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The Ubyssey Sep 2, 2014

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Array  What's on
HIS WEEK, MAY WE SUC
First day of classes: all day @ the UBC Vancouver Campus
Depending on whatyearyou're in, this is either the one ofthe best orone ofthe
worst days of the year. Get lost looking foryour classes, meet your profs and
form friendships that could last the rest of your life.
The cost of your tuition.
Open-air Pit Night @ The Pit Pub from 7:00 p.m. - late.
The first Pit Night of the year, and one ofthe last in the old SUB, is taking place
outside and inside this Wednesday. Dance the night away with long-lost
friends and maybe make some new ones.
Free (19+; bring two pieces of ID)
AMS Wet n' Wild Pool Party® UBC Aquatic
Centre from 9:00 p.m. - 12:00a.m.
The first week pool party is back for anotheryear. Get up close and personal
with your peers in an olympic-sized pool. There's limited space, so get there
early if you want to guarantee a spot! $5 or free with AMS first weekwristband.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
ON
THE
COVER
After a summer full of forgetting everything you learned last
year, we figured a simple welcome back cover was best.
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
SEPTEMBER 02, 2014| VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUE III
EDITORIAL
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Distribution Coordinator
STAFF
Business Manager
Editorial Office:SUB24
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Write/shoot/contribute to The
Ubyssey and attend our staff
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Web Developer
can produce. We meet every
6138 SUB Boulevard
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rteekinouroffice,SUB24 —ir
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News Editors
enow. You II get used to it
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LEGAL
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isheel every Monday and Thurs
tions Society.
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OUR CAMPUS
THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGS THAT MAKE UBC
The historic Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
One of UBC s most historic buildings
Austen Erhardt
Opinions & Blog Editor
It's one of UBC's most identifiable and striking buildings.
It's been featured in movies
and TV series, and is a second
home to thousands of students
during finals season. You've
studied there, eaten there
and possibly slept there. Each
year, hundreds of students run
through it in their underwear.
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is one of UBC's most notable — and oldest — buildings.
The history ofthe Learning
Centre, colloquially known
as 1KB or 'Irving' by most
students, stretches back to
the Great Trek in 1922, in
which thousands of UBC
students marched to Point
Grey demanding the creation
of a proper university campus.
The government responded
to the student-led movement,
and agreed to continue the
construction of a campus in
Point Grey.
The Main Library was one
ofthe first three buildings
built on the now-UBC campus.
Primary construction began in
1923 and the first section was
finished in 1925, with additions
(such as stained glass windows
and two new wings) being
made in later years. A 1920s
UBC publication described the
original library as "a massive
structure of two stories and a
basement built of British Columbia granite. The style is late
Tudor, modernized."
The library was constructed
in part while the Scopes Trial
— which debated the legality of
teaching evolution in schools
— was underway and a focus of
public attention. Accordingly,
the stone masons alluded to
this on the main facade ofthe
library by installing two small
carvings — one with a human-like figure holding a sign
that says "funda" (for fundamentalism) and another with
an ape holding a sign marked
"evol" (for evolution).
The first — and chief — university librarian of UBC from
1916-1940 was John Riding-
ton, whose reputation as an
authoritarian within the library
walls led to the Main Library
being nicknamed "King John's
castle." Prior to Ridington's
appointment, J. T. Gerould, a
librarian from Minnesota University, was assigned to acquire
the first 20,000 volumes for
the UBC collection. He made
his acquisitions throughout
Europe near the beginning of
the First World War, and he
was imprisoned for three weeks
in Germany, on suspicion being
a British spy.
The library saw its budget
cut from $12,000 per year to
$2,000 per year during the
Great Depression, and survived
by laying off staff and through
a donation from the Carnegie
Corporation. By 1936, despite
the challenges ofthe Depression, the library's collection had
expanded from 20,000 volumes
to 100,000. Today, the UBC
library collection is comprised
of over six million volumes.
In 2002, following a $20 million donation by UBC Forestry
alum and entrepreneur Irving
K. Barber, the library began the
process of a major renovation
— expanding and transforming
the nearly 80-year-old building
into today's Irving K. Barber
Learning Centre. Though the
refurbished library incorporated the original facade in the
centre ofthe building, both
wings and the majority of
the interior were completely
redone — a move which evoked
the ire of some heritage site
preservationists.
