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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 2011

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Array Swing your arms from side to side SINCE 1918
October 17,20111 vol. XCIII iss. XIII
Thanks to a win on Saturday, UBC is
heading to the Canada West football
playoffs for the first time since 2006
Exec«tive Offices
Rooms 238 A - B 21 Page 2110.17.2011
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
Yoga Club Movie Night: 8pm @ The Norm
Doing Time, Doing Vlpassana is not only the winner of the Golden Spire
Award at the 1998 San Francisco International Film Festival-it's also playing for free (by donation) at the Norm for members of the UBC Yoga Club,
as well as anyone interested in joining.
TUE
FOOD»
The Great Pancake Race:
12:30pm @ Koerner Plaza
This is part of Thrive Week on
campus, a series of events designed to promote positive mental
health. How do pancakes fit in?
Come to the event to find out.
TUE
CBC»
The future of CBC: A conversation with president Hubert T.
Lacroix: 7pm @ The Liu Institute
The president of CBC is coming to
UBC to discuss the future of our
public broadcaster and journalism
in general. Yeah, we'll be there. But
more importantly, will you?
"How to Run a Workshop"
Workshop: 5pm @ The Global
Lounge
Ever wanted to run a workshop,
but weren't sure where to start?
Well, this workshop is for you! But
what if you want to learn how to
run this sort of event? Where is
the How to Run a "How to Run a
Workshop" Workshop? WHERE IS
THE JUSTICE?!?
THU
FILM»
The Crucible: 7pm @ Old
Auditorium
On November 10-13. UBC Opera
will be presenting Robert Ward's
opera adapation of The Crucible.
In preparation for the opera,
there will be a free screening of
the Daniel Day-Lewis film version.
Come ready with your Soviet allegory of choice.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
4
THEUBYSSEY
October 17,2011, Volume XQIUssue XIII
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteditor@ubys:eyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Taylor Loren &
Will Johnson   1
tloren@ubysseyca
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
ijoel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
BUSINESS
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
business@ubysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@ubysseyca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce
Warnes, Catherine Guan,
David Elop, Jon Chiang, Josh
Curran, Will McDonald, Tara
Martellaro, Virginie Menard,
Scott MacDonald, Anna
Zoria, Peter Wojnar, Tanner
3okor, Dominic Lai, Mark-
Andre Gessaroli
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23 Print Advertising:
Editorial Office: Room 24 604.822.1654
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising@ubys-
sey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
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Editorials are chcsen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
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n The Ubyssey is the property of
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Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
JOSH CURRAN^HE UBYSSEY
UBC's own living rugby legend
Drake Fenton
Sports Editor
There isn't a speck of grey in his
beach blonde hair, his calves look
like they could kill a horse and he
can still be found patrolling the
sidelines of Wolfson Field, yelling
obscenities at no one in particular.
At the age of 62, Spence
McTavish has been a long standing fixture in the UBC rugby
community.
McTavish, the head coach
and general manager ofthe
Thunderbirds rugby team, came
to UBC in 1967. He graduated in
1973 with his teaching certificate. During that six year span, he
played for the 'Birds. In 1970, he
was selected for the national team,
a team he played on for the next 17
years, captaining Canada on five
different tours.
Though he played high level
rugby for over 20 years, McTavish
escaped relatively uninjured.
"I must have been flexible or
made out of rubber. I mean, I had
my fair share of injuries, but nothing that really set me back," he
said.
In 1992, while teaching at Lord
Byng Secondary, McTavish became an assistant coach at UBC.
Five years later, he was the head
coach. He continued to teach
at Lord Byng and coach at UBC
until 2007, when he retired after
34 years of teaching and took up
coaching at UBC full time.
During his playing days he
would get incredibly nervous,
often vomiting before games.
Though he no longer vomits,
McTavish said that even now he
gets nervous before games and
that his love ofthe game is as
strong as ever.
"I don't have to [vomit] while
coaching, but I still get pretty nervous and I still love watching the
game and I still love working with
the athletes," he said.
Anyone attending a UBC rugby
game can attest that McTavish is
still brimming with passion; they
only need to be in earshot of his
occasional sideline outbursts.
