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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 3, 1967

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 HOMEWRECKERS LEAVE MUD NURSING LOSS
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Mud, booze, and manure.
These were the ingredients for the annual Teacup
game between the nursing and home economics
students Thursday.
In a riotous, raucous display of skill, the nurses
won their second game in 13 years by a score of
sight to six before a capacity crown of 5,000 persons.
During the game, the girls showed excellent form
.ultivated during month-long training sessions.
Both teams showed surprising alacrity as they
tackled their plays with the polish of seasoned
players.
Cheer after cheer rang across the field while
thuds of contact wafted up from the green turf.
The players were given full support by their
cheerleaders, especially the huskier ones, who appeared busting with enthusiasm.
Receipts from the game go to the Children's
Hospital.
A highlight of the event was the half-time entertainment.
Two chariots, manned by engineers and foresters,
stood at the starting line all during the first half,
impatient to start the melee.
Not even waiting for "go", the two teams charged
off down the field, shin deep in the mud.
Red dye and manure appeared as if by magic,
covering both teams within a matter of seconds.
A cursing, cheerful scuffle erupted a few yards
from the starting line, around the foresters' chariot.
Soon the chariot became bogged down axle deep in
mud, while the engineers creaked their's around
the first turn.
When the red ones came down the stretch, apprehensive spectators moved up the stands, to be clear
of the science deluge which arrived in the form of
eggs, water-filled balloons, and various fruit.
The boat .-race was already setting up while the
two team fimshed slugging it out at the finish line.
This was won by exubriant Ubyssey staffers,
followed by\agriculture, education, forestry, science,
and engineers.
Engineering president Lynn Spraggs was heard
murmuring at one point: "I qan't take It, I haven't
touched the stuff for a year."
After the nurses received the teacup trophy, they
carried it down.to their dressing room. There the
coaches were greeted with a screaming ovation.
Fittingly, someone had obtained two bottles of
scotch in the event it might be needed.
Vol. XLIX, No. 20
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1967
224-3916
— kurt hilger photo
WITH A GRUNT AND A GROAN they were off to another engineering victory Thursday noon in the annual
chariot race. The engineers on the right slung the brown stuff and shipped the bull with a greater degree
of proficiency to win the contest.
AUC frowns on students in BoG
MONTREAL (CUP) — University
presidents Tuesday spoke out
against student demands for seats
on boards of governors at the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada annual general
meeting.
But they did admit students could
legitimately aspire to seats on governing bodies at all levels including
the senate.
Students have been clamoring for
such representation with some degree     of    success.     Administrators,
Library doesn't stock Roth
Three best-selling books by American author Philip Roth aren't on
UBC's library shelves.
One of the books, Goodbye
Colombus, contains the short story
'Defender of the Faith', which is
part of an anthology of stories in
current use in B.C. schools.
A four-letter word in the story
has caused controversy among provincial school boards and a revised
version of the story, with the offensive word deleted, has been approved for inclusion when the anthology is reprinted. The other two
are  Triumph   and  When  She  Was
Good.
Assistant UBC librarian Robert
Hamilton said Thursday a novel
comes to the library's attention only
if it is in a bibliography or on a
professor's reading list.
"We can't afford to buy every
best-selling novel," he said. "Most
of these books are requested or recommended by professors.
"In this we were just ignorant
of the books. But we don't necessarily buy them now just because
of recent publicity concerning a
story by Roth."
eager to prevent student protest
and disruption of the university,
have been scurrying to effect basic
changes in their governing structures to accommodate students.
There are at present student senators at three Canadian universities:
UBC has four; the University of
Alberta at Edmonton has three, and
Simon Fraser University, the first
to provide for student senators,
seated three students in June 1967.
At least nine other universities
student senators have been approved
in principle, but for one reason or
other students are not yet seated.
The cross-country student senator
box score <with number of student
senators) is as follows: Saskatchewan (4), Lethbridge (2), Guelph (at
least 3), Calgary (3), Windsor (4),
Sir George Williams University (4),
University of Montreal (6), and the
University of Western Ontario (5).
Noticeably absent from this list
are universities from the Atlantic
provinces.
New look
for CUS
at UBC
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Canadian Union of Students is going to
have a new look at UBC.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
Thursday announced a complete revamping of
the national union's campus structure.
The new plans came after Wednesday's overwhelming vote of confidence in CUS by UBC
students. A total of 5,565 students voted 70 per
cent in favor of CUS membership.
After an AMS executive meeting Thursday,
Sullivan said the campus CUS committee will be
abolished.
The committee's duties will be taken over by
members of council and the undergraduate
societies.
"It's not necessary to have a CUS chairman
and committee," Sullivan said.
"The CUS committee is nothing right now—
they can't make policy. Council is going to have
to give greater thought to CUS."
Sullivan said much of the action stimulated
by CUS would be taken over by the newly
formed education action committee of the B.C.
Assembly of Students.
The committee, formed Thursday, is chaired
by AMS first vice-president Don Munton.
One of its duties will be a high school visitation program next spring with 10 volunteers
visiting B.C. high schools.
Undergraduate societies will play a new role
at UBC in carrying out CUS policies in curriculum reform and the democratization of universities, Sullivan said.
"If we're going to do anything in curriculum
reform then we have to get the undergraduate
societies to do it."
He cited examples of curriculum reform l>eing
started by students.
Engineers now make up a course and professor survey and give it to the dean who talks
to each professor about the recommendations.
"Forestry and agriculture do the same thing,
and arts published an anti-calendar.
"Council now can only formulate policy and
act on general things like housing. Council really
hasn't done much this year."
A recommendation that the CUS committee
be dropped will come to council Monday.
FALL  FAIR   67   -   IH
FRIDAY and SATURDAY Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 196/
RED  HORDE
Canada from left   	
i
boosts economy  I Ants invade Acadia camp
By BONI LEE
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
McGill professor Laurier La
Pierre Thursday demanded an
alliance of the left to create
a new Canada.
Speaking to an overflow
audience of 600 persons in
aisles and on the lecturn in
Angus 110, LaPierre said
economic and social equality
is essential to the concept of
two nations in Canada.
"We've got to pool our resources to create economic independence,"  he said.
"The left believes in community action, in state and
government pooling of resources to develop a country."
LaPierre, a former moderator of This Hour Has Seven
Days, said English-speaking
Canada must be prepared to
allow French-speaking Canadians the same mobility and
control over their destinies
that other Canadians have.
"If they are unwilling to do
this, then the independance of
Quebec must be carried out."
He predicted that a government decision regarding Quebec's status will be made within a year.
"There is already an escalation of the campaign to transform the 85 per cent of French-
Canadians to separatism.
"Also, there is the natural
inclination of English-speaking
Canadians to end the bloody
nonsese, to let Quebec separate, if it wants to, if only to
settle the problem."
LaPierre, now a history professor at McGill, said the
status quo is the main problem
Canada faces today.
The status quo maintains the
double standard regarding the
two communities making up
Canada.
"An example of this double
standard is the reaction to De
Gaulle's statement in Quebec.
English-speaking C a n a d a' s
newspapers seemed to be reawakened to the crisis of
Canadian unity."
The end result of the maintenance of status quo is a
country of 20 million people
asleep.
"They may have two cars in
every garage but they'll have
degraded souls and eroding
dynamic spirit."
We should know history well
LAPIERRE
so that we don't repeat it, he
said.
"Start completely fresh. Devote all our energies and resources to the nation."
New Democrat LaPierre dispersed his speech with witticisms and barbs:
"In accordance with our rule
of bilingualism, I will speak
in English.
"I actually speak in Fran-
glais.
"Gerda Munsinger did something no Liberal government
was able to do — lay flat the
opposition.
When asked who he is, the
average American says proudly, with the stars and stripes
emitting from his eyes, 'I am
an American.'
"But a Canadian, when
asked who he is, says defensively, 'I'm not an American'."
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
11:00 a.m.
"A new idea of Repentance"
HAROLD MacKAY
ST.   ANSELM'S   ANGLICAN
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
11:00 a.m.  Holy Communion
& Sermon
7:30 p.m. film
"Billy Liar" at St. Anselm's
JIM McKIBBON
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
'It may be the most important film ever made"
Kenneth Tynan, London Observer
Varsity
__-._710W
214-17)0*
4J7» w. ieih
Starts Nov. 9th—8 p.m.
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Got a can of ant killer?
Acadia Camp hut 27 is infested with small red ants.
They crawl through
cracks, race across floorboards, and attack any food
in sight.
A check in the hut Thursday revealed general annoyance.
"You pay good money, you
expect good accommodation," said one resident.
"After all, this isn't a slum."
The residence fee per year
is $540.
One student showed a jar
containing 200 ants collected
on a half-slice of bread left
on the floor during an evening.
"I guess we squash about
30 a day," said an occupant
of a double room.
"And we aren't in here
much. That doesn't include
the number we kill with a
spray  bomb."
Janitor Jim Long said professional exterminators had
tried to rid the house of ants
but had not found their
source.
"Administration has spent
quite a bit of money already
trying to find the nest," he
said. "They're going to try
something new soon."
Ants devour anything in sight
Meanwhile, hut 27 residents are collecting as many
ants as possible to present
to the supervisor of men in
residences,  Leonard Proctor.
They denied, however, that
they were attempting to buy
a  mascot anteater.
Alma Mater Society treasurer    Dave    Hoye   was    not
anti-ant.
When asked for comment
he at first pleaded uncle,
then said he thought the ants
were  cute.
"I see in the struggle of
the ants a new concept in
the Lepidoptra movement
because I think they'll sprout
wings and trip throughout
the whole university."
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and many, many others.
Mono
Srereo
$1.49 $1.59
CLASSICAL
Choose from such celebrities as
• RUDOLF SERKIN
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OPEN FRIDAY UNTIL 9 PM.
or 6824846 fffdoy, November 3> 4^67
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
EVERYTHING LOOKS ROSE, gurgled Ubyssey bottle burpers Stuart Gray, Pat, Hrushowy, Kurt
Hilger, and Steve Jackson intoxicatingly as they sloshed their way to triumph in Thursday's
boat race. Swaggering slightly they wined their way to the Ubyssey office to write on in
high spirits.
Federal government should pay for
poll-set profs French  college
The federal government rather than the provincial should finance a proposed French cluster
:ollege plan, says the plan's originator.
Carl Baar, associate political science profes-
lor, told 15 persons in Bu. 203 that the federal
jovernment is spending millions of dollars to
>ilingualize the federal civil service.
"Only a small fraction of this amount would
je needed to operate an autonomous French-
;peaking college on the UBC campus," he said.
Gallery exhibits
Three new exhibitions are coming to the
JBC fine arts gallery in- the library basement.
Three Innocents, an exhibition of works by
Vinnifred Warters, Esther Rogatnick, and Hugh
2alverly, starts today and will be shown until
fov. 18.
Drawings and watercolors by Victoria artists
itaxwell Bates and Eric Metcalfe will also be
>n display starting today.
Indian and Persian miniatures from the late
Hth to 19th centuries will be on display Nov.
! to 14. Dr. Mary Morehart of fine arts will
;onduct a tour of the 32 miniatures on the first
lay.
Western  keeps  CUS
LONDON, Ont. (CUP) — University of
Western Ontario students' council defeated a
notion advocating Western pull out of the
Canadian Union of Students Tuesday.
The vote was 17 to five with one abstention.
The motion, proposed by student council vice-
jresident Peter Schwartz, was debated for three
.ours before being tabled.
After an hour and a half debate on Tuesday,
lie motion was defeated.
Baar's proposal, now under consideration
by UBC president Kenneth Hare, was a French-
speaking liberal arts college located on campus
but using separate facilities and faculty from the
rest of the university.   .
He said federal or private interests should
provide the money for the college.
"I'm disappointed that people tend to overlook the academic virtues of this program and
dismiss it because it's not politically timely.
"This plan is designed to assist in giving an
institutional reality to the national goal of
bilingualism.
Baar said he expected opposition from the
French department but felt the college would
give UBC a nation-wide name for excellence
in French instruction.
Student suing   EUS
over stunt injuries
An arts student has flared up in defense of
the left.
Hand, that is.
Ralph Stanton, arts 3, is taking action following an injury he received to his left hand durinjf
an engineers' stunt at an AMS council meeting
Oct. 17.
"I intend to see engineers involved," Stanton
said Thursday.
"It is also my intention to sue the AMS because their constitution clearly states that they
are responsible for order on campus."
Since it was at the AMS meeting that he was
injured, Stanton believes officers of the society
had prior knowledge of the stunt and that they
could have prevented it.
Stanton's hand was bandaged for ten days as
the result of second degree burns received when
an engineer flash bomb went off in his hand
at the meeting.
Co-operafive   bookstore
getting   closer   to   reality
By HEW GWYNNE
A student plan to have a co-operative bookstore on campus
has been given a shot in the arm.
Four English professors and 20 students turned out to support the idea at a noon meeting in Brock 350.
