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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1983

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 30
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 21,1983
228-2301
The Litton Bombing
Toronto police harass
peace groups.
Meanwhile in B.C. ...
Squamish RCMP arrested five people Thursday afternoon in connection with the bombings of Litton
Systems, Red Hot Video and B.C. Hydro's Cheekye-
Dunsmuir power station. Police caught the suspects
near the highways department explosives dump where
38 cases of dynamite were stolen last August.
The Ubyssey contacted the Squamish RCMP, but
they refused to provide details before today's 9 a.m.
press conference at police headquarters in Vancouver.
By SARAH COX
1 OK.OIN 1 O— Construction workers are repairing
the roof of a bombed building surrounded by a high barbed
wire fence. A car comes out of the guarded gates and swerves
only feet away from a woman giving out leaflets.
One of the security guards strides up to the woman and her
companions. "You put one foot over that white line an'
you'll be arrested for trespassing," he threatens. He spins
around and walks back to Litton System's glass security
booth.
Two months have passed since a group calling itself Direct
Action claimed responsibility for bombing Litton Systems
Oct. 14. The blast injured seven people and caused millions of
dollars in damages. The group was protesting Litton's production of the guidance system for the American Cruise
missile.
The effects of the bombing are still being felt. Toronto police recently raided
the homes and offices of disarmament
workers, threatening and intimidating
the peace advocats.
"Fewer people from Litton take our
leaflets now," says Cruise Missile Conversion Project member Murray
Mac Adam. CMCP is a Toronto based
group which is trying to stop Litton's
production of the guidance system.
"The bombing gave the police a real
excuse to harass and intimidate us,"
says MacAdam, who is in CMCP's tiny
office on the third floor of a church. He
is at the same desk he was working on
when police raided the office on Dec. 14.
The room was searched for three and a
half hours for clues about the Litton
Bombing.
"The raid was a shock," says
MacAdam. The staff sergeant was intimidating until our lawyer arrived."
"Initially the door was locked so we
pounded on it," says CMCP lawyer
Brian Her, who earlier that morning was
called by another peace group whose office had also been raided.
When Her was finally let in, he
discovered the police had taken the
phone off the hook.
"The police were testy and obviously
uptight," Her remembers. "They
systematically went through every docu
ment and piece of paper in the office,
looking specifically for the words 'direct
action'. They wouldn't let us watch what
they were doing or examine anything
they took."
The police are aware that a group like
CMCP is not connected with the bombing, says MacAdam. "The raids are
part of a harassment campaign against
the disarmament movement. If the
police really suspect us why did they wait
for two months to raid our office?"
The Toronto press was told about the
raid three hours before it happened, says
Her. "It's obvious a least one police officer sees his role as somewhat more
political than just investigating crime."
Her says he thinks the police are confusing the peace group's use of the term
"direct action" with the bomber's use of
the words. "The police seem to think
they are one and the same. Their reasoning is obviously not sophisticated."
The only communication CMCP has
received from Direct Action are two
communiques, which were also sent to
other peace groups and the media.
The communiques urged people to
take responsibility for the nuclear
weapons buildup and told them to actively oppose the production and testing
of the Curise missile. In the second communique, the group apologized for the
unintentional injuries.
CMCP objected to the bombing
because people were injured, says
MacAdam. "We don't believe this is the
way to build a mass movement of opposition to the Cruise." He pauses and
chooses his words carefully.
"We do distinguish between violence
to people and violence to property in the
case where property is being used to
threaten millions of people. We think
damage to property can be justified."
CMCP says Litton should convert
from its military production, to making
commercial goods. The $26.4 million
which the Canadian government has
given Litton to subsidize production for
the guidance system can be used in other
ways, says MacAdam.
According to CMCP, conversion of
the Litton factory is possible. Litton has
said only 40 percent of their production
in Toronto is for military purposes.
"We've heard they have commercial
contracts which they can't do now
because the Cruise contract is taking up
a lot of their assembly line," says
MacAdam.
While CMCP attempts to carry on its
educational role, the police continue to
visit their office and question members.
"They seem to be changing their tactics from harassment to being friendly,"
says CMCP member Brian Burch.
- sarah cox photo
Burch was picked up by a police
cruiser in downtown Toronto and told
they were looking for someone with his
name who was wanted for traffic violations in B.C. He was driven around for
three quarters of an hour and asked his
opinions on the Litton bombing.
"They asked me if I supported the
bombing and I gave qualifications." Burch
says he wishes he hadn't responded to
the question. He is afraid his answers
might be used as grounds for arrest.
Police also went to the houses of other
CMCP members after the raid. "They
didn't have a warrant when they came to
my house," says Len Desroaches. "I
just let them in for a brief period of
time."
The police quoted Desroaches from
the minutes of a CMCP meeting and
asked him to explain his comments. "I
refused to answer because I didn't want
to give them any information they could
use against other people." says
Desroaches.
Her says it is becoming increasingly
difficult to trust the police. "I had
hoped the police would realize they had
made an error," he says.
"I don't know what to expect next." Page 2
THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, January 21,1983
Electric Cowboys
die with
their boots on
By JACK TIELEMAN
The Cowboys played Saturday in
the SUB ballroom to 50 unen-
thusiastic people as part of
Showcase '83.
The Seattle band played a hard
pop beat but their safe brand of
music failed to offer anything unique and all the songs sounded the
same. The one exception to this was
the cut She Makes Me Feel Small, a
tune which the band called their
slowest.
The major problem with the
Cowboy's music was that it lacked
dynamics. The music went on and
on, and then stopped and started
again. No one was quite sure when
the songs were over.
The audience thought the songs
were over at least three times, twice
when the power went out and once
when a bass guitar had to be switched.
After over hearing a discussion in
the audience, the lead singer announced that the band played only
their own material and not the top
40.
The Cowboy's instrumentation is
solid and their singing is energetic,
but they need work to become acceptable AM radio material. They
will be on the road to fame and fortune when they learn to end their
songs on an up beat.
The warm up set was played by
another American band. The
Young Executives, yet another pop
band with only other group's music
to offer. The cxecuvites did not
wildly excite anyone, and only their
saxaphonist made their music interesting.
Other approaching shows are The
Members, an English group which
will be playing in the SUB ballroom
Feb. 20, and Star Trek creator Gene
Roddenberry will return on March
6.
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R EAT BIG
ASTL Friday, January 21,1963
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 3
A modern comedy
about two lesbians in
quest for parenthood
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The Canadian film By Design is a
gracefully intelligent comedy, and you may
be surprised by just how wonderful it really
is.
Claude Jutra, who also directed Mon On-
cle Antoine (1972) — perhaps the most
memorable Canadian film ever made — is
the kind of confident, assured director who
deosn't hit you over the head with his style.
By Design, which opens today at the Bay,
has its own unique pace — everything is so
natural that things seem slightly askew at
first; you can't figure out the characters at
the beginning.
But a significant part of By Design's
charm involves a sense of discovery and
revelation. It takes a minute or two to
realize that the two bright fashion designers
on screen, Angie and Helen, are also lesbians. Their sexual orientation isn't a major
source of concern because it isn't problematic to these central characters. Helen
and Angie, who work and live together in
Vancouver's False Creek area, have found
their own pace — and they stick to it.
The lack of self-consciousness is admirable. Jutra and the two actors who play
Helen and Angie understand the characters
better than anyone else. But Jutra doesn't
hide his design from the audience; he lets
them in on it scene by scene, until the whole
movie wins you over. When Helen (Patty
Duke Astin) reveals that she is disastisfied
and wants to become a mother, you don't
start questioning why. And you understand
the support that Angie (Sara Botsford),
who is taller than Helen, offers her lover.
Helen and Angie compliment each other
almost perfectly. One is shy, and demure,
the other is playful but slightly imposing —
Angie doesn't seem aware of her own size.
Jutra plays off the physical differences between Angie and Helen, but not in the way
male comic actors like Laurel and Hardy
used to play off each other. There is a
strong emotional core to Angie and Helen.
The two women in By Design are immensely creative individuals; and the success they have achieved designing clothes
made only from natural fibres is considerable enough for them to enjoy a certain lifestyle. One of the best things about
By Design is that you follow Helen and
Angie with confidence — you believe in
them the way they believe in each other.
Helen and Angie share a special world.
When you see Helen hurt and Angie coming
to her aid because she has failed to realize
how she has alienated her lover you appreciate the relationship the two women
have. It's stronger than most.
Fashion isn't the only implication of the
title of the movie. What the women want —
parenthood — is also a design of sorts, and
the film introduces them to labyrinth of
bizarre encounters. Their quest is to find a
man who will father their child.
There is a magnificent sequence in which
Angie and Helen visit a social worker who is
BOTSFORD, ASTIN . . . contemplating next step to motherhood
JUTRA . . . director at work in Vancouver
anxious to let the women adopt. She wants
them to have a child from a different ethnic
background so she can confirm all the latest
sociological findings about parenting and
make a statement about homosexual
parents. The words and gestures that
emerge from Clare Coulter, who plays the
dippy worker, are rhetorical; yet in her own
unique way she seems more sympathetic
and understanding than most of the other
characters around Angie and Helen.
A brief visit to an artificial insemination
clinic is next on the roster, but the women
are immediately turned off by what they
see. A drunken lout with a pornographic
magazine in his hand emerges from a room
and is handed money for services rendered.
Some audience members may object to
Jutra's flippant treatment of this scene.
Vancouver producer Werner Eallen, who
was partially responsible for the idea for By
Design says it is "too abrupt for my
liking."
The saving grace of this scene is that
Jutra doesn't linger on it. And because
Angie and Helen are competent and aware,
you trust the women enough to agree with
their rejection of this route to pregnancy.
In another scene, male-female sex roles
are reversed. Angie and Helen, now searching for "a stud" to father Helen's child,
size up construction workers — all men —
who are made immediately uncomfortable
because this time, they are objects of sexism.
The only time the women seem to make a
questionable decision is when they settle on
Terry (Saul Rubinek), their photographer,
who has a long-standing crush on Helen.
He thinks he is in love with her, perhaps
because she is a woman who will not give in
to his inane advances.
But even here, Jutra proves the women's
instincts correct. Terry is something of a
schmuck. He lays awful lines on gullible
young women who think they'll become
stars if they sleep with him, and has a huge
photomural on his bedroom wall that he
calls "Tits Transcendent." It is a collection
of pictures of these women's breasts. He
regards the ensemble with pride because it
simultaneously confirms  his  sexual  and
creative prowesses; it strokes his ego.
When Angie virtually drags Helen to
Terry's apartment for one night, both
women take a gamble. Angie, who thinks
she will be alone that night, meets a young
Swede (Alan Duruisseau) and goes to bed
with him. In an audacious cross-cutting sequence, Jutra alternates between Angie in
bed and Helen with Terry. The two women,
who are physically apart, connect with
each other by phone.