"I've always been a little bit of
a hot head and it's probably not
the best thing for coaching. I've
always been someone that likes to
tell it how it is. I don't candy coat
it," he said. "I think this generation or a lot of generations are
pampered enough. People are being told they're doing a really good
job when they're not, so I just like
to tell the truth.
"I think sometimes that has
backfired and I have probably
lost players because of it, but in
the real world, doesn't everybody
want to know the truth? I would
be a terrible politician, obviously."
For his dedication to UBC and
rugby, McTavish has been inducted into the UBC Hall of Fame,
the BC Rugby Hall of Fame and
BC Sports Hall of Fame. 13
what do you think?
UBC proposes name change
for Ponderosa Hub
Ponderosa Hub is one of five "hubs" identified in the Vancouver
Campus Plan. The goal of these mixed-use student housing projects
is to create vibrant social and academic campus centres, bringing life
to the core of campus 24 hours a day, 12 months of the year.
Now that we'll be breaking ground soon, we want to give these projects a name that captures
their broader social and academic character.
The consensus so far is that "Ponderosa Commons" best embodies the principles and goals of
the project. "Commons" would also be used as the name for all of the subsequent "hubs" to be
built, like "Brock Commons" and "Armory Commons."
Tell us what you think in a short survey open October 17-28
Scan this QR Code with your
smartphone to participate or visit
www.surveymonkey.com/s/BSRF7MX
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA »  »
T-Bird Standings
►>1 3-
*5
k'1
* io.i7.2oii I Features 17
Planning the system: bus routes
.^ '"-in-.r.:;-.
,    'nnL-.-.--^|nh1-i .r-:f-
■■Lr_- ......
*>'^
Brian Piatt
Features Editor
Planning out a bus network in a
metropolitan region is a rather complicated task.
Katherine McCune, the manager of service planning for Coast
Mountain Bus Company (CMBC),
paused when asked what people
should know about her job. "Well...
it's a lot of fun," she said with good-
natured sarcasm. "It's so many
elements, and we try to design
service for the broadest range of
customers."
Metro Vancouver is the largest single service transit area in
Canada, and CMBC is responsible
for managing over 200 bus routes
operated by more than 3300 drivers. At the company's headquarters in Surrey next to the Gateway
SkyTrain station, a small section of
staff work in cubicles on the fifth
floor to design and optimize the entire bus network across the region.
A challenging environment
Most ofthe changes to bus routes
are based on seasonal patterns.
Service levels are adjusted four
times ayear. In the summer, more
buses run to ferries and tourist
spots; in the winter, more buses run
to the universities—known around
CMBC as the "U-Pass routes."
CMBC constantly reviews service
levels to propose other changes.
The service design department has
planners, schedulers, analysts and
engineers, all of whom play a role in
shaping bus routes. Proposals can
arise from data analysis, customer
feedback, operator feedback and the
local knowledge of planners, many
of whom have previously worked at
regional service delivery centres.
"Once we come up with a proposal, it is shared among our organization and with the local municipal
government," McCune said. Once
everyone has had their say, a final
decision is made.
Changes can also be initiated
from the outside. CMBC is a subsidiary of TransLink, which produces
a "big picture" transit area plan
about every five years. The last one
resulted in the creation of both the
33 and the 84 bus lines to UBC.
There are large obstacles to
overcome when introducing change
into a complex transit system. Every
change affects everything else. It
takes many months to collect data,
analyze it, create a proposal, do
consultation on that proposal and
then integrate it with a finite amount
of equipment and operator hours. A
proposal will often be implemented a
year or more after it first comes up.
Bus schedules also have to take
into account the unpredictability
of city streets; almost anything can
throw a bus off schedule, causing
it to either run late or bunch up at
stops.
"Even the different techniques
of drivers [can make a difference],"
added Judie Robertson, the manager of scheduling. "It depends
whether you've got a pedal-to-the-
metal kind of thing, or a more cautious driver."
A technological revolution
Over the past ten years, advances
in technology have completely
changed how planners go about
their business. "What I have seen is
just amazing," McCune said.