The refurbished building,
renovated at a cost of almost
$80 million, features classrooms, lecture halls, a cafe
and an "automated storage retrieval system" — also known
as "the library robot." It also
has over 1,500 study seats,
though that may seem hard to
believe come midterms. The
refurbishment incorporated
various sustainable features
into the building, such as
locally sourced and recycled
materials (some materials from
the demolished parts ofthe
building were reused in the
new sections) and radiant in-
slab heating.
The next time you walk up
the steps ofthe library, or rush
by its imposing and juxtaposed
neo-gothic, modern exterior on
the way to class, pause a minute
to catch your breath and take in
the architecture and history of
this landmark building. XI
— '"—Cq
WIKIA: UFe-OU-CAMniS.WIKIA.CCM // News
RESEARCH»
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC + VERONIKABONDARENKO
AY, SEPTEMBER 2, 20
SPORTS»
UBC apologizes
to former Coach
Mark Rizzordo
=ILE PHOTO RICH LAM/UBC
Rashid Sumaila will be heading a $2.5 million research project on the state of Canadian oceans.
=HOTO COURTES- STRANGE ONES / FLICKR
UBC receives $2.5 million in research funds for Canada's oceans
Lawrence Neal Garcia
Contributor
Over the next six years, $2.5
million in funding will go towards
research on Canada's three oceans.
The project, known as Ocean-
Canada, is an interdisciplinary
research collaboration between
15 Canadian universities, various
non-governmental organizations
and Fisheries and Oceans Canada,
among others, and is funded by
the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council partnership grants program.
According to Rashid Sumaila,
research director of OceanCan-
ada and a professor of economics
in the UBC Fisheries Centre, the
project can be divided into three
main components: understanding
the current state ofthe Canada's
oceans, running simulation analysis of future scenarios and "knowledge mobilization" or informing
the public. The six-year timeline
ofthe project can also be roughly
divided into three parts, with each
component allotted approximately
two years.
An economist by training,
Sumaila first became interested
in fishing and oceans while doing
his Ph.D in Norway, where he was
exposed to the field.
OceanCanada, however, is just
the first step of what Sumaila
hopes will become a much larger
project. Already, he is involved
with a small pilot project in the
South China Sea which uses the
same principles, research ideas
and concepts as those developed
for OceanCanada.
The first component of this
latest project involves what Sumaila describes as an "assessment
of assessments," which entails
collecting all existing data on
Canada's oceans and using it to
assess their current state.
The second and most significant component involves predicting future changes under
different scenarios — including
climate change, ocean acidification and globalization — and analyzing both their bio-physical and
social impact on Canada's oceans.
"The goal is to protect Canada
for the future, in terms of managing the oceans," said Sumaila,
who stressed the importance of
preparing for different scenarios given the significance ofthe
oceans for Canada as a whole.
The third component consists
of putting the research in the
public eye, a responsibility which
falls to the sub-group ofthe
OceanCanada project in charge of
knowledge mobilization, co-led
by Ian Mauro, an academic and
filmmaker from the University
of Winnipeg.
"So we don't want to do this
and just publish the research
and put it up [on a shelf]," said
Sumaila. "We want to get the
information out to the people."
Ofthe $2.5M in funding, the
majority will go towards training
of students, resources for meetings, workshops and conferences
that bring the entire collaboration
together and fieldwork.
The funding amount is expected for the size ofthe project,
which covers areas of study that
range from ecology to economics
to philosophy.
For Sumaila, this will be a
diverse project that will bring
together various disciplines
in order to better understand
and improve the state of Canada's oceans.
"My hope is that we replicate [OceanCanada] around the
world," said Sumailia. "I see this
as the beginning of something.
We hope to conquer the world
with this idea."?!
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
UBC has issued a letter of apology
to Marc Rizzardo, a former
women's soccer coach hired for
only a few days before his job offer
was rescinded.
According to the letter from
UBC Vice President of Students
Louise Cowin on behalf of the
university, Rizzardo was hired to
coach the women's soccer team in
December 2012 due to his "excellent performance in the 2010 recruitment process." The university
then terminated his employment,
saying they did not follow their
hiring process correctly.
