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The Ubyssey Sep 19, 1975

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 Anti-leukemia drug synthesized
ByMARCUSGEE
A UBC chemist has, after 11 years of
research, successfully synthesized compounds for treating leukemia and Hodgkin's
disease.
James Kutney said Thursday the compounds, known as analogues, are similar to
two naturally-derived chemicals, the
alkaloids vinchristine and vinblastine,
which must be extracted from the
periwinkle plant.
The analogues still have not been tested on
humans, but tests on animals made at a U.S.
research centre have shown the effects of
the drugs to be similar to the alkaloids.
Kutney told the Ubyssey the analogues
will be ready for use on humans in about a
year and the drugs will be taken by injection, he said.
Kutney said the analogues he and eight
associates have synthesized would be much
cheaper and easier to produce than the
alkaloids.
"We have been working in this area since
1964 and we are finally in the position to
conclude the whole picture," he said.
Kutney said the analogues can also be
studied structurally to ascertain which part
of their structures fights tumors and which
produces side effects.
"We are trying to reduce side effects and
maintain the effectiveness of the drug at the
same time.
But Kutney said he needs several hundred
thousand dollars more to complete his work,
adding he hopes to produce vinchristine and
vinblastine synthetically.
He said the project so far has received
$400,000 from the U.S. National Cancer
Institute and was supported in the 1960's by
the Canadian National Research Council,
the Medical Research Council of Canada
and the National Cancer Institute of
Canada.
Kutney said the analogues must be
cleared by government agencies before
tests with humans can begin.
' 'We can and are preparing a whole family
of analogues using the data from comparisons between the natural drug and the
analogues."
Kutney said one problem is the toxicity in
the alkaloid drugs and their analogues. But
he said he hopes that by modifying the
analogues he will discover the toxic part of
the molecular structure and remove it.
He said he also hopes this process will
result in the discovery of analogues effective in combatting varied types of
tumors.
Kutney will explain his work at a news
conference Monday in saloon A of the UBC
faculty club.
CITR fate
in balance
By MARCUS GEE
There is a 50 percent chance the
Alma Mater Society will reject
UBC radio station CITR's budget
request and force the station to
close, AMS treasurer Dave
Theessen said Thursday.
It would cost the society $3,000
minimum to close down the station
if CITR's $7,215 budget request is
turned down when the AMS votes
on its budget in early October, he
said.
Theessen added: "There is
resistance in council to giving
money to anyone right now, so I
really can't say if CITR will get
any money."
He said the radio station
asked for forgiveness of a $563
AMS loan as well as the $7,215
budget. Both requests were made
at an AMS- budget committee
meeting Thursday.
CITR manager Richard Saxton
said Thursday the station must
receive the full amount requested
or become "uncompetitive."
"We cannot run a good radio
station on less than we have asked
for," he added.
The station had hoped to raise
$13,000 through Byron Lawes and
Associates (a firm which raised
money for the student-run station
last year) but recently ended its
dealings with the firm on the advice of AMS lawyers.
Saxton said CITR has had little
success in attracting advertising
money to the station.
He said the station has had no
ads on the air yet this year, but is
negotiating with a national firm
which solicits advertising for
campus radio stations.
Theessen said this year CITR is a
"frayed shoe string" operation
with a $1,090 debt to the AMS.
-"A large cut in any one of CITR's
budget areas makes it untenable to
run the station. It is unlikely they
will solicit their own ads — they
have no market for them," he
added.
Theessen said CITR is
negotiating for rights to transmit
into several lounges on campus
and plans to set up a transmitter in
Gage residence.
This expanded audience might
make the station more attractive
to advertisers, he said.
Saxton said installation of the
Gage transmitter would cost
$1,800.
The proposed budget also
requests $1,450 for office costs,
$1,025 for teletype and news wire
service, $1,050 for programming
See page 2: DECISION
m UBYSSEY
Vol. LV1I, No. 6 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
228-2301
SERENADING THE SCENERY, saxophonist Ross Barrey plays
tunes for passers-by and trees and shrubs near Sedgewick library
Wednesday. Barrey was part of a Janus le Blonde performance that
featured   dancers  and   other entertainment as well. They
welcome break from out-of-tune bell tower.
doug field photo
provided
Admin veeps sat on screening c'ttee
By RALPH MAURER
Two administration vice-
presidents" were, prior to their
appointments, members of a
committee set up to screen
potential UBC vice-presidents.
Chuck Connaghan, vice-
president of non-academic affairs,
and Michael Shaw, vice-president
of university development, were
members of a six-person committee appointed to assist administration president Doug
Kenny.
The committee, appointed by the
hoard of governors and senate, was
to help select a vice-president of
university development and vice-
president of faculty and student
services.
However, Shaw resigned from
the committee before he was
chosen to his current position.
The committee chose Erich Vogt
as the other vice-president. Chuck
Connaghan was named vice-
president for non-academic affairs
by the board July 8.
Neither Shaw nor Connaghan
would comment Thursday on their
appointments.
"I don't think it's appropriate for
me to discuss it," said Shaw. "I
think you had better talk to the
president on that one."
SHaw said that when he left the
committee "we hadn't got down to
brass tacks, to the short list (of
possible candidates)."
"I'm not trying to be evasive, but
I think you'd better talk to Doug
Kenny" said Connaghan. "My own
recollection is a bit.hazy."
Kenny was unavailable for
comment Thursday.
The board of governors in
February asked senate to appoint
three members to a seven-person
America versus Poon Lam
By RALPH MAURER
What does America have against Poon Lam?
Lam, a graduate student at UBC, had his U.S.
student visa revoked by U.S. border officials when he
inadvertently crossed the border.
Not only did border officials and the U.S. consulate
in Vancouver refuse to consider returning his visa,
but they neglected to tell him he was allowed to appeal the decision, Lam said Thursday.
On Sept. 9, after spending five days in Canada, Lam
attempted to re-enter the U.S., where he has lived for
three years on a student visa.
A U.S. customs agent told him some paperwork
would have to be done and asked Lam to park by the
customs building, pointing in its general direction.
Lam drove to the building the agent had pointed to
and parked. But, thinking he had made a mistake
because the building seemed too small, he started his
car again and drove' further down the road to another
building he thought was the right one.
The second building was empty, so he continued
along the one-way road, trying to return to the
customs building.
He said he couldn't find an exit and became lost.
A border patrol finally picked him outside Blaine,
driving at about 15 miles an hour and trying to find
the customs office.fl The border patrol confiscated
his car and escorted him to Canadian immigration
where he was released. It cost Lam $100 to reclaim
his car from the Americans.
See Page 2:   LAM
president's advisory committee on
vice-presidential appointments.
Board appointed three of its
members and Kenny was appointed chairman.
The three senate member appointees were commerce prof
Peter Lusztig, AMS secretary and
education student senator Ellen
Paul and Shaw. Board appointed
George Morfitt, Clive Lytle and
Connaghan.
During the months of March
through June the committee
placed advertisements for the two
positions in Canadian publications
and began sifting through the
applications — at least 30 for each
job, according to committee
members contacted.
All of the committee members
contacted said they could not
remember when Shaw resigned.
They also said they couldn't
remember how many applications
for that job had been reviewed at
the time.
The committee recommended in
June that the board appoint Shaw
and Vogt to the positions, and the
board did so at its June 20 meeting.
At the July 8 meeting the board
accepted Connaghan's resignation
from the board and immediately
ratified Kenny's recommendation
that he be appointed fourth vice-
president. rage ~jl
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19, 1975
ROSENBURG . . . visual display
—matt king photo
Women's art expands
By PATTI-REAY STAHL
The attitude that all art produced
by women is much less powerful
than a man's is a misconception, at
least to artists before 1900, a UBC
instructor says.
Avis Kosenburg of UBC's fine
arts department said Thursday
women who were able to overcome
restrictions in education and
training, followed the styles of the
men who taught them.
In the past, she said, "women
painters were artists first and
women second. They did not try
to create drastic new styles but
continued along the same lines as
men of the times."
But as the 20th century approached, art appeared with
qualities that could not have been
done by men, Rosenburg said.
Rosenburg gave examples of
three women who succeeded as
artists despite the restrictions.
The first was Sophonisba
Anguissola, a 16th century artist.
Anguissola painted in Italy until
the king of Spain called on her to
paint for the court.
Ethnic?
Sorry, ethnics.
If you managed to plow through
our Thursday editorial on Doug
Kenny's installation speech and
were still awake by the last
paragraph, you might have noticed
us lambaste the administration for
not introducing enough ethnics into
the university.
But that "ethnics" should have
read "ethical." A freudian slip.
Heh heh.
Artemisia Gentileschi, a bit of a
17th century feminist, was raped
by an art instructor and took him to
court.
The third, Elizabeth Vigee-
LeBrun, was court artist for Marie
Antoinette and painted about 30
portraits of her in 10 years.
Rosenburg's lecture was the first
in a series of slide presentations by
the fine arts department.
