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The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1971

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Array Garrod wins election rerun
to become AMS president
Second count of ballots shows
Garrod narrow winner over Lau;
Broughton far behind leaders
GARROD
Student senator Steve Garrod is the new Alma Mater
Society president.
Garrod narrowly
defeated AMS
co-ordinator Hanson
Lau by 81 votes in
the second count of
ballots cast Tuesday
and Wednesday.
The human
government, of
which Garrod is a
member, now
controls all eight
AMS executive
positions and ten
other positions on
next year's council.
"Neither    myself
nor   Hanson   ran   a
by 81 votes        high-level   campaign
since we both felt that the students knew the issues and
were in a position to make the decisions," Garrod told
The Ubyssey Thursday.
Ed faculty
boycotting
classes today
Students and teachers in the education faculty are
boycotting all education classes today.
In a special meeting yesterday, the education
undergrad society voted unanimously to support the B.C.
Teachers Federation, which is going on a province-wide
one-day strike today.
BCTF is protesting a bill wliich has its third reading in
legislature today.
"The main issue is over pensions for retired teachers,
who are asking for 17 per cent more than they are
presently receiving," said EDUS ombudsman Gary
Gumley.
Gumley also mentioned two other proposals included
in the bill which BCTF is against.
"One concerns changing BCTF from a compulsory to
a voluntary organization, which will weaken the
federation's strength considerably. The other concerns
teachers sitting on school boards," he said.
Gumley said that now teachers are only allowed to sit
on school boards outside their own district.
"The teachers feel it is a violation of their civil rights
not to be allowed to sit on any school board," he said.
In the EdUS meeting yesterday, it was also decided
that an information picket be set up outside the education
building to inform students of the BCTF situation.
"What we want is for education students to become
more aware of what's happening in the teaching field
which they will be entering soon," said Gumley.
He also mentioned that members of the education
faculty greeted the idea of boycotting education classes
with enthusiasm.
Deadline extended
The deadline for applications for provincial
government scholarships has been extended.
"We had set a deadline for March 15," administration
president Walter Gage said Thursday.
"This deadline has, however, been extended a few
days and applications will still be accepted without any
questions asked," he said.
Gage said that he hopes to be in contact with all
applicants before the academic year is over.
Applications should be sent to Gage's office, Room
207, Buchanan Building.
Garrod feels that the success of the human
government slate in these elections is a clear mandate for
change.
"There's a need for change on this campus - the
student is living in an alienated state," he said.
"There is no sense of community. The human
government makes no promises, but there are certain
things we can do to change this environment.
"We still plan to hold an October referendum to seek
student mandate for our program and policy," he said.
The human government executive, along with the
new council officially takes over the business of the AMS
on March 25. ,' I ^      i ' / n <-> .-> , r _
It is expected that the new executiv^Vvwjl have some "   l"
concrete programs to present to the student body by that
time. *c>^-' ■■* ■? -——*■---A. '
Hanson Lau ascribed the human government Trtetoag^^*'
to sloganeering.
"It was not a victory for radicalism on campus but
rather a victory for a pretty slogan," he said.
Neither Garrod nor Lau had a majority on the first
count of ballots. Garrod had however a 103 lead on Lau.
Bill Broughton was last with 215 votes.
On the second count of ballots, the scrutineers
counted the 215 second choices from Broughton's votes.
Lau took the majority of these, but he was too far behind
Garrod from the first count to win.
The extra 45 Broughton votes that Garrod received
gave him the mandatory 50 per cent plus one vote for a
majority and victory.
—maureen gans photo
YOU SAY you don't like the three cent per cheque raise on the use of your chequing account. Then bitch, like these
people have. Smartly-dressed types were out in lull force in front of the new administration building Bank of Montreal,
Wednesday afternoon.
Refusal to expand Pit facilities
sends AMS to student court
The Alma Mater Society is being taken to student
court for refusing to expand the Pit.
Former Pit manager Erwin Epp has served notice to
student court naming the AMS finance and SUB
management committees for disregarding the wishes of
the students as expressed at the general meeting in April.
At that time, students voted to set aside $250,000 for
expansion of the beer drinking facilities if capital costs
could be recovered by the beer-selling operation.
The plan ran into a snag when the provincial
government denied a draught beer license for SUB.
Epp said he believes an outlay of only $96,000 would
be needed to expand facilities and that this could be easily
recovered over a 20-year period.
He said AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce, assistant
treasurer   John   Wilson   and   members   of   the   SUB
management committee do not think the cost could be
recovered.
Bruce and Wilson say the Pit is making only $25 per
night, Epp said. But Epp believes that with the sale of 150
cases of beer three nights a week, the profit is more like
$125 a night.
He has asked student court to have the records of the
Pit seized for scrutiny by an independent body and to sit
in judgment over the finance and SUB management
committees for neglect of duty and violation of the AMS
constitution.
Epp said the Pit could make a greater profit if it
could seat more people. It now seats 165 but can do no
advertising because it is already turning people away at
the door. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   19,   1971
Federal government initiates
summer job program for youth
OTTAWA (CUP) - The federal
government will spend almost $58 million this
summer on its youth pacification program.
Details of the program came at a press
conference Tuesday attended by four senior
cabinet members and about 40 press
representatives.
Although the ministers present — Pelletier,
secretary of state, Lang, manpower and
immigration, Macdonald, defense and
Stanbury, head of Information Canada — were
unclear on many points it seems the money
will be spent on almost anything that young
middle class Canadians can think of to do to
keep busy and off the streets — at least until
the money runs out.
There will between 1.3 and 1.5 million
students out of school this summer, about
980,000 are expected by the government to
be looking for work.
Last year, about 62 per cent of students
that got any jobs in the summer got them
through "the private sector". This summer the
federal government is almost doubling last
summers spending on youth.
The ministers couldn't say exactly how
many students would eventually find jobs
through the program, or how much money
students getting jobs through the government
spending could hope to make.
They did say though that the program for
jobs will favor post-secondary students.
Here is what seems to be the government's
plan:
Twenty-three hundred students, chosen
on a basis of university attended and
unemployment rates in the region will work
for the public service of Canada in Ottawa
doing meaningful, worthwhile jobs and at the
same time learning about how Canada's civil
servants operate.
Seven hundred students willl study the use
of drugs by youth "to provide a system of
information from youth to youth during the
summer as a basis for ongoing programs
thoughout the year."
Six hundred athletes will get educational
grants to keep them in school giving them a
chance to excel as athletes and at the same
time to continue their studies.
About 38,000 students will participate in
group travel programs backed by the federal
treasury (read Canadian taxpayer's money).
An equal number of students will take
advantage of Canadian armed forces and
militia training programs. About 4,000 of the
38,000 will be working as civilians.
(The militia, which is roughly equivalent to
America's National Guard, in particular is
increasing its role in taking care of young
Canadian students. An additional 8,000 men
will be allowed to enter it).
An estimated 400,000 students will be
travelling on the roads, taking advantage of a
"network of hostels" to sleep in run by
volunteers or organizations within the
community.
But the biggest lump sum goes to the
"opportunities for youth" concept out of
Pelletier's office. Fifteen million dollars will
go to voluntary organizations and citizens'
groups "aimed at stimulating communities
across Canada to put forward and operate
imaginative and useful projects expected to
employ tens of thousands of young Canadians
during the summer months," according to
Pelletier.
"The scope of this program will be limited
only by the imagination of the young people
themselves and the participating citizens'
groups and voluntary community
organizations. "He expressed hope that
students, in particular, would develop exciting
and innovative proposals in a wide range of
useful community projects including such
efforts as urban re-development, clean up
campaigns, community research projects and
pollution probes," his press release said.
to page 17 see: HAZY
The columnist makes a complaint
(The following are excerpts from Dennis
Braithwaite's column in the Toronto Telegram
on Thursday).
What's all the fuss and feathers about
providing summer jobs for students? How
about finding work for 700 or 800 thousand
heads of families and others who are walking
the streets or standing in breadlines?
And what kind of "work" will the
government create with the $58 million it
plans to spend on the kids? From the prime
minister's description of it, the proposal
doesn't involve any real work at all, but is
merely a glorified system of baby-sitting, a
further indulgence of the most coddled,
sheltered and spoiled generation of young
people in the history of the world.
.. Of course there's work to be done, but
"77
these kids won't be asked to do it. Have you
tried hiring anybody for the simplest repair
work around your place lately? Or to clean
out your garage, shovel snow, gather up fallen
branches? The countryside is a mess of
discarded bottles, rotting cartons, dead elm
trees and potholed roads, but putting it right
means getting your hands dirty and maybe a
stiff back to boot. "Drug research" is cleaner
and "sharpening up athletic skills" a lot more
fun.
The government knows it won't get five
minutes worth of useful labor for its $57
milion: That's not the intention. What the
program really amounts to is a big fat bribe, a
desperate and probably futile plan to buy
juvenile peace during the summer ahead. If
there's one thing Pierre Trudeau is hooked
on, it's public order: If he can't reason with
the kids or down-face them into docility, then
he'll buy them off with fun and games
disguised as works projects.
. . . But what are we going to do with all
these kids? I don't mean this summer or next,
but when they finally graduate from
university? There are no jobs for most of
them and never will be, not the kind of jobs
they're trained for. There's work to be done,
yes: but it isn't work they'll ever do. You
won't catch BA's and MA's, conditioned to be
more or less useless, fulfilling useful tasks like
plumbing or carpentry. Besides, the unions
wouldn't stand for it.
Maybe we'll have to shoot all these
redundant kids or transport them to Australia,
or start a war to get rid of them. One thing's
sure, we can't afford to go on supporting
them in idleness. No way.
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THURSDAY
& FRIDAY
UNTIL
9 P.M. Friday, March  19,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
•    l$*
'■ .*
AY, LADDIE it was a grand trek back to Cairo. Sand, dried wadies, dunes and dust
wherever you looked. It was tough going after the fifth day when the major rationed
us down to a pint a man. All around us were these mirages of cool green firs. It was
— keith dunbar photo
hell! Parched, lad, you haven't been thirsty until you've trekked North Africa. Ay, and
we hated those royal engineers in their lorry. Here's to Monty.
Cyclists block university traffic
Four hundred cyclists can't be wrong.
The 400 cyclists successfully blocked traffic for half
an hour Tuesday morning on University Boulevard to
protest the poor cycling facilities at UBC.
Cycling club president Gordon Bisaro, who organized
the demonstration, was surprised at the turnout.
"I didn't think there were that many cyclists on
campus," said Bisaro. "If that many people can get out of
bed at 8 a.m. to protest the poor cycling facilities on
campus, then there must be something wrong."
The cyclists want bicycle paths built along the three
roads into campus so the bikers won't have to battle cars
for a piece of roadway.
/Honey for hostels from gov't
strictly for the summer
By BRIAN McWATTERS
and NATE SMITH
WINNIPEG (Staff) - The federal government's
highly publicized youth program may result in another
Jericho hostel crisis.
In a press conference here Thursday, secretary of
state Gerard Pelletier said the government will provide
funds for local groups wishing to establish hostels for
transient youth during the summer.
However he said the program would be strictly for
the summer months and all funds will be cut off in
September.
Last year the government provided youth hostels in
armouries across the country but that program also ceased
in the fall and some 200 transients were left with nowhere
to go when Vancouver's Jericho hostel closed.
The transients occupied the hostel until forcibly
removed by RCMP and Vancouver riot police Oct. 16.
When asked how the government could avoid a
similar situation this summer Pelletier said, "One purpose
of the hostels is to involve people in the community and
we would expect them to establish strict rules as to how
many nights people could stay there."
He said he has already discussed the Vancouver
situation with local groups who told him up to 3,000 beds
could be made available in peak periods.
"I also met with the mayor of Vancouver and he said
we (the federal government) recognized our mistakes,"
Pelletier said.
"Unfortunately I don't know if I can say as much for
him."
Pelletier said his departments realize that Vancouver
has a special problem but feels the situation could be
better this summer
The government program for transients will also
include about 50 roadside kiosks across the country at
which local groups can inform transients of local
attractions, job opportunites and counselling service. The
kiosks would also serve as "hitch-hiking depots."
Pelletier said a major part of the government's $57.8
million program will be the "opportunities for youth"
whereby any group or local organization could request
federal support for "meaningful projects that would also
employ students."
Although extremely vague about what specific
projects could be involved he said they could include
urban redevelopment, clean-up campaigns, community
research projects and pollution probes.
"Employment prospects are not very good and the
federal government feels it will be involved in this area for
quite a while/' Pelletier said.
Vietnamese conference comes to SUB
The SUB management has approved the use of SUB
for the Indo-Chinese Women's conference March 31 to
April 5 — for a fee.
The conference is being sponsored by the campus
women's liberation group and the Graduate Student
Association.
However, the SUB management committee decided at
a meeting held Wednesday.that a nominal fee, to be set by
building manager Graeme Vance, should be charged for
the use of student facilities.
