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The Ubyssey Nov 28, 1969

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 ;•$•#
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 22
wmmamumtmxm
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i.C, FRiDAV, NOVEMBER 28, 1969
228-2305
hit  i a-".ir^>^-.r.^-*s**-"*s**^^
SFU continues purge
4S PSA TAs canned
Under the covers
This it flie last issue of The Ubyssey for this
term,) this year and this decade. The premiere
issue of the seventies' Ubyssey wilf appear Friday Jan. 9.
Congratulations are in order to the infamous
crews of Page Friday and College Printers, who
messed up the names on the pictures of Tim
Wilson and Brace Dolsen. (See PF 11)
Wilson should be Dolsen and Dolsen should
be Wilson and ...
*;, $age 7, the great Yankee debate, part 2.
Page 11, racism iii agricultural Alberta.
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
■* Twelve    Simon    Fraser    University    teaching
£■ assistants—all heavily involved in the recent strike-were
dismissed   from   the   political   science,   sociology   and
anthropology   department  Thursday . . . and  the  witch
hunt continues.
The twelve TA's were passed over by a committee
hiring TA's for the forthcoming term. The committee
included Robert Wyllie, chairman of the rump PSA
department, and two graduate students.
X The staff cuts were made without consulting PSA
students.
"It doesn't make much sense to talk to students
whose stated aim is to destroy the department," said
Herbert Adams, one of the non striking profs.
-■ The   rationale   for   the   decision  came   in   a  PSA
announcement Monday, which said enrolment would be
•^ cui   by   two   thirds in  lower-level  PSA  courses next
• semester.
Therefore, there would by no courses for the
dismissed TA's to teach.
The dismissed TA's constitute half of the department.
_*-. They are: David Adair, David Dricol, Jim Harding, Beverly
Gibbs, Brian Slocock, John Cleveland, Tony Williams,
Lynn  Munde,  Pat  Hoffer,  Chris   Huxley   and Arthur
MacDugell.
End of the witch hunt
Harding, Slocock  and  Cleveland  were  among   11
y   students and three profs served with inductions by the
£   administration  during  the  PSA   strike, a move which
helped bring the strike to a sudden end.
Despite the official explanation, which claims that
there are no political reasons for the move, the political
motivations are "blatantly obvious" to many of the TA's.
'To me this is the end of the Witch Hunt," said
I   Kathleen Aberle, one of eight PSA profs, suspended for
*   their part in the strike. "It has made me determined to
fight to the end no matter what the consequences."
Adair admitted that there weren't enough courses and
students to teach. However, he pointed out that if the
firings of the TA's wasn't political "why do they not agree
f  to sit down and talk to us br give us assistance?"
Many of the TA's now find themselves in a very
difficult financial position: "Many of us are getting cut
right off due to lack of financial help," Adair said.
Adair was surprised by the move, but not so PhD
candidate Jim Harding.
Harding challenged the department to analyse the
•***"* teaching oHhe TA's;
The reasons for the firings were obvious, he said.
"They don't want an articulate opposition," he said,
"and after all Wyllie only has a BA. They aren't sure of
their intellect so they get rid of all opposition."
X Political implications
The TA's are unsure  as to what action they will
undertake now. A meeting to discuss the problem will be
:  called for some time next week, Adair said.
Adair said that as it stands now "the reasons are
obviously political but will be hard to prove."
The political implications of the departments;action
become even more obvious in view of the fact /jthat all
TA's that "scabbed" during strike were rehired, he ^id.
Meanwhile two of the striking PSA profs have been
definitely suspended, their appeals rejected by a five-man
board of governors tribunals.
The two are Saghir Ahmad and Mrs. Aberle; the
board has reserved judgment in the cases of Loui§.
Feldhammer, Prudence Wheldon and Mardecai Breimberg.
Looking back on the strike Mrs. Wheeldon said she
went on strike to "uphold liberal ideals."
"I believe that the university must have academic
freedom It was in defence of that ideal that I joined the
strike," she said.
She said PSA had been the most progressive of all the
departments at SFU.
"The students in PSA had achieved parity and it was
the most popular department on campus. This fact was
very disturbing to many senior faculty members," she
said.
'They left us no choice'
'The senior faculty realize that if students received
parity on the department they would force the level of
teaching to go up. This would mean that many of these
faculty members would be forced out of their jobs.
"Obviously then they were not willing to give
students parity, and were worried about this having
happened in PSA.
"The administration's actions left us no choice but to
strike. They imposed extremely unusual contracts on
some of us and fired denied tenure to others.
"Louis Feldhammer, the most brilliant member of
the faculty, was denied promotion.
"What else could we do?"
Before striking, the faculty examined other
possibilities, she explained. Normal channels, resignation
and conformity were all examined as possibilities.
"Normal channels were impossible since they had
already made their minds up. If we resigned or did
nothing we would be letting the university get away with
this witch hunt," she said.
"Striking was the only thing left for us to do."
Mrs. Wheeldon said the strikers ran into many
problems, the most serious being lack of a definition of a
strike as it applied to a university. She explained the
problem; "We couldn't close the institution down as can
be done in industry." Mrs. Wheeldon said she considers
the only failure of the strike to have been that "like all
strikes, it couldn't be maintained indefinitely."
She emphasized that the strike had been far from a
failure." It increased the awareness about the realities of
oppression in the university," she said.
'The strike also caused student unions to spring up in
other departments."
The strike and the struggle have now shifted to the
legal arenas as the faculty continue their fight against the
SFU administration. to page 3: see PSA
m
27 CONSUMING DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
'Higher authority changes rules when it suits them'
By GINNY GALT
According to UBC chancelor
Allan McGavin, the presidential
search committee still exists
although it hasn't met for six
months.
The 21-member committee was
appointed last spring by the board
of governors to assist in its search
for a new administration president
to replace Ken Hare who resigned
in January.
The committee was to
continue in operation because
Walter Gage, the man it chose for'
the job, is scheduled to retire in
June.
"We recommended Gage to the
board and he was subsequently
made president," said law student
president Carey Linde, one of
four students on the committee.
"However, we also made it
very clear that the presidential
search committee would continue
to meet.
"Walter Gage reaches
retirement age in a few months,
at which time the board will in
all likelihood announce that the
retirement age limit (65 for
administrators) will be lifted and
Walter Gage will be kept on
indefinitely as president.
"If the BoG makes a ruling
that at 65 administrators must
leave, it should stick to this ruling.
If a student misses an exam
because his car breaks down, no
one lifts the rules, but if it suits
the higher authorities they change
the rules.'
The last meeting of the
committee      was      in      May.
CHANCELLOR McGAVIN, surprised Thursday by photog Dave
Enns and reporter Ginny Gait, asking Santa Claus for Christmas
goodies. Said Sarita afterwards: "He was kind of childish about it.
Said if I didn't give the university more bread he'd start being
mean and nasty to the students."
"Something very funny is going
on — the committee hasn't met
for more than six months," said
Linde.
Linde said there seems to be an
implied understanding among the
"conservative senior faculty" on
campus that Walter Gage should
be kept on as long as possible.
"He (Gage) is one of the
warmest, friendliest, people on
campus, and personally I have no
objection to him. But politically,
he, like so many of the other
senior people on this campus,
represent a style of university
which is no longer ;appropriate,"
Linde said.
Linde said his concern over the
presidential search committee is
"merely to point out how the
authoritarian administration
makes and breaks the rules when
it suits its purpose."
"I am arguing for a recognition
and following of prodedure, and
for the students to be involved in
making that procedure," Linde
said.
Another member, classics head
Malcolm McGregor, was reluctant
to comment.
"I am reluctant to comment
because I am merely a member of
this committee. As members of a
committee, Carey Linde and I are
equals,' McGregor said.
"The proceedings of the
committee are classified. We all
pledged silence, therefore I cannot
say what happened in the
committee. But the committee
has not been dismissed, therefore
we are still in being. I assume that
we shall meet again.
"As to what Carey Linde had
to say is concerned, I have no
comment except that his
statements are merely
assumptions not based on
evidence. So far as I am aware, the
board of governors had broken no
rules.'
McGavin, the committee
chairman, said a meeting will be
called as soon as the committee is
properly constituted and everyone
is represented.
He  said some of the people
Info being gathered about
need for day care center
A co-operative campus day care centre moved
closer to reality Wednesday.
Students, non-students and children met and
decided to compile available statistics about the
number of students, faculty and staff who need day
care for their children.
A woman from the Kindercare center talked
about the present facilities in the Acadra area, then
enrolment and administrative difficulties.
It was obvious that there was a definite need
for a place for children who have learned to walk
but are under the age of three—which is the
minimum age at all the other day-care centers.
Another need was for a place which would take
children on a part-time basis. The present facilities
require that parents pay for the full-time.
At the meeting were students who had no
children but whose volunteer work is not accepted
on a regular basis by the present day care centers.
They   wanted  to  participate  in  the  cooperative
because its functioning will be based on cooperative
volunteer participation.
The immediate problem was definitely not
finding parents who have children and are willing to
work for a few hours each week. The possibility of
an available, very low-cost center which will also
include a variety of social and educational
experience for both the children and volunteers has
a great appeal.
The problem will be finding and preparing a
space which of course, 'just is not available'.
However, various areas are being examined
now-including the old empty coach house at Cecil
Green Park.
The group will be meeting next Tuesday night
in the clubs' lounge where information on space,
etc. will be discussed. People from the Louis Riel
(SFU) Cooperative Day Care will be there to talk
about their experiences with university and
provincial authorities and to discuss other problems
which have risen in the process of building a now
successful day care center.
Winnipeg council may be abolished
in favor of Athenian democracy
WINNIPEG (CUP - Athenian democracy
may soon live again at the University of
Winnipeg.
Student vice-president John Campbell
suggested this week student council abolish
itself in favor of a bi-weekly meeting of the
entire student body. A quorum wouldconsistof
those present.
.'Day-to-day activities of student
administration would be carried out by a
seven-man committee selected at large.
The proposal, still to be considered by the
council, has been called "utopian" by other
council members.
York University's Glendon campus has
been without a council for more than a month.
Students there are pressing for parity on the
senate and department committees.
If they get parity a student "plenum"
would meet regularly to discuss student
problems and co-ordinate action.
And the University of Waterloo council is
also considering replacing itself with a student
plenum.
Seeking a more democratic and involving
structure for policy-making, the council may
abolish all but it's strictly service organization.
\-320t W. Broadway     736-778-
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
- 25* -
Hebb Theatre
Friday, Dec. 5
7:00 — 9:00
who served on the committee are
no longer at UBC.
"We'll have to make sure that
all people who left are replaced.
For example, student council has
to replace one of its members,"
McGavin said.
"I'll be calling a meeting soon,
but we can't have a meeting until
all the vacancies are filled.
"I'm sure the BoG wouldn't
consider making any decisions on
this (Gage's retirement) without
recommendations from the
presidential search committee."
FASHION
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LEATHER and WATERPROOP
VINYL BOOTS
A boot that fits like a
glove. 15 inch height
in black or brown.
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228-8115
CHRISTMAS CARDS!
CHRISTMAS CARDS!
We have a Wonderful Selection
for your choice
•new*
p*ieiewei*-£i«tsi«E<s'si*feis**ie!'S'-ps(e
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5734 University Blvd. (in the Village) 224-3202 Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Demonstration to be held in support of grape strike
By JOHN LINGLEY
Representatives of striking California grape workers
"are organizing a mass demonstration in Vancouver.
The demonstration, to be held at 7 p.m. at the
Safeway store at. Knight and Kingsway, is intended to
publicize the plight of the grape workers.
"This particular store was chosen because the last
time the committee tried to picket it, the manager became
quite abusive, telling us, among other things, to 'get the
hell of my land'," said strike organizer Pamela Smith. "He
then physically tried to throw us off."
Miss Smith said the workers are not striking primarily
for higher wages but simply for the right to negotiate and
to hold a contract. They are also fighting the desperately
poor working conditions, the use of child labor and the
use of inseticides in the fields. The workers feel poisons
are killing them in great numbers.
"We can't be successful with strikes because they
would all eventually be broken. For every worker who can
be persuaded to strike, there are the labor contractors
who can bring in twenty Mexicans to work," Miss Smith
said.
"These contractors are Mexican themselves and are
really selling their people out. They charge exorbitant
rates for transportation and often are the ones who
distribute the wages.
"Those they take almost become bonded servants.
Once last year, a contractor locked 70 workers in a bus
overnight and three died of suffocation.
"None of the government people seem to mind all the
Mexicans coming to work. In fact, in 1967 Governor
Ronald Reagan even authorized prison labor to harvest
fields being struck by grape pickers," (Nine months later,
this decision was ruled illegal.)
"That's why we have to boycott," said Miss Smith.
According to Miss Smith, $20 million in grapes are
sold every year in Canada. In Toronto, the boycott is
becoming effective and 40 per cent less grapes are being
bought this year. In Seattle, sales are down by 30 per cent
and the New York Boycott is 100 per cent effective.
"In Vancouver, the percentage is near zero," said Miss
Smith.
Safeway stores in Vancouver are the United Farm
Workers' first target.
"We are picketing Safeway not only because they
refuse to stop selling table grapes but because it is a U.S.
chain controlled by giant California businessmen. J. G.
Boswell, one of Safeway's directors, owns 70,000 acres in
California, is the largest grape grower in Arizona and is a
notoriously poor wage payer," said Miss Smith.
"All the grapes Safeway sells are picked by
strike-breakers."
The UFW is showing the film "Huelga," which
describes the conditions of the grape pickers, Wednesday
in SUB auditorium.
Miss Smith is also trying to organize a student
commitee to support the work of the UFW. Those
interested can contact her at 876-2291 or at 433-2680.
PSA profs to move into Vancouver community
From page 1
"I think that in the end we will win," Mrs. Wheeldon
said.   "I  strongly  doubt  that  the   administration  will
succeed in firing us.
"Even if they do succeed in getting rid of the faculty,
the students will always be there and they will not forget
what they learned from the strike experience."
While waiting for the final results, Mrs. Wheeldon
plans to get involved in various educational programs in
the  Vancouver  area.  She  also  plans  to  pursue her
CONTINGENCY OF CELTIC NATIONALISTS occupied main library entrance Thursday in an attempt to publicize
demands including second-year course in Celtic history and feasibility study of department of Celtic studies. Present
membership is only 10, but a spokesman claimed that over 30 per cent of UBC students are downtrodden Celts.
Food blitz for poor rally
By LIZ MACKAY
A "food blitz" for Vancouver's poor has been
scheduled for next Wednesday and Thursday.
A rally will be held Tuesday noon in SUB
ballroom to inform students about the aims of the
food blitz. Speakers include provincial New
Democratic Party leader Dave Barrett, Unemployed
Citizens' Welfare Improvement Council secretary Jack
Maley and food blitz campus co-ordinator Jeff
Marvin.
Students are needed to work for one or two
hours Wednesday and Thursday. On Wednesday, the
volunteers will go into classrooms to collect money
and man booths and tables on campus.
Thursday is the day of the big off-campus drive.
Volunteers will knock on doors throughout the city
asking for money for the poor.
The food blitz has several aims, Marvin said. The
first is to collect money which will be used to buy
fresh food for those who need it.
Another important aim is to educate the
students. "Students who can't relate to poverty can't
relate to anything," Marvin said.
Students will come in contact with the causes
and effects of poverty while working with food blitz,
he said. They will gain experience with the problems
they will soon be expected to eradicate.
"This university is supported by the entire
province, yet 75 per cent of UBC students come from
the top socio-economic quarter of society,* lie said.
"The university has a responsibility to the other
three-quarters."
Further information on the food blitz is available
daily in SUB 100-A or by phoning either 228-3694 or
732-7936.
anthropology research, studying B.C. society.
Along with the other suspended profs, she is also
doing research on the fiscal economy of B.C.
Kathleen Aberle joined the strike because, as she saw
it, her colleagues were being severely penalised or phased
out of the university. "We felt certain that there had been
a witch hunt and it became necessary to save the
department and educate the students," said Mrs. Aberle.
According to Mrs. Aberle, the strike taught all the strikers
a bitter lesson about SFU: "naked power is the only thing
holding the university together."
"If the strike was not completely supported it was
because the administration was even more unconcerned
about the intellectual function of a university than we had
anticipated," she said.
Mr. Aberle admitted that some things had been the
fault of strikers.
"We did not involve people in positive action, so
many left."
"We were also rather slow in reacting. The
administration was much faster."
The faculty members involved were suspended within
nine days of having gone on strike (Oct. 24). Now their
dismissal is being considered because they did not teach
for a week.
Mrs. Aberle was less optimistic than Mr. Wheeldon
about the results of their dismissal hearings. "It will all
depend on the third man," she said.
A committee is to be set up to consider the striking
faculty's dismissal. The committee is to be made up of
one administration appointee, one striker appointee and
a third agreed upon by the other two.
All the committee members are to be from outside
SFU. All professors, from any university, are eligible.
Because of the structure of the committee, the third
man will be the one making the final decision.
"His decision will depend on whether he takes a
strictly legalistic point of view or more of an intellectual
one," said Mrs. Aberle.
Commenting on her plans for the future, Mrs. Aberle
said: "We will fight to the very end if we are fired; I
personally will stay in Vancouver."
Like the other profs, she plans to get involved in
other educational programs outside the university
community.
"I won't go back to teaching in a university. What
happened at SFU can and will happen again anywhere."
Ahmad entered the strike for the same reason as his
colleagues.
'To me the issues were academic freedom and the
purge of radicals who challenged the status quo," he said.
He too saw the strike as being the only way out
"under the given conditions."
"We struck in an effort to force talks," he said.
The strikers' only mistake was in not defining what a
strike in a university was, he said. The administration did
define it—along the traditional bureaucratic lines.
"All we wanted was the freedom to express our
opinions," Ahmad said. "The administration saw it in the
same way, as if it were a strike in industry."
Ahmed is optimistic about the results of the
dismissal hearings.
In the meantime, he will be involved in a program
offering counter courses at both SFU and UBC. "We want
to give a different view to the one usually presented".
He will also join other profs in writing a book about
the strike and all its implications. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, *1969
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising,*228-3977.
NOVEMBER 28, 1969
Finlay:      Who the hell are we?
Chorus:      WE ARE, WE ARE,
WE ARE THE UBYSSEY,
'    WE CAN, WE CAN
LIBEL HE OR SHE
WATCH OUT, WATCH OUT
ANYONE THA T'S NEAR
CAUSE WE DON'T GIVE A PIMP
FOR ANY OLD WIMP. ..
SHADDUP AND PASS THE BEER!
Finlay:      Give me L-I-B-E-L; what have you got?
Chorus:     LIBEL!
Finlay:      AAARRRRGGGGHHHHH!
If you are still in the dark as to "who the hell are we?" vou are in the
same position of most people on campus. Who really are that gang of
motleys that inhabit that obscure corner upstairs in the student union
building?
Are they weirdos? Are they perverts? Are they toadstool ticklers?
Garbage gobblers? Rhubarb wrinklers? Yes, the staffers of The Ubyssey are
these and more, so in an effort to familiarize you with the swell bunch of
guys and gals that have brought you the journalistic gems of first term and
will bring you still more newsie nifties second term, I shall now present a
brief, informal sketch of the assorted motleys.
Drum roll, maestro!
Our illustrious leader and self-proclaimed creative genius is Mike
Finlay. Mike is known to some as a great guy. However, Mr. and Mrs.
Finlay aside, he is known as an egg sucking chicken flicker, a chicken
sucking egg flicker, and a flick sucking chicken egg. He is noted for his
animal shows and his clever immitation of a skid road bum. Mike is an
inspiration to all of us.
Paul ("I have all the power on this newspaper") Knox is The
Ubyssey's news editor. Paul, the staff's "long-haired hippie pinko radical",
is a master of the fine arts of jounalism and eye-rape. When you hear Paul
say, "I love those breats and thighs", you know he isn't doing a promo for
Chicken Delight.
"Super Jew" or as his parents know him, Nate Smith, is The
Ubyssey's city editor. Nate's joke collection is reputed to be the biggest
repertoire of "all-time weaklies" ever assembled by one man. He is,
however, traditionist, demanding that the staff employ such journalistic
terminology as: "Stop the presses", "scoop, scoop!" "Copy!", "That's
thirty, sports fans", and his all-time favorite—"If it ain't kosher, it ain't
news!"
Bruce Curtis, or as he is known around the office, "pea-brain", is our
managing editor. Despite the fact that Bruce is a mental midget when it
comes to financial matters, under his shrewd management, The Ubyssey
will always have plenty of paper clips: no money, but lots of paper clips.
On an unsavory note, Bruce has been rumored to be a more-than-casual
smoker of LSD!
The head photo dingbat is Bruce Stout. The ugly rumour that big
Brucie died when he was born and his mother raised the afterbirth is not be
believed. However, it is also not to be discounted. It is Bruce's job to give
out photo assignments and supervise activities (shame! shame!) in the
darkroom. Bruce, who loves to be quoted, recently had a serious operation
to remove his foot from his mouth.
Irene (let's hear another one of those polak jokes) Wasilewski, is our
wire editor. Come in sometime, big boy, and let Irene edit your wire. Irene
spends tireless hours in front of the telex wolfing down chocolate bars and
dreaming up slogans for the polish youth movement, (not to be confused
with the bowel movement).
The Ubyssey's sports editor Is jungle Jim Maddin. The "jungle" prefix
could either pertain to Jim's "tarzan-like" athletic ability or the
"swamp-like" aroma of his sweat socks, take your choice. Non-sporters
have demanded that Jim remove the obscene word "puck" from his
hockey stories.
John Twigg is our senior editor. When not shrieking about his latest
byline in the Sun's sport pages, John likes to tell the little story about the
first time his father ever saw him and exclaimed, "Hey everybody, look at
my little twigg", after which he was given a six-month sentence for
attempted exhibitionism.
The Ubyssey's one-time associate editor is Peter Ladner. "Pistol pete"
dotes on all the spiffie little jokes that concern the bell tower. Senator
Ladner, whose campaign posters now grace the walls of every gum-boot in
residence, is often seen in the kneeling position, muttering, "Please dear
God, let grand-dad remember me in his will."
Fred Cawsey and Norbert Ruebsatt (is that a name, or is it a new
yogurt flavour?) are the co-editors of Page Friday. Ever since they took up
reviewing films, the Sea-Vu has doubled its attendance figures. Their
passion for free passes has revolutionized the spelling of "culture". It now
begins with a "v".
The Ubyssey's assistant news editor Is Maurice Bridge. This is the
position which Is often referred to as "the bum-boy's bum-boy". Bridge
has picked up such clever nick-names around the office as "lion's gate",
"suspension", and "bailey". Maurice laughs so hard at these little
witticisms that he has to send his hernia out in a doggie bag.
So much for the rag's bureaucracy. The back-bone of the paper is Its
staffers (reporters and photogs) without whom the editors would have
nothing to edit.
Nick Orchard is the resident humorist. Nick Is so funny that he even
has his exam markers rolling in the aisles, convulsed with nausea.
John Andersen, sometimes assistant city editor, sometimes jlbbering
Idiot, spends so much time In the office that it is rumored he has set up
housekeeping on the city desk.
Brian McWatters, Is the distinguished beared and mustachioed
reporter. His facial hair draws most attention when ihe has a cold. 'Nuff
said.
Sandy Kass is one of our dazzling girl staffers. Ever since joining a
sorority, Sandy has been Insisting that she be given the new position
(horizontal?) of society editor.
Leslie Minot, (you bet your bilingual bippy), does a clever imitation
of an artichoke, as well as being another one of our lovely girl staffers.
Shane McCune Is a big stupid. As our resident Arts 1 freak, Shane has
developed new techniques for sniffing glue. He can be found in the SUB
cafeteria with his nose stuck to a table.