"We want a student board of directors for a student co-op
bookstore," said chairman Blaine Kennedy, commerce 3.
"I think you'll find a tremendous amount of faculty support
for this idea," said David Powell, assistant professor of English.
"But you'll have to take some lumps for a while."
Powell said a student co-op would definitely need a professional acquainted with fluctuating prices and copyright procedures to manage the business.
Hank Paulus, a member of the Alma Mater Society student-
faculty bookstore committee, said the latest published figures of
bookstore expenses showed that the 1966-67 profit was $300,000.
This went toward the present expansion program.
AMS treasurer Have Hoye has sent a letter about the
planned co-op to acting UBC treasurer dean Walter Gage but
has not yet received a reply.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said later council is considering the idea of a student co-op.
He said the store should initially stock widely used first
and second year texts to guarantee a high turnover and maximum profit in the beginning stages.
"The problem of capital is not insurmountable," Sullivan
said.
He indicated funds could be available if a detailed plan for
the project is presented to the AMS council.
Kennedy said he hopes more faculty and students will turn
out to the next meeting scheduled Nov. 8.
jSAYS  VIVADER
$    ! !	
5   SFU brief useless
1 5-
'? By MIKE FINLAY *
| Ubyssey Academic Reporter -
J           The  faculty association  at  Simon  Fraser  University f*
;1   is ineffective, says its former president, Dr. William Vidaver. '
5           Vidaver, a professor of bioscience, resigned as president .
*?   Oct. 20 after the association voted to withdraw a brief on |
%t  academic freedom presented to the board of governors at j
SFU. |
", The brief objected to provisions in the faculty hand-   "?
book allowing teachers to be fired for reasons other than   g
incompetence. J
"President McTaggart-Cowan recently stated that the
rules of the handbook still stand," Vidaver said Thursday.   '
"This means the brief has had no effect."
Vidaver stressed the importance of the faculty asso-   v
ciation. v*
"In a meeting a few days ago, the members voted
overwhelmingly to retain the association," he said.
The union cannot take part in the policy making of
1   the university and the association can.
'S Support for the union has been greatly exaggerated,   ^
!*  he said.
5? "Many here are trying to make  SFU the  Canadian   r
'£  Berkeley, but faculty is becoming increasingly suspicious   *
**   of this activist minority," he said. |
x President of UBC's faculty association, Dr. Noel Hall,
^   said he would comment on the situation only as a faculty
~   member, and not as president of the association.
,* "It is a great pity to see any university get caught up
*;   in the difficulties SFU is experiencing," he said.
4 "Anything that diverts attention from the central issue
-   of educating growing numbers of students should be viewed
'    with concern."
There will be another meeting of the SFU faculty asso-
'"   ciation in two weeks in order to elect a new executive.
Both Vidaver and Hall stated that the problem is very
complex and must be solved through cooperation of faculty
and administration. k^«a*ittiw*-t'»\f'
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press'. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
NOVEMBER 3, 1967
Well risk it
We've got a question for the downtown papers in
the light of this week's visit to UBC by Richard Needham of The Globe and Mail:
Why can't you print Canada's most interesting and
original columnist instead of some of the U.S.'s worst?
We realize it might be a matter of giving up, say
Erma Bombeck, to make room for Needham. But we'll
take that chance.
Don't tell Tom
Politics, an eight-letter word, can lead men to
strange perversions.
Of our two sterling local examples, education
minister Les Peterson and Vancouver Mayor Tom
Campbell, the former is merely silly.
His attempt to have removed the word "fuck" from
a short story in a high school textbbook has guaranteed
that the three high school students in B.C. who hadn't
previously seen or used the word have by now
(a) looked it up (b) used it at the dinner table and (c) remembered it forever as something special, which it
obviously isn't.
Tom Terrific, on the other hand, is playing a far
more dangerous game than merely using public office
to exercise a quaint morality (another eight-letter word.)
Campbell has seized on a surefire publicity-getting,
vote-holding policy.
Banning Georgia Straight and urging the lifting of
Playboy from local news stands are nice, safe spurious
issues, bound to be a smash with the little-old-lady vote
(of which there is considerable, both sexes, all ages).
Campbell can, and quite likely will, indulge his
perversion until next election, secure in the knowledge
he can remain otherwise inactive as mayor of a city
that desperately needs serious, constructive action.
Vancouver citizens can draw little comfort from
the knowledge that their city is—and for all its leaders
are doing, will continue to be—in danger of disappearing in social decay and economic depression.
In short, Vancouver is sinking in shit . . . but don't
tell Tom Terrific. He'd be offended.
Guest  editorial
So what's new?
Ventilation in the library is inefficient. The air
there in the main concourse in the early afternoon, between one and three o'clock is hot and stale. In spite
of the height of the ceiling the air apparently never circulates quickly, with the result of poor working conditions for students of the first two years who customarily study there, and extreme discomfort for the staff
of the Library during the heaviest part of their day's
work.
Whether the uneveness and inefficiency of ventilation in the building is due to a fundamental oversight
in its construction, or whether it is due to lack of sufficient automatic adjusting equipment, we do not know.
We can only denounce the inadequacy and lament the
depression and fatigue which it causes.
—from The Ubyssey, Nov. 1, 1929.
Maple
Leaves
'Let's see ... I think we'll make our enrolment cut about here.'
A sheepskin
for Stokely
\)Y L-H^ap«r\
U)fe maa n^ Have to u>otrvj abooV
eojfmuft5 V*A have vpj es/erYried
to^fadlGL^ut\iweA [eoJ\?
By GABOR MATE
Among the tasks of the UBC
senate is the nomination of
worthies for honorary degrees.
The nominations for this
year have already been made,
but we have been asked not
to reveal the names until the
people involved can be con-
Mate, arts 4, is one of four
students elected last month
to the UBC senate.
tacted formally. This matters
not very much, for I have already forgotten the names.
But, as one faculty member
of senate told me after the
last meeting, all the people
nominated are "old fuddy-
duddies."
I, myself, don't know if they
are fuddy-duddies.
In any case, I have no desire
to disparage their achievements nor to suggest that they
are undeserving of the honor
the senate wishes to bestow
upon them. But I do wish to
suggest that there are people
equally deserving of such high
honors. I will therefore submit
the name of a nominee for
honorary degree to the senate.
The criteria for honorary
degrees seem to be very general. According to Dean
Walter Gage, persons will be
awarded honorary degrees if,
in the opinion of the senate,
they have made such contributions to society or university
life that would merit their reception of such an honor.
FIGHTER
My nominee has made and
continues to make significant
contributions not only to
North American society but to
the    peoples    of    the    entire
world. He is a fighter in the
cause of freedom, and almost
daily he risks his life to serve
that cause. He is in his early
twenties and few believe that
he will live to see thirty. He
has been shot at numerous
times, jailed more times than
he can probably remember,
and yet continues undeterred
in his fight to bring freedom
and dignity to his people —
and to all the oppressed peoples. I believe it would honor
this university far more than
it would honor him if he were
to accept a degree from us.
I propose then that UBC
offer an honorary degree to
Stokely Carmichael, former
chairman of the Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee.
OUR GENERATION
In contrast with the other
nominees, Carmichael is one
of our generation — and he
represents the best of this
generation. The struggle he is
engaged in — the struggle
against oppression, imperialism, and bigotry — represents
the only hope for a future of
liberty, peace, and dignity for
mankind. Our honoring him
would be a mere token of
moral support for this struggle, but it would be an indication of where we stand.
And as for those who would
object that Carmichael has
made no contribution to academic life — just remember
the dozens of sociologists and
political scientists who would
have difficulty justifying their
academic existence but for the
fact that Carmichael's work
provides them with research
projects.
rtP*!
RWuWMW#MWl.f9 *
We were told that a physiology prof had stocked up on
hundreds of rubber articles
for some sort of scientific experiment, but we were too shy
to check it out . . .
Stairs were built Halloween
night over the Totem Park
wall, as cheering girls looked
on. They're wooden stairs with
a banister. Last year Eric
Newell, leader of the red
horde, was thinking of building permanent concrete ones.
Former Special Events man
Brian Plummer is out of jail,
sent friends a postcard with a
big picture of LBJ. Seems
those arrested for storming
the Pentagon had a pretty
good time right in the detention camp . . .
UBC is due for its first sit-
in Nov. 15 when the Dow
Chemical Company, which
makes napalm, comes to recruit . . .
We see nobody spotted the
real identity of Suzy Cream-
cheese, Ubyssey dark horse
candidate for Homecoming
Queen . . .
One of this week's anti-CUS
handouts contained an irrelevant attack on Charlie Boylan,
former AMS first vice-president. American-born Charlie
wants to become a Canadian
citizen but his application
keeps being turned down
(mostly, he thinks, because
he's a Communist). The leaflet
called him a "draft-dodger."
Charlie's been in Canada since
he was four years old . . .
Arts councillors say ex-AMS
prez Byron Hender lied when
he told Jack Wasserman that
John Stuart Mill lounge was
to be fumigated. It wasn't.
Once again this year, the
staff are the noisiest people
in the library. Not only do
they speak in normal tones in
the stacks, but they hail one
another loud and clear.
That's the main library, of
course. Woodward is quiet as
a tomb.
No, our library does not
have a copy of that short
story by Philip Roth.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports  Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Hair*
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
Shouts rent the air, which was
rented. Bubbling spirits overflowed
as gallons of yogurt splattered stray
platypusses, hippopotamouses and
rhinocerouses. A stick-burning editor, incensed, locked himself in his
lair while screaming staffers in baby
bunting pyjamas splintered seven
desks.
Most chipper of all was Steve
Jackson, fortooth. Norman Gidney
sang yolk songs while Judy Young
egged him on. Mike Finlay got
abreast of the problem, and Jade
Eden was chased by a chocolate
cartoonist.
Meanwhile Irene Wasilewski and
Mark DeCoursey sipped wine with
decorum, Paul Knox fought giant
ants  with  Patrick  Dean.
Helping a crotchety jock shop
slave driver was Beverely Feather,
who tickled his fancy, Mike Fitzgerald, John  Twigg and Bob Banno.
A heap of inhicquity in the darkroom closely resembled a compilation of Lawrence Woodd, Bob
Brown, Chris Blake, George Hollo
and  Powell Hargrave.
An important editorial blorg meeting will be held noon today in the
third  drawer from the  left. Friday, November 3, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
TIN-HORN  PURITAN TOM
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Academic  Reporter
Vancouver
Tom
^      ,—,~_     mayor
Campbell is utterly incompetent, says UBC's poet in residence.
He is also eminently illiter
ate and a proponent of tinhorn puritanism, J. Michael
Yates, assistant professor of
creative writing, said Thursday. He was commenting on
Campbell's suggested censorship of the latest issue of Play-
WHAT TOM CAMPBELL SAYS YOU SHOULDN'T SEE  .  .  .
Campbell encouraged magazine distributors to remove the
November issue of Playboy from the stands because it contains these rather ordinary stag movie pictures. You probably wouldn't even have noticed them if Big Brother Tom
hadn't.
boy magazine.
Campbell this week asked
the regional distributor of the
magazine to remove four pages
of photographs accompanying
an article on the history of
sex in the cinema. The distributor has done so.
"This magazine is a tremendous outlet for some of the
best fiction writers in the
world today," Yates said.
"That Tom Campbell, who
in the past has shown himself
to be eminently illiterate, can
censor this magazine puts my
life as a professional writer in
jeopardy."
Yates said that Campbell's
actions against Playboy and
the newspaper Georgia
Straight are comparable to the
same repression that forced
such authors as Samuel Beckett and James Joyce to leave
Ireland.
The Playboy story in question is in no way offensive,
he said.
"The film study in the magazine is vitally important to
anyone interested in the history of the cinema, and was
not written by idiots.
"Campbell hasn't even got
the guts to censor the picures
legally, but tries to get around
it by making suggestions to the
distributor."
In an interview Thursday,
Campbell denied that it was
his actions that resulted in the
removal of the pictures.
"I brought my objections to
the attention of the distributor, but he said he had already
begun to remove the pages,"
Campbell said.
"I do not consider the pictures obscene, but I wouldn't
want a ten-year-old girl to see
them."
He added that he wanted
the public to know what was
being  sent  through  the  mail.
A poll of faculty members
at UBC indicated little support
for Campbell's position.
"I can't understand mayor
Campbell's behavior," said
UBC consultant psychologist
Dr. Conrad Schwarz.
"There are many other books
that should be removed if this
is to be the mayor's policy."
Zoology professor Dr. Dave
Suzuki said he got his monthly
copy from the newstand before Campbell had taken any
action.
"I really abhor this type of
censorship," he said.
"But it is pretty erotic, isn't
it?"
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan had little
to say on the matter.
"I got my copy before he
could pull them off the
stands,"   Sullivan  said.
SHEEP GROIN (UNS)—This city's annual prairie chicken
hunting season opened and closed Wednesday with four and a
half hours of frenzied activity.