At the time of Rizzardo's recruitment, UBC received complaints for hiring a male coach.
UBC alumn and Canadian Soccer
Hall of Famer Andrea Neil was
then appointed to the position following Rizzardo's termination.
As a result, Rizzardo filed a
complaint alleging discrimination
based on his sex, and a BC Human
Rights Tribunal hearing was
scheduled for Oct. 6 of this year.
UBC has settled out of court
along with issuing an official
apology for the "unfairness" and
"public embarrassment" Rizzardo
suffered. XI
CHAN CENTRE
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ChrisThileand
Edgar Meyer
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■tickets and info at CHANCENTRE.COM
CHAN CENTRE
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS NEWS    I   TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2014
SUSTAINABILITY »
Kinetic sculpture to take root in new SUB
Interactive tree sculpture will be at centre of AMS Student Nest
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
The new Student Union Building
will be home to an interactive tree
sculpture called Timber.
UBC's new SUB, officially
named the AMS Student Nest,
is expected to be a LEED Platinum building — the highest green
building certification in North
America.
According to the New SUB
Sustainability website, various
sustainability features will include
a rooftop garden and new composting system. In order to remind
students of these features and
the intention of reducing UBC's
carbon footprint, the AMS and
the Social Ecological Economic
Development Studies Program
(SEEDS) opened a call in October
2011 for proposals for an interactive art piece to serve as the
focal point ofthe building.
The Timber team, made up of
six engineering students, came
together as a result of mutual
interest in the sculpture project,
and were awarded the funding to
put their project in the heart ofthe
new SUB.
Timber will be a 23-foot kinetic
tree sculpture that interacts with
its surroundings.
"I was in the shower and I was
thinking about [the sculpture].
That's where the idea came to me,"
said project member Alexander
Shkuratoff. "I was thinking like
2
3
4
A group of students designed the sculpture.
what if you had a metal pole standing there? First thing you want to
do when you go near a metal pole
is to knock on it and hear what it
sounds like. What you don't expect
to happen is for it to break apart
and collapse."
Timber's branches will
collapse when the sculpture
is touched.
"Metaphorical ambiguity is
good, in my opinion," said Bock
when asked about the symbolism
behind the tree's movement.
"Obviously, the tree is dying and
collapsing with human touch and
it's snowing our impact on the environment," said Shkurtoff, "But I
think the experience itself is maybe
a bigger highlight than the theme of
it [...] It's up to the interpretation."
=HOTO COURTED PROJECTTIMBER
Accordingto Bock, the team
drew inspiration from "anything
from candelabras to organic structure to StarTrek."
The sculpture will be on display
directly underneath The Nest upon
the opening ofthe new SUB. XI II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
AY, SEPTEMBER 2, 20
THEATRE»
UBC alumni present
The Zoo Story at Fringe
Neelam Sidhu
Contributor
The Vancouver Fringe Festival
and Aenigma Theatre are presenting a production of Edward
Albee's The Zoo Story. The one
act play falls under the Dramatic
Works Series, a new category in
the festival, providing space for
previously published dramatic
works. The show itself features a
bench in Central Park, two strangers and the conversation that
unfolds between them.
The play, written in 1958,
launched Albee's career and
helped establish Albee as the
great American playwright that
he is considered today. This production of The Zoo Story is being
put on entirely, with the exception of one person, by graduates
and current students ofthe UBC
Theatre program.
Tanya Mathivanan, a UBC
Theatre Department alumna who
both produces and directs the
show, takes a slightly unorthodox
approach to Albee's play. Peter
and Jerry, the two strangers,
are conventionally played by
middle-aged men. Mathivanan,
however, decided to cast Scott
Button as Peter and Tom Stevens
as Jerry. The two don't exactly fit
the traditional age group ofthe
characters.
Mathivanan's company, Aenigma Theatre, is dedicated to
providing equal opportunities
for younger actors to play roles
that they customarily may not get
the chance to. "Ultimately I will
always cast the best person who
I think is right for the role," said
Mathivanan.
