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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1984

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Array TJBC Archives
Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 38
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 24,1984
™ggS.|.,48
228-2301
Professors slam artificial deficit
By NEIL LUCENTE
UBC economists charge the Social Credit government created an
artificial deficit to justify reduction
and elimination of many government services.
In studies released by the B.C.
Economic Policy Institute, professors Gideon Rosenbluth and William Schworm accuse the provincial
government of omitting accounts
and biased forecasts in its 1983-84
budget.
The study cites figures from Statistics Canada which show the government excluded revenues from
"special funds" and "special accounts."
The budget excluded all special
accounts which fund ordinary government operations. The accounts
include the Workers' Compensation Board, medical services plan,
the University Endowment Lands
administration  account,  and  rev
enues from B.C. Rail and the Insurance Corporation of B.C.
And accumulated surpluses from
1979-83 amount to $1.5 billion,
which the study says is "more than
enough to fund the projected 1983-
84 deficit."
The study also cites an analysis by
the B.C. Central credit union suggesting the budget overestimated
expenditures by $170to $250million
and underestimated revenue.
The study concludes the government could have decreased the
1983-84 deficit to $729 million from
$1.6 billion by including omitted accounts and correcting its economic
forecasts. If former budget surpluses were included, the deficit
could have been reduced further.
Rosenbluth said Thursday the
government has no financial reason
for its extreme restraint measures.
"Any reasonable estimate would
not include a deficit. There is no
reason to expect a deficit this year
or next year.
"The government definitely has
political reasons for these cuts.
They have consistently attacked minorities in the 1983-84 budget.
What it comes down to is that the
vote of such minorities as students
and the unemployed amount to
zero.''
Rosenbluth accused premier Bill
Bennett of having a "small busi-
See page 11: BENNETT
Protesters fed up
with Kissinger
There was plenty of food both inside and outside the Hyatt Regency
Hotel in downtown Vancouver
Wednesday night.
As 1,000 patrons sat down to a
$150 per plate benefit dinner for the
Arts, Sciences and Technology Centre, protesters outside the hotel set
up their own makeshift buffet with
refried beans and tortillas for $1.50
per plate.
The demonstration was in opposition to the hotel dinner's guest
speaker — Henry Kissinger, former
American secretary of state in the
Nixon administration. The rally was
organized by a number of labor
unions, peace groups and other activists calling themselves the Coalition Against Kissinger's Visit.
The coalition is opposed to Kissinger's past and current roles in formulating American foreign policy
toward Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Chile and most recently
Central America.
The demonstration began at 6
p.m. as a simple picket, with protesters marching and chanting along
Burrard and Georgia streets. The
demonstrators gradually congregated at the Hyatt Regency's
Burrard street driveway entrance,
partially impeding cars wishing to
enter, and shouting anti-Kissinger
slogans as cars inched their way
through the crowd.
When lieutenant governor Robert
Rogers arrived at about 6:45 in a
black limousine, escorted by a
dozen policemen on motorcycles,
demonstraters blockaded the
breezeway.
Without giving any warning the
police escort burst into the crowd,
sending protesters sprawling on the
sidewalk. Rogers' limousine stopped at the entrance, and a crowd of
about 300 people rushed the car,
chanting "Go Home, Kissinger!"
When it became obvious that the
car did not contain their object of
disaffection, the crowd retreated
back to the sidewalk and the
driveway entrance. A line of rally
marshals linked arms in an attempt
to keep the crowd off the driveway,
but were unsuccessful as the crowd
streamed past to continue blocking
the entrance.
Several cars tried to get through
but were hindered by protesters
leaning up against their hoods, at
one time rocking a car. At about 7
p.m., as demonstrators were blocking another car, the motorcycle
police appeared again, driving
headlong into the throng and whipping their front wheels about in an
attempt to clear a path. Many protesters responded to others' shouts
of "sit down! sit down!"
But the police continued to ag-
See page 2: MOB
— stuart dea photo
VICTIM OF SOCRED AXE yells out in agony as the thumb-screws of rising debt-load clamp down. Student
decided living on thin budget means a thin body is necessary for survival, thus explaining trip to Bennett's torture
chamber — the place guaranteed to squish your troubles away.
SFU knew
By PATTI FLATHER
While UBC was expecting a six
per cent funding cut, the universities ministry told Simon Fraser
University to expect a five per cent
cut six weeks before Monday's
reading of the provincial budget.
SFU    financial   director   Ernie
funding cut in advance
Gov't justifies grant withdrawal
By CHRIS WONG
The abolition of grants from B.C.'s student aid program will not prevent students from receiving a university education, claims an education ministry official.
Dick Melville, information services director for the
ministry, said accessibility is not affected because the
program changes announced Monday only mean
students must pay for more of their education later instead of now.
Students failing to get an education because of the
loss of grants lack motivation, he said.
"I just can't believe that anyone is not going to get
to university because it's not a grant but a loan. If that
grant is stopping them, maybe the commitment wasn't
big enough."
Melville added debt-loads resulting from the new
program will not be high in comparison to the amount
traditionally owed by students in faculties such as
medicine and dentistry.
But Alma Mater Society President Margaret Copping said the loans will be difficult to repay because of a
shrinking job market for university graduates.
Copping is herself a recipient of student aid and has
already acquired a $7,000 debt-load on her first
degree.
"I'm looking at acquiring three times as much in my
second degree," she said.
Students from outside the lower mainland who need
the greatest amount of financial aid will be affected the
most by the all-loan system, she said.
"(The government' is trying to turn UBC into a
lower mainland university."
Administration president George Pedersen agreed,
calling the new rules "an unfortunate move."
"It's obvious the money set aside for grants was not
of sufficient priority that it survived their process of
cutting back," he said.
Melville said killing the grants is saving the government $14 million "that is simply not available to provide free dollars for students."
He denied the changes violate an agreement reached
between the provincial and federal governments last
June that stated the latter would increase loan money
if the provinces did not decrease their contribution.
"I've never seen that on a piece of paper."
Details on the new scholarship program replacing
grants will not be available until next week, he said.
UBC's administration increased scholarship money
by $1 million as a result of the 33 per cent tuition increase announced in January.
Copping said a financial aid system that increases
scholarships but fails to provide grants will not
necessarily attract top students. "You don't get high
quality students by starving a province — that's what
(the government) is doing with the student aid program."
Scott said recent talks with the
ministry revealed the cut would be
five per cent.
"For the last six weeks our best
judgement was that the case would
minus five," he said, adding that
until the end of 1983 the ministry
talked of six per cent decrease.
But UBC administration president George Pedersen denied that
UBC was also aware of the change
before Monday.
' 'The universities were told at one
time it might be six per cent. I think
all three universities received the
same information," Pedersen said.
He said it is uncertain where the
$1.8 million generated by the
decreased cut would be used to ease
UBC's deficit.
But Pedersen said he does not intend to reduce the 33 per cent increase in tuition set in January.
The universities can use the savings from the lower cut to
"restrain" increases in tuition,
commented finance minister Hugh
Curtis in the budget speech.
Pedersen called Curtis' remark
"astounding" and said board of
governors chair David McLean
lodged a complaint with universities
minister Pat McGeer.
"I'm told McGeer wasn't aware
the (Curtis) comment was going to
be made," Pedersen said.
McLean was unavailable for
comment.
"Curtis is trying to make it look
as if the great tuition increases are
the total fault of the universities,"
charged Pedersen.
Vice-president academic Robert
Smith said it is too early to predict
where the additional one per cent in
funds would be used. Smith and
four faculty members were to submit a pared down budget to
Pedersen Feb. 28.
But the Universities Council of
B.C. does not meet until Feb. 27 to
decide how the funds will be
allocated. UCBC secretary Lee
Southern said Monday that the
three B.C. universities may not
receive equitable decreases.
"UCBC will have to make an
allocation for UBC. We would be
foolish to make definitive moves
'before then," Smith said. He refused to speculate on how earlier
knowledge of the five per cent
figure, rather than the six per cent,
would have affected tuition fees.
Scott said SFU tuition fees will
not be reduced from the 22 per cent
January increase adding that the
one per cent did not make much
difference.
"Whether the figure is minus five
or minus six, each university is facing a deficit far greater than that
sum. That doesn't say you're suddenly in the black," Scott said.
The actual cut is more than five
per cent because of inflation, said
Donna Morgan, Canadian Federa-'
iion of Students - Pacific Region executive officer. "Inflation was approximately five per cent so it's a
ten per cent cut overall," she said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24,1964
Mob of police push crowd
From page 1
gressively hard people out of the
way with their motorcycles, knocking many protesters down in the
process. The crowd's anger
mounted and intense pushing, scuffling and swearing started.
Shouts of "Fascist pigs!" arose
as police dismounted and began
throwing people toward the
sidewalk. A few motorcycles were
kicked or pushed over. Eventually
the police worked their way through
the crowd and formed a line between them and the hotel door with
their bikes. One group of protesters
near the police raised their arms in
the Nazi salute and chanted "Sieg
Heil! Sieg Heil!"
Asked Thursday why the motorcycle police returned a second time
to barge into the crowd, police
deparment spokesperson Chuck
Dixon said, "I would imagine they
were ordered in there as backup to
other policemen stationed at the
main entrance."
They were also ordered to clear
the driveway, he added. Asked if
they were given specific instructions
on how it was to be done, Dixon
replied, "There is no real standard
procedure for that kind of thing."
Reinforcements were brought in
because police thought the crowd
wanted to try to get into the hotel,
said Dixon. "As the crowd got
closer to the entrance of the hotel,
the intent changed," he said.
"We were advised that it was going to be a very peaceful demonstration. There was no aggression
shown by the police," he claimed.
Dixon also claims the police
agreed to withdraw their motorcycles if the rally marshals would
try to calm down the
demonstrators. "We acted in good
faith and withdrew," he said.
