal innovation involves
giving animals a leading role in a
theatrical production. The story itself
revolves around Marguerite, a
Spanish-Scottish slum waif who
escapes to her invalid uncle's farm in
New Jersey. The rationale for the play
would appear to be the author's
celebration of Marguerite's progression
from dehumanized East end gang bang
girl to a sensitive woman who is
resensualized on the farm.
Well and good so far. The farm with
its intrinsic earthiness and natural
acceptance of Body has frequently
been examined in relation to people
who have somehow cut themselves off
from themselves. And there can be no
doubt that this conflict was basic in a
metaphorical sense at least to the
original production of "King and I".
However, Sola's parody has a satirical
thrust which pushes the whole evening
off-balance, changing the experience
from potentially exciting human drama
to simple animal foreplay and
near-porno. There are distinct
comparisons between "Pig and I" and
the act playing regularly in certain
Mexican entertainment houses called,
plausibly, "Mule and I".
It's difficult to even begin to talk
about the acting technique. What
standards are used to rate the live
lovemaking shows in Copenhagen?
Admittedly, much of the actual play is
a bore, perhaps because Sola has
blatantly centered his attention on
three .scenes encapsulating the
developing relationship between
Marguerite and the animal lead. Much
is made by the playwright over the
fact that they are able, in a world
unreceptive to notions of fulfillment
whatever the cost, to achieve a
comfortable understanding and
communion with each other which
violates not only boundaries of race
but of species.
Natalie Woolf, debuting in
Vancouver in the role of Marguerite,
took the essence of the production in
her capable hands and managed to
stimulate us in a satisfying way.
Although Woolfs performance was
overplayed in several scenes, her
natural openness made many offensive
parts of the play almost acceptable.
The Pig of "Pig and I", in a
nearly-clever reversal, was in fact
played by a German Shepherd whose
name was coyly given in the program
as "King". According to the director
Martin Avison (also founder of the
new theatre), King is the original dog
who premiered in "Pig and I" nearly
six months ago on off-off Broadway.
Whether this is indeed the original
"Pig" or whether the idea is simply a
pubic relations gesture on Avison's
part, King's experience with the
nightly demands of his performance is
unquestionable. All the same, King's
part consists of several
look-I'm-nearly-human tricks along
with a willingness to be fondled (his
climactic blue dance in the scene near
the end of the play does not bear
description).
After the show ■ I spoke with
director Avison at some length in an
attempt to see if he could offer a
coherent justification for "Pig and I"
as legitimate theatre instead of mere
eccentric exploitation. Avison is a
showman, though, and was prepared:
among many other things, Avison
claims to be sincerely interested in
*'Pig and I" as a demonstrated
relaxation of crumbling sociological
and genetic distinctions. When I
countered that sociological
abstractions were surely the last thing
in the minds of the audience by the
end of the play, he quoted Virginia
Serraute, the New York critic who
reviewed the original production:
"Sola has created a minor masterpiece
of interwoven theatrical conventions,
beginning through visual stimuli with
an attack on intellectual rigidity and
ending with a new definition of
sensual fulfillment: "Pig and I" is not
to be taken lightly."
I can only suggest that if you are
interested in this sort of experimental
theatre, you should judge this
production for yourself.
Unfortunately, because of a parochial
gesture on the part of the usual retail
ticket centers, tickets may now be
reserved by phone only through the
theatre itself, at 687-2259. Avison has
indicated that he can be reached at
that number, and that he would be
very interested in discussing his
production with anyone, either before
or after seeing it.
^—Barry Friesen
Card
Gallery
Starting October 13 and
continuing to October 30, the
UBC Fine Arts Gallery presents
an exhibition entitled IMAGE
BANK POST CARD SHOW,
marking the 100th anniversary
of the invention of the picture
post card. Circulated by the
National Gallery of Canada,
the exhibition contains nearly
four thousand selected
commercial picture post cards,
as well as five hundred original
photographs, drawings,
collages, and objects - all sent
as post cards. While most will
be displayed on panels
according to theme, some will
be shown on shelves and racks
as seen in drugstores.
Artistically," the Post Card
Show is concerned with
printing processes (including
errors), the recurrence of
themes of place, nature and
people as related to serial
imagery, and with
correspondence and the
exchange and interchange of
image information.
CYVR RADIO
Monday—Holiday
Tuesday—
7:00—Infinite   Variety   —  Classical
Music.
8:00—Chalk     Talk    —    Interviews
Professors      about      their
courses.
8:30—Trends — Trends in Music.
9:30—Ernie McKay — Two janitors
take over the airwaves.
Wednesday—
6:30—Counterpoint      —      Campus
news,  sports  and  editorials.
7:30—Writers   in   Action   —   Steve
Scobie  reads  poetry  and   is
interviewed.
8:00—Comedy Spot — Half hour of
recorded comedy.
8:30—Digest     —     "Value     of     a
University Education".
9:45—Review — Reviews of movies,
plays, etc.
Thursday—
7:00—Folk — Hour of folk music.
8:00—Documentary     —      "Savary
Island",
8:30—Jazz
9:30—2407 Yew Street — Bedtime
Story for Freaks.
"Specialists in" Mercedes-Benz
Volvo Volkswagen — " Repairs
to All Makes" — All Work
Guaranteed. ...,
1700 W. 4th      /JZ-OllZ
LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY
TQ BE WITH!