Putting age aside, Mathivanan
saw Button and Stevens as best
"embodying the characters" rather
than "playing the roles," which
is often hard to find during the
initial auditions and call-backs,
she said.
Being almost 30, Stevens does
not find age to be a challenge to
overcome while playing Jerry, who
he described as "Just a man that is
no longer really in the workings of
society. He's found a way of kind
of living on the fringe and never
having to integrate fully." Button,
however, felt more of a challenge
at first to play Peter: a wealthy
middle-aged man from the Upper
East Side of New York.
"[Peter] lives a very comfortable, safe existence. And I think
that he really holds onto that comfortable, safe existence. He'll do
anything to preserve what that is.
And I think that he's really eliminated fear from his life, as best he
can —but like all of us the fear is
kind of always there anyway," said
Button.
"We both find ourselves in the
listening role, more often than not.
I think that we're both thinkers.
I think we're both very compassionate," said Button. For him, it's
"cozyingup to these similarities"
that help him in becoming Peter.
Mathivanan finds that The Zoo
Story, more than any other show
she has worked on, encapsulates
what she wants to do in her career.
"We can all relate to it so much:
loneliness, objection, feeling
UBC's Theatre department and Opera
program merge for the first time, and
produces new 2014/2015 season
Scott Jacobsen
Contributor
A new fall season, a merger of
UBC Theatre and Opera productions and a suite of new pieces for
the upcoming 2014/2015 season.
Does this sound exciting? It better. UBC Theatre and Opera productions have a fantastic lineup in
a first-ever union.
For 2014/2015 season, productions begin with Shakespeare's
Twelfth Night and work through
Bartered Bride, Naked Cinema,
The Bacchae 2.1, The Marriage
of Figaro, The Triumph of Love,
Choir Practice, ending with La
Traviata. With themes of freedom, triumphant women and love,
the common threads tie the pieces
together into a beautiful web.
Nancy Hermiston is directing four pieces: The Marriage of
Figaro, Bartered Bride, Choir Practice and La Traviata. Two ofthe
productions are directed by UBC
MFA candidates: The Bacchae
2.1, directed by Denis Gupa, and
The Triumph of Love, directed by
Barbara Tomas.
Deb Pickman, communications
and marketing manager for the
UBC theatre and film department, and Hermiston feel thrilled
with the upcoming productions.
In Twelfth Night, escapades
ensue of unrequited love and
sexual confusions. "It's been set
to take place in modern day in
New Orleans during Mardi Gras,"
said Pickman. "It's a romantic
comedy."
The next piece ofthe season,
The Bacchae 2.1, relates to the Eu-
ripdean celebration ofthe Greek
god, Dionysus, with works by
Klaus Theweleit's Male Fantasies, Lesbian Herstory Archives
by Joan Nestle, and The S.C.U.M.
Manifesto of Valerie Solanas.
Amidst this, it is "injecting this
ritualistic Philipino dance,"
said Pickman.
"[The Marriage of Figaro is]
a scheming, romantic intrigue.
It is considered one of Mozart's
greatest operas ever written,"
said Pickman.
Servants Suzanna and Figaro
find themselves in an imbroglio
involving everyone attempting to
save two marriages.
The season's finale, La Traviata, presents a doomed love tale
between Violetta, the courtesan,
and a handsome man, Alfredo. It
contains love, deceit, heartbreak
and flourishing parties.
"All of these operas are first-
timer friendly because they are
very engaging popular operas,
comedies, and tragedy in one
case," said Pickman.
Pickman said the merger will
benefit both the UBC Theatre
and Opera.
"There is this area ofthe campus that is a hotbed for art and
creativity," said Pickman. "It's
also a place where some ofthe
world's most treasured artists
come to exhibit."
The first show ofthe 2014/2015
season, Shakespeare's Twelfth
Night, premieres on September
24 and runs from September 25 to
October 11 in the Frederic Wood
Theatre, -a
Scott Button and Tom Stevens as Peter and Jerry in Edward Albee's The Zoo Story.
trapped, feeling claustrophobic,
not being able to connect with
people," said Mathivanan. Every
generation has a status quo, and
"there's always going to be people
who are left out, who are pushed
to the fringes," said Mathivanan.