At Wednesday's meeting women's liberation members
Anne Martin and Sharon Boylan, who is also Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer-elect and grad rep Everett
Hoogers asked that the facilities be given to the
conference free.
Hoogers and Boylan both pointed out that there is a
precedent for giving conference space free is SUB.
AMS ombudsman Hamish Earle seemed to feel the
request was out of order.
He said the use of six rooms during the beginning of
April would deprive the students of essential study space.
Martin pointed out that the conference was, in the
most profound sense, educational. The majority of the
committee agreed with her.
The conference has three delegations coming from
Indo-China, consisting of two women from the provisional
revolutionary government of South Vietnam, two women
from North Vietnam and two women from Laos.
Students are invited to the plenary session, Friday
April 2, in the ballroom.
Bisaro has predicted that if cycle paths aren't built,
some cyclist is going to get seriously injured or killed.
The cyclists passed two motions after completing the
ride down the Boulevard and sent them to highways
minister Wesley Black.
The first called for the provincial government to
immediately recognize the need for provisions for the
safety of cyclists and the second said that unless
something is done soon to improve the cycling facilities
another demonstration will be held against all UBC traffic.
(The provincial government has jurisdiction over UBC
roads.)
Bisaro said that Black now requested a meeting with
the cyclists.
The club has been included on the non-acadernic
planning agenda of April 8 and UBC physical plant has
promised 540 bike racks with lock-in mechanisms.
(The club has asked students to send suggestions on
improved bike rack designs to Box 62, SUB.)
Bisaro said that copies of all correspondence have
been sent to city hall in hopes that the city will take some
action to help cyclists.
Aid. Brian Calder appeared at the demonstration and
said he hopes governments will react to pressure of the
kind displayed at the demonstration because it signifies an
obvious need.
Bisaro said that if the cycling facilities on campus
were improved the number of cyclists would double.
"The success of the demonstration has made me
re-estimate the cycling population at UBC," said Bisaro.
"I now put it somewhere around 1,000 — and that's
despite the poor facilities."
Unemployment boost
'only 7,000 more'
OTTAWA (CUP) — There are now according to
Dominion Bureau of Statistics calculations, 675,000
women and men who would like to be working in Canada
but can't find jobs.
That's only 7,000 more than at mid-January, so the
government (and the daily press) say what a wonderful
improvement that is.
The DBS said there was "a very slight and somewhat
smaller than usual increase in the number of persons
unemployed" for February this year than in February last
year.
So of course, that's an improvement.
Why in 1970, the January to February increase
totalled 40,000 men and women. This year it's a 7,000
increase. It must be an improvement.
But the total represents 8.1 per cent of the labour
force.
In February, 1970, the month we have made such an
"improvement" over, the seasonally adjusted rate of
unemployment was 4.8 per cent. Page
U B Y S S
Friday, March  19,  1971
"What do you plan to do now that you've isolated the colony of cancer cells?"
TMU8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH 19, 1971
Gentlemen or . . .
It is heartening to see that the teachers of British
Columbia are prepared to strike to support their
demands for better pensions.
In a province as wealthy as B.C. is reputed to be it
is absurd to think that our teachers have among the
worst pension provisions in the country.
And the teachers federation is right in striking to
support the welfare of retired teachers, many of whom
who have served school boards for as long as 35 years
with less than adequate reward.
But we are concerned about a problem the BCTF
has created for itself, a problem which will get worse
unless the teachers make a firm decision in the near
future.
The problem was best isolated by a major union
leader a few days ago, who said: "The federation likes
to think of itself as a professional association.
"They want to be gentlemen but when it comes
down to acting like a union and engaging in collective
bargaining, they don't know what to do.
Make a decision, BCTF. Be a union and work for
your members or be an association of gentlemen.
Sometimes, you can be both.
Editor: Nate Smith ;..■.•„■,.-,
m-        .                            Maurice Bridae bomt>  >n Air Canada and another up
J*?ws Maurice »rioge Gerard pelletier, who dropped in for a
c,*y     Glnny salt m0ment to ask  who the hell is Nate
Jan O Brien Smith   but   we   couldn't   give   him   a
Wire     .. John Andersen satisfactory   answer,   which   prompted
Snorts Keith Dunbar charges    of   anti-Semitism   from    Art
««•« Naws                         Jennifer Jordan Smolensky and  resulted  in a punch in
Ass t News    Jennlfer J°™an the  mouth  for Art from the nand of
Les,,J? Plommer jermjfer AMey  wno was cnarged with
Photo    David Enns- anti-Manitobism   by   Brian   McWatters
David Bowerman who   called   to   breathe   a   beer   and
Page Friday Tim Wilson Sharon Boylan was while Jinny Ladner
wasn't     and     Jan     O'Brien     did     a
lightheaded rendition of Tea For Two
And I was walking along the beach And    A    Joint    For    The    Freak,   a
in my white tennis shoes and my collie performance     which      prompted     a
dog was in love with your collie dog soft-shoe    circus    act    from    Jennifer
and I was feeling so sad because there Jordan   and   John   Thompson,   while
was no fucking staff, 'cept for David David   Bowerman   clapped   and   John
Schmidt,   who   did .his   Rin   Tin   Tin Andersen hummed and Leslie Plommer
imitation  in  the corner of the office, sneezed   and   Maurice wept and   Dick
which   had to be cleaned up by Mike Betts puked and Rod McKuen shat and
Sausages, who spent the day whistling I Michael Finlay showed them all how to
Wish  I   Was An  Oscar  Meyer Weiner, do it with class and no mean amount
while Sandy Kass threatened to put a of style. Sports didn't.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Chartrand
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Michel Chartrand on Saturday
night (March 13) was hissed by
some women in the audience
without just cause. This incident
started when a woman stepped up
to the "microphone to ask a
question. Michel greets her,
among his words are "Let's talk of
love". This is greeted by hisses
apparently generated by some
women in the audience and
perhaps a few men. He speaks a
few words, delivered with a tone
of sadness and disappointment,
of women's liberation. The
rebuttal from the audience was
more hisses and accusations of
"Male chauvinist". In many, or
even the majority of cases (most
noticeable in public life is M. P. E.
Trudeau) such words are the
result of male chauvinism.
Anyone who listened to him and
understood him or who knows off
Simone Chartrand should realize
this fact. Here the women
involved were ignorant of Michel.
Why have women denied and
tried to erase any mention or
proclamation of love in public or
private? It is claimed that men
only see women as sex and love
objects. Not so with Michel. He
declares equality for all, but why
should equality deny love
between men and women? He
realizes the fact that both intellect
and love can be compatable which
is what many women appear to
have denied can exist. Many men,
true, do deny love and intellect
the chance to co-exist possibly
because of reactionary
conditioning based on primitive
and ancient requirements and
presently promoted by the
establishment because of its fear
of enlightenment of women and
the subsequent disruption of the
status quo, which, to business and
to a less extent, government, can
be expensive to them if disrupted.
Surely love between man and
women  has been exploited and
warped but certainly not by such
people as M. Chartrand. Again
the culprit, as many have pointed
out and as Michel singled out for
other crimes, is the capitalist
establishment. This real criminal
cannot by underemphasized and
must continue to be exposed,
explained, and proclaimed until it
is realized by all. This way we will
stop threatening the symptoms
and be ready to treat the disease.
NEVILLE WALLBANK
Typing
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to a letter
written to the Editor in the March
16 issue of The Ubyssey regarding
the AMS typing service, I would
like to make some comments.
First, Dell Valair's little gem of
witticism is a gross exaggeration
of what in fact took place. While
it is true that some typographical
errors were present in his paper,
the onus of every mistake cannot
be placed on the AMS Service's
typists. I would like to point out
that before a typist can attempt
to transcribe an essay, she must
first be able to understand
whatever form of communication
the paper seems to be written with.
In Mr. Valair's case, that task was
nearly impossible. As a guide to
any future typing he should
require (whatever the source) I
respectfully suggest he learn how
to write legibly.
Second, that it is a policy of
the AMS Typing Service to ask
each student to read his paper
over before accepting it, and if he
should find any errors to note,
them and return that, page if
appropriate to be corrected. In
Mr. Valair's case return of the
essay to the typing service was
made and prompt attention was
given to it. The problem however
was in noting the mistakes. It
seems that a small pencil mark or
other similar easily removed,
notification was not sufficient.
Mr. Valair felt he should take a
ball point pen and scratch out
each error, effectively destroying
that page no matter how minor
the error. It is my contention
then', that the financial loss born
by Mr. Valair due to the
unwillingness of the typist to
retype the entire essay under
those circumstances, lies in the
right place.
Lastly, I would like to point
out that since the AMS typing
service was started, one hundred
and fifty-three (153) thesis, essays
and papers ago, a total of four
complaints have been received.
Three were looked after to the
satisfaction of the student within
a short period of time, and the
fourth, Mr. Valair's, due to the
student's own lack of
consideration and common sense,
was refused.
I think the numbers alone
speak for themselves in this
matter.
BOB COUSINS
AMS typing service
Nursing
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We are responding to Kerry
Bysouth's letter to the Editor, re:
the Industrial Education fee
referendum which appeared in the
March 16th issue of The Ubyssey.
In this letter, he made reference
to the "fact" that the nursing
students at the Vancouver General
Hospital do not pay the fifteen
dollar SUB fee.
We wish to clarify the
statement:
1) Nursing students
presently training at VGH have no
affiliation at all with UBC, so
obviously don't pay any UBC
student fees.
2) UBC nursing students,
who use the clinical facilities at
VGH do pay the full student fees,
including the $15 for SUB.
3) At one time, UBC nursing
students trained with the VGH
students for three years at that
to page 5: see MORE LETTERS Friday, March  19,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
B.C. government keeps quiet over Skagit
By SANDY KASS
The provincial government has once more failed to
speak for the people.
No official B.C. representation was made at the
Mount Vernon public hearing into the Skagit Valley
development scheme Wednesday or at the hearing in
Seattle, Tuesday.
Washington state ecology department head John
Biggs said Wednesday that by making no official
presentation at the hearings, the B.C. government is
willing to go through with the 1967 agreement.
The scheme, which calls for raising of Ross Dam by
121 feet and the flooding of nine miles of southern B.C.'s
Skagit Valley was approved in principle by the B.C.
government in 1967.
In the same agreement the government approved the
granting of a 99-year lease of the valley to Seattle City
Light and Power Company a cost of $35,000 per year.
The estimated cost to Seattle Lightis $2.9 million per
year plus the yearly payment to the B.C. government.
Liberal MLA for North Vancouver-Capilano Dave
Brousson, who attended the Mount Vernon meeting asked
Biggs to meet with provincial officials in Victoria.
Biggs turned down the request on the grounds that
his authority ends at the 49th parallel and thatt his
department is not concerned with the ecology of B.C. if
provincial officials cannot show some concern themselves.
Brousson said B.C. was not officially represented
because the government did not wish to go back on its
1967 agreement. He stated his opinion as a private citizen.
Provincial opposition leader Dave Barrett said
Thursday if the provincial government did not take some
action soon the Skagit Valley negotiations should be
turned over to the federal government.
Brousson said the 1967 agreement was "a very poor
deal."
"By developing the timber, industry in the valley, the
province could gain over $50,000 yearly. By accepting
to page 17: see FEDERAL
MORE LETTERS
from Page. 4
hospital. These students were then
exempted from student building
fees. Perhaps this is what Mr.
Bysouth is referring to. However,
this program was discontinued in
1958. Since then, all UBC nurses
are on campus enough to warrant
paying the $15 SUB fee.
We are pleased that the
Industrial Education fee
referendum passed, but just
wanted to set the facts straight.
FAYE    BARICHELLO
IRIC CARTER
Nursing III
Weary
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I find myself becoming rather
wearied by The Ubyssey's
narrow-minded and surface
reactions to any issue which even
hints of government involvement
or action. It would seem as
though the editorial staff feels it
their divine right to be adamantly
anti-establishment on such issues,
to the detriment of logic and
reason which hopefully would
produce a counteracting
viewpoint.
I note that in A First Step, The
Ubyssey, March 12, 1971, p. 4,
the editorial comment
begrudgingly retracted a
statement which had previously
been generalized concerning the
Ed.U.S. However, it then ended
the expose with a final stab to the
effect that all the resolutions in.
the world are meaningless without
action. Obviously, this resolution,
and the telegrams which followed
it up, have brought about action.
DO YOU NEED AN
OPERATION ON
YOUR ANDROIDS?*
It's really a rather silly question for
this year. But, mayhaps, later in the
decade, it will be a question big
enough to involve the B.C. Medical
Plan. It may be that someone will
want to have his androids
programmed to go to Sunday
morning service as proxies — to
worship, to find out what the
sermon's about and what the church
should be doing in the world.