THE STUDENT
CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
ANNOUNCES:
OPENING OF OFFICE
6000 lona Drive - Room 39
(Vancouver School of Theology.)
Appointment of
Program Co-ordinator
Miss Jean Stobie
5th year education
Drop-In and Coffee
Mondays at 12:30
Look  for  further  information in
the Clubs Room on Clubs Day.
NEED FUNDS?
HAVE
KAY-HAN
Productions
Put on a concert for you
Phone: 685-4035
(Ans. Service)
or
WRITE:
No. 3-111 Dunsmuir St.
Vancouver, B.C.
tt
HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL
AT
IKItt
Sonny Terry
& Brownie McGhee
Tues. Oct. 12     8:30 p.m.
SUB ballroom
TICKETS
Rohans
Info desk SUB
AMS Business Office
AT THE DOOR
SPECIALIZING IN:
SHAG CUTS SHAPING
For appointments phone:
BERNARD 224-5540
UNIVERSITY SQUARE
LIHDY'S
"King of
Corn Beef
featuring buffet
STUDENT DINNER
HOURS: 3 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
cabbage rolls
meat balls
chicken
knish
macaroni
potatoe latki
cole slaw
dills
potatoe salad
bread & butter
All for '1.95
3211 W. Broadway
738-2010
at
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
4560 W 10th.
duthie
BOOKS
Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971 Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Dissolution threatens
Alberta student group
CALGARY (CUP) - Beset by internal
conflicts, the Alberta Association of Students faces
possible dissolution in the manner of the old
Canadian Union of Students when delegates from
across the province meet this weekend to discuss its
future.
Formed in 1967 to pursue matters of concern
to the students of Alberta's post-secondary
institutions and to provide for communication
among them, the association has come under fire
from student union officials who say the association
has not given the individual unions their money's
worth.
Last March the University of Calgary student
union external vice-president said the AAS wasn't
doing its job of lobbying with the government and
that its research program had foundered. He also
charged that U of C delegates were being ignored by
the association's executive.
But the result of the subsequent referendum
was solidly in favor of the AAS.
The present external vice-president, Gary
Langshaw, said in a mid^September interview with
the U of C student paper, The Gauntlet, that he was
very unhappy with the current set-up of the
association and particularly with the performance of
AAS president Tim Christian.
However, at a meeting with the AAS executive
the following Monday, he apologized for his
criticism.
Rumblings have also been heard from the
University of Alberta and Red Deer Junior College.
U of A external vice-president Ian Macdonald
doesn't think that his union has been getting a
satisfactory deal and would like to see a
restructuring of the association.
At Red Deer the students union is in a financial
crisis and withdrawal from the AAS appears to be
one method of alleviating their economic problems.
The situation resembles that of last years of
CUS, which went under when the large money-bag
universities withdrew to save money, because of an
alleged lack of communication from the executive
to the members and the belief that single
universities could do their own lobbying more
effectively.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS-
BARBECUED SPARERIBS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 2241720 - 224-6336
i FRI.
OPEN    FOR    LUNCH
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 am. to 3 am.
& SAT. 11 a.ra to 4 a.m. -SUNDAY4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
J
Laurentian enrolment down
SUDBURY (CUP) - Another
university has been beset by
economic problems due to a
decrease in student registration
this year and a consequent
reduction in government grants.
In an emergency debate on the
budget Sept. 30 the senate of
Laurentian University decided to
freeze the budgets of three fiscal
areas of the university for 30
days. The areas affected are
capital expenditures, salaries and
hiring of new staff and book
purchasing.
The freeze brought on by this
year's drop in enrolment is
designed to give the university
time to examine its economic
position.
While no official figures are yet
available the student enrolment
for this year will likely be 2,100.
This is a decrease of 300 over the
Beaver music
Following discussions with the
Alma Mater Society, the
administration has agreed that
Beaver Indian Sundance music can
be played through the bell tower
at 12:30 today, in recognition of
Indian Week.
projected figure for the year and
of 100 from last year's
registration.
This means Laurentian faces a
reduction of $1,250,000 in its
operating grant from the
provincial government. Added to
a budgeted deficit of $275,000,
this puts Laurentian in a serious
financial position.
On Monday, Representatives
from Laurentian, Brock, Trent
and Lakehead universities met to
discuss the falling enrolment and
financial problems common to all.
It is hoped Laurentian will be able
to negotiate with the provincial
government to pay a large part of
the deficit.
In discussing the budget freeze,
an amendment was proposed
which would add non-academic,
sports and cultural affairs to the
freeze. The motion failed to carry
due to abstentions. Discussion of
the motion brought up the
sensitive topics the inequality of
budgeting between the
professional schools and the
academic section.
Laurentian is the latest in a
series of universities and colleges
that are feeling the pinch because
of reduced enrolment or a
smaller-than-expected increase.
Earlier, the University of Calgary
imposed a similar budget freeze
and other universities may soon
be forced to follow suit.
UBC enrolment this year is
1,300 less than last year and 160
less than the projected figure.