Leslie Plommer, another of The Ubyssey's cuties is this year's editor
groupie. When Leslie Is not out covering a story, you will find her in
covering the editor.
Ginny Gait, or "skinny Ginny" as she is known to the boys in the
back room, is the daughter of the wonderful, Intellegent, clever, witty
managing editor of the Vancouver Sun who Is going to give us all summer
jobs.
Christine Krawczyk, or the "double barrelled blond viking", is
another lovely Polish lass. Chris Is the resident porno in the sleeping room
in downstairs SUB.
Robin Burgess, our Victoria import is the staff midget. Robin, well
known for her position (vertical) on the women's liberation issue, has been
shoplifting every available can of "special girlie deodorent" in an act of
protest. To page 26. see M0R-
Ah, sorry, but we're still here.
LETTERS TO  THE  EDITOR
Thanks
Dear Fellow Students:
On behalf of the few Filipino
students at UBC, the parents of
Evangeline Azarcon and the
Consul General of the Philipine
Consulate, allow me to express
our sincere and heartfelt gratitude
for your commendable service of
joining the search for Evangeline
around the University
Endowment lands on Nov. 26.
Our special thanks to the
officers of the AMS, the
engineering and foresty students
who led the groups, the hundreds
of young ladies and men who
braved the early morning chilly
weather, the thick and thorny
forest and stiff cliffs for the
purpose. We regret the accidental
injuries suffered by Ed Betterton
and Dave Craik and wish and pray
for their early recovery.
The Filipino community of
Vancouver is still hoping for the
safe return of Evangeline. In the
process, we are touched by the
spontaneous response and concern
of the people of Vancouver. And
because of this, we feel consoled
and unalienated in this great
country of golden-hearted people.
JAIME GELLOR
Yea us
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
After reading the letters to the
editor, counting the
commendations and
condemnations The Ubyssey
received, it became obvious to me
that students were missing the
point of our paper (I say "our"
because by contributing to the
paper it becomes mine as much as
any other contributer's). The
Ubyssey teases a student's
intellect to get that intellect to
respond. Some intellects
obviously need more teasing than
others.
Your point was well put when
you invited Mr. Incheol Kim of
Grad Studies (who objected to
your "Victory to the NLF") to
"write an article justifying the
U.S. presence in Vietnam". The
gentleman from grad studies also
said "the editorials ... should
always be fair and politically
neutral". If an editorial is
supposed to be an opinion, how
can it be neutral? The only thing
got by sitting on a fence is a sore
ass.   He   also   says   that   'The
newspaper is not owned by your
editorial staff but owned by all
the students". He does not realize
that The Ubyssey is owned by
interested students only; students
interested enough to say
something definite regardless of
the general opinion.
Do students have opinions?
Some perhaps, but the majority: I
think not. If they have opinions
what are they? If they think The
Ubyssey is not worth the paper it
is printed on why don't they
complain enough to have the
paper discontinued and the
monies rerouted to some student
movement. Though most student
movements are bowel movements
and from the looks of the
students on campus—irregular
ones.
Students do not have the right
to tell someone not to write his
vitriol, but those students have
the right to respond to it with
their own. Where are the people
who think enough of their student
paper to keep it going? They
obviously are on your staff and
have regulated their movements to
Tuesdays and Fridays. The rest do
not care and have not the right to
own the newspaper.
As one student who has
responded to the teasings and jabs
to my intellect, I would like to
commend The Ubyssey and its
definite stand in our society,
dubious though it may be.
RICK PATERSON
arts 1
Shackles
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I want to thank you for your
article revealing the shackled,
fawning state in which society
forces women to exist.
Unfortunately, while making its,
several good points, the article
was one-sided and patronizing.
May I suggest that perhaps men
also suffer from a similar
discrimination? Segregated want
ads keep men from becoming
secretaries and stenos, as well as
keeping women from driving
trucks. But, unlike women, men
would not dream of challenging
these conventions. Admit
it—you'd rather get a hernia lifting
freight than work as a counter
boy in a pastry shop.
Would you be a kindergarten
teacher? Or sew your own
clothes? Or bake a cake? Well, we
all know about men who are
interested in that sort of thing.
Someone is lapping up all that
blond, buxom status—and it isn't
other women. Women get their
reinforcement from men. The
chicks you groovy "liberated"
men pursue are the ones who
read, or at least emulate,
Mademoiselle, Glamour, etc.
Perhaps it's trite to mention
the double standard, but any
philosophy which has as its basic-
premise "sex is evil", as this one
does, is certainly no less
demeaning to the man than to the
woman.
Women started wearing pants
ages ago—where are the unhungup
men who will wear skirts (which 4
are quite comfortable in summer
especially, and therefore
practical). Perhaps men are shy
about flashing beavers.
Men are required by law to
support their wives and die in
wars. Now that's discrimination!
Success, money, education,
potency-all these are ultra
important to a man. You've got to
"prove" yourself in many ways
which women can more or less
ignore.
Strangely enough, the only
men willing to say there's
something wrong with this ideal
of manhood and struggle for
equality are the homosexuals.
All of which points out that
rigid male/female roles and taboos
are mutually maladaptive and
destructive. I, for one, would
welcome a militant male
organization that would try to
remove such "rights" as alimony *
and military service.
KARIN ATRENS
pschology dept.
A remedy
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I certainly do not share MRS.
MacFarlane's, MRS. Sommerville's
or MRS. Jefferson's sentiments
about "The Woman Market."
(The Ubyssey, Nov. 18). In fact,
the article is a disgrace to
discriminating women. I certainly
do not feel myself "oppressed" or
"exploited"-an if the authors of
'The Woman Market" (and its
admirers) do, I feel sorry for
them. If you are '"oppressed" it's
either because you are ignorant or
you choose to be "oppressed." It
seems that women who so bitch
fail to be rational and revel in the
idea that they are being
victimized. I have news for you;
no-one can possibly force you to Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
buy    seven    kinds    of   vaginal
deodorants!
And if by any chance you still
* feel "oppressed," I can offer you
a remedy that always works when
properly administered and
properly received; have a good
screw! It will liberate you!
Mrs. MIKOLT DUNIK
Propriety
Dear Michael:
On Page 7 of today's Ubyssey
(Nov. 21) you printed a letter
addressed to me by Art
Smolensky, president, graduate
. student association. Your version
begins: "Dear Malcolm." Mr.
Smolensky addressed the original
letter "Dear Dr. McGregor." Since
I do not wish your readers to look
upon Mr. Smolensky as
bad-mannered, I ask you to call
this correction to their attention.
MALCOLM F. McGREGOR
Dear Malcolm:
Since I do not wish that, in
future, my readers will, look upon
you as bad-mannered, I ask that,
in future, you address me as
"Dear Mr. Finlay," or "Editor,
The Ubyssey, Sir:"-Ed.
Er. Jeff
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
... but it is really Jeff Marvin's
fault. He was the one who invited
the Unemployed Citizens of the
Welfare Improvement Council to
the Psychology 100 class. After
hearing their well-founded point
of view, I, being a benevolent
person of great attributes, took
the opportunity to pawn a stove
off on them that we had been
trying to get rid of for a year. A
week later the stove was picked
up ... and so was our turkey!
Being of the 25 pound variety, it
was easier to leave it in the oven
of the stove, which was on the
veranda, rather than in the fridge.
We ate weiners that night! Alex
and Jeff.. . someone should tell
you the food drive doesn't start
until December.
DARLENE VARALEAU
arts 2
Action
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It bothers me that so many
t science students enter and leave
this university without ever trying
to make any attempt to make any
relevance of the four or more
years that they have vegetated on
this campus.
It is sad that those who are in
an enlightened position about
environmental pollution should be
so oblivious as to what is
happening around them. Should
they not be more concerned with
the disgraceful state of our
graduate studies programs in the
. sciences, where grad students
must kiss their professors asses in
order to get their PhD or even to
continue any sort of research at
this university.
Science students seem to be
unconcerned with anything which
is not directly concerned with
their own little niche in their own
little department. It is not
probable for a biologist to be even
the least bit concerned with the
microbiologist's    labors   or   the
microbiologist to be concerned
with the ecologist's warnings, even
though the connection is obvious.
How can we expect the future
generation (if there is one) to
respect the predictions of the
scientist if they don't show that,
they have any concern for the
relevant issues which are
everpresent in our universities
right now. What about the
corruption in various faculties of
closed enrolment where your
father's occupation is weighted
more heavily than your marks. I
could go on and on.
But now is the time to start!!
Science students get off your asses
and do something—join a
club—join an organization—or try
to force yourself onto a
committee. If you don't know
where to start, here is an idea. The
Life Sciences Club has the support
of the Science Faculty and
department heads. This is our
opportunity to turn a club into an
effective vehicle for change.
Attend the general meeting
Friday, Nov. 28 at 12:30 in Rm
3332 of the Bi Sci building and at
least show your concern. Get off
your ass.
JERRY MIDUVTTCH
science 4
Hassle
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to comment on
the social deviants that have been
bugging me ever since my innocuous article on graffiti.
Several young ladies have
accosted me in hallways, in the
library, and generally, all over
campus, accusing me of being the
biggest prevert since Atila the
hun.
There is, however, only one
thing that has been getting to me.
I refer to the phone calls
(anonymous variety) that I have
been getting at my apartment.
The calls, (there have been
about a dozen) have a standard
beginning—"Hello, you filthy
scum of the earth", and then they
begin to get offensive.
In an answer to these phone
calls, No, I am not a child
molester, No, I have never had
sexual relations with my mother,
and No, I an not sexually
attracted to young fair men.
I had no idea there was so
many puritans on campus. In an
effort to please this faction, I have
organized the following petitions:
* to cover the privates of
"obscene" statues
* to clothe our "obscene"
naked pets and farm animals
* to ban our "obscene"
restricted movies
* to burn all copies of the
"obscene" Ofxord dictionary
which contain the "obscene"
word fart.
To those I have offended, I am
deeply sorry. To those I have
pleased, where were you when I
needed you?
"Art is anything you can get
away with"-Marshall McLuhan
"Women should be obscene
and not heard."-John Lennon
"Obscenity is in the eye of the
beholder."—Jime Davies
I would offer a longer rebuttal,
however, little Jimmie has to go
peepee and poopoo, bye bye.
JIM DAVIES
arts 4
Barbarism
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I'm writing this letter in anger,
bewilderment, shame and despair.
I've just seen a group of a
dozen or so students, identically
clothed in red jackets, set upon a
fellow student, violently
manhandle him so that he was in
considerable distress and had
blood coming out of his mouth,
and carry him struggling towards,
I suppose, a fountain.
I couldn't believe it. I was so
upset to see this poor guy being
treated like this and yet, to judge
by the laughter and joking of the
"boys in red", they found it
funny. Funny, for Christ's sake!
Funny, to be violent to another
human being; funny, to hit him,
make him bleed, cause him pain
and indignity. Why, somebody tell
me, why is that funny?
I've only been here three
months and in my naivety I tell
my friends of my shock. Oh,
that's nothing unusual they say,
that happens all the time, there's
nothing you can do about it. And
there didn't seem to be anything I
or all the others who stood by and
saw this happen could do. Perhaps
they were immune to it from
having seen it so many times
before, and I was just paralyzed
by incomprehension and fear.
There's nothing else I can thing
to do but write this letter, even
though I know it seems hopelessly
inadequate. The people who
engage in these activities will
probably laugh at it and
everybody else who reads it will
probably try and forget it as
quickly as possible because it will
make them feel guilty and
inadequate at being so impotent
to stop it. But please, please try
and think about what you're
doing. It isn't funny to be violent
to other people—its cruel,
vindicative, mindless, degrading
and disgusting. Are we so immune
to violence that we're unable to
see the dreadful implications of
considering it fun? Will any one of
us, the next time we see this
happening or about to happen,
have the guts to say something to
try and stop it?
I hope so-or God help us all,
silent majority, flock of sheep
that we are.
ALAN BRAIN
grad studies
Oh, yeah
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It was a relief to see that
someone can write an intelligent
newspaper on this campus
without the use of obscenity,
pornography or just plain bad
taste. Why is it that the engineers
are the only group on campus that
can produce an objective,
constructive newspaper? The
Cornerstone had down to earth
good writing, something one sees
very little of in The Ubyssey.
S. GUTHRIE
science 2
Food
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As someone who has helped
work with Black Cross since it was
started, I would like to comment
on Ruth Blair's comments last
Friday. The fact that we sell food
cheaper than she does seems to
mean that we are unsanitary. I
protest. We do wash our hands
before making the food. Not only
that, we use bakery bread, not
McGavin's plastic wonder. Nor
do we wrap our sandwiches in
plastic made by Dow Chemical,
also makers of napalm. In other
words, I don't know if we are
illegal, but we're certainly not
immoral. Please note that I am
not speaking for the organization,
I fired this off in anger.
MARK WARRIOR
Standards
Editor,The Ubyssey, Sir:
Is it to be understood that The
Ubyssey is an accurate gauge of*
student activity on this campus. If
this statement is true, then a
review of the Carlos Montoya
concert on Tuesday evening
should have appeared in this
paper. I understand that members
of The Ubyssey staff were present
at this concert. I also understand
that he did not find this concert
to his liking. Whether the concert
was good or bad is. immaterial.
Why does the editorial staff not
have the personal conviction to
print a review. Reviewing is a
personal opinion at best and the
general public is well aware of the
fact. Some criticism is better than
no criticism at all.
DAVID Y. H. LUI
chairman, special events
A review was written but was
rejected on the same basis as any
other writing submitted for
publication.-Ed.
Award
'Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We have read with the deep
feeling one experiences when
reading a masterpiece of English
literature, the SINCLAIR-DICKIN
REPORTS. We happen to know
the authors well, which gives us a
deep satisfaction, for we can see
that these two names will live
forever in the history of the
English language.
The Reports have that
profound sublimity one expects
perhaps in Shakespeare or
Tolstoy. We have taken the
SINCLAIR-DICKIN REPORTS
and bronzed them, which,
although it makes re-reading
slightly difficult, renders them
virtually indestructable.
IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
- 254 -
Hebb Theatre
Friday, Dec. 5
7:00 — 9:00
If we have any voice at all,
Sinclair-Dickin will be nominated
not only for the Stephen Leacock
Award, but for the
Governor-General's Award.
SINCLAIR-DICKIN
Glow
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Just a note to congratulate you
on the completion of another
stunning first terra The Ubyssey,
as usual, has been great.
Just at random, one can point
to the fine coverage of the
SFU-PSA crisis, the senate's
Belshaw report (Peter Ladner
really knows where it's at), the
disintegration of CUS, the
Border-close affair, the Vietnam
Moratorium, the Trek Week
fiasco, the American deserters, the
X-Kalay people, the state ofthe
blind atUBC, the
Americanization of Canadian
universities, numerous reports of
crises at campuses across the
country, the state of affairs in
Quebec and the Maritimes and
innumerable features and speech
reports as examples of your fine
work.
Sports coverage has been great,
Page Friday is magnificent and
Tween Classes stupendous.
The editorials, needless to say,
have been absolutely fantastic,
probably the best thing in the
whole paper.
I really cannot understand the
people who criticize you. In my
books, you're tops. Keep it up.
MICHAEL FINLAY
arts 4
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THE      UBYSSEY
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U.S. influence at UBC
Until about a week ago, the issue of
de-Canadianization at UBC was a seething
undercurrent of hot discussions in professors'
offices and, occasionally, at departmental
meetings.
Last week a few of the issues came out into
the open in a public discussion between
American-born pharmacology professor
Thomas Perry and Canada's own Walter Young,
head of the political science department.
Young presented lots of statistics and
carefully thought-out arrangements, so he
obviously has more than a passing concern with
the problem, but he is unwilling to go further
than talk at the moment.
"I don't want to make a big political issue
out of this," he said in an interview.
"I think awareness itself will go a long way
towards solving the problem."
Referring to the French, Dutch, Italian,
German, Swedish and Russian laws that make
citizenship a necessary qualification for anyone
holding a permanent post in a university,
Young pointed out only Canada, Britain and
the U.S. have no citizenship restrictions.
"Britain and the U.S. don't need
restrictions, whereas our problem is different,"
he said.
"However, it would be proper to
strenuously resist any citizenship restriction; we
should just establish an awareness of the right
of Canadian students to be exposed to faculty
with Canadian backgrounds."
Although his public statements are
guarded, his own faculty, at the request of the
Canadian Political Science Association, is
starting this year to advertise all their openings
in the Canadian Association of University
Teachers journal.
Equally guarded are the public statements
of history professor Margaret Prang, who made
a   motion   at   a  history   department   faculty
meeting last spring that the department head
should be someone who is already, or
becoming, a Canadian citizen.
Although Prang wouldn't give details
herself, another faculty member said the vote
was nine for, nine against, with one abstention
until then acting department head John Norris
cast the deciding vote to defeat the motion
10-9.
"It provoked lively debate," Prang said.
'There's great interest in our department
in the number of Americans coming up,
although we still have a high proportion of
Canadians.
"Some of the most interested are
Americans. They probable have their own
reasons."
Prang's views are similar to those of the
CAUT (see other story). "I don't think inferior
people should be appointed just because they're
Canadians, but in some contexts being a
Canadian could be a qualification."
The issue also came up at a Graduate
Students' Association (GSA) meeting this year.
A meeting of grad student representatives from
the different departments on campus voted
13-10 against a recommendation that tenure
should be granted only to Canadian citizens.
The recommendation was still included as a
minority recommendation in the GSA brief on
grad student employment problems.
Even the Alma Mater Society is concerned.
AMS vice-president Tony Hodge, who met
Mathews and Steele on a recent trip to Ottawa,
is convinced they have a good case.
"I hope the AMS is going to do
something," he dreamed aloud in an interview.
"We're definitely going to do a study on
the nationality of UBC profs," he promised.
Several of the student senators have
expressed a concern with the problem and plan
to bring it up at the next senate meeting.
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to arrange interview appointments for December 3-4-5
Mr. Murphy will be located in the office of Student Services Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
THE GREAT YANKEE DEBATE/2
'Trivial compared to other threats'
Peter Ladner continues his analysis of Americanization.
"I don't accept this as being a real problem."
This is the feeling of pharmacology professor Dr.
Thomas Perry, an American citizen who has lived in
Canada for seven years and is now applying for Canadian
citizenship.
"I do not agree with the proposition that foreign
professors, in particular, American professors are an
important or even significant threat to the development of
a healthy Canadian nationalism," he said in an interview
Monday.
'The problem of American professors compared to
^the problem of American takeover of the economy is
about as significant as the problem of grizzly bears as a
health hazard in B.C. compared to cancer.
"It's trivial compared to other threats.
"Steele and Mathews have taken figures out of
context to make their point, and twisted them and
stretched them to an extent that is totally unforgiveable.
"I agree with them that it's of.great importance that
Canada work towards and further develop her political,
Cultural and economic independence.
"But the reason Canada's unique problems are not
being tackled in our universities is not because of
American professors steering our interests away from
them.
'The real problem of Canadian identity is American
ownership of so much of the economy. This makes
Canada susceptible to political and cultural control, which
has been well-documented by Walter Gordon, Dalton
Camp and Melville Watkins.
Carleton English professors Robin Mathews and
James Steele acknowledged this point in their haranguing
at the Carleton faculty meeting where they brought up
this issue last year.
"It need scarcely be said that this problem facing
Canadian universities is only one aspect of a much larger
crisis Canada is now undergoing," they said in a
memorandum to the meeting.
"No nation in the world faces the same threats to its
existence in the same ways from a contiguous nation.
"It has even been suggested that Canada has already
become so much absorbed by American multi-national
corporations that it is now only a matter of time before it
ceases to exist as an independent, sovereign state.
'The threat to Canada's independence can be
acknowledged, however, without admitting the
inevitability of the dissolution of the country.
"And   perhaps   one   not   unimportant   factor   in
determining the viability of our community may be the
survival of our universities as Canadian institutions."
Perry thinks the universities are only a small part of
the problem.
"The real American threats to Canada come from the
installation of the U.S. anti-ballistic missile system,
dumping of excess U.S. poison gasses in the Atlantic, the
Amchitka tests, and the country's growing violence and
racism.
"What should Canadian universities do?
'They should hire faculty solely on the basis of
excellence."
He acknowledged that in some cases excellence
implies a knowledge of Canada, but opposed any
restrictions on professors who are not Canadian citizens.
"Knowledge of things Canadian is not limited to
Canadian citizens. To measure interest in Canada by
Canadian citizenship is a bit artificial.
"Once you limit professors who are not Canadian
citizens, there's no end to the reasons you can use for
denying a person a teaching job.
"But if two equally-qualified candidates apply for a
job, one a Canadian and the other a foreigner, I would
give it to the Canadian every time."
It's similar to a struggle
for
Canadian
identity'
■     ?!3§™ - ■
i> 3&
S
SILVERS
Sociology prof Ron Silvers, an Americancitizen who
was born and educated in the U.S. is quite cheesed off at
Mathews' and Steele's recommendations.
Silvers met the two Carleton professors at a meeting of
sociologists at York University last June.
"Mathews really put me off. He took a really elitist
position. He wasn't asking people what was happening, he
was telling people what he thought all of Canada needs,"
Silvers said.
Alma Mater Society vice-president Tony Hodge
described his meeting with Mathews which explains how
Silvers could have been put off.
"Mathews is an amazing guy," Hodge said. "He
reminds me of a revolutionary, sitting there on the couch in
jeans and a sweat shirt, all fiery-eyed, getting very excited."
"Steele was on the other side of the room being very
quiet and academic, dressed in a white shirt and tie."
Silvers said Mathews' manner of presentation made
Americans feel they had to justify their position in Canada.
'They were being squeezed into that position.
"What Mathews and Steele are doing is similar to a
struggle for Canadian identity that was going on in Ontario
when I was there about five years ago.
"Students here don't see it as a real issue, I think. In
Ontario they think this way because they see themselves as
the centre of Canada. B.C. people see themselves much less
as speaking for all of Canada.
"When Steele and Mathews came out with their
statements, I thought, what gives them the right to speak
for all of Canada?
"It looks like they're saying: 'I don't care what your
local needs and differences are, you need a Canadian
scholar'.
"There are severe regional differences in Canada. What
if the Quebeckers want French scholars?
'That's what I see as wrong with their views.
"The whole thing has put me off.
"I realize I could be very biased about it."
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TORONTO (CUP) - Student councils haven't
wasted any time in forming a new national student
association.
Student council representatives from 12
campuses founded the association of post-secondary
educational institutions' student councils
XAPSEISC). The association is supposed to be a
purely non-profit services organization.
University of Toronto student president Gus
Abols said the organization will start by providing
charter flights, international student cards and life
insurance plans.
Abols emphasized that APSEISC will have
absolutely no political involvements. A founding
constitution includes a non-amendable clause
prohibiting any political activities.
Participating institutions will be asked to pay
ten cents a member at first, Abols said. Eventually it
is hoped to put the organization's operations on a
break-even footing.
The group has already picked up the CUS travel
plan and life insurance program, The travel plan
made a profit in excess of $30,000 last year.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,  1969
Students
hit war
in Biafra
from
Canadian
University
Press
Students from across the country, aligned with local groups
opposed to the Biafran war, joined the Biafra moratorium
Thusday to raise funds for food relief flights to the starving
nation.
Organizers said the aims of the "moratorium" were to urge
the Canadian government to take initiatives, to promote a
cease-fire in the UJM., to put pressure on Britain and others, to
end arms shipments to the war zone, and to provide financial
assistance to Canairelief, an organization flying food to Biafra.