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Lam plans appeal
From page 1
On Sept. 10 he went to the
American consulate in Vancouver
and was told he would have to get
his problem "clarified" with the
border officials before he could be
granted his student visa.
Lam said when he returned to
the Blaine crossing border officials
'Decision all
or nothing'
From page 1
and buying records, $200 for
production and tapes and $2,000 for
equipment maintenance.
According to Theessen CITR
only brings in $800 in yearly
revenues —r $600 from radio society
memberships and $200 by renting
out the station's sound car.
Theessen said the budget request
will go before AMS council Wednesday, and then return to the
budget committee to receive
second reading.
The final budget decision will be
made in early October.
"This will be an all or nothing
decision — either council grants
them all the money they ask for or
there is no point and they will give
them nothing," Theessen said.
listened to his, story and were
sympathetic but said there was
little they could do for him.
Lam said none of the officials he
talked to at the border told him
there was a procedure for appealing their decisions.
When he returned Sept. 11 to the
American Consulate here, the
official he spoke to became abusive
and, calling him a "bastard," told
him to "get out of here," Lam said.
Lam said he told Alma Mater
Society ombudsperson Dave
Johnson about his difficulties, and,
AMS president Jake van der Kamp
and Johnson went to the American
consulate.
But the official refused to speak
to Lam and van der Kamp, and
would only tell Johnson that Lam's
application for a student visa was
being refused because the consulate official thought Lam's
family ties were not strong enough,
Johnson said Thursday.
"It's an absurd stance, really,"
said Johnson. "He's the same
person he was ten days ago, when
he had his student visa."
Lam said he does not plan to
return to the U.S. to study, but
wants the visa so he can visit
friends. He plans to appeal.
Panhellenic Association
Welcomes You To "Rush Week"
Sept. 21-30
I
Come Meet The WOMEN'S Half
of Fraternities at U.B.C.
Further information phone: -
Genine McCurdy - 266-2629
Rush Chairman
Lynne Pollock - 261-3452
Panhellenic President
international
women's
year
atubc
"We (women) are confronted virtually with the problem of reinventing the world
of knowledge, of thought, of symbols and images."   Dr. Dorothy E. Smith
OPENING OF FALL PROGRAM
t
Dr. Dorothy E. Smith
distinguished sociologist at the University of British
Columbia, presents a thought-provoking new paper
which delineates the body of opinion controlled by men.
within which woman struggles for independence and
identity. Dr. Douglas Kenny. President of the University
of B.C., will introduce Dr. Smith.
AN ANALYSIS OF IDEOLOGICAL
STRUCTURES AND HOW WOMEN
ARE EXCLUDED
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 at 7:30 p.m.
WOODWARD INSTRUCTIONAL
RESOURCES CENTRE
LECTURE HALL 2
.© © o © © ©
AND THEN
in October and november twenty-six individual
events for women
lectures * panel discussions * workshops * international
speakers AND a month-long exhibition of women's art
interlaced with poetry readings * films * theatre AND
an eight-day sports festival when you can participate in
fitness evaluations, clinics for swimming, skating,
gymnastics, games, yoga, karate and MORE AND MORE!
A brochure giving full details will be available after
September 20. Call Information Services at 228-3131
for a copy. All events, admission free. Shrink pushes for prison reform
By LEN MacKAVE
"The first step in prison reform
is removal of the cruel, old-
fashioned efforts and methods
aractised in today's prisons,"
psychiatrist Dr. Karl Menninger
said Thursday.
"Stupid, awkward, cruel, outdated, cumbersome ... I can think
of a long list of such adjectives to
describe the whole penal system,"
Menninger told a press conference.
»As co-founder of the Menninger
Clinic in Topeka, Kan., he has
influenced generations of
psychiatrists. One of Menninger's
more recent campaigns is prison
reform.
"I've spoken with the men who
put people into these prisons," he
s'aid. "Their attitude seems to
suggest I'm going to hurt you back,
prisoner, so that you can't and
won't hurt anyone else."
Menninger compared modern
prisons to mediaeval institutions
for the mentally ill.
„ "It's boring! A man sentenced to
life imprisonment will just sit there
for the duration of his natural life
and it basically comes down to
sheer, utter boredom," Menninger
said.
Menninger, psychiatrist, author,
and leader of crusades for improved treatment of the mentally
ill, the underprivileged, prison
reform and environmental improvement, has been for 60 years
an outspoken critic of many institutions,   including   psychiatry.
"A psychiatrist is not a disguised
policeman," he said. "People use
psychiatrists to get rid of other
people who annoy them. If
someone has a problem and is
bothering someone else, it follows:
"What's wrong with him?
"I don't know. Send him to a
psychiatrist.
"This is the kind of judgement
and poor reasoning people should
avoid."
Menninger explained that a
psychiatrist is "wistfully attempting to help the weaker
members who are in trouble, insecure, or just need someone" in
today's society.
Asked if he thought there was
hope for these people, Menninger
said: "There's too much. Life itself
has too much hope. We can hope to
God, hope to heaven — all these
people need is a little lift.
"As I've always said, if you can't
help it, don't. There's no use in
hope — prevent it."
Another reporter asked if
Menninger thought all presidents
and prime ministers should be
examined by a team of
psychiatrists prior to being sworn
into office.
"Well, that would be an awfully
rapid way of cutting down the
supply," Menninger answered.
Responding to a question on
addiction and psychiatric care for
the addicted, Menninger said
"addiction is anything that should
be gotten over."
Indians needed
to teach natives
By HEATHER WALKER
Students enrolled in the B.C.
Native Indian Teacher Training
Program were told Thursday they
have a commitment to put more
'AMS budget
unaffected
by losses'
A drop in convention attendance
at UBC during the summer affected Alma Mater Society
revenues, but treasurer Dave
Theessen said Thursday the loss
won't affect the society's operating
budget.
Theessen said income in June,
July and August was low because
of convention cancellations and
fewer bookings. Convention
delegates use SUB rooms to hold
meetings and organizers pay for
the space.
He said the AMS can operate on
last year's net income of $37,000 —
of which $17,000 went to the SUB
building fund from rentals,
bookings and conferences.
About $16,000 is expected from
SUB rentals this year, he said.
Theessen said the AMS "won't
know until May whether or not we
will lose money for this year"
because UBC's fiscal year runs
from June 1 to May 31 and the
convention season goes from May
through August.
The AMS is using profits from
the Pit, which would normally go
into the building fund, as operating
funds, he added.
AMS general manager Bern
Grady said the AMS operating
budget is indirectly affected by a
drop in convention revenue
because "if summer convention
income is down, there is less
money to go into the building
fund."
He added that the United Nations
sponsored Habitat 76 conference on,
human settlements to be held
partially at UBC next May will
likely bring in enough income to
avoid an operating deficit for the
year.
"Coffee, drugs such as morphine
— these are a sacrifice to the body.
The addiction can sometimes be
both physical and psychological,
although the latter is usually the
case," he added.
Asked to state his opinions on
shock treatment and frontal
lobotomy, Menninger said he is
"uncertain."
Menninger was also asked if he
felt justice is served when people
are sentenced lo life imprisonment.
"Justice should serve us," he
responded.
The 82-year-old Menninger has
written books on a variety of
topics, including Whatever
Became of Sin?, his most recent
book and current best-seller.
Indians into schools to teach native
children.
Bert McKay, president of the
B.C. Native Indian Teacher's
Association, made the remark to a
meeting at UBC of the 105 students
enrolled in the program which is
beginning its second year.
Speaking at a Cecil Green Park
luncheon, McKay said the program
is not "watered down, but is more
extensive and demanding than the
regular program" taken by UBC
education students.
The four-year program is
divided in half — the first two
years being spent by the native
Indian students learning UBC
education courses in different
centres of the province.
The centres are in North Vancouver, Terrace, Kamloops,
Prince George and Kelowna.
During this first period they are
also sent to schools in these areas
where they practise teaching with
a sponsor teacher.
In the final two years, the
student studies at UBC taking
programs similar to the regular
university   teaching   curriculum.
One first-year student, Thelma
Thevarge, said she thinks the
program will be a success.
"Putting the program in centres
has made it the success it is,"
Thevarge said. "It breaks people
in gradually. Most people in the
program come from remote areas
and have never been to a city."
"If they had to come to UBC
right away, I don't think half as
many would have come."
Thevarge comes from Darcy, an
Indian community 30 miles northeast of Pemberton.
"It's not bad for me though," she
said. "I was here in school for four
years."
Program co-ordinator Art More
told the students the idea for the
program came from the centre
council of the native Indian
teachers' association six years
ago.
Jacqueline Leo, the new director
of the Indian education program
was introduced. She took over the
job two weeks ago replacing
George Wilson who died last year.