Originally, all their data came
from people who were sent out to
ride buses and monitor passenger
levels. Now they have Automatic
Passenger Counters (APCs), which
are door sensors that measure how
many people are getting on and off.
"APCs provide a good, broad
look at the service, and we can see
where there's crowding issues,"
said McCune. "We can then marry
that up with pass-up data, where an
operator pushes a button on a control system on the bus to indicate
they've passed up someone. And
that's all driven by GPS coordinates,
so we know where passengers are
getting on and off..which we never
used to have."
CMBC would be months behind
in data collection as they waited
for human counters to do their
work. APCs, on the other hand, give
almost real-time information on
whether buses are overloaded.
They also give a much more accurate response than human counters.
"Ifyou send someone out, they
come back and say the bus was full,"
McCune said. "Well, what does that
mean? Is that everyone in a seat? Or
is that people hanging out the windows? So [APCs] are a much more
precise way of getting information."
Another enormous change has
been the Transit Monitoring and
Communication system. This gives
TransLink and CMBC a map overlay of every single bus in operation.
Different colours of icons mean different things; red means the bus is
early, green is on time and blue and
yellow mean late.
A final piece of technology, currently in beta testing, are the smart
phone applications that will allow
passengers to query the exact GPS
location of a bus and give them a
real-time estimate of when it will
arrive. "We aren't there yet," said
McCune, but they're close.
Do your research
"One thing I would like to tell people...now, how do I word this nicely,"
McCune said in concluding our interview. "Too often, people are married to one bus route. And when the
bus is late, they're stuck." She also
mentioned examples of people who
are completely helpless when the
SkyTrain is not in operation because
they don't know the bus routes.
"Have your primary plan, but
have a back-up, too. Often when you
miss your bus, there's another one
coming half a block away. Know
your options. Because in the end,
it's easier on all of us when you have
that flexibility." 13
UBC COMMUNITY UNITED WAY PRESENTS
GAMPAIG
FRIDAY
OCTOBER 21
2Bpm
Doug Mitchell
Thunderbird
Sports Arena
Family State ytmtim
AUK*6*
United way
of the bcwer Mainland
Change starts here. 81 Features 11017.2011
Horror: The Night Bus
Peter Wojnar&
Veronika Kvorostukhina
Staff Writer &Contributor
3:09am:
You get on the bus. The driver looks
at your September U-Pass and
begrudgingly lets you on, despite
the fact that it's more than a week
into October.
310am:
A drunken old homeless man tries to
say something to you, but you can't
understand him. You sit down beside
him and he tells you about his night.
315am:
An entire "anything-but-clothes"
party boards the bus. Dresses made
of garbage bags and duct tape?
Check. Kilts made of beer boxes?
Check. Open alcohol? Check. There
aren't enough seats for everyone,
so they pile on top of one another.
That isolated seat you chose? Now,
you've got scantily clad men and
women in front of you, next to you,
and precariously close to being on
top of you.
316am:
The girls leaning against you in
what would be a comfortable
position ifyou were a little more
drunk introduce themselves: Anne,
Maddie and "Shanaynay" are also
UBC students.
317am:
Drunken old homeless man tries to
start a fight about personal space.
318am:
Drunken old homeless man is asked
to leave the bus. He agrees on the
condition that the bus doesn't leave
before he pees on the tires.
319am:
The bus leaves before the drunken
old homeless man is able to unzip
his pants. Shanaynay compensates
for this by vomiting profusely.
3:20am:
The majority ofthe bus is chanting
"scrambled eggs!" repeatedly. It
began as a description ofthe vomit,
but now it is the best song anyone
has ever heard.
3:25am:
The bus arrives at the UBC loop
and you wait your turn to get off
the bus. This is a long process
because one in five people are
terrified ofthe large step down to
the pavement, and of those people,
50 per cent eat shit. You pick your
way through the no man's land
of bodies strugglingto stand up
without losing the contents of their
stomachs and realize: this was you
last night.
What if you miss the night bus?
It's 3am and you are on Broadway,
watching the N17 leave you behind.
Don't panic!