She wants the audience to walk
away thinking about how they
interact with other people on all
levels, physically and subconsciously.
"What people should take from
this show is the question of what
are we doing? What is this thing
that we've deemed so socially
acceptable to be so isolated and so
cut off from one another that we
no longer really care about other
human beings? And I think as
PHOTO COURTESYJAVIERSOTRES
artists we all are so empathetic,
that we have chosen this line of
work because we are empathetic,
and because we can understand
and because we really reach out
to understand other people,"
said Stevens.
The Zoo Story will be playing at
The Vancity Cultural Lab Sept. 4,7,
8,10,13 and 14. "3
^COi,
PUBLIC NOTICE
BRITISH COLUMBIA UTILITIES COMMISSION
CORIX MULTI-UTILITY SERVICES INC.
APPLICATION FOR A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND
NECESSITY FOR PHASE 1 OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
NEIGHBOURHOOD DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEM
WRITTEN HEARING PROCESS
On August 8,2014, Corix Multi-Utility Services Inc. applied to the British Columbia Utilities Commission (Commission) for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) to construct and operate Phase 1 of the
proposed community-based district energy system at the University of British Columbia (Project), pursuant to
sections 45 and 46 of the Utilities Commission Act (Application).
HOW TO GET INVOLVED
A Person wishing to actively participate in the proceeding must register as an Intervener through the Commission's website at www.bcuc.com or in writing by September 12,2014. In their registration, Interveners must
identify the issues they intend to pursue and indicate the extent of their anticipated involvement in the review
process. Interveners will each receive a copy of all non-confidential correspondence and filed documentation,
and must provide an email address if available.
A Person not expecting to actively participate, but who have an interest in the proceeding, should register as
an Interested Party through the Commission's website or in writing, by September 12,2014, identifying their
interest in the proceeding. Interested Parties receive electronic notice of submissions and a copy of the Decision
when it is released.
Letters of Comment on the Application will also be accepted. All submissions and/or correspondence received
relating to the Application are provided to the Panel and all participants in the proceeding. Submissions are
placed on the public record and posted to the Commission's website. By participating and/or providing comment
on the Application, you agree that all submissions will be placed on the public record and posted on the Commission's website.
VIEW THE APPLICATION
The Application and supporting documentation are available on the Commission's website on the "Current Applications" page. If you would like to review the material in hard copy, it is available to be viewed at the locations
listed below:
British Columbia Utilities Commission
Sixth Floor, 900 Howe Street Vancouver, BC V6Z 2N3
Commission.Secretary@bcuc.com
Phone: 604-660-4700
Toll Free: 1-800-663-1385
Corix Multi-Utility Services Inc.
Suite 1160,1188 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, BCV6E4A2
Phone: (604) 697-6702v
Facsimile: (604) 697-6703
FURTHER INFORMATION
For more information or to register please contact Ms. Erica Hamilton, Commission Secretary using the contact
information above. // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
iMBER2,20
RIDE»
Bike Club is
off the chain
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
Ryan Grutze, President of the UBC Bike Club.
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
"If you're interested in riding
mountain bikes or road bikes,
you should join," said UBC Bike
Club President Ryan Grutze.
"Any skill level."
If that sounds ultra-inclusive,
that's because it is. The Bike Club
is made up of two sections that
anyone can join, depending on
their interests: a mountain side
and a road side. Grutze's passion
lies mainly with the mountaineers.
"It's mainly about just riding
around here. We don't do that
many races — it's about riding
and having a lot of fun."
The mountain bikers' first
event is coming up soon, although no specific date has been
set as of yet. A camping trip
to Whistler has been planned,
allowing club members to spend
three days and two nights up
the mountain. As any mountain
biker worth their salt knows,
the mountain is home to some
seriously radical trails within
easy reach of campsites, making
a Whistler outing an easy way
to escape both the city and all of
one's troubles.
The cyclists whose interests lie
on the pavement are a tad more
serious. The branch ofthe Bike
Club that races in the Northwest
Collegiate Cycling Conference,
the UBC Cycling Team, competes
with teams from Washington,
Oregon, Idaho and Montana.