•WHyjl*
GRINNING HIS DISTINCTIVE GRIN, Alma Mater Society president Jake van der Kamp, right, er, left,
seems to be enjoying cramped living quarters assigned him and two unidentified assholes Wednesday by
usual gang of maroonic gears. Ubyssey photog Doug Field, however, paid price for taking picture — he
later ended up in library pond with van der Kamp.
Campus news briefs
A public campaign will begin
next week to raise money for new
trees to replace the 19 trees being
removed to make room for the
covered pool.
Pool grove cpmmittee organizer
Jake van der Kamp said Thursday
38 new trees will be planted between the War Memorial Gym and
the parking lot to the west, at a cost
of $10-12,000.
"Response has been good
already," van der Kamp said
Thursday.
He said Alma Mater Society
council has voted to donate $300 to
the fund and the engineering undergraduate society has pledged
$100.
The 19 Lombardy poplars on the
pool site are due to be cut down in
late October, van der Kamp said.
They cannot be moved because of
their size and their spread-out root
system, he added.
No date has been set for planting
of the new trees.
UBC students have reacted with
enthusiasm to the opportunity to
guzzle beer during the afternoon,
food services director Robert
Bailey said Wednesday.
Bailey said the 60 cent-a-bottle
beer in the Ponderosa cafeteria is
selling well during the hours of
operation — 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
And the number of customers is
increasing as more people find out
about the sales, Bailey said.
Bailey said he hopes that the
serving time will be increased to_.
accommodate more imbibers. And
a poll of patrons conducted by food
services has met with favorable
reaction, he said.
Tenders for the proposed library
processing centre won't be accepted until at least next May with
the building scheduled for completion between one and 1-1/2
years.
The centre will be located at the
north end of the H parking lot, west
of Woodward, not near SUB or in
Brock Hall as originally considered.
This site leaves the space at the
centre of the campus clear of
additional buildings. The board of
governors picked H lot as the best
of eight locations studied. AMS reform
Another attempt is being made to restructure the
Alma Mater Society and this time someone has done the
homework.
This year's AMS executive, as promised in its
election campaign, has drafted a new constitution for the
society which will radically change its composition and
bring it into modern times.
In case you don't know (or don't care) the AMS is
your student society at UBC — funded by the student
body. The society gets that $34 marked on your fee
statement.
Light years ago the AMS was important and relevant.
It constituted the only voice students had in the university.
It represented the students.
But more recently, council and the students have gone
in different directions. Elected by several thousand students
at best, the council does its own business virtually
independent of input from the student body.
That's not to say the avenues aren't open. Council
meetings are public, numerous committee places must be
filled and student politicians are approachable.
No, there is little doubt that the AMS in its current
form has become irrelevant. People don't care about it.
In the last few years students have been granted
representation throughout the university at many levels.
Department and faculty committees are open to
students as is the board of governors. Here is where real
power and meaning lies and the proposed constitution
recognizes this.
The new constitution would abolish the concept of an
AMS executive and replace it with two bodies — a civil
service type commission to administer the day-to-day affairs
of the society and a political body with representatives
from all over the campus.
The political body would be composed of student
board and senate members plus representatives from
undergraduate societies, residences housing committees and
the women's office.
This body would represent the campus and its
organization would facilitate badly needed communication
amongst student politicians around the university.
One feature of the proposed constitution is to debunk
the AMS bureaucracy and make it easier to get your own
money back to you via clubs and social programs.
While dismantling the AMS, the constitution would
allow for larger undergraduate societies to become branch
societies of the AMS with full control over their budgets.
Instead of one big AMS, there'll be lots of little ones with,
presumably, fewer rules and less delay.
Here's one aspect most students can relate to if
they've ever tried to get anything from the current AMS
system.
If you've read this far you must have an interest in
the whole thing so now's the time for the pitch.
Today at noon the AMS restructuring committee will
be holding an open meeting to discuss and explain the
proposal.
The only way any constitution will be meaningful is if
people understand what it's intentions are. So take an
interest in it. Talk about it.
Without a radical shake-up, the AMS will never be
anything more than a self-perpetuating bureaucracy full of
circular arguments and irrelevant decisions.
THE WSStY
SEPTEMBER 19,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"Scoop, scoop," shouted chief police reporters Mark Buckshon and
Gary Coull, "we've finally got the inside dope on Patti-Reay Stahl
Hearst. The two tapdanced and sang in glee, as their heroes, constables
Doug Field, Matt King and Andrew Shearon dragged poor Patti off to a
grungy cell. When she arrived at the jail, chief medic Marcus Gee insisted
a copyrighted medical exam be given. With the help of nurses Boyd
McConnell, Eric Ivan Berg and Len MacKave, the tottering doctor
discovered the dread and dire news.
"I'm afraid to say the poor woman has leukemia," he whispered to
onlookers Ron Binns, Jean Randall, Aubrey Homes and Robt Diotte.
Gregg Thompson sighed. Doug Rushton farted. B. I_. Gibbard cried. Fred
McMahon chortled. Heather Walker giggled. And prosecuting attorney
Debbi McElmon moaned, "How am I ever going to get her into court
where I can really throw the ole book at her?" Sighing, she picked up a
copy of the Yearly Truth and glanced at the headline: Cure for leuk
found. She grabbed the nearest person, who happened to be Cedric
Tetzel, and yelled: "now I can get her." Meanwhile Patti-Reay's
accomplices Paul Weetman and Janice Inglis plotted to think of a way to
get her out of the mess.
P.S. Sorry, Lorna and Mark, but I've forgotten your last names.
Please come around again, soon, so all of us can learn them. And don't
forget the secret gathering Saturday.
FO* ' PSHUWAL REALMS"
f
Letters
Ubyssey
dumped on
As a creative writing graduate
student and an English 100 TA/GA,
I am appalled at your newspaper.
CITR radio sucks for bucks
Shit Mountain
Computer fucks up registration
The above titles show a lack of
intelligent use of the English
language. Rather than devising
effective captions, you relied on
overused and therefore
meaningless cliches.
Perhaps you should read George
Orwell's essay, "Politics and the
English Language." It is required
reading for many English 100
students. You may think it is 'cute'
to put such words in print. It is.
It is also childish.
If the newspaper continues to
mutilate the English language over
the next few months, I am not
hesitant (sic) at all to challenge
your funds.
There is no reason why such
writing should be funded while the
University is under criticism for its
English 100 failure rate.
A. Delaney Walker
English 100 TA/GA
Thank you for your letter.
Might it be possible to point out
an apparent error in the syntax of
your penultimate paragraph.
The Ubyssey consulted the
English department about your
problem and was advised that at
best   it   is   awkward,   unclear
phrasing, while at worst it is a
flagrant violation of English
language principles.
If you continue to abuse the
English language over the next few
months, we will not hesitate to
challenge your salary as an
English 100 TA. — Staff
P.S. You apparently missed our
headline "Electronic dick blows
job." [Ubyssey, Sept. 11]
Tickets
I would like to draw attention to
the way in which the Frederic
Wood Theatre has sold tickets to
this season of plays.
During clubs day, ticket
vouchers were on sale in SUB.
These numbered vouchers were to
be exchanged for seasons tickets at
the theatre general office.
This exchange, the voucher
counselled, should be done as soon
as possible. The voucher neglected
to add that tickets which were not
picked up immediately would be
sold again without notification to
the original purchaser.
I attempted to exchange my
voucher on the Tuesday after clubs
day only to find that the entire set
of tickets which I thought that I had
purchased had already been sold to
someone else.
The fact that the vouchers were
numbered and addressed .(with
telephone number) should have
enabled the theatre to keep account of their sales and to retain
sufficient seats for the vouchers as
yet uncollected.
The least that could be done, out
of common courtesy, would have
been to notify the purchaser that he
had had his seats taken away.
Art Hamilton
Insult
With regard to the "little
physical error" made by someone
at Gage Towers recently, I have a
brief comment.
On page 12 of the current UBC
calendar is a paragraph which
reads:
"The University authorities do
not assume responsibilities which
naturally rest with adults. This
being so, it is the policy of the
University to rely on the good
sense and on the home training of
students for the preservation of
good moral standards and for
appropriate modes of behaviour
and dress.
This sudden reversal of policy,
i.e., "that men and women are not
allowed to co-habit", by Michael
Davis of the housing administration is an invasion of
privacy and an insult to UBC
students and to their families.
L. H. Thirza Irvine
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241 K. SOCIDDOX
What happened to 5° coffee
From Canadian University Press
What ever happened to the nickle
cup of coffee?
Well, for years coffee was just
one of the commodities which were
■ ripped off from underdeveloped
countries which were paid low
prices by profit-seeking corporations.
International trade in coffee
s, worth $2.3 billion (1968) is
generated by 42 coffee-growing
countries. All of them are underdeveloped and many rely on
coffee sales as their major source
of foreign currency earnings.
Across the world 20 million people
are employed in nurturing the
•- coffee crop and many more are
dependent on it.
Now the coffee producing and
exporting nations are attempting
to form an organization similar to
the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries (OPEC).