BUY LOW-SELL
The Day You Sell Your Car
could very well be a
"Black Friday"
BUT NEVER-EVER WITH USED
VOLKSWAGEN
TRY TO BUYONE-
without any doubt a new V.W.
is your very best investment
Margaret Zittier at
Kirkpatrick Volkswagen
IN KERRISDALE
Your nearest Volkswagen Dealer
will tell you why
Phone me personally at 266-8391
or at home 277-0848
DARKROOM
A%H °° 0FF
fum All Paper,
™"        Chemistry,
Dark room Supplies,
Accessories,
Bulk black & white film
Chat with  the experts and  inspect our first class
demonstration of black and white and color prints.
Large stock of
Kodak, Agfa, llford, Edwal, M & B, Neofin, Bauman,
Patterson, Unicolor, Retouching Supplies, (Black and
White   and   Color),   Mounting   Board,   and   Tissue.
(PRESS FOR RENT)
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
224-5858 or 224-9112
4538 W. 10th Vancouver
"THE Store With the Technical Photographic Knowledge"
Plant shutdowns
lead to blockade
MONT LAURIER (CUP) - Workers demanding action on
unemployment from the Quebec government have blockaded
Highway 11 three miles north of here.
Mont Laurier is 120 miles northeast of Montreal.
More than 100 former employees of two local wood processing
plants closed by the Quebec government this summer set up the
blockade early Monday and have vowed to keep it going until Premier
Robert Bourassa makes some response to their problem.
The workers are members of le Front Commun des Travailleurs
de Sogefor. Sogefor is a part-government agency that operated the
two plants until three months when they were closed because the
government claimed their operation was no longer a money-making
investment.
In closing the two plants Bourassa broke a pledge made last
February when he promised the factories would be kept open until a
new buyer was found for them.
The FCTS is asking the plants be reopened and their jobs
returned.
The workers' road-blockade protest to government-imposed
unemployment is the second use of the tactic in Quebec in the past
month.
On Sept. 22, 300 citizens of Cadillac used parked cars, trucks
and tractors to blockade Highway 59 outside the town.
The roadblock was set up to protest the closure of several mines
in the area and the consequent loss of jobs.
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
o oc\
IIM
cTlLfl
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SURANCECOMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
I
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MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name-	
Residence
Address	
City.
(Please Print)
Phone: Home    Office..
Occupation         	
Prov..
Age      Married □ Divorced □      Male Q
Separated □  Never Married □ Female □
Date first licensed to drive     	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes □ No □ (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?  	
Are you now insured? 	
Date current policy expires  .. .	
This  coupon  is  designed  solely to  enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile 	
Make of automobile 	
No. of cylinders  	
Horsepower. 	
Model. (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w. h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area 	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
Days
Miles
Yes D No D
Car No. 2
Days
Miles
Yes D No D
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
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FPR UBC 34 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1971
AMS BUDGET
This is the budget.
There's quite a lot to be said about it
and not much room to say it;
If you'd like to know more, I've written
a preface which you can pick up
at the AMS office next week.
Or come to the student council meeting
Wednesday at 8 p.m.,
where the budget will get its first reading.
Dave Mole, AMS treasurer
Handy Guide
Revenue
A.M.S. Fees
Undergraduate Fee Levies
Interest Income
Allocations
Non-Discretionary Schedule (6)
Undergraduate Levies
Wot's Left
Expenditure
424,800
11,435
9,300
445,535
277,620
11,435
289,055
156,480
Schedule
Politics
(1)
11,000
More Politics
(2)
3,500
Bread
(3)
62,010
Circuses
(4)
18,500
Propaganda
(5)
40,230
Margin
21,240
^.
156,480    A
t                             -
... _,
Politics
Schedule (1)
Amchitka Demonstration
1,250
Donations
750
External Affairs
1,500
Education Committee
1,000
Registration Photos
4,500
Conferences
1,500
Union of Radical Social Scientists
200
Non-Faculty Teachers
100
11,000
^_    .
^
Bread
Schedule (3)
Office Salaries
Executive Salaries
Insurance
Telephone and Telegraph
Postage
Audit and Legal
Machine Maintenance
Entertainment
Elections and Meetings
Honoria
49,840
4,500
100
1,000
70
2,000
500
500
2,000
1,500
62,010
Home
and
Garden
Schedule (6)
Student Union Building 265,500
Accident Benefit Fund 1,770
SUB Art Fund 1,500
SUB Management Fund      8,850
277,620
More Politics
Schedule (2)
Agriculture
Architecture
100
Arts
750
Commerce
Dentistry
Education
500
Engineering
Forestry
Grad. Students
Home Economics
Law Students
Librarianship
Medical
50
50
Music
Nursing
Pharmacy
Physical Education
Rehabilitation Med.
50
Science
800
Social Work
100
Margin
600
Special Editions
500
k-
3,500
Propaganda
Schedule (5)
Sedate Guide
Bird Calls
Sundry Publications
Ubyssey
1,650
(500)
2,080
37,000
40,230
r
Circuses
Schedule (4)
Intramurals
3,500
U.C.C.
5,000
Poets
2,000
Events
3,000
Advertising
1,500
Speakers
2,000
18,500 Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
'Tween classes
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, all welcome. Bring
your lunch and speak French.
International House, upstairs
lounge, 12:30.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Manager's meeting, Memorial Gym
room 211, 12:30.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Planning meeting, SUB room 210,
12:30.
INDIAN WEEK
Jimmy Sewid speaks about his
autobiography Guests Never Leave
Hungry, 12:30 p.m., SUB art
gallery. Also Jimmy King, orator
from Alert Bay, and carver Doug
Cranmer.