But head marshal and police
liason Patricia Donohue said no
such agreement was made.
"They never said that to any of
us at all," Donohue said Thursday.
"They wouldn't talk to us." When
she tried to start a discussion with
the police, they "picked me up and
set me on my ass on the sidewalk,"
she said.
"I was saying to these cops why
the fuck didn't they tell us what
they wanted us to do and we'd do
it," she added. But the police
responded by telling her to 'Just let
us take care of it our way,' she said.
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"I could well empathize with the
crowd as to why they were getting so
aggravated," Donohue said.
In reply to Dixon's charge that
demonstrators wanted to enter the
hotel, Donohue said, "I don't think
anyone was serious about it. Maybe
there were five people who wanted
to go in."
When the confrontation cooled,
protestors started to drift back to
the hotel's Georgia street entrance
to hear speakers criticize Kissinger
and current American foreign
policy. By 8:30 it was all over, and
several volunteers with garbage
containers roamed the area picking
up cardboard remains of the $1.50
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ALTITUDE 473mi. Friday, February 24,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
False hope boosts jobless youth
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Employment centre personnel say
young people are "cautiously optimistic" about finding work, but
experts charge the job search is filled with false hope.
"Last summer, students were
nervous. Now the comment I hear
is: 'Oh, there's more jobs than I expected,' " said Steven Archibald, a
clerk for Canadian Employment
Centre on campus.
The level of frustration among
students seeking jobs is on the
decrease, he claimed. "There seems
to be more optimism in the air."
Centre manager Michael Kar-
dynal echoed Archibald's sentiments, saying more jobs for young
people are appearing because
employers suspect the economy is
improving.
"There's still a fair amount of indecision, but business and industry
feel it's just around the corner."
But with the national unemployment rate for 15 to 24 years olds
hovering around 20 per cent,
unemployed rights activist Kim
Zander said the job market for
young people is anything but on the
upswing.
"There's a real feeling of
hopelessness out there. Young people are quitting school because they
don't have the money and then they
can't find a job.
"The optimism is false."
And judging  from the meagre
listings    posted    outside    LiBC's
employment centre, employers are
not exactly flocking to UBC for stu- -
dent workers.
The board listed a few treeplan-
ting, childcare and sales commission jobs, but the pickings were thin
and the pay lean.
Mary Ann'Roberts, a law student
taking a year off from school,
stared at the listings with a look of
resignation on her face. "I find that
I'm high educated and poorly trained," she said.
Armed with good grades and
fluency in French, Roberts said she
can only find secretarial jobs, and
even the competition for those is
stiff. "I find I'm qualified for
women's ghetto jobs," she added.
"I hope something in dishwashing will come up. "
The Liberal government recently
allocated an extra $150 million to
the $1 billion Youth Opportunity
Public can rally
to save DTUC
By DEBBIE LO
On DTUC Day the public will
have a chance to help David
Thompson University Centre
students save their school from the
axe of the provincial government.
Monday two simultaneous rallies
at Robson Square in Vancouver and
the legislative lawn in Victoria will
protest the scheduled May 1 closure
of the Nelson institution.
"A petition with over 11,000
signatures protesting the closure
will be presented at the rally in Victoria," said DTUC action committee president Brian Marion.
An alternative to the DTUC
closure proposed by DTUC faculty
will also be handed to the government in Victoria, said DTUC faculty spokesperson Tom O'Connor.
O'Connor said education
minister Jack Heinrich requested
the proposal Feb. 8 but the government told Heinrich the decision
would not be reversed a week later
and the proposal was rejected.
"We see this as a backward step
for education  in  B.C.   when the
Car theft
hits B-lot
A rash of thefts has struck cars
parked on campus.
"In this week alone 10 to 12 cars
have been hit in B-lot," said campus RCMP constable Robert
Nestman Thursday. Most of the
break-ins occurred Wednesday,
some not involving thefts.
No thefts had been reported
Thursday, another constable said
late last night.
Nestman said the thieves moved
around and only stole in one area
for a short time. In January cars
parked on N.W. Marine Drive near
Fraser lot were broken into, he said.
The thieves either smash windows
or break open doors to get at
stereos and loose valuables, he said.
He advised people to lock their
valuables in the trunk and said victims or witnesses should report
break-ins as soon as possible.
He said the police patrols
couldn't completely prevent the
problem, as the thieves strike when
the patrol car is on the opposite side
of the lot.
government redirected educational
money to other purposes. The
federal grants have increased five
per cent while the provincial educational grants have decreased five
per cent," said O'Connor.
"The students from the
Kootenay region will be forced to
go to larger metropolitan areas to
study the fine arts and obtain
university transfer courses," said
DTUC Students Association president Gary Shaw. DTUC contains
the only comprehensive rural education program in Canada, he said.
"We believe it is part of the
government's strategy to eliminate
art education as more and more college education is becoming
technical," said Donna Morgan,
Canadian Federation of Students
-Pacific Region executive officer.
The rallies will feature outdoor
classes on the centre's courses and
the value of DTUC from 11 a.m. to
4 p.m. The teach-in format will include DTUC students and faculty
speaking in their own disciplines,
West Kootenay MPs and MLAs,
and Canadian writers.
In Vancouver, B.C. Federation
of Labour leader Art Kube and
B.C. Teachers' Federation president Larry Kuehn will speak. NDP
leader Dave Barrett and Nelson
mayor Louis Maglio will speak in
Victoria..
The UBC's Alma Mater Society
currently has no plans to conduct
its own protest. "At the moment
we want to concentrate our efforts
and focus attention of students at
UBC on the rally," said AMS external affairs coordinator Nancy Bradshaw.
Fund to help young people like
Roberts find jobs. But Zander said
the jobs created will not provide
people with training needed for
longer lasting work ia business and
industry.
"The extra money is like giving
everybody a tiny crumb from a
huge loaf of bread. Everyone still
stays hungry."
The Liberal government realized
unemployed young people are in a
rut, but its superficial attempts to
address the problem will not even
patch over the situation, she said.
Citing a British study which linked an increase in suicides among
youth to the increase in unemployment, she added young people in
Canada also encounter difficulty
coping without jobs. Most people
using Vancouver's Unemployed Action Centre — of which Zander is a
coordinator — are young, she said.
The provincial government's recent cuts to welfare rates will only
deepen the problem, she said. People under 26 with no dependents
will receive $50 per month less for
the first month they are on welfare
and $25 per month less for the next
seven months. The government also
stiffened welfare criteria to make it
harder for young people and new
applicants to get on the roles.
Human Resources minister Grace
McCarthy has said young people
were singled out because they can
find jobs elsewhere or depend on
parents for financial support.
Zander said the amount of
money the government will save is
small compared to other budget line
items, and that welfare rates are
already 40 per cent below the poverty line.
"The poverty level doesn't get
any lower. It never ceases to amaze
me that somebody can be as ignorant to the realities as
McCarthy," she said.
— stuart dee photo
PAUL WATSON SPOKE to a large crowd in a debate on the B.C. wolf kill issue at the SUB ballroom yesterday.
The current government wolf control project in unprecedented as it involves systematically exterminating wolves
in northern B.C. where no livestock is threatened, he said. See below for details.
Wolf kill profits wealthy few
By ALAR OLLJUM
The provincial government's northern wolf kill is a "political pork
barrel" designed to create private
game farms for wealthy trophy
hunters, says the leader of Project
Wolf.
Wealthy guide-outfitter Bob
Keen contributed $100,000 to the
Socred election campaign and is
now receiving his "pay-off" from
environment minister Tony Brum-
met, Paul Watson told 200 people
Thursday in SUB ballroom.
Altough the government implemented wolf control programs
before, Watson said the current
project was unprecedented because
it entails systematic wolf extermination in northern B.C. and is proceeding where no livestock is
threatened. Also wolves are being
machine-gunned from helicopters,
at great economic cost.
Dale Denny, B.C. wildlife federation director, was originally
scheduled to debate Watson, but he
refused Monday. "It's not our style
to go around debating," he said.
"We make sense. These other guys
UBC could get trolleys
UBC students taking the bus to school might soon hear the hum of
trolley wires instead of the usual buzz from diesel transit.
The B.C. transit board of directors is meeting Friday to discuss a
proposed $2.3 million expansion of trolley service from Blanca street
to UBC, and the service could be set up by this fall.
Trolley service would be more convenient for students currently
transferring onto diesel buses to reach UBC, said transit information
officer Norman Gidney. The trolley buses would eventually replace
the current diesel service, he said.
"Trolley service to UBC is the first priority on our list of capital
expenditures," he said.
Meanwhile, students can make transportation to UBC more accessible by giving away their transfers after use to the lonely souls at
the bus stop.
make sensationalism."
The BCWF will provide $100,000
for the government's wolf kill, Denny admitted. But he denied the entire wolf population in northern
B.C. would be exterminated,
despite government biologist John
Elliot's earlier statement that this
was a desired objective.
Both Denny and BCWF executive director Dan McCaughey
denied that the wolf kill lacks
biological justification.
"We trust our boys out there doing the job, not Easterners or . . .
strictly academic biologists," said
McCaughey, referring to statements
made by national zoologist and
wildlife biologist associations to the
contrary.
Francois Messier, UBC graduate
biology student, emerged as a surprise debating partner Thursday,
claiming "wolf removal" was a
"management tool" and that the
kill would not exterminate the wolf
population.
"But we need more information
to manage our wildlife in more
clever ways," he said.
Messier and BCWF spokespeople
conceded declines in ungulate —
moose, caribou, elk — population.
Denny admitted mining, forestry
and dams adversely affect wildlife.
But when asked about BCWF's
steps to stop the slaughter of
ungulates by B.C. Rail locomotives
travelling to and from northeast
coal mines, Denny said: "I take
care of my tracks, let the railroad
take care of theirs."