BUT IF YOU'VE
ALREADY  LOST
YOUR ANDROIDS
or may never have had one. why not
come yourself to study some rather
ancient love-letters at 9:30 a.m. on
Sunday and then stay around to
celebrate with some faith-feeling
people at 10:30? The Lutheran
Campus Centre, 5885 University
Blvd., is one among many places that
you can re-discover your person.
(*Android—a simulated man created
by man.)
The minister of education is
reviewing that section of Bill 47
which deals with teacher
membership on school boards.
As a member of the Ed. U.S.
council I have criticized the
society's lack of support of
important external issues, such as
the order-in-council. It is laudable
that the Ed.U.S. is now
determining a united, forceful
reaction to Bill 47, particularly
the clause which infringes on civil
rights of teachers. With respect to,
and not in defence of, the Ed.
U.S., I feel that the action taken
was appropriate and effective,
within both the student body and
the teaching profession.
However, the Ed.U.S. has
become another target on which
the wrath of The Ubyssey editors
can be aired. We are thus
associated with all other
organizations, campus or
community, who do not blatantly
resort to radical action. When is
the monotony and parallelism of
Ubyssey viewpoint and comment,
which blindly advocates the
overthrow of any form of
administration, going to end?
Some   constructive   reporting   is
long overdue.
TREVOR GAMBELL
"Incumbus"
Ed.U.S.
When the administrations are
overthrown, naturally - Ed.
Humanism
P.S. 2. Why not have for a
change candidates of, say, Animal
Government on next year's slate?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I support The Human
Government — I do not want to
be anti-human or un-human.
JAROSLAV NAPRSTEK
Arts 2
P.S. Sorry Lau, you, and others
like you, lost your case before the
election even started. What do
you think a simple voter like me
thought while making his
decision. "Shall I vote for Love?
They may want to make everyone
make love the whole year — for
God's sake no, I have to study,
too. I shall better vote Human it
sounds more indifferent. • They
will not interfere in my personal
doings? Next time think harder
how to label your proposed
government.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  19,  1971
The Paris Commune;
one hundred years gone
By SHARON and CHARLIE BOYLAN
The entrepreneurs, merchants and governors who
made up the ruling class of Canada in 1871 managed to
bring B.C. under their sphere of influence with
remarkably little opposition from the people they ruled.
But while the rituals of B.C.'s confederation with the rest
of Canada was being planned, the bourgeoisie of France
was engaged in a far more difficult endeavor: the
suppression of the Paris Commune.
The formation of the Commune on March 18,1871,
marked the first time workers anywhere in the world
exercised political power. It was the first attempt at
socialization of modern industry and democratization of a
modern state, and it took on an international character
when the red flag of the Commune was proclaimed "the
flag of the World Republic."
The audacity and courage of those working men and
women of Paris, who from March 18 until May 28 lived
out at least the hint of an alternative to a capitalist society
based on class privilege, state bureaucracy, racism and
religion, have inspired rebellious workers around the
world.
Three days after the last communard defenders were
shot down en masse by Versailles troops, B.C. premier
Amor de Cosmos wrote in the Victoria Daily Standard:
'The names of Rouge, Red Republican, Communist, scare
men not only in France but abroad. But the day will come
when the principles of the ill-fated rebellion of Paris will
be extolled to the skies.'
No doubt Cece Bennett will read this tidbit from our
very own B.C. Father of Confederation when Mr. and Mrs.
Trudeau open the whale pool at the Vancouver aquarium
on May 1st (May Day — another day workers remember).
The story of the Commune is probably best told by
Karl Marx who delivered his essay, The Civil War in
France, to a general council meeting of the International
Working Man's Association on May 30, 1871 - a day
before de Cosmos commented in the Daily Standard:
Marx's co-worker, Frederick Engels, wrote a terse outline
of the Commune to celebrate its 20th anniversary in
1891.
His version briefly:
• December 2, 1851: Louis Bonaparte seized the
National Assembly. Industrialization flourishes (those
who own flourish more than those who work).
• 1870: Bonaparte regime's French chauvinism
leads to territorial war with Bismarck's Germay.
• September 4, 1870: Paris Revolution knocks
off Bonaparte, whose armies have been smashed at Sedan
and captured at Metz. Germans at gates of Paris.
• National Guard — majority armed workers —
supports bourgeois government. Workers storm Town Hall
October 31. Government breaks its promises. Workers
thrown out. Resist civil war in face of German army.
• January 28, 1871: starved Paris capitulates.
National Guard keeps arms. Germans occupy only small
section of Paris.
• March 18, 1871: bourgeois government led by
Thiers tries to seize National Guard artillery bought with
public subscription. Workers very angry. Declare war on
Versailles.
• March 26: Paris Commune elected; proclaimed
on March 28.
• Commune abolishes conscription, remits all
payments of rent for dwelling houses, decides to pay
officials no more than 6,000 francs (the average worker's
salary), decrees separation of Church from State, abolishes
state payments to church, excludes all religion from
schools, nationalizes church property. (English Jesuit
priest-poet, Gerrard Manley Hopkins, suppors the
Commune in spite of Catholic hierarchy hysteria.)
• April 16: Commune orders statistical tabulation
of factories closed down by capitalists. Plans for workers
to take them over in co-operative societies, organized in
"one great union."
• April 6: guillotine publicly burnt by National
Guard, on May 16th destroy Napoleon I's "Victory
Column" on the Place Vendome, denouncing it as a
symbol of chauvinism and incitement to national hatred.
• April 30: pawn shops closed, night work for
bakers abolished, employment offices closed.
• Versailles government of Thiers - meanwhile,
regroups French army from Germans. Captures "luxury"
Paris first; working class east-end Paris resists for eight
days.
• May 28: Commune vanquished. Unarmed men,
women and children shot en masse. Thousands more
deported.
Their crime? They dared to be their own masters.
They dared to abolish the privilege of capital, and the
arbitrary power of the state.
Nor have workers forgotten the essence of the
Commune: workers' control of their factories and
democratization of the state. All officials of the
Commune were elected, subject to recall, and paid no
greater salary then the average workman.
Then we should ask ourselves how much we're
hearing that during the centennial celebrations.
Come Out To Vote  •   General Meeting
THE GUARANTEED INCOME PROPOSAL:
e WILL GIVE EACH UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY AND STUDENT ASSOCIATION ON CAMPUS
A GUARANTEED INCOME
e WILL GIVE EACH UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY AND STUDENT ASSOCIATION ON CAMPUS
FULL CONTROL OVER THEIR OWN FUNDS AND HOW THEY SPEND THEM — AS LONG AS
THEY DO NOT ALLOW A DEFICIT
e WILL END COMPETITION AND FIGHTING BY LOCAL GOVERNMENTS FOR AMS FUNDS
e  WILL GIVE EACH LOCAL GOVERNMENT A FAIR SHARE (PROPORTIONATE TO THEIR SIZE)
OF THE PRESENT $9.00 PER CAPITA FEE PAID BY THE STUDENT BODY TOWARDS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
THE LOCAL GOVERNMENTS ARE BEING GIVEN MORE RESPONSIBLILITY FOR THEIR OWN AFFAIRS —
BUT WITH RESPONSIBILITY COMES MORE OPPORTUNITY AND FLEXIBILITY WITH WHICH TO SERVE
STUDENTS       THE LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ABLE TO MEET THE AMS AS EQUALS AND PARTNERS
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GIVES LOCAL GOVERNMENTS REASONABLE AUTONOMY.
ENABLE ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT TO SERVE YOU BETTER -
VOTE YES FOR BYLAW 12 (10), 12 (11), 12 (12), and 12 (13) Page Friday
/
i*-i
.»>
John Innes as Oedipus in Donald Soule's adapted version of Oedipus The King.
Oedipus The King p. 3
•*• "* ml
^ Photo—Guy Palmer
Heavy Letter
Wins Award
I Page Friday hereby proudly presents The
Jumpin' Joe McCarthy Memorial Award to Mr.
Cohn, author of the letter reproduced here.
I The Editor,
I Sir:
I would like to comment briefly on your
(piece entitled "Pete Seeger" (March 9).
Sandy    Kass    and   Nate   Smith   write   of
| Seeger's   "gentle  intensity  and sincerity", and
recall his activities in Kentucky in 1942 and in
I Alabama in 1963.
Sincerity is a very difficult quality to judge
| in others. While I would not wish to attack Mr.
I Seeger in  this  regard,  there are, nevertheless,
some considerations which may throw a
different light on the matter. A recent doctoral
dissertation by R. Serge Denisoff entitled "Folk
Consciousness: People's Music and the American
Left," (Simon Fraser University, 1969, 332 pp.),
gives details of Seeger's close adherence to the
various shifts of the Communist party line. This
point is best illustrated by the songs of the
Almanac Singers which Seeger helped to found
in 1941 and with whom he sang throughout
their existence.
In the early days of the Second World War,
both the  Communist  Party and the Almanac
Singers     strongly    opposed    any    American
participation in the war. At that time they sang:
"Oh,   Franklin Roosevelt  told the people
how they felt
We damned near believed what he said
He said 'I hate war and so does Eleanor but
We won't be safe 'till everybody's dead'."
Several anti-war songs  of that type were
promptly withdrawn when the Germans
attacked Russia on June 22, 1941. But after that
date, the Almanac Singers became very
enthusiastic supporters of the American war j
effort. Some of their songs are exceptionally
bloodthirsty, such as the one entitled "Round
and Round Hitler's Grave", in which it was
suggested that Mussolini be "hung up to dry"
and Hitler be "boiled in Russian oil".
I fully agree with Sandy Kass and Nate
Smith in their judgment of Seeger's very fine
craftsmanship. But any evaluation of him as a
guide to political morality must consider the
question of his relationship to the Communist
movement, a relationship which began in the
days of Stalin and which seems to have changed
only insofar as the Communist party itself has
changed.
Very Sincerely,
WERNER COHN
March 16, 1971.       Assoc. Prof. Sociology UBC rgVVoMfius DISCPvBS rrpgNALW;:^ gML SEMINAR
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Masthead
Tuatara, a poetry magazine, will give a poetry
reading today at 12:30 p.m. in Bu. 104.
* * *
Mussoc presents Sweet Charity, March 24
to 27 at 8:30 p.m., in the SUB Auditorium.
Richard Ouzounian, who has previously
directed over fifteen musical productions in and
around New York, will direct the production.
Ruth Nicol stars in the show, which will be
choreographed by Lorraine King, with musical
direction by Bruce Kellet.
A new gallery has opened in Gastown, at
155 Water Street, on the second floor. The
MIDO co-op GALLERY is presently holding a
one-man show by Korean-born artist, Taik Woo
Whang. His work includes paintings in ink, pencil
and tempera, miniature sculptures, rock painting
and art posters. The gallery is open Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Show continued until April 4.
Mike Doyle, poet, teacher, and editor of
Working and slaving over hot typewriters
and steaming pencils to bring this week's Pf to
you was a small multitude of people and
animals.
In one of those categories fit Editor Tim
Wilson, exercising to the last his dictatorial
powers, Keith Dunbar creating our centrespread
with due care and attention, and myself,
bewildered to the end by the startling number
of typographical tyrranies foisted upon the
unsuspecting and undecided in their moment of
glory.
—Grant Dickin
siitunbiY
inarch 27,«»»
*
FRASER MacPHERSON and his Jazz Group
improvise and integrate with the Symphony.
Likewise SPRING — they'll do Song Cycle
with the Orchestra, then take off on their own.
LLOYD BURRITT'S electronic Overdose and
Charles Ives' Variations on America and
General Booth's Entrance into Heaven (with
vocals by Frewer) add.
PRICES ARE EASY: $1.50, $2.50 & $3.50
Tickets NOW at the Vancouver Ticket Centre
(in the O.E. on Hamilton Street) or charge to
your Eaton account. 683-3255
sponsored by CKLG	
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
"An outrageously, raunchy parody of
normal television programming, 'Brand X'
knows where it's at sexually, politically
and (pop) culturally. It transgresses
the last taboo!" -Newsweek
brand
directed by Win Chamberlain, starring Taylor Mead,
Sally Kirkland, Frank Cavi-
stani, Tally Brown and
Abbie Hoffman, Candy
Darling, Ultra Violet and
Sam Shepard
"devilishly, piercingly funny,
fortified with an acute sense
of the absurd!"-N.Y. Times
"A filthy, good humored,
crass something-or-other."
—New Yorker
"Scenes of 'making it' on
the road are enacted with a
spirit that makes the sex-
education films seem
positively anemic!"
-N.Y. Post
"The first entertainment
film of the Woodstock
Nation, or the last of the
Nixon Nation. Funny from
beginning to end,it's pure
gold!"        -Village Voice
FRIDA Y 26th & SATURDA Y 27th
6:00  —   8:00  —  10:00
a CinemaWest presentation:
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  19,  1971 Scene from Oedipus the King, left to right: John Innes as Oedipus, Peter Brockington as
Terresias and Judy Young as Manto. Photo-Guy Palmer
Oedipus The King
Donald Soule's adaptation of Sophocles'
play Oedipus The King, the story of the tortured
man who kills his father and marries his mother
is a fascinating and involving piece of theatre.