Salmon bake, east SUB plaza. Learn
how from Domanic Charlie, 3-6
p.m.
SATURDAY
UBC WOMEN'S CURLING CLUB
Practice for competitive or new
curlers, Thunderbird rink, 10:15
a.m.
SUNDAY
UBC TAEKWON-DO CLUB
Practice    led    by   Mr.   Choi,   new
mei >Lers   welcome.   Winter   sports
centre, Gym B, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
FENCING CLUB
Group lesson starts at 10:00 sharp,
Phys Ed Gym B.
TUESDAY
ACTION CANADA
Students     Interested     in     forming
Action    Caiada    club   on   campus
meet in SUB 213 at 12:30 or phone
Rick at 434-8950.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Join us to put on Kole, SUB 215,
12:30.
Tutor takers touted
The turorial centre is now matching students and tutors.
The project, in its second year, is organized by the alumni
association in co-operation with the Alma Mater Society.
"To help maintain the centre as self-supporting, a registration
fee of $1 will be charged," said Barbara Vidols, co-ordinator of the
program.
"If the centre is unable to find students for tutors or tutors for
students, this fee will be returned," she said.
The centre's office is in SUB 228. Registration is from 12:30 to
2:30 p.m.
FENCING CLUB
Film, anyone welcome, SUB 205,
12:30.
PRE-LAW
Organizational meeting, Angus
room 410, 12:30.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, new members
welcome, SUB 105A at 12:30.
PLANNING AND
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOLS
Prof. R. Montgomery, architect,
Univ. of California at Berkeley,
lectures on American housing
renewal: Implications for Canada.
Lasserre room 102, 12:30.
THURSDAY
AQUA SOC
Beer night, SUB 215, 8:00 p.m.
FORESTRY FORUM
Jack Walters on best-use forestry,
Grad Student Centre ballroom, 8:00
p.m.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Beer garden every Friday afternoon,
4:00 to 8:00, live music, come and
jam.
PUBLIC NOTICE:
The   Phraters   will   meet
Corky's  Men's  Hair Styli
3644    W.    4th    Ave.,
October 19th.
10:00 A.M. till 3:00 P.M
a*
ng,
on
10th
YEAR
Servicing
import
cars
We thank you for your
patronage over the past
decade and look forward to
continuing to service your
Volkswagen, Volvo, Mercedes
Benz, Porsche, B.M.W.,
Datsun, Mazda or Toyota.
* Fully guaranteed work
* Reasonable rates
* Genuine    factory-made
parts
* Specialists in major repairs
B.C.'s
LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION
2 UBC LOCATIONS
We'll help you arrange
all your travel needs
your trip home . . . your
SKI EXCURSION . . .
your MEXICO SUNBREAK . . .
your MEETING IN VEGAS . . .
your PLANS FOR SUMMER
visit us or phone us at
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
PHONE 224-4391
B.C.'S
LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION
Like someone
to do your essay
research for you?
It's already been done by the Syntopicon. A unique indexing system for the
163,000 ideas contained in the Great Books. This means that instead of spending
hours on research for essays, you can spend time on thinking and writing. The
results? A better essay. And better marks.
To learn more about how the Great Books and the Syntopicon can help you
budget your time and work more productively, write the Great Ideas Programme,
No. 607-509 Richards St., Van. 2, B.C.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Oftce, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
FUR COATS $19 & LESS. PAPPAS
Bros. New Annex, 459-461 Hamilton
at Victory Square. Double fur bedspreads $79. Open Fri. nite 7:00-
9:30 p.m. Sat. 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Satisfaction guaranteed!
Lost & Found
13
LOST LADIES' GOLD LINK WRIST
watch — within last two weeks.
Phone 261-7430.	
LOST SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2,
two sleeping bags near Geology
Hut 15. Phone 228-5319 or 224-6973.
LOST BLACK PARKER FOUNTAIN
pen between Hut B-24 and Angus.
Please, please, phone Joan 733-1921.
LOST WEDNESDAY NIGHT TWO
library books, green loose leaf
binder plus thesis notes. Finder
please call Gord at 733-4013.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHY BUM A RIDE? SEE THE
Wheeler Dealer at the Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th, 731-5531.
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN
has the  largest selection  in
Canada of posters
and pop art.
Also Jokes, Gifts and 24" x 36" Photo
Blowups from your own prints and
negatives.
Enquiries welcome at
THE GRIN BIN
3209 W. Broadway
across from the Liquor Store
Call 738-2311
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual, Akai, A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for sav-
ings.	
FREE DRAW — SAT.. OCT.   9
FOR  $500  DIAMOND RING
Drop in and fill out coupon today!
The Diamond Room — Your Campus
Jeweler — 2109 Allison, next to
  World Wide  Travel	
DON'T SPOIL YOUR PANTS. USE
CIC lab coats. We have all sizes in
stock now. Only $4.00 at Chem. 162.
Noon.	
DO   THE   DEAD   RETURN?   -   -   -
ANRE   KODFJ   knows   -. -   -   SUB
Ballroom, Oct. 14, 8:00 p.m. Tickets
Advance, $1.50. Door, $2.00. On sale
now — Main Floor, SUB.	