First, you'll want to prepare
yourself for the night. As our ancestors have known for millenia, fresh,
warm meat will give you the nutrients you need for survival. Chicken
would be the tastiest option, but
you'll probably have to settle for
pigeon. Find a blunt tool and set out
on the hunt. The adrenaline rush of
the kill will be a further source of
warmth.
Or you could just go to Tim
Horton's—but ifyou think the
experience will be less awful than
bludgeoning a pigeon, you clearly
haven't tried ordering there in the
middle ofthe night before.
GENNIECHEUNG^HE UBYSSEY
Now that you've had something
to eat, you're ready to take on the
night. You have several options:
1. Sleep. Cozy up against a tree
or bush in the park and pray that
nobody urinates on you.
2. Walk. As an average intoxicated person, you should be able
to cover at least two miles an hour.
Don't hesitate to say hi to everybody—chances are, they won't try to
kill you.
3. Just enjoy the night! Most
people will not have the opportunity to see Vancouver as empty as
this. Think ofthe profane, vulgar
things you have always wanted to
do in public: sex, vandalism, sexual
vandalism, etc. Now you can.
Worst-case scenario, you'll sit
through a moderately chilly night
and catch the 7:30am bus back to
campus. And your next "bad" blackout night won't seem quite so bad. 13
Soar at Brock
Let the Faculty of Graduate Studies at Brock University take you to new heights.
Our 42 dynamic programs offer you the opportunity to work side by side with some
of Canada's brightest researchers and faculty members. Stimulate both sides ofyour
brain at Brock — personally and academically — just like graduate student Lisa
Neville did. She researched the remediation of the Alberta oilsands ecosystem, which
included habitats for animals like the peregrine falcon. The other side of Lisa's brain
focused on teaching local cadets how to fly. She soared at Brock.
So can you. Apply online today at brocku.ca
First person to enter The Ubyssey office and debate the validity of Occupy
Vancouver with Brian Piatt gets 100
free copies of the paper. Great for
sleeping on or under at Occupy!
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE: SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Both Sides of the Br; » Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
10.17.20111 IQ
VIRGINIE MENAROTHE UBYSSEY
At a UNA meeting 20 years later, with all natural light blocked by condo towers, the residents begin to catch on
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Gondola today, zeppelin
tomorrow?
It's very possible that in the near
future, TransLink is goingto build
a freaking gondola to get up the
mountain at SFU. If this happens, it
goes without saying that it's not fair
for the rest of us. Where are our cool
transit options?
Many UBC students live downtown or on the North Shore, and
would have a much shorter route
to campus if they could commute directly across English Bay.
Therefore, we demand a zeppelin
line be implemented using state-of-
the-art technology for a smooth and
speedy ride. For trtose who have to
descend down the hill from campus
into Kitsilano, we kindly request a
zipline be constructed. A logflume
would also suffice.
Now, as with the U-Pass, we're
sure that the smaller colleges in
Metro Vancouver will complain if
SFU and UBC get awesome transit
routes and they don't. But who
cares? We'll just point and laugh
from our zeppelin.
Jets today, Grizzlies tomorrow?
The return of hockey to Winnipeg
resulted in an outpouring of
national emotion, a nice case
of Schadenfreude towards
Gary Bettman and a temporary moratorium on jokes about
Winnipeg. However, if we're looking
at Canadian cities regaining sports
teams, why not dream of an NBA
team back in Vancouver?
For you young 'uns, the
Vancouver Grizzlies (1995-2001)
were notable for their turquoise
jerseys and terrible play. They left
after six years due to declining attendance, a 70-cent Canadian dollar
and bad ownership. But could it be
time for a return?
Okay, this was mostly the idle
thoughts of our coordinating editor, who confuses nostalgia for real
emotion. But the dollar no longer
cripples Canadian sports teams.
The further internationalization of
this city means truly global sports
(sorry, those that believe Eastern
Europe=Earth) should thrive here.
At the very least, it would give
those that hate having to cheer for
the Canucks a second option during
the fall, as long as the NBA could
resolve the whole lockout thing.
Petitions, petitions
everywhere-.