The U.S., promoting the interests
* of the giant coffee corporations
(U.S. buys 40% of the world coffee
- production) has done a great deal
to try and sabotage any tendency
on the part of the coffee producing
nations to form what Kissinger
describes as another "cartel"
, which   will   "gang   up   on   the
developed world."
Now     the     underdeveloped
countries are trying to redress the
imbalances  in  world  trade,   in-
.   comes  and  standards  of   living
brought about by capitalism and
imperialism.
'    Coffee is the lifeblood in foreign
exchange   earnings   for   many
countries. Columbia, for example,
relies on coffee for nearly 68 per
cent of all its exports and five of the
other leading Latin American
producers obtain more than 30 per
cent of their overseas  earnings
from coffee sales.
*>   In Africa, half of Angola's export
trade is accounted for by coffee,
while in Uganda the percentage is
around 44 per cent and in the Ivory
Coast over 30 per cent.
That the countries of Africa and
Latin America are so dependent on
the export of one commodity for
their foreign exchange is a direct
result of imperialism.
Much of the most fertile land in
the underdeveloped world has been
taken to be used for the growing of
export crops such as coffee, sugar,
tea, tobacco and bananas.
Throughout the centuries great
areas of land have been made
infertile by careless growing of
these crops.
Huge plantations owned by a
small local land-owning class or
directly in partnership with foreign
food firms have "locked-in" the
fertile, lands for the growing of
cash crops for the developed world.
The most abhorent aspect of the
plantation economy is that it
restricts severely the amount of
arable land available for the
growing of food for the millions of
peasants, the very ones who,
working on the plantations, face
continuous hunger, malnutrition
and often starvation.
From 1962 to 1972, trade in coffee
was controlled by the International
Coffee Agreement (ICA). Its
purpose was to prevent massive
over-production. To this end it
fixed export quotas for each of the
producing countries.
These were reviewed and
amended annually by producing
and consuming countries together.
In principle their effect was to
stabilize the prices of all grades of
coffee.
This agreement was unfair to the
producing nations, as the consuming nations had just as much or
more to say about the price of
coffee and the amounts to be sold
every year. As a delegate from the
Ivory Coast put it in 1970, "No one
seems to put limits on what we
have to pay for manufactured
goods from industrialized countries."
The U.S. led the way for the
consuming nations in the
development of this agreement and
did everything they could to try
and increase the quotas from the
producing nations and thereby
reduce the price per bag that the
corporations had to pay.
But what we as consumers had to
pay was something else. The
highest the market would bear was
and still is the principle here.
In  1972, the ICA  broke  down
primarily because the producing
nations felt it was no longer in their
interest to maintain such an
agreement. The fact that OPEC
was started that year gave impetus
to forming an independent
producers group.
In January of this year coffee
producing countries of Latin
America met in Mexico City and
launched an organization whose
first task was to withhold 30 per
cent of the crop, about 18 million
bags, in an effort to raise the price.
Backed by an $80 million pledge
from Venezuela, the organization
was hailed as the most progressive
and important step that had ever
been taken by coffee, producing
nations.
In the consuming nations as
might well be expected, the
processing, sale and profits of
coffee are all controlled by large
corporations. An exchange in New
York deals in coffee futures.
Brokers buy and sell coffee from
anywhere between a month and a
year ahead making what are called
"green coffee contracts." The
future market in all commodities
does not add any real value to a
commodity, but only provides a
way of making more money for the
wealthy by speculating on the
value of commodities in the future.
We now pay jacked up prices for
coffee that the corporations bought
cheaply in the past year. For them,
new   prices   provide   windfall
profits.
General Foods is the largest
controlling over 38 per cent of the
coffee sold. (This is the same
General Foods that is paying their
White Spot employees in Vancouver peanuts.)
Its brands include Maxwell
House, Sanka, Maxim, and Yuban.
The second largest producer on the
continent is Standard Brands
which sells Chase and Sanborn.
These two companies, along with a
few others, dominate the coffee
market and set the price the
consumer will pay for a pound of
coffee.
Sarge casts a critical eye on society.
Why are you drawn to the vocation of
protecting people?
I don't really know. Probably because I've
been in it so long now it's rather foolish to get
out. It's very difficult being a policeman
today. There is a decline in respect for the
police throughout the whole community.
It starts at home. There is no respect for
parents, or very little. The church, your
community, the police, it's all a growing
thing. It's all part and parcel. There is less
respect for teachers by students. It's not only
us.
You look out into the society that you have
to work and you find that it is disrespectful in
many ways. Your job is more difficult
because you have to enforce laws in a climate
of disrespect for many kinds of authority.
How do you account for all this?
I can't answer that.
Students would want to learn from your
thinking and your findings. What have you
learned from having to be practically involved in protecting people? Why is society in
such a state, in your own personal view, that
police have to put their lives on the line, and
buy all sorts of protection. . . .
We don't get all sorts of protection. . . .
Some police feel that it is necessary to
purchase heavy stopping power dum dum
bullets just to keep themselves alive long
enough to spend their pensions. It must be
very trying to protect people.
It is.
George & Berny's
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We on campus would like to join with you as
you wonder why respect is breaking down in
the place where we all have to live. How may
we benefit from your expertise?
O.K. If you want to learn, we will appear,
we will go to any place. I mean if students
want to learn, if they want to know our gut
reactions to some of these questions, ask us.
This is what we are trying to do now; but
there are certain difficulties about going on
record.
If you want to know something you could
give us the courtesy of a letter. We could then
review the questions. When you ask me a
question off the top of my head, which
couldn't be answered in two or three days or a
week or probably never answered, it's very
hard to put it down in a few words.
Students are familiar with this challenge.
That is precisely what teachers expect
students to do all day. When the student says
he wants to learn from the police, he doesn't
necessarily expect THE definitive statement.
We know from our studies that there are no
clear-cut answers. ©
Our own president Doug Kenny, a
psychologist, talks about a concept called
"tolerance for ambiguity": the things from
which one receives one's information, and
upon which one has to ground one's thinking,
are themselves ambiguous in nature.
We have completed our questions. Were
there any public relations statements that you
wanted to make about your concern for
students?
One individual problem that we have with
students generally, and some faculty
possibly, is in regards to the bookstore. We
had a tremendous number of shopliftings.
These were people who, for momentary
lapses of attention, were stealing things.
Refusing to pay for them. And we were sort
of running a mill here: of putting students
through the court and they were receiving a
criminal record as a result of this, which will
have a tremendous adverse effect on them
and their later careers; and mainly it was
through stupidity that they were doing this.
A lot of them had the money. They just
picked up articles and, out they came. So we
took the position: well, this is rather nonsensical, why should we have students get
criminal records?
Let us do something to prevent this. We
were looking at possibly 20 people a month
that were being charged with shoflifting.
So, in conjunction with the manager over
there, Mr. (BoM Smith, we drew up two large
signs (one coming in and one going out) that
are presently in the bookstore. I think the
wording is, "Notice: SHOPLIFTING WILL
GET YOU A CRIMINAL RECORD" and, for
the simple preventive measure of that, we
went from 20 down to two.
This was directly related to two things.
One: prevention of crime. Two: an interest in
the students and their eventual careers and
what effect a criminal record would have on
them.
We aren't just out to catch crooks. We're
out to prevent crime. An awful lot of people
don't have criminal records because of that
one instance that has been taken.
JUST A BUNCH A GOOD OLE BOYS.
* *     *
Don't just sit there
pulling your plow, boys
get down! Go see
the cement city cowboys.
Mark your drawers
grab some spirit
* *     *
It came to our attention that we used a word
in our last column about which there could be
confusion. The term/cliche was REDNECK.
We see a redneck as one who works in the
sun, one who is impatient with such trifles as
philosophy, when he can just barely dig the
earth he stands upon. In the rain he (the
Redneck) demonstrates his irritation with
what he takes to be foolishness by causing his
neck to blush in subcutaneal rage.
F.O'.
—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-
SPECIAL EXTRA PERFORMANCE
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
MONDAY, September 22
TUESDAY, September 23
WEDNESDAY, September 24
8:00 p.m.
MUST END WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
Student Ticket Prices: $2.00
BOX OFFICE   *   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   •   ROOM 207
Bocowwti'nnc   0QR.0A7R After qnfi-Scienfofogy book suppressed
Librarians to fight libel law
MONTREALiCUP) — The head
librarian of Concordia University
has received the support of the
Canadian Library Association in
his fight to change a law that
forced him to remove a book from
library shelves last year.
The book, George Malko's
Scientology: The Now Religion,
was highly critical of the Church of
Scientology and was removed from
the     shelves     of     Concordia
University as well as St. Mary's
University.
Under Canadian libel law, the
publisher of a book is anyone who
makes the book available to the
public, as a library does.
Faculty ignores meeting
A sparse UBC faculty
association gathering Wednesday
received a report recommending
establishment of a 35-member
collective bargaining committee to
negotiate salaries with the
university administration.