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn $123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872. '
THE PURCELL STRING QUARTET
at Grad Student Centre, Tues., 19
Oct., 8 B-m. Tickets 75c each at
the Grad Centre office.	
CAMPUS CHURCHES — UNIV.
Blvd. invite you to Thanksgiving
Services — St. Anselm's Anglican.
8 and 11 a.m. — University Hill
United, 11 a.m., Sunday.
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE WHO SAW THE PICKUP
truck hit me at the Sumas border
demonstration please call 224-7326
or leave your name with AMS
office. I have been charged!
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED — BY VICTORIA SYM-
phony violinist, good bow — up to
$150, write Box 834 Totem Park.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1963 ECONOLINE VAN. '68 EN-
gine, transmission. Fully camper-
ized.  Best offer!  738-3438.
1970 MG MIDGET. ONLY 8.500 MI.
Radials, mags, reel, seats, undrct.
tonn. Must sell. Wife is pregnant
and can't fit inside. $2,150. Phone
263-9044.	
'55 VW, EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Just overhauled. Ready to drive.
Good trans., brakes, tires, radio
hook-up.   738-6003.	
'59 PORSCHE CONVERT. NEW
motor, trans., clutch. New paint,
seats, silver, red interior. Ph. 261-
7713.	
'63 RAMBLER CLASSIC. BLACK.
$100 transmission work needed on
reverse which I cannot afford for
this otherwise reliable transportation. $409, offers? Phone Mary,
224-7076 — 224-0955.
2T
Automobiles—Repairs
Motorcycles
25
'64 VESPA, 125CC, 55 MPH, 100 MPG,
carrier, 2 helmets. $225. X4147 or
941-3836 evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
FOR SALE — SIX TICKETS FOR
P.N.E. Octoberfest. Good Tuesday,
October 26. Includes one beer, a
mug and entertainment. Phone
738-4765. Price $6 each.
Photography
35
U&e Htnti anb gutter
MjJ       Camera*
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
also  at  Dfenman  Place
Want  to   shoot  from
the waist?
Don't waste  money  with costly
accessories!
RICOH TLS 401
Dual Metering,  Dual Viewing
17 Different Lenses
Rip-offs   NOT   our  Specialty!
INSTANT BLO-UP, 8x10, $1.00;
16x20, $3.00. film processing, proofing, while you wait. 4472 W. 10th
Ave. 224-1732.
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay & thesis typist.
Reasonable rates. Mrs. Ellis —
321-3838.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
GRAD STUDENTS: UBC TUTOR-
ing centre needs tutors in all
university subjects, $3.00 per hour.
Register SUB 228 (12:30-2:30).
DEAF-MUTE PARAPLEGIC RE-
quires student to live in his home
to do light cooking and housekeeping in exchange for free room
and board. Interested persons
please call 261-1335. 9:00 a.m.-5:00
p.m. Monday to Friday.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
HAVING PROBLEMS WITH A
course? UBC tutoring centre will
find you a tutor — any subject,
any course. Come and see us, SUB
228 — 12.30-2:30.	
HATHA YOGA CLASSES AT
Shyam Yoga sh ram beginning
week of Oct. 18, 206 E. 6th. 879-3703
 MEDITATION	
GERMAN TUITION AND TRANS-
lations phone 224-7197. Ask for
Gerhard.
Tutors—Wanted
64
DANISH  TUTOR NEEDED — PH.
224-6379 (after Thanksgiving).
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DIAMOND WEDDING & ENGAGE-
ment rings, both for only $79 at
your campus jeweler. The Diamond
Room, 2109 Allison, next door to
World Wide Travel.	
HEAD MASTERS BRAND NEW
top surfaces 210 cm. $75 phone
Dave Turner 738-9813.	
ANSCOM ATIC SLIDE PROJEC-
tor ($50.00) 23 slide trays ($8.00).
Call 688-8822 after 8 p.m.
BUDDHIST BOOKS
for further information and
free   catalogue
Write   to:
THE BUDDHIST BOOKSTORE
1710 Octavia Street
San Francisco, Calif.. 94109
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ACCOM. 1 ROOM, $50. KETTLE,
toaster, fridge. Non-smokers. Men
only. Mrs. M. Jambresic. 4570 W.
12th Ave. 228-8408.        	
NEAR CAMPUS, LARGE ATTRAC-
tive suite for two people. Priv.
bath  & entrance. $40 ea. 224-6389.
WOMEN STUDENTS, 2 SINGLE
rooms. 5 min. walk from UBC.
Non-smokers, meals optional. Ph.
224-6963.
ON CAMPUS SLEEPING ROOM
for male student.' Phone 224-9170
after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food, colour TV.
Sauna, 5785 Agronomy Road,
Phone 224-9684.
Furn. Apts. 83
MATURE MALE STUDENT TO
share 2 bedroom apt. in Kits. $61
per mo. inclusive. Leave message
at 274-3542.
Unt. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3 Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971
I 3-Drawer Desks
I 4-Drawer Chests
I 6-Dr. Mr.&Mrs. on Legs
I 9-Drawer on Legs	
I Nite Tables 	
I Double Pedestal Desk .
I Toy Boxes, Hinged Top
i Parsons Tables from  .       	
3-Shelf   Bookcase    9.95
Benches — Vanity Chairs —
Tables  -  Chairs  -  Buffets  -
Bookcases - Rockars - Stools.