"The men are only the physical vehicle,
which isn't the cause of their orgasms,"
says producer Aellen.
It may trouble some people that as close
as Helen and Angie are, they never kiss during the movie. It may also surprise the same
people to realize that the omission doesn't
matter because there is never any question
about the affection the two women feel for
each other. In a dancing scene set in a lesbian bar, Sister Moon, Helen and Angie
come together — and the comfort at being
in each other's arms is so perfect, that you
don't want them to separate.
Angie and Helen come off better than
any male character in the film. But it isn't
because the two women, who have to deal
with men on a business level, don't like
men. The tall Angie seems to flirt with men.
If they don't respond, it is because she is someone they cannot dominate; she has them
all figured out. When Angie talks to men,
she talks in an even, wise tone; you know
they can't match up to her.
Sara Botsford and Patti Duke Astin, who
play Angie and Helen, establish their
characters naturally; they're in perfect sync
with director Jutra. Botsford, especially, is
an unbelievably confident and forthright
prescence. Jutra never ridicules his women
characters because he understands just how
intelligent and aware they are. Their success
as co-workers and lovers requires appreciation and applause; and as Aellen says, "The
most important thing is that you don't
make fun of the women. You make fun of
everything else, including the men, but not
the women."
Few who see Jutra's film will want too —
by design or otherwise, Helen and Angie
have found their bliss. Page 4
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, January 21,1983
Cover 'misleading'
By KERRY REGIER
Stanislaw Lem's hero, Ijon
Tichy, is a thoroughly modern hero
who is forced to face a world bigger
than himself.
Memoirs of a Space Traveller
By Stanislaw Lem
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, $13.50
Beneath the misleading puerile
cover of Memoirs of a Space
Traveller is a second volume of
short stories (following The Star
Diaries) detailing Tichy's adventures in space and on earth.
It is clear Tichy is no superman,
for he polishes a spot on his
spaceship's viewscreen for four
hours before realizing he is looking
at a planet. Nor does Tichy have a
clear idea of what he is looking for
in his wanderings.
Tichy never speaks about a goal,
and it is precisely this aimlessness in
a non-deterministic universe that is
central to all Lem's writing.
Lem portrayed the resulting
moods of fear and isolation in the
expanse novel Solaris, and gave
theory a human face in the detective
novels The Investigation and The
Chain of .Chance. In these short
stories Lem confronts loneliness
and disorientation. Lem's short
stories are tiny vignettes which,
while retaining the essential mood
of the science fiction story, remain
within a small enough scope to be
personal.
The subjects are no smaller than
those of the novels — Tichy en
counters a pair of alien artificial
minds, a solipsistic world in a
laboratory cannister, and the moment of the Big Bang itself — but
Lem's intent is different.
Through Tichy, he offers a simple solution to the great loneliness:
keep moving.
In his novels Lem conveys a
human feeling of the unbearable
scale of the universe, while the short
stories offer consolation for the
pain of a comprehension of the true
size of things. To stay at home is to
remain in fear of the darkness, and
so for Lem the traditional consolations of the home life, such as
religion, are empty. The only remaining virtue is the courage to
keep looking ahead without flinching.
Presentation House Theatre
333 Chesterfield, North Vancouver
The
WOOLGATHERER
by William Mastrosimone
with
| Terry David Mulligan & Jill Daum|
' 'A wish is just a detour..."
Tuesday - Thursday: 8:30 pm
Friday & Saturday: 7 & 9:30 pm
Sunday 2 fori: 3:00 pm
Tickets: $5.50, $6.50
For reservations call: 9oO-i35l
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v»*>e'\o^ «rA*
© \9»l
tt*»»
W»«»'
a**" Friday, January 21,1963
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 5
All things vague with Images
By CHRIS WONG
Images In Vogue is a disturbing
band. While its music is catchy and
energetic, an air of coldness and
sterility hangs over the group.
At SUB ballroom on Jan. 15, the
Vancouver band demonstrated its
awesome inability to generate
anything remotely resembling excitement or inspiration.
Electronics dominated the performance as the group's line-up
consists of four keyboard players,
including two who double on bass
and guitar, a synthesized drummer,
and a vocal — perhaps the group's
only human element.
But that is stretching Dale Mar-
tindale's contributions to the band.
His black horn-rimmed glasses and
neatly cropped hair-style gave him
the appearance of Clark Kent gone
neuro-romantic. His voice is strong
and clear but inevitably overpowered by the layered synthesizer
sounds. On stage he sounded as
mechanical as the banks of
keyboards that surrounded him.
The group played songs from
their first album, Educated Man.
Each tune was typical if not redundant.
First came the syndrums which
provided the incessant backbeat.
Then came the carefully executed
melodies, harmonies, and various
musical lines played on the
keyboards which replaced the conventional bass and guitar. Over top
were the always obscure lyrical
ramblings of Martindale.
It must be said that the music was
truly danceable. The fairly large
turnout of punks, mods, and Euro-
Discoites showed approval. But due
to dominating synthesizers the
band's music was simply too
calculated and slick.
Images In Vogue revolves around
synthesizers and their infinite
possibilities. Despite its dependence
on such electronic gadgetry, intelligent arrangements and competent musicians gave the music subtle
appeal. But only minimal amounts
of sensitivity — essential to any
musical style — were generated.
In short the band and many other
similar groups were about as emo
tionally stimulating as an English
100 course — full of potential but
lacking in substance and creativity.
Visible Targets, the opening act,
were not any more successful in
creating inspiring music. The Seattle band played songs off their
recently released E.P. and tried unsuccessfully to grab the audience's
attention.
The band had a three woman
front-line and a wildly thrashing
drummer. It isn't the most accessible music, but with a few more gigs
Visible Targets could soon have the
edges polished and begin their rise
among the ranks of alternative
bands.
It'• a gray. gray, grayar thing ttanw* Mm aim dona bafora.
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and Mack, but rt comaa to tha aama thing, on avarnga.
Th»t to why you ahould Join tha Ubyaaay. SUB 3tttk. Now.
Come and Hear the Candidates Running for
AMS EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS!
Friday, January 21,   12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
CITR-UBC Radio will provide music from 12:00
COMMUNITY SPORTS
EXPANSION SALE SPECIALS
Now at Two Locations
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HffiUofBLlJE
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BEER
Lesson #2 "Storage and temperature"
Unlike wine, beer should be stored upright to avoid the
extra surface contact with air in the bottle. Lagers should
not be served below 7°C (45°F). Ales and dark beers
taste better over I0°C (50°F); stouts, porter and bock at
about I3°C (56°F). In fact, the English do not refrigerate
their ales, porter and stouts at all * These temperatures
are suggested as a guide by our brewmaster who
believes many people have a tendency to serve their
beer a bit too cold. "Still,*' our brewmaster adds, "it all
comes down to personal preference. Some like it warm,
some like it cold, and I'm sure there's someone,
somewhere who even likes it hot.'*
*But then some people think that the English
also drive on the wrong side of the road.
Lesson #2 from the College of Beer Knowledge Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 21,1983
mM
Vancouver
after Classes
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Give yourself
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THE    U BYSSEY
Page 7
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — It was
a solemn time on the island. The
puce blorgs had decided. Well, a
few of the puce blorgs had decided,
the rest had hidden in the video arcade in case they were caught in the
open by a teller and asked to make a
decision. How horrible that would
have been.
Anyway, those puce blorgs who
had participated in the glorious
electoral process had elected
thousands of new leaders from a
field of millions.
Target Dropping wept quietly at
the thought of the heavy responsibility she was about to take up.
But Rave Tank was happy. His eyes
glazed at the thought of the brave
new world HE would build. Free
televisions sets for every Blorg and
the state would also undertake to
supply free popcorn, with real butter to every Blorg under 90 every
day for breakfast. They would all
be SO happy and nobody would
dare to laugh at his knees ever
again.
Meanwhile Dead Nixon went out
and bought a new keyring, because
he'd been told he'd get the keys of
office and at the shops he saw other
recently elected Blorgs. Showanne
Wherearewe was buying some chic
Alligator mittens to match her
scarf, Smart Pompson was coming
out of a store with throat lozenges
"I propose to say a lot."
Suddenly Tank realized where
he'd find Nan Frame and Cerise
Dikinfronk and he rushed around
the corner. Sure enough they were
there already in the talking shop.
Meanwhile, the lucky Blorgs contemplated the next elections. THEY
didn't have to wait a whole year
before they had the honor
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Information Line 228-3777
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avoid inhaling. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Ja
Just when you thoughl
Laying Low vs. Mitch pitch
The candidates for Alma Mater Society
president are everything but dynamic. Doug
Low is running on the incognito ticket while
his opposition, Mitch Hetman, cannot trust
himself without his trusty campaign manager
in tow.
Mystery candidate Low failed to show up
for a pre-arranged interview at The Ubyssey.
His purple hand-scrawled campaign posters,
which do not include a picture, attest to his
desire to keep a "low" profile and
simultaneously maintain a "low" budget.
A Ubyssey staff member discovered Low
putting up campaign posters in SUB late
Wednesday night. Low indicated to the
reporter he would come to The Ubyssey office Thursday, but he never did.
Hence, no photo, no interview.
To quote Low's entire campaign poster:
"Doug Low for AMS President."
Mitch Hetman would like to see most of
the money, from the $20 referendum go
towards improving and increasing student
housing facilities on campus.
"There is too much crowding in certain
facilities such as Totem Park, while at the
same time, Gage is deficient in what students
want," said Hetman. "I would like to see
more facilities built to accommodate student
ARMSTRONG...would don suit and tie
I
Stories by
CRAIG BROOKS
BRIAN JONES
NEIL LUCENTE
CARY RODIN
SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Photos by
CRAIG BROOKS
ARNOLD HEDSTROM
NEIL LUCENTE
Graphic by
ROBBY ROBERTSON
housing for eight months and four months
for summer conferences."
Hetman has no idea about daycare or
whether the AMS should involve itself with
off-campus organizations such as the Canadian Federation of Students.
And Hetman believes AMS should not
concern itself with political issues such as
disarmament.
"I think everyone should be concerned
about bombs but taking those and other
LOW...keeping a namesake profile
issues into council will detract from AMS's
day to day business."
Student accessibility to Hetman means accessibility to the AMS president.
"I want to be accessible to the students
through the undergraduate societies, clubs
and organizations. That means going to their
meetings and hearing (issues) through the
grapevine."
Hetman is an avid supporter of Ubyssey
autonomy.
"I'm all for it. I can't see why it shouldn't
be. The paper should be autonomous so that
students can have a wider perspective. It
would be easy for a tyrant to say 'you're printing this and that, so stop.' "
Using a standard political line, Hetman
says he will try to improve communications
between student council and AMS subsidiary
organizations.
"Students will be the first to know where
student funds will be spent."
Hetman is currently Gage Community
Council president, where he "has got things
done."