Soule has used slides, films and music
together with some very fine actors in this
strikingly new adaptation.
The layout of the Freddy Wood has been
changed so that the audience is free to move
around during the performance to watch the
production from every angle. The actors do most
of their performing from three platforms and a
revolving ramp set up so that everyone can see
and hear everything that is going on.
The production is further enhanced through
the use of six screens on which slides are shown,
slides that add to the viewers' comprehension of
the events that occur within the play, and
simultaneously help to create a powerful visual
effect.
Soule has also used lighting and music
to involve the audience. As the actors wander
around within the audience, to the sounds of
some very eerie music by Courtland Hulberg of
UBC's music department and the lights dim and
flash, you cannot help but become involved in
the play.
Oedipus is played by John Innes, and a more
convincing Oedipus would be difficult to find.
He avoids the pretentious qualityjhat traps the
performance of Robert Clothier as the
Corinthian, but even for an opening night
performance, the cast was polished and audible.
Some of the most dramatic scenes inthe play
were those that involved Mariko Van Campon,
who plays the Sphinx. Here, Soule has creatively
used films and lighting to aid the actors in their
drama. Especially effective is a curtain with a
film projected on it, which is used to help break
the barrier between myth and reality that is so
much a part of this ancient play. As the actors
walk through the curtain, their images are
projected on the screen.
Derek Ralston as Creon gave a convincing
performance of Oedipus' mistaken enemy, while
Lilian Carlson as Jocasta' wife of' Oedipus 'was
slightly weak in a part that I think demand a
stronger emphasis. Teiresias, the convenient seer
who forecasts Oedipus' doom and so keeps the
story from becoming lost in a miasma of legend
is played by Peter Brokington, a Vancouver actor.
Brockington, like Innes, was very good, he too
was convincing without the pretense that brands
most actors as actors on stage, rather than people
to which one might relate.
This is the most difficult part of creating the
illusion-reality-illusion that is the theatre, finding
actors that can portray, not necessarily in a
photograhic sense, but an interpretive sense as
well, a character who must be not an actor, but a
person.
Most of the actors in Soule's production do
just that, in a way that is superior to anything
that the downtown theatre has been able to
provide us with this season. The credits more
than likely go to Soule himself, the man who
created the the flexible form in which these
actors can move and interpret their roles, a form
that is neither too tight to restrict their freedom
or too loose that they become lost. Oedipus the
King is one of the only good plays on in
Vancouver this year and it's right: here. 8:30 at
the Freddy Wood.
TIM WILSON
Playhouse Plans A Farce
French bedrooms, Prussians, contemporary
Englishmen, Hadrian VII, and possibly new
theatrics by an old playwright will be happening
at the Playhouse in the 1971-72 season.
Artistic Director Paxton Whitehead, in
announcing his choice of plays for the season,
said that the Playhouse would emphasize plays
which will not be seen elsewhere in Canada.
At least three of the productions will be
Canadian premieres.
The season opens October 7 with a
production of the 19th Century French bedroom
(whoopee!) farce, The Chemmy Circle by
Georges Feydeau. Starring in the comedy will be
Frances Hyland and Patricia Gage.
Serious students of European history will be
overjoyed to hear that the Canadian premiere of
The Sorrows of Frederick will be the second
occurrence of the season. The play is a portrait
of Frederick the Great of Prussia, his ascent to
the throne, and bitter quarrel with his friend
Voltaire. (You mean the Volaire?)
Under negotiation for production in the
New Year is a premiere of a new play by
Tennessee Williams. All you long-title freaks will
be consoled by the fact that if Williams' play is
unavailable, it will be replaced by The Effect of
Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.
In February will occur Relatively Speaking,
a contemporary English comedy by Alan
Ayckbourn.
Whitehead has chosen not to announce a
play for March. We are told there will be one,
though.
The season will conclude with a production
of Peter Luke's Hadrian VII, based on the novel
by Baron Corvo.
As a special treat the Playhouse will present
Treasure Island as a Christmas production.
Subscribers get first priority at the box office for
this extra.
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MONTREAL. TORONTO,  VANCOUVER
Friday, March  19,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Dr. Joan Reynertson
66
DAVID LUMSDEN .. .
. . . started  it all two years ago.
... a happy accident
She doesn't look like a film-maker; more she
appears as the studious sociologist, out to
revolutionize a statistical system. But looks are very
deceiving.
She is Joan Reynertson - Doctor A. Joan
Reynertson - and she has come to UBC to work with
the film program in the Department of Theatre.
With herself comes a multitude of credits and
experiences. With her comes a phenomenal amount of
talent and knowledge. With her comes an equal
amount of enthusiasm. She speaks about the events
that brought her to UBC:
I have a background in theatre and in film as well
and there aren't too many people that have this
particular combination.
It happened to be that I wanted to come here
when they wanted somebody to come, especially
with those qualifications, so it turned out to be a
happy 'accident'.
FILM COURSES AVAILABLE
2nd year—Theatre 230; an introductory
film course on the history of film
(technology).
3rd year—Theatre 330; an introductory
course on the history of film
(aesthetics).
4th year—Theatre 333; and introduction
to film technique.
Theatre 431; an advanced seminar on
the aesthetics of film.
. a tvay ol
Her credentials to work in film at UBC are
excellent. She speaks of how she started a program at
her previous employer, San Francisco State College:
I went there in 1962 and at that time they had
no production courses at all. I had about three
students that I had on a special class basis and they
were very interested. I was fortunate that they were
talented, as the minute they started making them,
their first films won prizes. They have over 250 film
students now, the third largest film school in the
United States.
film is a medium today that cannot be
confined to countries
In taking a year's sabbatical from the College, Dr.
Reynertson spent one half of it writing a book and
the other half touring film schools around the world:
Film is a medium today that cannot be confined
to countries — extremely international in character. It
used to be that Americans made films for the
Americans and Russians for the Russians — but now
there is so much international interest in films and
they are distributed throughout the world.
I didn't feel that I really knew my field as I
should until I had had first hand viewing of the people
that were doing it and the kinds of production
facilities that they had.
Canada is very conscious of being a
country
She recognizes the problems that face the
Canadian student who wishes to learn about film in
his own country. With this in mind, Dr. Reynertson
talks about a 'Canadianization' program for students:
There are very few places that a Canadian
student can go for film training. He has to go to
England or the United States.
The whole Canadian film industry is just in the
process of being born. Canada is very conscious of
being a country and when you begin to get this
national sensibility you begin to get people who want
to make films about what is to be Canadian.
When this happens, they shouldn't be learning
film in England, the United States, or somewhere
else; they should be learning it in their own country.
it's an extremely chancy field
One of the largest problems concerning the
whole subject is that which relates to the industrial or
vocational market. What will be the future for
somebody who studies in this field? What practical
uses does film have in today's society? She
extensively deals with this problem:
Many people are using film-making as an
avocation rather than as a vocation. I've never tried to
fool anyone into thinking that it's a good job. It's an
extremely chancy field — highly competitive,
sometimes vicious, very fickle — fat one year, very
hungry the next.
If someone wants security in life, they should go
to another field where there is security. There
certainly isn't in film. I have never been very
successful with discouraging someone, however.
When going to a television station or film
production company, graduates should have with
them, as proof of their capabilities their little films.
These could lead to iobs.
Film is also very useful as a teaching aid.
One could go into a company as an audio visual
specialist and provide their industrial films for them.
It would be useful as a skill to be used in
conjunction with something else. Some people will
use it to broaden their horizon on whatever kind of
job that they want to take on.
The other thing that is going to happen and this
is going to completely revolutionize the whole film
production activity — and that is going to be when
cassettes come in. It is going on now — 8mm cassettes
that you are going to buy like a phonograph record
and which you will be able to plug into your TV set.
It is going to be the hottest thing going, as far as
a promotion market. You will have to have something
on them — you are going to have to have someone
turning out thpe things - millions of them.
The concept of being an American working as an
import in a. dmtdian university does not affect Dr.
Reynertson^ approach to the language of film.
Likewise, ifyhouKf not affect the student.
I know that one of the questions — a very good
question that has been asked of me is that — you are
art American - how are you going to work with
Canadian film students?
I. have never, on any one of my students, ever
said "no" to a project. My job, as I see it, is to
providj^the tools for them to say what they are trying
<Kss-
Beeaum: very little is known about Joan
Reynertson, it seemed appropriate to allow fter to
back-track a litHe to her intriguing ami unique past:
I was working in theatre when I was six months
old. I was carried on as Shakespeare's daughter. My
whole childhood was a movie set, IVt been in it in
one capacity or another ever since and I have kept up
my theatre work as well, by directing a number of
plays, writing some, and by teaching and studying it.
I would never want to have to ever choose between
them.
The films I've made are from those that are
shown in the theatrical way to television films, school
type films, documentary films, propaganda films —
you become something of a mercenary as a
film-maker — someone gives you money and you
make a film with it.
It is a rather unique experience — not everybody
is brought up on a movie set. You get a rather odd
view of life in the sense that you see everything that
is going on behind the camera. You know all that
hokum-pokum and then you go to the theatre and see
the finished product.
You realize how much of life and how much of
everything that we do has this very theatrical aspect
about it. Even things like wars and politics are theatre
games.
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  19,  1971 ■--*
"N/"
being alive"
ig at UBC
You get this rather skeptical view of things that
are going on. You tend to ask yourself - what's he
really saying, what's really going on? — because you
know it isn't what it seems to be, nothing is the way;
it is on the surface.
Dr. Reynertson never quit at the aforementioned
activities, she had to go and write a book as well:
The book is The Work of the Film Director. It
came about when I was teaching a course in
film-making and couldn't find a book that I wanted.
So I decided to write one. I began to develop the
ideas in it and then I started teaching a course in film
direction; and what I did is just try the ideas out on
classes for a few years.
What I've tried to do in the book is to talk about
the process of film directing as it applies to any kind
of film... it's more about the thinking process
behind making a film than it is about the technical
aspects.
When . asked if she had achieved any other
accomplishments, she had to be persuaded to relate
the following:
I've also done a lot of photography, written
poetry, painted, and invented — I have a U.S. Patent.
device for achieving randomness within
a fixed field
Whqn asked to explain this patent, she replied:
It's * device for achieving... nobody ever
understands this . .. randomness within a fixed field.
Since there was a lack of understanding she
attempted to go on.
It can be played as a game and it grew out of
game theory. It introduces you to a situation in
which you have to play with a number of variables
simultaneously.
It can be used to play games with, used to study
with, used to develop your thinking with, and can
even be carried around in your pocket.
middle class students doing their
expensive films
H. David Lumsden carries all the physical
characteristics of a film-maker. Blond hair and an
actor's face compliment a charged atmosphere of
tenseness. There is no end to his images and analogies
of film to life.
He is now in his second year as an Assistant
Professor with the UBC Theatre Department. An
extensive interview with him was presented in an
edition of last year's Ubyssey. (Friday, October 10,
1969)
Although fantastically enthused about his life as
a film-maker, he is also a realist concerning many of
the drawbacks that it can present.
He is willing here to present a couple of them as
they relate to the university.
Structuring a film course within the society -
that's easy to do.
But to me, the only justifiable film course would
be something involving the community, where the
film would be shown within 24 hours.
Otherwise, you'll get middle class students doing
their expensive films and it doesn't become a solution
to anything but still remains a part of the problem.
To me the whole thing is a question of the university.
As an alternative, you could go to somewhere
like the London School of Film Technique - it's a
technical college — where everybody goes to make
films and do nothing else.
Film is not a 9-5 job. There (London) a guy
might go out with some fishermen, film for three
days, come back and sleep it off for 24 hours, and
then edit for two solid weeks.
It is very hard to fit it in to a curriculum where
you have grades and other courses as well, because the
rhythm of film-making is so different.
H. David Lumsden
There is another aspect as well. That is the actual
study of films today which are getting so complex
that in order to study films like Performance and
Zabriski Point you really have to see them five or six
times. You really have to do as much research into a
film of that sort as you would to Joyce's Ulysses.
The distriburor will not allow you to have the
film that amount of time.
So they are really telling you what film history is
all about, by regulating when films may be released.
You will get the good films - which are
absolutely relevant now - you will get them 20 years
later. Now we are getting a lot of films we should
have gotten 20 years ago.
remember Mick, the point of this
performance
Take a film like Performance. You cannot discuss
it after seeing it only once.
It has one level which hits you and a lot of
people get turned off by that one level. As you really
study it you will see that the director is in control of
the performance of the film. He has moments, in the
soundtrack, where he says: "Remember Mick, the
point of this performance."
You cannot study that film without discussing
Borges, and you cannot discuss Borges without
discussing Schopenhauer's philosophy. Both are in
the film.
And this is what a university is for. To get this
level of discussion which is essential to modern film,
you have to have the film for a week. You have to
study it with all the powers you have at the university
— the intellectual powers. Otherwise you're
pretending to study film.