Hutches,  Childs and Adult
Wardrobes,  Lingerie  Chest
FLATS. SPINDLE HEADBOARDS
WALL-TO-WALL  UNITS
ARBORITE end  FANCY TRIMS
CHESTS PAINTED ON REQUEST
SAMPLE   COLORS   ON   DISPLAY
Tues: to Sot. 9 to 4:30
I Modern Woodcraft Mfg. 3
■ 44(2 DAWSON  ST. ■
E Vi  Block off Willingdon           H
£ North  Burnaby—Closed Mondays  H
■ SAVE . .  . $ S$ S S $ 1
5 •This  is  NO Warehouse Outlet*  B
2 ONE LOCATION ONLY            H
B Buy  Direct  from  the Mfg.  Plant S
!■■■■■■■     299-3902    ■■■■■■£
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive  Prices
.Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
—garry gruenke photo
POTENTIAL THUNDERBIRDS try for places on the hockey team during practices at the Winter Sports
Centre. Practices held every day at 5:30 and should again produce a winning team.
UBC hockey champs again?
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKEOUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224 6121
LOND ON m DRUGS
OPTICAL   * DEPARTMENT
Save on your eyeglass prescription
OPTICAL
PRESCRIPTION
TO US
SINGLE VISION GLASSES
* Depending upon your prescription
and type of frame you select.
FROM
13
90
, I ncludes
Frames — Lenses — Cass
CONTACT LENSES
Any Color
One Price Only
$49
.50
We Have The New
Soft Contact Lenses
129
50
Operated by Save-on Optical Ltd.
677 Granville-681-6174 * 697 W. Broadway-879-9401
2987 Granville at 14th-736-7347 * 5618 Cambie-327-9451
* 4068 E. Hastings, N. Bnby. (across from Wosks)-291-8491
1825 Lonsdale, N. Van.-987-2264       * 6391 Fraser at 48th-321-1911
Richmond Sq. Mall-273-6177  • 675 Columbia, New Westr.-521-0751
By KENT SPENCER
Last year's winning hockey team is shaping up
for another season.
A lot of the talent is back. All-stars Ian Wilkie
and Bob MacAneeley are playing again. Wilkie plays
in goal and MacAneeley plays at centre.
Doug Buchanan, eighth in league scoring last
year from his left wing position, is at centre this
year. Doug Burr turned down a professional
contract and will play again.
The lineup is impressive.
"We were probably the second best team in
Canada last year," said Bob Hindmarch, the coach.
The team finished second in the western
conference and then went on to win the Hardy Cup,
symbolic of western intercollegiate championship.
At the national finals in Sudbury they narrowly
lost three games to two in round robin competition.
The Toronto Blues took the championships.
Apparently the flu had something to do with
that result.
Absent this season are wingers Barry Wilcox
and Norman Park. Wilcox is now with the
Vancouver Canucks organization and Park, the Los
Angeles Kings.
"We had three players offered professional
contracts," said Hindmarch. "That's the highest of
any Canadian college team.
"1 think Wilcox will be assigned to Rochester
and Park to Springfield."
Frank Carney, from the University of Ottawa,
is the new assistant coach. He started in Hamilton,
Ont., then moved on to play and coach in Austria
and Germany.
Hindmarch and Carney look to Edmonton and
Calgary for their toughest games.
"Edmonton lacked a good goaltender last
season. They have one now. Also a couple of players
from the Edmonton Oil Kings, the Junior A team in
Edmonton.
"Calgary is always tough," said Hindmarch.
First exhibition game for the team is Monday
with themselves. This should provide a good preview
of what's to come. Come out to the arena at 4:15 to
see the game.
Practice is every night at 5:30. Hindmarch
wants any interested player to come see him in the
War Memorial Gym, anytime.
The first league game is November 19th against
University of Victoria here. Heaven help them.
Grid 'Birds look for first win
The UBC T'Bird football team
will look for their first win of the
season in Saskatoon against the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies.
This follows four consecutive
losses for the 'Birds. Last time the
teams met this season, the 'Birds
came very close but ended in
defeat 13-7.
This game should be a much
closer battle than last time. The
'Birds have finally developed a
running and passing attack. In the
game against the University of
Manitoba Bisons, the
Thunderbirds managed 337 yards
offensively, and completed 15
passes.
Jim Tarves will again
quarterback the team and should
fill the air with passes now
knowing that his receivers can
catch the thing.
Rick Peck and Joe Gluska, two
of the 'Birds most experienced
players are expected to play
having missed the last games due
Women's hockey tourney
?
Top notch women's field
hockey will be on display next
week as teams from the
universities of Calgary, Alberta,
Victoria and the Thunderettes of
UBC clash in the Western Division
Intercollegiate Athletic
Championships.
UBC, co-champions last year
with the University of Calgary, are
rated one of the top teams in the
country and favoured to be this
year's champions.
The Thunderettes have been
practicing an hour and half every
day for the last month and should
be in top shape.
The games will be played on
the Chris Spencer Fields starting
on Friday, October 15 at 1 p.m.
UBC meets the university of
Victoria in the first game. Notices
of other games and times will be
posted next week.
to injuries.
Coach Frank Gnup is confident
of victory. "Now that we can
finally move the ball, we should
do fairly well against Saskatoon.
Last time we met, our team had
trouble running and passing and
the Huskies barely managed to
win."