He is running in conjunction with vice-
presidential candidate Rick Oliver.
Hetman urges students to "get out and
vote."
Now, if Hetman only had somebody to run
against.
HETMAN...campaign manager in tow
(The AMS president coordinates the day-
to-day activities of the society, chairs student
council meetings, acts as liaison between
council and the AMS full-time staff)
External race draws experience
Someday both Bruce Armstrong and Lisa
Hebert will likely work in Victoria or Ottawa.
But next week, only one of these shrewd
politicians will be elected to work for the
Alma Mater Society.
To say that both Armstrong and Hebert
are slick might be an exaggeration, but they
are certainly polished and confident. Both
have a list of qualifications that would make
Joe Clark blush and wish he was a Liberal
backbencher. Hebert has extensive experience with the Canadian Federation of
Students, and has been a delegate to provincial and national CFS conferences. She
presently sits on student council, and has
served two years as arts senator. Armstrong
has served two terms as AMS president, three
terms on student council and has been a student board of governors representative.
Herbert and Armstrong both say the major
problems facing students are government
underfunding, accessibility, quality of education, housing, and cost of transportation.
Armstrong opts for a lobbying strategy, of
having student representatives gain access to
and then put pressure on politicians and
government officials. Hebert agrees with that
strategy to an extent, but would like to see
vehicles for more widespread student input.
"I'd like to redefine the position so we see
a lot coming out of the external affairs
office," says Hebert. "We should establish
an anti-cutbacks team — ACT," she adds.
Armstrong views the process of protecting
student interests slightly differently. He
prefers to cooperate with the university administration and board of governors to make
use of their contacts within the government.
"You have to get inside (government) to
do something," says Armstrong. "We're
wasting potential if we don't recognize what
people in the alumni association, board of
governors and senate can do." Their
assistance can be useful in specific areas such
as student aid and employment, he adds.
Once access to government is obtained student representatives must concentrate on particular programs, says Armstrong. "If you're
not going to give specific examples the
government is not going to act. You have to
be prepared."
In regard to student demonstrations, Armstrong said they should be used if they are going to help, but students should look for
alternatives. "If it takes a suit and tie and a
briefcase to get a talk with McGeer then I'll
do it," he says. Armstrong is pragmatic, and
one can easily imagine him reading
Machiavelli.
Hebert agrees with Armstrong about initial
strategy, but is more inclined to activism.
"You have to start gently at first," she says.
"But if they (government) have a confronta-
tionist attitude, then your tactics have to
change."
But Hebert stresses that demonstrations
should always be followed up by actions such
as lobbying and letter writing. "Demonstrations alone don't solve everything, although
they may be a necessary release," she says.
HERBERT...redefinition required
UBC would also benefit from joining CFS,
says Hebert. "There may be problems with
CFS, but we can work to change them," she
says. About the $7.50 per student membership fee, Hebert says "If it's spent on
research and getting information out to
students it's an investment in better conditions for education."
UBC membership in CFS would require
the consent of student council, says Hebert.
"I   don't   think   a   referendum   (on   CFS
membership) should be held unless council is
willing to support it," she says. "If certain
people on council, especially executives, are
against it they can do a lot to make it fail. So
you have to have a supportive council."
Armstrong is less supportive of CFS,
although he says he is not necessarily against
it. "I won't stand in the way of CFS," he
says. "Personally I think it's unrealistic for
CFS to think they can run a successful
referendum on this campus because of the
money involved. But I won't campaign
against it."
On off-campus political issues Armstrong
is meekly noncommital, while Hebert at least
has the courage to speak up, a dangerous
thing for a student politician in these reactionary times.
Hebert thinks students should be involved
in controversial political issues, such as the
peace movement. "I put it on my poster and
if I'm elected I'll continue to support disarmament," she says. "I feel that is one of the
issues I'm running on."
Armstrong evades the political question by
saying he will do what is most useful to
students. "I will try to represent as much as
possible what they want," he says. "I cannot
stand up as the coordinator of external affairs and say that students shall or must go
out and join groups."
Asked who his three favorite political
thinkers/writers are, Armstrong replies that
he admires Thomas Jefferson and Lester B.
Pearson because they "stood up for human
rights." Then he takes off his glasses, thinks
for a moment, and says the third is Eleanor
Roosevelt. "It's not because of her
husband," he adds.
Asked the same question, Hebert once
again displays courage. "That would be incriminating, because I'd have to say Marx,"
she says, obviously referring to the world's
most famous corrupter of young minds. She
says she also admires John Maynard Keynes
and   Kenneth   Galbraith.
(The AMS external affairs coordinator
keeps council informed of UBC's relationship with other organizations, such as CFS
and governments.) Uary 21,1983,^
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 9
democracy was safe...
Greg Pelling, physical education 4, isn't
very worried about taking on an incumbent
for the position of Alma Mater Society administration director.
Pelling criticizes current DoA Alan
Pinkney, arts 4, for having few office hours
and a narrow view of the position.
"There is more to the job than running
SAC (student administrative commission)
and keeping ties between council and SAC,"
Pelling says.
Pinkney was appointed to the position last
term, after student court overturned a by-
election for the position. AMS by-laws permit student council to appoint people to executive positions when the term of office left
is less than four months.
"Alan has really done his stuff, but I think
I can do more," says Pelling. "I'll have the
time to spend finding out these things."
"I want to take the traditional position
and do more things with it," he said. Pelling
wants to get things done "properly," but admits "I am not saying that they're not being
done properly now."
Pinkney isn't worried about his last term
by-election defeat affecting his chances this
time. "That whole election was a disaster. If
there were that many irregularities none of
the results say anything," he says.
Student court found Scott Ando guilty of
illegal campaigning and other irregularities.
Pinkney was faulted for only a slightly oversized poster, the size most current candidates
for AMS executive are using.
Pelling lists his qualifications physical
education society president, president of the
men's athletics association and coach of
several wheelchair basketball teams. He has
sat on student council for the past year.
By contrast, Pinkney is running heavily on
his AMS experience. As a member of SAC
(which the director of administration chairs),
secretary of SAC, and having been on five
AMS committees, he says he knows the
system and can help students.
He agrees with Pelling that he has done little since taking over Dec. 1, but says that exams and the recent problems with asbestos
being discovered in the Pit and other areas in
SUB have taken most of that time.
Pelling would like to see the current $15
building fund spent on housing and athletic
facilities. But priority number one is daycare
DoA
renovation, he says. "People come before
dollars, when you have the dollars."
Pelling wants the AMS to start building
housing gradually, building preferably for
first year students. "There are maybe 200
students hurting right now," he says.
Both Pelling and Pinkney feel the Whistler
cabin, priority number seven in the
November referendum, should be treated by
council as a higher priority. "It's dollars and
cents right now," Pelling says. "Besides, you
could always sell it."
Pinkney ranks SUB plaza (club space)
development and housing as top priorities.
He also favors buying the whistler cabin immediately, an area under DoA jurisdiction.
"You could lose (the $400,000) if you don't
act on it. Two thousand people use it each
year — $70,000 is not an unreasonable investment."
But neither candidate wants to buy the
cabin unless it becomes absolutely necessary
to protect the investment.
Both candidates intend to take a major
load of courses next year if they are elected.
Pelling would take nine units of courses,
while Pinkney intends to enrol full-time in
law school.
Pinkney is not worried about the unit load.
"I have been spending up to 40 hours per
week (in AMS activities) now, and I am still
maintaining a first-class average," he says.
Both candidates support Ubyssey
autonomy.
"It's time it ran itself," says Pelling.
Pinkney appears more knowledgeable about
the issues regarding autonomy.
"The bottom line is sure, there is going to
be a lot of shit flying (without autonomy),
and it would cost the same (with
autonomy)," says Pinkney.
At Tuesday's council meeting Pelling moved closure on a motion to force Ubyssey
advertising content to more than 45 per cent
since "everyone had made up their minds
already."
The Ubyssey staff were still making a
presentation at the time.
(The DoA chairs and directs the student
administrative commission.)
PINKNEY...running on AMS experience
Hear humble Hollis
PELLING... challenges incumbent
Why should students re-elect James Hollis
as finance director?
Just ask. He'll be glad to tell you in his
own humble way.
"Anyone here two years ago realizes that
AMS services have never operated better
than they are today. That certainly is not by
accident."
Hollis has in fact overseen improved financial operations for the AMS. But many people have criticized Hollis for being unable to
see past the dollar signs to consider the
human aspect of issues.
Fifty percent of AMS revenue comes from
student fees. The remainder comes from
business like the Pit, the games room, and
the copy center. They've done well. The biggest moneymaker is the games room,
budgeted to yield a $143,000 profit. That is
almost twice last year's profit. The Pit will
make a $53,000 profit, while the copy center
will make $29,550.
And despite the acquisition of five new
Two candidates and their vices
With education cutbacks and university
funding problems no longer the primary
source of concern in the minds of candidates
running for vice-president, housing, of all
issues, seems to have emerged as the dominant issue in both politicians' platforms.
Renee Comesotti says "affordable housing' is a priority, while Rick Oliver says
OLIVER..."as good a job as Cliff"
"residences should be brought closer to the
Alma Mater Society."
Comesotti, one of only two women candidates in this year's executive elections, says
her experience as the arts undergraduate
society vice-president has given her "a good
working knowledge of the AMS."
"The whole AMS needs a fine tuning,"
she says. "There seems to be a poor allocation of money, especially in the business office. I don't know if (it's) budget is
justified."
Comesotti says she doesn't see cutbacks as
being as severe a problem this year as in
previous years. As with her position on AMS
budgets.it may be a matter of allocation," she
says.
"It's not as bad as it could be."
Oliver seems to agree. He doesn't appear
to think that an active AMS campaign
against cutbacks should be a great concern of
the vice-president.
"The AMS should watch themselves. They
should stay out of the board (of governors),
and go through the board reps." He says he
doesn't think the AMS can have much impact in university affairs.
He says he wants to make sure that "the
($20 fee) referendum which was just passed
this year is followed, and that committees set
up to do their job do it as they were set up."
"If I can do as good a job as Cliff
(Stewart, current AMS vice-president), I'll be
satisfied," he says when asked about a personal evaluation of the position.
About his position as budget committee
chair if he gets elected, Oliver says he will see
that  clubs  get  a  fair  money  allocation,
especially intramurals.
-   Oliver says his main administrative ex
perience comes from being the Place Vanier
residence association president.
Both Commesotti, Arts 2, and Oliver,
Science 3, are running for the first time in
AMS executive elections.
COMESOTTI..."working knowledge"
copiers this year, Hollis promises prices will
not increase for at least two years.
But Hollis has reneged on campaign promises in the past. Last year Hollis said he was
in favor of dropping the AMS fee levy from
filmsoc movie prices. But the AMS recently
imposed an annual $5,000 rental fee for the
SUB auditorium, resulting in a 50 per cent increase in SUB film prices. Hollis refuses to
shoulder the responsibility for the policy
change.