But only about 25 of 1,500
association members attended the
first general meeting of the 1975-6
academic year.
Installation
costs 'not
public info'
Wednesday's installation
ceremony for administration
president Doug Kenny must have
cost a bundle, but the man in
charge of the operation won't say
how much.
Director, of ceremonies Malcom
McGregor said Thursday: "It's not
public information and I shouldn't
discuss the matter."
He said the gala event was
necessary to ensure that Kenny
"got off on the right foot."
Asked whether the money could
have been spent on other, more
student oriented activities,
McGregor said he wasn't prepared
to debate the matter. "That is a
question of values," he said.
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$50
Joseph Smith, member of the
association's negotiating committee attempting to set an
agreement outside the B.C. Labor
Code, said the bargaining committee would have representatives
from every faculty, in proportion
to general membership in the
association.
The association voted in April to
establish a collective bargaining
system with the administration but
not form a union under the labor
code.
Smith said the framework
agreement, which annual salary
negotiations will be based on, is
expected to come before the
association membership in
November.
He said details about the committee's function and the nature of
the framework agreement have
not yet been formalized. "It's a
very nebulous thing," he said. "It's
too early for any of the concrete
issues' to be dealth with."
Economics prof Don Patterson,
one of the association members
who favored unionization, indicated he and most other
association members didn't attend
the meeting because they had lost
interest in its collective bargaining
activities.
The Church sued the Hamilton
Public Library and Etobicoke
Public Library to prevent them
from circulating the book. The
Church also threatened other
libraries with suit if the book was
not taken off the shelves while the
case was pending.
The Scientologists have since
dropped their suit against the two
libraries, and Malko's book is back
on Concordia's libraries' shelves.
But the situation has raised some
questions about the law in the
minds of librarians.
If a library Can be sued for libel,
Kanasy points out, a threat is
posed to intellectual freedom since
the library should be able to make
controversial material available to
scholars and social historians
without worry of suit until the
material is actually judged
libelous.
"What we want to change ... is
that libraries would not be considered as having published a book
for having it on the shelves and
circulating it," Kanasy says.
At its annual meeting this year;
the CLA passed a resolution
sponsored by Kanasy whicb
mandated the CLA to convene a
meeting of various professional
academic associations to decide
what course of action should be
taken in order change the law.
Kanasy expects the meeting tc
be held at the November conference of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada.
There are two possible courses of
action. The first is to submit a brief
to the Law Reform Commission of
Canada and to each of the
provinces. The second is to select
and contest an appropriate court
case.
"I think both should be done. I
think we should proceed with the
first and then go with the second,"
Kanasy says.
Meanwhile, in collaboration with
the CLA, the Intellectual Freedom
Committee is drawing up a manual
of what should be done if a similar
situation occurs.
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2803 W. Broadway ( corner of Broadway & McDonald)   736-7771.  dra madra madra madramadra madra madra madra madramadra madra madra madramadram
Brockington   bubbles    up
Imagine a social bunny rabbit
hopping across the stage after a
sexy "active verb" who is pursued
in turn by a passionate sky-pilot.
But the social clodhopper is
pounced upon and flattened out by
a luscious Polish amazon-come-
Misalliance
by George Bernard Shaw
Directed by John Brockington
Settings & Lighting by R. K.
Wilcox
Starring Matthew Walker, Camille
Michell, Lome Kennedy et al
Frederic Wood Theatre UBC
high-wire acrobat. With all this
sudsy insanity is it possible that
Monty Python's "Circus has invaded the venerable old Freddy
Wood Theatre of UBC? Just what
kind of madcap sit-com is this you
may well ask? For could the great
George Bernard Shaw really be
this silly?
Well fortunately, as the first
night's audience at his comic social
bubblebath Misalliance found out,
Bernard Shaw can certainly be this
silly. Throughout the performance
the audience seemed delighted
with the cute cut-and-thrust of the
comedy's witty repartee. It wasn't
Shaw's intention to spare any soap
bubbles in this engagingly silly
soap opera. For when he wrote the
roles for these actors Shaw ran
them all through the ringer of this
basic comic plot laundromat.
Hence his Misalliance is subtitled 'a debate in three sittings"
all of which quickly bubble into the
audience's thick lather of laughter.
The play had a definite detergent
effect upon its lively audience who
always applauded on cue. They
obviously enjoyed seeing the
superabundant vitality of the
show's characters giving risky life
to Shaw's well known wit.
Misalliance is as witty as any class
conscious comedy of the marrying
errors can seem to be. Yet since it
was written at the turn of the
century, it still manages to sparkle
with the zest of its original flavour.
Throughout this production Shaw's
famous epigrammatic wit did not
seem to have aged one bit.
And again what fascinating
characters they are. Almos't all the
roles are admirably carried off by
veteran director Dr. John
Brockington's livewire case of
students   and   Equity   Actors.
DEREK KEURVORST . . . plays the assassin while, unbeknownst
to him, Lally Cadeau sneaks up behind to, perhaps, thwart his
attempt.
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Bentley Summerhays- (Lome
Kennedy) appears as the
somewhat foppish social bunny
rabbit, the "little squirt of a thing"
who keeps hopping in and out of the
play. This aristocratic "Bunny"
Summerhays, as he is so
nicknamed, is always threatening
to turn this marriage-go-round
romp into a fruitcake comedy.
"Bunny" has big plans of hopping aboard the lovely Miss
Hypatia "Patsy" Tarleton (played
in a predatory manner by Camille
Mitchell), thusly marrying into the
"nouveau riche" money of
England's rising middle class
industrialists. "Bunny" is foiled
not only by Hypatis's brother
Johnny the underwear exec (Scott
Swanson) but by fate which
literally "drops in from the sky".
A "newfangled flying machine"
crash lands in Hypatia's father's
greenhouse and the magnificent
man rising from his crashing
machine is Joe, the aviator (Paul
Clements), her new beau. Also
disgorged in Shaw's surprising
nosedive in believability is the
plane's sensational passenger
from Poland. Lena, the acrobat's
(Lally Cadeau) last name proves
almost unpronouncable but her
magnetic effect on most of the men
is quite pronounced.
Standing out from this most
capable case is Matthew Walker's
romantically swashbuckling
portrayal of hot-pants Hypatia's
rich industrial daddy ("The
Tarleton of Tarleton's Underwear!"). Walker's winning
sideshow as the longjohn
millionaire who dreams of being a
great writer, yet lusts after his
shopgirls, is both energetically
animated and hilarious.
A would-be assassin and socialist
puppydog, played nervously
enough by Derek Keurvorst, only
adds more melodramatic soap
suds to an already well soaked
social opera. Yet of all the nonequity cast Keurvorst's performance of high-pitched hilarity
was well nigh perfect. Lord
Summerhays (Barney O'Sullivan)
the aristocratic poppa of the
irrepressable bunny rabbit has the
unenviable problem of learning
"How to endure Bentley till he's
fifty." This Lord's romantic tryst
with the sizzling daughter of
Tarleton the underpanty mogul,
seems to be his only foolishly
redeeming quirk. Mrs. Tarleton
(Marjorie Le Strange) rounds out
the cast of middle class and
aristocratic caricatures as the
befuddled shop gal elevated by
wedded alliance into the
bourgeoise.
A klutch of socialist and coun-
tercurrent matrimonial themes
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keeps this comic laundry of
brilliant caricatures and witty
dialogue well nigh bubbling over.
.Hypatia feels trapped in her
father's mansion built on a woolen
foundation of his underwear sweat
shops. She tells her opportunistic
sky-pilot that her dawning
feminism makes her feel "A
prisoner of unending talk — still
I've got a ghastly sort of love for
you!" She wants to break out of the
late Victorian social rut in which
she feels all too tightly corseted.
The passionate daughter want's
to be a joyous "active verb."
Having been wounded at birth by
being born a woman into a male
dominated social circus and
having suffered under the same
she now deliciously enough wants
"to do."
Life is a lark for the all too witty
"Bunny", the Little Lord Faun-
telroy of tand melodramatic
cartoon.."An overbred expensive
little dog" says Mrs. Tarleton as '
she sizes up her potential son-in-
law, and the collar fits the
character which the exuberant
Lome Kennedy whines around the
stage. Kennedy's tempting excesses manage to insult everyone
in the cast equally thereby making
the only upper class plea for social
democracy in the whole play's rich
bubblebath of ideas.
Walker's rather outstanding
understanding and rendition of the
sentimental Tarleton, a meditative
man with a soft spot near his
centre for all the ladies is quite
charming to watch. "There is
magic in the night when the heart
is ,young" he croons poetically to
the magnificent Polish acrobat
Lena during his awkwardly
uproarious attempt at seduction.
"It is our profession to be wonderful" the liberated lady proudly
boasts before putting poor
Tarleton's underwear through the
wringer in the gymnasium.