Springtime is road season, then
cyclocross, cross-country and
downhill competitions are held
each fall. In line with the club's
inclusive spirit, all competition
is tiered in order to give a fair
chance to riders of all skill levels.
The cycling branch also puts
on two weekly rides, as much to
train for races as to get out and
enjoy the open road. These rides
are open to every member of the
club, again, regardless of experience or skill level.
Those interested in joining the
club shouldn't hold off, as the
club attempts to fit in much
of its activity before the cold
season hits.
"Once winter comes around
we're more limited," said Grutze.
"We're going to have the Whistler trip as soon as possible, then
next March or April we might
have another big trip. Other
than that, we're hoping to have
some weekend rides when it's not
raining ... maybe go down to the
States, or just ride Squamish and
the North Shore."
The club will have a booth at
Imagine Day, and will also be
present at Club Days (September
17-19 in the SUB). Membership
is $10 for UBC students, and
includes perks aside from biking
with people passionate about the
sport — the club also has occasional film premieres in reserved
classrooms, though Grutze
assured us that they're "mostly
mountain bike movies." XI
EXPLORE»
Places to be: Iceline Trail
A chilling excursion west of Banff
Ailsa Naismith
Contributor
If you look at a map ofthe Rockies, you may see a sliver of colour
drawn beside Banff National
Park, the don ofthe Canadian
National Parks. This is Yoho
National Park, the easternmost
outpost of B.C., and too often
it's just a scenic panorama on
the way into Banff. In terms of
sights per square footage, however, there's no comparison — a
fact echoed by the park's name,
which means "awe" in the Cree
language. The most spectacular part of this little gem is the
valley that stretches north to
south along the Yoho River,
carved out over millions of years
by glaciers. My sister Iona and I
set out to tackle the Iceline Trail
one beautiful July morning.
As we steered our hire car
around a series of hairpin bends,
the Toyota rumbled and shook,
and we wondered if breakdown
services operated in the Rockies.
We congratulated ourselves
on our ride with breakfast beside
the awesome Takakkaw Falls
— the Evian River was the most
beautiful dishwasher I've ever
used. Afterwards, we strolled up
to a viewpoint beside the falls.
Meltwaters had come from the
alpine glaciers during the long
spring, and made their bid for
freedom. The water sprang full
clear from the cliff, dropping a
staggering 254 metres into the
valley. I felt my ears fizz and pop
from the roar, and our clothes
were beaded with rain even
at this great distance. Double
rainbows appeared when we
turned our heads to the west. We
couldn't have wished for a more
auspicious start to our walk.
Reality bites, however. Our
first ascent mirrored our car's
troublesome journey: a group of
stacked switchbacks in an aged
forest, the contrary path ducking
and weaving and inflicting pain
on our calves. Other people we
passed cheered our flagging
spirits, and we chatted about the
views we hoped to see. From a
route first enclosed by pines we
rose to meet shelves of rock supporting the glacial cascades off
the mountains. The rock scree
we walked through was unlike
any I've seen before — yellow
and blue and alien.
Without sounding trite, what
makes the Rockies so special
is the solitude and peace you
can feel while meeting so many
people on your way. A parade
of walkers passed us; they were
our inconstant companions on
the trip. We met Dutch, British,
Canadians, French; groups of fit
sexagenarians, a couple with a
wildly excitable poodle. Perhaps the most appealing group
we met on our trail was the trio
of park rangers whose path we
crossed during the middle of
our hike: we were lucky to be
able to thank them for their
contributions to one ofthe great
natural wonders of our planet.
Out of interest, we asked them
what made the Iceline trail so
special. The answer, according
to one, is constant change. The
trail is spectacular not because
the scenery is great, but because
the sceneries are great. They're
almost too good to be true:
The Iceline Trail is a glacially-carved valley in eastern British Columbia on the way to Banff.
constantly changing in front of
you as the path curves, a movie
in Technicolor.
The start ofthe Iceline Trail
leads you past the cirques and
the glaciers, and the end finishes
in dense thickets of ancient forest punctuated by waterfalls. We
were inspired by some trail-runners we had met to charge down
the last part; the trees flew by
and we must have shaved half
an hour off our walk. As we
passed beyond Twin Falls, the
trailhead narrowed. The forest
of tall pines hemmed us in from
all sides. Our previous exertions were forgotten as the long
walk out began and the weather
matched our mood as the grey
clouds rolled in overhead.