Here I think the film course now is getting
organized in a very good way because if anyone is an
expert on film it's Joan Reynertson. And within the
system the course is organized in the very best way.
it has so many langoages going on there
My main interests are where film is going - the
aesthetic sides of film. I would like to get courses
started where films could be really studied, in the
same way that people re^Hy understand books.
A film is so rich — it has so many languages going
on there.
story and photos - Keith Dunbar
it's \% years old now and still running
t
\ As the idea of communicating the device was
getting a Utile complex, she then went on to relate
how she almost completely rebuilt an automobile
Mdiite she was working on her doctorate:
I got aJ^W that had been totalled, that had been
rolled. I needed a car and didn't have much money;
and I was doing a nutty thing like writing my
dissertation and spending all this time really hitting
the books. So I decided that I needed a car and some
diversion and this was a cheap way of doing both.
I still have it; it's 13 years old now and still
•  running.
The end of a long day was now nearing for her.
Before this interview we had spent a couple of hours
• watching Wajda 's Ashes and Diamonds, an intensely
emotional movie that drains a lot of energy from an
avid film viewer. She still had time, however, to
philosophize on the many facets that comprise her
life:
I feel as long as I am doing something creative it
doesn't matter particularly what it happens to be.
I do whatever I'm capable of doing and if it
comes out alright, fine; but if it doesn't come out
alright, then I'll try something else.
And it's a ... uh ... a way of being alive.
*■ -■■■.. f> 'A* := *. -Ss"" *: ■ -■ ■ ■:• r .-■■ V  E..
Bl'   --"■ i-.W ■. .*,■»- :■ ,-■■-■    1
KEITH DUNBAR ... self photo of film-making in progress at Theatre 333 lab.
Friday, March  19,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, S &&.
LORNE ATKINSONS
B3l
ACE CYCLE SHOP
Ami
Student Discounts
rm
10% OFF on Accessories
5% OFF on Bicycles
With Student Card)
[13*
3155 W. Broadway 738-9818
a newjilm by
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i SUB Film Soc presentation—
FRIDAY 19 & SATURDAY 20
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 21 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public-75c
TurnTable Traumas
STEVEN   STILLS   *   STEVE
STILLS (SD 7202)
This is another one of those
albums that's got everybody
and his grandmother on it.
Gee, look, far out, there's Jim
Hendrix, Eric Clapton, wow,
and David Crosby, outasite .. .
In sheer numbers, this album is
overwhelming. Musically,
though, it's not quite so
exciting.
Steve Stills is a complete
mystery, a fantastic musician
but a totally insensitive
arranger. What he does to a
song would be unmentionable
in a family newspaper, but I
guess I can talk about it here.
Stills is the man largely
responsible for the muzak
melodies of Crosby, Stills,
Nash, and Young, and this, his
first solo album, sounds like it.
There's lots of the
simple-minded la-la vocalizing
that so distinguishes C, S, N,
and Y's work, and if any good
musical things get through the
mish-moshy mess which
results, it's usually accidental.
It's a real shame, though,
because Stills is a great
musician. He's so talented it's
just disgusting. He plays
everything, mostly well, and
when you hear him, it's hard to
believe that such a super
musician could allow his songs
to be as brutalized as they
usually are, much less do it
himself. He plays great blues
acoustic guitar alone on "Black
Queen," and the silence that
accompanies him is the nicest
thing I've heard on this album.
Close seconds, though, are
"Old Times Good Times" and
"Go Back Home," which
feature Jim Hendrix and Eric
Clapton respectively. On the
first, Jimi's not in great form,
but Stills plays unbelievable
organ, while on the second,
Clapton's fiery licks add the
spirit which the rest of the
record seems to lack.
Oh well, at least there's
some far-out pics of Stills on,
the cover. On the front, look,
outasite, there he is, sitting in
the snow playing with his pet
polka-dot giraffe, and, far-out,
on the back he's wearing a
football sweater and riding a
horse. Groovy. An obvious
ecological message there.
THE LADY AND THE
UNICORN - JOHN
RENBOURN (RS 6407).
It seems to me that, in the
pop music world, there are few
honest-to-God musicians, good
musicians who are interested in
playing high-quality musk and
to hell with the sales figures.
Sometime Pentangler John
Renbourn is one of these.
Renbourn is in the vanguard of
the rebirth of what may be
loosely termed early music. His
last two albums of sensitively
updated medieval and
renaissance type music have
been real things of beauty.
The Lady and the Unicorn
is, if possible, even better than
Sir Jon Alot of. Renbourn says
on the album cover that he has
no pretensions to historical
authenticity, but his
interpretations sound good,
and that's what counts. His
modernizing touches, like his
sitar-playing on a
fourteenth-century Italian
piece, are subtly done.
Renbourn is a consummate
musician. He knows what he's
doing, and as a result his
adaptions of early music retain
their gentle, spiritual character.
The music on this album is
taken from all over medieval
and renaissance Europe, and
played by some pretty fair
musicians, like violinist Dave
Swarbrick of the old Fairport
Convention, flautist Ray
Warleigh, and drummer Terry
Cox of the Pentangle.
Renbourn is a super guitarist as
solo pieces like The Lady and
the Unicorn attest, but doesn't
take the spotlight on the group
pieces. The blend of flute,
violin, and guitar on side one
and flute, viola, and guitar on
side two creates a mood of
peace which most far-out
groovy schlock-rock
psychedelic musicians have
never even dreamed of.
-Bill Storey
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Plus your choice of 18 holes of
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NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
The Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be
held on Thursday, March 25,
at 12:30 P.M.
in the New-Wing Lower Lounge.
ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE INVITED
TO ATTEND
Business will include a proposed fee
increase for Summer Session students.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
leek to
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Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  19, 1971 Wild Child
Francois Trufautt's Wild Child is gentle in
expression and devastating in impact. It succeeds
in illustrating the shattering of a world-view by
epitomizing its height.
In 1798 a 12-year-old boy was found running
wild in a French forest, and was patiently
re-educated to civilization by a curious scientist.
This is Truffaut's material; we watch the training
of the primitive, of the "enfant sauvage", by the
man who exemplifies the rational spirit. Slowly
and painfully, Victor the child is "humanized".
And in the final moment, as he stares
comprehendingly at his mentor (Truffaut himself),
we understand that the experiment has been a
success. Victor has tasted the forbidden fruit; dark
complexities follow the dawn of first
comprehension.
The effect of the film and what it appears to
be are opposed; and it is this opposition on which
all aspects of the film converge. That Truffaut as
actor and Truffaut as director are in different
worlds is grimly purposeful.
One way of measuring the excellence of this
film is in noting the melding of forces in acting,
direction, and technique. In each we find both
Rousseau and Voltaire refuted, although the story
line itself tells of the victory of rationalism over
naturalism. Truffaut reveals the sterility of this
victory.
In wildness is not the true man;in wildness is
no humanity at all. Jean-Pierre Cargol in an
awesome performance as the primitive boy shows
us that. Without speaking one intelligible word he
is the most exciting, tragic, complex creature in
the film. His wild state is a-human, and the
awakening to another world painful. Cargol makes
that awakening as frustrating for us as it is
agonizing for him.
His longing for his forest home is
communicated through his child's body, and in his
final return to civilization, after escape, he reveals
wordlessly the inevitable. And the final moment,
focussing on his look of bitter, weary knowledge,
is his finest moment and the highest point in the
film.
His patient, detached mentor is the messenger
of civilization, and his message makes us
re-question our assumptions about civilization.
Truffaut's performance as the scientist reveals its
insufficiency. It is difficult to analyze Truffaut as
an actor; his persona here depends both for the
-PAT AUFDERHEIDE
superficial and for the underlying point on his
self-restraint. And probably it is the restraint of his
position, the unbearably cold rationality, that is
the finest indication of his success.
For his highest values are cold and resonant —
justice, experimental success; and his heart is
empty. When Victor returns, admitting his new
humanity, his mentor barely smiles. Putting his
hands on the boy's shoulders he says, "This is your
home," not in warmth but because he knows he
has destroyed the boy's old world.
Truffaut as director intentionally sabotages
Truffaut as actor. In his approach he highlights the
tension between his protagonists without giving
any answers. The wild writhings and gradual
taming of Victor (the victim) are the visual parts
of the film. His action, however, is of a negative
sort; it is counter-productive in the world to which
someday he must submit. His mentor's world, on
the other hand, is hardly visual at all. He is defined
almost entirely through a narration from his diary
as we watch Truffaut, cold and constrained,
standing at his writing podium.
This contradictory use of image cannot help
but frustrate the viewer; the medium is a moving,
visual one. Yet the victor in the struggle is
non-visually, even anti-visually expressed. In that
frustration is the beginning of the question
Truffaut is asking.
In technique the camera is restrained so
impressively as to be almost suspicious. Many
cinematic options have been refused in favor of a
muted pseudo-acceptance of the established mode.
The film might have been made in the fifties with
its heavy dependence on the narrator; the stock
angle and design of scene; the banal fade-in-out
occasionally replaced by the blatant slow shutter.
Visually'and aesthetically the film as medium
brings nothing new; instead it manipulates and
parodies the film conventionalities. It is the same
solemnity revealed as sterility that is expressed in
the theme.
The acting, direction, and technique express
blatantly an accepted set of values; and in the
expression the validity of those values is shown to
be empty.
Truffaut in Wild Child discovers the horror of
the unknown by revealing the vapidity, the
insufficiency of the known. In a strange and
unified way the film succeeds in being both true
and beautiful.
Chartrand Circus
The following is a review of a recent performance in Vancouver, starring Michel Chartrand. Our
reviewer assessed the production from an unbiased standpoint of pure political ignorance.
The scene at Kitsilano High School last
Saturday was part circus and part sermon. Michel
Chartrand appeared to share his vivid, honest soul
with the strange collection of Vancouver leftists;
and the resulting event was another of Vancouver's
rich but unintentional art forms.
Chartrand provided the creative nucleus for a
social event in many colors. The gathering of the
tribes combined with the intensity of Chartrand
evoked the carnival aspect of politics.
Inside, pre-Chartrand, it was raining leaflets.
The entire spectrum was covered. An
exceptionally obnoxious girl flogging a petition
against oil tankers was competing, as literature,
with the leaflets from the Committee to Defend
Political Prisoners in Quebec, the Young Socialists,
and even Steve Garrod, smiling humbly, for AMS
president. As personality, she was competing with
a strange lot indeed.
Paddy Neale, Vancouver Labor Council rep,
looking like corrugated cardboard in action,
brought down the house with his introductions.
The amusement passed to hostility as Hilda
Thomas was presented. Shouts of "Trot plot"
revealed the belief of some that Hilda was not
simply a public-spirited woman but a
not-very-secret functionary of the Trotskyites.
It was a strange world, and getting stranger all
the time.
But all the bobbing, bowing and booing was
inadvertently a worthy introduction to Michel
Chartrand. For, having been shown what petty
politics could produce, we were than presented
with its antithesis.
Chartrand was magnificent. A man who could
be both human being and politician, he exercised
his charisma in a humane cause, and in a delightful
mode. His is a politics for people.
The anger he felt was well-expressed, useful,
and genuine. The humor he gave was a part of the
rich personality with which he infuses his politics.
Four months in jail in Quebec had angered
Chartrand; and the focus of the talk was the
incredible injustice of the incarceration.
It was an event to warm the heart of the
politician and the psychologist. Chartrand's speech
was punctuated not only by his own irrepressible
commentary but by "Right on!", clapping,
stamping and hollering.
The circus resumed after Chartrand's
explosive closing remarks with a question and
answer perio.d. A low murmur of
"beeblebeeblebeeble" from the Yippies expressed
well the content of the questions. Chartrand's
ebullient remark to one lady, "Ah, madam, let's
talk about love!", showed what he thought of the
questions.
And then Hilda Thomas stood up and begged;
and despite the rumor that the money was really
going to support Vancouver Trotskyites, over
$400 was collected without even one enterprising
freak grabbing the bucket and running.
It was a wonderful show - exhilarating,
exhausting, and entertaining by turns. In
Chartrand's own phrase, "C'est fantastique, eh?"
-HEIDE
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Friday, March  19,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Love in the OR
Part VI-By Rebecca Quirk
What was Nurse Mary Loveheart's secret?
Where was Luigi Lasagna Mazzorella?
Why wouldn't that idiotic Allan Gay stop running around
like a decapitated chicken?
These were the earth-shattering considerations running
through the agile brain of Lance Sterling, M.D., as he enjoyed the
first few moments of blissful freedom from the clutches of the
dread Galloping Peedink X.
Lance was also grappling with the torturing problem of his
love for Virginia White, who had tried to poison him after
learning of his affair with Mary Loveheart. When you came right
down to it, after all, Virginia wasn't really all that bad. Lance
knew he loved Nurse White more than Nurse Loveheart - but
how was he to convince Virginia?