The idea of a moratorium originated with two McMaster
University students, Al Brown and Richard McGrath, who sent
letters to student councils across Canada asking them to bring
their schools into the action. Both have been working since the
summer with Interpax, a larger pro-Birafra group, and say their
goal is $200,000 for food relief flights.
At McMaster, more than 200 students volunteered to do
odd jobs and donate the proceeds to Canairelief. McMaster
faculty had donated $1500 by Wednesday for jobs ranging from
fence painting to piano tuning. At a Nov. 22 Gordon Lightfoot
concert, students donated $300 and a student union dance gave
all proceeds to the fund.
The McGill Biafra committee has concentrated on a
petition committee, which had collected over 1,000 signatures by
Tuesday and was expecting many more.
A film of Biafra was shown in the late afternoon and also in
the classes of sympathetic professors.
Students also raised funds through a 'rice meal' available to
the exclusion of all other food in the university cafeteria at noon
Thursday.
As of Wednesday, more than $350 had been collected for
relief flights.
The McGill group is also distributing a petition for the
federal government to other cities in Quebec and to Bishop's
University in Lennoxville, Quebec.
At Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario students
aligned with local citizens for a silent march of mourning
Thursday night.
Council organized a discussion group on the war.
At the University of Waterloo 40 students attended a
two-hour teach-in where a debate between pro-Biafra and
pro-Nigeria groups was only avoided by heavy control by the
moderator. Administration president Howard Petch supported
the moratorium and urged students and faculty to attend.
In Edmonton, most action centered around local churches,
which held special services, and a petition committee
concentrating on local citizens rather than the university.
Students from the University of Toronto, York University
and Ryerson Polytechnical Institute also joined citizens groups, in
a rally Thursday evening at City Hall where former CBC newsman
Stanley Burke, a leader in the Biafra campaign spoke. Burke also
spoke in Hamilton Wednesday.
The University of Toronto groups also hosted Samuel
Imeko, a Biafran cabinet minister, and Dick Quinn, a minister
who has worked with the food relief program.
Opposition to the Biafra day came at McMaster from
Nigerian students opposed to Biafran independence, and also
from the McMaster student movement, who denounced the war
as brought on by imperialist nations who wanted the profits from
guns to Nigeria and Biafran oil.
And at the University of British Columbia, student council
external affairs officer Mike Doyle said the moratorium was a
"silly idea" that council would not follow up.
AND LOOK WHAT I got for Christmas," says Santa as Ubyssey staffer Bev
Gelfond beams.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
UBC laboratories lack safety, report charges
By JAN O'BRIEN
Many students using laboratories on campus are
exposing themselves to unneeded danger, says a report
released Thursday by the graduate students association.
The report was compiled from a questionnaire
distributed to 984 grad students last summer.
The report showed most labs have safety committees,
but safety precautions are almost nil.
It also showed a lack of adequate safety equipment in
labs. In 19 accidents reported only 9 cases had first aid
kits, which often contained only band-aids and borate
solution. The report suggests that complete first aid kits be
placed in each lab.
Safety equipment is sometimes faulty, as in the case
of one student with deep cuts who pulled an emergency
shower and received a ten gallon mud bath.
A solution to this is a regular check of emergency
equipment, the report said. Installation of eye washers
and a loaning system that would make expensive safety
equipment available to labs is suggested.
The report says labs that contain 75 per cent of
students have no safety literature.
"It is a consensus of opinion that 95 per cent of grad
students do not know what to do in case of an
emergency," the report said. "Several years ago a
radiation prevention course and lectures on high voltage
shock were given but have not been repeated.
"Ventilation standards at UBC are exceedingly low
compared to other large universities in Canada and
abroad." The report said several accidents have occurred
because of defective fume hoods.
Emergency telephones are practically none-existent
or are so far from labs that their existence is unknown to
many students.
One student who was injured had to go up two flights
of stairs and 100 yards down a hall to a phone. The report
says installation of phones every 30 yards is a necessity.
The accidents reported could have resulted in
permanent disability. Grad students have no accident
coverage other than personal medical insurance.
It is suggested that the university provide an accident
coverage plan. "It seems unethical that the university have
an insurance contract against negligence, which relieves it
from responsibility toward graduate students," the report
said.
HOPEFUL SEARCHERS
gather outside SUB on
Wednesday as they wait
for hunt for missing
Evangeline Azarcon to
begin. Some 800 students turned out to scour
endowment lands for
girl who disappeared
more than a week ago.
No trace was found.
—maureen gans photo
Must scientists now turn
to U.S. military for funds?
By ROBIN BURGESS
The National Research Council doesn't have the
funds to adequately support research in Canada,
says chemistry prof Richard Pincock.
Frustrated Canadian scientists have been forced
to turn instead to the interested ear and open hand
ofthe American military establishment.
Pincock, whose own research on chemical
reactions in frozen solutions is being largely
supported by the U. S. Air Force, said the Canadian
government is aware of this situation but can't do
anything about it.
"The Canadian government has been very good
and very flexible," said Pincock, "but they just
don't have, the funds available. The Canadian
Research Council can give researchers barely enough
funds to cover the cost of their equipment."
He said most of the American military money
supporting Canadian research is in the form of
grants rather than outright military contracts.
"The military is essentially giving money away
to see what we can come up with," said Pincock.
"As far as I know the decision of whether or
not to accept a research application is determined
by a board of scientists-on the basis of scientific
merits and budgetary considerations."
He said possible future military application
seems to bear no part in that decision.
"I definitely feel my own research will not
contribute to the ills of the world in any way and I
hope in 20 or 30 years this still will be true," said
Pincock.
He said his experiments are more relevant to
preservation of human tissues and organs or storage
of food than problems of war and destruction.
"Scientists are concerned with the social
consequences of their research," said Pincock.
"I wouldn't personally work on research I think
might prove detrimental to mankind."
Black Cross challenges Blair
By JENNIFER JORDAN
Black Cross food services have challenged Ruth
Blair to a sanitation contest.
The challenge comes in reply to a charge by the
food services head that Black Cross food is
"unsanitary." "We are willing to hold a nutrition
contest and compare the food being sold by each,"
said a Black Cross spokesman.
The purpose of Black Cross is to provide an
alternative to regular food services for students,
organizers say.
So far Black Cross has been a tremendous
success according to organizers. Many students are
buying the better quality, yet cheaper, tuna, cheese
and egg sandwiches.
The number of Black Cross volunteers now
stands at 80 people.
The whole operation is very informal. Food is
bought by different people each week and the
sandwiches are made the night before sale. Next
morning the food is brought out to campus where
volunteers help sell it.
Next week will be the last week of operation
for this term. Members are contemplating several
changes for the remainder of the year. Expansion is
definitly in the future, but whether the varieties of
food or the number of locations is to be increased
is still to be decided.
Black Cross is also considering starting a co-op
bookstore.   A   committee  has been  set  up  to
investigate this possibility further. So far the big
problem is lack of a substantial capital base and
enough people who are willing to work hard. At
present, a literature table is set up beside the food
stand as a substitute. The purpose is to offer
students publications that are not otherwise easily
available.
Petition not sent
What's happening to the beach road
protest?
The petition protesting the conversion of
the Point Grey beach from a "unique remnant
of original landscape" to a combined highway
and marina was not presented to Premier
Bennett Thursday, as originally intended.
"We've decided to postpone sending the
petition," Alma Mater Society vice-president
Tony Hodge said Thursday. "We have a brand
new program of action which is, however, only
in the planning stage."
Hodge refused to reveal the details of the
new plan at the present time.
Hodge said the protest petition had drawn
large support from people both on and off
campus. "At least four thousand people have
signed it," he said.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,  1969
Racism in Alberta:
John Ferguson, a school teacher and
former employee of the Indian Affairs
Branch now working with the Board for
Basic Education in Regina and Barry
Upton, a reporter for The Prairie Fire,
Regina's opposition press, recently travelled to the beet fields of southern Alberta
to investigate rumours of exploitation of
and discrimination and unfair treatment
of Indian. agricultural labourers. Here is
their report.
Calgary, symbol of the big west where oil meets beef,
is one of the most affluent and fastest growing cities in
Canada.
It bustles with new industries, housing developments
and high rise apartments, the downtown shopping and
entertainment core, centered on the Palliser square and
the brazen pretentiousness of the new Husky Tower, has
been virtually rebuilt over the past ten years.
Driving south from Calgary you pass through an
idyllic countryside of small ranches set back from the
highway, nestled in the foot hills. The further south you
go the more the land flattens out until it becomes as flat
as the Regina plains and fields of sugar beets appear on
either side ofthe highway.
The Taber, Lethbridge, Picture Butte area of
Southern Alberta is where sugar beets are grown. They
grow in low straight rows in irrigated fields, and growing
them takes a lot of hard hand labour, hoeing between the
rows to keep the weeds down. Most ofthe people hired to
do this work are Indians.
We spent a week, in this area living and talking with
the Indian beet workers.
The plumbing was primitive
We lived in a "Beet Shack" with an Indian family, a
very old house with many of the windows and walls
broken, an average home for the beet workers. There was
no water and no refrigerator. Plumbing was primitive: an
outdoor privy. The shack had electicity, a luxury which
many others did not have.
The Indians, most of whom come to the area from
long distances and live there during the growing season,
make their living doing hand hoeing in the fields. It's hard,
back-breaking work beneath the hot prairie sun, yet
women and children as young as six or seven take part.
There are three different hoeings during the beet
growing season.
The fust involves weeding and thinning (the beets
have to be ten to twelve inches apart) and pays seventeen
to thirty-five dollars per acre. This is the most difficult
hoeing.
The second, which is simple weeding, pays nine to
fifteen dollars per acre.
The third hoeing, the final operation, is a light
weeding which pays three dollars per acre. This year the
third hoeing was not done due to the lateness of the
season.
We found the range in pay, the difference between
the top and bottom rate for any ofthe operations, is due
to two factors - the dirtiness (weediness) ofthe fields and
the color of the workers' skin. Indians are,paid less than
whites.
The Indians were short-changed
We talked to David Courtoreille, an Indian beet
worker, and asked him if he thought racism affected the
wages he was paid. To answer he spoke of a recent
experience ofhis with a beet farmer.
"Well, he had twelve Hungarian workers there. Now
he paid them thirty-two dollars an acre. Then I was
supposed to do second hoeing and I got only three dollars
an acre. The second hoeing is normally worth nine dollars
an acre. Supposing if we did the first hoeing on his piece,
we'd only get twelve dollars an acre, we Indians," he said.
In a different setting we talked to Steve Rostic, a
white field worker.
"We (white field workers) get twenty-five dollars an
acre on first hoeing and ten or eleven dollars for second
hoeing," he told us.
one lump or two?
"We just have to try hard to make out a living. By the time we're finished on those
beets we got nothin' coming."
According to these figures white workers get seven
dollars more per acre for first hoeing than do Indian
workers and one or two dollars more per acre for the
second hoeing.
Many Indians claimed to have been short-changed on
acreage and deductions when they were payed-off.
Three Indian families spoke of the poor treatment
they received from one farmer. They said they had been
"contracted" to hoe beets for the farmer. Under a
"contract" there is an understanding that the man who
does the first hoeing will also do the second and third.
After the families completed the first hoeing - the
hardest one - the farmer refused to let them do the easier
second and third. He claimed they did a poor job on the
first hoeing and deducted three dollars an acre from their
pay-
Many of the Indians of Lethbridge claim that they
have been involved in similar incidents and can do nothing
about it because they have no place tojtum to for aid.
'I've seen a lot of cheating'
We talked to a group of Indian field workers and
asked them if they had been short-changed in their pay
cheques or knew of people who had been. David
Courtoreille answered first.
"Yes, I've seen a lot of that cheatin'," he said. And a
lotta poor Indians got that too - they don't know the
difference. A lotta these farmers, you know, they think
the Indians are dumb.
"But the Indians won't say nothin'. You know, they
won't even talk about it. And yet I see a lotta them said -
Well, they got beat - you know a lot of them got beat. I
know that myself.
"What I think it's because is a lot of them can't read
or write, you know.
If anybody was here to look after those Indians ..
The field men, what the heck, they are sitting over there
and none come around.  They don't even measure our
fields. I betcha we got beat on that too."
The "Field men " he referred to are employees ofthe
sugar factories whose job it is to measure the fields and
see that the beets are grown under the conditions
specified by the company. The beets are grown by the
farmers under contract with the sugar mill. If the farmer
does not meet the terms of the contract related to
growing conditions the mill will not buy his crop.
David Courtoreille continued.
"A lotta times I know darn well the Indians are
getting beat on the acreage. When we get beat there is
nothing we can do. What could we do unless they come
around and check. The Indians are timid, you know. They
are timid, that's the reason they get beat.
"If they only knew, you know, if they only knew,
that would be different. "
Then Clarence Miller, another Indian field worker
joined in.
"They really try to beat us, you know," he said.
'This last place I worked for, me and my brother-in-law
Mosy Swan, me and my wife and his wife, we done second
hoeing there and we all finished, you know.
'Lord knows what happens'
"All of a sudden we said we were finished, so he
walked through the field and he seen a few weeds, you
know, in between the rows like, you know where he is
supposed to cultivate. He says: No, we are not going to
pay you until you do a better job.' So me and my
brother-in-law went up to Picture Butte and we talked to
the field man like and told him to come down here."
David Courtoreille broke in. "... that's his (the
farmer's) friend, you know. We got no chance whatsoever.
The field man is right in with the beet farmer. They helps
them more than we could get any help out of them.
"There's a lot of Indians that can't read or write
down here. All they talk is Cree and Chippeweyan and a
lot of them don't even read or write — they can't even
spell their name or nothin'.
"They pay them out in cash and lord knows what
happens then. They don't give a written statement. /-
know myself I got beat, even on the labour. I still didn't
get my payment from this spring ..."
"Some of these Indians when they 're finished their
beets, the boss that owns the place, well they say, 'Okay,.
here is fifty dollars and that's it.' You know know they,,
the Indians, don't realize what is going on. They don't
even know how much money they got coming, "Clarence
Miller said.
"The biggest problem with the beets," he continued,
"is that one year they measure out a field, then if the
same person works on it next year, like they expect it to
be the same length and then they, the farmers, they do
about four or five rows more, you know, and do more.
beets along side, a little bit, you know, lengthen the rows.
Then they expect the Indians to accept the same amount
of payment."
"We got nothin' coming'
The Indians also complain that they are not eligible
for unemployment insurance and workmen's
compensation.
"I can't understand why we don't get unemployment
insurance," John Courtoreille said. "We work by the
families with all the kids, but we don't get a cent of
unemployment insurance or stamps. We don't get nothing.
"We just have to try hard to make out a living. By the
time we're finished on those beets we got nothin'
coming." Friday,  November 28,  1969
"When a man is hurt in the fields, Workmen's
Compensation doesn't even pay for that. Even if we were
to die in the beet fields they wouldn 't do nothin' about
it, "David Courtoreille added.
Housing is supposed to be supplied free to the field
workers by the farmer they are working for.
A "Letter of Instruction and Information, Sugar Beet
and Vegetable Industry Workers, Season 1969-1970" put
out by Canada Manpower and distributed to the beet-field
workers contains this promise:
"Houses are supplied free and vary in size from 2 to 6
rooms, depending usually on the acres of sugar beets and
the number of workers required to handle the contract.
Houses are equipped with stoves, beds, and mattresses.
Water is hauled if necessary, by the farmer, free of
charge."
That wasn't quite the way we found things.
Living conditions for most beet workers are very
poor. Almost all of the buildings provided by the farmers
for them to live in are shacks, converted graneries and
chicken coops. Many of them have only dirt floors and
none have plumbing facilities or easy access to water.
None have refrigerators or storage areas for fresh
produce. As a result the beet workers' families live on
canned goods for the two to three months they work the
fields.
Child labour, etc.
We found the wages played to those supplied with
housing amounted to two to three dollars less per acre
than those finding their own accommodation off the
farm. This works out to a "rent" of tow to three hundred
dollars, quite a sum to be paying for a converted
chihicken coop.
"I don't pay rent like, but what they promised I
never did get that. The difference for not living on the
farm is two to five dollars more. I'd say it would cost
about two hundred dollars for a hundred acre contract to
live on the farm, "David Courtoreille said
Child labour is another feature of sugar beet work.
Most of the Indian families have small children who work
side-by-side with their parents in the beet fields. Most of
the Indians don't like the idea oftheir children working in
the beet fields, especially the younger ones of six or seven,
but feel they have no choice if the family is going to feed
and clothe itself. The beetgrowers cynically exploit the
situation as a device to obtain cheap labour.
"If we had a union the first thing I would want them
to do would be to raise the price on beets and then pay
unemployment insurance. Oh, I think we'd live better if
they had to pay all the same like white people. We work
harder than white people and we still don't make the
money we should, "David Courtoreille told us.
One of the most unsavory aspects ofthe situation the
beet workers find themselves in is that they are recruited
for work in the fields under conditions of compulsory or
forced labour. At least two federal government agencies.
and the welfare departments of two provincial
governments (Alberta and Saskatchewan) are complicit in
. this process.
Southern Alberta concerning the summer work
opportunites available to them. Eighty-five per cent of the
beet workers interviewed reported that they had tried to
find work near the reserve but that none was available.
These same men all said that they would prefer to work
on or near the reserve. We noted earlier in this section that
there are almost no jobs in the area surrounding the
reserve either in the winter or in the summer. The
majority of the people have no alternative in the summer
but to travel to where there are jobs available, making use
of the skills or lack of skills they can offer." —Morton
Newman, For the Human Resources Research and
Development Executive Council.
'I started working when I was six and I don't like it."
Canada Manpower working in co-operation with the
Federal Department of Indian Affairs recruits the Indians
for work in the sugar beet fields from as far away as
Northern Saskatchewan.
.ws-jCSw.
"When a man is hurt in the fields, Workmens' Compensation doesn't even pay
for that Even if we were to die in the beet fields they wouldn't do nothin' about
it"
"/ have three children under eight working the
fields, "John Courtoreille told us.
His son David said, '7 started working when I was six
and I don't like it."
We asked the beet workers if they thought a union
would make things better for them. Most thought it
would.
And "co-operate" the Indian Affairs Branch does:
"The Indian Affairs Branch has the policy of stopping
welfare payments during the summer, for all reserve
members but those'on permanent welfare. The result of
this policy is that reserve members must leave the reserve
during the summer months to find work We asked reserve
members who were working in the sugar beet fields in
The Alberta and Saskatchewan government welfare
agencies do their share by cutting off payments to
non-treaty Indians and Metis.
Then the buses cruise the Indian communities,
waiting to take them to work in the Alberta beet fields for
little pay and poor working and living conditions.
Our society destoys the ability of the Indian society
to support itself, makes the Indian society dependent
upon welfare handouts, then cuts the welfare off in the
beet growing season, forcing the Indians to go to work for
low pay. Thus the state provides a service to the beet
growers - abundant, cheap labour.
But the state provides few services for the Indians.
Although they are recruited by Canada Manpower, they
are not even eligible for unemployment insurance.
It's over thirty years since John Steinbeck wrote The
Grapes of Wrath, his classic tale of life for migratory
workers in the great depression. Since then men have
landed on the moon and there's a lot of talk about the
"affluent society" but the Indians of the Alberta beet
fields live in conditions worse than those described by
Steinbeck.
The agencies of the federal government and two
provincial governments contribute to the situation that
denies these people a decent human life, basic human
dignity, yet we do nothing about it.
"We're pretty smug when we condemn the Americans
for the way they treat Blacks or the way they exploit
grape pickers. But what about the Indians and what about
the beet fields?
Will anybody do anything about it? We doubt it.
Things will only change when the Indians organize
and force a change. They might even have to arm
themselves to do it. Who knows? They'd certainly be
justified.
But then, of course, the actions of ihe Indians
working in the Alberta beet fields would become headline
stories. Not stories about the plight of their life, but
stories about law and order and anarchy. Nobody would
ask why the Indians were driven to such extreme
measures. The papers and the good, solid, white' citizens
would only demand that order be restored and the guilty
be punished. Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
' * * #J_&*^
SOUTH GRANVILLE ... "we'll take action.'
—John kurtz photo
New anti-pollution probe group
plans hard-hitting attacks at UBC
A new, militant anti-pollution
group has sprung up at UBC.
The group was formed last
week to actively wage war against
pollution. A meeting of the group,
which for the time being is called
the UBC Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control, was held
in SUB 209 Wednesday.
"We are not officially affiliated
with SPEC, this is a different
group altogether," said Bob Reed,
science 9.
SPEC, formed in January, is a
group of citizens fighting
pollution.
SPEC's aims are to preserve
and develop a high quality
environment for all forms of life,
to prevent and eliminate pollution
of water, air and soil and to
investigate pollution problems.
"Because we are a university
based group, we have a great
spectrum of support right on the
campus,"   Reed  said.  We  have
ecologists willing to donate time
and money, people from the law
faculty, money from the
university and an office, hut
B-4-room 15."
The group is similar to
Pollution Probe, a spontaneous
organization set up at the
University of Toronto eight
months ago.
Pollution Probe started as a
small number of students
concerned because ducks were
being killed in Toronto Island
Park by Diazonon, a pesticide ten
times more dangerous than DDT.
"From then, they went
through a rapid series of events
which resulted in a ban of DDT in
most of Canada", said UBC SPEC
member Lucille Rasmussen.
—barry narod photo
UBC BEACH ... bottles and French safes
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
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Canada's leading trust company
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graduating in 1970
A Royal Trust representative
will be interviewing interested
graduates December 2
Make a point of talking
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* *    IN UBC CAMPUS
Introducing
Mr. Gabriel, formerly of David Anson Coif.
.... Gold Medalist on haircutting
.... Master of the "Modern Look"
Miss Lillie, many years of experience to serve
all your hair care and hair coloring needs.
Mr. Samir, from Paris, with the touch of elegance. Specialist in High Styling and hair care.
LEO'S
UPSTAIRS
**
5700  BLOCK
-i L
UNIVERSITY   BLVD.
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ex.
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2*	
54
WESTERN  PARKWAY
We welcome you to our
MODERN   LOCATION
for your
MODERN NEW LOOK
PLEASE   CALL
224-7514
OPEN  MONDAY TO SATURDAY
442 MAIN
CAUTION!
Tha dialogue used In this show may
be considered offensive by some.
VANCOUVER'S IMPROVISED SATIRICAL REVUE
 "Daring to be Different" — Alex McGillivray SUN
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SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
\\
HOW I WON
THE WAR"
Starring:
JOHN  LENNON   -   MICHAEL CRAWFORD
Nov. 27, 28, 29, 30
TONIGHT   -   7:00,9:30
Sat. 8:00 - Sun. 7:00
SUB THEATRE—75c
Film Soc. & UBC English Dept. present Oscar Wilde's
IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
HEBB THEATRE
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
25c
7:0019:00        25c
Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
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NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU1
Downtown
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5618  CAMBIE            at  41st
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Emmmimm
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DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
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566 Seymour 685-2271
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Sindair-Dickin
write a novel • •
SINS OF THE SARDINE
Chapter 1
One day Henry walked into his room and
discovered it half filled with sardines. They'd
been there for several days and had started to
stink. Having noting else to do, Henry began to
eat them. Three days later Henry was found
dead. His friends chopped him, with a hatchet,
into a million little pieces and flushed him
down the toilet.
Henry flowed through the sewer down to
the sea. As he mingled with the sea, Henry said
to himself, "What now?"
Chapter 2
Before his friends had a chance to chop
him up, Henry cried, "Stop! Do not chop!" His
friends were relieved to see him alive, since
Henry owed them money. Henry was in debt
because he'd gambled away all his money in the
Montreal tax lottery. To celebrate his good
fortune, his friends treated him to lunch. They
had sardines. They were bad. "This is the last
time I'll eat here.", said Henry as he died.