Now the pace became important. We were walking down
a path in the fading light. The
trees seemed to continue in an
endless line. It was tedious, not
spectacular Rockies — and then
we saw lightning whip the valley
in front of us, just a flash in the
gloaming.
Suddenly the walk was alive
again. The feel in the air was
electric, and the coming storm
was dense and inevitable. We
had no choice but to run as the
storm chased us. There's nothing
that makes you feel more awake
than being on thunder road,
dashing out ofthe forest as your
feet slap the wooden bridge that
spans the final field. We laughed,
because of course we'll make it
=HOTO COURTESY IONA NAISMITH
to the car on time — won't we?
I ran, chasing Iona's red jacket
that had become a matador's flag
waving angrily at me. We smiled,
later. This is what we came to
the Rockies for. The sky spat
at us — it hurt, and we realized
that the perfect hailstorm was
descending. We made it to the car
a minute after the storm broke.
We grinned at each other and
settled back in the seats. It was
wonderful to be in the warmth as
we watched our fellow travellers
run in, one by one, bedraggled
and struggling to dry themselves
off. We're sure that the weather
gods will eventually deal out
meteorological revenge for our
schadenfreude, but really —
who's laughing now? tJ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2014    |    SPORTS
DIVE»
Explore B.C.'s deep with the AquaSoc
Angela Tien
Contributor
The thought of exploring the deep
underwater conjures up childhood
inklings of compact yellow submarines and old sailors in red beanies.
And while these memories seem farfetched to our adult minds, they are
closer to reality than you may think.
UBC's Aqua Society (AquaSoc) has
been home to the preservation of
these underwater fantasies since the
late 1950s.
Nestled in the basement ofthe
SUB, AquaSoc is an AMS club that
caters to students and members of
the Point Grey community. Originally founded by a passionate group
of professional divers with a keen
interest in the sea, AquaSoc is one of
the largest diving groups in Vancouver. The club has evolved into a fully
functional dive shop, equipped with
the necessary gear and instructors
for courses. They expel the common
misconception that only tropical
regions are dive-able, and showcase
the diversity and opportunities that
Vancouver presents.
"Jacques Cousteau, one ofthe
founders ofthe newer open-circuit
breathers, rated B.C. and the Pacific
Northwest the third best in the
whole world. And it's definitely rated the best cold water diving," said
Brendan Andresen, AquaSoc's shop
manager, director and instructor.
In line with its growing popularity, the club has expanded the
types of courses available. AquaSoc
offers courses for both beginners
and advanced divers. Novice divers
will enjoy the accompaniment of
professional instructors and staff,
a few of whom are UBC students
themselves.
Brendan Andresen, AquaSoc's shop manager, director and instructor.
"If a student comes to UBC, [and]
wants to learn how to dive, we run
them through a two week program
over four evenings and two days,
then we get them certified [with]
PADI [Professional Association
of Diving Instructors] open water
[and] go diving where they like,"
said Andresen.
Over the years, the club has developed newer courses to fulfil the
interests of their divers. AquaSoc
is hosting numerous fall specialty
courses that are specifically
designed for different types of
water and methods of diving. For
example, Andresen hopes to lead
one ofthe speciality courses on
night diving. These evening dives
will include a smaller instructor-to-student ratio and more
detailed experiences with the
marine life and water itself. Some
of these courses are also designed
for those who wish get back into
diving after a hiatus.
One of these specialty dives
will feature B.C.'s environment,
especially the abundant marine
life. Andresen hopes to work
together with the science department, especially for science
students or faculty interested in
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
marine life, to create first-hand
experiences and interaction with
the subjects the group is studying.