But right now, Allan Gay was prancing about Sterling's bed,
begging him to find Mazzorella, the bullet-riddled Mafia chief
who had escaped from the hospital and was last seen drinking
with Nurse Loveheart.
Lance leaped out of bed and strode swiftly out of the
room. High-pitched giggles erupted down the hall as Lance strode
swiftly back into the room to put his clothes on. Allan Gay was
nowhere to be seen, which Lance found a little odd, but there
was no time to think about it. Lance sped down the stairs and out
into the street, narrowly avoiding being hit by a parked car. A
plan was rapidly taking shape in his head.
Mary Loveheart thought Lance knew her secret. But for
Lance, the maddening thing was that he didn't know. He had a
pretty good idea, though. He knew it had something to do with
Luigi Mazzorella.
Lance Sterling had a pretty good idea where those two
were. Lance had been around and he knew the city. He knew
where all sorts of people hung out and he knew where he could
probably find Luigi and his pals. That was where Lance Sterling,
M.D., was going.
As he entered the door of a rusty, galvanized tin shack in
the seedier part of the city, surrounded by boiler factories and
welding shops, Lance felt a blunt object strike the back of his
neck. Seconds later, he blacked out.
* * *
A soft hand was caressing his lower abdomen. Blue and
green and purple shapes moved slowly in front of his eyes. A dull,
throbbing pain at the back of his neck reminded him of the
foolhardiness of his venture. Slowly his surroundings took shape
and Lance Sterling found himself in the middle of a filthy,
candle-lit dirt-floored room.
The caressing became more urgent and Lance didn't quite
know what to do. So he did nothing. Finally, Mary Loveheart
gave up.
"I always had you figured as some kind of Don Juan," she
sniggered, in her rasping, nasty voice that Lance knew so well.
Why, oh why can't you just be nice to me, he thought.
"Well, do you know where you are?" she rasped nastily.
"I — I think so," Lance replied testily. Of course he knew
where he was. This was the secret hideout of Blackface, the
continent-wide underworld who ran his billion-dollar crime
empire virtually unseen except by a few trusted advisors. Luigi
Mazzorella was one. And Mary Loveheart's "other life" was a life
of crime and sin, hopping from bed to bed among these
distasteful characters.
Two dark-haired, mustached characters wearing dark glasses
argued over a bottle of cheap gin, on a table in the corner
opposite the mildewy couch on which Lance was lying. A door
on the opposite wall led into a corridor through which Lance
couldn't see. Andd Nurse Loveheart lounged sleazily in a sagging
chair, her bulbous lips open and cigarette hanging out of her
mouth.
"Why did you do this to yourself," asked Lance. "How
could you get mixed up with these — these reprobates?"
The nurse uncrossed her legs. "Beats hangin' around with
those flaccid doctors an' pesky orderlies," she said. "Besides, who
wants too make out with a guy who once had Galloping Peedink
X?" •■
"Wanna toke before ya go in to see The Man?"
She held out a crinkled cigarette that smelled to him like
burning hay. Instinctively, from his urbane knowledge of the
workings of the world, Lance knew it was Marijuana - the weed
with roots in hell.
"Mary — Mary darling, how could you, I mean a nurse,
allow that evil substance into your body?" he asked. "I mean,
what's the matter with a simple Coca-Cola, or a chocolate malt?"
Mary Loveheart didn't answer - she was lost in the
marijuana trip. But there was something else to occupy Lance's
mind. A hulking figure appeared in the doorway that led to the
corridor. In the dim light Lance soon perceived that it was none
other than Luigi Lasagna Mazzorella, bandaged and obviously
weak from loss of blood.
"Come on," he told Lance. "We're goin' to see The Man."
They went down the corridor and through three more
doors. Finally, they came to a stateroom with purple carpeting
and dark oak chairs. Behind an immense desk, in front of the
fireplace, sat The Man.
It was none other than Allan Gay.
* * *
Tune in next week to find out whether Lance and Virginia
ever see each other again.
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Page Friday. 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  19,  1971 Friday, March  19,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
We told you first;
chain letter ripoff
On Friday two Ubyssey staffers received chain letters in the mail
from a woman who admitted she got the names from The Ubyssey.
The letter requests recipients to answer immediately by sending
one dollar to the top name on a list at the end of the letter, and by
sending 20 copies of the letter to 20 other people.
According to the letter, every person not breaking the chain
should receive $8,000 within 60 days.
The chain is reputed to have been started by Imperial Sales
Company of Knoxville, Tennessee, but according to Knoxville
directory assistance, the company does not exist.
Further, the top name on the list the staffers received is at a
non-existence address.
So after you buy twenty-six cent stamps, xerox your letter 20
times, send a required report to the non-existant Knoxville company,
and receive nothing in return, don't say you haven't been warned.
On the way to legal dope
SAINT JOHN (CUP) - Thirty delegates at a provincial New
Democratic Party policy conference voted over the weekend to support
the legalization of marijuana, and called for its sale in
government-operated stores.
New Brunswick NDP leader J. Albert Richardson, who did not
attend the conference, said the resolution would have to go before a
provincial convention before becoming part of the party's platform.
The resolution said sections of the narcotics control act affecting
marijuana should be repealed and that it should be made "publicly
available through government outlets, at standard prices."
MUSSOC PRESENTS
SWEET CHARITY
LIVE ON STAGE
March 24-27 - 8:30 P.M.
Matinees — Thurs. — 12:30 Noon AUDITORIUM
Sat. - 2:30 P.M.
SUB
-Tickets - $1.00 in AMS Bus. Office-
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WILL MAN
CREATE LIFE?
Is Genetic Engineering a possibility? What is the
possibility of significantly extending the human life
span?
DR. DUANE T. GISH
Research associate with the Upjohn Company, and Graduate
of the University of California (Berkeley), outstanding
bio-chemist associated with Nobel Prize winning research
teams in medicine and genetics, speaks on this subject.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21ST       MASSEY AUDITORIUM
2:45 P.M. 8th Street & 8th Avenue
New Westminster
ADMISSION FREE ALL ARE WELCOME
Sponsored by
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P.O. Box 4006 Vancouver 9, B.C.
W. Bruce King. President Phone 531-4883
# KIRKP ATRICK®
is pleased to bring
VOLKSWAGEN
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KERRISDALE
Max Kirkpatrick and Staff cordially invites
you to visit their new Volkswagen dealership in Kerrisdale at 42nd and W. Blvd. to
see their complete line of 1971 Volkswagens and fine selection of used cars all
here in Kerrisdale under one roof. Refreshments will be served 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Max Kirkpatrick, President
Robert Montgomery
Sales Manager
Ron  Barnier
Used Car Manager
Margaret Zittier
Sales
Dave  Hinton
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42nd Ave. & W. Blvd.   NEW PHONE No. 26641391 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   19,  1971
in the
classroom
By SANDY KASS
For all potential actors and actresses, Theatre
300 is a must.
The course is open to second year students of
any faculty, although theatre majors are preferred
by department head John Brockington.
The course consists of development of voice,
movement and actor's training, in three classes
during the week.
The course load is heavy for all six sections,
with two hours a week for acting, two for speech,
one for movement, and countless out-of-class
rehearsal hours for class presentations.
At present, all sections are working on their
collective presentation of Cancer — a play in six
acts, with each section preparing one of the acts.
The play concerns a group of college students
living communally, with all the trials and
tribulations of a pestering landlord and neighbour,
living at close quarters with one another and
opposing ideologies of the student revolution, of
which all charactres, at one time, are a part.
Section three students, preparing the third act,
discussed the play's meaning at the regular 3:30 to
5:30 Wednesday session.
While the play is easy to identify with, they
decided, it leaves a bitter taste in your mouth.
"In some parts it is the breaking down of old
sexual barriers, yet in others, new barriers are built
up again," said one student.
"No matter how close the kids are living, and
how much they confide in each other, they still
place invisible barriers around themselves to keep
from being vulnerable," said another.
Theatre 300 a must
for stage freaks
The class has prepared several scenes in the
past, of both comic and serious natures. Other
scenes were prepared as students split into partners,
and this is the first time the class has worked on a
single play together.
Irene Prothroe, seasoned actress, is directing the
play in conjunction with professor Stanley Weese,
who is also teaching acting for Theatre 300.
The play is scheduled to go on April 3 in room
206 of the Frederick Wood Theatre, with two
performances at 10:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., and is
open to the public.
Admission will be free.
Speech therapist Sheila Ovens conducts the
speech section of the class every Thursday from
1:30 to 3:30.
Students presented to the class excerpts from
Shakespeare's Henry The Fifth, spoken to music
chosen by students.
The aim of the speech class is to develop a
strong, clear and resonant speaking voice, which
Ovens considers a must for all actors and actresses.
Students often do such exercises as repeating
tongue tanglers to improve articulation and the
pronunciation of certain sounds.
During the movement hour, happening every
Monday or Friday at noon, students learn to move
their bodies rhythmically to everything from
Beethoven's Fifth, to African tribal beats.
On the whole, the class is a worthwhile and
rewarding experience for both theatre and
non-theatre majors.
Students were recently asked to complete a
questionnaire stating their opinions on the course as
it is presently structured.
"It isn't likely the course will change much,
though," said Prothroe, as she distributed the
questionnaires.
Lemieux here —
speaks Saturday
Robert Lemieux, lawyer and a
member of the Quebec Five, will
be speaking in Vancouver on
Saturday, March 27.
Lemieux will be speaking at
Vancouver Technical Institute at
7:30 p.m. Other speakers are also
planned but no one else has yet
been confirmed. The meeting is
sponsored by the Committee to
Defend Politcial Prisoners in
Quebec.
Lemieux is acting as appeal
lawyer for Paul Rose, recently
convicted of murder in the death
of Pierre Laporte. Lemieux was
recently acquitted on a charge of
seditious conspiracy. He is still
charged with membership in the
outlawed FLQ.	
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NO APPOINTMENT* NECESSAR Y\ Friday, March  19,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Federal minisfer opposed
from Page 5
$35,000 from Seattle Light we
stand to lose $15,000 a year, not
to mention the ruination of the
area's ecology," he said.
The Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control sent about
30 protestors to the Mount
Vernon hearing.
SPEC spokesman Gwen
Mallard protested the destruction
of the natural environment,
habitat of deer, and the further
elimination of salmon spawining
grounds, which Vancouver
consulting engineer Fred Slaney
said could be mitigated.
Seattle Light lawyer Richard
White said by 1974 Canada will be
going through the same power
shortage as Washington state is at
present.
"We must look to the future of
both countries," he said.
Federal ecology minister Jack
Davis said recently the thought of
flooding the valley is appalling
and indicated his all-out support
to stop the Skagit Valley purge.
Canadian and U.S. officials
held a private meeting at the U.S.
State Department in Washington
D.C. Tuesday on the valley
flooding controversy.
It is believe the meeting
involved resolving differences
between Canada and the U.S. to
clear the way for an
environmental study of the power
project under the auspices of the
International  Joint  Commission.
Over 100 briefs were submitted
at the two hearings including one
by Alma Mater Society delegate
Dave Jones.
Jones said Thursday he was
extremely disappointed by the
lack of student interest in the
controversy   and   added   that   a
collective presentation by 31
Washington high schools showed
considerably more concern and
degree off understanding of the
situation.
Vancouver consulting engineer
J. A. Knowles speaking at Mount
Vernon said Seattle. Light could
save itself at least a million dollars
by purchasing its power from the
Bonneville Power Authority in the
state, and added that even if
completed, the Ross Dam will
only provide Seattle with 20 per
cent of its power needs, and will
soon be obsolete.
"A hazy concept"
from Page 2
But for a number of reporters
at the press conference the
"opportunities for youth"
concept sounded a bit hazy.
To clarify exactly what the
government meant, a woman
asked:
"Does this means that if the
ladies auxiliary in . .. say, Moose
Jaw organizes a pollution clean-up
project that it could pay students
to do the job?"
"Yes, that's it exactly," said
Pelletier with a broad smile.
Then someone asked if that,
because of course it was federal
government money being used, if
the federal minimum wage of
$1.75 an hour would be paid to
the working students. We'll see.
But there's something new for
We're experts at it. You
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ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
SHOWTIMES
12:20. 2:30, 4:40,
6:55, 9:05
"THINDERBALL"
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YOUONUT
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THUNOERBALL:
12:30,5:05, 9:40
LIVE TWICE: 2:45,7:20
ADUIT INTIRTAINMiNT
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12:00, 2:20, 4:45.
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A rip-snorter. A triumph!
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Dunbar
234.7212        Warning  Nudity, Sex
DUNIAR .1 lOrii        With Drugs
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*■"•*-»* ,5r"**ry—~~        SHOWTIMES:
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The DOLPHIN THEATRE Proudly Presents
Part 2 of "CANNES FESTIVAL WINNERS"
Sunday - 2 P.M.