"The budget committee and the general
situation dictated the fee levy," he says.
Hollis, who was previously external affairs
coordinator, has come under attack during
the past year for "railroading" numerous
budget amendments through council. In the
case of Filmsoc, society members did not
HOLLIS...can't see past $$$ signs
know of the rental proposal until just before
council approved it.
Recently Hollis pushed through budget
amendments to force The Ubyssey to run 45
per cent ad content. The amendment was
presented during a budget committee meeting
to which The Ubyssey was not invited.
Hollis was aware of the political implications of making the amendment before the
election, but felt it "would not be responsible
to wait until after the election to make the
changes because we would be looking at an
additional deficit."
Hollis claims there are no serious communication problems between the various
societies and clubs, adding they all receive a
fair allocation of funds.
Hollis is running without competition but
faces a yes/no ballot on election day.
Candidate Peter Mitchell withdrew from
the contest.
(The AMS vice-president chairs the AMS
budget committee and acts as signing
officer.)
(The AMS finance director draws up the
society's annual budget and manages the
cash flow.) Page 10
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, January 21, 1983
End of joke
When the Klu Klux Klan burns a black male effigy it is a violent act of
racism — but when would-be fraternity members sexually assault a black
female effigy it is a "prank."
At the SUB Pit Saturday, six Psi Upsilon pledges abused an inflatable
black female effigy, forcing a rubber penis into the effigy's mouth and
vagina. This was done on the Pit's dance floor and the management ignored the incident and withheld comment.
Despite the fact the pledges were drunk, this is an obvious act of
misogeny.
The abuse of the black female figure represents the participants' attitudes towards the person symbolized, a black female.
This violent attitude of males towards females is not uncommon.
Anyone who has seen the pornographic magazine Hustler's depictions of
necrophilia and women being butchered with axes and chain saws knows
this.
Just as a Klan sympathizer sees a black person not as an individual but
as a "negro," many males see females as submissive sex organs who exist
to satisfy their pleasure and need to dominate.
As one man said about a woman murdered during a rape, "if she just
gave him what he wanted she wouldn't have got hurt."
Any person in the security of a group is capable of actions that he would
not individually consider. Chances are these men alone would not have
committed this act of abuse.
These men also had the support of a publicly sanctioned group, the Psi
Upsilon fraternity, which made this act a part of pledge initiation. This
fraternity has made symbolically abusing a female a requirement of its
members.
And the Pit staff, if they did not support the event, did not oppose it.
They said it a usual frat prank.
If the prank involved six blacks who brought in a white female figure and
proceeded to sexually abuse it would that be acceptable, just a prank?
With his statement, "the women were not laughing," an eyewitness
summed up the event.
Women are not laughing. In fact, theye fighting acts like this — rape,
pornography, discriminatory legal and hiring practices and more.
They have turned to violence, as in the Red Hot video fire bombings.
People in Canadian society seldom turn to organized violence. Women
have been pushed past that point.
The prank was not funny. The women were not laughing. Most men
were.
Letters
Fun times for all
The 1983 winter sportsfest for
disabled juniors is a day of fun and
excitement for 50 disabled and 50
abled-bodied youths between eight
and 18 years of age.
This is the first event of its kind
in British Columbia.
It is unique because each able-
bodied participant is paired with a
disabled youth of the same age and
they compete together as a team.
The events of the day include a
wheelchair obstacle course relay,
nurf volleyball, broomball, floor
hockey and basketball shoot. There
are special events and demonstrations planned throughout the day,
including sledge hockey, which will
be available for everyone to try, and
visits from various celebrities like
Ronald McDonald.
The event is presented by the
students of the school of rehabilitation medicine. Although it is a day
of fun, it is expected to be a powerful learning experience for youths
and adults alike. It gives disabled
and able-bodied youths the chance
to join in cooperative sports in the
hope that this will increase public
awareness of the potential and need
for sports opportunities for disabled youths.
It happens Saturday, Feb. 12 at
the Thunderbird sports centre from
8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Spectators are encouraged and
welcome to attend!!
Deb Sebum
rehab 3
sportsfest rep.
"I suppose the hardest part to accept is
the not being able to get around!"
Dave Frank and Margaret Copping elected
Socreds perpetuating pips
We have heard the Social Credit
government's notion of the university as an institution producing
economists, scientists and
technocrats who will oil the wheels
of B.C.'s economic machinery. Fully expressed, this view specifies the
function and purpose of the university as an integral participant of an
enterprise which systematically exploits the riches of this province.
The role of its graduates is to
perpetuate this endeavour, not to
question it.
perspectives
In a sense, we are already well
along a path leading to this vision.
Increasingly, students graduating
from university can best be described as "Idiots Savants": specialists
of a narrow field possessing limited
knowledge outside their discipline.
For the most part, nothing is
taught that might lead the individual to look at the assumptions
and prejudices which he or she
might hold. It follows that this individual's contribution to society is
likely to be restricted to the chosen
specialty.
Thus, bridge builders can erect
magnificent structures but do not
perceive or have no concern for the,
good or harm of their constructions. The bridge builder may simply assume that someone thought it
was desirable to build a bridge, that
the matter of good and bad was accounted   for,   and  anyway,   what
Round 14 in
Tieleman-Milne
debate
Re: Bill Tieleman's clarification
about me (Jan. 14):
Liberalism, it appears, has once
more raised its ugly head, and clearly it must be dealt with. Tolerance
and freedom must be stifled by all
true progressives, and dissenters
must be denied their right to speak.
Only in this way can we possibly
hope to build a true broad based
coalition.
But how peculiar this all sounds:
almost as if the psychological
pressure of impending war had addled someone's mind. Much as Bill
Tieleman may dislike it, Students
for Peace and Mutual Disarmament
works towards a just and lasting
peace, not just a lasting one.
Andres Milne
graduate student
engineering physics
harm could come from such a
splendid structure?
Obviously, I am drawing a
caricature. Yet the world in which
we live is shaped and practically run
by specialists, many of whom
received their training at university.
Each one has his or her preoccupation, and smartly resolves any problem forwarded to him or her and
passes it to the next specialist.
When things go awry, none has a
claim to responsibility since
everyone diligently fulfilled his or
her obligation.
Any assumed responsibility is
dissipated out of existence. Clearly,
there is a problem here. Undesirable
by-products of our activities seem
to accumulate without control.
In my mind, the difficulty arises
because bridge builders primarily
have an allegiance to bridges and
bridge-building, rather than to
society. By this, I mean that we fail
to perceive ourselves as members of
a society, with the potential through
our acquired skills to help or harm
others just as others may help us or
harm us.
This recognition of our role as
participating citizens is an impor
tant part of the university's mandate. It is not obvious to me that
universities currently fulfill this
mandate.
Forming citizens is not the same
as forming technocrats. The former
is achieved by providing
technologists and scientists with an
understanding of the human context in which their skills are put to
use. (Whatever human context had
the creators of the Neutron bomb in
mind?) This is certainly not achieved in Accounting 100 or its
equivalent. It is also clear that the
humanists should be provided with
an understanding of the way science
operates and of its major contributions.
I am not asking that the university forms us all into erudites. Lord
knows we all have personal limitations. However, what we now have
is clearly inadequate: it is a mere
shadow of what we ought to be.
Andre Sobolewski
grad studies
biology
Perspective is a column opinion
open to the university community.
Board rep not
'misinformation vehicle'
Normally I do not make an issue
of minor misquotes in the Ubyssey;
however, there is one point relating
to the election coverage that I
would like to clear up.
I was referred to as rejecting the
practice of granting tenure
automatically after five years.
While I certainly would object to
such a practice if it existed here, it
does not, and I never meant to say it
does.
I did say that I didn't think
abolishing tenure is an appropriate
budget cut, but tenure is not
something to be granted without
serious consideration. There are
abuses at UBC as everywhere, but
automatic tenure is not one of
them.
I have failed to make myself clear
before, and probably will again, but
I do not wish to be, however inadvertently, a vehicle for misinformation.
Margaret Copping
board rep
THE UBYSSEY
January 21,1983
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
The Ubyssey collective was all assembled. 'Now class' said Kelley Jo Burke 'It's time for our
emotional orientation hour, so break up into your groups and pracitice your drills.' Brian
Jones, Sarah Cox, Eric Eggertson and teacher sneaked off to one corner and screamed
jealously at each other. Enviously Chris Wong, Neil Lucente, Peter Berlin, Jack Tieleman and
Victor Wong watched them from over the back of the sofa and told the most outrageous
gossip. In the middle of the room Harry Hertsheg, Monte Stewart, Muriel Driaasma, Robby
Robert-thing and Lisa Morry stood in a circle, held hands and lept up and down joyfully
bellowing H-A-T-E, hate, hate, hate. Robert Beynon, Cathy McGann, and Kerry Regier sat at
Arnold Hedstrom's feet, as he told them gentry about the AMS council they fett sad. Dominic
Spooner told Russell Fraser all about Cary Rodin and they both laughed happily. Glen Sanford at and watched all the fakers and nursed is genuine hate with pride. Meanwhile Shaffin
Shariff thought about love and big brother. Friday, January 21,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Letters
Complaints deluge welcome
The Alma Mater Society ombudsoffice was astonished at the
number of complaints received on
complaints day, Wednesday — approximately 900 complaints. It
would appear from a preliminary
analysis of the surveys that the
following are the major complaints
of those students who completed
the survey.
Godspeak:
from Ohio
to Yorrick
My Dear President Brezhnev:
GOD is not dead — not if He can
Dictate Letters to newspaper
Editors and even United States
Senators. Enclosed is a carbon copy
of a Letter to senator John Glenn.
Perhaps it will interest you?
I deplore waiting years for a
meeting between you and President
Reagan. This hoarding of nuclear
warheads is outlandish. You can
varify that because of the cost of
nuclear arms. It is outrageous that
President Reagan slashes monies to
help the poor but upholds spending
billions for more nuclear arms.
Perhaps this condition also exists in
the Soviet Union?
This letter could go on but it has
an end — as all mortals must in due
time. As Almighty GOD, My Holy
SPIRIT has Dictated this Letter to
you, President Brezhnev, through
My humble Son who wrote My
Very Words. Because My Holy
Name is void of form, it is never
written on paper. Only My Son will
sign this Letter for a brighter future
between you, President Reagan and
the population of this world.
Prayerfully yours,
Eugene Changey
jOhio
The problems listed are not in
order of priority:
• The Bookstore: "it should be
a service, not a business." Prices
are much higher than anywhere else
was the general consensus;
• Registration: this appeared to
be the no. 1 problem, according to
the survey. "Why can't we have
pre-registration?"