First prize went to Elsnerd Glotz of Moose Tail road, who
managed to bag 83 V_ chickens during the period.
Mrs. Glotz is reported to have retched when told she would
have to clean and cook the birds.
Sin binge
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Perturbation was caused in
this island sin-bin last night
when puce blorg striptease
girls went on strike. Hundreds
of frustrated blue blorgs
howled and hollered for the
girls to expose their delicate
puce boobies, but their only
reply was "Expo's over."
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PAN AMERICAN  PETROLEUM
CORPORATION
Calgary, Alberta
requires
GEOLOGISTS
THE  MAN
Postgraduates,  Graduates  and   Undergraduates in Geology and Geological Engineering.
THE JOB
Regular and Summer Employment Opportunities in our Exploration Department involving
duties in the Calgary Division Office and in
field locations throughout Alberta.
THE OPPORTUNITIES
Pan American is an expanding major producer of oil, natural gas and sulphur. The
Company's operations now embrace British
Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon,
North West Territories, and the Atlantic and
Pacific coastal waters. We offer excellent
salaries, benefits and opportunities for advancement.
INTERVIEWS:
Wednesday, November 8,  1967
Thursday, November 9,  1967
Contact your Student Placement Office for Company and
position information. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1967
LETTERS  TO   THE EDITOR
Human Les
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would not be "human" if
your kind editorial had not
pleased me. I am particularly
pleased that have finally closed
the gap and we are now communicating.
I share the credit in this with
you and all the students who
have helped me.
L. ROHRINGER
acting director
housing administration
certainly do so on an equitable
basis. However, it is the position of the Liberal Club that
this is unnecessary and a complete waste of the supposedly
scarce funds.
NORM FARRELL
UBC Liberals
Whigs
'Partisan
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It appears that the Special
Events Committee has decided
to institute a policy whereby
the students of UBC are sponsoring and subsidizing partisan
politicians for purely partisan
reasons: namely Charles Taylor and Laurier LaPierre, national vice-presidents of the
New Democratic Party. Mr.
Taylor was paid $100 to propagate the party line on confederation problems and Laurier
LaPierre will apparently receive $150.
The political clubs on this
campus have always managed
to provide representatives of
their parties to discuss current
issues at no cost to other students. If Special Events is now
able to begin payments to
political   speakers    it    should
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In a recent news story In
your paper we were unhappy
to note that you maintained
your usual standards of accuracy in reporting. In your edition of Oct. 17, you referred to
the student Liberals as Whigs.
The term Whig has been used
in Great Britain and at one
time in the United States to apply to the Liberal parties in
those countries. However in
Canada the Liberal party has
always used the name Grit'
rather than Whig. The term
Grit is an anachronism often
used to save space in headlines
as is, or was, the term Whig.
Being Canadians we would
prefer it if you would use our
Canadian name.
KENT PEARSON, president
UBC student Liberal club
Contradictions
These two contradictions, I
think, are to be noted.
Financial responsibility: It
was the engineers, spoken for
by Lynn Spraggs, who accused
the arts US of being "irresponsible"    with    money   because
STUDENT SPECIALS!
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sings
-LEE LYNN
Chinese & Malaysian Folk Songs
Recital Hall, Music Building
TUESDAY, 7th NOV., 12:30 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Admission: 50c
CO-SPONSORS: Chinese Overseas Students Association.
Malaysian  Singapore Students Association.
Film Soc Presents
BANNED
'HIGH'
Nov. 3
Nor. 7 & 8
12:30 & 8:00
Adm. $1.00
Auditorium
Restricted to Students, Faculty, Staff,
AMS, Faculty, or Staff Cards must be shown.
they spent it on free, creative
activities. It was the engineers,
led by Lynn Spraggs, whose
destructive activities resulted
in loss of over $2,000 for The
Ubyssey.
Violence: Gabor Mate states
in Friday's Ubyssey that "a
society which practises violence against foreign peoples
must inevitably turn that violence against its own people."
In the same article he claims
that "the violence of the Vietnamese people is quite justified and is to be supported so
long as the aggressor remains
in their country." He says that
"violence breeds its own destruction" yet urges war protesters to meet police "with
defensive violence."
It appears that both the right
and left at UBC have something to learn about violence
and destruction.
SHAMELESS
NIGHTINGALE
arts 2
stolen by souvenir hunters.
Granted that the posters
are eye-catching and well-
made; granted that poster-
stealing is a way of life for
certain deprived overgrown
teenybopper personalities. But
do they have to swipe them
before the dance actually
takes place? Damn it, they
cost money!
IRATE POSTER HANGER
arts 5
Indeed!
Dammit!
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I have been helping put up
posters for a dance at the
armory this weekend. The
posters were put up on Monday. Wednesday, all the posters in Buchanan, one in the
bookstore (scotch-taped to the
window), and several from
other    locations    have    been
Editor, The Ubyssey:
To quote a Ubyssey article
(page 3, Oct. 31, 1967):
"Blaize Horner, residence
representative on council,
said the residences limit the
number of foreign students in
Canada less than two years
to five per cent men and three
per cent women. 'But it is
simply a matter of expediency,' she said."
Expediency indeed! We
must ask Miss Horner what it
is that is being expediated.
The excuse of expediency has
been used to justify almost
every conceivable action taken
by various power structures
throughout western history. I
challenge Miss Horner to state
in detail the objectives of such
blatant   discrimination.
DUNCAN ODNER
grad studies
"A
WELL-
FURNISHED
SAINT"
ONE
OF
SERMON
TITLES
FOR
SUNDAY
Nov. 5
10 a.m.-LCA-ELCC
Pastor  Pearson
1:15 a.m.-LC-C
Pastor Fox
LUTHERAN
CAMPUS CENTRE
U.B.C.
5885 University Blvd.
Phone 224-1614
or 228-8220
OUR GLENGUARD SUITS
BY HYDE PARK:
fashion-now, yet enduring styles
sumptuous, full-bodied worsteds
up-to-the-minute patterns—colourings
safety tabs on the inside breast pockets
lavished with hand-tailoring
110.00, the two-piece suit
sometimes luxury comes unexpectedly
... expectedly at Eaton's, the
fashion store for men
Gtenguard Suits are available at
major Eaton stores coast to coast.
EATON'S  pt
NOVEMBER 3, 1967
ON THE COVER:
Gordon Fidler dripped ink
to make one of his oh-so-
very - clever multi - media
non-linear   mind   blowers.
champagne casks:
judy bing, Stephen scobie
leather wineskin:
bert hill
hip flasks:
arnold saba, gordon fidler
beer bottles:
kurt hilger, rae moster
plastic cup:
andrew norvat
Thursday Special Events
brought to campus middle-
class culture hero Laurier
LaPierre. Next week there
will be three showings of
Andy Warhol's Chelsea
Girls also courtesy of S.E.
Two good safe choices,
considering that Chelsea
Girls played twice to sold
out houses at the International Film Festival very
recently, and LaPierre
spoke at the annual alumni
banquet little over a year
ago.
True, the concert by Ali
Akbar Khan three weeks
ago was a groove. But all
the same Special Events is
nothing special this year.
Following in the footsteps of flamboyant Murray
Farr and Brian Plummer,
Gerry Canon obviously has
big shoes to fill.
Farr and Plummer took
chances, sometimes going
too far — remember the
Von Thadden fiasco? —but
they accustomed UBC students to seeing and hearing
the most controversial
speakers, the most avant
garde musicians, the most
experimental dance. The
things one cannot see and
hear off campus. Richard
Alpert, Sidney Cohen, Jon
Hendricks, Paul Krassner.
James Meredith, the Erick
Hawkins Dancers, the San
Francisco Mime Troupe.
Not having to be a strictly money making proposition Special Events can and
should be run with daring
and flair, keeping its audience at the forefronts of
cultural change.
Or else we suggest it be
renamed Ordinary Events.
— J.B.
bar-
Lawyers
conform
By S. A. RUSH
In the recent student senate elections two
Law students offered themselves to the campus
as candidates. Both ran campaigns which were
aimed at the more responsible (as they hoped)
segments of the student populace. Elements of
each of their platforms included such dogmatic
slogans as "working within the system", nonradical approach   and  "responsible"  leadership.
What is interesting about this approach, in
addition to it being grossly out-of-touch with
the student movement in B.C; and across Canada, is that it appears to be characteristic of
the Law school and the legal profession. This
attitude is evident even to the first year students.
The question may be posed as to why this
attitude prevails among the students leaving the
Law school and those entering the profession.
Simply stated: why is the legal profession so
damn conservative? And why does it demand
that same conservatism of its trainees?
There is one answer in the legal profession's
own image of its duty to society. There is a
large body of opinion in the Bar and its training school that law is the instrument by which
stability is secured in society. Law then is a
tool for the maintenance of social order.
For such an opinion to be maintained and
perpetuated the legal association must insure
that only acceptable lawyers be infused into the
system, all of whom must in general share the
same convictions about the nature of man and
his role in society. This they guarantee by instructing the devotees in the uniform attitudes
of the profession. Demands are made of the
school to produce the kind of responsible person
who will operate only within the confines of the
preordained system.
The effect of this is most detrimental to the
training school and the lawyers it churns out.
The school usually suffers from an identity crisis
in which it can never quite resolve the problem
of whether it is a machine to grind out knowledgeable technicians or a college which is devoted to academic excellence. The school is continuously balancing itself between duty to the
Bar and duty to educating individuals.
But it is the students who really suffer! The
system mercilessly shapes the learning mind, as
the sculptor does his clay, into standard forms.
Little interest is directed to freshness of mind
and the imaginative spirit. The profession must
be certain the properly-indoctrinated students
can survive the years of propagandising. A combination of frustration and resignation drives
any vestige of radicalism or non-conformity out
of the student. What remains is a group efficiently trained and willing to accept the conservative norms of the profession. Therefore,
it is understandable how the two law senate
candidates epitomized everything that was the
legal profession.
There are other answers to the aforementioned questions such as the Bar's need to maintain itself as the spokesman of the legal profession and the administrative inconvenience of
switching to a more academically orientated
learning situation. The result, however, is the
same; the perpetuation of a frame of mind which
is questionable in its value to the student and,
what is more important, suspect in its value to
society.
ofioaog
pt:ivii
To the hopeful I find around me.
hallow e'en leaves
ALL SAINTS WALK TO NIGHT.
they keep right on turning.
on the night
they ride new broom
sticks in the mind.
observe the ancient tree,
the deity in side of me.
hallowed even hears
the darkness of my ears
lying in the nameless place
with you / a mud of puddle pain,
green, never know where we
were again.
observe the ancient tree,
the deity in side of me.
and you, strumming your own tune
to your own god at your own speed
with your own seed on your own steed,
but here you are so near,
i bring you back, my golden fluids
moving gently thru our two minds.
observe the ancient tree,
the deity in side of we.
ALL the memories today exist like mobile
flashes. SAINTS have seen all, will
keep seeing early visions as they WALK
as they walk as they walk as they
talk of the orange and black nights they met
in the forest paths of the child's way.
observe the deity in we,
we embrace to climb the tree.
you thought it was married, alive,
the joined and fucking trees,
in love grow wooden a little version
of misplaced passion, a direction
which seems mistaken only at first glance.
by chance the NIGHT will replace your face.
observe the deity in we,
we embrace to climb the tree.
looking out over the bay,
with sun tickling the way
it sparkles into solid grapes
of light, falling into fluid form,
we are torn to each other,
only plasma remains hallowed colours ween.
saw the saints as they walked,
seen the men as they steamed,
seen the tree in its green,
in its silver light as we broke
the secret law of duality, the silver
light of sacred profanity, waking.
saw the saints as they walked,
heard the masters as they talked,
seen the tree in its green thinking of orange,
and  black  folds   away  revealing  what  we
hoped
would be true, so i sing lately for you
forming for you, requesting vision anew.
by Scott Lawrance
aganaci
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By JOHN SKAPSKI
Fireweed   by   Ken   Belford.
Talonbooks.   $2.50.
Fireweed reveals a poet
with a sense of the poetic.
Much poetry, it seems, is
poetry only in form, in its
use of language. It is poetry
only in a linguistic sense: a
mere glibness of tongue. It
seduces like a picturesque
orator with a meaningless
speech. Belford, poetically,
has an argument.
He knows that poetry communicates through metaphor
(in the widest sense of the
word) rather than lecture, and
that the reader should be approached through the senses.
His language is clear, concise,
hard; he does not mistake
confused language for elusive-
ness and depth of meaning.
What he has to say is not easy
to define, but the medium he
chooses to put it in is clear.
It proceeds from the concrete
image.
These images are vigorous
and striking — they work intuitively, rather than by logical explanation. This, of
course, is all part of poetics,
of metaphor. The images deal
with the various facets of the
north; solitude, open spaces,
cold, uncomplicated people.
These elements are superimposed upon the workings of
the mind. In this sense the
poetry is psychological, surreal.
Back wheels spinning out
And pulling his brain back
behind his eyes.