Chapter 3
Before they left for lunch, Henry's
friends-Sam, Dennis, Sue, and
George-proposed taking a midnight swim.
"But it's lunchtime," protested Henry.
"Chicken," sneered his friends, "You're afraid
to swim nude." "Nude!" gasped Henry, but he
went along with them to Beaver Cove. There
they all went for a midnight swim at one in the
afternoon. Henry, as he swam in the surf, was
devoured by a gang of sardines.
Chapter 4
On the way to Beaver Cove they were
challenged to a drag by a strange-looking
Professor with no beard. He was driving a
Mercedes-Benz. Henry and his friends lost by
five bicycle lengths. They had to treat the
Professor to lunch. They went to a Seaside
Restaurant called The Sardine Nest. When they
ordered, the waitress shot Herny dead with an
army surplus shotgun because he ordered
sardines and she didn't want to disappoint him.
The Sardine Nest was out of sardines. Some
fool had come in and bought them all three
days before.
Chapter 5
On the way to The Sardine Nest, the
Professor without a beard began to laugh
hysterically. "Why", asked Henry, "are you
laughing hysterically?" "I'm laughing
hysterically", said the Professor between
hysterical laughs, "because I need the money.
You see—I'm the Marvelous Professor
Mystico-the man with the hysterical laugh."
While they were listening to the Professor's
hysterical laugh, the bicycle tipped over and all
five were killed. An ambulance arrived two
weeks late and took the bodies to a glue
factory.
Chapter 6
Henry considered the Professor's
explanation, it seemed sound to him. He asked
the Professor why he was on the bicycle instead
of in his car. The professor had forgotten all
about his car. He got off the bicycle, said
goodbye to Henry and his friends, and returned
to his car. They stopped the bicycle—Henry was
pedalling-and went for a walk along the cliff.
Henry fell off and was killed.
Chapter 7
As they walked along the cliff, Henry said
to his fellows, "I'm hungry." His friends agreed.
"Henry, you certainly are hungry.", they said.
Henry agreed, "Yes, I certainly am."
It began to rain. The clouds grew darker
and darker. They heard thunder in the distance.
"I'm wet", announced Henry. "I'm wet
and I'm hungry. Let's go somewhere for
lunch." But-his friends wanted to go for a
midnight' swim. Okay," said his friends, "let's
dive from the cliff. But Henry was chicken. As
he stood on the cliff trying to decide, he was
struck by lightning.
Chapter 8
As it began to rain, Henry and his friends
decided to go for lunch. "Let's go to lunch,"
said Henry and his friends. They climbed on the
bicycle and road down the road. They stopped
at the first restaurant—the specialty of the
house was sardine pizza. Henry enjoyed his
pizza. 'This is a great pizza", said Henry. He
ordered more. Henry and his friends ate
thirty-seven pizzas. His friends had one each. It
was too much for Henry. He died.
Chapter 9
Before they came to the restaurant, they
noticed a wolf lurking in the woods. "I bet that
wolf is hungry," said Henry. His friends agreed.
"We bet that wolf is hungry," said his friends.
The wolf then took their bets, and announced
that he was not hungry at all. He took the
money he had won and headed for The Sardine
Nest where he had all the food his money could
buy—three pieces of bubble gum and a glass of
water.
The wolf was still hungry. He began to
chase Henry and his friends. Henry pedalled
harder and harder but the wolf kept coming
closer. "Perhaps", said Henry, "we should
throw one of us to the wolf. It's getting hard to
pedal the bicycle with five people on it." His
friends agreed. "We agree, Henry." They threw
Henry to the wolf. The wolf ate Henry with
relish. He then caught up with the bicycle and
ate the rest of them as well.
Chapter 10
While the wolf was in The Sardine Nest,
Henry and his friends decided to go home.
They all lived at Henry's house. Henry's friends
were a bunch of free-loaders. In two hours they
were at his house. Henry decided to show them
the desk where he did all his writing. He wrote
experimental novels.
Henry walked into his bedroom and
discovered it half-filled with sardines.
•pS 2WO
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969 Original Play Festival
EXCITING theatre. ORIGINAL and LIVE theatre, written
and produced by STUDENTS'
That's what is happening every noon hour next week in the
Freddy Wood Theatre. The event is the Original One-Act Play
Festival and it offers a great variety of productions from
conventional to offbeat plays to pure abstract mime.
The Original One-Act Play Festival is a joint project between
the UBC Creative Writing department and the Theatre
department. The plays, written and directed by students, will run
from Dec. 1 through Dec. 5 in the Freddy Wood Theatre. One
play will be presented each day at 12:30 p.m.
Admission is FREE.
The festival originated four years ago with a grant from the
Alumni Association to the Theatre department.
The contest is open to any student writer, graduate or
undergraduate who wants to submit a play. As it happens, all of
this year's productions were written by Creative Writing students,
but CW prof. Doug Bankson stresses that the contest is open to
any UBC student. Each play is directed by a graduate Theatre
student who is specializing in direction.
Bankson says it is a great annual showcase for student works
and provides an opportunity for playwrights (budding, flowering
or otherwise) to get involved with the actual process of live
theatre production.
If there is going to be any kind of revitalization of live theatre,
says Bankson, this is where it will happen, among young vibrant
writers and directors.
Bankson said upwards of two dozen entries are received every
year with generally four or five being accepted for the festival,
although others may be presented in subsequent productions.
Already he is accepting entries for next year's contest, so anyone
with manuscripts lying around can bring them to Bankson's office
in the Creative Writing department in the south wing of Brock
Hall.
The hope is that the project will stimulate more people to
write for the theatre, and by getting involved, students can at
least see productions in action.
The level of the material is very good, Bankson said. KAFKA,
a ritual by Brian Shein, which was in the festival two years ago,
was subsequently produced by a downtown theatre group, and
The STATION, written by another student, Rod Langley, won
the B.C. Drama Festival awards for the best original play, best
direction and two awards for best acting. It was later translated
and produced in Paris by a professional company.
Following is a list of the plays and their production dates:
December 1, 1969 - 12:30 P.M.
MAL
By Jeremy Newson
directed by John Gray
December 2, 1969 - 12:30 P.M.
THE PARAGON OF CUBICLES
By Nela Leja
directed by Larry Lillo
December 3, 1969 - 12:30 P.M.
WORK AND PLAY
a mime by Joyce Atkinson
directed by Gordon Cavers
December 4, 1969 - 12:30 P.M.
FINALE
by Jim Sait
directed by Hilary Nicholls
December 5, 1969 - 12:30 P.M.
RED, WHITE, AND BLACK
by Pat Iwabuchi
directed by David Bulger
pS 3hree
Friday,  November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
- 25* -
Hebb Theatre
Friday, Dec. 5
7:00 — 9:00
Back when Grandma was in
school this old world was quite a
bit younger. So Grannie had fewer
history dates to remember and
fewer authors, poets, playwrights
and artists to study. Fewer chemical elements and less advanced
math. All in all, she had it pretty
easy.
But there's one thing she
didn't have to make life in general
more pleasant: Tampax tampons.
So those difficult days each month
were really uncomfortable.
She didn't know that internally worn Tampax tampons
would come along and keep her
free of discomfort and irritation.
Never let odor form. She had no
idea that this modern development would permit herl
to swim any time, bathe any[
time. In fact, grandma just didn't
know what she was missing. But
you do. So now that it's "back-to-
school time," shouldn't it be "try
Tampax tampons time," too?
naci no
■
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Year-end
Decade-end
Survey
MICHAEL QUIGLEY
/
/pincc it's getting near the end of
fye year (not to mention, the decade),
ic's my own egregiously personal list
il Best Pop Records of '69 which
•lorsn't include Abbey Road. (Gosh)
Initi'ud are a couple of well-known
-ilhiiim and a few others which shou!
lv well known:
20/20--The Beach Boys (Ca;
SKAO 133),^ The beit album byffliis
gmup 'sdnce Pet Sounds one \wtich
combines studio roc,k*,with the idla of
•mu^-j-js-sqiifid. as developed by I Van
t .Dyke -Pajk-s as well as a | few
\ i "'reriiiiUsdngly real" memories.
!j., I.cd Zeppelin (Atlantic SD 821
'" M.i\K* an under-rated first albun^in
t -.pile of its massive sales, but Jim
\ I':iii*-* is the ultimate guitar geniu:
\ / Men to this album, don't just hear it
Street noise - Julie Driscoll, Brian
Auger and the Trinity (Marmalade 608
|5.6) Another high-powered studio
■k album combining an excellent
l-i/ariick trio and Joplinesquc vccals
-AitliVit the rasp.
Chicago Transity Authority
(ColumtSa GP8) - Superb big-band
rock delivered at an up-tempo pace
and with si*.*«o-shaking intensity.
Tommy 1*ke Who (Decca DXSW
7205)    The re \ fqHaslic musicianship
ib this' i-ocfc-opera in'^pite-of lyrics''
'.X,, ..vfticb confuse-- ratifer' fbm cferiry* K r
"'xtXi-P^«&*   *•    **&■*■&* .**■:■*#*'
Ej£v.- "i&olutioaaiy" record, theit-buy f&&-':
y£ V-$*bf a copy for CKristirtas.
f£  '; d$^~mwm .(RCA -Victor LSI*
'^^•/4ii*^-'Review0d.fo PF earlier, this
>^.i»iaGPBifhe best album of the year fcy
■*%£&'!£&' s*nSBlf*   Ni^sott's   fe*9*-  *•»
'"^gjsstid^ equate, if not surpasses, that
of'Bm Beatles.
:*..'. .i «-,■-* i.
%«
■NT
.£*
ii,aHmrns ' -K-hicft
^■*oaasea,b,arriei frere ftubea aad I
'Jets, Colossi^, iridCM&wi erf Light
(Biff ^ose)..Rotjft>op A^ttds go to
Bfmd FaJfii *n4 tiie; Soft Parade.
Laura NyroVNew *jfo&'pfflfeterj-y is
still' receiving ^{fitfctiye consideration.
"*. s       •' ■■   t    * .   '
■ .^    - ■■  .        ■       _
'■' ■- ''-N.. * *■* ■' • -' '.*'-
Some i-fa-t^co^^ral jstcitsanent
to lielp relieve-.*™^ apst -post-exam
frustratn>jtsr—a6T"T;o .■"mention the
.traumatic experiences while they're
happeomp^,,     ;^ ^^
Ondhe local fock^cMe^Jbejarrivals
of Steppe"nwoJirYtomor[Q.w night),
Steve 1«illisr'Bar?fr(tRIs SunSay) and
possibly Chicago" dwrtftg -the holidays
should all be rftfJed.1*-*"""
"R$*norrow^rig|*t ♦U'thtrQueeniE
tlWisJast  pcrfoVmuncc^Of* Doni,
i':S
■tLmw-'L.tiil. ■ ■ ^im.Sik,: fi   '^n\-ii?li*irV> - ^Mfc:.-***-*. -.MS***-Jlh.     „J
i^ia Monday "Will
.'chances to hear
.^^       symphony   concert*
The^qii.wHl play Schubert's Fifth
Symphony, Wagner's Rienzi Overture,
erHoz* Notts dlitS (featuring guest
>rano    Heather   Harper),   and
Hflyemith's Concert Music for Strings
the last containing a fair
jf dissonances.
December 8,   mezzo-si-piano
jiForst (a one-time UBC graduate
ith  tiie  Metropolitan  Opera)
tie symphony in a prog* am of
and   ballet   music,   and   on
riber   19   and   20,  symphonic
Stmas concerts will be heard.
'or    musical    masochists,    Lhc
(Ginate experience arrives tomunow
It noon on CBC-AM radio: W-ijiiicr's
s u p c r-1 c ngthy    Goetterdaemmcrung,
last opera of the Ring of the Nibelung
cycle * recorded  last  summer  .it   ih
Bayreuth Warier Festival. Onlv
most kardy • will endure this i»rt
and,*-^hea  turn on* CBC-FM Su^yiv
night at*7:-'35 to hear the sccun-JJRing
opera,' bte'J.yhjikpete. .•T.ha^'hird,
Siegfried,. vrilY^'fewin \ *ij&& s-' me
time on FM a wj*|s*1:iro*-iijjj^day. ynd
the Big G wiU'bc'.hea^^ain on FM
December 14
QVIGLETS
PWAL
L**.*<■ *t •t****! *t *t**t*t*t *«■•■■ 1.*t*t*t■!.•«■•«.•«.•«■ *L*t.*L*L*i.*<■•«.•^•-.•^•■.•■.•■■•t-t-t
De Broca — Fun Fantasy Film Trip
In  Devil By The Tail
director Phillippe DeBroca
has an ulterior motive. He
isn't, like most
film-makers today,
attempting to impress,
enlighten, change or freak
you. He is simply inviting
you on a trip, a hilarious,
beautiful trip. Those
readers who saw King of
Hearts at the Varsity two
years ago will have a good
idea of what DeBroca's
trip is all about.
In this film DeBroca's
space borders on the
fairytale, but as in King of
Hearts, it is a space that is
easy to enter and hard to
leave. The film is again set
in France; the characters
are again caricatured, but
always in such a way that
the viewer is invited in,
rather than being pushed
back     and     merely
entertained.
Yves Montand is at his
comical    best    in    his
YVES MONTAND with cup and friends - heavy poker game.
portrayal of an Italian bon
vivant-cum-gangster who
becomes involved with an
aristocratic French family
which is in the classic
dilemma of trying to
maintain their tradition
(and their chateau) at the
expense of appearances
(but not pride). The old
but still charming and
audacious Marquise, the
imperturbable Baron and
his three beautiful (but of
course) daughters form a
supporting cast which is
hard to fault.
I'm certain the reader
will find Devil By The Tail
both charming in itself and
also a refreshing change
from the long run of heavy
American and European
films of the past months.
-JIM MITCHELL
pf 4oiu*
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,  1969 MUl*inUI?iil£[S post exam depression now
In these sterile days of glazed streets and eyes and during
nights so hollow the crack of each frozen twig echoes like the
report of a hunter's weapon, we feel a depression.
To coin a phrase (or not to), Winter is upon us.
The albatross of all our expectations hangs heavily from our
necks now as we realize the worst is yet to come.
Hunched over our makeshift work tables in our cold water
garrets (or so they seem) our minds drift away from quantum
mechanics, and in the nights darkest hour we are transported to
our individual heavens. For some it is the surf and blurring heat
of Acapulco. For others the powdered crystals of an untouched
new fall on Swiss slopes regenerate the flagging currents that once
buzzed through our thought passages but now merely drone. For
still others, surely, it is the fantasy of long overdue fame and
riches that fans the glowing embers of consciousness.
But slowly the flames flicker and warm red becomes cold
black. The fire is out. The glimmer of hope fades and we must
face the reality of still shorter days and clinging nights.
In the sure procession of time, as in movement in
three-dimensional space, there are obstacles to overcome, walls to
climb, (it relieves tension) and gaps to bridge (not leap from).
^■v;*^^*-^4*t-^#^&H/i/ ?■&*&:■■'J
»t;-?35*-
By ROON
This burg has been recently inundated with a collection of
bad skin flicks, culminating with Inga last week at the Studio.
Syd Freedman, manager of the Studio should be given some sort
of award for the way he advertises his shows. If there is anyway
he can get a bared thigh or a horizontal, lust-ridden female out on
the marquee, he will do so. This is not to say you will see any of
that in the flick inside, but if there is a hint of it even in the
dialogue, that's good enough for Syd. For instance, with Inga
there is a nubile chickie with her arms over her head on the
marquee. I don't recall any such scene in the actual movie.
In his ad for the film, the Studio manager has inserted a
quote which reads: "So graphic I could have sworn the screen was
smoking." It says in the ad the quote is from the N.Y. Daily
Column, whatever that is. I suspect it is some obscure, poor taste
tabloid.
The screen did not smoke (indeed) and the film (Swedish)
was in itself one of the more banal servings of tripe seen this year.
The Studio always has advertising which appeals to, shall we say,
certain interests, and very rarely serves up the desired repast. This
is not to say the ads are misleading (potential libel suitors note)
but merely stretching the point slightly.
Inga is not a film worth seeing. It is in black and white,
with poorly dubbed English and tells of a 17-year-old girl who
lives with her aunt when her mother dies. She then runs off with
the aunts lover and the film ends. There are a few scenes with the
young chick's bare bod, but not revealing all and certainly not
worth the admission price.
Another Swedish flick, The Fountain of Love has turned
the Fine Arts Cinema on Georgia into a disaster area. The only
advantage this film has over Inga is that it is in color. The English
dubbing, however, is worse, and the nude chicks don't even have
nice bodies like the young nymphet in Inga (there's that damned
film again). It said in one ad that Fountain was the "biggest,
barest,   bawdiest romp." It ain't. It is bad, bad, bad; avoid it.
DeSade, at. the Capitol, is still basically within the skin
flick genre, but has quite a bit more class than most of its ilk.
There are good orgy scenes in de Sade and lots of anatomy on
view for those with quick eyes. The scenes of perverted
sex-come-violence   are   very   interesting  although   the   movie
Now we are (some of us) hurtling toward a great fortress of
opposition that must be conquered if we are to return after
Xmas. The bastille we must storm (some of us) are the impending
exams. One of the first outcroppings appeared the other day; the
timetables. It is always interesting to see students mass around
the schedules as they are posted, clamoring for a good look. They
seem like the proverbial lemmings, eager for their own
destruction.
At any rate, when cries of anguish reverberate through the
dank caves of predawn winter, they often evoke only a wry smile
from the hunched rows of cold water garrets. (This is depressing,
isn't it?)
What this is really is a message of hope. Fan that ember,
bridge that gap.
Although we are repeatedly inundated with cynical
humbuggery (?) every year at this time and are told that Xmas is
hypocrisy and merely a plot by the corporate elite to take more
of our money, it can be a nice time of the year.
After all, statistics show that at least 80% of university
students are still alive after exams have taken their toll. And
besides, if you don't pass that just means you weren't interested
or didn't want to pass anyway.
Forget it.
Xmas can be fun. Enjoy it. Visit your parents and cultivate
their affection. Gorge yourself on your mother's cooking. Drink
lots of booze. Have a little smoke for Jesus.
Think of the happiness in everyone's hearts on Xmas day.
Toasting relatives in far away lands, monstrous turkey dinners,
mince tarts, Jap oranges, figgy pudding.
And Xmas morning when everyone unwraps their presents.
The joy you feel when you see the skis Mom and Dad bought you
and the matching ski jacket Santa left. Wow.
But, what's this?
What's your little sister raving about? They didn't spend asi
much on her as they did on you. But she doesn't ski, and besides,
you pay your own way to university (well part of it). And why is
Mom crying? Doesn't she like the genuine North Afghanistan
incense pot and matching cow bell you got her at the Treasure
Van? Oh well, presents isn't where Xmas is at anyway. It's the
spirit of good will that counts.
Too bad about that row on Boxing Day. The old man
caught you blowing weed in the basement. What a fuss! Man they
just don't understand where it's at.
Wait a minute! This is a pro-Xmas message.
Well, er,... ah.
In these sterile days of glazed streets and eyes....
F.C.
generally cops out in trying to show that de Sade was a pervert
because of a tsifled love affair.
The best skin flick in the area in recent weeks, however, has
got to be School for Sex, which played at the Sea Vue in Blaine.
In the best tradition of soft core, School for Sex comes on with
lots of beaver (with shapely YOUNG chicks) and lots of humor
(intentional). Where movies of this genre cop out in showing
unobscured beaver, this film shows lots, with good close-ups too.
The girls are young, very well built in the slim side and very
pretty (not to say innocent looking.) The color is excellent and so
is the photography. Last week the live theatre in the audience was
also up to its usual high standard. Friday and Saturday nights are
beautiful for one-liners from drunk lechers. The audiences have a
ball these nights and the whole scene is very convivial.
* * *
On the serious side for a moment, there is another film
coming to Vancouver over the Xmas break which should interest
a lot of UBC students. It is called Downhill Racer and stars
Robert Redford (who was Sundance in Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid).
Downhill Racer is about skiing, downhill racing,
international style. The plot isn't much in this but it doesn't
matter too much because the photography is exciting and
excellently done. Fantastic Alps scenery as well as a view from a
pair of 60 mile an hour skis flash across the screen. For ski buffs
it is well worth seeing. Even for non-skiers it is good fun because
of all the tension and excitement of competition skiing.
pf Sive-
rmeM comet on ^
\\DOWNJb-ME WAK
~Q**&t?saietP}
YOVHG6I00DS
QoNcefirr**
VI
Friday, November 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY Following a recent showing of "Shame" at
the Varsity and "Hour ot the Wolf at SUB:
An exclusive Ubyssey seance on the Swedish
director with Danish oracle Simon Grabowski
from Copenhagen — a former graduate of UBC
and M.A. in Scandinavian from the University
ot Washington — who is presently lending his
northern lustre to the UBC departments of
Creative Writing and Comparative Literature,
in pursuit of a combined Master's degree in
these two fields.
Max von Sydow and Liv UUmann in Bergman's latest: "Shame".
Wiikbro: Mr. Grabowski, you are known to have been a great
admirer of lngmar Bergman's?
Grabowski: Well, let's just say an admirer. There are a few films
ofhis that I did admire, or even still admire, greatly.
W. Such as?
G. They're almost all in the past. Some of Bergman's very best
works were made before he became famous. That's not so very,
very unusual with artists. As far back as 1949, Bergman made a
film called "Fangelse" — I'm not sure of the English title — which
is one of his very best ones. In 1954 he made "Sawdust and
Tinsel" — which at some point or other, I believe, he has referred
to as being perhaps his best work. It's still relatively unknown.
W. Is it the one about the circus people?
G. Yes that's the one. You know, when that film came out, it
made such a flop at the box office that Bergman was kicked out
of Sandrew-Bauman, the big atelier in Stockholm, he worked for.
He went all over - to Copenhagen, even to Oslo - to get inside
somewhere, and nobody would touch him. Then finally he was
given another chance back home, scored a commercial success
with some second-rate movie and then went on to make "Smiles
of a Summer Night." Then he was in for good.
W. That's one of the ones you really admire, isn't it?
G. Not very originally, yes. You are charmed helpless by it the
same way as you are by "Faust" or the Beatles. It's a comedy on
the highest artistic, the aesthetically most sophisticated level. It's
a great work of art, simply, and you can see it again and again
without ever outgrowing it.
W.   Lately   you've   been   talking  a  lot   about  a  transition  in
Bergman's production. Would you try to define to us what you
are implying by that?
G. Well, yes, I think that transition occurred right after "Smiles",'
with 'The Seventh Seal." What the transition amounts to is, that
from then on Bergman surrendered more or less unconditionally
to   his   own   basic   preoccupation   with   "the   quest   of  the
individual."
You see, Bergman is, after all, Scandinavian — very much so —
and that means something collossally different, in these terms,
from being American, or even South European.
What "the quest" in American terms always, invariably, boils
down to in the end is to define yourself, one way or the other, in
terms of the group. In Scandinavian terms, it is to define yourself
in terms of the universe. But you can get too much even of that.
Bergman's problem is that he has breathed too much of this quest
atmosphere at a too early stage of his personal development to
even have had a chance of defining and formulating a more
personal, more sophisticatedly complex version of the quest — as
for instance Ibsen succeeded in doing — by himself. To him, 'The
quest" has largely remained at the level of such general cultural
stereotypes as "Does God Exist?" This is fine for the guy next
corner, but you can't really build a whole literary or cinematic
production on that and hope to remain intriguing at the same
time.
W.   Nevertheless,   it   took   ten   years   before   Bergman  really
embarked on that quest,   didn't it?