• Counselling: Brock hall
counselling office, according to
many students, has given out information which has turned out to be
incorrect and prevented completion
of degree requirements;
• Employment Office: "the
staff at the employment office is
rude," and "they do not give you
much assistance;"
• Traffic and Security: they are
perceived by many students to be
"out to get us" and harass
students. The general consensus
was that more parking facilities are
necessary;
• The Pit: "why do UBC
students have to stand in line when
non-UBC students are taking up
space inside?" "The music is too
loud" and "the beer is too expensive."
The ombudsoffice will be compiling a report based on the survey and
will then investigate all major problems. We would like to thank all
those students who took the time to
complete the survey.
Debra Bellamy
ombudsoffice
Reading, Writing,
and Study Skills
Register Now
Reading for Speed & Comprehension
Grammar & Basic Composition
Writing Improvement
Choosing the Right Word
Improving Your Speaking Voice
Study Skills
Writing Business Letters & Memos
Writing Effective Reports
Writing a Research Paper
Courses begin the week of January 24
SUED
Phone 228-2181 (245)
Centre for Continuing Education
*J3 383/
The
Price
is Right
hair design ltd.
JtZI Ufest&u-rtk,
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. jre*t prices en-perns,
• tto a/>^>ntrnent r»te<x!.e^
$A*7A/t>oo ui*r*k 6*5 cat
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING or MINERAL ENGINEERING and
EXTRACTIVE or PROCESS METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
$2,000
to students wishing to enter the first or subsequent professional
year of a degree course in Mining or Mineral Engineering
and Extractive or Process Metallurgical Engineering.
For applications contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation,
P.O. Box 45, Commerce Court West, Toronto, Ont.
or
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING DATE: FEBRUARY 18, 1983
GRAD CLASS GIFTS
AND PROJECTS
Applications for grad class gifts or projects
are now being accepted. Submit applications to the AMS Business Office c/o Grad
Class, SUB Box 118 by 4:30 p.m., January
28, 1983. Vote at the Annual General
Meeting, Thursday, February 3, 1983, at
12:30 p.m.
Come and Hear the Candidates Running for
AMS EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS!
Friday, January 21,   12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
CITR-UBC Radio will provide music from 12:00 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 21,1983
P
I
T
P
I
T
OLD FORT BREWING CO. — producers of Yukon Gold, Iron Horse Malt Liquor
and Pacific Gold bring the best to you each week.
THE SCISSORS
with Special Guests
Power Pop
JANUARY 20 AND 21
THURS. — FREE COVER — 7:00
FRI. — $2.00 SHOW — 9:30
Non-Students $1.00 extra
FRENCH LETTERS
"Rough'n'ready new wave dance music"
JANUARY 27 AND 28
THURS. — FREE COVER — 7:00
FRI. — $2.00 SHOW — 9:30
Non-Students $1.00 extra
located in Ihc /tudent union bldg.
in Ihc heart of the ubc campu/
DEVON HAN LEV
Folk country pop
January 17-22
GARY KEENAN
Jazz Quartet
January 26-29
Showtime 9:00
NO COVER CHARGE
OPEN
Mon. thru Fri.
Noon - 12:30 am    Saturday 12:30 am 4:30 pm
THE NEW WORLD OF
Futuru>( Cruior tod Producer
QEHE RODDEHBEBBY
AMERICAS FAVORITE LIVE SCIENCE FICTION PROGRAM
A FfalKMrr Cootwt  wlh At bnau STAR TREK   Elooprr Rwl    TIm Hiifo Awirt ««iui| on|«*l
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SUN. MARCH 6th    KJOpm & 7.30pm
WAR MEMORIAL GYM,   UBC
ADVANCE TICKETS^ $6 AMS STUDENTS
$6 GENERAL
AWLABLE AT  VTC/CBO OUTLETS, WOCCVVARD':
- EATON'S, COMC SHOP, AMS BOX OFFICE. _
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE PHONE 687 4444
PRODUCED BY A.M.S. CONCERTS
am
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FRI. FEB. 4 THUNDERBIRD ICE ARENA
skatetime:730 showtime800 no minors please
adv. tix $5ams $6gen. (skate rental not included)
available at ams box office
produced by ams concerts
AMS GAMES ROOMS
invites you to come in and
CHALLENGE
our newest member of our
Video Family
"ZAXXON"
This Week's Special:
RED ALERT — 4 SHIPS — 25c
TRON — 4 SHIPS — 50c and 25c
"Buy in" (continue playing from where you left off)
For the "Aces" and "Sharks" in the crowd — if you acquire a top "3" score on any video game or pinball — leave
your name and high score with the attendant on duty and be
eligible for monthly prizes and entry into the future hall of
fame board.
SUB Game Room located Lower Level of SUB
Open - 8:00 a.m. - 12:45 a.m. Monday thru Saturday
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. - Sunday Friday, January 21,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
(   'Bird Droppings
HOCKEY
It's an old cliche, but this
weekend's series against Calgary
Dinosaurs will be the two biggest
games of the regular season for
UBC's Thunderbirds men's ice
hockey team.
If the Thunderbirds come out
with anything less than a split from
the two-game home series, their
chances of making the third and
final play-off spot in the Canada
West   Conference   will   be   very
remote.
A sweep of Friday and Saturday
nights' games at the Thunderbird
arena would put UBC in a third
place tie with Calgary at 4 wins, 10
losses apiece. The Dinosaurs have
won three of the four previous
league meetings between the two
clubs.
Although the 'Birds haven't won
a league game at home yet, UBC
students and other friends of the
'Birds should keep in mind that the
UBC rugby backs in front
By DOMINIC SPOONER
The rugby 'Birds began the second half of the season with a victory over Cowichan at the Thunderbird stadium, Saturday.
The Cowichan Rugby club are
traditionally one of the
powerhouses of B.C. rugby. But
they were rendered ineffective by
UBC on Saturday, going down to a
13-3 defeat.
Cowichan played hard and were
aggressive in the rucks and mauls
(two UBC players needed stitches)
but the smaller 'Birds forwards held
their own and the UBC backs ran
their opponents ragged.
Charlie Foster dominated the
lineouts of UBC and the possession
was quickly moved out to the back
division.   There,   Pat   Palmer,   a
former B.C. sprint champion,
shone.
Palmer scored the first of UBC's
two tries with a blinding forty yard
dash which left three bewildered
Cowichan players wallowing in his
wake.
All the other nine of the 'Birds
points were scored by Mclean. He
converted Palmer's try, scored one
himself off a pass from number
eight Tom Trafford and kicked a
late penalty.
Mclean also used his boot to
good effect in defense and in that
department UBC also received good
service from speedy Palmer and
full-back Geoff Kendall the very
last line of defense.
The unbeaten 'Birds next game is
against James Bay in a weeks time.
team is undefeated at home in front
of crowds over 500 (they're 3-0).
It's the small crowds of 200 that's
been creating all the troubles. Game
time is 8 p.m. both Friday and
Saturday night at the Thunderbird
Arena. The game will be broadcast
live on CITR-UBC radio.
BASKETBALL
The 'Birds lost the first two
games of the Canada West season,
68-54 to Alberta in Edmonton Friday and 66-52 to Saskatchewan on
Saturday.
Friday, the 'Birds were called for
51 fouls compared to only 15 for
Alberta. Alberta sunk 20 of 26 foul
shots while UBC scored on six of
just nine free throws.
In Saskatoon, the 'Birds played
well but still managed to give up a
35-28 half-time lead. Fedorak led
the 'Birds with 13 points. Colette
Pilloud had 14 rebounds.
The women play the Vikings in
Victoria tomorrow night.
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, "Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
— ruaaal f raaar photo
SWOOSH . . . UBC's John Hillard wins Mt. Baldy skimeister
> LSAT
LSAT • MCAT • GRE
GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
HAT-GHAT-DAT
OCAT • PCAT - VAT
SAT-ACT-TOEFL-MSKP
NATL MED BOS • ECFMG
FLEX • VQE • NOB • RN BUS
CM'SPEED READING
Sfe*fley-R KAPLAN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since  1938
For information. Pleas* Call:
'(206) 632-0634-
Come and Hear the Candidates Running for
AMS EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS!
Friday, January 21,   12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
CITR-UBC Radio will provide music from 12:00
VIDEO    CENTRE
'2809 W. 16th Avenue, Vancouver
corner of MacDonald & W. 16th
14851 - 108th Ave., Surrey, B.C. Tel: 585-7200
20285 - 56th Ave., Langley, B.C. Tel.: 530-2700
107 - 32988 S. Fraser Way, Abbotsford, B.C. Tel.: 853-4533
15148 North Bluff Road, White Rock, B.C. Tel.: 536-4777
562G Clarke Road, Coquitlam, B.C. Tel.: 939-4511
MOVIES
WEEKDAY SPECIAL: Monday - Thursday
2 MOVIES FOR 1 ($5.00)
WEEKEND SPECIAL: Rent Movies on Saturday,
Sunday FREE
NEW MOVIES EVERY WEEK
Movies Inside Marked * Any 2 for $5.00
MACHINES
MONDAY - THURSDAY
$5.00 PER DAY
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
$8.00 PER DAY
We also accept Reservations
A MOVIE CLUB YOU'LL LOVE TO JOIN
NO DEPOSIT
STORE HOURS: 10:30 - 9:30 Monday to Friday
10:30 - 8:00 Saturday, 12 noon - 6 p.m. Sunday
RENTAL RETURN TIMES: Mon. - Fri. 7 p.m.; Sat. 4:30 p.m.
734-6822
For The Very Best In Entertainment Page 14
HE    UBYSSEY
Yiutic
Science: twist and shout to the quantum
theory, to Jan. 22, The Savoy.
David Raven and The Escorts: east end's
greatest gift to the rock world, Jan. 24-29,
The Savoy.
Spent Youth: toned down rockabilly, to Jan.
22, Town Pump.
Revolution: music for the anarchists, Jan.
24-26, Town Pump.
David   Griiman:    premier   jazz   mandolin
player, Jan. 22-23, Soft Rock Cafe.
Frosty Mountain: bluegrass, Jan. 24, Soft
Rock.
Kanaka Creek/Denise Larson: folk, Jan.
27, Soft Rock.
Moev: neuro-romantic rock sock hop, Jan.
28, Soft Rock.
Phoenix Jazzers: dixieland, Jan. 25, Hot
Jazz.
Jim Armstrong Quartet: dixieland, Jan. 26,
Hot Jazz.
Reyal Johnson and Tiger: R and B, reggae-
blues {talented band), to Jan. 22, Inner Circle,
828 East Hastings.
Sounds of Jazz: vocal jazz at its best, Jan.
21, 8 p.m., Italian Cultural Centre, 3075
Slocan.
Academy Strings: with Gwen Thompson,
Jan. 21, 7:30 p.m., Koerner Recital Hall, 1270
Chestnut.