It is fair to say that poetry
is only good in that it leaves
a strong positive sense of itself behind. Belford has many
images that are not easy to
forget—it is a welcome change
from most local material.
Another welcome change is
his complete lack of sentimentality. It is about time poets
realized that there is absolutely no excuse for subjecting
a reader to anything as common, immature and meaningless as their superficial emotions: sentimentality is the opposite  of  the  poetic.
Although Belford avoids this
trap, he could be criticized
for a tendency to bleed a little
too much; however, he is no
haemophiliac, the flow will
cease.
There is a lot of first person
Continued on pf 7
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laaaa
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oBc	
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xontents-
bar pf 2
books      pf 2
outside   in      pf 2
film       pf 3
theatre      pf 3
interview       pf 4, 5
letter       pf 6
music       pf 6
food         pf 7
clubs       pf 8
V J
Friday, November 3, 1967 —.—^ films——	
LESTER  LOSES   UNFUNNY WAR;
KENT  FLIES  HIGH, AND  FLOPS
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
The bubble had to burst sometime. After his two early
nasterpieces, A Hard Day's Night and The Knack, Dick Lester
las been in steady decline. Help!, although great fun in its way,
s essentially a sick film, and A Funny Thing etc. is positively
ichizophrenic.
The basic trouble is that Lester has no style, only technique;
le has never been brilliant, only clever. And with How I Won the
ffax, the whole precarious house of cards comes tumbling down.
To be fair, the film is attempting the impossible in the first
.lace: an anti-war film which would be simultaneously very funny
ind very horrific. Even Dr. Strangelove achieved this only occa-
donally; and to do it at all would require a very strong cohesive
ityle. Which is precisely what Lester hasn't.
JOHN LENNON contemplates his navel—from the inside.
The result is that the various elements, instead of being complementary to each other, undercut and invalidate each other.
The fantastic comedy deprives the horrors of their reality; and
the reality exposes the phoneyness of the comedy.
What one might not have expected, however, was that the
comedy should be so singularly unfunny. Too much of it depends
on English class-structures (and accents) for an American audience
to appreciate; but it mainly consists of Michael Crawford falling
on his back and John Lennon simpering. Michael Hordern
enlivens the show for a while with his veteran officer still fighting "the wily Pathan", but the gleams of humor are fitful, few,
and far between.
As an anti-war film, How I Won the War will doubtless have
wide success in preaching to the converted, and it may even outrage a few idiots who still believe in the things it ridicules.
But as anything resembling a serious movie, it's a sad flop,
and not even as instructive a one as Larry Kent's High.
Admitted that High is a goddam awful lousy movie (although some people may like the nudes, the rock theme music,
the all-time record number of flat jokes, and the grubby hero who
looks disconcertingly like Gabor Mate), it does have a certain
value.
Kent is blessed with an absolute lack of self-criticism. He reproduces faithfully, albeit in their crudest and naivest form, all
the stupidest cliches and platitudes of his time. High contains
every overused gimmick and trick in contemporary cinema, and is
an extended text-book in how not to use them.
Its view of the process by which pot leads to sex leads to
crime leads to murder must delight the hearts of all the moral-
izers whom (one suspeets) Kent dutifully says he despises.
His view of a marijuana sex-orgy must coincide with that of
every ill-informed thirteen year old girl; and thus its value, to
some sociologist in a future age, seeking the lowest common
denominator of our society.
If you want to see how this sort of thing should be done (to
end on a brighter note), watch out for Arthur Perm's true-life
gangster story Bonnie and Clyde, due at the Capitol downtown.
This film comes here with a reputation a mile high. Critics all
over the world have hailed it as the best movie produced in
America this year.
Fraser's double freak-out
By KEITH FRASER
A heavy breeze is teasing our city,
md will be for some months.
Unfortunately the only way to ignore
t is to strap storm shutters about one's
;ar lobes, and smile at friends spending
wo and a half dollars on a super movie
vhich threatens to blow away everything
mt its own smell.
In this era of war-movies-to-end-all-
var-movies, Gone With The Window is
in anachronism, whose new film size and
:tereophonic sound make it about as con-
emporary as The Ten Commandments in
lugh Hefner's private theatre.
Its cinematic techniques appear hope-
essly melodramatic. Cardboard silhouet-
es pasted against a fire-stained sky, to
he sway of sawing violins, are balanced
>y close-up tears of screen idols, an onion
n every hand.
The locks of Scarlett O'Hairy often
esemble a frizzy pyramid, and her elastic closing line ("Tomorrow is another
lay") is no longer a truism for an audi-
;nce used to the garbled verbosity of a
ktarat-Sade inmate.
Since reading Margaret Mitchell's epic
rovel of strife in the Old South, I have
;agerly awaited the return of the 1939
ilm account. Frankly, I had planned to
lame my first kid, Ashley, after the
:tory's famous character.
But people are laughing at my hero
fvery evening now. Even I could not
iuppress an odd chuckle a few nights
igo.
Suddenly I resented the stoic cinema
(ttitude we have acquired through our
ophisticated approach to filming emotion.
Oh well. Maybe I'll call the kid
>partacus.
ENGAGING  HIPPIE Christian  smiles
bravely at prospect of Shavian  lions.
The local Androcles and the Lion is a
tasty hors d'oeuvre, but no banquet.
The only appetite now being satisfied
at the Playhouse is the lion's, into which
the chicken Christian, Spintho (Terence
Kelly), unwittingly runs in hope of
escaping early martyrdom.
In a prologue and two short acts,
Bernard Shaw's play humorously recreates early persecution of the Christians. The Roman heavies, complete with
biceps and fishnets, are grandly offset
by   Ferfovius   (Graeme   Campbell)   who
LANNY BECKMAN, leading
actor in Larry Kent's movie
High, reviewed on this
page. Beckman is now a
student at UBC.
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
mops up the Coliseum for the good guys.
His performance is steady and rock-
tongued   as it should be.
Androcles is the antithesis of Ferro-
vius. Slight and timid, he is saved from
death because the lion he has earlier
befriended refuses to devour him. Robert
Clothier's portrayal is spotty because he
sometimes swallows his words; he is perfectly cast. And how do you judge Hutchison Shandro's performance? I suppose he
danced nicely for a lion.
The hippie Christians, equipped with
beads and hairbands, are led by the
beautiful Lavinia (Patricia Gage). Her I
voice is pleasant, but her costume is \
strangely glamorous for someone soon f
to be dumped to the lions. Roman captain
(Peter Haworth) does not mind, however.
In the finale these two pledge their love,
and then relax while Shaw himself (Roy
Brinson) addresses some pointed words
to Mayor Campbell in this production's
surprise ending.
Generally the performance is adequate
but rarely shines. Only the fire-eater,
belching wide slices of flame, comes close
to giving the play a warmth it lacks.
The conflict of ideas, what Shaw is all
about, is not sufficiently evident to vitalize his social comment. Hence the necessity for a concluding parochial jab.
The Playhouse Company has merely
stirred appetities for future productions.
Perhaps this is as it should be; but the
onus will be upon those coming performances to leave us burping with satisfaction.
■ - ! *   -'%i:-J* '    " : '-'^ I
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Friday, November 3, 1967 NOTICE
THAT THE ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
OF THE
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
OF U.B.C.
will be held
TUESDAY, NOV. 7th, 7-9 P.M.
UPPER LOUNGE, I. HOUSE
• discussion  of house objectives
• election of members of the
BOARD OF  DIRECTORS
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"UP HALF A BLOCK FROM BIRKS CLOCK"
Establishment wants
SOME CRITICAL INSIGHTS INTO THE WORLD'S HANGUPS
BY A  DISSIPATED   RACCOON.
Richard J. Needham. a self styled 55-year-old
dissipated raccoon blew into town early this
week from Toronto where he writes a daily
column for the Toronto Globe and Mail. In the
three years he has been writing the column,
Needham has declared war on just about everything including twin beds, lump sugar and the
education system.
Bert Hill of page friday followed him around Vancouver
from UBC to the CBC for a fast
taping session and then back lo
the Devonshire. Needham presented the receptionist with her
fourth bouquet of the day and
in the hotel emptied the result
of a raid on the government
dairy into a huge gallon whiskey
bottle which he carries with
NEEDHAM him  everywhere.  The  conver
sation continued with a hord of other followers
(he brought three students from different Ontario universities with him) at Ming's in Chinatown and back at the Devonshire and on the
following day at UBC.
Needham has authored one book, Needham's
Inferno which won the Governor General's
award for humor. He has also written editorials
for the Globe on financial matters.
Hill: What is education ?
Needham: I like this definition: Education is
looking for the truth in the company of friends.
Hill: Earlier you labeled UBC the Point Grey
Institute of Applied Technology and Natural
Science. What is your idea of a university ?
Needham: Most of the present universities are
glorified high schools. They are too conservative
and a conservative university is like a pregnant
virgin, a contradiction in terms. To be a university means to be a hotbed of revolution and dissent.
Hill: OK, why are UBC and all the others
glorified high schools ?
Needham: The establishment doesn't want
you educated. Educated people are after the
truth but this is the very opposite of what the
establishment speaks, thinks, legislates and enforces. The whole system operates on force and
the worst place is the high school. That's where
most die and they only get buried when they're
65. The result is that everyone spends their life
squeezing out the slave and gets finished in time
to pick up their old age pension.
Hill: 'How do you fight the establishment?
Needham: The establishment controls every
thing: the schools, the newspapers, the goven
ment, the parties, the industry, the army and a
the guns.
Hill: What can be done ?
Needham: My life personally has been a r
treat from collective actions but the young ha\
lots of confidence in groups. Parallel institutioi
seem like a good idea and I think the future <
the kibbutz and co-op is great. They realize thi
politics is irrelevant and they are building the:
own communities. I only do what I can do nov
Hill: What would you do if you had bee
picked to follow president Macdonald ?
Needham: I would have a meeting place, del
nitely a bar where students and faculty coul
meet and drink and talk 24 hours a day, seve
days a week. All the administrators, all the pap<
work and all the machines would be thrown 01
and the teacher would teach. The people wt
mentioned the word "job" would be taken 01
and shot. It seems that everybody in the unive
sity today spends five per cent of his time thin]
ing, and 95 per cent on money worries.
Hill: Do you have much faith in the students
Needham: (Yes, but most people at universil
would sell their souls for a degree and most di
I am disturbed most by the lack of confident
in students. They only learn how to cringe in tr
high schools. When I start talking about m
ideas, there are a lot of creepy high school sti
dents who think I'm irresponsible and my ides
are impossible. The establishment has got then
The only good thing now is that at least all tl
people of the same age group are together und*
one roof.
Hill: Earlier you said politics is irrelevant.
Needham: Yes, only second rate men ente
politics and only third rate men succeed. Polit
cians never act in the interests of the people bi
for the preservation of their power.
Everything is impossible in politics. We ha\
a tremendous shortage of housing and the po]
ticians can do nothing about it. I think we shoul
invite perhaps the Chinese to bail us out of tr.
mess: foreign aid in reverse.
All of the welfare and defence money is pou
ed down rat holes. It doesn't appear to be doir
the poor any good. If we took the defense func
we could give every 18 year old person ever
year $4,000 and let them go off to Europe. Thi
would solve the defense problem.
I support Bennett in his fight with Ottaw.
There the money just disappears but here yc
at least get a highway and maybe a dam.
LYNDON'S PRAYER
Our Lyndon, which art in Washington
Hallowed be thy gall bladder
Thy  Bomarcs come
Thy will be done in Ottawa as it is in Saigon
Give  us this  day our daily defence contract
Forgive  us our wheat sales to the  Chinese
As we forgive them for being dirty rotten Commies
Lead us not into Paris,  Rome or Vienna
But into Detroit,  Dallas and   Disneyland
And  deliver us from  Cuba
For thine art the money,  the power and the weapons
For ever and  ever
A-OK
— by richard  j.  needham
"The only thing students
Friday, November 3, 196 »•!
responsible slaves
Hill: If you could, what would you do as
head of Canada ?
Needham: We need lots of people to make
this a strong country. Every Canadian woman,
married and unmarried, should be encouraged
to have lots of babies. We should open up the
immigration barriers for at least a million a year.
If we don't then we will just continue to be
hewers of wood and diggers of holes.
We also need these people to help us defend
the country. If you read the history books you
will realize that the few of us can't possibly hold
the land for ourselves against the great masses of
the world forever and the only thing is to welcome them now before they arrive uninvited.
According to the 1952 Paley Report, the US
will be shortly running out of natural resources
and we will need lots more people to defend ourselves.
Hill: What about Vietnam?
Needham: I think that after the next federal
election with all parties running on an anti-
Canadian participation platform, the establishment will send Canadians. The U.S. wants the
troops to give the war an air of virtue. It'll only
be token participation but I think it will break
up Canada.
Hill: What's behind the war ?
Needham: It's partly an anti-Chinese thing
just like the second world war against the Japanese. Also it's a religious war and doubly dangerous because the bomb begins to look like the
answer. I think that the U.S. will probably
eventually attack China.