Grabowski on Be
on Grabowsk
Grabowski- Wiikbro
GrabowskUWiikbro
Grabowski-Wiikbro
Grabowski- Wiikbro
Well, you see, exactly, yes. Those ten years - from the
mid-forties to the mid-fifties, roughly speaking — were the ones
during which he was struggling to establish himself as a
film-maker. Very simply speaking. He had to make films that
would make money, however talented and original they might at
the same time be. He was recognized as an original talent all right,
but he simply hadn't become really established yet. The
"Sawdust and Tinsel" - incident in 1954, at a time when he had
been around as a director for about eight years, showed that as
drastically clearly as possible.
Suppose that he had been carrying this "Does God Exist" quest
around with him during all the time, burning towards the day
when he could put it on the screen — and I quite tend to see it
that way — he didn't really have a chance, because nobody would
pay to watch this kind of stuff if it didn't happen to have the
signature of a famous director on it. I am putting it all in a very
gross and simplified manner now — you can always do that in
retrospect, you know.
W. You have always struck me as someone who had the courage
to be gross and simplifying.
G. Thank you.
W. Someone who dared to be intelligible.
G. Thank you again. Quite an apt expression, your last one.
One might aptly pick it up, within this whole contest, to ask:
Does Bergman dare to be intelligible? Well, if it has looked, on
some occasions, as if he didn't, the explanation may be that he
has been secretly worried about the simplicity of his own
subject-matter - worried that maybe after all this wasn't exactly
the most advanced sort of problems that he was dealing in here.
And then having to make it look somehow advanced after all. But
I would like to get back to our chronological line of survey — the
"transition" in Bergman's production and all that. As I already
suggested, Bergman, so long as he wasn't safely established, had
to put in a far amount of pot-boiling. But, as it so often happens
during precisely that phase of an artist's career, that resulted in a
number of quite excellent works, Bergman, during that period,
was always dramatic, always immediately entertaining—and at the
same time managed to retain that special "metaphysical"
dimension of his, which, so long as it was exactly that: a
dimension, subordinated to the whole work-succeeded in lending
effectually to that work that particular aura of spiritual mystery
which came to be a synonym for Bergman. In this are, where he
was almost always primarily physical, primarily dramatic, the
metaphysical worked for Bergman.
W. And all along, you claim, he was going around yearning to give
the metaphysical the real primacy.
G. Exactly! This is the very way in which, so very often, an artist
with a very good and really special thing going for him
misunderstands the role of this thing in his total effort, and,
lifting it out of the whole interfunctional effort landscape,
designs a new, purportedly "sublime" effort more or less
exclusively in terms of this one thing. And then the new
landscape winds up being a desert, with the thing towering in the
midst like the lovely pillar of some freaked-out sty lite.
W. A metaphysical towering Something in a dramatic wasteland!
G. Yeah, How about that. At any rate: Here, then, he suddenly is
— Bergman established, finally, as Bergman. A man free to make
any picture he would choose to make. Free to embark. And that's
where the transition occurs at last.
W. But surely you wouldn't call "Wild Strawberries" and "The
Seventh Seal" a part of that desert bag?
G. In "Wild Strawberries" the protagonist's quest was inherently
dramatic: an inquiry into how he had lived his life, the basic
nature of his relationship to other people, and so on. And all
carried out in interaction with the other characters. So I would
exclude that picture, yes. But I certainly would not, at least in
principle not, exclude 'The Seventh Seal." On the contrary. In
fact, this was the very thing, right there! The returning crusader,
Mr. Blok, or whatever his name was, pondering the issue of God's
existence. All by himself, doing his thing. But here, the dramatic
desert was as yet disguised—and very intriquingly so, indeed. The
Middle Ages, imagine! And Death as Blok's adversry ...
The Middle Ages, imagine! And Death as Blok's adversary ...
Of course, the weakness of
there is no adversary, no tan:
but here, Blok was given a
formal, since of course such
statuary pawn on the menta
Remember the Devil in Cam"
diabolus ex machina figure, t
central struggle - one of th<
against all rules, with the wbi
genuinely dramatic.
Virtually everyone who has
Seventh Seal" as the great,
the Middle Ages has been
actually getting there about 1
two films, however, Bergmai
post-war sense. Camp's Devil
in the old commedia delVai
Death plays portable chess
daybreak. Such a thing j
contemporary audience. I dig
W. There is no indication, tho
considered "The Seventh Seal
G. Generally speaking, they
again, this is very much a ret
over Bergman's whole produc
see how that film had in
metaphysical marching-on-th
Bergman's thing, as he himsel
open. But as I say, the film <
it had quite a lot of surface c
all those magnificent pictori;
abounded in. Just think c
transfigured forest picture wi
the woods at night, and how
"The Magician" a few years 1
on its way through the fores
five hundred years apart, and
shot with the Thespian cart <
artistic transfiguration! Wow.
W. Well, then, but how do :
this static trend?
G. I don't! "The Magician-
^^*^***v*(t^,      * "Nmm^JI
^
pf 6ix>
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,  1969 gman by Wiikbro
f on Bergman
Grabowski-Wiikbro
Grabowski-Wiikbro
Grabowski-Wiikbro
Grabowski-Wiikbro
religious quest business is that
struggle to get the drama going;
mal adversay, Death, and I say
-ure is a mere projection, a mere
sssboard of the so-called drama.
Les Visiteurs du Soir"? A mere
too. But in Carrif's movie, the
0 envoys of Hell falling in love,
he was supposed to seduce - was
:n down and worshipped "The
Bering "modern" film poem on
lindful of the fact of Carrie's
;n years before Bergman. Ofthe
eems more contemporary in the
somewhat tiresomely, moulded
tock character cast; Bergman's
ii the hero on the beach at
has to go to town with a
yself, no question about it.
that the audiences of the fifties
any way undramatic.
't; didn't at all, I am sure. But
active thing: Looking back now,
to "The Seventh Seal" one can
all the germs of that whole
>t to follow. Here at last was
st have thought of it, out in the
veirdly and exquisitely original,
i, and then of course there were
mpositions in it that Bergman
mething like that beautifully
he troupe is on its way through
nan repeats that very picture in
with another theatrical troupe
ie two films take place at least
1 this identical nocturnal forest
ing, timelessly, through. That's
see "The Magician" continuing
well, 'The Magician" initiates
L> **M*pr**»v •* *
another trend, parallel to the one initiated by 'The Seventh
Seal." Here we have, no the quest of the individual grappling with
Bergman's God bag, but the quest of an individual who is,
specifically, an artist. And in 'The Magician," the artist was
pitted against society, — represented, in the conclusive struggle,
by empirical, clinical science. This was genuinely and immediately
dramatic, and today it is still the one of Bergman's movies which
I admire the most. I accept it with as good as no reservations.
W. But after that, what happens to the Bergmanesque artist?
G. After that, to the Bergmanesque artist, more or less the same
thing happens as to die Bergmanesque god-seeker — the
continued journey into a vacuum of brooding, a lonely desert
island of sombre, anactive speculation. Elisabeth Vogler of
"Persona," an artistic descendant of Vogler the magician. Not
very interesting herself, and the whole interaction drama of the
Ifilm: seems postulated to me. The hero of "Hour of the Wolf.
Who are his adversaries? Projections! I was quite impressed by
that film nonetheless. I though that, despite the whole
subject-matter, it had much more vitality than most other
Bergman films in the sixties. But again, this vitality was mostly on
the surface; one had the feeling that there was only just enough
substance of this brand underneath to last Bergman through this
particular movie — like staging a brilliant auto race on a dollar's
worth of gas and just making it across the line as the last drop is
burned up. I felt that, in terms of future production, the film was
a blind alley, but at the same time I was personally quite carried
away by it.
W. After the religious installments earlier in the decade, you saw
it as an improvement?
G. Well, that seems exactly the wrong word, because, as I was
trying to say, Wiikbro, it did't seem to herald anything new. Let's
face it: Bergman has more boredom in his conscience than any
other artist today of his demonstrated brilliance. How about
something like "Through a Glass Darkly"? There ought to be
censorship against such excesses of boredom. If there were,
"Winter Light" would probably have had a hard time getting
through too.
W. And yet you have spoken favorably of "Winter Light"!
G. Yes, imagine, somehow I just like it. . . These things are so
subjective, you know, sometimes. It had nothing to do with the
film - what Bergman was trying to say, etc. - I just liked the
landscape, the time of year, the idea of perhaps being back in
Scandinavia some day and living in a small place like that, taking
things easy. And to me, this was the only movie ever in which
Ihgrid Thulin had any measure of attractiveness—quite a lot, at
that - and then she was supposed to be really unattractive in that
film! So there you are . ..
W. Well, then, but if 'The Hour of the Wolf was a blind alley,
how do you view "Shame" then? That was about an artist too?
G. Well, let's say that Bergman, ignoring the blindness of the
alley, barged through the wall and found behind just one more
little chamber that he could portray. In "Shame" Bergman's artist
has reached a state of total lethargy, whas been reduced to a
spiritual vegetable. The actual fact of his being an artist is not
dealt with, not portrayed in any manner; there is just a very
formal, totally external reference to it once or twice during the
whole film. It is formally given. Every trace of any individual
quest whatsoever is gone — very differently from, say "Krapp's
Last Tape" by Beckett, where strong currents of a quest, amidst
the whole vegetableness, are make intensely felt, and are
extinguished only with the very end of the play. Nothing of that
sort. But then it turns out that there is one step further beyond
this seemingly terminal state, and it is this step that Bergman goes
on to show us. Because what he shows us here is that the
apathetic ex-artist's apathy may have come about, not as a state
of life in its own right, but as a specific result of the artisic
dead-end itself. And so, subsisting along in this state, the
washed-up, lethargic "artist" may be storing a totally different
kind of energy, dangerously compressed by the utter frustration
Wiikbro Wiikbro Wiikbro
of his humiliating existence, an energy not accessible for artistic
nor any other current purposes; not available, in other words,
until tiie advent of some outer, extra-ordinary circumstance.
Given such a circumstance, the person may suddenly turn around
completely and find the necessary outlet for a secretly built-up,
gigantic urge to take his existence vastly into his own hands. In
"Shame", this outer circumstance is the war, and the "new"
personality which the artist suddenly reveals is indeed horrifying.
It is totally logical that, following such a state of complete
lethargy, the person making the switch would go to the complete
opposite extreme. That certainly gives all us other lethargic artists
something to think about...
W. So you didn't think "Shame" was bad after all?
G. By no means. The film did what it set out to do, quite
handsomely. But then - we are talking about Bergman, a director
formerly of extreme promise. We are confronting the fact that he
really isn't blowing anyone's mind these days - hasn't been doing
so for a long, long time. He has taken his individual quest as far
as, on the original, simple premises, it can be taken; and he has
not given us any hint of being able to shift it to a new and really
more sophisticated and intriguing level of exploration. Take a
film like "Blow-Up" for instance. That film, to me, stands as
everything Bergman has so far proved incapable of going into ...
And, as I say, he has not given us any real hint that, somewhere
up his sleeve, he may have a new secret weapon brewing. A real
new trip, as you guys out there would call it. If he hasn't we'll
have seen the end - or let's call it the mummification - of
Bergman soon.
W. Do you think he has?
G. Does he even know himself? Maybe i God only knows - if
Bergman's decided he exists.
Famed Fenno-Scandian star reporter, critic,
and Grabowski-crony Magnus S. Wiikbro, who
did the interview tor The Ubyssey, is academically best known for his TERRIBLE INFANCY:
A STUDY OF SIMON GRABOWSKI'S LACK
OF WORKS, University of Haparanda Press,
1967.
Ingrid Thulin and (again) Max von Sydow in "Hour of the Wolf.
pf 7even.
Friday, November 28, 1969
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PURE VIRGIN W001
Electric god-bodies drift
away in streamers to vast
light; carnal transparency
filled with opalescent blood;
metamorphosis of terror and
fire performed on souls of
flesh. The announcement of a
festival of homage to William
Blake, master mind-blower;
such visions of heavenly and
hellish delight promised by
the swirl poster. Clean and
pure-no speed, strychnine,
belladonna-visions straight
from the third eye of the
horse. Little rectangles of
joy—postage stamps of the
endless vision—far beyond the
cheap thrills of the street
stuff, just like it was in the
old days. All this to be
accompanied by readings to
raise the serpent of fire so
long dormant in your spine;
music to make him dance and
writhe in your head; foods to
calm his darting tongue across
your eyes—quiet voices
dissolve the centuries bringing
all to now—the high thin flute
insinuates the voice of
God-the co-dependent
arising doctrine, visions
arising out of voidness.
I do different things in
different places because those
places turn me toward doing
those things. The only reason
for an art gallery—worn out
tramps from the glue-factory
sweeping up the shattered
rocks of joy—let them sweep
in the inevitable gallery—you
can fly—is that the place can
be adapted to direct cosmic
ozone peculiar and necessary
to each artist—all of
us—Rather than snorkel
diving in orange—blue heat
waves captured from Quasar
moons at great effort and
expense to amaze the viewer,
to astound the critic, we
dog-paddled through sand
dunes breathing noxious
fumes sucked off burning
piles of special reprints from
the Reader's Digest- not
stopping at the picture —not
stopping at the image—just
like Billy Blake his mind
unfolding in bright
sea-waves—The only buzz we
got courtesy of the
management was an orchid
associating with colour plates
in a glass box. Nice orchid, it
so easy and so much fun I
can't believe it wasn't done.
Imagination and vision are
proven to be totally
non-infectious submits a team
of faggot sociologists recently
emerged from undercover
duty as thumbtacks in art
circles. Nice survival Billy.
JOHN and DANNY
And So Therefore...
And a flourescent light
tube is a light tube is a light
tube. Great cellular
downcrashing of chromosome
breakage, midnight assaults
by leprous spasms? Fantastic
ochre occlusions of brain
paths? Irreparable retinal
damage? Volleys of hair
desertion roots, flibbering
carnage of smoking neural
collisions, nasty portent of
mustard gas! Last week's PF
review of the Dan Flavin
show!
The V.A.G.'s current
showing of Flavin's works
have nothing to do with
anything, including last weeks
review of them. If it was ever
the case that they had
anything to do with
something then that was last
week. They had nothing to do
with  technology or Thomas
Edison last weekend they will
not have anything to do with
him next week. If you wish
to suicide go there, for
going there to make
interpretations or to look for
meanings is suicide. The
works are wholes that have
no parts buried in your ego.
You are asked to quietly stop
meaning things and simply
be. That creates difficulties,
and perhaps Flavin is being
subversive. No one speaks to
the etcetera's of your
existence, nor does Flavin say
anything about the etcetera's
of his. Flavin is not showing
you that he is an artist so you
need not show that you are a
viewer. If you've ever felt
that the world was imposing
on you? That it was making
you play roles and socializing
you? Then this show will
leave free. For those who
need titles where there are
none, simply read "Zonk" or
"Grok" and meditate
backwards from there. Ifyou
get into difficulties proceed
directly to "untitled (to
Dorothy and Roy
Lichtenstein on not seeing
anyone in the room.)" Then
close your eyes and go to
"ping out of a corner (to
Jasper Johns)." And if
nothing happens you get
double your money back.
Definitely the last thing to
see is the room containing
Flavin's earlier works and
sketches. It temps one to see
his work in some kind of time
perspective, which is
probably unimportant to the
main exhibit. So. Needless to
say? If you don't go none of
your little blinkety blinkety
Christmas lights will work.
LORENZ FERSEN
■^       \\ idiom this lalicl    iXtiuO & I '* '*" "'" a Kcnuine KITTEN.       «
*••* tX L 1 (**>
***** $*
V **<?<"*'¥'¥<?¥¥*?** *?¥**■** »»**'¥f»i|t»¥¥»(*¥»¥*^f¥,?f»»¥f
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969 •
■M
Incredibly   Speaking
I tried to do a really difficult thing during
the last week.
What I tried to do is approach, talk to
relate with, the Alma Mater Society, (or its
members) my "duly elected", my
"representative" body. Besides being more or
less a total failure, it was also a tag drag.
Wow! There they all sit in their
plush-carpeted, well-upholstered, designed,
flowered, officially paper-strev/n, dictaphone,
telephone walkie-talkie equipped sunspeckled
offices, playing at relevance, at being important
persons with prestige and the support of their
equal lessers. There they are as their
junior-hoping-for-senior-administrators copying
their elders and after-all betters dedicated to
the "unfortunate but necessary" and
smooth-flowing process of community order
and stuff like that.
What I was (Anyway) trying to achieve was
to bring the Gallimaufry Theatre Company
onto campus for a series of noon-hour
performances.
Yes, the Gallimaufry was an "outside"
gjoup. Yes (I even agreed) UBC people should
have priority in oiFCampus. bookings. They
jmust therefore - in the due respect of order,
•Mid in contrast to "on-campus" groups, — pay
|rent for the use of "student" facilities I
disagreed.
The Gallimaufry is the only theatre group
in town that can in any way revive the present
local theatre situation. The Gallimaufry, as you
-probably know, was busted during its
performance of McLure's The Beard at the
jRiverqueen about two weeks ago, (Stupidly
busted. Many counts of "OBSENITf" against,
actors Angela Slater and Wayne Robson as well
as against Ronnie of the Riverqueen and his
wife).
The "Morality Squad" (!) detectives who
performed the act of aggression (metaphorically
speaking of course) claimed someone had
complained to them of the "OBSCENE"
performance. (Trial has been set for Dec. 10,
but will probably be remanded.) See last week's
Georgia Straight, by the way, for a report of
the bust — which the downtown press more or
Jess ignored.
Anyway — again - as a result of these acts
against them, The Gallimaufry lost money. The
Che 4-to you to!
"Well, yeah, it was an exciting play and the
evening wasn't a! waste of time. But then, on
the other hand ..."
David Gardner (Artistic Director of the
Playhouse Theatre) displayed a small quantity
of daring-along with his personal
"commitment" Jo the twentieth century and
its "art" - last Tuesday night when he unveiled
his production of Mario Fratti's Che Guevara
on the Arts Club stage.
But then Che carries enough legend and
myth around with him these days to make even
(or maybe ispicially) the more conservative
"intellectual arts patron" convince himself that
"the phenomenon of Che*" deserves
open-minded consideration. And furthermore,
"avant-gardish theatrical techniques are also a
possible reflection of our times,   Martha."
is on Stage
(Productions like this are the small
extra-curricular pleasures that directors like
Gardner allow themselves once or twice a
season when they are assured of box-office
goodies from other productions.)
The production was by no means
avant-garde. It was however somewhat closer
to the idea behind Playhouse 2 and, as I said, an
entertaining evening.
Che Guevara! That "20th Century Man",
that "Romantic Idealist, that 'Totally Human
Revolutionary". Idol of the young — dilemma
of the settled. And a lot of things.
I think we have to agree that Che is now,
Company is badly in debt.
So what better than to bring them out to
UBC — to aid students to see some things and
at the same time raise some money for the
company. (They are almost at the point of
extinction as it is). After all, is it for not the
"Young" (wow!) the prospective vanguard and
opposition to establishment oppression that the
company exists? (They're obviously not going
to gain support elsewhere ...)
But the AMS — it was not under Graham
Vance's jurisdiction; Fraser Hodge was
somewhat positive but had never heard of the
company; Dave Graham, "the man to talk to"
(!) more or less demanded rent from the group
(which would totally destroy the whole idea of
a benefit) and was after* thcrt-t-cori-renje^th/ out
of town.        *      ;. '-•-*.-.
So you -see 1 failed. And the Gallimaufry
will probably expire shortly. :•'N
That, ladies and gentlemen, is^what your
"duly-elected representatives" consider in, the
interest of ''public order" and "the majority of
students". Order is more or less all it is. And
the MONEY that has so much affect on order,
is also closely involved. It seems obvious that
the AMS is devoutly trying to centralize and
manage (and thereby truly "administer")
student activities, very directly from their
(above-mentioned) offices. Kirk Tougas of Film
Soc is running into the same kind of thing. Not
to mention, of course — haw haw, we're not
proud - the whole Ubyssey affair.
In their effort to truly "do their job" the
AMS executives are genuinely creating a
beautiful mountain of red tape - stand up in
the name of ORDER please Johnny — which, I
think we all agree, is quite closely akin to
creating a ; beautiful mountain; 'of pure
"ill-begotten" POWER.
And so can I (Help! and "individual") or
even as a member of the Ubyssey editorial
board (hmmmmm) or the Gallimaufry — which
somehow has this distastefully anti-bourgeois
flavor about it — possibly tamper with this
fortified KEEP?
P.S. As I found out after some time (or at
least I think I did) there are three "categories"
of possible space bookings. And the
Gallimaufry is still, in spite of this, dying.
-NORBERT RUEBSAAT
This is the Revolutionary gang and their recently
discovered creation, (on left, with the white limbs.)
here, a myth, and is therefore, strictly, neither a<
man, nor a theatrical character: he is more than
both. He is alive in people's heads as they
expectantly enter the theatre. And therefore he
demands a lot of both playwright and director
and actor. Seen on a stage., he is, inevitable,
much less real than he was before he was put
there - be becomes an actor, part of a staged
artistic process which, despite Gardner's fine
production, is totally less alive than myth.
(Statements, writings, conglomerations of letters
as seen above are, incidentally, also put-ons and total
unrealities.—Ed.) Norbert Ruebsaat
pf 9toe
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STUDENT NIGHT DECEMBER 9
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Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY EDITION
r.  Deulsshe
This time, unlike previous years, all the boxed recordings are already available. Order the recordings you
want in good time for Christmas! You can order the
6 sets in gift boxes until the 31st January, 1970, the
special reduced price applying from now until the
end of the subscription period.
Once again, as in past years, the music on offer ranges
over the baroque, classical and romantic ages, by way
of Richard Wagner to compositions of our own day.
You know our libretti and introductory booklets which
are supplied with the recordings? In these you will
find the words of all the vocal works (with English
translations), together with interesting information
about the works and performers.
GIFT BOXES AT REDUCED PRICES
WOLFGANG  AMADEUS  MOZART
46 SYMPHONIES
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Karl Bohm
Stereo 643 521/35
15 12" l.p. records
$52.00
instead of $104.70
AVANT-GARDE
MUSIC OF TODAY
Composers:  Kagel,  Cage.  Koenig,
Pongracz,  Riehn, Schnebel,
Stockhausen,  Zimmermann
"Nuova Consonanza" Ensemble
6 12" l.p. records
Stereo 643 541/46
$20.00
instead of $31.74
FRANZ SCHUBERT
LIEDER
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Baritone
Gerald Moore, Piano
12  12" l.p. records
Stereo 643 547/58
$44.00
instead of $83.76
GEORGE FREDERIC HANDEL
SAMSON
Oratorio
Complete recording in English
Martina Arroyo - Shiela Armstrong. Sopranos
Norma Procter, Contralto
Alexander Young - Jerry J. Jennings, Tenors
Ezio Flagello - Thomas Stewart. Basses
Munich Bach Choir - Munich Bach Orchestra
Conductor: Karl Richter
4 12" l.p. records
Stereo 643 517/20
$18.00
instead of $27.92
RICHARD WAGNER
SIEGFRIED
Helga Dernesch,  Oralia Dominguez,
Catherine  Gayer,  Zoltan  Kelemen,
Karl Ridderbusch, Thomas Stewart,
Gerhard Stolze.  Jess Thomas
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Herbert von Karajan
5  12" l.p. records
Stereo 643 536/40
$25.00
instead of $34.90
JOSEPH HAYDN
THE CREATION
Gundula Janowitx.  Fritz  Wunderlich,
Werner   Krenn,  Dietrich  Fischer-Dieskau
Walter Berry — Vienna Singverein
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Herbert von Karajan
2 12" l.p. records
Stereo 643 515/16
$9.00
instead of $13.96
BEETHOVEN EDITION 1970
FIDELIO
(3-record multiple stereo set)
REDUCED   from   $20.94   to   $13.00
Beethoven-9 Symphonies
Von Karajan and
Berlin   Philharmonic  Orchestra
8  Long  Play  Records
$16.88
THE CONCERTOS
(6-record multiple stereo set)
REDUCED   from   $41.88   to   $26.00
BEETHOVEN
WELLINGTON'S VICTORY
(Battle Symphony)
The Berlin  Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Herbert von Karajan
and a group of Beethoven Marches
performed by the wind members
of   this  great  orchestra
Special $2.98
$6.98 value
THE STRING QUARTETS & QUINTET
(ll-record multiple stereo set)
REDUCED   from   $76.78   lo   $41.00
A UNIQUE RELEASE
12" Stereo L.P. containing an
Illustrated 24-Page Brochure
Karajan in Rehearsal
$1.98
TOP SELLING ALBUMS USED IN MOVIE THEMES
MOZART
Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major K. 467
Piano Concerto No.  17 in G major K. 453
Camerata Academica
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Theme  from:  Elvira   Madigan
Geza  Anda,  Pianist  and  Conductor
138  783 Stereo
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R.  Strauss "Also sprach  Zarathustra"
Karl Bohm  conducts
The  Berlin  Philharmonic Orchestra
136 001 Stereo
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J. STRAUSS
ON THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE DANUBE WALTZ
Album also includes: Die Fledermaus Overture,
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969 d(j)i (poop Poop diot
Frederick T R.