Across campus, various groups are
looking to make changes. They're
not occupying regions of campus or
holding signs outside ofthe houses
ofthe UBC powers-that-be, but
they're doing what can be understood as the written equivalent:
circulating petitions.
UNA members are upset about
the lack of consultation over high-
rise development in south campus. A
number of students are upset about
the AMS executive pay raises. And
the "concerts not condos" petition
regardingthe zoning of Gage South
is also circulating.
It can be said that we don't have a
radical campus, and the days of sit-
ins in the Old Admin building and
student arrests at APEC are long
gone. Still, petitions only surface
when people don't feel their concerns will be otherwise considered
bythe powers that be.
However, the AMS's quick reaction after students started paying
attention to them and their work
is heartening. It seems that they
understand that it doesn't happen
often, and that students pushing
to take the issue of exec raises to a
campus-wide referendum is rare.
They worked quickly to do something that takes more student voices
into consideration: holding an open
house and consultation to see what
the rest of us have to say. Are you
pissed that referendum money is
being put to exec salaries? Do you
think they should be compensated
fairly, above minimum wage, given
their responsibilities and commitment? Well, here's your time to
come right out and say it.
Fraud & U-Passes. Again.
There's something that's been
grating on us ever since the calendar turned over to October.
Specifically, something about the
U-Pass.
We've been told that many ofthe
changes made to the program were
made to combat fraud, which is
completely fair; fraud was an issue
under the old system, and it should
be harder to buy/sell heavily subsidized passes.
However, the new monthly
U-Pass has a flaw. Namely, an
October pass looks exactly the same
as a September pass. And while
transit cops may ask for your ID, bus
drivers don't. Yes, there's been an
increase of transit police on major
routes—but because drivers just
want people to get on the bus and
the October U-Pass looks exactly
like the September one, there are
still giant opportunities for fraud,
despite the increased inconvenience
for students.
We know that the Compass computerized transit pass is coming in
2013, which should effectively end
all fraud. For TransLink, that day
can't come fast enough, because it's
clear they can't design a fraud-proof
system without it.
All the single ladies don't stop
believin', 'cause good times
never felt so good
Ah, karaoke. The refuge ofthe
drunk, the talented and the exhibitionist. (Pick at least two.)
We either love goingto karaoke
or barely tolerate being pushed to
the bar and onstage. But too often
we are held prisoner by the song
choice of our local bar—and until
recently, the Gallery had been no
exception. It's easy to mistake any
upstanding establishment for an
old man bar when the karoake book
has a sprawling catalogue of Jimmy
Buffett and Jon Bon Jovi songs, but
contains single selections by artists
from the last 15 years.
That's why this year's expanded karaoke selection on Tuesday
nights at the Gallery has been such
a welcome surprise. Having a selection that ranges from newer pop
and rock songs to oddities like TV
themes ensures that you'll never
again be disappointed you had to
settle for "Brown-Eyed Girl."
Ultimately, we know that the
night will still end with 15 people
singing "Don't Stop Believing."
That's okay, as long as we can sing
a few White Stripes songs beforehand. 13
Occupy Together may
be what the left needs
Editors
Notebook
Brian Piatt
There's a lot to like about the
Occupy Together movement that's
taking root in cities across the continent, and I say that as someone
who normally rolls his eyes whenever professional protesters get all
worked up over something.
This protest feels different than
the demonstrations against the
G20, the Olympics, the World Trade
Organization or any other occasion
where men wearing suits are gathering to talk about stuff. The focus
is more broad-based and it's an overdue expression of real anger at how
Wall Street banks have operated in
recent years. It's also—and we'll get
to this in a bit—a welcome pushback
against the Tea Party.
But before this column gets too
sappy, let's quickly go over the
things about Occupy Together that
are annoying.
There's the obvious fact that
Canada does not share the dire
economic circumstance ofthe US.
This protest is basically happening because we have to copy what
the Americans are doing—though
Vancouver has abetter excuse than
most, given that the movement was
kicked off by the Vancouver-based
magazine Adbusters.