Visconti's "THE LEOPARD"
1963 Grand Prize Winner
SPECIAL CRITICS' PRIZE
(Venice)
GRAND PRIZE MAR DEL PLATA FILM FESTIVAL
english   titles V M
MASAKI KOBAYASHIS
Varsitu
224-3730V .
4375 W. 10th
Show Times: 7:30,9:30
Sunday Matinee 2 P.M. Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   19,  1971
FRIDAY
CZECH FILM-MAKING
Joint   UBC-SFU    seminar   starting    8
P.m. Friday, 1 p.m.  Saturday, 1 p.m.
Sunday in Hebb Theatre.
CARNIVAL
At Lord Byng high school at 2 p.m.
BIBLICAL SEMINARY
Seminar in SUB 113, noon.
HISTORY   DEPARTMENT
Hungarian   prof.   Alek   Karsai   speaks
on   German   occupation   of   Hungary,
1944. Laserre 104, noon.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Forum  on  the  Paris  Commune   at  8
p.m. at 1208 Granville.
VCF
Talk on "The Meaning of Christianity"
in SUB 125 at noon.
GSA
Grad   centre   opening   complete   with
poetry by George Stanley  and other.
From 3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Party to celebrate 100th anniversary
of Paris Commune, 1208 Granville at
8 P.m.
SUNDAY
T-BIRO MOTORCYCLE  CLUB
Meet at the field between stadium
and Marine Drive. 12 noon, 50(f per
entry.
'tween
classes
SPORTS   CAR  CLUB
Lion-lamb gymkhana in B and D lots
at 10 a.m.
MONDAY
SPANISH  CLUB
Elections  in   room   402,   International
House at noon.
ZOOLOGY   DEPARTMENT
Dr. Ronald Alvarado of Oregon State
FIAT
SPORTS CONVERTIBLES from $2595
See the NEW 1600cc FIAT 124 SPIDER
At Canada's Largest Fiat Dealer Since 1958
CLARKE SIMPKINS
Burrard at 7th Ave. - 736-4282
'Perhaps the most disturbing,
powerful and insightful moments
to be recorded on film of the
young generation raised
on rock."
University on "Ionic regulation in larval bullfrogs", 4 p.m. in room 2449,
new wing of Bio   Sciences Bldg.
PSYCHOLOGY   DEPARTMENT
Beer nite in International House upper lounge from 7 p.m.
CLASSICS   DEPARTMENT
Prof. D. C. Earl of University of
Leeds on Roman politics in Bu. 100
at noon.
ALUMNI   ASSOCIATION
Dr. Michael Ovenden on "The Guilt
of Science" at Cecil Green Park, 7:30
P.m.
TUESDAY
UBC   LIBERAL   CLUB
Executive   elections   at   noon   in   SUB
205.
WEDNESDAY
MUSSOC
Performance of "Sweet Charity", 8
p.m. in SUB auditorium. Until March
27 Tickets $1 each at AMS business
office.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau and Bob McDiarmid, vice-
pres.-elect, discuss academic reform
at UBC  at noon in SUB 123.
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 10th next to Varsity Theatre
CLASSIFIED
Rote* Students, Faculty * Club-3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified mda era not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ctonne Deadline it 11:30, the day before pttWieafion.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
•PERSONA'. PRODUCED BY ING-
mar Bergman, represents a personality duel between two women.
See it in SUB Aud. Fri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30, Sun., 7:00. AMS card
holders $50c.
Greetings
12
CREATION TWO,   SUB AUD.  12:30
today: a Play.
Lost & Found
13
ONE BLUE SKI JACKET WITH
car keys and gloves in pocket. 4th
Floor, Hebb Building. Need keys
urgently. Phone Dave at 325-6715.
GOLD CHAIN BRACELET LOST
Wednesday between B-Lot and
Buchanan. Great sentimental
value. Reward. Susan 922-7778.
WOULD PERSON FINDING
notes in D-Lot on Monday please
phone 263-3326 or deposit in SUB?
Thanks.
LOST 1 SOUTH AMER. SHAWL.
Great sentimental value. 738-9486.
Color—Browns, Oranges.
Special Notices
15
A.G.S. QUALITY CASSETTE
Tape C-90. Guaranteed against all
defects $1,901 each. Call Peter 732-
6769. Can arrange for delivery or
pickup-pt.   on  campus.
'PERSONA', PRODUCED BY ING-
mar Bergman, represents a personality, duel between two women.
See it in SUB Aud. Fri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30; Sun., 7:00. Ams card
holders  50c.	
"SWEET CHARITY" LIVE ON
stage. SUB Auditorium March 24-
27, 8:30 p.m. Matinees Thur. noon,
Sat. 2:30 p.m. Tickets $1.00 in
AMS Business Office-	
C.C.F.A. FILMS MARCH 21 —TIME
11:45 a.m. "The East is Red" —
modern song and dance extravaganza of the Chinese revolution.
Spectacular in color with English
commentary.  Olympia Theatre.
CONSIDERING ALASKA?
We regret the publishing of an advertisement under the above heading in previous issues. It is not The
Ubyssey policy to accept advertise-
ments which offer job lists for a fee.
— SUNNY TRAILS CLUB —
VANCOUVER'S LARGEST
YEAR ROUND
FAMILY   NUDIST  CLUB
OFFERS RECREATION FOR ALL
VOLLEYBALL — ARCHERY
SAUNA — SWIMMING
40 Acres of Beautiful Nature Garden
For Information Write  to
P.O. Box 806, Vancouver 2, B.C.
From  The  Producers of  Hair
LION'S LOVE
Hebb Theatre, March 23rd & 24th
7:30 and  9:30.  Admission  .75c
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St., Van.  1, B.C.
TRAVELLING  OVERSEAS  ON A
LIMITED BUDGET?
Then come to the travel meeting on
Monday, March 22nd at 7:45 p.m. in
the Auditorium of Eric Hamber
Secondary School, 5025 Willow
Street, Vancouver. Experienced
travellers will be talking to you, and
will help you save hundreds of dollars! Everybody Welcome — No Admission Charge. Sponsored by the
Canadian Youth Hostels Association.
Wanted—Information
17
DURING OCTOBER 1970 AND FEB-
ruary 1971, and while I was away
from home, and also during one
of the get-togethers which were
held here, an item was removed
from my home. This was attached
to the inner door chimes of my
front door. There is a certain
monetary value attached to this
item, but more important, it has
been in my family for a very long
period. It's an artificial rose, set
in a beaten, scrolled coronet
shaped c6ntainer. If you know
where this may be, will you ask
that it be mailed to: Mrs. Joan
Thomson, 816 — 5th Street, New
Westminster.
Wanted—Information
17
IMPORTANT. ANY PERSON OB-
serving a red car skid into the
ditch on S.W. Marine Dr. Thurs.
a.m., Feb. 25, please call Mr. Miller 683-7636.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED. NEW OR USED 16' F.G.
canoe. Will trade 100 c.c. Zundapp
Motorcycle. Barrett 731-9753.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969 MGBGT WIRE WHEELS
overdrive, immaculate condition.
Must sell. Best offer buys. Ring
684-0988 to midnight.
1959 VW FOR SALE $150.00. CALL
224-1983.	
1960 VW. GOOD CONDITION, RA-
dio, sunroof. Phone Pat 228-2627
day; 731-9628 night.
1965 VOLVO 122S 4 DR.. RADIALS,
radio, roof rack, good cond. $1,100.
Phone 435-7665.	
LEAVING COUNTRY. '69 TOYOTA
Corolla. $1390 or offer. 228-4442 or
738-0057.	
196a AUSTIN 55,000 MI. 30 MI./GAL.
dependable transp. $300 or best offer. Phone Gary 224-9383. Leave
message.	
1969 DATSUN 1600, 4-DR. RADIAL
tires. Radio. Good condition. Must
sell. Phone 731-0679.	
1963 FORD 66 PASSENGER
school bus converted to mobile
home. 2 bedrooms, kitchen-living
area, wood stove. New industrial
V8 still on warrantee. 5-speed
transmission, sleeps 6 comfortably
$3,000. Call Gord Clee 921-7239.
Motorcycles
25
1968 HONDA 175 CYCLE. ONLY 400
miles, so like new. $400. 731-2270
after 6.	
1970 YAMAHA 80 C.C. MUST SELL.
1000 mi. Perfect condition $250 or
reasonable offer. 732-5256.	
'69 TRIUMPH TIGER. IMMACU-
late. A perfect power machine.
Call Paul, 732-5455 Eves.
Photography
34
35 M.M. REFLEX CAMERA. MIR-
anda dr., fl.9, 1/500 sec, Soligor
2X lens extender $65. 738-0994.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL? WOULD YOU
like to meet a young homosexual?
You may use an alias or make
your own arrangements for a
meeting, but don't waste away
your life. Graduate student 24,
Box 6572, Station G, Van. 8.	
CREATION TWO. SUB AUD. FRI.
March  19,  12:30.  A Play.	
DYNAMIC READING CHARTER
class. Almost half regular price.
Call Tom 733-9246.
Typing
40
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c per  page   with   2   days   service.
12:30   -  1:30  in  SUB  Co-ordinator's
office  weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
— SEE US FIRST! —
TEDIOUS   TASKS — PROFESSION-
al Typing Service IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone:
228-9304 — 30c per page.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable Rates — 321-3838.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR ES-
says, term papers, £tc, reasonable rates, in my home, North
Vancouver,   988-7228.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING.
Theses, essays, term papers. Fast,
accurate. Reasonable Rates. Call
Mrs.  Duncan,  228-9597.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van. 985-0154.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5317.
Typing
40
TYPING — ELECTRIC I.B.M.
29th & Dunbar
 Tel.: 224-6129	
TYPING—ESSAYS,   THESIS.   ETC.
Phone Mrs. Brown 732-0047.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
EXPERIENCED TYPIST
MRS. FREEMAN. 731-8096
TYPING — ESSAYS, STENCILS,
envelopes, etc. 277-1602 after 5 p.m.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drats. Reas. rates. 10:00
a.m. to 9:00 p.m., phone 738-6829.
Quick service on short essays.
SAME DAY TYPING SERVICE
call Tom 228-8164. 3791 W. 4th
Aye.  30c per pg.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COUPLE TO MANAGE ISLAND
campground June 15 to Labour
Day.  Phone  224-0539.
INSTRUCTION St SCHOOLS
Tutoring
84
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
DON'T! WORRY OVER EXAMS.
Register at UBC Tutoriig Centre.
Tutors in almost every subject.
SUB 100B 228-4583, 12-2 weekdays.
$3.00 an hour.
Instruction Wanted
61
WANTED COSTA RICAN STUD-
ent to teach Spanish during summer. Call 224-9091, Room 122, ask
for Joan.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRDCALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
ONE SLIGHTLY USED COFFIN
for sale. Phone 434-2464 Rm. 115
by March 21 or come to SUB to-
day at  noon.	
TREMENDOUS ASSORT MENT
baby's and toddlers used clothing,
shoes, cribs, car bed, buggy &
misc. items. Apply 2279 W. 45th
Ave,   (rear).	
Y.M. "WATERWITCH". 30' LOA
26' W.L. 8'6" beam, fully framed
in clear fir. Ready for planking,
ballast keel. Leaving town, must
be moved by March 26. $27000
value for $1,200 cash, or trade for
flatdeck truck or offer. 2636 W.
11th Ave., Vancouver.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SHARE HOUSE ON 2761 W. 3 AVE.
with grad.stud, couple. Separate
living room (fireplace) and bedroom, semi-furnished, garden, $90
all included. Immediate or April.
Call 731-8744 evenings.	
WANTED PERSON TO SHARE
house with three grad. studenas.
Own room. Shared cooking, $70.
732-0454.
Room & Board
82
FREE ROOM/BOARD FOR GIRL
exchange help with children evenings.   Nr.   UBC gates.   224-6192.
Furnished Apts.
83
ROOM-MATE NEEDED: FEMALE.
May 1st - Aug. 31st. Share apartment in Kitsilano; furnished. Call
731-4032.	
MALE TO SHARE FURNISHED
one-bedroom apt. May lst-Aug.
31st. 8th & Vine. Rent $65. Phone
922-4991 after 6.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
ABOVE SHOP. UNFURN. APT.,
lge. liv. rm., fireplace, 1 B.R.,
huge kit. Dunbar, April 1, $110.
Phone 224-6440. Friday,  March  19,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Formula for success
ByGORD  GIBSON
UBC has an unfair advantage in Western Intercollegiate Football!
"Spring, says the WCIAA, is an unfair advantage.
Just because we have spring when none of the other teams in the
West have, we are to be penalized.
We are not allowed to hold spring training camp.
That's too bad — the Thunderbirds could use the extra practice.
'It just might put us even with the other teams.
After careful consideration of the problem, your writer thinks he
has found a solution. Why not have the footballers meet under other
circumstances.
Below is part of the script for the first Annual Spring
' Thunderbird Picnic. More will be available on request.