(evil genius)
Cawsey
(See Page 5)
Norbert (yogurt) Ruebsaat
lit  & ?§!■*!*"
Michael (surfln' sam) Quigley
Bruce (mysterioso) Dolsen
Heaven and Hell has been open for one
month now and things are going quite
swingingly according to owner Pat O'Donahue.
He says to keep up with the demand he is going
to expand the club's menu. There will be 12
types of tea, bowls of coffee, all types of juices,
pies, pizza and assorted cheze dishes along
with the regulars; pop, coffee, chips and other
foods.
Menu isn't the only thing being expanded.
Longer hours are in the works too, probably
from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Shows will start at 8 with
good music between band sets which should be
about 9:30- 10:30, 11 -12 and 12:30 to 1:30.
O'Donahue wants to get in other acts too so a
good time can be had by all.
The room has seating for 200 and special
group rates can be arranged. Sunday is folk
night; from 7:30 to 10:30. Any folk artists who
sing or play guitar or whatever are invited to
come down and do their thing. Admission for
performers is free.
Half price tickets can be had from the
editors in The Ubyssey office. Just come up
and ask any time but especially today at noon.
This week Thursday through Sat. the High
Flying Bird are performing at the club. The
doors open at 8 and show goes from 9 to 1. For
reservations phone 224-1415. High Flying Bird
are a fantastic young group so things should be
really jumping this weekend.
There is also talk of a New Year's Eve bash
so phone next week and get the details.
A FESTIVAL 70 PREViEW EVENT
ELECTRIC CHRISTMAS CARDS, make
your own, Thursday, Dec. 4,10:00 A.M. - 6:00
P.M. Lassere foyer. The Fine Arts Department
in collaboration with Intermedia and Captain's
ROMEO and POLAROID.
Save and bring Christmas newspaper ads,
old photos and used greeting cards, curious
lettering, drawings and favorite pictures: cut,
tear and paste together a collage up to 8" x
10". The Roneoroni scanner will copy and
make a stencil for multi-printing. A polaroid
beep beep camera will be there, put yourself in
picture, make it a creepy Christmas.
David (minnesota fats) Bowerman
I   Masthead    I
KERRISDALE
Timothy (intrepid) Wilson
Since Norbie the Rube Tube says I, the
musical Quiggles, have control, authority, and
authorship over this masthead, I'm tempted to fill
it with musical nose-pickings and name-droppings,
but I won't do that.
Instead, mention of the various trivia and
trash ia going on about this great gasp of a final
issue for 1969 may be probably more in order.
Note, for example,, the proliferation of
photographic* phrenology which abounds all
around. We present these pictures only out of
sheer egomania, this visual variety being provided
with cameraderie by Davids Bowerman and Enns
with technical direction by Bruce (Subordinate
Santa Claus) Stout.
More appropriately, though, the positives
presented Wend in with the overall concept of
our artsy-pfartsy Christmas issue with which we
issue the best of help-put-the-X-back-in-Xmas
cheer. (Tell them to look at the groovy ad cover,
mumbles the Poop Toop.) Helping hedonistically
in this department were the prancing pens of
able; artists Bruce (Pedro) Dolsen and Timothy
Wilson.
To close once and forever, we wish you
nothing' less than the very best mess, and for my
own self, may visions of Stockhausen dance in
your heads.,,.
pf llleven
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969 Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 25
FEW COMPLAINTS
'Ubyssey should work to fight apathy
JBy SANDY KASS and x
BRIAN McWATTERS
Opponents of The Ubyssey
turned out in full force Thursday
to spank the campus paper — but
the spank was little more than a
slap on the wrist.
What was billed as a discussion
of the role of the student
newspaper neither drew the great
numbers of complainers expected
by many nor became as virulent as
was predicted.
The standing room only crowd
of about 400 in the SUB party
room heard gripes and defences
aired by members of a panel but
offered relatively few substantial
complaints themselves.
Panelists included Ubyssey
editor-in-chief Mike Finlay and
news editor Paul Knox,
Cornerstone representatives Ian
. McGillivray and Al Tipman,
impartial member Dave Zirnhelt
of past Alma Mater Society
president   fame   and  moderator
MIKE FINLAY ...
ponders next question
Tony Hodge of present AMS
vice-presideflt fame.
Panelist Tipman cited the
Cornerstone - financed by the
~ engineering undergraduate society
— as an example of dissent with
Ubyssey opinion. "We are not
publishing in opposition to The
Ubyssey as such, but since our
opinions were not reflected in The
Ubyssey we started our own
* paper," he said.
"The campus needs another
newspaper to act as a liaison
between the various faculties
which The Ubyssey does not do,"
said Tipman.
"A campus newspaper should
reach the community outside of
^the university," said Neil Brown
of the Rho, a paper started by the
inter-fraternity council.
"We should get a newspaper
downtown to give people a
different outlook on information
than that which is presented by
the downtown press," he said.
"The Ubyssey wants to have its
cake and eat it too, said panelist
Zirnhelt.
negative impact of the AMS and
the campus, he said the paper has
been fighting apathy for years,
but to no avail.
"No   matter   what   we   do,
Engineers Al Tipman (left) and lan McGillivray sit on panel discussion.
They want the financial
support from the students, yet
they want to spend the money in
any way they see fit, he charged.
"Most people don't accept The
Ubyssey because it does not
explain its editorial position
explicity enough," he said.
"The Ubyssey should work to
fight apathy and alienation of
students and to encourage real
participation in campus activities
rather than just write about
them," he said.   -
"However, I do think that The
Ubyssey has lived up to 85-95 per
cent of what I feel the role of a
newspaper is," said Zirnhelt.
The AMS has not done and is
not doing what it should and The
Ubyssey is acting with a negative
impact on the AMS in trying to
move it to act."
McGillivray added that he
would like to see more
representation from other
individual groups in The Ubyssey.
Editor Finlay maintained
throughout the discussion that
people with gripes against The
Ubyssey paper should air those
gripes by either writing letters or
articles for the paper or by becoming
a staff member.
"People complaining about
poor coverage of campus events
should take the time to send us a
press release about upcoming
events or -offer to write something
for the paper about them," he
said.
He noted that despite Tipman's
complaints that technical faculties
are not covered, only one engineer
works for the paper and no press
releases or phone calls have been
sent to The Ubyssey by the
engineers.
'The idea that the paper
should go downtown will not
work at this point because
Ubyssey staffers will not work
unless they have total editorial
control, and the AMS would not
stand for that," Finlay said.
In reply to Zirnhelt's
allegations that The Ubyssey has a
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nobody gets up off their asses,"
he said. "We print things that we
feel are educational and
worthwhile, arid then don't get a
ripple of reaction."
In response to a charge by
Zirnhelt that the paper should be
taking a stand on such things as
pollution, Finlay said there is
little point in a campus paper
doing so because the downtown
papers have the time, manpower
and money to do the job better.
(Nevertheless, see the pollution
feature in today's paper.)
"We have articles that the
downtown press cannot or will
not print," Finlay said. "We try to
educate people in things that the
downtown press doesn't have."
Ubyssey news editor Knox
pointed out that the paper has
moved into the community this
year with several features dealing
with activities in the city.
He also criticized the
complainers for attacking the
paper on generalities, such as
"being too far left, too cynical or
too Slanted.
"You can't talk about
newspapers in generalities, you
have to be specific,"-said Knox.
In addition to being a third
community newspaper, he said
the campus paper should present
campus news and news dealing
with the activities of youth
throughout the world.
Ubyssey staffer Peter Ladner
said he does not agree that The
Ubyssey will print anything as
articles, but said all views will find
n a place in either the letters to the
editor column or in Page Friday's
Forum.
"But nobody contributes to
Forum anymore. They had to
discontinue it after about six
issues because nobody would
submit any opinions."
In the question and answer
period, one student complained
that he did not like giving
financial support to a newspaper
whose opinions he did not
support. He cited The Ubyssey's
support for the Vietnamese
National Liberation Front as an
example.
"I don't feel that anyone's
"point of view" should be
subsidized by the students," he
said.
"What about clubs and other
student groups subsidized by the
students through the AMS?"
asked Finlay.
Ladner then pointed out that a
considerable amount of The
Ubyssey's budget comes from
advertising, and not only grants
from the AMS.
Tipman then brought up the
question of off-campus images..
"I feel a campus paper should
project campus opinions and
maintain the UBC image. Some
people  outside  this campus are
To page 29: see EDITORIAL
To live To laugh
To be
beautiful
CARE FREE WIG
NEVER NEEDS TO BE SET
24.95
MR. ELIO
OF ROME
MISS EVALINE
MISS KAREN
The Home oi International Hairstylists
4554 W. 10th 224-5636
MR. RON has returned
from Europe—with exciting
new ideas and will be in
our Salon starting Dec. 2nd
■*■*■
''*■ Page 26
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
University court urged
for York in Toronto
TORONTO (CUP) - A university court system
should be set up at York University, according to
the report of a joint student-faculty administration
committee which has been investigating the rights
and responsibilities of members of the university.
The report, released Thursday lists 83
recommendations.
The courts would hear grievances by students,
faculty and members of the administration, and
would have power to apply sanctions to students
and faculty members it finds guilty.
Suspension and explusion are possible sanctions
the court could impose, the report says.
It adds that only "reprimand or apology or
public retraction" could be used to punish
administration members, as "The purpose of judicial
condemnation is not to punish the administration
but to secure redress for faculty members and
students.
The university court would be made up of
students and faculty members, with a majority of
students for trials of students.
The committee completely ruled out "a show
of force" as a legitimate means of expression or
pressure, adding it "does not ignore the fact that
there may be precipitating reasons for a
manifestation of force."
If violence were to occur, the ultimate
responsibility to call the police on campus would lie
with the administration, the report says. But it
recommends they consult with students and faculty
members before talcing a decision to call in police.
York University president Murray G. Ross gave
his tentative approval to the university court idea
last spring.     x
Arts faculty senate elections
declared illegal by Loyola
MONTREAL (CUP) - Arts faculty elections
for senate faculty vacancies were declared invalid by
the Loyola College senate Thursday, following a
boycott of the elections by over half the faculty.
The boycotting faculty were protesting
dis-enfranshisement of lecturers, although lecturers
were allowed to vote by a last-minute ruling, and the
senate's handling of the disputed Santhanam case.
Santhanam, a physics professor, was not rehired
by the administration earlier this year. Senate at
first supported the professor, then earlirer this fall
upheld the administration's stance.
The Arts faculty vacancies were created when
seven faculty members resigned at the Oct. 7
meeting in which senate backed the administration
over Santhanam.
Five of the seven ran again Wednesday, but lost
to more conservative candidates, apparently because
of the boycott.
Ubyssey thanks
The Ubyssey extends its sincere appreciation to
International Costume Designers Ltd, 4243 Dunbar
and Watts & Co. Lts., 400-A, West 5th Avenue for
the loan of the Santa Claus suits which were used
for the pictures in today's Ubyssey.
The participation of these companies has
helped to lighten the pages in this edition. Once
again our sincere thanks and Merry Christmas.
New elections will be called before Dec. 5.
The Canadian Association of University
Teachers investigation into the Santhanam case was
also temporarily suspended Thursday at the request
of the Montreal police department.
Police feared that demonstrations might
develop over the investigation which they would be
unable to handle because of the demands of the
Gray Cup parade.
The investigation is expected to resume
hearings after the Gray Cup weekend.
"-■-I* - 'isL&'-i!^*^""^''*'-
  *^wi&ifjibg
lis fffifeas^ feet it c&eS&tH
jMHBHKMBE-S-i.;
More Ubyssey staff exposed
From page 4
Murray Kennedy, greek freak turned hippie, is The Ubyssey's
academic reporter. Murray plans a much more comprehensive coverage of
the university's academic matters second term when he starts attending
classes.
Jan O'Brian is another of the local cutles. Another Arts 1 freak, Jan
does wonderful things for sweaters as well as her reporting duties.
Fran McGrath, whose name rhymes with bubble bath is another
delightltful young lady staffer as is Colleen Hammond. Colleen has been
known to become distressed at hammond organ jokes.
Bev Gelfond Is The Ubyssey's diligent 'tween classed editor, and is a
delightful new addition to the staff. Threei not-so-delightful new staffers are
Robert (I'm plugged into Finlay) Bennett, Dave (dirty young man) Keillor,
and John (our token engineer) Moret.
Other writing worthies include Liz Mackay, Jennifer Jordan, Phil
("the kid") Barkworth, Bernard Bischoff (ho obscenity intended) and
Anne Rale.
Michael Quigley, page friday weirdo, is noted for his lucid, clever
reviews written in red crayon on a brown paper bag. Quig cut his hair after
his mum told him that if it grew any longer, he would have to climb a tree
to take a poop. Other pf motleys Include Tim Wilson, Bruce Oolson, and
Jacques (Elvis) Khoury.
John Kula is The Ubyssey's cartoonist extraordinaire. John Is a
diploma holder from the Marquis de Sade School of Graphic Art.
Sports types include Dick (I was named after my nose) Button, Tony
(look at my clever zombie imitation) Gallagher, Steve (my mommy was a
duck) Mallard, and Scott (anyone seen my jockstrap) McCloy.
The photogs, or darkroom dingbats, as they ar.e referred to In
journalistic jargon are the biggest bunch of misfits and social deviants ever
to be assembled In one place at one time. David Bowerman, or "Dlnkie
Dalton" as he is known to most, is the weirdest appleclimber ever to
twiddle a brownie. Dave Enns and Dirk Visser are the two mainstays of the
department.
Adding to the dirty deed in the darkroom were Barry Narod, Tricky
Dicky Sullivan, George Mah, and the beauteous brownie bobbler Maureen
Gans.
The Ubyssey is not, however, without a bureaucratic meddler. Ai
.Vince, local financing genius and fishmonger, keeps the boys in line (you
can read anything Into that that you like.)
Finally, there is the stud that keeps the whole outfit running. His
name is Jim Davies (girls, phone 731-6624) and his endless stream of wit
and brilliance is of immeasurable value to The Ubyssey. Jim is an all
around great guy, a senator of note, and probably the best thing to ever
happen to this university.
Well, that's us. If you would like to join us come second term. We will
be glad to have you.
—JIM DAVIES
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atioiii.l (ihristm,n>'iyi Friday, November 28,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
SAYS FEMINIST
Women persecuted
by lower job positions
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Quotable quotes:
"A man cannot grant anything to his wife, for
the grant would be to suppose her seperate
existence."
-an early edition of Blackstone's, the law
commentary.
Women scientists and engineers are paid $2,000
to $3,000 less a year than men in the same
positions." -the Harvard Medical Alumni Bulletin.
"Femininity? It's looking pretty and elegant.
It's being nice, not arguing with men or nagging or
complaining, or having different opinions. Not
pushing them, or interfering or anything, not
wanting to get their own way instead of doing what
they're told. I would say it's wanting to please a
man all the time."-anonymous man's comment to
newspaper columnist Flora Lewis, 1967.
Some facts and figures:
Fifty-five per cent of B.C. teachers are women,
but 17 of the 18 executive members of the B.C.
Teachers' Federation are men. All the committee
heads are men.
^ In 1966-67, 80 per cent of Canadian teachers
earning less than $2,400 were women, while only 22
per cent of teachers earning more than $10,000
were women.
In Vancouver, the first women principal since
1935 was appointed this year.
A Manpower executive admits that the
government accepts work orders from companies
that refuse to hire women.
University placement officers say many
companies refuse to interview or consider women
for jobs.
Of the 90 faculty members in the SFU science
department, three are women.
In June, 1969, Attorney General Leslie Peterson
announced a Human Rights Bill would go into
effect on June 16, 1969, by an order in council of
the B.C. government.
In an advertisement in the Vancouver Sun Aug.
19, the Human Rights Commission said it is
unlawful to discriminate in hiring, continuing
employment, membership in a trade union or
seeking or advertising for employees because of sex,
or to pay women lower wages than men for the
same job.
The same issue of the Sun carried help
wanted-men and help wanted-women advertising.
Meanwhile, in one of Petersons' own offices the
lowest salary paid a man is $580 a month, the
highest $1,060. The lowest paid a woman is $317,
the highest $461. On the average women are
employed twice as long as men.
A man is officially the office manager, but the
office is in fact managed by a woman who is paid
$461 a month after 48 years of service.
In B.C., 12 per cent Of women workers are
organized into unions, compared to 60 per cent of
the male workers.
In most occupational categories, women with
university educations have been shown to be earning
less than men with elementary school educations.
A woman applying for a job with the B.C.
department of corrections in 1969 was told the
department limits its female staff to 12 per cent.
Another woman, hired with a number of
classmates by the federal government, found that
men were hired at a 55 per cent higher salary. At
first this was justified by giving the women easier
work, but after two years, women were doing the
same work as men paid three times as much.
Students urge nationalization
of U.S. industry in Canada
EDMONTON -
(CUP)—Canada should nationalize
U.S. industry in Canada, pull out
of NATO and NORAD, and stop
Chemical-Biological warfare
research, participants at a
University of Alberta teach-in
decided Monday and Tuesday.
2,000 students voted Monday
to condemn Canadian
participation in NORAD, NATO
and chemical-biological warfare
research projects.
The vote ended a
foreign-policy panel discussion in
which former minister of external
affairs Paul Martin claimed that
Canada's foreign policy was
completely separate from that of
the U.S.
Martin claimed the closeness of
Canadian and American foreign
policy is due mostly to a
"concurrence of interests."
University of Toronto
professor Kenneth McNaught
called for nationalization of U.S.
businesses in Canada to counter
rapidly-growing U.S. influence.
"We walk in kind of a
psychological terror of the U.S.,"
McNaught said. "Not knowing
where to draw the line is a
national disgrace."
We are too afraid of retaliation,
he said.
Other    panelists,   including
Lewis Hertzman, chairman of the
York University history
department, and Pauline Jewett,
director of Canadian studies at
Carleton University, joined
McNaught in calling for action on
the national question.
Tuesday, Mel Watkins, Toronto
professor and author of a royal
commission report on U.S.
ownership of Canada and of a
major  policy  statement of the
NDP's left wing, joined McNaught
in calling for action.
But, Watkins said, "American
global imperialism appears benign
in Canada because we share in the
American exploitation of the rest
of the world.
"Our economic policy is
formulated by the private sector,
the capitalists," he said, "and the
really important part of the
private  sector is in the U.S."
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A JEROME  HELLMAN - JOHN
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Now! At the DUNBAR
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4939 Kingsway, Burnaby
&
Weekend Ski Trips
—Return Bus trips to Whistler, Baker and Hemlock Valley — $3.50.
—Starting November 29, Leave SKI COUNTRY shop at 4939 Kingsway (1 block
south of Simpsons Sears) at 7:00. a.m. Returns from Hill 4:30 aan. Every Saturday
and Sunday. Reserve before weekend.
Night Skiing
—Monday and Thursday night return bus trip from shop — $1.50.
Our Shop Comes a Complete Line of
1)
Blizzard Skis
5)
Hallmark Ski Wear
9)
Tyrol Ski Boots
2)
Dynastar Skis
6)
Kofflack Ski Boots
10)
Salomon Bindings
3)
Ski Packages
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ALL MOUNTING AND MINOR REPAIR FREE Page 28
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
WHADDYA MEAN you
won't give any money to
anyone with long hair
and funny clothes,
Chuck.
iMMW'W****'**'*^^
THE STAFF OF
HEAVEN and HELL
WISH YOU ALL      ,
and. cl dtappj^ Jfl&w y&a/L
Hope to see YOU during The Holiday Season
PAT O'DONOHUE
Manager
10th at DUNBAR
ii
Give us a chance to let our hair down, too.
We're not as square as you think! Behind our
seemingly straight-laced image, there throb some
pretty way-out projects. And people.
Alcan is involved in many unexpected areas.
Because we do a lot more than just produce
aluminum. We and others try to find new uses
for it.
For example, one new use that came to our attention was developed in Belgium arid refined by a
Montreal artist, Through a process called
Aluchromie, he "paints" on specially prepared
aluminum panels. The resulting work of art has
a water-colour effect with unusual depth and
perspective, and endless applications in art and
architecture.
And that's just one of the exciting new developments in aluminum.
Alcan researchers and scientists are continually
searching for better ways to do things with
aluminum. And it's not always easy. Often they
have to struggle for years to find ways of making
their ideas come to life.
So you see, they aren't the only ones who have
to cope,with hairy problems.
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA. LTD   'ALCAN
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9cf>  The Holiday
from the
UBC BOOKSTORE
A GOOD SELECTION OF  BOOKS FOR
CHRISTMAS    NOW AVAILABLE.