Masterpiece Music: Shubert, Turina, and
Boccherini, Jan. 23, 2:30 and 8 p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Eric Wilson:  cello  recital,  Jan.  26,  noon,
recital hall.
John Loban: violin recital, Jan. 27, noon,
recital hall.
Shakin Pyramids: pure, acoustic rockability,
Jan. 28, Commodore Ballroom, VTC/CBO.
Mose Allison: bluesy jazz, Jan. 24-29, not
Jan. 17-22, Sheraton Landmark Jazz Bar.
Reflection On Crooked Walking: Ann Mor-
tifee's musical fantasy. Arts Club Granville
Island. Tues.-Fri. 8 p.m.; Wed. 5 p.m.; Sat.
6:30 and 9:30 p.m.; Sun. 2:30 p.m. to Jan. 29.
Betrayal: Harold Pinter's Love Triangle, Arts
Club Seymour. Opens Fri.
Six Characters in Search Of An Author:
Luigi Pirandello's twisted tale, 8 p.m.
Brew: life in Quebec pubs, Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, Mon.-Fri. 8 p.m.; Sat. 6 and
9 p.m.
Mass Appeal: stars William Hutt of Stratford
fame. Queen Elizabeth Playhouse. Mon.-Sat.
8 p.m.; Sat. 2:30 p.m.
The Working Man/Babe Rap: two wonderful plays, Firehall Theatre. 8 p.m., Jan. 21.
Hossana: a play by Michel Tremblay, Firehall
Theatre. Opens Jan. 24.
Home: life on the farm, Waterfront Theatre.
To Jan. 30. Reduced prices up to $4.50.
HcVi£6
SUBFilms (SUB Auditorium) Jan. 19-23:
Raiders Of The Lost Ark, 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Matinees Sun. 3 p.m. Jan. 26-30;
Poltergeist. Wed. 7 p.m.; Thurs.-Sun. 7and
9:30 p.m.; matinee Thurs. noon.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium) Jan. 24-25:
Double Indemnity, 7 p.m.; Scarlet Street,
8:40 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (NFB Theatre, 1156
West Georgia) Jan. 21: Nightmare Alley,
7:30 p.m.; Thunder Road. 9:30 p.m. Jan.
22-23; Vic Sjostrom: A Film Portrait, 7:30
p.m.; The Phantom Chariot, 9:30 p.m. Jan.
26: Accatone, 7 and 9:30 p.m. Jan. 27-28;
The Wages Of Fear, 7 p.m.; Sorceror, 9:30
p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Jan. 21-27: Burden Of Dreams, 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. Jan. 28-Feb. 3, 7:30 and 9:15 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5456) Jan. 21-23: The 400 Blows, 7
p.m.; Shoot The Piano Player. 8:46 p.m.;
Bombay Talkie, 9:15 p.m. Jan. 26-27:
The Maltese Falcon, 7:30 p.m.; The Big
Sleep, 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Theatre (3321 Main at 8th, 872-2124)
Jan. 21-23: The Secret Policeman's Other
Ball, 7:30 p.m.; Monty Python Live At the
Hollywood Bowl, 9:15 p.m. Jan. 24-25:
Man Who Fell To Earth. 7:30 p.m.; A Boy
And His Dog. 9:46 p.m. Jan. 26-27: Some
Like It Hot, 7:30 p.m.; Let's Make Love,
9:46 p.m.
DOCUMENTARY DIRECTOR Les Blank
(The Burden of Dreams) is coming to the National Film Board, 1156 W. Georgia, on Feb.
1. Tickets $4.00 at the door, 7:30 p.m.
Jzxkihtfc
Lori Goldberg: experimentalist paintings in a
solo exhibition. Artists Gallery, 555 Hamilton.
To Feb. 5.
Diana Dean/Sheila Tennenhouse: portraits, still-lrfes, landscapes, and interiors,
Surrey Art Gallery, 13750 88th Ave. to Feb. 6.
Literary Storefront: poetry reading, Jan. 21,
8 p.m. and Jan. 27, 8 p.m. 314 West Cordova.
Pacific Ballet Theatre: B.C.'s own professional classical ballet company in performance
of Pas De Quatre. Jan. 21-22, 8 p.m. Surrey
Arts Centre, 13750 88th Ave.
TODAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Tickets for the Newman Winter ball (Sat. Jan.
29) are on sale at the AMS ticket office and from
executive members, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Development and distribution of rift systems, 4
p.m.. Geology. 330A.
THE UBYSSEY
Important  staff  meeting  to discuss council's
latest transgressions against a free press at UBC,
noon, SUB 241k.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film showing: No First Use, noon, SUB 205.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch, an alternate to the cafeteria, noon,
St. Mark's lunch room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour,  noon.  International  House
main lounge.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Development and distribution of Rift systems, 4
p.m., Geo. Set. 330A.
INTRAMURALS
Bowl and pizza night, 7-10:30 p.m., SUB games
room. Register teams to Jan. 19.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Burns —  night social evening, 7:30 p.m., International House main lounge.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Thundervolley   tournament   featuring   best
women's teams from around B.C., all day. Peace
gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Bring  your  Magnavox  flyer  to  the  game  for
change   to   win   a   colour   television,   8   p.m.,
Thunderbird   arena?   (the   Tween   class   form
doesn't say who we are playing!)
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
To give info on contraception, morning after pill
and related subjects, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.,
Speakeasy desk, SUB 100B.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tennis night, 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. Armouries.
EDUCATION STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Dance, 8-12 p.m., SUB party room.
CENTRAL AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
International Day of Solidarity with the People of
El Salvador, 7:30 p.m. Brittania Secondary
School auditorium. Free admission and daycare
available.
MARDI GRAS
Game night, games until 9:30 p.m. dance afterwards, 7:30 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB ballroom.
SKI CLUB
Hamburger weekend, all day, UBC ski cabin,
Whistler, B.C.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Social night (games and beer), 7-12 p.m., SUB
212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Tap workshop, 12:30-2 p.m., SUB ballroom. Introductory tap tape workshop which will be
taught by Bonnie Hauss, a well known Vancouver instructor. Registration is necessary.
Please come to SUB 216E for more info.
INTRAMURALS
Sports-Alpine squash grand Prix Round II,
Thunderbird  Winter  Sports  centre.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Thundervolley tournament featuring best
women's teams from around B.C., all day. Peace
(War Memorial) gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Magnavox colour television and seasons tickets
to the Whitecaps will be drawn for on Feb. 19, 8
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Condorman, 3 p.m., SUB
auditorium, $1.50. Eight films $5.
SUNDAY
MARDI GRAS
Car Rally — Tickets $2 — all proceeds to CFMI
orphan's fund, 12 p.m.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Slalom — fourth in winter series, registration at
10 a.m., B-lot.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Full gospel praise and worship, all welcome, 7:X
p.m. SUB 211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Second day of tap workshop. See Saturday.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome to come along, 9
a.m., between SUB and aquatic centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   10  p.m..   Aquatic  centre.   All  new
recruits welcome.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride to Squamish, weather permitting,
10:30 a.m.. North side of SUB.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Full gospel, praise, worship and teaching,
visitors welcome, SUB 217.
MONDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting, 7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Bill Clarke, M.P., Vancouver Quadra (UBC MP),
PC caucus spokesperson on public accounts will
be speaking to all those who attend, noon, SUB
213.
POUTICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Talent show practice. All political actors
welcome, 6-7 p.m., Buchanan penthouse. Show
,itseif Feb. 8.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, finalizing gay/lesbian week
'83 plans, 4 p.m., SUB 119.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Agriculture week begins today, yippeel Apple
Day all day aH over campus with donations going
to B.C. Lions Society crippled children's fund.
Displays in SUB all day.
Friday, January 21,1983
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Slide   presentation:   Argentina,   with   Hugo
Leschot, 8 p.m.. International house Gate 4.
English language evening, 7:30 p.m.. International house gate 4.
NATIVE LAW STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Native Land claims, by Neil Sterritt, president of
the Gitksancarrier tribal council, noon-1:30 p.m.,
Law 101. All interested students welcome.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bin Soto evangelist singer and recording artist
from Dallas, Texas, visitors welcome, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
TUESDAY
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's The Adventures of Winnie the
Pooh and The Ugly Duckling, 6:30 - 8:04 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 11:30 - 1:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus centre conference room.
MARDI GRAS
Hockey game, fraternities vs. CFUN Cyclones.
8:30 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
PRE MED SOCIETY
Dr. Max Walters, head of the department of
medicine at the Acute Care hospital speaks on
cardiology, noon, IRC 1.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
General meeting, come out and learn about our
newly adopted prisoners, noon, SUB 215.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
207.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES CANADA
General meeting, anyone welcome, noon, International House.
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Lester C. Thurlow speaks on Why is Productivity
not Increasing, noon, Buch. A104.
CUSO UBC
Development education series. Sharing Global
Resources, and Tho How and Why of Resource
Distribution, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film Show: Let My People go (Jews in search of
a homeland) and The Jews of Winnipeg, 8 p.m.,
Gate 4 International House.
CIRCLE KCLUB
Weekly meeting, 4:30 • 5:30 p.m., SUB 213.
(Please use one Tween class form for each
meeting, thank you.)
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Aggie week continues . . . tug o'war, Mctnnes
field (next to SUB), noon. Boat races, noon,
SUB.
WEDNESDAY
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
Whither the World Economy, noon, Buch. A104.
Lester C. Thurlow, professor of management
and economics, MIT, speaks.
MARDI GRAS
Variety show, tickets $2 at door, all proceeds to
CFMI orphans fund, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom.
Beer garden, 4-6 p.m., SUB ballroom, all proceeds to CFMI orphans fund.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 224.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Bzzr garden, 4-6 p.m.. Psychology annex 123.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
Meet vs. defending champion Manitoba Bisons,
featuring  Patti  Sakaki,  three  time defending
Canadian champion, 6 p.m., gymnastics gym,
Osborne centre.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance language evenings, 7:30 p.m.. Gate 4
International House.
POUTICAL SCIENCE GRAD CLASS
Short but important meeting of all graduating
students. PSSA executive meeting to follow,
noon, Buch. penthouse.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Aggie week is still  on  .  .  .  Goldfish and  pie
eating, noon, SUB plaza. Student-prof night,
Cecil Green.
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting moved to Lutheran Campus
centre, noon.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Aggie week, and the animals in blue want to give
everyone a free lunch! Pentathalon, featuring
beer, egg, goldfish and haybale, SUB, by PIT entrance, noon.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and Roll seminar, 7:30 p.m., Scarfe 100.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Discussion led by Karim Damji, noon, SUB 207.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Kung Fu As Folk Art, noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch evening, 7:30 p.m., Gate 4 International House.
FLYING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Hennings 302.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, topic TBA, noon. Brock hall
304.
UBC OLD GIRLS RUGBY TEAM
Practices for league play, players needed. No experience necessary. For information call 733-3877.