Richard Kent Wilcox's mansion
set is as per usual a lavish acting
arena replete with jigsawed
Victorianna. While one might tend
to deplore some of the excessive
unsubtleties of the student's acting
one can only applaud the heavily
subsidized and expensively concocted sets and staging of each
Freddy Wood Theatre season.
The sources of sudsy comedy in
this bubblebath are several and the
audience seemed to find them all
equally laudable. Shaw's famous
wit, the magic vitality of the cast,
the swordplay interchange of
brilliant social debate and the
intriquing matrimonial mismatches all make for fun theatre.
"Misalliance's" total entertainment package succeeds in
treating its audience to George
Bernard Shaw at his silliest. Still
Shaw's social debaters never let
the enjoyable matrimonial soap
opera sink down to the dishpan
hands level pf mere drawing room
comedy. Dr. Brockington's hardworking cast all manage to display
that same superabundant vitality
bounced around by the bunny
rabbit which seems to elevate the
bubblebath comedy to a fine high-
wire act of lively entertainment.
—guy palmer photos
.  . .Meanwhile, MATT WALKER
gets ready to change his pants. . .
An Arts and Humanities
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Page Friday, 2.
THE      UBYSSEY
Priday, September 19, 1975 CanlitCanlitCanlitCanlitCan UtCan litCan litCan UtCan UtCanlitCan litCan lit Can UtCanlitCanli
'Figures:9 fragmented booh
Page Friday prefaces this weekend's Writer's forum with a review of Audrey
Thomas' novel. Blown Figures. Along with Margaret Atwood, Sylvia Fraser,
Graeme Gibson and others, Audrey will talk about writers' problems.
By ROBERT DIOTTE
Novelist Audrey Thomas' latest
book, Blown Figures, is a very
difficult book to catch hold of.
Featuring a discontinuous
narrative line, fragmentary inserts that have only oblique
reference to the actual story and a
narrator who carries on random
dialogues with both the heroine,
Isobel, and a character the reader
never sees named Miss Miller, the
third in Thomas' "Isobel" novels is
a picture puzzle mosaic of diverse
images spliced into the book rather
than written in.
Blown Figures
by Audrey Thomas
Talonbooks 1974
547 pps. $5.95
The story is about Isobel's
journey-quest return to Ghana
where she had a miscarriage
earlier in her life. Africa, the dark
continent, the primitive dream-
nightmare world of the psyche, is
invoked as the central symbol for
the return. Isobel is looking for the
dead child she left behind in
Ghana. Isobel is also searching for
a spiritually deceased Isobel.
Thus, the book as a whole is a
"mind trip" which is vividly
recorded in the startling
associative roll of the images
through the grotesque on to an
ultimate horror.
Behind the journey is Isobel's
personal history. She has a
husband, a man she has never
really been able to find an
authentic intimacy with despite all
the children they bred together.
There are some scattered details of
an affair in London dating from an
earlier time in Isobel's life. That
affair ended badly for her with
Richard, her ideal, walking out on
her while Jack, Richard's friend
and also a lover of Isobel's, threw
her out. There is also a sketchy
outline of a grandfather, Harry
Goodenough, and a family. For
more detail on Isobel's early life,
though, the reader should see the
two first novels — Mrs. Blood and
Songs My Mother Taught me.
Finally there is the child Isobel lost
while Jason, her husband, was
teaching in Ghana.
From the outset Isobel emerges
as a woman on her way down.
Caught as she is descending into
the subconscious underworld of her
fears, she has not yet been able to
assemble that necessary
rationality which structures the
reality of an anemic social and
domestic life. For Isobel, the
quality of this life has been
aggravated by the miscarriage, by
the sense of rejection and by the
sense of failure she transports with
her. Her husband has said of her,
"Isobel doesn't live, she.exits" —
the pun on exit-exists calculated to
show the irony of Isobel's reluctance to give herself in any
emotional sense. Mind spaced by
her own egocentric ennui, she is
unable to act meaningfully within
the social conventions of her
marriage and her family.
But Thomas suggests that the
social structure, the system of
relationships that has assumed
Isobel as a part, is partly to blame
for the character's state.
Fastidious, conventional,
repetitious and civilized people are
fixed within given patterns,
behavioral ruts which disguise
frustrations, anxieties, fears, joys,
the whole spectrum of emotional
tones and moods. Jason, Isobel's
husband, shies away from the child
while it is in the womb. When they
live at his mother's house, they
sleep in separate beds in separate
Prince     George    letters
By ERIC IVAN BERG
Dorothy Livesay has written: ". . .the real poems
are being written in outports/on backwoods farm-
s. . .(by) men with snow in their mouths. . . ."
The grand old gal may actually be right. Case in
point: poet and teacher Barry McKinnon. McKinnon
originated from a prairie homestead in Alberta,
graduated from grad school here at UBC and now
teaches "destructive writing and communication" at
the regional college of New Caledonia in Prince
George. But most important of all is that the poet has
managed to transplant both himself and his verse to
the interior hinterland of B.C.
The Death of a Lyric Poet
Poems & Drafts
Barry McKinnon
Caledonia Writing Series
Prince George, 1975
Prince George — vicariously known as
"Greaserville," B.C. — is probably the roughest and
toughest city in the province, a big, brawling boom
town that hasn't stopped growing. The poet's latest
chapbook, rather sardonically entitled "The Death of
a Lyric Poet," does, in many well-crafted ways,
manage to reflect this very sensitive man's poetically
humanizing response to that pulp mill town and its
rather rugged and virile emotional geography.
McKinnon's often frostbitten toned "Poems &
Drafts" are dedicated fo several of his literary
friends, Ken Belford, Brian Fawcett, Paul Shut-
tleworth and Brett Enemark (the co-editor of the
famous poetry magazine "Iron II"). Interestingly
enough, all of these men are transplanted interior
poets, like the author himself, although none has his
resonant tang of "snow in their mouths."
McKinnon's little book is further unique in that it is
the only one I know of which actually incorporates
original rough drafts (as the subtitle insists) in a
wildly chicken scratched and xeroxed offprint on the
page opposite the poem's final draft. Hence, it is easy
and quite illuminating to follow the poet's written
changes and his sometimes violently "X"-ed out
deletions from original to resolution. These phrase
changes and additions betray a defiant tone, tinged
with a termometer's sensitivity, to the landscape the
words were welded together in.
His poesm such as "The North" (in which Ken
Belford insists that "the worse it gets, the better")
are sometimes blunt poetic instruments used to
survey his perspective.
Somebodies walked the woods
in the air, the lines appear, as a grid
cut thru trees
. . .what men have walked these woods?
His lines often betray a rather indubitable bit-
chiness about the vise-grip landscape in such poems
as "Bushed" (a la Earle Birney) and "Living Here."
For example, in the latter his laconic sense of
regional distance and its disparities bubbles up in
lines like, "the death of a lyric/poet is living here/at
the end of the line. . . ."
But the poet's essential warm sensitivity and gritty
humor in the face of it all cuts through the several
windchill factors of his transplanted poetic
geography.
In the touching poem, "Gestures," he talks about
his innocent baby daughter with an emotive impact
which tends dangerously toward the overly sympathetic:
Claire has 4 teeth/
& can stand
high enough to turn
the radio off
. . .what questions can I ask. . .?
Then in the pub (perhaps the Inn of the North, or
' 'The Barn" as it was known when I live in Prince) his
.poetry waxes wry and relaxed as he giggles:
Reality is a G-string, the rest is imagination or
imagine her ass spread to receive
every man in this beat out northern bar. . .?
It is a strict humor that tempers the frostbitten
toughness of language and the snow-depth of image
hidden in his outdoor pieces.
Poems like "Astoria" and "BAYDAY" have this
tough texture and ironic humor: "but people people
lived here there (Giscome)/ as c.b.c. radio goes on/
'we are capable of understanding/ the culture. . ./
etc." The point in puncutation being that they don't
understand.
For you have to live the landscape and with the
warmbodied folk who so damn defiantly go on living
there, way north of north. Several other poems reveal
his deeply thoughtful and enduring sympathy for
these folk who, like himself and family, are
pioneering up there. "Bingo/Dance" is one such
sympathetic reflection on the innocence available as
it wails on like the scratchy country & western tune
". . .there's a strom across the valley. . .BINGO" —
with a downer last-tango-in-P.G. melody. McKinnon's sparse but honest language can range wildly
from b^er parlor ribaldry to icicle tough — hanging
tough in a northern landscape already tough enough.
If Livesay is right about the hinterland quality of
"real" Canadian poetry then the sentient and rip-
sawn poetry of Barry McKinnon's little book is
perhaps the real McCoy — er, or McKinnon.
rooms. The other passengers on
the boat she takes to Africa are
invariably naive and insular in
their actions and their talk.
TimoYous and withdrawn or
pompous and overbearing, Isobel's
voyage is through a mindscape of
characters bereft of the essential
capacity to be free, to be spontaneously interesting and vital. It
is all summed up in the aloof figure
of Miss Miller whom the narrator
frequently addresses and
ultimately curses for her polite
indifference.