Hill: What can the peace movement do?
Needham: It is quite obvious that the democratic institutions are no longer useful. Much
as I cannot personally embrace it we are already
getting the answer: violence. But the establishment still has everything including the guns.
Hill: What kind of a state would you like to
see?
Needham: I have always had a deep antipathy for the state, so I would probably sweep
away all the laws and risk anarchy despite all
the creepy students and people who are worried
about it. We can learn things from progressive
t countries like Yugoslavia that have no liquor
laws. The major law would be that people
couldn't bash their fellow man and the second
law since we live in that kind of system is that
you can't steal the other man's property.
Incidentally hippies are all these things. The
only people who don't like hippies are people
who have dreary jobs. Hippies aren't brutal and
cruel which are my criteria for good people.
Hill: What about the minimum annual wage?
* Needham: People like adventure and if they
had everything handed to them with four meals
a day, pretty soon they would be getting together and setting the place on fire.
Hill: What about the school of thought that
all that people want is a womb with a view?
You seem to be at one end of this spectrum:
the adventure end while most students are the
products of a security-conscious society.
Needham: My security is in the principles I
hold. Every time I walked out of a job because
I disagreed on a moral issue I was sticking to
my conception of security. You must always
have the courage to be on the side of experimentation, change and revolution. The founding fathers of the U.S. wrote this into their
constitution: the need for constant revolution
and we know how far the U.S. has gone since
then.
Hill: What's the difference between Canada
and the USA?
Needham: In CanaSa you can say you are
a communist and not get killed. If I meet one I
always ask when he is going to start sharing his
goods.
The vast bulk of Canadians just want to
rest on the bosom of Uncle Sam and make
more money each year.
The U.S. is much more interesting right now
with all the change and the struggle. Canada is
so formal; just so many cadavers. At the
Toronto Love-in there was a cop for every hippie
present.
Despite the Establishment's control, they
can't do anything if all the bright people dig in
their heels and say they don't want their schools
and universities and all the other things. Things
would change fast then.
Hill: What about censorship?
Needham: The people who decide the moral
level of the community are usually the most
immoral. Have you noticed that most comj,
mercials today sound like obscene telephone
calls?
Hill: Do you consider yourself an anarchist?
Needham: No, I believe in the rule of law
but I wonder about our society that can't keep
the streets safe at night yet has so many useless
laws. But when they start sending Eskimos to
the gas chamber, people who are so afraid of
anarchy might be able to get change, made in
the usual way in time to save one or two Eskimos.
A politician is the only person who will give
you the shirt off someone else's back. People
have to recognize the basic facts about the
politicians.
The fastest way to get rid of your illusions
about our democracy is to spend a week in parliament, or about justice is to spend a week
watching the courts.
The state wants to get into every house and
every bed. Why is the state enforcing marriage
laws that no good lawyer would go near? Marriage should be renewable every other year.
About one marriage in twenty is worth keeping.
learn  is  how to  cringe"
Film Soc Presents
4HICH'
BANNED
Nov. 3
Nov. 7 & 8
12:30 & 8:00
n i u n
Adm. $1.00
Auditorium
Restricted to Students,
Faculty, Staff,
AMS, Faculty, or Staff Cards must be shown.
ARTS - COMMERCE - ENGINEERING
Have you considered a career as a
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT?
Our representative will be on Campus
November 13 and 14, 1967
Please contact the placement office for further information
and to arrange an interview.
PEAT, MARWICK, MITCHELL & CO.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.:
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE - NOV. 6 & 7 at 8:30
'a joy tO WatCh' London Daily Telegraph
'Sheer delight' Cleveland Plain Dealer
rWSra a
e9
NOV.
NOV.
PROGRAM
ROSE LATULIPPE"—Choreographed
by Brian Macdonald.
Music:  Harry Freedman.
7—"PAS DE DIX" — Choreographed by
Balanchine. Music: Glazounov.
"THE STILL POINT" —Choreographed
by Todd Bolender.
Music: Debussy String Quartet.
"MONCAYO  I" — Choreographed  by
Gloria Contreras. Music: Pablo Moncayo
"DAYDREAM"  (a Pas de Deux by Leo
Ahonen). Music: Minkus.
"LES PATINEURS"—Sir Frederick Ash-
ton—choreographer. Music: Meyerbeer.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE—NOV. 19 AT 8:30
% 9«a Carlos
'Moirto$
4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50
TICKETS THE BAY BOX OFPICE,
MAIN FLOOR, THE BAY—681-3351
Friday, November 3, 1967 CHOOSE A DIAMOND
WITH CONFIDENCE
i
i
$150 and up
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
BOXER REBELLION
f
Editor, Page Friday:
I question a growing trend
in university architecture as
propounded by Alan Bell in
last week's Page Friday. If
UBC is the prime example of
the "box" building concept,
let's look at SFU as an answer
to that trend. Is the unified
university-complex a workable alternative?
It has been my experience
that such a unified and integrated complex, unblessed with
the division of grass and boule-
RENE LEVESQUE SPEAKS
Hear the leader of Quebec's "quiet revolution" on
CANADA AND VIETNAM"
Eleanor Collins, Radio & TV Artist
Sings Canadian and Vietnam songs
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 8 P.M.
Admission  free Collection
Auspices Canadian Aid for Vietnam Civilians,
P.O. Box 2543, Van. 3, B.C.
THE INTERNATIONAL FALL FAIR
PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, NOV. 3rd
7:00 p.m.
OPENING
7:15
FILM: The Flooding of Florence, Italy.
(Upper Lounge, International House.)
8:00
JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Lower Lounge, I.H.)
9:00
FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
10:00
FASHION SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
11:15
FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
12:00 midnight
CLOSED until 2:00 p.m. Saturday.
SATURDAY, NOV. 4th
2:00 p.m.
JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Nitobe   Memorial   Gardens,   Admission    at
International House.)
3:30
Combined FASHION and FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, International House.)
4:45
FILM: The Flooding of Florence. (To be introduced by the Italian Consul General.)
5:00
JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Lower Lounge, I.H.)
6:30
FLOORSHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
7:30
Final Combined FASHION and FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
9:00
DANCE to the Trinidad "MOONLIGHTERS."
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
Stop in any time for a light snack in the
INTERNATIONAL RESTAURANT
Lower Lounge
STUDENTS .50 ADULTS $1.00
West Mall at
Northwest Marine on Campus
vards, tends to promote a subordination of the user-student,
that it inhibits the student's
chance to "escape", retreat or
seek relief from the force of
what is, in this case, an overawing structure.
Is it not more desirable to
have a university structure
that is somewhat less embellished, less overpowering, and
more escapable, in order to
promote an emphasis on the
human population rather than
the concrete environment? A
complex unit or a multi-angular,
unboxlike and interconnected
plant is fine to admire. But it
tends to de-emphasize that the
unit has a function as a simple
place of study and discussion.
Less encroaching surroundings, conversely, seem to promote discourse.
It seems that the presence of
a concrete "umbilical cord"
tying in all buildings, as at
SFU, denies the student the
feeling that he can leave behind one environment and
enter into another — a feeling
that walking onto (real) grass,
under trees, and onto landscaped boulevards provides at
this university.
Although not advocating a
return to army huts, I do urge
that architectural monsters, of
the SFU genre, should be as
rigorously avoided.
STEVE BECKOW
Arts 4
music -
Tuckwell's
loving horniul
By ANDREW HORVAT
Barry Tuckwell, London hornist, does his thing at the
Queen Liz with the Vancouver Symphony last Sunday afternoon.
Love is all you need to play seventeen feet of coiled wind
which grooves in a blondbrass package called the French horn.
Tuckwell proves a beautiful relationship with his French horn
when he does Mozart's Concerto No. 2 and Australian composer
Don Banks' piece.
Gaudy Beardsley paintings ooze out from the dizzying mass
of tube under his arms. The horn casts images in the flickering
darkness of the Queen Liz. Visions of eighteenth century flower
groves grow from his trills and galloping horsemen come close
behind his hunting calls.
The French horn's "Cry For No One" mourn turns the
concert into Vancouver's first sound show. In Banks' Concerto
strange electric sounds from the orchestra are woven together
by Tuckwell's fanfares. Loving clapter from an audience of
mostly straights reaches out to Tuckwell.
In the lobby Ellen and Noel appear to utter groovy sounds;
Tuckwell's thing is obviously a meaningful experience.
Meredith Davies lifts his hands for his happening to begin.
He lowers them and he and the orchestra begin to move to
the music.
Towering Davies with flying long hair is the conductor
and everyone is in tune with him. Through Appalachian Spring
where he selects each soloist almost touching them with his
arms, he adds trumpets, clarinets and flutes into his pot of
sound, sending vibrations to all the people in the audience.
The Debussy piece, "La Mer" really comes off. We sit there
and the violins come in waves and the trumpets are the shrillness of seagulls and they all row together their cufflinks like
whitecaps coming into shore.
The Queen Liz is a hall left over from the fifties, but every
two weeks or so it turns on to the sound of a group called
Meredith Davies and the Vancouver Symphony. The place is
done in red with brown wood and grey concrete. It's never been
busted.
Friday, November 3, 1967 food
FRESSER SAM, now retired, is the original ot the
"Fresser of St. Urbain St.", a character irequently
mentioned in the delicatessens and byways oi the
old Jewish quarters oi Montreal. He was recognized
in the crowds at the Hadassah Bazaar, in the Food
Building on the PNE grounds. Here are his characteristic comments, as recorded by Seymour Mayne.
A bazaar, need I tell you what a good old bazaar is?
No, never.
But, maybe. Yes, maybe, you're all too young, how could
you know? Yes? Let me remember—and can I remember!
When I was small, when I could only reach up to the tables
to grab a little handful of chickpeas, or sliver of moist strudel!
Such bazaars in the (you'll excuse me, of course, those were
different times) ghetto of Montreal, in the old Labour Zionist
building, corner Esplanade and Laurier, and right on the block
Joe and Malkeh's poolhall, and the Hasidic bakery and the
smell of fresh chalah!
On those days, and such days they were, thousands, tens of
thousands of women with full Eaton's shopping bags ready to
burst, stormed the rag counters, stampeded to the food counters,
hollered over second-hand brassieres, shouted with full mouths
stuffed with delicacies—and delicacies, need I tell you, such
spicing, such mouthwaterfulls—why, it was rumored that if
any cherubim had still been hanging around the synagogue on
the block since the last wedding feast, they were the ones who
disguised themselves as zesty old pensioners who wheedled for
free handouts of creplach, such doughy meaty things! And
how could such holy creatures, they used to say, have money
anyways? There's no pockets in the prayershawls? Hands gave
freely, mouths were gouged with delicious bounties!
And what did I find here, in Vancouver? What did you think
I'd find? Yes, I know, this isn't Montreal, yes I know, our
people have gotten ahead in the world, have left the old habits
—and need I tell you such wonderful ways they were? And
this bazaar the other night, I ask you, what else is new?
It was a mishmash, not a bazaar, it was a plate of cold kasha
undercooked! Why, some of the middle-aged ladies couldn't even
recognize my accent—my Yiddish accents, you fools. Why in
such times, such forsaken times of the Yiddish tongue, handfuls
should have been bestowed upon me for the old sounds I uttered
with the fullness of my hot heart and my expectant popek!
But yes, yes, this was a Zionist affair. Zionist, shmionist,
that's nothing to do with it! Nothing! How can you have a bazaar
with "Psychedelic Raffles"? Have you heard such a thing?
Where's the soul, the heartbreaking music?
And the food? Food? Fodder for the Beasts of Gehenna,
BIZARRE
more
books
BAZAAR
77  U
that's what it was! And the prices! "It's for Hadassah," they
all said, "it's for a good cause." Nuu, a good cause, why the
old ladies next door would have given them a good cause—
over their heads! And this food (if you'll pardon me), what,
fish 'n' chips, nuu, alright, I suppose the fish is from the Red
Sea, and next, pizza burger—on a bagel, yet! And cabbage
rolls—the leaves not cooked, and the meat bland, and the
blintzes smaller than the wort of a seventy-year old rebbelzin,
rabbi's wife!
No, no, this doesn't do with raffles and cars and planes
and bingos for turkeys and speed readings and more raffles
here and admission tickets there, and no one shouting, and no
one frantic for the joy of holding back a penny or a bargain!
And no one gouging your eyes out for a rag, an old dress, a
scarf from yesteryear from the Ukraine!
"No, no, my brethren, it won't do," said Hymie, the old
pickler himself, when he tasted the vacuum packed stuff—"It
won't do, not for me!"
And cooking from cook books, shnookbooks—let me get
down to the tzimess (the stew of the matter)—the taigalach
were stuck together like the shrivelled fingers of old maids,
strudel full of gluey artificial candied fruit, egg keechlach stale
and algebacken like week-old bagels, knishes bland like mashed
potatoes. No, no, if you want to make money for a "good cause",
get a radio station.