CITR FM 102
Cable 100
No. 1 Album this week:
Siouxsie and the Banshees — A Kiss in the
Dreamhouse.
A CITR NEWS DIET MENU
Special Items . . .
Preview of next week's student council elections,
along with clips from candidates speeches: Fri. at 6
p.m. on the Dinner Report, repeated Sun., Jan. 23 at
6 p.m. during the Doug Richards Magazine.
At UBC Feature
Every weekday at 8:40 a.m.-12:40 p.m., 4:00 p.m.
and 8:40 p.m. Announcements to let you know
what's happening at UBC. If you would like to put
one in, visit SUB room 233 or call 228-3017 between
9-and-5 on weekdays.
DISCORDER
A guide to CITR.
A complete listing of CITR's programming as well
as record reviews, band interviews and upcoming
concerts in the city and on campus.
Available Feb. 1.
The first ever UBC winter carnival
is Jan. 24-30. To help celebrate the six
tieth anniversary of the Great Trek, UBC
intramurals is organizing many events:
• Broomball Tournament — Monday, Jan. 24, 7:30-11:30 p.m. at the
Thunderbird Sports centre. Register
before 3:30 p.m. today.
• Slide presentation: Climb of
Mount Gongga, Tuesday, 12:30-2:30
p.m.
• Exhibition hockey game between
the CFUN Cyclones and Mardi Gras
Greeks, Tuesday, 8 p.m. the Thunderbird Sports centre. Donations to Tim-
my's Christmas Fund or Mardi Gras.
• Frostbite Run on Wednesday at
12:30 p.m. Meet at SUB Plaza! Two
distances — 3.5 km and 6.5 km.
• UBC Ice Show '83-8 p.m.
Wednesday night. Andrea Hall (who
represented Canada at Skate Moscow
in November and placed fifth) and Dennis Cole (B.C. Senior Men's Champion)
featured.
• Grouse Mountain Ski Challenge
— Intramurals goes off campus for a
day of skiing. Thursday, January 27.
• Winter Carnival Hockey Tournament — Thursday, January 27 — Saturday, January 29. Intramural teams compete against teams from the University
of Washington, Trinity Western college
and BCIT. Watch the action.
• Winter Photography Contest —
pictures will be judged Friday, January
28.
• Winter Carnival Curling Bonspiel
will be held all day Friday and Saturday,
Jan. 28-29. Visiting teams from BCIT
will challenge UBC teams. Register
before 3:30 p.m. todayl
• UBC Ski Team goes up to Grouse
once again to compete in the SFU Invitational Ski Meet.
• On Friday and Saturday nights at
8 p.m., UBC Thunderbirds Hockey
Team continues their league schedule
against the University of Alberta Golden
Bears.
For more information on scheduled
events, contact the intramural —
recreational sports office, room 203 in
War Memorial gym.
"Little Gardens" is the name of the
project sponsored by the Elders Network. Volunteers are needed to help
prepare, plant, fertilize and weed
gardens for OAPs in the Kitsilano-Point
Grey area. If you have a green thumb,
or even one that's slightly off color, give
Molly Ransford a call at 731-0371 or
733-4169.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:      AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
60c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver, B.C. V6T2AS
5 — Coming Events
30 - Jobs
70 — Services
INCREDIBLY INTERESTING 1 month
adventure to a town 7000 ft. in the
Himalayas of India. Departs May '83. Fantastic climbing area! Complete cost, including airfare, only $19891 Info: Joe Pilaar,
CC, trent University, Peterboro, Ont.
705-743-4391.
11 — For Sale — Private
MOVING SALE: 6378 Cedarhurst St.
49th & S.W. Marine Dr. Van. Sat., Jan. 22.
10 a.m. - 4 p.m. SOMETHING FOR
EVERYONE.
20 — Housing
FULL ROOM & BOARD. On campus.
$1,240 per term. Call Dennis at 224-3606 or
224-9431.
ROOM AND BOARD available at Deke
House, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Phone Jack
Fournier 228-1568 or John Robertson
224-4140.
HOUSING: Wanna buy a house? It's easier
than you think. Call Irene Plett, Block
Bros., 435-1471, 266-1959.
PART-TIME breakfast cook wanted. Hours:
approx. 6:30-8:30 a.m. On campus. $7.50
per hour. Call Dennis at 224-3606 or
224-9431.
DANCERS for Vancouver STRIP-O-GRAM,
female and male. Excellent pay, no nudity.
Car required. 1-206-754-8877.
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
NEED EXCELLENT DAYCARE? Applica-
tions welcome Unit 2 UBC. 5603 Yalta PI.,
18 mon.-36 mon. Call 224-3828 or visit.
ADMINISTRATOR
BASIC SCIENCES
The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center is
seeking an experienced individual to assist the
Associate Director, Basic Sciences (Scientific
Director}, with administrative functions relative to
the basic science faculty. Duties will include
assistance with academic aspects of grants
management, organization and support of major
committees, technical administration of graduate
training, institutional grant and report writing and
general liason and coordination functions. Strong
background in biological science plus scientific administration experience is required. An advanced
degree in biological sciences is desired. Salary
commensurate with training and experience. Excellent benefit program. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, M/F/H. Send resume
and salary requirements to:
Associate Director, Basic Science
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
1124 Columbia Street
Seattle, Washington, 96104
80 — Tutoring
WILL GIVE Conversational French, composition & grammar lessons. Phone 255-0961.
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
35 — Lost
GMAT, LSAT, MCAT Preparation. Call
National Testing Centre 738-4618.
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners
Course or Basic Coastal Cruising. 30 ft.
cruiser/racer. Hands on experience.
Registering NOW Feb. Mar. Apr., classes.
Don't be left on the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after 7. Sailcraft Ltd.
LOST: Ladies burgundy wallet, Fri., Jan. 14,
vicinity of the village to Gage. PI. call Deir-
dre 224-2502.
40 — Messages
CONGRATULATIONS: Dan the drummer
on your engagement. Love piano lady and
Pentax.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports,
Correspondence, Days, Evenings,
Weekends.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone in 224-6518.
PETER'S TYPING. 731-9752.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing
Service. Student discounts. 4326 West
10th. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates, 5670
Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814. Friday, January 21,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
>^44vlv ** W<&&
DES daughters
finally funded
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
federal government recently
granted $20,000 to DES Action
Canada, for research and distribution of information concerning the
cancerous effects of the synthetic
ihormone on the children of DES
users.
Dethylstibestrol (DES) was administered to millions of North
American women during pregnancy to prevent miscarriage. Hailed
as a wonder drug in the '50's, one
early proponent claimed it would
make "normal pregnancy more
normal."
It was also distributed for
morning-after contraception, and
to prevent vaginal bleeding.
But in 1970 it was discovered by
American gynecologists that post-
pubescent daughters of DES users
were developing a rare form of cervical cancer.
Other side effects in DES
daughters include genital structure
abnormalities, benign tissue growth
in the cervix, increased risk of
miscarriage, and abnormal
pregnancies and genital development.
The health and welfare ministry,
now responsible for the $20,000
grant, advised doctors of the
dangers of DES use in 1970. While
urging monitoring past DES users,
they did not ascertain that doctors
had followed their recommendations.
The Canadian government was
also reticent about distributing information. According to the president of the American DES registry,
who has dealt with Canadian officials," they didn't want to warn
people and frighten them."
McGill graduate Harriet Simand
began DES Action last May. She is
a DES daughter, who developed
cancer. She currently operates DES
Action from a telephone in her
basement.
Last September, she approached
the McGill Women's Union, for
assistance in constructing Canada's
first DES support network. Such
networks have existed in the United
States for four years.
No one knows how many women
were exposed to the drug, since it
was marketed under more than 80
different brand names, and in
various forms. However, the U.S.
department of health, education
and welfare estimated in 1978 that
between four and seven million
American women were exposed to
the drug.
Up to $1,000 law suits have been
filed against U.S. manufacturers
for negligent distribution of DES.
One victim won her case in 1980.
— craig brooks photo
BURSTING WITH EXHILARATION, like door mice at a tea party UBC students at CFS conference contemplate timeless mass of matter before them. Students are at the beautiful seaside resort of camp Alexandra in
Crescent Beach but don't really care that just outside the door the Pacific Ocean, a sea of tears, pounds against
the shore in all its majesty. Escape lies within their reach, all they need do is dive into the surf and swim for the
croquet game. These exciting folks reject this alternative and opt for more challenging task of organizing radical
revolt. Revolting radicals were unavailable for comment.
Ethical responsibility examined
Council's little
budget-go-round
By NEIL LUCENTE
In a forum Tuesday evening at
the graduate centre, panelists and
audience members unanimously
called for increased social consciousness among the world's scientists.
"People fear science because of
scientists' possible and careless
manipulation of life," said forum
chair Andre Sobolewski.
The panel, whic1- consisted of
Sobolewski, graduate studies
biology, Andrew Milne, graduate
studies engineering physics, and
biology professor Harold Kasinski,
proposed to create more social
awareness among scientists.
They concluded there is too much
emphasis on the "vocation" of
science in education which may
deprive future scientists of a
broader viewpoint.
"The humanities courses I had to
take to get a B.A. at Columbia in
chemistry have given me a broader
perspective of science and its applications," Kasinski said.
"At UBC you can now chew up
your so-called humanities elective
by taking accounting for example
which may put our engineers into
more of a technological mode."
Kasinski proposed formal discussions on responsibility in the present science curricula.
The panelists expressed concern
about the proposed four year
engineering program and how it
could push the curriculum further
away from formal discussions on
ethical issues.
pressure to stop potential abuses of
technology. Science graduate
students can also apply pressure to
scientists because of their close contact with professors he said.
They are also responsible to continue scientific expansions, said
Kasinski.
Topics and examples discussed at
the forum included atomic
engineering, genetics, and pre-natal
technology.
At an annual meeting of the
association of professional
engineers, proposal to organize a
nuclear disarmament group was
turned down by a 40 per cent
margin, said Milne.
Money makes the world go
round.
And at student council Tuesday,
money made councilors go around,
and around, and around . . .
Finance director James Hollis
surprised council with a revised
Alma Mater Society budget. The
paper was still hot from the
photocopier when councilors
received the document late in the
meeting.
Student activists meet by seashore
Canadian University Press
SURREY — Fifty students from
across the province are meeting here
this week to set the course for student activism in B.C. this spring.
They are delegates at the first
general meeting of the Canadian
Federation of Students (Pacific
region), and they do not have an
easy job.
Even as they discuss campaign
strategy, delegates here are hearing
new horror stories about cutbacks
to post secondary education. Thursday morning they learned that UBC
president Doug Kenny said a zero
budget increase for the university is
likely next year.
There is a sense of urgency at this
conference, as various committees
address specific pressing tasks for
the fledgling federation.