But, if Isobel is distanced from
the social hierarchy of conventions, is stuck outside those
proprieties and activities which
traditional mores have sanctioned
and forged into an acceptable
(albeit mundane) lifestyle, she still
does not emerge as any kind of
ideal. She is alone and vulnerable
despite the emotionless shell of her
womanhood. She finds her kind of
love in the disinterested youth of
the thin Dutch boy — whose only
goal is to marry a rich old woman
and promptly "fuck her" to death
so he can inherit her wealth.
Isobel's companion in Ghana is
Delilah, a woman who has aborted
four pregnancies and is in the early
stages of a fifth. Where Isobel is
cold and private, Delilah is an
emotional weakling. Perhaps there
is no more revealing scene in the
entire novel than the one between
Isobel and Delilah where Isobel
searches for the words with which
to focus Delilah's moral stature for
her own mind. The first speaker is
Isobel:
"You think it's liberated to go to
bars and pick up men to buy you
things? You think it's liberated to
use abortion as a kind of birth
control?"
Delilah stood up; the cards fell
onto the concrete floor of the
courtyard.
"That's what you really can't
stand isn't it? All this sacredness-
of-life crap people like' you
preach!"
Isobel sat at the table, running
her fingers over the painted top of
the table.
"I'm worried about what it does
to you, that's all."
But the lameness of Isobel's
excuse doesn't even convince
herself. As Delilah moves away
from her, hurt and in tears, Isobel
is left holding the weight of her
moral assessment:
She knew she should feel
something for this girl but the hard
cold centre of herself could only
look on, captive.
What if she said, "I'll take the
child, I'll pay for you to go
somewhere until it's born." She
tried to imagine Delilah carrying a
child — she was so much a construction of long thin bones and
tightly stretched skin. No room at
the inn —. Anyway, the girl had a
perfect right. And who was she to
talk, condemn or even criticize?
"Let he who is without sin cast the
first stone." It was ridiculous to go
on thinking about "Delilah's baby"
when the thing in there was much
more like a prawn or maybe only a
large hangnail. How many ants
have you stepped on in your day,
Isobel? How many flies swatted.
How many mosquitoes, allowed to
drink their fill, squashed with glee
against your bare forearm. How
many fish caught or chickens
eaten? How many babies in the
courtyard of the Hotel de Bull and
truly I blush for your stoney-
heartedness. Go to her, give her
your hand, Delilah weeping in front
of the advertisement for Star beer.
Isobel does go. But the confusion
in her thought, her incapacity to
distinguish any levels of life and
mark one with a greater dignity
than the other, to avoid the kind of
judgments that violate her own
humanity and the need to express
that humanity in the show of
concern for Delilah, these are all
the characteristics of Isobel's inept
rational structures. Like Yeats'
centre, they cannot hold, cannot
sustain themselves on any level
when challenged directly and not
theoretically.
That Isobel is ultimately driven
in an instinctive desperation to a
juju priest, a witch doctor, who can
exorcise the witch of her conscious
mind from its grasp of her spirit
(her "kra") is wholly satisfying in
those terms.
But there are problems with the
book. The voice of the narrator, at
times jesting with — at times
abruptly rude to — at times cursing Miss Miller, sets up a distance
between itself and Isobel
throughout the novel. This distance
is lost in the final pages and the
book suffers for this loss for it
collapses in the scene with the juju
priest. The voice has. become a
counterpoint to the narrative.
Without it, the novel is not only left
with a loose ending, but the function of the voice is never really
realized. What else can it be but an
ultimate moral? A transcendence
over the whole book? As a result
the book ends blindly despite the
brilliant scene of the witch exorcism.
There is also a problem with the
fragments inserted into the
narrative. Some of these have very
flimsy relationships to the story.
Some of these have no apparent
link to what is going on — for instance the Libra and Scorpio
horoscope projections. While
others are interesting, in general
they struck me as rather gimmicky.
Moreover, it also seems to me
that some of the details of Isobel's
life assume the reader's knowledge
of the earlier novels Mrs. Blood
and Songs My Mother Taught Me.
Though this is a minor quibble,
because the power of the
imagination at work, as seen in the
quality of imagery, is sufficient to
carry the .failings in the narrative.
And finally, the amount of paper
wasted (with as many as one
sentence per full page) struck me
as silly and pretentious. But this
may merely be a personal gripe.
It will be evident nevertheless, to
anyone who reads Blown Figures
that it is a book Thomas had to
write. While it is not my personal
favorite, a comparison of Blown
Figures to the earlier two novels
illustrates an incredible range of
writing virtuosity. It will certainly
be difficult for Thomas to
duplicate, let alone surpass, the
emotional intensity and psycical
energy of Blown Figures. But she
has distinguished herself as a
writer with the ability to constantly
surprise her readers thus far and
there is no reason to suppose that
there is no more to come.
Interestingly enough Audrey
Thomas will be one of six Canadian
novelists attending the Novelists'
Forum on campus which begins
this Saturday. She will also be
reading from her current work in
progress. Also attending the
Forum will be Margaret Atwood,
Sylvia Fraser, Graeme Gibson,
Harold Horwood and Robert
Kroetsch.
Friday, September 19, .1975
THE      U BYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 filmsrecitrdsfilmsrecordsfilmsrevii'rdsfilmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfilm
Erie Clapton comes again
"Derek" Clapton, of Layla and other fame, is making another stab — his new
cut features him as a singer. After dropping out ot sight, he kicked his
drugging and turned onto booze. His new release.
By B. L. GIBBARD
Slowhand is back. If there was
ever any doubt as to whether Eric
Clapton could still play the blues,
there isn't now. His latest album
"E.C. Was Here" has Clapton
playing-well enough to make you
forget even the golden days of the
Cream.
This new album is a significant
departure from his last two efforts.
Instead of recording songs in
several different styles, he has
stuck with the genre he does best;
blues. This album is a blues album
and a good one.
What's more Clapton now has his
best band since "Derek and the
Dominoes."    It   js   as   good   a
recording band as the Dominoes
and judging by their recent concert
may be an even better show band.
The other instrumentalists all
play very well. George Terry, the
second guitarist, complements
E.C.'s playing beautifully. Their
twin lead on "Have You Ever
Loved a Woman" is as nice a
guitar solo as I have heard for a
very long time. I would like to have
heard more from the organist,
Dick Sims, and Carl Radle the
bassist. The album however, still
works well as guitar-based blues.
Clapton has never been
renowned as a singer, often ap
pearing "mike-shy." Although he
is still not exactly Caruso, he is
singing with much greater confidence and authority than ever
before. The reasons for this newfound confidence are not clear.
Perhaps it's because he kicked his
junk habit. Perhaps it's because he
finally has the kind of band his
talent deserves.
Certainly the addition of Yvonne
Elliman on vocals helped. The
former J. C. Superstar star worked
well with Clapton in his Vancouver
concert and sings well with him on
the record, particularly on
"Presence Of The Lord."
Finally,   I   think   this   album
Dim    prophecy   in   filch
By AUBREY HOMES
and JEAN RANDALL
If you are a fan of Dave "The
Hammer" Schultz or Paul the
"Bejr" Rupert, then this film has
possibilities of appealing to you as
sheer violence is the only memory
of the film. The plot is not at all like
the previous productions that
Jewison has directed ("Jesus
Christ Superstar").
It is rather a jumble of scenes
attempting to explain a future
social system that has supposedly
achieved complete order.  There
are no more wars. Instead, war is
replaced by an Olympic style game
called Rollerball, a combination of
roller derby, hockey ,-motocros and
carnage. The masses love the
game.
Their superhero is Jonathan E.
(James Caan) who plays the game
with a vicious skill while managing
to stay alive and unharmed. The
inside conflict arises, when the
head of the corporate executives
Mr. Bartholomew (John
Houseman) becomes jealous of
Jonathan's popularity. He decides
that Jonathan should retire and
Jonathan disagrees. So to rid
themselves of Jonathan, the rules
of his own game are changed so
that it becomes a deadly
marathon. 0
Rollerball
Directed by Norman Jewison
Screenplay William Harrison
Starring    James    Caan,     John
Houseman
Stunt Production Max Kelven
Richmond Square Theatre
What follows is the major effort
in the film involving screenplay
and stuntwork. The screenplay
(William Harrison) fails under
scenes of architecture in Brasilia
and a modified roller derby rink.
All are easily recognized as the
future world in the sixties. The
stuntwork in the actual game is
done on a mass scale and is
gruesome to say the least. But in
the end it reminds one of an old
cowboy-Indian flic, where the bad
guys end up dropping neatly one by
one never to rise again. The
violence is of a soft-core type and
has none of the mastery of say
Peckinpah.