The Occupy message boards also
contain the usual contributions
fromwackos spouting impenetrable
post-modern gibberish and various
conspiracy theories. But it's at a
lower level than usual, and the organizers are doing an admirable job of
keepingthe discourse sane.
Finally, and this is most important to me: the Occupy Togetner
activists are not the heirs ofthe
Arab Spring revolutionaries, no
matter how much Adbusters or
pundits insist on it. There is no
comparison between severely impoverished and politically repressed
people facing down the military
forces of a decades-old dictatorship,
and people living in a democratic
country camping out in a park in the
financial district. Sorry, it doesn't
matter how many times you get pepper-sprayed: you're not in the same
league, and you never will be.
Ah, that feels better. Now here's
why the protests may prove to be
worth supporting.
The left has been disorganized for
years. This is certainly true at UBC,
as The Ubyssey has pointed out many
times, but it's generally true across
the country. The problem is that leftist activists have largely eschewed
the difficult work of political organizing in favour of political stunts.
When challenged about this, they'll
tell you sob stories about how the
system is gamed in favour of conservatives, so why should they even try?
This is bad news for those of us
who want a smart and strong left
wing voice in politics, because the
most energetic and determined
grassroots leaders have essentially
excluded themselves from the work
of winning elections. The Occupy
Together movement has a chance of
changing this.
If the protests keep the wide-
ranging support that they've built
up in recent weeks, the leaders are
eventually goingto realize that it
can be translated into a lot of votes—
and hey, votes win elections. The
Tea Party figured this out quickly,
and they've swung many congressional elections in the United States.
In standing up for the 99 per
cent against the super-rich, activists have finally found a cause that
resonates with a majority of North
Americans. It's now up to them to
leverage this support during an election, and not make Occupy Together
just another ineffective stunt. 13
Bookstore remains a
valuable service
Letters
Re: How the Bookstore's purpose
went astray
The UBC Bookstore remains focused on supporting students and
our university.
Dedicated staff worked hard to
put it at the forefront of Canadian
campus bookstores in providing
electronic and rental textbooks, a
more affordable option for students.
They launched an online ordering
system this summer to make materials more convenient and accessible.
They expanded their technology offerings, and partnered with UBC IT,
to meet students' digital needs.
The commitment to providing
academic materials has not been
jeopardized by growing other products and services, which through
responsible management can make
an important difference for student
services, facilities and research.
Should the Bookstore (which
does not pay rent and gets access
to UBC services for free) reduce
its support to faculties, or get
subsidized? UBC is facing the same
inflationary pressures, at around
three per cent, as everybody else.
Significant investments are needed
in learningtechnologies and classroom infrastructure, and expanded
student housing carries an annual
multi-million dollar price tag.
How do we pay for that? Our
government grant is flat—that's
a zero inflationary increase on
the biggest source of revenues.
The Provincial Annual Capital
Allocation for building maintenance has gone from $20 million to
zero in three years. Domestic tuition increase is capped at two per
cent. We reduced expenses by $30
million two years ago, but we still
need to find another $10 to $15 million in efficiencies or new revenues
every year to balance our budgets.
I love idealism. But let's be careful about simplistic criticism. The
UBC Bookstore continues to provide
excellent service, while contributing
vital support to our university mission. That is a good thing.
—Pierre Ouillet
Vice-President Finance, Resources
and Operations of UBC Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
10.17.20111 11
STUDENTBODY»
Turkey hangovers and home blues     , J JtTnTFSTrs
Happy
Healthy
Homy
RaevenGeist-
Deschamps
Week seven (ish). Maybe you've
just gone bushwacking through
thickets of midterms, papers and
presentations. Maybe you've perpetrated—or fell victim to—the
Turkey Toss, and you're feeling
both horny and peeved. Maybe
motivating factors to skulk over to a
morning biology class seem few and
far between. Maybe a general sense
of malaise has settled in your rib-
cage. It might help to sort out your
brain tangles by talking. UBC has
an incredible range of resources for
you to talk it out. I spoke to Katie
Berezan, ex-rez advisor extraordinaire, and she rolled through the
options.