The most important job for these
students is to tie together issues
ranging from tuition fee increases
to student unemployment into a
coherent campaign that will
generate student participation.  If
of optimism that the conference will
succeed.
UBC is currently a prospective
member of the federation, and will
have to hold a referendum for full
membership next year. Membership
costs $7.50 per student per year,
and for the referendum to succeed
the federation must develop a
popular campaign.
It all hinges on the next two days,
when delegates will have to meet
late into the night to develop their
strategy.
r
An estimated 40 per cent of the~ CFS is t0 survjve as a SUCCessful stu
world's scientists and engineers
presently work for the military or
conglomerates producing military
wares, said Milne.
The panel further discussed the
public's right of access to scientific
knowledge with help from the
education system and media.
The panel agreed scientific
associations   must   apply   peer
dent group, it needs more grass
roots support on its member campuses.
Should the delegates fail to gain
student support, the federation
faces disintegration.
The conference began Wednesday night, and continues until Sunday afternoon. Events have run on
schedule so far, and there is a mood
"N
Computer unarousod
By CATHY McGANN
"I can read X-rated books but I don't get excited by them," a
computer recently acquired by UBC's Crane library says.
The machine, which is the most sophisticated model of its kind,
functions through a scanning system which converts printed images
into spoken words.
Visually impaired students will now have access to regular print
material in addition to tapes and Braille books already in the library.
Pronunciation is governed by a computer program with about a
thousand linguistic rules and 1,500 proverbial exceptions. Stress
points and inflections give the computer voice some human qualities.
"Kurt" (the computer's nickname) is operated from a keyboard
whose message keys can, at any time, explain what the computer is
doing. The computer will state for example, "Looking for first
line."
The volume, pitch and speed are three of 33 controls which can be
adjusted according to individual preference.
In addition, the machine contains a talking computer terminal,
functions as a complex calculator and also can translate printed
material into signals which drive a Braille printer.
In the future Kurt will read in French and Spanish.
Crane library students now being trained how to operate the computer by librarian Judith Thiels. A grant from the Alumni Association's Wesbrook society made possible the purchase of the $40,000
Kurzweil electronic reading machine.
But despite limited time to examine and debate changes council
voted to increase the publications
budget by $17,649 and to save additional money by forcing The
Ubyssey to run 45 per cent ad content in remaining papers this year.
Council Briefs
Councilors asked few questions
before voting, by two-thirds, in
favor of the changes.
Increased money for publications
came from game's area and Pit
revenue.
Council only approved changes
to the publications budget. Other
budget revisions will be voted on at
council's   next   meeting   in   two
weeks.
* » *
In other money news, council approved travel grants of $400 for the
law students association, the nursing undergraduate society, and
ratified fee increases of $6 for
forestry and $11 for physical education.
The fees take effect in September
and are subject to board of governors ratification.
Council rejected a pharmacy
undergraduate society application
for a $400 travel grant members
said. Pharmacy's contribution was
too low and other revenue sources
had not been approached.
Pharmacy representative Dan
Rimek told council the grant is
needed because of limited funds in
the undergrad society.
"I can't really object. I suppose
we haven't checked it out as well as
we could have," Rimek said after
the vote.
"Nobody asked any questions
about it," he added. James (Hollis)
said it's okay, so I guess its okay."
Rimek said other sources will be
approached before the professional
development conference starts Feb.
11 in Halifax.
He said council was just trying to
show their strength. Page 16
THE    U BYS S EY
'Shameless' pledges shock Pit
Friday, January 21,1983
By ROBERT BEYNON
Six fraternity pledges took an inflatable black female doll to the Pit
Saturday and publicly forced a rubber penis into its mouth and vagina,
a fraternity member said Sunday.
The member preferred to remain
anonymous as he fears repercussions.
"I don't think any women were
laughing," he said.
He said the drunk Psi Upsilon
pledges entered the Pit at about
9:30 p.m. and danced with the
clothed effigy. "Then the clothing
started coming off and was thrown
to other pledges."
Then  a pledge,  alone on the
dance floor, forced the penis into
the effigy's mouth.
One pledge looked like he did not
want to abuse or dance with the
doll, the fraternity member said. He
said they all left shortly afterwards.
Stephenson Yang, a physics
teaching assistant who was present
during the incident said it was sexist
and   racist.   "I   don't   think   that
ted dixon
Joanne querie
Th€ away
should be allowed in the Pit," he
said.
The women's students office
would not comment on the incident.
Marjorie Lang, a women's
studies faculty member, would not
comment.
Psi Upsilon president Stephen
Rowell said the incident was just an
offbeat stunt. He said they intended
to just dance with the effigy, not
abuse it.
"He (the pledge) was inebriated
and got carried away," Rowell said.
"We're sorry."
David Jefferys, Psi Upsilon
alumni vice-president said the rubber penis was meant for use in
another "prank."
Rowell said the effigy was used
because they could not find a white
female effigy, and that it was not
racist, he added.
Rowell further said they forced
the rubber penis into her because
SPACE CADETS extraordinaire descend upon UBC campus after cosmic election held Monday and Tuesday.
Senate cadets made heavenly promises, and supersonic speed to solving student problems to get elected. See
page 10 for bored cadets.
Vast majority at UBC cast vote for apathy
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
It's either anarcy or apathy, but
only the 23,400 students who didn't
vote this week know for sure.
A record low number of UBC
students showed up at the polls for
board and senate elections Monday
and Tuesday. Elections commissioner Donna Chow said the turnout which totalled 1,593 was disappointing.
"Students at UBC are really
apathetic. They are only concerned
with their studies and should be
more concerned with what goes on
in the campus because it will invariably affect their academics in
the future," Chow said.
The winners of the board election
race are (the envelope please): Dave
Frank, with the highest number of
votes for any candidate, 1,155; and
Margaret Copping, the first woman
to be elected to a student board
representative position, with 776.
The new senators-at-large are:
Sherri Dickinson with 830 votes;
Ted Dixon, 556; Mark Thompson,
509; Ann Rahme, 507; Joanne
Querie, 481. Fourteen candidates
ran for the five positions.
The newly elected faculty senate
reps include Peter Nishihama for
agricultural sciences with 25 votes;
Sean Williams, applied science, 60;
Bruce Gilmour, forestry, 67; Peter
Kendall, law, 92; Brad Waugh,
science, 44.
Results for graduate studies
senate elections were withheld
because four students submitted a
notice of complaint to elections
coordinator Mary  Raphael. They
are contesting the election results'
validity because of the publication
of two letters in The Ubyssey which
they claim to be a breach of regulations.
"I was informed of the irregularity and I'm just voicing my
concern," said Mardell Parrish,
one of the graduate students who
signed the notice. "The letters probably didn't have much of an effect, but the rules should be followed."
The question which stems from
the complaint is: should Alma
Mater Society's rules be applied to
senate and board elections, which
are under jurisdiction of the
registrar's office, not that of the
AMS? The senate elections committee will discuss the issue today at
1:30 p.m. in the registrar's office.
"it wouldn't fit," and that it was
not abusive.
A pledge dancing alone on the
dance floor with a black female effigy was quite funny, and it was not
an objectification of women as a
sex object, he said.
The Psi Upsilon fraternity performed the same act last year and
people thought it was quite funny,
he added.
When Saturday's Pit supervisor
was asked why he did not stop the
incident he said, "no comment."
Patrick Chapman, Alma Mater
Society food and beverage
manager, said the incident was
unacceptable. "Just because it's a
student bar does not mean you can
do things you would not do in any
other bar," he said.
But the fraternity member said
many of the Pit staff were laughing.
Chapman said the Pit
supervisor's task will have to be
redefined.
More cuts here,
gloom ahead
By CRAIG BROOKS
The university must cut at least
$700,000 in expenditures over the
next two and a half months, senate
learned Wednesday.
"We're short $700,000 this
(fiscal) year," administration president Doug Kenny said.
"We may or may not be short
more, depending on the outcome of
collective bargaining and (provincial compensation stabilization
commissioner Ed) Peck."
A nine to 12 per cent faculty wage
increase is currently being reconsidered by arbitrator Richard
Holmes after Peck turned down a
faculty association appeal of his
earlier rejection.
Under questioning from student
senator Lisa Hebert, Kenny declined to comment on how much more
would have to be cut if the faculty
wage appeal is successful. "We
have to be delicate," said Kenny.
"We wouldn't want to influence
the arbitrator."
Kenny also expressed concern
about next year's funding.  "The
noises, that are emanating from
Victoria would appear to indicate
the lift in the university budget for
next year is zero," he said.
Kenny said this would require additional cuts since many current two
year collective agreements call for
wage increases next year.
The senate budget committee is
currently examining the "role" of
the university and establishing
priorities, committee chair Geoffrey Scudder said Thursday.
University deans and vice
presidents are currently meeting to
discuss where to make the cuts,
Kenny said. Under provincial law
the university must present a
balanced budget March 31.
Last year a retrenchment committee cut more than $7 million,
mainly from the library, computer
centre, arts faculty and physical
plant. The university subsequently
ran a $6 million surplus.
Universities minister Pat McGeer
cut B.C.'s three public universities
by $12 million in October. UBC's
share of the cut was $7 million.
Gear program put on hold
The applied science faculty may
not get its controversial four year
engineering program for at least a
year.
Senate passed a motion to refer
the engineering proposal back to
the senate curriculum committee
for further deliberation Wednesday
night — a move which applied
science dean Martin Wedepohl says
will take away valuable organizing
time.
"A whole year is lost because of
the logistics," Wedepohl said after
the meeting.
The proposal will return to senate
at its February meeting.
Even before debate formally
started one senate member tried to
table the motion. Senate chair Doug
Kenny successfully blocked it.
But the mood was set.
After limited debate, senate
voted on the motion to table which
passed 41 to 26.
Senators in favor of tabling
argued last minute program
changes distributed at the meeting
had changed their opinions on how
to vote on the proposal which now
goes back to the senate curriculum
committee for further consideration.
Wedepohl said he is encouraged
by comments made in defense of
the proposal and is hopeful it will
eventually pass.
"I'm   always   optimistic.   We'll
just have to go through the process
again," he said.
Before the motion was tabled
Wedepohl spoke in defense of the
proposal.
"If I could have done this a different way, I never would have used
the words four year program," he
said. Wedepohl stressed a four year
program already exists for "high
achievers."
* » *
In other business senate defeated
a proposal to create a special admissions category for the Native Indian
teacher education program.
New admission regulations would
have admitted applicants who failed
to meet regular or mature student
status, but still showed potential to
succeed in the program.
Senate members raised concern
over extending mature student
status to applicants straight from
high school.
• • •
Senate change the wording requirements for admission to UBC.
The change officially recognizes
native languages as fulfilling second
language requirements.
Under the previous wording
native tongues were not
acknowledged as foreign languages.
The word "foreign" has now been
replaced with "second" in admission material.

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