Try something new this year
and revel in the natural habitats
ofthe open water — just keep
Jacques Cousteau's words in
mind: "The sea, once it casts its
spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever." X&
CROSSWORD
1
2
3
4
5
G
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
IS
19
20
21
22
23
24
■ 25
I26
32
27
28
^3
34
35
29
30
31
40
37
41
3G
38
39
42
43
^^^|
44
45
46
|47
48
49
50
51
52
53
57
54
55
5G
5S
59
GO
Gl
G2
G3
ACROSS
DOWN
1-By surprise
1-Communion table
6-Swiss artist Pau
2-Vessel
10- Cambodian currency
3-Slippery as
14-Polynesian porch
4- Roman capital of Palestine; 5-
15-Standard
Young goat
16-Mother of the Valkyries
6-Mix dough
17-Cornered
7-Trent of the Senate
18-Novel ending
8- Harper's Bazaar illustrator
19-Manner of walking
9-Appearing
20-Matures
10-System of rule
21- Dowser
11-Steamed
23-Associated
12- Decree
25-Reproductive eel
13-Shopshaper
26-Yank's foe
21-Spider's creation
27-Similar
22-Rouse from sleep
29-Fax forerunner
24-JohnRitter'sdad
32-Home             ; Culkin movie
27-Dress style
33-       Beta Kappa
28-The       Ranger rode a horse
36-Movie-rating org.
called Silver
37-Imitating
29-HBO alternative
38-Trompel'
30-Ecol. watchdog
39-       in Charlie
31- Part of UNLV
40-Coeurd'
32-Copied
41-Suckle
33-A pop
42-Put up with
34-Towel word
43-Little one
35-Land in la mer
44-Doctrine maker
37-Make hostile
47-Fine wood particles
38-Outmoded
51-Extraction of teeth
40-Peek follower
54-       girl!
41-Without delay
55-Strike out
42- Fervent
56-Opera set in Egypt
43-Univ. aides
57-Shed
44-Purple Heart, e.g.
58-16th letter of the Hebrew
45-Daisy variety
alphabet
46-1 swear!
59-Adolescent
47-Examines closely
60-Earth
48-Wombs
61- Internet writing system that
49-Kick off
popularized "pwn3d" and "nOOb"
50-Gogol's"      Bulba"
62- Cupid's counterpart
52-A wedding cake may have three
63- Prepares for publication:
ofthese
53-Prefix with logica
57-Corroded AMS EVENTS PRESENTS
A
r~\
FEATURING
FRIDAY SEPT 5,2014 | 300 - 900 PM | NORTH SUB PLAZA | ALL AGES
S12"20 WITH FIRSTWEEK WRISTBAND
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.GOODNIGHTS.ME/BACKYARDBBQ/TICKETS
fffi?
4 t&e^&w&d^&faumwftiM&week
Improv Show e/s
Totem Ballroom :>-
Comedy Show «£*
Norm Theatre (SUB) 9
Outdoor Yoga Class
Main Mall (north of fountain)
Outdoor Dance Class
Live at Lunch Stage, SUB North
Wet'n Wild Pool Party
The UBC Aquatic Centre
Open Air Pit Night (19+)   v*
SUB 2nd floor Patio & PIT Pub
Shaw)
AUG 30 - SEPT 12
Outdoor Yoga Class
Main Mall (north of fountain)
Outdoor Dance Class
Live at Lunch Stage, SUB North
Improv Show
Vanier Ballroom
Galactic Paint Party
SUB Ballroom
Free Concert
Outside the SUB (North Plaza):
War Baby (Sept2), Village (Sept 3),
Fine Times (Sept 4), Flintettes
(Sept 8), Supermoon (Sept 9), Royal
Streets (Sept 10), Purple Hearts
Social Club (Sept 11)
Shine Day
SUB Ballroom
Spoiler Room (19+)
Koerner's Pub
For full event listing, visit
www.amsfirstweek.com
^5
£s
mf\^\m
^^               —
-—-sg^n.'i-ii--Lk
0-Q£Mr(Lfa fadtiuajl
LOCAL, LIVE PERFORMERS
WASHBOARD UNION | TWIN BANDIT
Square Dancing with
SHOUT!WHITE!DRAGON!
cui&mxwe.
CELEBRATE LOCAL FOOD COLTORE
UBC FARM
3461   ROSS  DRIVE,  UBC  (BESIDE WESBROOK VILLAGE)
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 1213-8PM
FREE ADMISSION-
ams
3*®^W^§W
BACKYARD BBQ
IS IN ASSOCIATION WITH
$ Skullcandy

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