Watson said he plans lo disrupt
the planned kill of 400 wolves in the
Muskwa Valley in early March. He
also announced a $2,000 reward for
John Elliott's "head" — that is, a
photograph of the elusive biologist.
Watson concluded the debate by
appealing for an end to
humankind's "war against the
wolf."
"In 15 per cent of the areas where
wolves lived, they are now extinct
. . . northern B.C., the Yukon,
Alaska and 2,000 wolves in northern Minnesota is all that remains.
Let's give the wolf somewhere they
can live in peace."
Feds are angry
VICTORIA (CUP) — The
federal government wants accessible and quality post secondary
education but the provinces aren't
cooperating, Canada's youth
minister says.
"By provinces cutting their own
funding and not matching the
amount of money and effort that
we are making, they are transferring
a good part of the burden on to
students shoulders," Celine
Hervieux-Payette said.
The provinces and the federal
government are currently
negotiating a funding arrangement
but Hervieux-Payette said nothing
has been finalized.
This year in B.C., despite increased federal funds, the province held
education operating grants at the
previous year's level.
The B.C. government claims
transfers under established program
funding can be spent at the province's discretion.
Donna Morgan, Canadian
Federation of Students - Pacific
staff person, said the federal
government pays about 76 per cent
of post secondary education in B.C.
The figure will rise to near 84 per
cent for 1984-85 with B.C.'s cuts in
its budget. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24, 1984
Kissassinger
If I had to choose between justice and disorder on the one hand, and injustice and order on the other, I would always choose the latter.
— Henry Kissinger
Should Vancouver be proud that a man such as ex-American secretary
of state Henry Kissinger would come here to speak? Or have our society's
values become so warped that we agree with Kissinger that order must
take precedence over justice?
The scene Wednesday night outside the Hyatt Regency hotel offers us
some good local examples regarding questions of order and justice. For
once there is no need for activists to express indignation over Central America, Grenada, Lebanon or the arms race.
This week one need look no farther than Burrard Street.
Local media have claimed that Wednesday's protesters "got ugly" and
formed a "gauntlet" in front of the hotel's parkade. Print, television and
radio news reports have emphasized the demonstrators' unruliness and
violence.
But no one seems to be concerned about explaining how it is possible
for protesters to start violence when they are busy trying to jump out of the
way of policemen driving into them with motorcycles.
Sure, protesters blocked the driveway. And yes, they did pound on a
few car hoods. But does that justify the police roaring in with engines revving? Did they expect the protesters to shrink back in terror of the law's
long arms and tires, instead of venting their displeasure?
One has to really wonder what event the commercial news reporters
were covering. How much truth was reported, if mayor Mike Harcourt can
seriously say (we hope in innocent ignorance) that the police did a good
job?
Perhaps things have become so bad that the powers-that-be now consider it a "good job" to provoke peaceful people to unrestrained anger. In
any case, it sure was a good show for the media cameras, wasn't it?
Well Henry, you got your injustice — and your "order."
THE UBYSSEY
February 24, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Ronald, you've got to help me. We haven't yet won their hearts and minds. You'd better send in some
troops ..."
neillucentemurieldraaismabrianjoneschriswongcharliefidelmanrobbyrobertsonrobertbeynonpatti-
flatherdebbielowaynechongrosspinkstephenwisemhalvernemcdonaldjustinwyattelenamillerpeterb-
erlinstuartdeevictorwongallarolljum all got naked and laid in a great big pile. Stay tuned for update.
World refugee crisis demands fair solution
By ROSS PINK
The global refugee crisis has
become a humanitarian and
political problem hitherto unknown
to human kind.
In recent history, the number of
men, women and children fleeing
their homelands to escape persecution, starvation and war has increased dramatically. Today, it is
estimated there are 16 million
refugees in the world.
Although most world attention
has been focused on the refugees of
Indochina, all continents have ex-
AFGHAN REBEL: refuge from Soviets
perienced refugee problems.
The southern U.S. has been
deluged with thousands of Latin
American and Carribean refugees.
There is a continous flow of
Turkish refugees seeking political
asylum in Greece. Both India and
Pakistan maintain large refugee settlements. There are approximately
100,000 Tibetians in India and 2
million Afghans in Pakistan.
(freestyle)
There is no simple answer to why
people flee their homeland.
Refugees are often the victims of
superpower hegemony, civil war
and brutal oppression. The countries from which refugees flee are
often so wracked by violence and
poverty that life is endangered. The
decision to flee, often taken at great
personal risk, is a last desperate attempt to find a haven of peace and
stability in the world.
The experiences of the Turkish,
Afghan and Kampuchean refugees
provide lucid examples of the conditions from which refugees have fled and the uncertain futures they
face. Once the decision to flee is
taken, refugees in effect become
stateless people. They become
wholly dependent upon the moral
and political will of other governments.
During the last three years,
several hundred Turkish refugees
have sought political asylum in
Greece. The exodus began in
September 1981 when the armed
forces seized power in Turkey.
After the army seized power it
began a mass campaign against
dissidents and leftists. Several hundred people were arrested and imprisoned. Although a civilian
government assumed power in
Turkey   last   December,   Turkish
refugees continue to slip into
Greece.
The Turkish refugees are sent to a
government resettlement centre at
Lavrion, a small town on the Greek
coast. The U.N. high commission
for refugees reports there were
3,500 refugees in Greece awaiting
resettlement as of last October. The
largest number were Iraquis,
followed by Turks and Romanians.
Due to greater political stability
in Turkey, the number of Turkish
refugees seeking asylum in Greece
will probably diminish. It is encouraging to note the Greek
Government and the UNHCR
responded generously to the needs
of the Turkish refugees during their
plight.
The Afghan refugee crisis is inexorably linked to social and political
factors. While the Pakistani regime
of General Zia ul-Haq is providing
shelter and sustenance to Afghan
refugees, it is also providing bases
and support for the counterrevolutionary insurgency against
the Soviet-sponsored Afghan government.
As the Soviet campaign against
the Afghan freedom fighters continues, Pakistan becomes more
deeply involved in the conflict and
more heavily populated with
Afghan refugees.
Shortly after the Soviet-inspired
revolution in Afghanistan in April
1978, refugees began pouring into
Pakistan. In May 1979, an
estimated 100,000 refugees fled to
Pakistan. After the Soviet invasion
of Afghanistan the number
dramatically increased. By January
1980 there were approximately
460,000 refugees in Pakistan. In late
1981 the figure reached 2 million.
The Afghan refugees are caught
in an extremely tragic and complex
situation. The Soviet Union is
engaged in a brutal and bloody battle against the Afghan guerilla
movement. As the fighting inten
sifies, more and more Afghans are
forced to flee into neighbouring
Pakistan. Although Pakistan is
becoming overburdened by the
refugee problem, it remains locked
into a position of diplomatic and
political support for the insurgency.
The United States has put pressure
on General Zia to support the insurgency and is using Pakistan as a
conduit to funnel millions of dollars
worth of military equipment to the
Afghan guerillas.
The Pakistani government has
worked hard to provide food,
shelter and clothing to the Afghan
refugees. Undoubtedly it is an
ominous task. In February 1980,
the federal government established
a department for refugee affairs. In
October a plan was drafted to
organize the refugees into refugee
tented villages of up to 5,000 people. The efforts of the Pakistani
government have been greatly
enhanced by the work of the
UNHCR which set up a permanent
office in Pakistan in 1980.
Ultimately, a solution to the
refugee crisis will be pursuant upon
a political or military settlement in
Afghanistan. Until then, Pakistan
will continue to serve as a haven to
Afghan refugees and freedom
fighters.
The tragic refugee crisis in Indochina was severely exacerbated
by the brutal Pol Pot regime in
Cambodia.
When the Khmer Rouge forces of
Pol Pot seized power in April 1975
there was a sense of relief in the
country. The Khmer Rouge were
viewed by many as liberators who
would end the American war in
Cambodia. They had defeated the
corrupt Lorn Nol government and
would restore stability and independence to Cambodia.
But the initial enthusiasm toward
the Pol Pot regime quickly turned
to horror.
See page 5: SAVE Friday, February 24,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
DTUC causes grave concern
The provincial government's
decision to close the David Thomp-.
son University Centre May 1 is a
matter which should be of grave
concern to all students in B.C.
Part of the government's reason
for the closure is of course linked to
its single-minded "restraint" program. Jack Heinrich cited
"relatively high costs" for the
closure, less than six months after
stating the "success gained thus far
warrants (DTUC's) continuation."
DTUC costs the government $3.5
million each year. When the closure
takes effect May 1, the government
will take over the facility at a cost of
$1 million per year, thereby saving
$2.5 million. At the same time the
government has announced plans to
invest $16 million toward a new
micro-chip engineering faculty for
the University of Victoria. If the
government's real concern was cost-
efficiency, then surely they would
have allocated the funds to UBC
and saved millions in the cost of a
new building for UVic.
In reality what we are witnessing
in this province is a dramatic shift in
this current government's priorities
with regard to education. Its intention to implement more math and
science in high schools is a clear indication of things to come. If it
must invest in education, against its
better judgement, then obviously it
sees pure and applied science, commerce and business administration,
and the like as the only areas worthy of consideration. I am not sug-
Save Khmer refugees
From page 4
The Khmer Rouge believed the
first step to the nation's rehabilitation was an intense effort at
agricultural production. The first
tasks of the Khmer forces involved
emptying all the cities and putting
the people to work in the countryside in collective farms.
Phenom Penh, a city of 3 million,
was completely evacuated in 1975.
Those who dissented with government policies or were inefficient
were quickly killed. Academics,
professionals, intellectuals and even
those who wore glasses were brutally liquidated. The Khmer strategy
was to isolate the country, rebuild a
simple peasant society and to boost
agricultural productivity and self-
sufficiency. The government pursued these goals with rigid and
ruthless determination.