UBC Counselling: Guess what? It's
free. They're located at 1040 Brock
Hall and are open from 9:30am to
3:30pm. They promise to listen to
your crises, academic or personal,
and help you get the most out of
your UBC experience. They also
have a referral program for professors concerned about the health of
their students.
Speakeasy: On the first floor in the
SUB, staff are available to talk about
any personal or mental difficulties
you are bumping your head against.
Trimentorship programs:
Everyone's doing it! Land and Food
Systems, Arts and Science have
trimentorship programs in which
a first- or second-year student is
paired with a third- or fourth-year
student and a working professional.
Go to a couple meetings, share a few
ideas, get inspired!
Arts and Science Advisors: They
can be helpful. Much like the department secretariats, they can assist in
communicating with your professors
ifyou are unable to.
Residence Advisors: Ifyou're in
residence, they have the yellowpages
of UBC and community resources.
Don't like your RA? Speak to one on
another floor. Their job is to help
YOU feel good about being here in
whatever way they can.
Teaching Assistants: Yep. They're
everywhere and they're usually students. Ifyou feel too intimidated to
speak to your professor directly, the
TA's role is to guide you through the
class material. They are also probably working on interesting research,
so take the time to pick their brains.
A few things to bear in mind.
First of all, wander the campus.
There are many spots to escape the
humdrum of Koerner and Hebb, like
the Nitobe Gardens, the Museum of
Anthropology, the cliffs, etc.
Secondly, there are always a few
monumental realizations that may
change your academic path or lead
you away from university. Who
knows, you might figure out your
passion is actually interpretive
dance/raw dog food catering/uni-
cycling around Canada, and that's
what you're meant to do to make this
world abetter place.
As Berezan says: "Ifyou know
you need to switch, then there's no
changing that, no matter how long
you put it off." So play around a bit.
"Fake it till you make it," and do
things that you know will make you
happy until they actually do start
making you smile.
Take classes that make your heart
glow, or follow awesome professors.
I spent my first degree prancing
around literature classes when all I
should have been doing was esoteric
historical research. The questions
"why am I doing this?" and "how is
this goingto get me where I want to
go?" should be quotidian reflections
in choosing what you really want out
ofthe beautiful, chaotic experience
of university. This is the opportunity
to meet your own expectations. tH
7
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Used with permission.
1-Ancient Palestinian
7- Embrace
10- Cereal grain
14- Fit with clothes
15-Clean air org.
16- Actress Garr
17- Evaluate
18- East Lansing sch.
19-_ Rhythm
20- Given to vituperation
23- Word with panel or energy
26- After taxes
27- Ascends
28-I smell !
29- Prince Valiant's son
30- IV units
31-Skill
33- Bingo!
34- Gasteyer of Saturday Night
Live
37- Shoebox letters
38- Mom-and-pop org.
39- June honoree
40- Bit
41- Treasure Island
monogram
42- Black gold
43- Aromatic herb
45- Fall from grace
46- PC monitor
47- Bedouin
48- Month of showers
51- Not for a Scot
52- Licorice-like flavoring
53- Standing alone
56- Needless bustle
57- Help
58- Recompense for hardship
62- Monogram Itr.
63- Hindu honorific
64- Sort of
65- Lawless character
66- Blue
67- Fashions
Down
1-?h letter of the Greek
alphabet
2-Airline to Oslo
3- Bros counterpart
4- Lift up
5- Polite refusal
6- Formerly, formerly
7- Made of cannabis
8- Overturn
9- Massive wild ox
10- Inflammation of the ear
11- Protection
12- Valuable collection
13- Locations
21- Fantastic
22- Area with coin-operated
games
23- More secure
24- Bay window
25- Back streets
29- Sean of The Lord of the
Rings
30- Graph
32- Mars
33- Worshiped
34- Pong maker
35-Grannies
36- Maker of Photoshop
44- Gangplank
45- Midday nap
46- Frank
48- Attach
49- Dried plum
50-Gum
51- Currency unit in Nigeria
52- Concerning
54- Soviet news service
55- Coloured part of the eye
59- Hole maker
60- Actress Charlotte
61- Bad start?
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step into character,^ SAVE!
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