You want a bazaar—you really want a bazaar like in those
goldenbaked years, I bless them, get an ol' timer like me,
Fresser Sam, and I'll tell you, we'll put your Chinatown out
of business for a month!
Continued from pf 2
in Firewood, but as Baudelaire said, "Anybody at all has
the right to talk about himself
—provided he knows how to
be entertaining." Belford has
the idea. And more. The
poems go beyond the poet in
particular, they contain insights which apply much more
generally. If you do not find
facets of yourself in them you
had better  look again.
But enough panegyric. Although the book is consistent,
it is more in terms of good
lines and images than complete poems. There are traces
of a rather sophomoric revolt
against society and authority
in some of the poems (his
earlier ones). Others are a bit
too anecdotal in nature, and
he tries just a little too hard,
at times, to slip his own image of himself in. Also, perhaps a lack of subtlety of approach: his ideas tend to rape,
rather than seduce, the reader's intellect.
There is a clean, short
rhythm almost all through the
book. Also, some competent
syntactical variations. The
feel of the poems is rather
simple: pleasant. The shape
and sound work as a bass
back-up to the aesthetic, the
fireweed.
Fireweed is a plant, or
group of plants, which grows
in areas that have been recently burned. As a theme for
the book, it is not all that consistent. So far, however, the
local publishing scene has
done a fair job of resembling
a burned out area, and in this
sense the title of the book is
quite  appropriate.
Still Time
for
Nominations
to the
Board of Directors
of the
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Until Mon. 6th, 5 p.m.
ELECTIONS
AT THE
General Meeting
Tuesday, Nov. 7th
I.H.
Coffee   and   International   dessert
at 7 p.m.
'Galia'—a briskly amoral young girl"
-Howard Thompson, New York Times
GALIA' IS TOTALLY AMORAL. HER
BED HABITS ARE HEATEDLY NATURAL.
-Archer Winsten, New York Post
'4375 W. 10th
ONE WEEK ONLY
November 2nd - November  8th
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
at the
BAVARIAN
ROOM
Delightful food —
Excellent service
in  an
Intimate Atmosphere
phone for reservation
MODERN   CAFE
Bavarian Room
3005 W. Broadway    -    RE 6-9012
PRINTS
PRINTS
PRINTS
Reproductions, etchings,
woodcuts, brass rubbing, silk
screens, etc.
THE
Print Centre
2760 W. Broadway
10%    student   discounts
on prints and framing
u
rr
CHELSEA GIRLS
Andy Warhol's Shocking Movie !
A Masterpiece ?! Or a Put-on !
YOU MUST SEE IT-ONE OF THE MOST TALKED-
ABOUT ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN YEARS.
3 Showings in UBC's Aud.
NOV. 10 — FRI. — 1:30 & 7:30
NOV. 14 — TUES. — 7:30
AT S.F.U.-NOV. 18-7:30
Students & Staff $1.50
Others $2.00
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Friday, November 3, 1967 FALL FAIR
EVENT:
"THE FLOODING
OF FLORENCE"
NOV.  4th,   1967  MARKS  THE   FIRST
ANNIVERSARY   OF   THIS   EVENT.
The film will be shown:
Friday—7:15 p.m.
Saturday—4:45 p.m.
& mm
Conducted   3y    UMCU    <?ORDl£.   MCLE   M\tilE
COLLEGE
BROCK EXTENSION
RENTAL & SALES
* 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full Dress (Tails)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and  Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
Menu of the Month
Consomme
Boeuf Bourguignon
Rum Pie
'EMI
Cousiti AL
^Laxative Creator
Dies at 84
ATLANTIC BEACH, N.Y.
(UPI)—Max Kiss, a Hungarian
who came penniless to the
United States when he was 16,
and became a pharmacist who
created the chocolate laxative
Ex-Lax, has died of a heart
attack. He was 84.
Kiss took the laxative name
from the Hungarian phrase "Ex
Laz," which applied to the
Hungarian parliament when it
had reached a stalemate on an
i_sue and could not function.
I
Dissident Gaullist candidates for the forthcoming French general election, led by M. Giscard d'Estaing, gathered %
at a Paris hotel yesterday for keep-fit exercises under the supervision of a doctor who is also a yoga specialist. {
Chez Victor
Restaurant Francois
614 Davie St.
Dinner by reservation only
Phone 688-1822
BRING THIS AND GET A DINNER
FOR TWO, AT HALF PRICE, ($5.75).
THIS OFFER GOOD FOR THE
MONTH  OF   NOVEMBER.
"A GOOD MEAL  IS PART OF
A GOOD EDUCATION"
Ii
"OLYMPIA"
PIZZA
SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
2599 W. Broadway
DINING ROOM
r
Take Out
Service
BUY 3 PIZZAS
GET 1 FREE
Soviet leader shows himself
Printed In England.
ftELEDU CYMRU j >TAX KISS
But informed sources here privately are
'less enthusiastic.
One source said, "There's still optimism
built in. There's still inaccuracy. But they
do show a definite trend."
Sources note the steady increase in the
delight for most women, Mrs. Foster builds.
policy that has the ring of history about it
in the government's ears.
■ Despite all the gimmicks, the banger remains the favorite. One manufacturer says,
"It is easily top priority, a long way ahead
of its nearest rivals."
Pink-footed booby's
home in  danger
By KCl'MY.nv*  WYHLSHNH
Tlic   Aivi^rii w   P'oliffi''   .-.priP.; h.33 ?a luted
John*.}- Acpleseed and David Crockett.
The Vice-President replied, "I think Barry
Goldwater is a patriot, and I'm glad he's
pleased with our performar«?e."
However, the temper of the Indian congress here suggested that Indians would
want, to free themselves progressively from
certifying a food for human consumption.
It's an even longer way In preparing 1hat
fond economically and in forms that people
who need it will huy and eat.
"It isn't psychedelic swing," Mr. E. said.
Everyone laughed comfortably.
His wife Leonore committed suicide after
her arrest—reportedly when she learned she
h;id been married only to be used.
They werp sp'rved with granulated sugar
sprinkled in the center, then folded into a
Irinngle and offered with maple syrup or a
'stove holding a metal teapot. This he surrounds with fragile looking, but sturdy,
pink liower spray calyx ware by Adams.
"But very few of the cakes were eaten. I
was puzzled as to what to do with all those
leftover cakes, when suddenly I had an idea.
Wrapping each one in a little bag, I presented them to my guests as they left. They were
really pleased to take them home to their
children."
Once a spoilt darling, a disastrous marriage
has sent her spinning downhill into poverty
and asthma. But she is determined to surround   her   daughters   with   understanding
and to communicate the love of books she
learned at Radcliffe. And all the time a par- ^-^j^TCO    /-»T   A TA/T
ticularly grim skeleton is protruding from Ul !jl_L__t\.    V/JLAIJVI
the closet. Glimpses of a different life at
grandmother's   furnish   the   parallel   Miss
Bartlett is drawing between two homes, one
responsible to San Diego's city manager for
community   development.   Previously,   Mr.
Earnest directed the development of Missioo
Bav Park.
JOIN THE CLUB! tollv
UNCLE QOROlE ,t/MO_£ ARNIE ,
AND U^LV COUSIN AL /NVfTE
VOUTO WRITE IN *&u« ****,
AQ£,AnO SlKTHPMl AJ-SO.YOm
UTTLC PoenS.GTDRtes, ETC
BIRTHDAYS TODAY
Right Rev. Dr. F. R. Barry, 77; Dr.
Nora Chadwick, 76; Sir Albert Coates, 72;
Sir John Houlton, 75; Sir Melvill Jones,;
80; Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, 64; Sir A.:
Gren'.'ell Price, 75; Sir Stanley Reed, 95;
Mr. Joseph Reeves, 79; Air Commodore.
Sir Percy  Smyth-Gsbourne, 88;  Sir Ivan *
Stedeford, 70; Mr. Herbert Strudwick, 87;,'AND DISCARD |Jnd told him
Sir Alec Zealley, 74. THIS STICKER "balding such
Tomorrow.—Captain Sir Ian Bolton,
78; Mr. Havergal Brian, 91; Mr. E. Martin
Browne, 67; Lord Burden, 82; Major-
Genera! Sir George Burns, 56; Lard
Ferrier. 67; Major-General K. F. M. Lewis,
',"'0; Lord Rupert Nevill, 44; Sir Cecil
Parrot., 58; Hon. Richard Stanley, 47; Sir
Laurence Watkinson, 71; Mr. F. T. Wyn-
yard-Wright, 83.
"I'm sorry, Fletcher,
but Mother ivants me to
marry a doctor."
BY CHINESE
ISTANBUL, Turkey (Reuters)
— Fifty eagles were killed
Tuesday in an aerial battle with
storks over a valley near
Tarsus.
Thousands of nuns
She   then   made   a   half-hour "tour' of
Coventry Cathedral  accompanied  by  the
Provost, the  Very  Rev.   Harold Williams,
who said afterwards that she fully understood the significance of the cathedral ruins,
Land told him it would have  b.en worth
a place just to demonstrate
/the futility of war.
WWmm      Mrs. Gvishiani and her party then moved
on to Stratford-on-Avon. Qt)|C>^l_V.
Mom didn't know
///
PEEL OFF
BONUS BABY
Laundromat monsoon
TORONTO—A 22-year-old woman who had a baby here
says she didn't know she was pregnant.
" It sure is a surprise," said Mrs. Norman Miles, a peanut packer who was sitting on her front porch, got "stomach
cramps" and 12 minutes later gave birth to a full-term,
four-pound, seven-ounce girl.
"I noticed my shorts got tight. Couldn't wear them any
more. But I thought it'was the food I was eating," she said.
iday eight
Friday, November 3, 1967 Friday, November 3, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
COMFRU pm
By JOHN LYNN
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
grass-roots stimulus to the Sir
George Williams University
sit-in and sleep-in which pre-
ceeded the one-day strike last
week came from the Committee for a Free University
(COMFRU), which agitated for
student power.
Decisions made by the administration and/or faculty,
should not be made without
including the point of view
of the student, the group said.
Their first target was the
bookstore, for which they
scheduled a sit-in in co-ordination with the bookstore investigation  committee.
Without the student support
mobilized by COMFRU the
bookstore controversy might
well have been buried in a
committee.
COMFRU, known on other
campuses as Students for a
Democratic University or some
other such name, is usually
composed of a small group of
students, and sometimes professors, committed to basic reform of the university. They
invariably operate separate
from student council, in some
cases in opposition to it.
They claim no bureaucracy,
no dogma, and provide an excellent forum for far-ranging
discussion of essential principles of what the university
should be, unimpeded by politics, program concerns, and
other student government responsibilities. It works with
the students and as such has
power student government can
never hope to claim.
Also significant in the Sir
George strike was the participation of the faculty. When it
became apparent there would
be a demonstration in the
bookstore, faculty echoed the
concerns shown by students.
Andre Gunder Frank, a visiting economic historian, wrote
a long letter to the campus
editor condemning the bookstore for inserting Time-Life
subscription cards in text
books. Professor Henry Beisel
of the English department had
a similar letter in the same
issue.
When student government
called for a strike, student
president Jeff Chipman and
other members of the executive were in close consultation
with professors all through the
night. Professor Frank Chalk,
president of the local Association of University Teachers
called a Thursday morning
meeting attended by about 60
faculty, which passed resolutions in support of the striking students.
Part of the reason for faculty
support at Sir George is that,
as one of the many young,
fast-growing Canadian universities, Sir George Williams has
managed to attract a faculty
which can reasonably foe de-
, scribed as radical and innovative. In a university where
academic initiative originates
at the department level, professors are accorded a good
deal of academic freedom.
Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec has certainly
affected the thinking of students toward the university
governing structures. The union's    syndicalist    philosophy
George strike
has encouraged several student strikes in the Montreal
area, notably at the University
of Montreal last year and
among the students of applied
arts the year before. Expressions of support for the strike
came from McGill, Loyola,
Sherbroke and other Quebec
student groups, and UofM's
Jean Dore was joyously on
hand to watch the syndicalist
action most of Thursday afternoon.
But more than UGEQ, the
Georgian newspaper, this year
adopting a syndicalist philosophy itself, put out a concerted
attempt to "politicize" the
campus. It worked in co-operation with COMFRU in convincing students  that they in
SOLIDARITY ... SGW lobby
European o^oe (Store
EXCLUSIVE DEALER FOR
MANZ, THE CHOICE OF THE
GERMAN OLYMPIC TEAM, 1968
IMPORTED FROM
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979 Granville St. at Nelson
Phone: 683-2819
Near the Downtown Theatre
Tw*GGY s
TRUE    DISCOTHEQUE
WILL BE OPENING SOON
A PRIVATE CLUB FOR YOUNG SWINGERS
AGE LIMITS 18-35. MEMBERSHIPS $2.50 A YEAR -
ENTITLES MEMBERS TO CLUB PRIVILEGES
7 NIGHTS A WEEK-
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For information call 683-9076
or call in and see—795 Seymour
niiiicrs
The Diamond Centre
For Young Moderns.