Thousands of people fled the terror in Cambodia. Most of the
refugees made their way to
Thailand which shares a border
with Cambodia.
Despite the resettlement in third
countries of more than 50,000 Cambodians since 1975, nearly 100,000
refugees from Cambodia still remain in camps inside Thailand.
Although the Pol Pot regime was
toppled by the Vietnamese in 1979,
few Cambodian refugees are willing
to return to their country.
Refugees continue to pose a grave
humanitarian and political problem
to humankind. Refugees serve as a
reminder of our failure to build a
just and peaceful world order.
Despite the enormity of the problem there are steps individuals and
international groups can take to
help ease the problem. At UBC,
there is a club called World University Service of Canada, which is
sponsoring a refugee family in
Canada. Churches and
humanitarian groups all across
Canada have sponsored refugees.
These are clear examples of how ordinary citizens can make an important contribution toward easing the
refugee problem.	
Ross Pink is a Ubyssey staffer
concerned about the growing problem of refugees and who can write
intelligent opinion pieces. Freestyle
is a column open to such articles
although the occasional rambling
piece slips through.
COMPUTERS DON'T
HAVE ALL THE
ANSWERS!
IEITHER DO WE
BUT
WE, THE REDEMPTORISTS, PRIESTS AND BROTHERS,
ARE DEDICATED TO  HELPING PEOPLE MEET THE
PROBLEMS OF LIFE TO FINDING ANSWERS
WHICH GIVE SPIRITUAL MEANING AND PURPOSE TO
LIVING.
CARE TO JOIN US?
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT -
FATHER JOE MURPHY
12704-102 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta
T5N 0N5
Phone (403) 452-2310
gesting these areas should not be
considered high priority, but rather
I find it distressing to see this move
toward an ever increasingly
technological society — coupled
with a lack of concern for the
humanities and fine-arts so
necessary to maintain a rich and
healthy society.
DTUC's closure is the most blatant example of what lies ahead. Indeed, UBC students may witness
greater cuts in arts than in science
next year. With a further 5 per cent
decrease in government funding
next year and another 5 per cent
decrease the following year, how
much longer will it be until we see
our own fine-arts department axed
due to lack of funds, while at the
same time continue to witness a
deterioration in all other faculties?
Feb. 27 the students of DTUC
will be staging a "teach-in" at Robson Square from 11:30 to 4:00 to
protest against the government's
stand on education. If you want to
prevent UBC from becoming
nothing more than a trade school,
lend your support Feb.  27.  Our
future's at stake.
Mike Looney
science 2
We heard about the dinner too. We'd have comB but paper disintegrates to grey mush in water, and
it rained heavily that day. We think of K bs a judgement from above, diureticaiiy speaking, on Henry.
Naturally, tha dinner outdoors had a better floor show at a better price. Everyone participated at sone
level, from sing songs around the ross bushes to marching in a formal parade of militia and furs. Incidentally, apple throwing contests weren't on the agenda, and the fur dad person implicated in the incident is barred from further dinners.
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anas
Schniii^
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with the cool minty flavour of Hiram Walker Schnapps. For schniers,
the taste is a cool blast of freshness that feels like they never left the slopes!
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS.
WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NAME MAKES. Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24.1984
Romantic not divvu
Folkie strummed versatile mixture
By PETER BERLIN
There's this guy who plays
guitar. Plays real well too;
acoustic, electric, doesn't
seem to matter. Sings nicely
too. He's been doing if for a long
time, maybe 20 years now. He turns
up here and there from time to
time, was at the folkfest last summer.
Anyways, he played at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre last
Sunday. Pleasant gig, highly enjoyable.
It's a nice joint, that Cultural
Centre. Intimate old-fashioned
theatre and this guy, he was all
alone on stage just him and his
guitar and a moth-eaten old rubber-
tree plant. He gives a really intimate
show too.
He played all sorts of stuff. Some
old folk music (he started in a folk
band. Fairport Convention they
were called), some jazz, some rock
n' roll, some oddball and some of
his own stuff which is kind of hard
to put into a box. And he handled
the audience real well, you know.
Cracked jokes, making everybody
laugh, totally relaxed and very
modest, came on like any ordinary
Joe, 'til he started playing that was.
Most of his stuff is tuneful and
romantic, but it ain't dippy. The
guys been burned see. Also he's got
these strong roots in English folk
which show in songs like I need you
at the dimming of the day. Real
rural flavour and all that. He also
sung Wall of Death, Just the motion and Don't let a thief steal into
your heart, three other right on
slow numbers he wrote himself.
The uptempo things he writes
aren't so hot. Was she a woman or
a man was meant to be a real chortle, like Lola by that Ray Davis guy
in the Kinks, only it just don't
work.
Mind you he done some other
uptempo stuff which was okay. He
rocked out on flying saucer Rock n'
Roll which was pretty wild considering it was him by himself on
acoustic guitar. He also booted it
with Tear stained letter and Tutti
Frutti by Hank Williams which sort
of turned into Move it over half
way through.
But the guy is originally an
English folkie and he done a couple
of them sort of things too. He did a
medley of old Scottish marches and
a meditative pebroch (that's for the
bagpipes) which made for nice instrumental interludes, 'specially as
he had a cold and his voice was bit
shot. But the real virtuoso bit, I
mean totally showing off, was his
guitar version of Duke Ellington's
famed jazz piece Rockin in
Rhythm. Talk about guitar pickin'.
But the most interesting bits was
a really weird new song of his. It
was so new, it didn't have a name
and he had to read the lyrics. All
about the Moors murders back in
the '60s who tortured and killed all
these little kids. Anyway it was an
RICHARD THOMPSON: enjoyable folkie shows his stuff.
-Charlie t-stop fidelman pnoto
Playwright satisfies Catholic revenge
By ELENA MILLER
Two things can be said about a
play written out of a strong
motive for personal vengeance
— it is very biased, and very powerful.
In Sister Mary Ignatius Explains
It All To You, playwright
Christopher Durang reeks his
revenge upon his Catholic education and upbringing.
The result is a wickedly funny
religious satire, which ceases to
deliver a knock-out punch only
when it forgets its prejudice and
tries to convince the audience to
take it seriously.
Sister Mary Ignatius Explains
It AH To You
By Christopher Durang
Directed by Ray Michal
At City Stage until March 31
For the show's first three-
quarters, Sister Mary is simply
hilarious. As the title suggests, a
nun explains "it all" to us — the
earth, heaven, hell, purgatory, and
limbo. With the help of her angelic
schoolboy sidekick, Thomas, Sister
Mary answers queries about mortal
sins, such as murder and masturbation and the ever popular question,
"tell us more about your life."
In reply, Sister Mary describes
the forces shaping her, and eventually led her to become a nun and
teach children.
"If God is all-powerful, why is
there evil and suffering in the
world," Sister Mary sniffs disdainfully. All her answers reveal she is
the opposite of the Oxford English
Dictionary's definition of Catholic
namely, "of wide sympathies,
broad-minded, tolerant."
This lack of tolerance and compassion becomes even more apparent when four former pupils of
Sister Mary enter the scene. And for
reasons which are never made very
clear they re-enact a pageant for
her. This pageant, which seems
almost sacrilegious, has Sister Mary
nodding her head benignly — it
contains all the perverted half-
truths she fed them as
schoolchildren.
Sister Mary then becomes shock
ed to discover that her former
pupils are not the bloodless saints
she raised them to be, but have real
world problems.
The plot becomes more absurd,
and is only brought to a standstill to
allow one pupil to explain her
gradual yet total disillusionment
with Sister Mary's brand of
Catholicism. At this point the play
unfortunately bogs down in a heavy
underlining of the points already
made extremely well in the play's
preceding satirical part.
In Sister Mary Ignatius' central
role Betty Phillips gives a
remarkably believable and consistent performance, given the role's
exaggerated nature. She makes frequent transitions from sugary
devoutness to cold-blooded
fanaticism with apparent ease. Bobby Luft as eleven year old Thomas
spoke his lines clearly and projected
his character well.
In supporting roles Rick Stojan,
Sharon Timmins, Lory Dungey,
and Hamish Mcintosh capably filled their rather one-dimensional
characters.
attempt to sort of get into their
heads. Worked too, if you ask me.
Catch Michael Jackson trying that.
Course it doesn't always work,
another 'psychological' number
Pavan (cute musical joke, a Pavan
is a boring folk dance) and all about
a woman terrorist is a real disaster,
1 don't know why he still plays it, I
mean he called it crass. Spot on
buster.
I forgot about the musical hall
thing he did too, sort of British
history. It was an old George Form-
by song. Remember George, sang
all these rude songs in the 1940s,
real ugly git, made dreadful movies,
so he sings "If women like that like
men like those, why don't women
like me?" Probably the only song
by Formby a man would sing
nowadays without being done over
by feminists.
What all this means is that I
thought the show was really straight
and so did everybody else there —
they all clapped like crazy every
time they had the chance (usually at
the ends of songs). If you want to
check it out then I've heard a rumor
Co-op radio will be putting it out
some time in March, so keep your
eyes open. Yeah, I forgot to mention, the joe's name is Richard
Thompson.
Jobless roots
inspired UB40
By F. IAN WENIGER
The term UB40 is to Britain's unemployed youth what UIC or
welfare is to Canada's jobless young people. When you leave
school or look for work, the chances are poor that you will
find a job; the only alternative is usually filling out a welfare
form, titled UB40.
The situation today is just as bad as it was in 1978 in Birmingham, an English industrial ghetto like Oshawa or Hamilton in
Canada. In that year, six jobless youth, none of whom had been
playing an instrument at the time, decided to form a band.
The members based the band on their own experiences —
unemployment, government, racism, imperialism and war. They
express themselves through reggae, a musical style common to
Birmingham youth and characteristic of black struggle
throughout the seventies.
The band called themselves UB40.