In recent western conference
action the University of Manitoba
defeated highly-rated University
of Calgary 33-2, and the
University of Alberta beat
Saskatchewan 21-18.
So it shapes up for a much
closer conference than was at first
thought.
Intramurals
TUG OF WAR time to be
announced.
BADMINTON, players A-M, is
cancelled on Monday due to the
holiday.
BASKETBALL preliminary
schedule is now up. Check outside
the Intramural office room 308
War Memorial Gym.
HOCKEY and SWIMMING
deadlines are October 12. Friday, October 8, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Olympic 76
Development conference
OTTAWA - One hundred and seventy-five representatives from
all levels of Canadian amateur sport will meet in Ottawa to plan
programs to improve Canada's participation in the 1976 Olympic
Games during the National Conference on Olympic '76 Development,
October 7 to 10, 1971.
The conference is sponsored by the National Advisory Council on
Fitness and Amateur Sport in co-operation with the Canadian Olympic
Association and other multiple sports governing bodies. The idea was
put forth in National Health and Welfare Minister John Munro's speech
on Sport Canada and Recreation Canada at the Council's meeting last
May.
Philippe de Gaspe Beaubien, chairman of the National Advisory
Council, and Robert F. Osborne, vice-president of the Canadian
Olympic Association, will be conference co-chairmen.
Delegates will determine the immediate needs of Canadian
athletes and discuss how available resources can be organized to meet
these needs.
Discussion topics will include methods for increasing the number
and quality of coaching staff and sports facilities, and ways to enlist
support of business, industry and the communications media in future
sports development programs.
Work sessions will give delegates the opportunity to exchange
ideas about successful practices in sports development.
Delegates will include executives of national and provincial sports
governing bodies, intercollegiate and high school administrators,
selected coaches, consultants and outstanding Canadian athletes.
The conference will be in camera at the Centennial Conference
Centre, but there will be press briefings at the close of each day's
activities.
OWNERS!
Come Down And See Our Wide Selection of Goodies
For 1200-510-240Z - Everything From Front Spooks
To Steering Wheel Covers
1845 - W. 4 Ave.
Vancouver
732-3731
INDOOR TENNIS IN THE ARMOURY
Students and members of faculty are invited to join the
University Open Tennis Club. A membership fee of $2.50 for the
academic year 1971-72, or $1.50 per term, entitles the individual
to reserve a court for one hour periods by telephoning 228-4452
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through friday.
Membership cards may be obtained from Mr. H. Tyndall, Room
101, in the Physical Education Building in Thunderbird Park
(South Campus).
THE HOURS FOR OPEN PLAY ARE AS FOLLOWS:
MONDAY
9:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m. to   8:30 p.m
FRIDAY
7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m
SATURDAY
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m
5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m
SUNDAY
12:00 noon to 3:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m
** **********•*••••**•*,
M
Edelweiss Haus
"sports specialists"
GRAND
OPENING
SALE
Friday Oct. 8 10 a.m. through
SAT. Oct. 9-6  p.m.
We are celebrating the newest and most modern
specialty sport shop in the Northwest, specializing
in skiing, mountaineering, ski repair, rubber inflatable
kayaks and canoes.
SKIS
SKIS
SKIS
Girls
KNEE SOX
Reg. 2.00
Now T05
FREE
SKI POSTERS
1970-71
Kniessl
Red Star
Reg. 185.00
Now 11950
1970-71
Kniessl
Blue Star
Reg. 165.00
Now 10950
1970-71
K-2 Model A
UNIGLASS
with tyrolia
2000-3000 step
in binding
Reg. 145.00
Now 9995
BEGINNER
SKI PACKAGE
Sapporo 72
Red-white-and-blue . 25.00
Aluminum poles . ...   6.50
Tyrolia Clixs
step in binding   . . J. 26.50
Mounting         8 00
Fri & Sat only
$34.95
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
WARMUP PANTS
Special Purchase
Reg. 19.95
SALE 1495
SKI SWEATERS
Special Selection
40-50% OFF
1972-73
SKI JACKETS
By Local Maker
Reduced 40-50%
Nordica
Hiking Boots
Reg. 19.95
Now 1488
Fabiano
Hiking Boots
Reg. 24.95
Now 1995
*
*
*
*
Hochland
climbing boots
Vz OFF
RD Rockshoe
Reg. 24.95
Now 1595
Mountain tents
ByMPC
All 25% OFF
*
*
*
*
+C    PRICES SUBJECT TO
MERCHANDISE ON HAND
CANADIAN MONEY AT PAR
OPEN WEEKDAYS   )f
'TIL 9, SAT.'TIL 6
EDELWEISS HAUS
"sports specialists"
1230 N. State
(Next to Shakeys)
733-3271
Bellingham
************   ••••*■••••• Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1971
B.C. schools need more money
Provincial education budget
cut by W per cent
EDUCATION ... in the best interest of the people of B.C.
The following is a report by Alma Mater Society
education representative Sandy Kass on the teaching
situation in B. C.
What would the government do if it built a school
and nobody came?
The school would have to be closed down, of
course, and no teachers would be hired.
If this happened to many schools, then many
teachers would be unemployed, for there would be
nobody to educate.
Then the provincial government could cut its
education budget, for without people to educate,
schools and teachers would not be needed.