Illustrated above is 'Lady Wisteria'
$950.00. This is just one in Millers
new and exciting "Bridal Bouquet"
Diamond   Ring  series.
Insured free for one year. Easy
terms available to fit young budgets.
Special   Courtesy   Discount   to
U.B.C.   Students   and   Personnel.
IHillcrs
655   Granville   Street,   683-6661
Vancouver, B.C.
47 W.  Hastings  Street, 682-3801
Vancouver, B.C.
622  Columbia  Street,   526-3771
New   Westminster,   B.C.
the International
at the
International
House
all
students .SO
• Japanese tea ceremony
• international fashion show
• floor shows       •  international restaurant
friday, nav.  3rd,
Saturday      4th, 2 pm.
effect had power already, that
they simply have not as yet
put it to work.
The strike was generally
successful in its aims—to provoke a hard look at the governing structures of the tmiversity and the student role in
them. But the successful nature of the strike also contained a warning. Students
have now seen that they do
indeed have power, and they
may want to use it again. And
again.
m
Skimpy knits are in. You wear
them. Matching knee-socks
call for more excitement.
You're all for it. Youth is your
world. No wonder you feel so
much a part of it all. You're a
swinger. Nobody is going to
tell you what to do. Or what to
wear. Or how to have your hair
cut. You know. Same goes for
internally worn sanitary
protection. You use Tampax
tampons. There are no
bulges under your
sleekest, lightest
clothes. Also no belts,
no pins, no pads, no
odor. Your hands never need
touch the tampon. The
moisture proof removal cord
is chain stitched for safety,
and there's always the handy
small package that tucks extra
Tampax tampons away in your
purse. So off you go. You. The
swinger. Tampax tampons are
available in 3 absorbency-
sizes—Regular, Super and
Junior—wherever such
products are sold.
TAMPAX
'-. '■'.,x • tampon)*
*-
SANITARY «j»TECTI0li WORM l«Tt*-»#r
MADE ONLY BY CANADIAN TAMPAX COR«MM*$ON
LIMITED. BARRIE, ONTARIO.
I
•m Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1967
s
The Bay's gone on the silver standard for the
festive  party  season  .   .   .   with  sterling fashions  to
let you shine in the night! Sparkled with quicksilver magic are the exciting Lurex knits, brocades
and metallics in the holiday collection on the Bay's
Fashion Floor, third. From a mere gleam to total
all-out sizzling splendour, you'll find the silvery
sensation that's just right for you . . . for cocktails,
dining, dancing and romancing.  Add the spark of
glittering silver shoes and you'll be ready to step
into the party limelight . . . the Bay Shoes, second.
the
^ay Friday, November 3, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
— chris blake photo
SOMETIMES WE FIND ourselves in bottlenecks, but the important thing  is to keep one's chin up, or bottoms  up or
maybe just sluuuuuuuuuuuurp.
Council meet all wet?
Next week's council meeting may be all wet.
Council has accepted an invitation from Lynn Spraggs,
engineering president, to meet in the civil engineering building
Monday.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said Spraggs
told him the engineers haven't used their portable tank this
year and the meeting might be a good time.
Spraggs' invitation followed the suggestion of the Fort Camp
residence association that the council hold last Monday's meet
in the Fort Camp dining room. The meeting was held there before
100 residents.
Meetings begin at 7 p.m.
Residents get books
UBC residences will have full time library reference services
starting Friday.
Place Vanier, Totem Park, Acadia and Fort Camp will each
have collections of four basic reference works, said W. M.
Watson, assistant librarian in charge of technical services.
The works will include full sets of the Americana and
Canadiana encyclopedias and language dictionaries, he said.
None of the books will be taken from residences. Their
use will be supervised by housing administration staff.
The books are the gift of the university alumni association.
BACK-TO-THE-
B00KS
EYEWEAR
Don't let poor
eyesight hinder
your progress.
If You need
new glasses,
bring your
eye physician's
prescription to
us.
SPECIAL
STUDENT DISCOUNT
HofaQptiecl
seven
locations
In Greater
\fencouver
1701   W.   Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft Med. Bldg.
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENSES
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
Plebiscite
supports
openess
KINGSTON (CUP)—Queen's
University students Wednesday overwhelmingly supported open meetings of the junior
board of trustees.
In a plebiscite called to
secure student opinion on the
rector, a student representative to the board, students also
voted in favor of retaining the
post on a part-time basis.
In the balloting Wednesday,
1,459 students voted yes to
open meetings of the board of
trustees, and 354 voted against.
In the second section of the
ballot dealing with the rector,
064 voted for a part-time man,
386 favored a full-time rector,
and 227 students voted to
abolish  the  post  altogether.
The part-time rector received
351 votes more than the two
alternatives combined.
The post has been vacant
for a year because of the death
of Leonard Brockington, the
previous   rector.
The Ontario universities act
stipulates only that a university employee may not sit on
the board. This rules out a
professor as rector, so students
have always chosen a citizen
at large for the post.
But some students feel there
is no ruling against a student
sitting as rector, and at least
one student is expected to run
in the election for a new rector which is slated for this
month.
LOOK YOUR STUNNINGEST!
Glenayr
0fc
Stun the fashion world in this
machine-washable full-
fashioned English Botany
pullover. It'seasy-to-care-for,
comfortable, and a fashion
ivourite with its ribbed front
nd plain-knit back and
sleeves, splitcollarwith zipper
closing, and Continental band
and cuffs. In bright new
shades.
To complete the pretty picture,
these superbly tailored pure
wool worsted slims, woven
from superfine English
Botany. They are dry-clean-
able, and dyed-to-perfectly-
match all bright new Kitten
sweater colours.
PURE VIRGIN WOOl
Look for the
Woolmark on the label
Without this label    £  'i&iLc.*Si   it is not a genuine KITTEN
'rrwsjppsprj-v
•3r\
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Kf.
'-^ii^C^i&^i „
l.„   I   . ...fc-r
for-chemists and engineers in the
only solution potash mining company
in the world today
Our representative will be on your
campus for interviews
NOVEMBER 7th
Details are available in the student
placement office.
Kalium Chemicals Limited Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Frfday, November 3, 1947
Judo tournament
This Saturday the Women's Gym will be the scene of the
first important judo tournament in the Pacific Northwest.
The UBC judo team will be hosting over 200 participants
from centres throughout B.C. and Washington.
Junior competition will start at 1 p.m. and senior competition
will begin at mid-afternoon and last through Saturday evening
with black belt and senior finalists fighting at 7 p.m.
Some of Canada's top figures in judo will be either officiating
or competing in the tournament.
Doug Rogers, who represented Canada in the Pan-American
Games in Winnipeg this summer, will be the head referee.
The tournament is open to spectators and those who come
will toe treated to a show of high calibre.
Cold Weather Ahead!
■jf Free Antifreeze Check
^ Free Battery Check
■£ Goodyear Winter Tires
■£ Imported V.W. Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W.  10th 224-0828
Ws like owning
my own business'
PLANT
CHEMIST
A recent male graduate, 22 to 30 years of age, with
a B.Sc. in Chemistry (preferably honours), with
courses in Bacteriology and/or Microbiology, is required for our Edmonton Brewery.
The main area of work will be in Quality Control and
Biological Analysis.
This position provides excellent opportunity for
advancement.
Full range of employee benefits. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Interested applicants are invited to submit a complete personal and employment resume to:
PERSONNEL MANAGER
MOLSON'S V/mfofai Q/t/tsmMeb ^ZwritaJ
218 Eleventh Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta
Breweries at VANCOUVER EDMONTON LETHBRIDGE
PRINCE ALBERT REGINA WINNIPEG
Roger Kedwell, a London Life sales representative in Toronto
"It's true.  At London Life you get
a concentrated, personalized
training program that's recognized
as the best in the industry. You can
choose where you want to work.
Then you go out and sell. From the
very first day, you have the
responsibility of shaping your
own career.  You determine how fast
you grow, how much you earn.
And you have the London Life name
to help you."
An economics graduate of the
University of Western Ontario,
Roger began a three-month London Life
training course in the summer of 1966.
Within a year he had established
himself as an exceptional life
insurance underwriter.  To learn more
about a career Jn life insurance
sales, see your placement officer.
Or write to the Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Co..
London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada
Why Don't You Get a Group Together and Swing
Like a King at Vancouver's Greatest Night Spot
Kma of Clubs
\__J 1275 SEYMOUR STREET
This Week Dance to The Music of
FRIDAY NITE
NIGHT TRAIN  REVUE
with CY.   RISBY & CHUCK FLINTROY
SATURDAY NITE
JASON  HOOVER AND THE EPICS
REMEMBER !   Continuous   Action   from   9   p.m.
* Go ! Go Girls (The Best in the Northwest)
* FULL FACILITIES
Phone and Reserve Your Table Now — MU 1-4010 Friday, November 3, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
THE SKI BUM fTf*r
"OH, WHAT NICE RIBS you have," says a charging bed-
panner as she tackles a tenacious homewrecker. The spectators in the background don't seem too interested in the game
which was won by the nurses, 8-6.
Varsity versus Grads
in basketball opener
Has basketball talent at UBC already started to slip?
Tonight at War Memorial Gym, hoop fans will find out as
Peter Mullins' 1967 Thunderbirds make their debut grappling
with the Grads, a makeshift team composed wholly of former
UBC stalwarts.
Mullins is hoping to offset Grads' height advantage with
superior speed and a scrappy zone-press.
The veteran Thunderbird coach added this year's team will
be stronger than last year's varsity.
Game time is 8:30 p.m. and Older Grads provide comic
relief at 7:45 p.m.
By BJORN SIMONSEN
Vancouver's second annual Ski Fair got off to a good start
last night with the showing of Jim Rice's film "Ski West: Part
Two."
Living up to his reputation as one of the best producers
of ski films, Rice aptly portrayed last season's ski scene.
This year's flick featured Nancy Greene on the World Cup
racing circuit and also included some fantastic local ski action
filmed on the glaciers behind our own Whistler mountain.
The ski fair which continues through Friday, Saturday and
Sunday at the PNE Agrodome will offer skiers an excellent
opportunity to view and examine the newest developments in ski
equipment, areas, technique and fashion.
A giant ski deck will be featuring ski demonstrations by
Western Canada's best ski school directors.
Members of the National Ski Team, including the darling
of the ski set Nancy Green, promise to be on hand to demonstrate
their intensive training program carried out at Notre Dame in
Nelson.
The admission for the fair is a ridiculous $1.75 but this can
be reduced to $1 by presenting the special 75 cent discount
ticket which appears elsewhere on this page. You can also pick
these up at any ski shop.
While you are at the ski fair you may drop in at the Whistler
mountain booth and voice your displeasure at the rising cost of
skiing at this favorite spot.
As you are probably aware of, rates have gone up (from
$5.50 to $6.00) and a group of concerned student skiers at UBC,
Simon Fraser and West Vancouver high school are gathering
signatures on a petition to have the rate cut by 20 per cent for
students.
A rough estimate of the portion of Whistler's skiers who
are students would probably be about 30 per cent.
Surely this warrants some special consideration on the
students' already strained budget.
The petition carried 3,500 signatures as of noon Thursday.
See you at the fair.
FREE STUDENT ADMISSION
THIS WEEKEND SPORT HIGHLIGHT
1. THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Grads vs Thunderbirds
Memorial Gym—Fri., Nov. 3—8:30 p.m.
2. THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
New Thunderbird Stadium—Sat., Nov. 4—2 p.m.
vs New Westminster Labs
Special 75c
Discount
Ticket
This ticket; when presented
at box office, good for
75c discount on regular
$1.75adult admissiph.
Does not apply to regular
child admission of 50c.
(See other side.)
ShOW  Hours:     Jrijlay: 6 pm-11pm
Saturday:     1pm -11pm
Sunday:       1 pm -   6 pm
CUP OUT the above ticket
and receive a 75 cent discount on regular adult admission to the Ski\Fair being
*held   Nov,  3-5  in   the  PNE.
VANCOUVER'S MOST ENJOYABLE BANDS
Papa Bears Medicine Show
United Empire Loyalists
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
For Girls
FRI.
SAT.
FRI.
SAT.
FRI.
SAT.
GUYS, if you want to meet georgeous girls,
this is your best $2.00 bet.
Retinal Circus
1024
Davie
FIVE HOURS OF FAR-OUT FUN
on Saturday
Here are the sporting
events on campus Saturday.
There's a women's volleyball tournament i n
memorial gym from 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m.
The field hockey Birds
meet Grasshoppers A at
1:30 p.m. at Spencer Field.
The soccer Birds play
Westminster at 2 p.m. in
Thunderbird Stadium.
At the same time UBC
wrestlers meet Royal Roads
in the stadium's wrestling
room.
The rugby Birds play
Barbarians at 2:30 pm. on
Wolfson Field.