There's something to be said about being on welfare; all you
can do is watch the world go by. UB40 did that and more. They
gleaned from the injustices of the capitalist system to produce
music full of hope for the future and anger with the past and present.
UB40's music is as compelling as it is listenable. The most important reason for this is that UB40 is a working class band. The
members aren't looking at the world from a lofty tower or a cave.
UB40 seems to be in the thick of everyday working life, with the
people who do the jobs to keep the world running but never see
the fruits of their labour.
UB40's fame hasn't changed their perspective. During their
1983 tour, Thatcher's Tories claimed that the band hired two road
hands with government job creation funds and praised the band
accordingly. UB40 was quick to point out that they had hired the
roadies with their own money, and went on to denounce the
Tories for the sham the job schemes really were in light of massive
handouts to big corporations and increases in defence spending.
George Orwell wrote that the judgement of art based on
ideology alone is useless; art is an individual reflection of the conditions of life and could hardly be fitted to political theory.
UB40 is worth your time and money because their music comes
from the reality in which most of us live. Despite major recording
contracts and tour engagements, their music still reflects the lives
they left behind.
UB40 is appearing in SUB Ballroom Saturday.
UB40
UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFIT ATT
Surname (block capitals)
M
1 Initials j               Nl Number
1              1
 1 . L	
PJ|        IMPORTANT  NOTICE  ABOUT CLAIMING  BENEFIT
Vou should make your claims for unemployment benefit at the
Benefit Office each week on the days and at the times shown
in the box on the right. Produce this card on each occasion.
If you f3il to claim in any week on the day specified you risk losing
benefit and you could be disqualified for all the days between your
last claim and the day you next claim.
If you do miss claiming benefit on the day specified go to the
Benefit Office on the very next day you can (but not on
Saturday or Sunday). Do not wait until the specified day in the following
week.
This notice ceases to apply when you start work or claim another
benefit. If you again become unemployed you should claim benefit on
the first day of unemployment.
THE   UBYSSEY
Novel predicts violent future
By VERNE McDONALD
You wake up to the clock-radio, wondering whether it is worth it to
shake yourself out of bed. Along with the weather report the announcer tells you there are unacceptable levels of violence in the Lower
Mainland; essential services have been withdrawn.
You are free to sleep, after you have checked the various security systems
in your home, for your union contract requires you to get to work only
when there are tolerable levels of violence.
Tolerable Levels of Violence
By Robert Collins
Lester and Orpen Dennys
241 pp., $17.95
This future vision is what Robert Collins, a University of Ottawa English
professor, uses as the core of his first novel, Tolerable Levels of Violence.
What he tries to hitch to this old science fiction vehicle is far too heavy a
load of pseudo-intellectual baggage.
The theme is an old one, recurring several times in the 'future history' of
Robert Heinlein, as North America is engulfed in libertarian warfare
among individuals. And Lebanon makes it topical, too.
Collins, the Ottawa literature prof, gives his book the original angle of
COLLINS: 'erudite' prof, belatedly pens his fears for the world.
being seen through the eyes of an Ottawa literature prof. The novel's focus
is on how the stalwart gentleman farmer and sensitive intellectual copes
with the bloodthirsty attacks from most of the rest of the world.
Collins' fictional counterpart John Cobbett does fine as the gentleman
farmer, proving that Collins is capable of taut, natural narrative and dialogue.
As the prof's prof, Cobbett proves a fundamental artistic law: never
allow a good writer to become an English prof and never allow an English
prof to take a belated try at writing novels.
The novel is loaded with Cobbett's — Collins' erudite dissertations on
Aristotle, Hamlet and the obscure inner nature of humanity and its
violence. A sample:
"As Conrad's Marlowe told us in Heart of Darkness, to see the truth of
man clearly and without illusion is to become an alien among men, a man
marked, set apart, by the death in his eyes. The price of re-entering the
society of man is to utter consciously the lie that society wishes to hear. But
the ironic thing about that is that all parties understand what is happening,
and must, if the re-initiation is to be a true one. And so the fatal lie
becomes a deliberately inverted truth. We are born with the fatal truth in
us. Our contest with, or play around, that truth is Shakespeare's requiem
mass."
Amid such passages, we glean that Collins is worried violence is essentially a lust as inherent as those which cause us to eat, or engage in sex, to excess. The fear is that a self-indulgent era will necessarily degenerate into
continuous automatic weapons fire.
True, the increase in violence in our society has been noted for some
time, and not just by science fiction writers. In his Civilization lectures, Sir
Kenneth Clark compared the bloody aftermath of Rome's fall to the post-
Second World War era:
"Clovis and his successors not only conquered their enemies, but maintained themselves by cruelties and tortures remarkable even by the standards of the last thirty years." As the toll of people slain in this century
goes past the hundred million mark, Clark's comparison of our time and
the Dark Ages becomes an understatement.
Yet Collins fails to make his violent Ottawa Valley of 1991 believable.
Cobbett's literary soliloquies are an inadequate explanation of the motivations behind a society based on daily murder and mayhem.
His finer writing in the narrative of Cobbett's defence of his home is
undermined by poor characterization and an even poorer sense of the balance between logical and dramatic progression.
Twenty years of killing and maiming has left North America half depopulated. But the question of how the remnants have the energy to continue the slaughter without visible means of support is never reconciled.
If it had not been puffed up with wishy-washy philosophy and monologues by characters who usually sound vaguely like English professors,
Tolerable Levels of Violence might have made a tolerable six-pager in Astounding Stories.
The essence of this tedious and brief novel is that life is rough and capricious, but it must go on and there is hope somewhere. Its inner message is
the last might not be true of novice novelists too caught up in their scholarly pretensions.
Collins' premise of how humanity deals with the ethics of violence is
either too wide or too narrow for his talents. But he is more assured in his
descriptive and narrative prose, betraying the possibility of being a worthwhile weaver of fiction.
Musical succeeds where others often fail
By JUSTIN WYATT
Footloose represents a new type
youth musical that flawlessly integrates its musical numbers
into the plotline. Songs in Fame and
Flashdance often seemed obtrusive
and gratuitous to the main action,
and the transition between song and
drama rarely seemed smooth. All
such problems have been solved in
Footloose giving the audience a
completely satisfying and invigorating musical entertainment.
Dean Pitchford's original
screenplay describes Ren MacCor-
mack's move from Chicago to the
small Utah town of Bomont. Ren
(Kevin Bacon) discovers the town is
completely run by the local
preacher Rev. Shaw Moore (John
Lithgow) who has banned rock and
roll music and dancing. Ren runs
afoul of the Reverend due to his individuality and his relationship with
Moore's free spirited daughter Ariel
(Lori Singer).
vant topics such as the moral majority, women's independence and
male menopause with largely successful results.
Because of the story's emphasis
on the ban of music and dance in
Bomont, the energy and release offered by dancing are integral to the
plot. The film's musical numbers
strengthen the film's themes and
advance the story. A bonus is the
choreography   of  Lynne  Taylor-
Corbett.
Especially noteworthy are the
restrained gyrations in the number
choreographed to Dancing in the
Sheets, and the humor and rhythm
in Let's Hear It For the Boy. As is
conventional, the biggest number is
saved for last. Director Herbert
Ross uses the Kenny Loggins theme,
song to full advantage in the film's
Footloose
Directed by Herbert Ross
At the Downtown Theatre
Each of the major characters is
transformed and the young couple
together with Moore's wife Vi force
the Reverend to confront the basis
and need for his laws. Pitchford has
a good ear for realistic dialogue,
and all the interactions between
parents and children ring true.
While amazingly simple in design,
Footloose also confronts many rele-
KEVIN BACON: saves world for gyrators
climax — the ending leaves the audience breathless.
Ross' cast combines talented performers from the New York stage
and Hollywood. As Bacon proved
in Barry Levinson's Diner, he is
capable of creating a memorable
character. Bacon makes Ren intelligent, driven, confused, and appealing.
Lori Singer as Ariel is simply
amazing. She is so energetic she
becomes Footloose's life force.
The supporting players are also
competent. Special mention must
be made of John Lithgow, who
refuses to compromise his character
— Shaw Moore can't be blamed entirely for the problems of Bomont,
and only an actor as fine as Lithgow
could show the inate worthiness of
the largely narrow-sighted
preacher.
Paul Hirsch edited the Star Wars
series and several of Brian
DePalma's films. He brings his expertise to Footloose, and his razor
sharp cuts clarify the dance scenes.
His work is controlled and
measured
But credit for the film's success
must largely be given to veteran
director Ross. Previously, he has
seemed mediocre with his Neil
Simon adaptions, but promising
with his musicals The Turning
Point and Pennies from Heaven.
Ross makes all the right moves with
this film. He has created as fine a
specimen of the contemporary
musical as one is likely to find. Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24,1984
Vanciouvef
ite
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THE KEG
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Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
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- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
iBring Student I.D.)
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Treat yourself —
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Central American
tour inspires angry music
Hlllllll [ IIIIIIIIII Iltlll I IIMIIIIMIIIIIIII llllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliMII IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Cockburn
4
3
By RICK JANSON
Canadian University Press
perches himself in a corner table of
a Halifax hotel coffee shop. It's a
depressing room and the service is
anything but brisk as he taps the
table awaiting a much needed coffee.
The previous night's show went
well. The audience responded enthusiastically to his new songs — including the angry ones.
Anger, a new side of Cockburn,
has become part of his music since
he travelled to Central America last
year. His new music is tougher
sounding and more direct, and his
songs about Central America contain a sense of urgency.
Originally labelled a "folk artist"
14 years ago, Cockburn has made
the record racker's job a nightmare
by welding together a disparate
range of musical styles, incorporating jazz, reggae and rock n'
roll. Today he travels with three
other band members, and his silver
toned hair contrasts with black
leather clothes.