A few suggestions:
Alice's Restaurant Cookbook: by Alice May Brock-
Random House $ 6.95
The Asmat: The Michael C. Rockefeller Expeditions: ed.
by Gerbrands—Museum of Primitive Art, New York .... 33.00
Bartlett's Canada: A Pre-Confederation Journey: by
Tyrwhitt— McClelland and Stewart  14.95
The Boat Who Wouldn't Float: by Farley "Mowat—
McClelland & Stewart  6.95
Canada: by G. Conchon—Queenswood House  12.75
Chinese Sculpture, Bronzes, and Jades in Japanese
Collections: by Sugimura—East-West Center Press  18.90
Egypt: Architecture, Sculpture, Paintings: by
Lange & Hirmer—Phaidon  30.00
The Encyclopedia of Space: ed. by All ward—Paul Hamlyn     29.95
Forms in Japan: by Kojiro—East-West Center Press  16.20
Group of Seven Drawings: by Duval—Burns & MacEachern  9.50
Hawaii's Enchanted Islands: by
Czolowski & Sharp-Rand McNally  15.95
Hockey is a Battle: Punch Imlach's Own Story: by
Imlach & Young—MacMillan  5.95
How Summer Came to Canada: by Cleaver—Oxford      3.95
The Human Zoo: by Desmond Morris—Clarke Irwin     6.95
The I Ching or Book of Changes:
Wilhelm & Baynes—Princeton     6.60
Indian Art in America: by Docksteader —
New York Graphic Society      27.50
Larousse Encyclopedia of Byzantine and Medieval Art: ed.
by Huyc-he—Prometheus  16.50
The Last of the Bush Pilots: by Helmericks—Knopf  8.50
Lawren Harris: ed. by Harris & Colgrove—MacMillan  20.00
Leonardo Da Vinci: by Goldscheider—Phaidon  13.45
The Making of Georgs Orwell: by Alldritt—Edward Arnold  6.95
Maori Paintings: by Lindauer—East-West Center Press     8.10
May Your First Love be Your Last: by Clark—
McClelland & Stewart      4.95
Men in Groups: by Lionel Tiger—Nelson  10.00
The Miller, the Boy and the Donkey: by Wildsmith—Oxford  3.50
The Mountain Goats of Temlaham: by Cleaver—Oxford  3.95
Notes from the Century Before: by Hoagland—Random House . . . 8.50
1001 British Columbia Place Names: by Akrigg—
Discovery Press  5.70
Oregon: by Atkeson & Gohs—Belding  25.00
Pleasure of Ruins: Beny & Macaulay—Thames & Hudson     25.00
The Pooh Cook Book: Milne & Ellison-McClelland & Stewart . . . 4.95
Profile of a Pro: The Russ Jackson Story: by
MacCabe—Prentice Hall     5.95
Rembrandt: Paintings, Drawings, Etchings: by
Goldscheider-Phaidon  13.45
Row Houses and Cluster Houses: by Hoffmann—Praeger     21.50
Sally Go Round the Sun: by Fowke—McClelland & Stewart  6.95
Ski North Arnerica: Your Guide to the Top 28 Resorts by:
Rand—Lippincott  3.55
Summer of the Black Sun: by O'Brien—
Prism Int'l Press & November House         . . 4.95
Sylvia Sidney Needlepoint Book: by Sidney & Lewis—Reinhold   .. 10.75
Thailand: by Sieben—Taplinger  17.95
This is Haida: bv Anthony Carter—Carter     14.95
Washington: by Atkeson & Gohs—Belding   25.00
Also a comprehensive selection of children's Books, Canadiana, Sports,
Cook Books, etc.
We also have a selection of other gift items, including UBC jewelery, crests,
sweat shirts, etc.; also, Christmas cards (including UNICEF, UBC crested
and Photo Cards) and gift wrap.
PAPERBACK—New Arrivals
Arrival and Departure. Koestler. Bantam. (Fiction) $ 1.10
The Chinese Mind. ed. C. A. Moore. East-West Center Press.
(History Far East & Philosophy)        4.25
1848: The Making of a Revolution. G. Duveau. Vintage.
(History Continental Europe)        2.25
The Idea of Usury. B. Nelson. U. of Chicago. (Sociology)     3.20
The Indian Mind. ed. C. A. Moore. East-West Center Press.
(History Near & Middle East & Philosophy)      4.25
The Japanese Mind. ed. C. A. Moore. East-West Center Press.
(History Far East & Philosophy)          4.25
The New English Bible: New Testament. Oxford & Cambridge.
(Religion)         2.00
Pornography of Power. Rubinoff. Ballantine. (Psychology) 95
Philosophy of Education: Supplement 1969. Smith & Broudy.
U. of Illinois. (Education)      2.10
Philosophy of Education. Broudy et al. U. of Illinois.
(Education)     3.20
Political Collapse of Europe. H. Holborn. Knopf.
(Political Science)      3.85
Promise of Buber. Streiker. Lippincott. (Religion)      1.80
Promise of Kierkegaard. Hamilton. Lippincott. (Philosophy)      1.80
Ski North America: Your Guide to the Top 28 Resorts.
Rand. Lippincott. (Miscellaneous)      3.55
Struggle for Canadian Universities, ed. Mathews & Steele.
New Press. (Education)          3.50
Student Power and the Canadian Campus, ed. Reid.
Peter Martin. (Counter Display)          2.95
Summary of French Verbs. Howard. Evergreen Press.
(Language)      40
Theory of Knowledge and Problems of Education, ed.
Vandenberg.'U. of Illinois. (Education)     3.70
Tsar & People. Chernia-sky. Random House. ( Russian History)...     3.
Under the Mountain Wall. Matthiessen. Ballantine.
(Sociology-Anthropology)  .     1.25
Visions of.Culture. Weintraub. U. of Chicago.
| (History General)     3.20
Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples. Nakamura.
i East-West Center Press. (History Far East & Philosophy) .    5.35
wm.mmw.mm*im:M.mw.mwi Friday, November 28,  1969
THE       UBYSS-EY
Page 29
Co-ed dorms spring up
at eastern colleges
HAMILTON (CUP) - It's hard to believe some
university administrators are still fighting to prevent
Sunday visiting privileges in student residences.
At McMaster University students will request
that the president's residence policy committee
allow males and females to live in the same building
- probably on different floors.
At Trent, approval in principle of a fully co-ed
residence policy was passed Nov. 19. The policy
would allow men and women to live next door to
each other and share all facilities. A committee has
been set up to study problems of implementing the
policy.
Residence buildings at Trent are already
integrated.
Students at Carleton have been living in fully
integrated residences since September. Men and
women can live next door to each other but not in
the adjoining rooms that share washrooms.
Men and women also live in integrated buildings
but not floors at Guelph and York, and Queen's is
presently considering the Carleton system.
Meanwhile in the Maritimes, committees at St.
Francis Xavier and St. Mary's are studying longer
visiting hours.
'Editorial opinion a bit heavy
From page 25
getting  pretty upset about the
image we're projecting."
When asked about a possible
drop in Ubyssey funds, AMS
treasurer Chuck Campbell said:,
"Possibly some student money
will be used in support of another
campus newspaper but it is
possible to do this without
reducing Ubyssey funds."
"All things considered, I think
The Ubyssey is doing a pretty
goodjob,"hesaid.
'The paper weighs a little
heavy in editorial opinion, but
that is to be expected. Good news
coverage is a difficult thing to do.
News is only news for a short time
until it becomes history. Can you
imagine waiting three weeks for a
newspaper?"
Science rep Fred Buckwold
added his opinion to the list.
He called the whole meeting a
bunch of hogwash.
He added that a newspaper is
put out to make people think, and
shouldn't be taken for the gospel
truth.
"Whenever science has wanted
anything published, we've just
taken it to The Ubyssey office,
and they have printed it," he said.
After hearing from engineering
Student Ideas needed for
cultural activities in SUB
undergraduate society president
Duane Zilm who said that at the
start of the year he encouraged
engineers to write for The
Ubyssey, but they didn't want to
on the grounds that it would
defame their reputation, Hodge
adjourned the meeting.
Said AMS ombudsman Sean
McHugh after the meeting: "We
will try to keep these open
debates going to example what a
campus newspaper should be."
"The idea behind all this is to
see where The Ubyssey will be
going next year and to know what
the students want from a campus
newspaper," he said.
Flores... gets culture
Are you dissatisfied with the cultural happenings on campus?
You can do something about it.
Fred Flores, cultural supervisor, is interested in creating more
activity in SUB. However, students must let him know what they
want to see.
At present the Crafts and Pottery Shop SUB 251) produces only
pottery. If you are interested in working with leather, copper, or
batik, let Flores know; it can be arranged.
In December, Flores has planned a one week photo display from
Sweden. The subject is pollution. The display has been all over the
world.
Later in December, the Art Gallery is putting on a "high calibre
art show using photography in a completely new form, including
works of well-known people in the art world,"
Next term there is to be a free theatre in SUB. "Anyone who
has written plays, or who'd like to direct, manage, or participate in
one-act plays is invited to do so.'^aid Flores."You don't have to have
theatrical experience."
How are things going elsewhere?
'The record collection in the music lounge is really growing.
But will students please be more careful with the headsets. They are
constantly yanking them out by the cords and sitting on them."
- If you are interested in doing something culturally creative,
contact Flores in the excessive offices in SUB.
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STEREO HEADPHONES.   25-18,000 CPS, EXTRA LIGHT.
COMPLETE WITH VOLUME CONTROLS. $-f
Reg. $24.95
'36
6HT.
16
CHRISTMAS GIFTS
TO DELIGHT THE
SPORTS CAR OWNER
DROP IN AND SEE US AT
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
12th & Alma Telephone 736-9804 Page 30
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
YOUR LEVI'S HEADQUARTERS FOR GUYS and GALS
mcKee's are NUMBER ONE in LEVIS and you will be NUMBER ONE
WHEN YOU STEP INTO A PAIR OF    LEVI'S.      SEE THE  LARGEST  SELECTION OF GENUINE AMERICAN    LEVI'S    AT ALL THREE McKEE'S STORES.
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Color... Style... Fashions   -We've Got urn... You Get um!
OPEN A
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ACCOUNT
Ok USE...
3 STORES
2550 E. HASTINGS  -   6257 FRASER at 47th
1409 KINGSWAY at KNIGHT ROAD (Friday, November 28,  1969
com ROCK
THE       U BYSSEY
Page 31
Groupies eager to pop
for Vancouver pop groups
By JIM DAVIES
In recent years, the world has
been subject to a phenomenon
which has influenced the lives of
countless people. This
phenomenon is called "the rock
culture".
DAVIES ... groupie groper
Manifestations of this culture
can be seen in the millions of
records sold annually,
rock-oriented publications and
radio stations, the proliferation of
rock groups, the use of rock
terminology and the giant rock
festivals such as the one in
Woodstock, New York, that drew
400,000 people.
There is, however, one facet of
the rock culture that, despite its
interesting character, is constantly
overlooked — the "groupie".
In investigating the groupie
phenomenon, I talked to members
of various groups (and types of
groups). In as much as the
statements of some of the
interviewed musicians may tend
to "screw up their groupie
activities", they have asked to
remain anonymous.
What is a groupie? Generally
speaking, a groupie is a person,
usually female, that hangs around
prominent people for her own
gratification.
'The groupie phenomenon is
as old as life itself," said one
musician.
The fact is, however, that due
to the fantastic extent of the rock
culture, rock musicians now
attract the largest amount of
groupies.
"Fifteen years ago everyone
wanted to be the new Babe Ruth;
now everybody wants to be the
new Eric Clapton."
Disgust for groupies is not
uncommon by rock musicians.
Said one rock artist, "From my
own personal encounters with the
so-called groupies, I can say that
they rank in the same class as the
beer leech party girls and the joe
athlete parasitic cheerleaders.
They're all glory and gain seekers.
"Just as the beer leeches drink
all your beer at a party and then
go home with each other when it's
oyer, the groupies hang around
you at a dance saying 'Gee, look
at me, I'm with Fred Drummer or
Ralph Guitar', only to say 'bye
now' when the dance if over."
Another rock musician said: "I
can walk up to some groovy
looking chick in the SUB cafeteria
and she will say; 'fuck off,
weirdo', when I say hello. Two
nights later, your cock hasn't got
any longer, your face ho
handsomer, and you're probably
dirtier - covered with sweat and
defecation and yet she wants to
know and blow you because
you're behind an instrument."
What are groupies like? Are
there different types of groupies?
What are their particular
preferences? The rock musicians
interviewed had answers to these
questions.
"Groupies are wholesome.
They are peaches and cream,
bouncy and bubbly."
'They are largely impervious
to insult."
'They are wonderful for the
ego."
"They are people who have a
hope of betterment through
association with others. Even if
nobody thinks you are better for
it except yourself, I believe it is of
some good."
"Kids used to dig Superman
because he was a good guy. Now
they dig good guys like Peter
Fonda. However, because Fonda
isn't available, the rock band is a
real substitute for their feelings."
All the musicians recognized
that there were different types of
groupies. Their comments
reflected their concepts of
different types.
'There are basically two stages
of groupie - the 'bop groupie'
who is under 17, and the older
groupies that have absolutely no
age limit."
'The band suck is the male
form of the groupie," said one.
'The one that we have spends
more money on taking our
pictures than We pay him for
working our lights. The band is so
much a part of his life that to fire
him would be like cutting off his
left testicle."
"the groupies range from the
youngies who crave your
autograph to the older ones that
just want to go to bed with you."
"Usually the older groupies
want just one guy. The attraction
isn't the person, it is the musician.
He doesn't have to be good, just
so long as he jacks off his guitar
on stage."
'The ultimate groupie is the
one that does it for everyone from
the band boy right up to the
leader."
Although there is reputed to be
a hierarchy of groupies among the
big name bands (for example, the
girl in New York who is called the
"queen groupie" because she has
made it with both Paul McCartney
and Mick Jagger) the local rock
musicians did not recognize any
groupie hierarchy in Vancouver.
"In the States and back east
there is probably some sort of
hierarchy, but not here mainly
because there are no local groups
big enough to promote this sort of
ranking."
It was felt by several musicians
that groupies have certain
preferences.
'The freakier the group, the
more desirable it is to group
them," said one musician.
"A lot of chicks dig black guys.
This is part of the syndrome tied
to black lead singers.x Often the
reaction of the guy is that he
expresses pleasant surprise. I
remember one of the black
vocalists telling me, 'this would
never happen to me in
yankeeville.'"
One of the things that amuses
the musicians is that the girl
doesn't even have to know you,
yet she will want to go to bed
with you.
"One time we were just sitting
around after a gig when our
trumpet player came up to me
and told me there was a chick that
dug bass players that wanted to
talk to me. He was with one of
our regular groupies and he
introduced me to this girl.
"I took her to one of the
guys's place and asked her to tell
me about herself.
" I am in grade 11 at Eric
Hamber high school and that's all
there is to tell about me,' she said.
"I asked her if she wanted to
go to bed, she did, and we did — it
was ludicrous.
These are typical examples of
groupies — rock band relations.
All the musicians felt the
groupie phenomenon was growing
with the rock culture and said
they quite liked it despite the
artficiality of the situation.
I don't blame them.
INTERNATIONAL
CHRISTMAS BALL
Hotel Van. Dec. 19
TICKETS AT I.H.
A   JEROME   HELLMAN  - JOHN
SCHLESINGER PRODUCTION
"MIDNIGHT
COWBOY"
Now! At the DUNBAR
Christmas Special
POLAROID SWINGERS
MODEL 20    -    $13.88
COLORPACKII    -    $29.95
WHILE THEY LAST
AND MANY OTHER GIFT IDEAS
(Opposite Safeway)
4538 W. 10th AVENUE
224-5858 (Parking at Rear) 224-9112
"The Store with the Technical Photographic Knowledge"
ir £%.
Are you trying to tell me you don't like
our brand spanking new, panoramic,
air-conditioned campusbank? Gak!
\
True Chequing Accounts.
True Savings Accounts. Complete banking
services for students and faculty.
tt
Visit your Campusbank md Bank of Montreal
Canada's First Bank
Student Union Building Branch — T. Locke, mgr.
Administration Building Branch 4'G. F. Peirson, mgr.
10th Ave. & Sasamat Branch — J. W. Ferguson, mgr. Page 32
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
FRIDAY
HILLEL
Dr.   Abe  Carmel  speaks  on "Why I
became a Jew"—first Catholic priest
to  embrace  Judaism  in   1,000  years,
noon, Hillel House.
DESERET CLUB
Tire Philosophy of Mormonism, noon,
Ang.   214.
GEOGRAPHY  CLUE
Short   business   meeting,   noon.   Geography Geology Bldg. 147.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Regular meeting,  noon,   SUB 213.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOCIETY
Tour of special collections, noon,  at
card catalogue.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, IH upper lounge.
LIFE  SCIENCE CLUB
General meeting, noon, Bi. Sci 3332.
GREEK CLUB
Dance for tonight cancelled.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Blake's   birthday   party,   noon,   Fine
Arts Gallery in Main Library.
FINE ARTS OALLERY
The  Extologers,  8:30 p.m.,  Art Gallery, SUB.
ANTHO-SOC.  UNION
Steering   committee   meeting,    noon,
Lounge or IS.
UBC   HOCKEY
UBC Braves vs.   SFU Clansmen,  8:30
p.m.,  Winter Sports Center.
SATURDAY
AFRICAN STUDENTS ASSOC.
Dance and cultural evening,  9 p.m.,
International House.
UBC   HOCKEY
UBC Braves vs.  Gonxaga University,
8:30 p.m., Winter Sports Center.
'tween
classes
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Talk with Dr. H. McGregor, 7 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Center, 9885 Univ.
Blvd.
MONDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 211.
NEWMAN CLUB
Organizational     meeting     for    Xmas
Party, noon, SUB 10KB.
LEGAL  AID
Legal advice dispensed every Monday,
Wednesday,   and  Friday,   noon,   SUB
237 and 237A.
FOLK SOC.
Room   change,   Monday   to   end   of
month, SUB 216C.
CLASSICS DEPT.
Prof.   H.   Lloyd-Jones   speaks,   noon,
Bu. 100.
TUESDAY
VARSITY ROD AND GUN CLUB
Important  holiday  meet,' noon,   SUB
117.
B.C.  CO-OPERATIVE  DAY CARE
CENTER
Meeting, 7 p.m., Clubs Lounge.
HILLEL
Dr. M.  Vallance speaks,  noon,  Hillel
House.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL   EDUCATION
Panel discussion, 6:30, SUB 125.
PREGNANT?  NEED  HELP?
Pregnancy testing and Information on
abortion available  every Tuesday  at
7:30 p.m., 307 W. Broadway, Room 6.
WEDNESDAY
SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meting, noon, Chem. 350.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Tony Hodge  and Karl  Burau speak,
noon, SUB 125.
FOLK SOC.
Concert,  noon,  SUB ballroom.
CIASP
Training meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 119.
THURSDAY
FINE ARTS FESTIVAL
Electronic Christmas Cards, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m., Lasserre Foyer.
SATURDAY
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Communion Service, 8 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Center.
AIESEC
Deadline for applications for trainee-
ships is Dec. 31.
ARCH. CLUB
No   Arch.   Club   meetings   till   next
term.
EAT IN • TAKE OUT- DELIVERY.
.3261 W. Broadway   736-7788;
Weekday* to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.nr*.
• Next Thurs. Dec. 4 10 a.m. - « *
• »••"• • FESTIVAL 70 pr,vi,w •
• event:    "Electronic    Christmas •
_. Cards." Make your own in Las.
w Foyer. Fine Arts + Intermedia •
•) + Captains Roneo and Polaroid f
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 ajn. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. oi B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
"F*R*E*E P'L'A'Y"
opens FESTIVAL 70
Jan. 6 Fine Arts Gallery
BE HAPPY
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AND FREE POOD. THE
Swamp and the Viceroys Friday,
Nov. 28, 9:00 p.m. Hallmark Hall.
5550 Fraser. Tickets $1.75 from
NDP  Club,   SUB 216C.	
HIGH FLYING BIRD IN PERSON
3 nights only Thurs. - Fri. - Sat.
Doora 8 p.m. Dance 9-1. Heaven
and Hell. 3730 West 10th Ave.
224-1415.
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost fc Found
14
LOST & FOUND BEING CLEANED
out for Xmas. Come and claim
your  Junk.	
FOUND OODLES OF I.D.! COME
and claim it. Also Books!	
FOUND: PENDANT WITH BLUE
stone in I.H. parking lot. Phone
Marilyn, 228-3001 days. 	
LOST: BROWN LEATHER BRIEF-
case. Fantastic reward offered.
Doug Clarke,  922-4044	
LOST: RING IN GIRLS' WASH-
room, Bio. Sc. Bldg., Nov. 20th.
Reward. Phone 224-0620. Senti-
mental value.	
SMALL BROWN FEM. CAT, SPLIT
face; brown and black. Phone
224-0473. Her kitten misses her.
(2276 Allison Rd.)	
HIGH SCHOOL RING, LOST IN
Buchannan, Wed., Nov. 26. Phone
731-4576.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY FREEDOM
118.00   per   month,   including;   insurance. See the volume dealer in "Two
Wheel   Freedom"   for   details.    Hi
Performance    Honda,   3712   W.   10th
at Alma.  Phone  228-9077	
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO PER-
sons from Lougheed Hwy. and
Bainbridge.   Phone   298-1564	
CAR POOL FROM VICTORIA AT
Marine, 8:30-5:30 daily, requires
one   passenger.   Phone   325-1036
COUPLE WANTS RIDE TO ED-
monton, Dec. 17 or 19. Will help
with  expenses.   Phone   738-9185
URGENT. DRIVE NEEDED FOR
UBC secretary from Coquitlam.
Dianne,   936-6957
Special Notices
16
DON'T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY
Sign up for sex-ed course every
Monday evening starting Jan. 12
ih SUB NOV.  24.  26,  28 at  12:30.
AQUA SOC. CHRISTMAS DIVE.
Three days Under water. See,
Sign  in Club's Lounge.	
LOST & FOUND BEING CLEANED
out for Xmas. Come and claim
your Junk.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
BLOW-UPS <2'x3') MADE FROM
photos taken in our studio or from
good negatives or prints. Black-
lights, largest selection of posters
in B.C. Jokes gifts, cards. Post
Office. The Grin Bin. 3209 W.
Broadway. 738-2311 ( O p po s 11 e
Liquor Store & Super Valu).
SIGMA CHI HOUSE -RATES ON
request for room only, weekly or
monthly. Meal tickets or full room
and board. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
224-5530.
FREE SKIING — FREE ROOM
and board at Whistler Mtn. for
part time housekeeping and baby-
Bitting.  Call  932-5422.	
JOHN LENNON CAVORTS THRU
"How I Won the War" with
Michael Crawford, Fri., 7:00 - 9:30;
Sat. 8:00; Sun. 7:00. Come see the
last show of the term, SUB Aud.,
75c.	
PAT BRIGHOUSE, WHERE ARE
you? I need those English notes
this weekend. 733-0244 (please!).
—Shelia.	
NOVEMBER 29th IS YOUR BIRTH-
day. Happy may it be, Jan.
Love,  Ian.	
NEED RIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO
about December 20. Share gas &
driving.  Phone 731-3056	
"SOUL" MEANING, FEELING,
peace. Topic for Open Forum this
Sunday, 3 p.m., 2556 Highbury
St. at 10th (Alma 'Y' Building by
arrangement).	
ACADIA DAY CARE CENTER.
Vacancy.   Mrs,   Campbell,  228-3146.
Special Notices—-Cont'd
16
DON'T FORGET TO RESERVE
early. We have room for 200
people so get the gang together
and come . . . and join the fun,
Heaven and Hell, 10th and Alma.
224-1415	
2 HOURS OF THE 'POPPY FAM-
ily' at Churchill High School, Fri-
day night,   8  p.m.	
WIFE OF STUDENT DESIRES
Poodles to clip. Expert work,
reasonable. Phone 733-6881, Lorna.
RESERVE   OFFICER  UNIVERSITY
TRAINING PLAN
Selected men who desire to become
Army Reserve Officers and who
wish ten weeks paid summer training are invited to apply to The
British Columbia Regiment, 620
Beatty    Street,    Tuesday    evenings.
Travel Opportunities
17
STUDENT TRIP TO SAN FRAN-
cisco over Christmas holidays.
For inform, phone Ted at 731-3706
weekdays between 6-9 p.m.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 LANDROVER, EXCELLENT
condition.  New  tires.  Ph.  736-6840
1962 CORVAIR AUTOMATIC, WINE
colour, radio, four doors. Good
condition. Phone 224-3186 after 5
p.m.
1965 SPRITE, 27,000 MILES EX-
cellent condition, $860. Phone
255-9151   day,   or   224-6670.	
1969 HILLMAN CONVERT. GOOD
condition. Must sell, $100 cash.
Ph.   261-5290	
VOLKSWAGEN DELUXE 1962,
must sell. Stereo tape, immaculate
condition,   phone   277-5092,   $750.00.