And premier WACky Bennett could stand up and
through the mouth of B.C. education minister Donald
Brothers announce the budget cut to the world,
glorifying the move "in the best interests of the people
of B.C."
Ah, but alas. The government has no need to worry.
It  can  boast  the  highest  teacher-pupil  ratio  in
Canada, next to Newfoundland.
But because Wackyben tells us Newfoundland is the
poorest province in Canada, and B.C. one of the richest,
we don't have to worry either.
B.C. also has over 1,000 fully qualified unemployed
teachers this year, but we are all aware of how seriously
Bennett is taking the unemployment problem. So
seriously that he has forced the education department to
stop advertising overseas for qualified teachers.
Now advertising is restricted to the rest of Canada
and the United States.
But despite the provincial rhetoric, one main point
remains clear.
Classrooms in B.C. schools are overcrowded.
They are overcrowded because school districts
throughout the province are forced to cut back on the
hiring of teachers because they do not have the
provincial funds with which to do anything else.
They are overcrowded because construction of new
schools in all but a few districts has come to virtual halt
for lack of provincial funds.
Field trips have been cut to one per year in most
classrooms, and while texts in the elementary grades are
still provided free, notebooks are the responsibility of
the students.
In high school grades, neither text nor notebooks
are provided.
The only thing that seems to suffer is the quality of
education, so Wackyben doesn't worry.
But people suffer too.
Students suffer. Placed in a classroom where the
pupil-teacher ratio averages 40 to one, they cannot get
the quality of education they deserve.
Working teachers suffer. For the most part, they are
individuals dedicated to providing students with the best
education possible within the limiting B.C. school
structure, who are forced to take an impersonal attitude
to their occupation because they lack the time to give
each pupil the help that is needed.
But what of the people who dedicate themselves to
teaching, attain their goal with a university degree, and
are then told that despite overcrowded classrooms, there
is no room for them to teach?
Classrooms are far from empty. Schools are not
closing down. Yet the provincial education budget, as
announced Monday, by Brothers is cut by 10 per cent.
The 10 per cent results in a loss of 150 teachers'
salaries, and over one million dollars for the Vancouver
district alone, not to mention the cuts in already
restricted school construction projects.
Teacher unemployment is high all across Canada,
but it is highest in B.C.
The education students association has only one
question to ask. "Why?"
After attempting several times to meet with
Brothers to find out, the EdSA managed only one
response: "I'm sorry, I'm just too busy to meet you
now. But please try again in the future."
Thursday, when the Unemployed Teachers'
Association spoke to education students, the response
was quite different.
UTA began last year when a small group of
unemployed teachers joined forces in attempting to
combat the education crisis in B.C.
It now has a membership of several thousand
throughout the province.
There are presently 22,000 teachers employed in
B.C.
UTA members eagerly await the time when their
association will no longer be needed but presently
estimate it will live a long, if not healthy, life.
"The B.C. government is stingy with everything, but
most stingy when it comes to education," said UTA
spokesman Beth Myers.
"For the most part, new teachers that are hired are
those without degrees, only certificates, because their
pay scale is lower," Myers said.
"The job situation is bad for teachers with teaching
specialties like home economics or industrial arts, worse
for secondary teachers, and deplorable for those teachers
in elementary," she added.
Myers said two years ago, the average lower
mainland school board received ten applications for
every teaching position available.
"Last year the ratio was 100 to one," she said.
"I fear what it will be this year."
Myers said about half the unemployed B.C. teachers
are restricted to the lower mainland because of family
ties, but added that because over 40 per cent of all
teaching positions are for lower mainland districts, the
proportion is not excessive.
"Teachers have just not been successful in
convincing parents the key to good education in B.C.
today is not teachers, but money," Myers added.
"Also the board's hiring policy is very
discriminatory against women."
UTA spokesman Roy Lowther said the association
gets little support from the B.C. Teachers' Federation,
because as long as a teacher is unemployed, he or she is
not able to pay dues to the BCTF and take out a
membership.
"This however, is a situation we soon hope to
correct," said Myers.
Myers added the education faculty at UBC has given
students no information on how bad the B.C. teaching
situation is, and said the Simon Fraser University
education faculty gave students a clear-cut picture of the
teaching situation before they graduated.
"Perhaps our faculty doesn't want to tell us how
bad it is because then less people will want to teach and
they may lose their jobs," one student commented
during the UTA presentation.
Stu Sherret, ed 5, said as long as Bennett is premier
of B.C., "the funding in education is not going to
change."
"Students today become a welfare generation
because there's no place left to go," said Lowther.
Myers criticized a UBC teaching survey done last
year by student services counsellor Claire Hurley,
claiming the survey was "meant to paint only a rosy
picture."
"Hurley did not mention the fact that in the
category of 'employed' teachers, she included substitutes
which may only work one day a month, if that," Myers
said.
Lowther urged students to direct their protests over
the teaching situation to Brothers, and education
external affairs officer Jim Ross urged students to write
to Brothers, demanding him to appear at UBC and
explain provincial education policies.
"The present teaching situation is destroying our
futures, and it hangs a dark cloud over yours," Lowther
said.
"It's up to you to help us try and change it."
Thus, the situation exists.
Qualified teachers are unemployed; students are
forced into overcrowded classrooms.
Teachers suffer, students suffer, and the B.C.
government builds another road.

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