His audience remained faithful
throughout his evolution. They now
see a man who has been greatly influenced by the images, people and
culture of Central America. He
travelled with Canadian singer-
satirist Nancy White as part of an
OXFAM investigative tour to
Guatemalan refugee camps and
Nicaragua.
They arrived at the Guatemala-
Mexico border with all the medicine
they could carry. There they found
two camps totalling 8,000 people,
served by a small infirmary run by
three nuns. Inside, the medicine
shelves were empty.
Cockburn was impressed by how
these people managed to keep their
social order together in the camps
under extreme circumstances.
"They had no food, no medicine
and they had fled from the most
disgusting and horrifying things imaginable."
During their visit, they heard a
nearby camp had been strafed by a
Guatemalan helicopter.
"There was story after story of
people being rounded up and herded into a structure like a church and
the church being burned down with
them in it."
Cockburn reluctantly relates the
stories while contemplating his
breakfast of poached eggs on toast.
"There was a guy who was
organizing for a farm co-op. The
army took him out in front of his
house. In front of his pregnant wife
they beheaded him with a farm hoe,
then cut open her belly, tore out the
fetus and stuck his head in its place.
They were left like that for the
villagers to see."
The   government   prevented
villagers from organizing
themselves, whether it be through a
church organization, a farm co-op
or "anything that smacked of people getting together."
Throughout Cockburn's Central
American visit, musical culture provided a constant thread in keeping
people's lives together.
"The first camp had a marimba
(a musical instument) they carried
piece by piece over the mountains
from their village. Each person carried a piece of the marimba in their
escape."
Cockburn jammed with the
marimba players in the camp while
eight to-12-year-old girls danced in
a circle with babies on their backs.
"They were not used to working
with a rhythm guitar player, but is
didn't matter — they played so
much louder no-one could hear
what I did anyway."
Cockburn said there were between 80,000 and 100,000 refugees in
southern Mexico — about half in
camps and the rest dispersed among
the Mexican population.
"The Mexican population has
been extremely generous with their
space and energy in helping these
people. The church has been helping them too."
When Cockburn — himself a
born-again Christian — returned
from his trip, he had problems dealing with the North American Chris-
tian community over the
Guatemalan issue.
Many were sending money to
then president Efrain Rios Montt —
a fervent evangelist Christian.
"A lot of people thought he was
really great. A lot of Christian com-
munitys in North America thought
he was God's gift to anti-
communism," he said. "But it was
his army out there doing the sins."
"They (Christians) always waited
until the end of my concerts. They
listened to everything and then
they'd want to get in the last word.
They always said something like
'what about Christian unity?' as if
it was more important than the effect of his policies on people's
lives."
Montt was toppled by a coup
about six weeks after Cockburn's
tour and was succeeded by another
general — Oscar Humberto Mejia
Victores.
"Now there's a general that has
no pretensions of being anything
but a general."
From the Guatemalan refugee
camps the tour continued to
Nicaragua.
"If the refugee' camps
represented the worst of the status
quo in Central America, Nicaragua
was at the opposite pole — at least
in terms of potential."
When Cockburn arrived in
Managua he was surprised to find
an ad in the paper saying he was doing a show the next day.
"I wanted to make it a purely investigative trip," he said. "But the
government saw us as artists and
sort of thought it must be some
kind of cultural tour.
"Fortunately we had brought
guitars. I was really nervous. I had
never played to an audience that
didn't know my music and that
didn't speak English before."
Cockburn was rotated about different neighbourhoods on various
evenings to play street corner concerts.
"Managua is an interesting city
because   it   doesn't   have   any
downtown. It had been completely
destroyed by the earthquake in the
early '70s. It was never rebuilt
because Somoza took the relief
money that was sent from all over
the world and put it in his pocket.
The downtown looked like an
atomic war 50 years later. So we
ended up playing these
neighbourhoods."
Each evening a crew would set up
a P.A. system on a street corner.
While this was going on a little
Volkswagen with a speaker on top
would circulate around the
neighbourhood announcing the
concert.
"By 7 p.m. a big crowd of kids
and old people and all kinds of individuals would be sitting there.
Somebody would make a speech,
there'd be the chanting of a few
revolutionary slogans, and then
we'd play," he said.
"If they liked the music they
didn't applaud — they'd lapse into
these slogans. They just had no experience with concert halls, and it
was their idea of what you'd do in a
situation like that."
Cockburn said life was more conventional in middle class
neighbourhoods.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Musical culture
provided a constant
thread in keeping
people's lives together.
iiiiniiiiifiiiii uiitif miiiiii hi
"What the shows did for us in the
end was they gave us a real 'in' to
talking to people because we were in
their neighbourhoods just putting
on a show. That in turn made them
very curious about us. They'd come
up to us and say things like 'where
is Canada anyway' and they'd want
to know what we thought about the
revolution. We got a good cross-
section of the people's views this
way."
During the day they met with
people from church organizations,
the police, military, the local
defence committees, women's
organizations, medical people and
other groups.
They also managed to get an interview with the La Prensa editor, a
long time opponent of the San-
dinista government.
Cockburn was impressed by the
huge role arts and culture played in
the revolutionary process.
"I've never seen anything like the
amount of interest in poetry,
theatre, music and visual arts
among such a broad cross-section
of people. Every town, every
military unit, every organization
had its own theatre group. They put
on plays regularly and they were
usually satirical."
Cockburn said during a national
festival of these plays, one group
put on a very pointed skit critical of
a local Sandinista official. After the
play, some of the government junta
members asked the actors if their
criticisms were true. The theatre
group concurred and the official
was fired.
"The plays were not only a form
of artistic expression, but also a
means of communicating with each
other and focusing their feelings
and thoughts — which I guess is
what art is all about."
"The impression I got out of it
(the trip) is that the majority of people have benefited so much from
the revolution. They're standing
solidly behind it and they're trying
to do so much with so little."
Former dictator Anastasia
Somoza looted the national
treasury before fleeing Nicaragua
and left the country with enormous
debts.
The U.S. has continually blocked
Nicaragua from borrowing money
in the international money markets.
In addition they have tried to
discourage countries from trading
with Nicaragua and armed the rebel
"contras" in their war of
destabilization against the Sandinistas.
"It's just so bad to see they're
(the U.S.) wasting everybody's time
and energy and everything else. It's
such a stupid policy. How can you
expect the Sandinistas to do
anything except to cozy up to the
Soviet Union if you cut off all their
other sources of supply?
"Then they'll (the U.S.) turn
around and say we had to waste
them because they were too close to
the Soviet Union. That's exactly
what's happening. What they're
destroying is one of the best attempts at setting up an equitable,
moral and pluralistic society. It's
obviously a humanitarian type of
government. Yet the more pressure
that gets put on them the less that
will show — they'll have to keep the
lid on because otherwise too many
people will be killed. They're doing
a good job keeping that from happening."
Cockburn said Americans fear
other countries in the region might
want to emulate Nicaragua, "just
like the American revolution spread
to Europe."
"It's such tragic hypocrisy. It's
obvious to anyone who looks that's
the case. Somehow not enough people look — especially in Canada.
Canadians have a tendency to kind
of sit back.
"My hope is there would be
enough pressure generated
somewhere that would see a change
(in Central America) without too
much more violence — but it's going to be a long time before the
Guatemalan army turns into a
bunch of nice guys."
Meanwhile Cockburn continues
to sing about Central America, doing what he can in concert
auditoriums instead of lecture halls.
"The anger's natural. You can't
be confronted by those kinds of
things and not get angry. It's not
necessarily the best way to accomplish things, but it's my job to
write about what's really there. The
anger is really there."
"I've got faith, and I know what
my faith is. But now what do I do
about it in relation to the rest of the
world? What does Christian love
mean in the world? It doesn't mean
sitting around and watching your
neighbour starve to death — that's
for sure."
Cockburn heads into the recording studio in March to record his
ideas on vinyl.
In those bitter songs, Cockburn
leaves his characteristic trademark
— an ounce of hope.
"That hope that seems to be in
Nicaragua — one I guess that is
really all through the world — but
the hope we can all latch onto that
is pretty tenuous. It's a very fragile
thing." Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24,198*
Waet
\Jisk
zl
Gigllo. 9:30 p.m. Feb. 27-Mar. 4: Table for
Five, 7:30 p.m., The Four Seasons, 9:40
p.m.
CAMPUS SOUNDS
Music of Ramaau. Duphly, Bach: featuring
Doreen Oke on harpsichord, Feb. 25, noon.
Recital Hall.
Faculty Recital: featuring Eileen Brodie and
Philip Tillotson, Feb. 26, noon. Recital Hall.
Purcell String Quartet: performing the
music of Mendelssohn, Somers, Schuman,
Feb. 27, 8 p.m.. Recital Hall.
Noon Hour Concert: featuring Lea Foli,
Toby Saks, Gerald Stanick, and Robert Silverman, Mar. 1, Recital Hall.
UB40: Feb. 25, SUB Ballroom.
NIGHTCLUBBING
Phoenix Jazzers:  Dixieland,  Mar.  1,  Hot
Jazz Society.
Shannon Qunn: Jazz vocalist, Feb. 28, The
Classical Joint.
The Questionnaires: R & B, Feb. 27-29, The
Town Pump.
CONCERT CONNECTION
Tabu Ley - Rochereau with Mbilia Bel:
African rhythms, Feb. 25, Commodore
Ballroom.
Yehudi Menuhin: Violin virtuoso, Feb. 29,
Orpheum.
Dizzy Gillespie: Be-bop, Mar. 1-10, International Plaza Hotel.
Roalia Sorrels: Singer/songwriter, Feb. 26,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Country Swing Dance: Bluegrass, Feb. 24,
Oddfellows Hall.
ON THE TOWN
Two Plays by John Gray: Snowbird and
Florence 1478, opens Feb. 28, Thompson
Community Arts Centre. Rmd., 277-3624.