1962 SPRITE. GOOD MECH. COND.
Hardtop. Must sell now. Make an
offer.     732-8209	
'68 VIVA, ACCIDENTED - IMMO-
bile—fixable en., trans., wheels,
parts. Must sell, $400. Offers, Bill
Moore,   224-9834  after  6:00.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS PRODUC-
tion    of   Graphs,    Maps,    Illustrations,    and'   Formulations.    Scientific  Displays,  Advertising.   Phone
733-4506
Photography
34
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
HEAVEN AND KELL IS PROUD
to present the High Flying Bird
three nights only Thurs.-Fri-Sat.
9-1. Sun Folk Night. Everyone
Welcome 7:30-10:30. 3730 W. 10th.
224-1415.	
THE WILD WILLY ZOOM ROCK
and Roll Band.' Dirt cheap entertainment.   985-6727 or 733-5293.
JOHN LENNON FIGHTS (?) HIS
own war! See "How I won the
War", Thurs. - Sun., SUB Aud.,
75c. This is the last show for
this   term.	
HEAVEN AND HELL IS YOUR
kind of place to bring your date
and friends. To enjoy yourself we
have all sorts of food and things.
3730 West 10th, 224-1415. Don't
forget, folk singing on Sunday
night.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters fc Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING, 35c
page (10 copy) call Mrs. Duncan
228-9597.	
COMPETENT TYPING ( Documents, theses, essays, general)
my home. Senior Legal secretary-
bookkeeper, excellent references.
946-4722	
ESSAY   TYPING   733-5922
Typing—Cont'd
40
EXPERT TYPING — THESES, 35c
page; Essays, 30c page, 5c per
copy. Fast, efficient service. Ph.
325-0545	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Theses, essays, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Phone 321-2102	
EXPERIENCE ELECTRIC TYP-
ing.University Grad. Free pick-up
& delivery; 30c. page. Phone
942-8114 — 9   a.m. - 5   p.m.	
HOME TYPING; ELECTRIC; Experienced. Reas. rates. Ph. 738-7881
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four   restaurants.
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm   —   vacation      employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER  LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676   West   Broadway.
Help Wanted-
Male or Female
53
NEED EXTRA MONEY?
FULL   or   PART-TIME
Excellent   Opportunity  Needs
Exposure
—  Mon.-Fri.-   After   6  p.m.   —■
685-0903 or 738-6404
EVELYN WOOD READING DY-
namics. Campus reps. See file
P 472,   Placement   Office.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted 61
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
HOOCH KOOTCH AND GRAMA -
phone. The Drinking Man's Band.
Call 435-1327.
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
 64
EXP. TUTORING IN CHEMISTRY
and MATH, by Graduate. Phone
738-5603	
THIRD OR FOURTH YEAR PSYCH
major wanted to tutor first year
phsyc student. Urgent. Phone af-
ter  7   p.m.   942-4281.   Ask   for  Joe.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NORDICA SIZE 12 'DOUBLE-
lace' new. $50. Kneissel 'Red-Star'
205 cm. Nevada Harness $60. Convention! '6-pack' Skirack $12. Sac-
rifice prices. Don 922-2806.
205 CM. "ECL" SKIS WITH STEP-
in Harness.  Phone 224-7533.	
LE TRAPPEUR ELITE PRO;
size 8%, $70. Phone 733-6102, 6-8
p.m. 	
NEW UNFINISHED WRITING
desk for sale. Price, $10. Call
435-0520	
100 METAL STACKABLE CHAIRS
and dolly, $6. each. 200 wooden
chairs, $1.55 each; also 8 folding
tables, 3x8, $8 each. For further
Information   contact   939-3180	
BAUER GIRLS' SKATES, SIZE
6%; case guards, 266-7688 after
4:00.	
SALE XMAS . . . CLEARANCE
Sale. Reductions from 30 to 50%.
Quality power and hand tools.
Hansen Industrial Tool Supply,
1535 W 3rd Ave. Ph. 736-0371.
Limited stock,  so hurry!!
Misc. For Sale—Cont'd
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
at the Bookstore,
AMS Publications Office
and Thunderbird Shop
CUSTOM BUILT TWO - MANUAL
portable organ, two Jensen 15 in.
speakers in boxes, Bogen Challenger 50 amplifier. Phone Bernie
298-5810.      -	
FRIG. AND STOVE FOR SALE OR
rent. Trombone for sale, only $50.
Call   254-6196   after   6:00.	
SKI     BOOTS,      KOFLACH     EXPO
Pros.   Size   12,   used   one   season,
$75.00.   Phone   736-5008,   5-7  p.m.
2SNOW   TIRES,    6.50   x   13.    LESS
than  1000  miles.  Retreads.  Phone
731-2804   after   6.	
SKI    BOOTS,    RIEKER    BUCKLE,
8%.    New    $99,    very   good   cond.
Sell   for   $30.   Phone   261-3234
FENDER       TELECASTER      BASS
GUITAR,   $250.   Dave,   224-6431
ONE   JAUBERT   TEN-SPEED   Bicycle.   Best   offer   over   $70,   three
months old.  Clips, fenders included.   Bob,   261-8032  after  6.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS ROOMS; STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe Cupboards;
room only $60 mo. Room and
board $115 mo. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy   Rd.,   224-5530.
FEMALE STUDENT ACCOMMO-
datlon. Reasonable. Phone 261-0844
NEAR GATES—2 ROOMS. USE OF
kitchen, bathroom, basement.
Available Dec. 1. $75. Ph. 224-9380
(except  weekend).
FREE ROOM FOR GIRL (18 - 22)
to help take care of groovy farm
home in Richmond with two working    artists.    Mail    info.    2646    W.
 42nd Ave. Vancouver.	
MATURE WOMAN WANTS TO
rent a room for January only. Ph.
224-4185	
LARGE MODERN ROOM, 1 BLK.
from 25th and Arbutus. Breakfast and bag lunch with babysitting on Saturdays, $55 per mo.
732-5317	
LIVE CHEAPLY ON CAMPUS !
Room with kitchen privileges,
only $50. For male students.
Board available for $45. TV and
weekly linen. Very quiet. Large
lounge. 5760 Toronto Rd. or Phone
224-0327
Room fc Board
•2
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on Campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725 Agronomy,  224-5530  evenings.
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD
for quiet senior male student.
4595  West  6th.   Phone  224-4866.
ROOM AND BOARD, 4th NEAR
Alma.   Ph.   224-6255	
ROOM & BOARD FOR GIRL STU-
dent, Oakridge District. Phone
327-3698  or   326-0693
Furn. Houses fc Apts.
83
LOOKING FOR FEMALE GRAD-
student or Ass.-prof, to share 3
Br. house. Rent $80. Phone CR
8-8763.   Granville   &   65th.
3 GIRLS HAVE RENTED LARGE
house  near  Gates  on   14th.   Need
2 more girls. Move in Dec. 1st.
$65 month. Call Penny or Leslie
224-9047  or 224-9038.	
LOOKING FOR MALE  TO  SHARE
3 Br. House — Not too heavy,
Not too light—10 min. from Univ.
Phone 732-8771.	
ROOM - MATE WANTED. MALE,
20+ Kits. apt. $55/mo. 731-1790
8-12  p.m.	
MALE GRAD. OR OLDER STU-
dent . . . share West-End apt.
$63.50 mo; pool and Sauna. Sound-
proof.	
FURN. UNIT, FULL BATH. SUIT-
able Faculty, Gr. Stud, or UBC
personnel (female). References,
non-smoker, non-drinker. Phone
224-3494
GIRL STUDENT WANTED TO
share mod. furnished suite in
West  End.    MU  1-7707
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, November 28, 1969
FRUIT DROPPINGS
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 33
BY NICK ORCHARD
Santa tells of Xmas spirit
Department store decorations are up, exams are
near, and once again it's time to hit the Christmas
cheer.
Being so intoxicated with the spirit, we now
present our exclusive interview with Santa Claus,
performed by carrier pigeon from the North Pole.
Ubyssey: Mr. Claus, I hope we're not taking
you from anything important.
Santa: Not really, ho ho I
was just playing with the elves, |
ho ho ho.
Ubyssey: Speaking of thei
elves, we hear so little about;
them. What are their names, and!
do they encounter any*
difficulties being so short? ORCHARD
Santa: Well, there's Sleepy, Dopey, Sneezy,
Ralph and George. Only one of them ever has any
complaints, and that's the one the others have to
stand on in order to load my sleigh. We call him
Grumpy.
Ubyssey: Will Rudolph be guiding your sleigh
again this Christmas?
Santa: Unfortunately not. Last Christmas at
one of the department stores some little bastard was
playing with his nose and bruised it. A blue light
isn't much^good, so we're using a cousin of his, the
one with the glowing ears.
Ubyssey: Do you anticipate any trouble on
your run this year? I understand you had a few
problems last Christmas.
Santa: As a matter of fact, I did. Apart from
being hijacked to Cuba and being nearly shot down
over Vietnam, I was making a low pass over your
campus when suddenly this big cement tower
loomed up out of nowhere. It wasn't there the year
before.
Ubyssey: That was probably the bell tower.
Santa: Thanks for telling me now. I thought it
was someone's chimney and almost killed myself.
Ubyssey: Do you notice much difference
between the kids of today and those of 20 years
ago?
Santa: I would say most definitely yes. Where I
once got cute letters telling me what good boys and
girls they'd been all year, they're now sending me
letters that sound pretty much the same as this:
"Dear Santa, I think you are an imperialist war
monger and a fascist commie bastard. Gimmee a
Johnny 7 war and destruction kit or I'll booby trap
our chimney."
Lawyer-hating Ginter gets
unexpected gift from LSA
Beer baron Ben Ginter could
ramble for hours on how much he
hates lawyers.
But it only took Ginter five
minutes to become honorary
president of the Law Students
Association in a ceremony
Thursday afternoon in the Law
building.
Ginter was late for the
ceremony because he was tied up
by lawyers downtown, but he
arrived in time to receive a gold
plaque.
He was delayed by the current
hearings into B.C.'s liquor laws, at
which Ginter is making headlines
with his charges of corruption in
B.C. liquor dealings.
Ginter, apart from being a
construction industry mogul, has
attracted much popularity
through his battles with the
Liquor Control Board over liquor
laws.
Ginter is testifying at the
hearings because he is the owner
of Tartan Breweries. Much of his
testimony   has   amounted   to
Lottery product
of Davies' ego?
By DIAMOND JIM DAVIES
Two students win daily prizes of $500 every day of the school
term. All kinds of free dances and performances on the UBC
campus.
These brainstorms could become a reality under the new UBC
lottery.
Here is the brainchild (play by play) I have conceived:
• Every student contributes five dollars along with his tuition
fees.
• This all adds up to the staggering sum of $110,000.00
'  (22,000 times $5).
• There are 26 weeks in the school year, five school days per
week or a total of about 100 school days (discounting holidays).
• Two prizes of five hundred dollars daily adds up to about
' $100,000, leaving $10,000 for free campus activities.
If Montreal can get around the lottery rap, so can we. We can
„ call it the UBC impartial scholarship awards.
I don't know about you, but I think this is one hell of a good
idea (not just because I thought of it, either).
Five dollars is not a lot of money at the beginning of the year.
Five hundred dollars is a lot of money any time of the year.
If you like this idea (this means you Fraser), act on it.
undisguised jabs at the legal
profession.
That attitude was instrumental
in Ginter's being given the award.
"We consider you worthy of
this honor because of the effective
manner in which you pissed off so
many members of the Bar" said
LSA president Carey Linde.
Ginter opened a cliche-studded
speech with the admonition. "I
don't usually spend too much
time with lawyers because it
usually costs me too much time
and money that's very dear to
me."
"Uncle Ben" went on to warn
students to stay legal. "Look at
me, I have principles and I can live
with myself," he said.
His short speech gave way to a
question-answer period in which
he felt "more at ease."
Many of the questions dealt
with his latest publicity
concerning the hearings with
liquor control officials and fellow
brewers. "That monopoly'll never
I break me 'cause I always have
another sock to dip into," said
Ginter    in    referring    to    his
construction company.
Concerning allegations that he
and Phil Gaglardi are related,
Uncle Ben said: "If I was his
brother-in-law I sure wouldn't be
in the brewing business or use the
language I do."
The Village printwrights
2109 ALLISON RD. AT UNIVERSITY BLVD. VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
PHONE 224-1015
§t
COMPLETE   PRINTING,  BINDING  AND  MAILING  SERVICE
A  DIVISION  OF  BENWELL-ATKINS,  Vancouver  Printers  For  Over  40  Years
A professional career with
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Our representatives will be pleased to discuss your
plans for a career in Chartered Accountancy during
their annual recruiting visit at the University of
British Columbia.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1969
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1969
WEDNESDAY- DECEMBER 3, 1969
There will be openings in the Vancouver office of
our Firm as well as throughout Canada for 1970
graduates in Commerce, Science, Arts, Engineering
and Law.
Please contact the Student Placement Office to arrange a convenient time for a personal interview
on campus or to obtain a copy of our recruiting
brochure.
// the dates of our visit do not suit your time' schedule,
you are invited to call Mr. R. G. WIGINTON, in our
Vancouver office, at 682-7821.
A Notice of Interest
To  All   U.B.C.   Students
Richards and Parish Ltd.
AND
The College Shop Ltd.
wish to announce that they will NOT
be led into the new era of far out
men's fashions
HECK NO!
were going to be the leaders
RICHARDS & FARM LTD.
786 GRANVILLE
AND
THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
869 GRANVILLE Page 34
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
SPOB TS
FOOT
e   e
Hindsight '69
wsm
Paul Nemeth's UBC wrestling
team was defeated 19-16 by the
University of Alberta last night in
a meet held at the Thunderbird
Stadium wrestling room.
The meet was a warmup
competition for both teams as
they will be competing in the
UBC 7th annual Invitational
Wrestling Meet to be held
Saturday  from  10 a.m. until 7
WRESTLING HERE THIS WEEKEND
p.m. at War Memorial Gym.
Doug Briggs, Taras Hryb and
Len Mariash won their matches
against prairie competition
Thursday and all look good
according to Nemeth.
Heartbreak award of the
evening went to Bruce Grift who
lost his match 7-8, but Nemeth
thinks that he can do better
Saturday.
Both Hryb and Grift were on
the B.C. schoolboy wrestling team
that travelled to Japan this
summer.
Nemeth's tournament, the
largest yet held has a total entry
of some 80 competitors, with the
strong teams being a 20 man
contingent from the University of
Washington and a team from
Seattle Pacific University.
The UBC coaching staff is not dissatisfied with a 2-6-1 record,
and in thisarticle maybe I can see why.
Having watched all the games, I can see how a record of 7-2
would be possible, but then hindsight is always 20/20. A major
problem with football on this campus is that everybody has a negative
attitude about it.
As far as the team went, the biggest problem was the passing
attack. Quarterback Al Larson showed flashes of proficiency, but
these didn't occur often enough. Inexperience was a problem, but so
to was inconsistent pass protection, and his general lack of height and
mobility.
Coach Frank Gnup did not always start his best 22 players, as
they were seldom all fit to play in a particular game. Dave Corcoran,
Ron Fowler, Bill Henderson, Paul Danyliu and Fred Maier among
others all spent valuable time nursing injuries.
The constant mistakes — fumbles, interceptions, cheap penalties
and mental letups all hurt the Thunderbirds' record, as they allowed
opponents free points.
Poor support for home games didn't help motivate the team at
all, either.
The brighter side of the season was the running, especially
through the middle. Dave Corcoran and Ron Fowler provided tough
exciting football for those fans who attended home games.
Opposing teams knew exactly what to expect from the Birds,
yet they were unable to stop the power running attack. If there had
been an aerial attack, the Birds would indeed have been a top rate
team.
Not all the praise can go to the backs however, an offensive line
weighing much better than 220 pounds from tackle to tackle opened
some big holes to run through. Fred Maier, Don Lumb, Ian Jukes,
Dick Stein and Mike Ayre did the bully work for the backfield.
Next year UBC can look forward to not having to play such
powerhouses as Pacific Lutheran, or Portland State, the only two
schools who physically mauled them. The Birds re-enter the Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association, and get to play against
schools who do not offer scholarships for high school stars.
All is not rosy however, the Birds must play the U of Manitoba
Bisons twice next year, and the Bisons looked good playing in the
Canadian College Bowl last week.
The team will even look different next year. Danyliu, Lumb and
Stein have all used up their eligibility and people like Corcoran are
graduating, many of the faces from this year's team will be missing in
September.
As coach Gnup commented, "I don't know what next year's
team will be like, we always seem to be building from scratch."
There is one more aspect to the football program as it is offered
on this campus, that of recruiting, or finding players. I suggest the
coaches let some of the prospects know that UBC is interested in
having them play here. They can't offer scholarships, but they can
show a reasonable interest.
Apparently UBC has a Director of Player Personnel yet Al
Larson snowed up a training camp unknown to the UBC coaches, as
did some of the other starters.
GRADUATION
S$%€ia!*r&les o»
eMmt at. ;<feoigfetj^
POPULAR MISCONCEPTION
Insurance is dull and
so are the people that sell it
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE CENTRE
Parts - Service Accessories
Discount  Clearance  on
1969   Low   Mileage   Demos.
2185 W. Broadway 731-7510
A  JEROME   HELLMAN - JOHN
SCHLESINGER  PRODUCTION
"MIDNIGHT
COWBOY"
Now! At the DUNBAR
This misconception has been circulating for years. It was
probably started by a life insurance agent who wanted to keep his
favourite resort in Tahiti from becoming overcrowded.
We've heard somewhere around 168 misconceptions just like this one.
Why don't you drop into the placement office and ask about
Crown Life's Graduate Career Programme.
We'd like to talk about some misconceptions.
Crown Lite
INSURANCE COMPANY • TORONTO, CANADA
B.C. MAINLAND AGENCY
1550 West Georgia St., Vancouver 5, B.C., Tel. 682-6511
CROWN LIFE REPRESENTATIVE
ON CAMPUS DECEMBER 1st and 2nd, 1969
Complete Auto
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• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
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10 YEARS IN THIS
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UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W 10th Ave.
224-0828 Friday, November 28,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 35
• .  •
BALL
by Steve Mil/art/
The director does not seem to be contacting the prospects, or
even telling the coaches about them.
The football image comes into being here. UBC's image is that
of losers, one that certainly doesn't fit any of UBC's coaches. The
Birds put up creditable performances against polished American
schools, yet according to the grapevine, UBC football is bush.
This kills any desire a young prospect who wants to play
football would have of coming here.
One of the reasons for the continuing image is a lack of a proper
machine for turning out releases about what is happening here, in
football and other sports.
"They send out one* press release, and then do a little through
the season and that's it," said Gnup.
Once again the coaches are required to drum up their own
advance publicity for the sport.
Corcoran, the Thunderbirds answer to a bulldozer, has been
offered a try-out with the San Francisco 49er's of the National
• Football League, yet only very few people on campus know because
.they haven't been told.
Gnup thinks Corcoran is a much better pro-prospect that Wayne
Holm, yet everyone in Vancouver known who Holm is. Again the
publicity thing.
Gnup's record as a coach is no great thing, but then it is better
than the coach before him, Dan Coryell. Coryell is now coaching at
San Francisco State College, and his team has lost one of its last 45
games. What could Gnup do there?
I don't think UBC should be turned into a "jock" school, but
intercollegiate athletics, such as football, are an integral part of the
idea of exchange between various universities.
To improve the football image, one would only need to work on
publicity and recruiting, and if anything was done, it would improve
UBC's reputation athletically and also in regards to the community.
Novice dropouts practise
Jerome <. Fallon won the accuracy competition of the UBC
Dropouts novice skydiving meet held in Abbotsford Saturday, as he
missed the target by a mere five feet.
Denis Clements at 17 feet away and Craig Lyth at 30 feet were
second and third.
Fallon tied with Clements for the top prize in the style
competition.
One hard luck prize went to Alf Randall who landed about 150
feet away in a pasture used by cows answering nature's call.
i Jie uoyssey sports
Staff wishes all Us
readers a Very Merry
Xmas and a Happy
New Year.
Birds hit
the road
The UBC Basketball
Thunderbirds take their 2-0
record on the road this weekend
as they play Friday night in
Regina and again Saturday in
Saskatoon.
The two University of
Saskatchewan clubs have already
each sustained two losses each.
Coach Peter Mullins said "we
really don't know much about the
new clubs but they'll be tough at
home."
Both clubs will also play at War
Memorial Gym against the Birds
later in the season, as Regina
comes in on Jan. 30 and
Saskatoon on Jan. 31.
The Birds, after this weekend's
Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association games, have a
three week lay-off until Dec. 27
and 28 when the St. Martin's
College Saints provide the first of
seven American games on the
schedule. The only other home
game against American
competition comes two nights
later when the Western Washington
State Vikings play at War
Memorial Gym.
The Birds leave on their
toughest road trip of the season
during the holidays when they
meet the Seattle Pacific Falcons in
Seattle Jan. 2-3 and in Portland
against the Portland State Vikings
Jan. 5-6.
LETTERS
Sports Editor,
In Tuesday's edition of The
Ubyssey's special section on skiing
there was no mention of the
Thunderbird Women's Ski Team.
As manager I would like to know
why I was not informed that there
was to be such a special edition
and why I was not requested to
submit an article on the team? In
the write-up on the men's team
there was one sentence concerning
the women's team and at that it
was entirely incorrect.
JOY WARD
sc. 1
We don't have anything to do
with the ski issue.
Blocks Meet
The Big Block Club is
holding its December
luncheon Wednesday in Rm.
111 of SUB. Newsletters are
being sent out and if any
members don't receive them
they should turn up at the
meeting to get their names on
the mailing list.
Intramural
Notices
Intramurals resume January  5,  1970
with Ice Hockey. Basketball starts again
January 7.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
1) All managers, who had teams defaulting in volleyball and bowling should
report to the Intramural Office between
1:30 and 4:30 this afternoon.
2) Next IAB meeting second Tuesday
in January.
3) Hamber I won volleyball. Delta
Gamma won bowling ,with Alpha Gamma Delta second.
4) Tennis entries due by this afternoon.
Rugby lads
looked at
By SCOTT McCLOY
So far the season's record for
the Thunderbird rugby team
appears dismal.
To date the Birds stand with
four wins and seven losses and one
tie.
One of the biggest drawbacks
to playing in the city league has
been the frequency of injuries.
Coach Spence has had to do a
regular juggling act every game to
fill in positions left vacant by the
injured. People have been playing
unfamiliar positions and when a
big play is needed it is, more often
than not, blown because of poor
communications between players.
If one looks at the total points
scored for and against, an
interesting pattern evolves. To
date the Birds have scored 143
points while allowing 153.
Inexperience has accounted for
the fact that this team's ability to
score is almost as great as its
ability to be scored against.
When asked how much
experience has been gained by
playing the city teams the coach
replied, "Well, it hasn't hurt the
team's morale. Naturally they're
disappointed they haven't won
more but playing the experienced
teams has meant a lot. If I was to
put the team in a tamer league
where opposition was minimal,
the players and L would not know
what to do in a tight
intercollegiate match."
The Birds will enter the
North-West Rugby Conference
after Christmas with a number of
resolved problems... Perhaps
then we'll know whether those
problems were the margin
between victory and defeat.
IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
by Oscar Wilde
254 -
Hebb Theatre
Friday, Dee. 5
7:00 — 9:00
Come SKI With Us
AT
£ilfiet £tar
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20 miles open ski runs Parking 1,000 can
Chair — Poma — 3 T-Bars Day lodge & cafeteria
6,000 elevation Ski School — Ski Shop
DEAN'S
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Take-Home
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PIZZAS - CHICKEN
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Special 10% Discount to Students & Faculty
Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are en-
Joying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
Student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
. ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST.. VANCOUVER, B.C.
684-7341
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates. Page 36
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1969
RECORDS MAKE
THE BEST GIFTS
2H&
>SHap
GROUND FLOOR SUB.

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