The great one speaks:
"Okay boys, gather around and I'll fill you in on some words of
wisdom from my vast knowledge of this game of badmint .. . , hock
. . . , tiddly-wi . . . , — John, what the hell are we playing this year
anyway?
FOOTBALL ... is that what they call it.
This here's the ball. See, I've painted it at both ends. That's so
you fellows will know which way to go.
Now, when our team has the ball, I want you fellows - all twelve
of you — to line up on the red side of the ball — that's our side.
And when we hike the ball — I'll cover that aspect later — run
where the blue side of the ball is
pointing.
The   gridiron   .. .   field,  you
idiot, is 110 yards long. Now, I
' know that seems like a long way,
but I hope you can all run it in a
minute or less.
Any who can't, I'm going to
put on offense as our receivers.
Two things I'd like you to keep in mind. When we have the ball -
that's offense — the idea is to go 10 yards in four tries.
Try not to do it in less tries nor to go more than 10 yards. To do
so would only give our fans false hope, and as we all know, we're not
that good.
Secondly, when our opponents have the ball - we're on defense
then - the object is to make them take as much time as possible getting
from one end of the field to the other.
After all, the object is not to win but to play the game for the
benefit of keeping our record intact — never a winning season.
Any questions? . .. you have to leave the room. I'm glad you
mentioned that, so do I. Class dismissed."
SPOR TS
. . . to get our support?
By TED DALY
The sports season at UBC is
coming to an end, and it's a damn
good thing!
It seems that the apathy that
reigns supreme on this campus hit
the football curriculum with full
force.
A group of dedicated players
who were out on this campus in
the middle of the summer
sweating and working their guts
out were all there for the opening
Rugby still at it
Again may we remind all you
rugby fans of the game this
Saturday against Washington State
University in Thunderbird
Stadium at 2:30 p.m. The 'Birds
will be looking for their 500th
point and their 18th win. Along
with their record of 17 wins and
only one loss, they have 468
' points for and 102 against.
A heavy schedule looms ahead
for the team. In addition to the
North West College and World
Cup action, they will participate
in the McKecknie Cup series and
B.C. Club Championships. There
is also a possibility of a rematch
with the University of Victoria,
the only team that has defeated
the UBC squad this year.
An added incentive for the
players is the chance of being
selected for  the Canadian Rep.
Team, which will tour Wales in
September. Selectors for the team
will be closely watching the
performances of winger Spence
McTavish, second row man Bob
Jackson, and standoff Ray Banks,
Barry Legh, John Mitchell, Gary
Hendrikson, Andy Beane, and
Eric McAvity.
FRANK GNUP .. .
. . which way do we run?
game of the season. So were their
families and friends, but where
was the student support. I'm still
trying to figure it out.
Sure they are not the best
football team in their conference,
and that is precisely the reason
why they need the support of the
student body. Out of the 22,000
people on this campus, perhaps a
few hundred turned out if the
weather was right. But then again,
were they there to watch the
game or get a sun tan?
In comparison we have the
basketball team, one of the finest
in intercollegiate play. They draw
tremendous crowds to their
games.   It's   great   to   see   the
4^
OVERSEAS AUTO
New Location-4442 W. 10th
Telephone 228-9913
Sports Car Accessories, also goodies for Datsun — Mazda —
Toyota — VW — Cortina — Mini and other popular imports.
(10% Discount With AMS Card)
ALL XC SKIS & EQUIPMENT
We Norsemen at SCANDIA think that GROUSE MOUNTAIN is one
of the best. Close to the city, we find it easy to reach when we've
only a couple of hours to spare, and the night skiing really turns us
on!
If you have a couple of minutes to spare today, why not come over
and see what we have to brighten up your spring skiing, and let US
turn YOU on.
Remember, at SCANDIA, the coffee's always hot!
"BE KIND TO YOUR MOUNTAINS,
WITHOUT THEM WE'RE LOST!"
GOOD PRICES ON ALL ALPINE SKIS
- 20% OFF KNEISSEL SKIS - 25% OFF
KOFLACH
SWING STAR
LA DOLOMITE
LA DOLOMITE
LA DOLOMITE
HUMANIC
Reg.
135.00
85.00
160.00
85.50
67.50
110.00
SCANDIA
100.00
65.00
120.00
67.00
55.00
80.00
WARM UP PANTS
SKI SWEATERS
SKI JACKETS
SKI JACKETS
SKI POLES
REG.
25.00
25.00
58,00
55.00
SCANDIA
16.00
18.00
45.00
35.00
1     HIS f! vwQ
1804 West 4th Awe. at Burrard - 732-6426
support here, but this is where all
this support isn't required.
The reason the team gets all
the support is that the fans are
pretty well assured their team will
emerge as victors. So fans keep
coming and the team keeps
winning. Here is positive proof
that fan support can really boost
the morale of a team.
So we can assume a few things
about the students on the UBC
campus. Either they don't like
football (highly unlikely) or they
are poor losers. They'd rather sit
back and criticize, than get off
their asses and contribute their
support.
It's a shame that the students
just don't care about the efforts
of the football team. It's a shame
so many people realize the apathy
on this campus and do nothing
about it.
^Otntex SfwtU (pent**
ARENAS and CURLING RINK ice time
requests for the 1971-1972 season, and
Handball/Squash Group Bookings are
required as soon as possible.
THESE REQUESTS ARE TO BE
FORWARDED IN WRITING TO
MR. S. FLOYD, Manager
Requests for
Summer Arenas ice time are
also presently being received.
For information call 228-3197
DO YOU LIKE TO SKI? Then We'll See You At Grouse Mountain
WE ALL KNOW IT'S BETTER AT NIGHT!
B.C. CENTENNIAL '71
PACIFIC NORTHWEST COLLEGE MEN'S
GYMNASTICS
CHAMPIONSHIPS
SATURDAY, MARCH 20, 1971 - 7:30 P.M.
AT
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
* Top gymnasts from Western Canada, and Northwest
American universities.
* Contestants include Yoshi Hayasaki (University of
Washington), 1970 U.S. Open and Collegiate Champion.
* Exhibitions by H. Matsuda Yamashita - Olympic &
World Champion Kanati Allen - U.S. Olympic Team,
and U.B.C. Women's Gymnastic Team Members.
* Preliminary competition, starting at 11 A.M., Open to
public — Free Admission.
Admission For Finals
ADULTS-$1.50 STUDENTS-.50
U.B.C. STUDENTS-Free Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   19,  1971
•
Page Canada
•
We finance the U.S. takeover
By ART SMOLENSKY
One of the greatest myths perpetrated on the
Canadian people has been that large influxes of foreign
capital are required to maintain our expansionist
economy. Not true.
According to the U.S. Survey of Current Business,
January, 1967, only 11.4% of the funds to U.S.
subsidiaries comes in the form of new capital inflow.
Canadians finance the rest. From the same source we
find that 42.4% of the funds come from retained profits,
28.3% come from depreciation allowances and 17.9%
from borrowing.
The case for American investment in Europe is
virtually identical. Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber in The
American Challenge eloquently states the case.
"The least known aspect of American investment in
Europe is its means of finance. Financing investments is
not a serious problem for American corporations.
"With their scope, capabilities and techniques they
have no trouble finding money on the local market to pay
for their factories.
The High Cost of U.S. Investment
U. S.  Direct Investment in Canada: Balance Sheet for the 1960's ($U. S. Millions)
New American    Interest & Divi-       Royalties &Fees
Year Investment dends Repatriated   Repatriated Balance,
1960
451
361
90
-0-
1961
302
464
102
-264
1962
314
476
114
-276
1963
365
455
134
-224
1964
298
634
162
-498
1965
962
703
185
+  74
1966
1,153
756
211
+186
1967
408
790
243
-625
1968
625
851
261
-487
1969
619
762
268
-511
Totals
$5,497
$6
,252
$1
,770
-$2,625
Source:
U.S. Department of Commerce
Survey of Current Business
L, No. 10 (Oct. 1970), Table 9, p. 31. Back issues wereusedto
find the amount of royalties and fees for 1960-67.
Major periodicals American-owned
- but Canada is making comeback
The reaction against the American takeover of
Canadian textbook firms is also making itself felt in
another publishing field, that of periodicals. ■
The major periodicals sold in Canada at present are
American owned Time and Reader's Digest.
While the pablum posing as information in these
publications is in itself reason enough to discourage their
circulation in Canada, the blatant pro-American outlook
completes the indictment.
Both magazines have so-called Canadian editions.
In the case of Time, sports and general culture.
In the case of Reader's Digest, it means an occasional
article titled "The Marvelous Maple Leaf or "Ookpik:
The Rise of Eskimo Capitalism?"
To make matters worse, pressure from the U.S. state
department has forced the Canadian government to
exclude the two publications from taxes imposed on
foreign perodicals sold in Canada.
Now Canadian magazines are making a comeback and
several new publications are making an appearance on the
national publishing scene.
The     following    national     publications    are
Canadian-controlled and have a Canadian viewpoint
ranging from left-liberal to left-social democrat.
MacLeans: No comment necessary as you've all seen
it.
Saturday Night: Originates in Toronto and barely
keeping its financial head above water. Edited by former
Sun music critic Robert Fulford. Slightly to the left of
MacLean's.
Last Post:: Originates in Montreal under the
editorship of a collective. Perhaps the best of new
magazines appearing in Canada. Has a definite left wing
outlook.
Canadian Dimension: New Democrat oriented
magazine published in Winnipeg. Under the editorship of
NDP theoretician and academic Cy Gonick.
In addition, two tabloids have a small but growing
circulation.
New Leaf: Published in Vancouver by former
Ubyssey editor Al Birnie and several other former UBC
radicals. Sold on the street and in grocery stores much like
the Straight. Takes a strongly nationalist viewpoint.
New Canada: Much like the New Leaf. Published in
Toronto but occasionally makes an appearance in
Vancouver.
N.ore foreign than Canadian
textbooks used in universities
By far the largest number of books used in Canadian
universities are written, published, and printed in the
United States. Books from France probably rank second,
books from Great Britain probably third, and books from
Canada probably fourth.
Significantly, 80% of all library and 92% of all
university bookstore purchases are books not published in
Canada. Only 17% of all post-secondary textbook sales are
from  domestic publishers, roughly half of these being
published based on adapted rights.
If these figures are coupled to the fact that, on a
dollar sales volume, 80% of all books produced and
published in Canada are by foreign controlled firms then
just 2lA% of all books used by university students in
Canada are produced by Canadian-controlled companies.
The 80% figure was arrived at by the Department of
Industry, Trade and Commerce before the Ryerson and
W. J. Gage presses fell to foreign hands.
"During 1956 the Americans invested $4 billion in
Europe. This is where the money came from:
• loans from the European capital market.. . and
direct credits from European countries - 55%.
• subsidies   from   European   governments   and
internal financing from local earnings — 35%.
• direct dollar transfers from the United States —»
10%.
"Thus, nine-tenths of American investment in Europe
is financed from European sources. In other words, we
pay them to buy us."
It seems we are not the only ones about to become
the slaves of the American corporate Caesars.
The balance sheet compiled from U.S. sources holds
an even grimmer story . . . Over the period 1960-69,
Canada sent over $21A billion back to the United States.
The accompanying table gives a more exact picture.
In this light the conclusion is inescapable. The leech
of American business (or multi-corporations if you will)
sucked away $500 million of Canadian vitality in 1969,
money that Canadians could have used in developing this
country.
H
The position of Canadian Science and
Engineering research staffs in branch-plant
laboratories: "In some cases, there is at least a
suspicion that the research department is mere
window-dressingj designed to create a good company
image without serving any practical purpose and, cjtfi
the part of afewpoliticaliy-foresighted managements,
perhaps iso inteMed to forestall criticism that the
firm's parent company is preventing the development
of research in its Canadian branch."
O.E.C.D.,   Reviews   of National Education
Policies, Paris, 1966.
•
A FEW ECONOMIC FACTS
Industry
% Non-Resident
% U.S.
(a sample)
Ownership
Control
Iron Mining
86.2
85.8
Aircraft and Parts
91.6
48.3
Motor Vehicles and Parts
95.7
95.6
Total Chemicals
83.0
unknown
Petroleum Refineries
99.9
72
Scientific and Professional
Equipment
66.6
62.0
Total Electrical Products
65.7
unknown
Smelting and Refining
84.9
unknown
Pharmaceuticals
82.2
68.6
-from Corporations and Labour Union
Returns Act, 1967Report
^
"Because of a large number of big concerns in
Canada are under foreign control, most of the
initiative is taken in decision centres outside Canada.
Such would be the case, for instance, with the
branches of the big foreign firms, United States in
particular, whose contribution to research and
development would be strictly complimentary,
because the head office would consider it more
rational and efficient to have its research carried out
in its central laboratories and only such results
communicated to the Canadian branch as might be
deemed to serve its overall expansion strategy."
-Q.E.C.D., Reviews of National Science Policy -
Canada, Paris, 1969.

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