A Taste of The Talea of Hoffman: English
hour-long opera performances, opens Feb.
26, The Waterfront Theatre, 2:30 p.m. Nice
People Dancing to Good Country Music: a
hilarious new Canadian comedy by Lee Blessing, opens Feb. 17, The Waterfront
Theatre, 669-3410.
Les Viosins: a comedy depicting an evening
in the life of three couples in the suburbs,
opens Mar. 15, Firehall Theatre, 682-2628.
Interact: A showcase of original works,
opens Feb. 23, First Vancouver Theatre
Space Society, 681-0872.
Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for
You and The Actor's Nightmare: a
ferociously funny satire and an adept parody
by Christopher Durang, opens Feb. 16, City
Stage. 688-1436.
Ring Round the Moon: A play by Jean
Anouilh, opens Feb. 22, West Vancouver
Little Theatre. 986-1351.
The Tomorrow Box: A farm wife strikes out
on her own after forty years of marriage and
transforms herself from submissive wife to independent career woman, opens Feb. 17,
Q.E. Playhouse. 872-6622.
Hovi£6       ByUhih
CAMPUS FILMS
SUBFilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697), Feb.
23-26: Risky Business, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Mar. 1-4: Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs.
ALTERNATIVE CELLULOID
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 West Georgia,
732-61191, Feb. 24: The Divine Emma, 7:30
p.m. and 9:46 p.m. Feb.: Roma. 7:30 p.m.
REPERTORY CINEMA
Vancouver East Cultural Cinema (7th and
Commercial, 254-5455) Feb. 24-26: Under
Fire, 7:30 p.m.; Year of Living Dangerously, 10:00 p.m. Feb. 27-28: Road Warrior,
7:30 p.m.; Clockwork Orange. 9:20 p.m.
Feb. 29-Mar. 1:A Special Day. 7:30 p.m.;
Garden of the Finzi-Contini, 9:30 p.m. Mar.
2-4: The Osterman Weekend. 7:30 p.m.;
Das Boot, 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Feb. 24-26: A Star is Born, 7:30
p.m. Feb. 27-28: Putney Swope. 7:30 p.m.;
Morgan. 9:15 p.m. Feb. 29-Mar. 1: The Best
of W. C. Fields: Five Great Shorts, 7:30
p.m. Mar. 2-4: Flashdance, 7:30 p.m.; Tex,
9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (3131 Arbutus, 738-5212) Experience Preferred . . . But Not Essential,
7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre (3123 West Broadway,
738-3211) Feb. 20-26: Class. 7:30 p.m. Just a
ESOTERICA
Linda Ohama: innovative mixed media works
involving etching, silkscreen and college and
paintings, until Mar. 11, Burnaby Art Gallery,
6344 Gilpin, 291-9441.
Wendy Hamlin: an exhibition of biographical
development - B-Clubs, Centre Culturel Columbian, 795 W. 16th.
Paul Klee: this Swiss artist's 61 paintings and
drawings, Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby,
682-5621.
David Ip: an exhibition of watercolors, Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables,
254-9578.
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from
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Active Components
3070 Kingsway
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IT 438-3321
Store Hours:
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Cassation Group: The Whole Thugogmagog
- acoustic, electro-acoustic, textsound works
and dance, Feb. 25, Western Front, 303 E 8th,
669-4851.
FRIDAY
ANSO LECTURES
Indo-Canadian Adjustment in Vancouver, presented by Marjorie R. Wood, noon. Museum of
Anthropology.
DANCE CLUB
Masquerade party, 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m., grad centre.
DHARMA REALM BUDDHIST ASSOC.
Lectures on Buddhism (Chinese), 7 p.m.. Golden
Buddha temple, 301 E. Hastings. Continues Sat.
and Sunday 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT
Feminism and Family Therapy, symposium, cost
$75, students $37.60, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m..
Health Sciences, Psychiatry.
PAULA ROSS DANCE STUDIO
Dance performance, free admission, noon, SUB
auditorium.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m. to midnight, SUB 205.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Reception for senator Richard Stanbury, president of the Liberal Party of Canada (1968-19731,
free admission, 8 p.m., 1984 W. Broadway.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
Work party, 10:30 a.m., Jericho Sailing Club.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie Cup game vs. Vancouver reps; 2:30
p.m., Brockton Park Oval.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOC.
International food fair. Tickets $4 members, $5
non-member, advance at International House,
6:30 p.m.
CAMPUS COMMUNITY ALLOWANCE
Coffeehouse to support David Thompson University's fight against closure, 7 p.m. Garden
Room, Grad. Student Centre.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Sushi-sake party, all welcome, 7 p.m.-midnight,
SUB 205.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Season-closer against Saskatchewan, 8 p.m.,
Thunderbird arena.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Divisional playoffs vs. UVic, cheering contest,
tickets $1.50 for students, WMG.
SUNDAY
SAILING CLUB
Fun races, all members welcome, 10:30 a.m.,
Jericho Sailing Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise, worship and teaching, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
MONDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Jim Coutts, former chief advisor to the P.M
speaking to the public, noon, Buchanan A203.
UBC FILM DEPARTMENT
Auditions for TV commercials which will be oi
air this summer, 1-3 p.m.. Brock 163 Annex, filr
department.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Speakei: Dr. Doug Ross, UBC political scienc
department on Trudeau's peace initiative, noon
SUB 205.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY LECTURE
Cancelled,   lecture on  ophthalmology is  car
celled.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Regular  meeting,   12 noon,   Lutheran  Campu
Centre.
STUDENTS AGAINST THE BUDGET
Weekly general meeting, noon, Lutheran Cam
pus Centre.
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EAST-WEST SECURITY:
PROSPECTS FOR PEACE
Prof. Condoleezza Rice,
Political Science,
Stanford University
FRIDAY, FEB. 25 at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
ONE MONTH ADVENTURE to a secluded
town in the Himalayas of India. Student
organized. Lv May '84. Total cost (incl airfare) $1989. Info: Pilar Brothers c/o Trent
Univ., Peterborough, Ont. (705) 743-4391.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FOR SALE— One-way airline ticket to Toronto for March 23 $190 (negotiable) 874-2598.
20 - HOUSING	
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies. Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
POSITIVE PERSON WANTED to share
house with 3 others. Main & 20th area.
$1567month & util. Call David or Debbie to'
arrange a visit. 879-5054.
KITS SLEEPING ROOM & use of kitchen
in warm cozy house beside beach & bus
stop $195 plus utilities 732-0950.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Childcare for 2 yr. old, two or
three afternoons a wk. at my house.
228-6285 or 224-0289.
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKSI Commerce students & others, start your own career, earn
extra income while studying & during the
summer. Call Charlie for appt. 738-7561.
OUTSTANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. Health-fitness nutrition field.
P/T or Full time. 738-9591. Call today —
no obligations.
BIOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, for MCAT
preparation — $25/hr. - teaching experience essential 788-4618 leave message.
86 - TYPING
50 - RENTALS
CLOSE TO SILVER STAR. Spacious self-
contained kitchen suites w. cable, color TV.
4 pers. $30/day - 2 pers. $20/day. Tel-A-
Friend Motel, 1501-32nd St. Vernon, B.C.
(112)545-1779.
65 - SCANDALS
THE U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD SHOP can
print ANYTHING you want to say on a personalized bumper sticker - One Day Ser-
ARYAN: If you're the right one, you're in
sect. 6, own a red bomber jacket, and read
the Globe and Maill (I'm not in your class,
incidentally.)
FOR RENT quiet resp. n/s person wanted to    yg   SERVICES
share suite with 1 other. 12th & Blanca.      	
$185/mo   also   available   p/wk.   or   mo
222-8541
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6618.
FORMER UNIV. PROF. (10 yrs. exp.)
will critique Er edit term papers, theses,
manuscripts. Reasonable rates. Fast turnaround. 689-1284.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSINGIMicom.) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333
EXCELLENT TYPIST. IBM. AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports,
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
688-5884.
THESIS TYPING on UBC Computer. Experienced with Data Analysis, FMT, SPSS,
etc. References available. 872-0841, 8-9:30
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from regular
work, essays, theses. 738-6829 10 am to 9
pm King Edward bus route.
WORD PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
90 - WANTED
WANTED: Men 18-25 yrs. old, interested in
a video taping for a screen test of a new
Stanley Kubric film. For info, call 942-5785
after 6 p.m. Friday, February 24,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Nationalism distorts
People in Eastern bloc countries
and Western nations hold grossly
distorted images of each other
which result in mistrust and ignorance, a noted Hungarian physicist
said Tuesday.
Ferenc Mezei of the Hungarian
National Science Academy, told 40
people in Hennings 202 that East-
West conflict arises out of nationalism.
"Nationalism is a crime against
humanity. Extreme nationalism on
both sides is a common feature. So
is mistrust, fear, and ignorance of
each other."
The media is primarily responsible for this ignorance, Mezei said.
"People in the West take the press
much more seriously than we in the
East do. In the East we know not to
believe anything our press says. In
the West it is not so easy."
The arms race is a tremendous
drain on both economies, but arms
expenditures account for more of
the Soviet gross national product,
he said. The military burden stunted the Soviet economy and contributed to a poorly developed consumer sector, he added.
"Soviet citizens accept the arms
buildup as legitimate. They accept
the guns for butter mentality."
The USSR fought three wars on
its soil during this century. Every
citizen is personally touched by
war. Fear of the West is genuine."
Mezei said many people in the
Bennett just hardware
From page 1
ness" approach in running the government and in estimating budgets.
Bennett seriously believes the
government and universities operate inefficiently, he said. But there
is bound to be inefficiency in any
large institution, unlike a family
hardware store, Rosenbluth added.
"Bennett is trying to run the government like a hardware store. Firing people is an inefficient way of
dealing with inefficiency."