In Thunderbird Arena,
the Birds play Lumber-
kings at 3 p.m.
^
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, white dinner   jackets,   morning
coats  .  .  .  complete  size
range.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
(Suits by  Hyde-Park)
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUISH  f°™atldwea*
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:30
2046 W. 41 st 263-3610
Featuring
• DEMONSTRATIONS   BY
CDN.   NTL.   SKI  TEAM
• MORE   THAN   50   EXHIBITS
• TOP  9KI  FILMS
• FASHION   SHOW
• ENTERTAINMENT    GALORE
Co-sponsored   by   The
Rotary Club of Marpole
NOV. 3,4 & 5
AGRODOME P.N.E.
FACTORY
TRAINED
. . . our mechanics that is
Specializing In Repairs To:
MERCEDES-BENZ - VOLVO
& VOLKSWAGEN
WE HAVE ALL THE
EQUIPMENT TO FIX
MOST OF THE REPAIRS
TO YOUR CAR . . . RIGHT
ON THE PREMISES
FULLY GUARANTEED
Very reasonable priced too!
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized    Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 3, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Up-tight Indo-Pakistan
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
UN
Reasons for tension between
India and Pakistan by Dr. K.
Sandhu, Monday, noon, IH.
ALPHA OMEGA
General    meeting    Monday,
noon, Bu. 223.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Meeting for anyone interested in helping with Xmas party
for underprivileged children,
noon, today, St. Mark's music
room.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
Regular meeting,  noon,  today.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
The native Indian,  Monday,
noon, Bu. 203.
VCF
Rev. Floyd Anksberg speaks
on salvation, noon, today. Ang.
110.
SCM
Billy Liar scheduled for Sun
day night is cancelled due to
unavailability.
WOMEN'S INTERMURALS
Entries    due    Monday    for
bowling and table-tennis, women's gym.
CU s
All those interested in working on the CUS committee,
leave phone number and name
in CUS office, Br. ext. 258 or
in CUS mail box.
PRE-MED
Dr. Pat McGeer speaks Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Regular meeting, Friday,
noon, IH 206.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Workshop on Federalism in
AMS council chambers, Saturday, noon.
LSM
Should We Have More Vet-
erens? by Rev. Sodt (former
US navy chaplain), Monday,
noon, Bu. 104.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Speaker and films noon, today, Bu. 102.
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■BROADWAY a! GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   4Ut at YEW
Community planner first
Canadian prez of ASCP
Dr. Peter Oberlander, UBC's director of community and
regional planning, has been elected president of the Association
of Collegiate Schools of Planning.
He is the first Canadian to be elected to the
post, and will take up office in the new year.
Oberlander was elected at the tenth annual
meeting in Washington, D.C.
The group is the largest of its kind and represents all North American schools of planning.
Oberlander has been a faculty member
since 1950 and is a graduate of McGill and
Harvard.
He has a B.Arch., Master of community
planning, and a Ph.D. OBERLANDER
He is also a special consultant to the housing and planning
section of the UN Dept. of Social Affairs on Education for city
planners.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POST-HALLOWEEN BASH, November 4th, Armouries: Night Train
Revue, United Empire Loyalists.
8:30-12:00,   $1.50,   Girls   $1.00.
CHECK THIS PAPER FOR THE
Fall Fair programme: Thirteen programme Items over two days, all
for .50 per day. Dance at 9:00 p.m.
Sat.,  Nov.  4th at I.H.
HARD TIMES MIXER, LIVE BAND
Fri., Nov. 3, 9 to 1 in St. Mark's
College Lounge.	
TOTEM PARK DANCE FRIDAY,
Nov. 3. 9:00-12:30. Band Intensions.   Admission  A.M.S.  75c.
POST - HOMECOMING DANCE IS
Now! Enjoy Papa Bears & The
Loyalists in a modern Dancehall
with Light Show & Strobe. Retinal
Circus — Fri. & Sat. 9-2 a.m. Girls
.50c.
Greetings
12
I RICK: MANY HAPPY RETURNS OF
your 22nd Birthday. I shall love
you always. Your Missy.
CIA finances Columbia
Europe economy study
NEW YORK (CUP-CPS) —
Columbia University has confirmed that it has been receiving funds from the Central
Intelligence Agency since 1961
for a research project.
The project, designed to
study the economies of countries   in  east  central  Europe,
Russian
revolution
The new head of UBC's
Slavonic studies department
will speak on the Russian revolution at a meeting of the
Vancouver Institute on Satur-
^ _   day at UBC.
Dr. Michael Futrell joined
UBC in September from the
University of Nottingham in
England. He will talk in
Bu. 106 at 8:15 p.m.
*» Futrell has done research
into Russian literature and also the history of the revolution in Russia.
has been in existence since
1955, but has been funded by
the CIA for only the last six
years.
The CIA has been giving
Columbia University $125,000
annually for the project.
The only secrecy regarding
the project has been the source
of funds.
Columbia listed it in the
school's catalogue, and a number of students reportedly
have been involved in the research.
The CIA funding of the project was disclosed by the Columbia chapter of Students
for a Democratic Society at a
special news conference this
week.
SDS members would not
say how they found out about
it.
The university confirmed
the CIA has been financing
the project, but gave no indication that the project would
be stopped or that future
CIA funds would be turned
down.
Lost & Found
13
LADIES WATCH LOST 3rd LEVEL
stacks. Sentimental value. Reward
offered.   CR   8-6460.	
LOST OCT. 22, 1967. GOLD GRUEN
Watch in Curriculum Lab. Education Bldg. Reward. Contact 298-
1155.
A SLIDE RUDE IN A BLUE CASE
in the vicinity of Hebb. Reward
offered. Please return. Phone 435-
1168.
RETINAL CIRCUS IS NOT LOST.
You can find it and lots of other
nice people and things to do at
1024 Davie. Friday and Saturday.
9-2 a.m.
FOUND! IN THE ARMOURIES! Tomorrow, 8:30 - 12:00 / Night Train
Revue, United Empire Loyalists /
$1.50, Girls $1.00.
FOUND: ANDY WARHOL'S ''CHEL-
sea Girls" in the Auditorium, Nov.
10 at 1:30 and 7:30 and Nov. 14 at
7:30.   Students  $1.50.   Adults  $230.
Rides 8. Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30 - 6 p.m., Saturday 'til
5:30.
GET HIGH IN THE AUD. TUES.,
Oct. 31 to Fri., Nov. 3. 12:30, 8:00.
Aud.   $1.00.
CHECK THIS PAPER FOR THE
Fall Fair programme: Thirteen programme Items over two days. All
for   .50  per  day.
LARRY KENT'S HIGH NOV. 3, 7 & 8.
12:30, 8:00 Aud. $1.00. Restricted
to   UBC   Students,   Faculty,   Staff.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.
CALORY   CORNOR
Tuesday's   quick   Lunches
basement Ed.   Bldg.
— no crowds —•
Travel  Opportunities
16
.50 IS YOUR TICKET TO A UNIQUE
travel experience to over fifteen
foreign countries. This weekend at
the   Fall  Fair.
DON'T MISS THE JAPANESE TEA
Ceremony at the International Fall
Fair. Three performances only.
Friday, 8:00 p.m., Saturday, 2:00
and  5:00  p.m.
Wanted—Texts
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956  CADILLAC  4-DOOR GOOD  EN-
gine,      trans.      P.B.,      P.S.     Radio,
W.W.'s.  $525.  Phone  291-1059.
WALKING? THEN BUY 1956 DODGE
good running order, tires, clutch.
Big V-8. $120.00. 987-3997 after 7
p.m.	
FOR SALE 1957 TR-3. GUY, 224-7858-
4968 Chanc. Blvd. $600. Radio. Disc
brakes.  New  paint.  S.  belts.	
'57 MORRIS MINOR, GOOD CONDI-
tion. $250 or best offer. Phone evenings, 922-5284.
Motorcycles
26
FOR SALE NORTON 650cc. NEW
tires, chains, compet. clutch. Motor
perfect.   731-9630.   Aft.   6   p.m.	
BULTACO LEASE TO OWN, $9
per week. No deposit required. Repairs all bikes. Open 9-9. 54th &
Victoria   Drive,   Amor,   327-9111.
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671   anytime.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
IS SOCRATES DEAD ? Where hid-
eth the six-toed mystic ? The IHJB
naf  blue.	
LARRY KENT'S HIGH IN THE
aud. Nov. 2 & 3, 7 & 8, 12:30, 8:00
adm.  $1.00.
WOW! ZAP! GROOVY! NIGHT
Train Revue, United Empire Loyalists, Tomorrow 8:30 - 12:00 / Gents
$1.50; others,   $1.00.   Armouries.
HIGH! LARRY KENT'S LATEST
Film, Nov. 3, 7 & 8. 12:30, 8:00 Aud.
$1.00. Banned in B.C.	
50c   GIRLS    50c
is all it costs to enjoy outasight music
by    Papa    Bears    &    The   Loyalists.
Dance   &   have   fun  at  Retinal   Circus
Friday &  Saturday from 9 till  2 a.m.
DON     BURNS     IS      A     HIGHLAND
Savage — D.A. R.P.  S.L.  P.J.
COMING SOON! SPARROW FILMS
presents "Sparkling in the Slum",
starring Lip the Little Dipper and
Girl Friday. Two weeks' notice you
old  smoothie.
THANK YOU BRIAN (HUT 13),
Brenda, Jackie and all who believed
in me on Hallowe'en. The Great
Pumpkin.
ANDY WARHOL'S "CHELSEA
Girls" Shocking! Unusual! Censored! Auditorium, Nov. 10, 1:30 & 7:30
and Nov. 14, 7:30. Students $1.50.
Others  $2.00.   Special events!
Typewriter  Repairs
39
ANDERSON  TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND    RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free   Estimates Reasonable  Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185   West   Broadway 879-781S
Across from Zephyr Motors
Service   Centre
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   EL.EC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-612$.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd.  at University Blvd.  Mon.  to
Fri.   9   to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.	
TYPING, ESSAYS, ETC. LOW
rates. Two drop points. (On campus   &  West   End).   Phone   683-2859.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis  typist
Reasonable Rates — TR.  4-9253
TYPING,    STENOGRAPHY,    DICTA-
phone,  437-3803.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
31
EXPERIENCED TYPIST NEEDED
4 hours a day. Apply Prof. Dicker-
son. Faculty of Law.	
52
Help Wanted—Male
Male or Female
53
Maths. Tutors,  4th year or graduates,
GRADES   7  to  13
736-6923  —  4:30   -   7:30  P.M.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY — THE
Ubyssey requires a copy runner to
transport material to printers. Car
essential. Apply Murray McMillan,
Managing Editor, The Ubyssey,
Brock   Hall.
Help Wntd. Male/Female contd.
QUICK DRIVERS WHO KNOW
the campus needed to deliver one
or two evenings. Phone 224-0833
after  6  p.m.
Work Wanted
54
WORK IT OUT! NIGHT TRAIN'
Revue / United Emipire Loyalists /
Tomorrow   8:30   -   12:00   Armouries.
Music
62
BASSIST (OWNS PROFESSIONAL
equipment) will join Established
group.   Tony   988-4564.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH. ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.  736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
Also   complete   repair   service   for  all
makes and models.
McIVER Appliances  Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181	
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER — SMITH
Corona. Electra 120. Like new, used
less than 1 year. $140. Dr. Melton,
228-3536.	
THIS WEEK ONLY. "CHARTER"
brand Recording tape, regular $2.74,
%"x900', 5" reel — Kam-Tap Sales
price $2.35 each. We also carry a
complete line of tape-recorders,
radios, etc. Call Bob Williams, 263-
9679  anytime.	
NEW TWELVE STRING GUITAR
and reverb, amp. for sale. 816 W.
8th   Ave.   874-0744.
UBC   TEXTS   BOUGHT   AND   SOLD.
Busy   B   Books,    146   W.   Hastings.
68^-4931.	
BLUE, ALMOST NEW TRUNK FOR
sale.   40 x 22"   $25.00.    If   interested
phone  224-0981  after 6 p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURN.     STUDY-SLEEPING     ROOM.
4593 W. 14th, 224-5410 after 5:00 p.m.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS FOR RENT.
Close to meals. 225-9662 (male) @
$40  mo.:  2250  Wesbrook.	
MAIN FLOOR ROOM WITH KIT.
priv. for girl, at 24th & Macdonald.
Phone   733-4670.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD, MALE STU-
dent, on campus. 5475 Agronomy
Road,   224-9667   after   six.
QUIET PRIVATE STUDY — NO
children, good food —■ only serious
student need apply. 266-4056, near
McDonald bus, reasonable.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
WANTED: GIRL TO SHARE FURN.
apt. with 3rd year student. Phone
Pam  732-5751.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished apartment near 4th & Alma.
Phone Judy,   733-6994.	
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share suite until Xmas. $40.00 per
month.   1878  W.   5th   Ave.,  Van.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
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