Rosenbluth added the government probably used the same methods in estimating last year's budget
for the recently released 1984-85
budget.
A finance ministry official who
wished to remain anonymous denied the professors' charges.
"It's all nonsense. Government
deals only with direct revenues and
not those from crown corporations.
Moreover,  governments  are  con
stantly accused of biasing their economic forecasts. Forecasts are just
estimates and there's always some
variance in estimates," he said.
He also denied the surpluses in
the past five years, except for 1980-
81 when the province had a surplus
of $52.8 million.
Rosenbluth and other UBC professors will address the consequences of provincial cutbacks today and tomorrow at Angus 104.
East and West possess different perceptions of freedom and liberty.
People in the West assume they represent individual liberty and the
East social injustice, he said.
Most citizens in the East and
West care little about politics or ideology, he added.
"What happens in a country in
everyday life depends more on tradition and history than the current
political system.
"Both superpowers engage in opportunity wars in third world countries. These countries don't care
about ideology, they just want to
survive."
Mezei said one of the best ways to
overcome this mutual ignorance is
through greater communication.
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Phone   now   for   your   complimentary sitting, choose from
18 previews (proofs!
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWA Y
Resume photos as low as 75c in
colour.
SELF-SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
Good quality copies
require good
quality typing.
Do your typing at
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
ELECTIONS
Nominations are invited for the following executive
positions: PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
FINANCE DIRECTOR
SECRETARY
HOUSE DIRECTOR
• All students registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies are eligible.
• Nominations open Fri, Feb. 10
close Fri, Feb. 24 at 4:00 p.m.
• Nomination forms are available at the Graduate Student Centre office.
• Elections are scheduled for the week of March 5-9,
with polling stations available at the following locations:
Graduate Student Centre:
Mon., March 5 — Fri., Mar. 9
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Sub Main Concourse:
Thurs., Mar. 8 — Fri. Mar. 9
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
• An all candidates meeting to be held on Fri., Mar. 2
at 3:30 p.m. in the Graduate Student Centre.
PSYCHOLOGY AND THE BIBLE
LECTURE SERIES
Training in ... .
• Understanding the Bible in the light of modern psychology
and how to become more Christ-centered in your life.
• How to practice Christian meditation and answer occultism
• How to experience healing and relieve tension and anxiety
• Insights into creativity, dreams, intuition, visualization and
healing
THE SEMINAR LEADER IS          The Rt. Rev. Stephen Barham, Ph.D'
Dr. Stephen Barham, a Christian psychologist and vice-president of the International Institute of Integral Human Sciences at Concordia University in Montreal. Dr. Barham has taught at major universities in Canada and United States.
He graduated from Central Bible College and has travelled around the world
ministering in historic churches and college campuses.
LOCATION: Feb. 28, 29, March 1, 2 at 12:30 in Buch D238
Also March 5 at 7:30 Buch A100
Topic — Is Bible relevant in the light of psychology today
SPONSORED BY: Charismatic Christian Fellowship
Maranatha Christian Club Box 62
GET THE BEST DEAL AT LARRY'S
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STEREO
AWARENESS
2053 W. 41St Ave. (near Arbutus) 263-0878
Enter the '84 Osca r Challenge. Reed the Georgia Straight and
listen to Fred Latremouille on 14 CFUN for details.
AL PACIN0 IS RIVETING
Warning:     Frequent    gory
918 GRANVILLE        violence   and   very   coarse
,„ .,,, language. B.C. Dir.
685-5434 AT 2:1B. 6:40. 9:00
MACE
l/Z7TSZmmm\      Warning:    Some   nuditv,   suggestive     —«
■ (MATURE/      scenes and very coarse language. B.C.  /-4/
07Z
881 GRANVILLE
682-7468
AT 2:10. 4:00. 6:60. 7:66. 10:00
MICHAEL MINE   JOSEPH BOLOGNA
^■—«»-^^ Warning:   Occasional   coarse
■ MATURE/ language,  nuditv snd suggestive
scenes. B.C. Dir.
coronet:
851 GRANVILLE
685-6828
AT 2:46.4:30.6:16. 8:00. 9:46
t^STEVE MARTIN
-MELY GUY
I ^jHJHBEH^*
coronet
Warning:    Frequent   violence;   occasional sex. B.C. Dir.
AT 2:30, 4:10,6:50,
7:46. 9:30
DEADLY
ssi granville    When nothinq else fMMmmm.r.
685-6828 wj|| Jq_~ ■    ■•'■••■'•■■t
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AT 7:30. 9:30
CAMBIE AT 18th 2 Academy Award nominations
876-2747 Ind. Best Actor-Tom Conti
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DUNBAR AT 30th
224-7252
5 Academy Award nominations incl. Best Picture. Best Actors-Albert Finney. Tom
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varsity
4375 WEST 10th
224-3730
AT 7:30. 9:30
BEST AUSTRALIAN FILM 1982
/T^^mmm%SLmi\    Warning: Some very coarse language;    TMf
IWWUw   occasional nudity Et suggestive scenes.
B.C. Dir.
BIG CHILL
broadway
707  W.  BROADWAY
874-1927
AT 7:00 9:00 ^ Academy Award  nominations  incl.
Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress -
Glenn Close
[AAATUeftCl   Warning: Some ve>v coarse language
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broadway
AT 7:16. 9:16
707 W. BROADWAY
174-1927 3   Academy   Award   nominations   incl.   Best   Actor-
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4375  WEST 10th
224-3730
SUNDAY ONLY    .ff^
2 P.M. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 24,1984
'Unstrike' starts
Students caught in the bus
"unstrike" Friday might be able to
keep their shiny new quarters for
another day.
Bus drivers involved in the current transit dispute might refuse to
accept bus fares, but will allow
students travelling on the buses to
UBC to stand in the aisles. On other
routes considered high speed, standing passengers will be bumped off.
Members of the Independent
Canadian Transit Union may exchange their uniforms for street
clothes and will maintain service,
unless cemented barricades are
placed at depots.
"We will keep buses running
even though we have to use means
to let the company know we are
dissatisfied, and nothing will happen that will affect the public," said
Fred McCormack, financial
secretary of ICTU local 1.
The union, locked in a dispute
with the Metro Transit Operating
Company, wants exemption from
the Public Sector Restraint Act and
to retain the past practices clause in
its collective agreement. The
clause's elimination will narrow the
union's access to grievance procedure to appeal management decisions, said McCormack.
The ICTU is also protesting the
company's plan to hire part-time
drivers, he said, adding the
MTOC's last position on the issues
was "totally unpalatable."
The two sides met Thursday for
the first time since negotiations
broke off in January. MTOC
spokesperson George Stroppe said
the meeting indicates both sides are
making progress in the dispute.
"The meeting is a favorable sign,"
he said.
And although bus riders might be
saving some money during the
"unstrike", they will have to contend with higher bus fares starting
April 1. Student rates on fare cards
will be discontinued when the new
zone system is introduced. The current $28 will be increased to the
adult fare of $34 for one zone, $40
for two and $50 for multizones.
During peak hours, adult fares
will be 85 cents for one zone, $1.00
for two zones and $1.25 for
multizones. During non-peak
hours, a flat adult rate of 85 cents
will be introduced for all zones.
And some student are beginning
to complain.
Rosalind Morris, arts 3, said:
"I'm not impressed with the decision at all. That the government can
consider putting money into painting the buses and bus stop signs
Socred blue and red, and not subsidize bus service more, is grossly
unjust."
B.C. transit spokesperson Norman Gidney admitted students cannot afford to pay the increase.
"Post-secondary students should be
considered a special category, but
there are no easy answers. It becomes a question of policy."
He claimed the new system would
make the system more equitable,
shift ridership from peak to non-
peak periods and increase revenues
through the farebox.
YES, YOU CAN LEARN
HOW TO LEAD
Attend this successful seminar and learn how to
lead others far more effectively
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Any student involved in leadership, or aspiring to leadership.
SEMINAR LEADER: Your seminar will be personally conducted by Peter Lowe, recognized
successful president of Lifemasters Training Co., training leaders across Canada. Former UBC
student and member of the International Platform Association.
WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? The Precision Model for effective leadership . . . The single
greatest key to all leadership . . . How to persuade others to follow you . . . How to set goals
. . . How to be a goal-achiever instead of a tension-reliever . . . How to conquer fear of failure
and rejection . . . Break crippling attitude habits that hold you back as a leader . . . Gain self-
confidence and overcome feelings of inferiority . . . Learn the mental secrets that give you
energy, drive and motivation . . . The secret of charisma . . . and much more.
SEMINAR FEE: Special fee of $15.00 for UBC students (All others only $30.00) which includes
all written materials and coffee.
GUARANTEE: If you are not fully satisfied with this seminar, return the materials at the conclusion of the seminar and your money will be refunded in full.
SEMINAR DATE: Saturday, March 3, 1984 1:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M. SUB 205
REGISTRATION: Phone 263-5710 or 278-0454
Specifically sponsored by AMS Club Campus Crusade for Christ 	
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD presents . . .
THEATRE
THE SUICIDE
A Comedy
by Nikolai Erdman
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
MARCH 9-17
(Previews — March 7 & 8)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets - $4.50
Previews — All Seats $4.00
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Nominations  for Arts   Undergraduate
Society
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
SOCIAL COORDINATOR
ACADEMIC COORDINATOR
are open between February 13,1984 and
4:00 p.m., February 27, 1984.
Nomination forms are available from and must be
returned to Buchanan A107.
ELECTION WILL BE HELD ON MARCH 2, 1984
Nominations for
5 A.M.S. COUNCIL REPS
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER
ATHLETIC COORDINATOR
are open between February 20, 1984 and 4:00
p.m., March 5, 1984.
ELECTION WILL BE HELD ON MARCH 9, 1984
Descriptions of the duties associated with these
positions are posted outside Buchanan A107.

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