The acting is secondary in the
film. It stars Caan in a solo role,
different from his usual "partnerships" in that he does an unconvincing job of beating his way
into nothing. Houseman who plays
the executive world controller,
seems only to be putting in a
passive appearance, which was not
expected from his experience
derived during a long career in
film. Perhaps the best reactions of
humor and sympathy are provided
by Moose (John Bechman) who is
Jonathan's best buddy in the game.
The film ends as inconclusively
as it beings with Jonathan E. as the
hero and the winner in the game.
But there is no tying of loose ends,
leaving as many conclusions as
there were ideas in the film. One is
left with the impression that
maybe the future just won't work.
The Pit
goes
DISCO
SEPT. 20
8-1:00 A.M.
Advance Tickets.
Available
at
Information Desk
A.M.S. Business Office
Coop Book Store
or at Doer
••••
There are a limited number of
Vancouver syiviphoNy orcNestra
ma.n SERIES
ThE MASTERp'lECE SEASON"
subscriptions available for the 12-concert
series which begins the end of September.
Students are still entitled to discounts.
For concert information, call the Symphony
Office, 689-1411.
For tickets, call or go^o the Vancouver Ticket
Centre, 630 Hamilton Street, 683-3255.
kAzuyoshi AkiyAMA
REsidEINT CONdllCTOR ANd Mlisic diRECTOR
SIMON STREATfElld
ASSOCIATE CONduCTOR
VANCOUVER SyMphONy ORchESTRA
proves that Clapton was right in
deciding to use mainly American
musicians. Jimmy Page said he
thought they had influenced
Clapton into becoming too mellow.
At one time I might have agreed,
but this record loses none of its
power even though it's relaxed.
If you like Clapton, or if you like
blues, or if you just enjoy good
pickin' then buy the record, it's a
beaut.
SEE THE MOST RIDICULOUS CAST OF CHARACTERS
EVER ASSEMBLED. YOU'LL HOWL AT THE ANTICS OF:
"HARRY THE SEX MANIAC"
"DO IT AGAIN MATILDA"
"OMAR, WORLD'S GREATEST LOVER"
"THE SWANEE RIVER KID"
"USCHI BAZZOOM"
"SUSIE SUPER FAN"
"MORRIS, THE PUSHY PEDDLER"
"SCOTTY THE SHEEPHERDER"
... AND EIGHTY MORE CRAZIES WHO WILL KEEP YOU
IN STITCHES FROM BEGINNING TO END!
A  CRUDE SEX  COMEDY
R. McDonald, B.C. Director
Shows as 12:20, 2:00, 3:35, 5:10,
7:00, 8:30,  10:15
Sunday 2:00, 3:35, 5:10, 7:00,
8:30, 10:15
Coronet
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
"BLUE WATER, WHITE DEATH'
The hunt for the Great White Shark
Odeon
A COLUMBIA RE-RELEASE
General — Warning, Some killing of
881 GRANVILLE      Whales — R. McDonald, B.C. Director
682-7468        SHOWS AT 12:15, 2:10, 4:05, 6, 8, 10
Thi terrifying
motion picture
Vogoe
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685-5434
JAWS
ICHARD DREYFUSS
ROBERT SHAW
Mature—Some frightening and
gory scenes—R.McDonald, B.C. Dir
Shows at  12:15, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30
Sunday 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30
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224-3730*' Mature—Many real scenes of horror
4375 w. 10th       from Vietnam War   R. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
■Page Fridayr,4
THE   . V B YSS.EY
Priday, September.. 19,. ] 975 filmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfilmsrecordsfi^
Binns indicts A Itman movie
By RON BINNS
Nashville is a monotonous two and a half
hour extravaganza of second-rate music and
heavy-handed irony.
It deploys the shabby underside of the
Nashville music world as a microcosm of
the U.S.A.
The activities of a dozen or so characters
become the focus for director Robert Alt-
man's message that this is a land of shallow
emotions, insincerity, and gaping ironies.
This message is scarcely new, and though
the camera work is occasionally brilliant
this film reeks of deja vu.
Nashville
Directed by Robert Altman
Starring   Henry   Gibson,   Ronee   Blakely,
Karen Black
Showing at the Downtown
Altman's protagonists weave in and out of
the Nashville music scene in parallel with
the electioneering of a new political party,
and both elements come together in a
climactic concert punctuated by a random
act of violence which is somehow intended
as a commentary on American reality.
This kind of fictional evocation merely
seems redundant after the late savage
realities of American society, after the
assassinations, the wars, the CIA-sponsored
coups, and Watergate. Altman, it seems to.
me, is just climbing on the bandwagon with
his chic sense of irony and despair.
As a statement about America this movie
contains none of the daring or clairvoyance
that is evident in, say, the early political
journalism of Norman Mailer.
Altman uses a collage technique which
results in a kind of cinematic Ulysses. There
seem to be two motifs which stitch the action
together. One is photography ("We're
making history," Mr. Nashville himself
cries at the beginning of the movie), and
throughout we see hundreds of Americans
obsessively snapping away with their
cameras, capturing the surface gloss of
show business, but missing the corrupt,
rotting reality which lies just underneath
the skin.
Secondly, there are the food motifs. All
through the movie we see the characters
gobble, gobble, gobble at junk food. This is a
disposable trashy world, where human
beings are as easy to throw away as the
cardboard cups and plates.
But none of these devices is new, and the
mediocrity of the songs in this movie
together with the lack of depth of its
characterization, makes it as much a part of
the American disease as a commentary on
it. Altman holds the mirror up to America,
but he offers no real analysis, no profound
probings under the skin, no formulae for
action or change, just a polished, glittering
reflection. This is a hollow movie, a dazzling
shell, about as esthetically satisfying as
television soap opera.
Altman's use of a fictional political party to
make his second-hand point that politicians
are bland opportunists strikes me as a cop
out. Nashville is stich a safe movie its
ironies will offend no one. I have read
comparisons between Altman and Godard,
but this is just a joke. Directors like Godard,
Bunuel, Peckinpah, Jodorowski, actually
disturb the bourgeois sensibility, whereas
Altman merely titillates it.
Altman doesn't even come across as a
very accomplished director. You may
remember him as being guilty of the appalling cock-up of McCabe and Mrs. Miller,
and he was also responsible for the enormously boring California Split.
In Nashville Altman has an army of talent
at his disposal, and what good moments the
movie does possess owe everything to the
brilliance of stars like Karen Black (superb
as a bitchy, ambitious singer — and she also
gets to sing a couple of the best songs in the
movie), Geraldine Chapman, as. a
gruesomely-pseud interviewer from the
BBC, and Ronee Blakely as Ms. Sincerity,
trembling on the edge of a nervous breakdown.
One of Altman's chief failings as a
director is his lack of a sense of economy.
Geraldine Chapman's performance as the
obnoxious patronizing English female intellectual is brilliant — but it goes on far too
long, until in the end its edge dulls and it
becomes merely predictable and tedious.
The episode where she walks in the
graveyard of wrecked autos is a fine inversion of a cinematic cliche. But Altman
spoils it by using it a second time, having
her wander through a yard of parked buses
spouting a pseudo-poetic monologue, once
again unaware that there is a second person
present.
Nashville has a surface sparkle which at
first is very seductive. If you like country
and western music (God help you) and you
like your irony in the comfortable, easy-
fitting wide screen size, you may enjoy it.
The stereophonic effects are tasty.
But to my jaded mind you'd be better off
catching up on previous movies like The
Day of the Locust, The Getaway, The Last
Detail, or even Alice Doesn't Live Here
Anymore, which offer far more accomplished and insightful portraits of the
American reality. Better still, read Norman
Mailer's Cannibals and Christians, or The
Presidential Papers.
Nashville is a put-on. Is America really
the kind of place where beautiful dumb
waitresses come up to a man drinking his
coffee and sing, "I can't get enough"? Gee
whiz. I doubt it, somehow.
Toronto    turning    to    tinsol
By BOYD McCONNELL
The promo person for It Seemed
Like A Good Idea At The Time
answered my query about the
movie: "Well . . . it's a Canadian
film. Filmed in Toronto. . . . But,
really, it's good. . . ."
Now, as everyone knows, the
biggest hype any producer can
give a film is to say, "This is the
film Canada and Canadians have
been waiting for. . . .." For there
are no really "successful"
Canadian films, except for The
Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
— and that, being flawed both
technically and artistically, has
more of a reputation as the first
attempt at The Canadian Film
than anything else. Theoretically,
every film is going to be it, but
never is. So, was I supposed to get
all excited about seeing a Canadian
film?	
It Seemed Like A Good Idea At
The Time
Directed by John Trent
Written by John Trent and David
Main
At Lougheed Mall
Canada, welcome to Hollywood.
Or maybe it's the otner way
around. In any case It Seemed Like
A Good Idea At The Time proves
that a film made in Canada can be
humorous and entertaining.
Whether or not such a film can be
called "Canadian" is another
question.
But if you're not a . fanatic
nationalist, and don't get pissed off
about the lack of Canadian content
in things called "Canadian," then
you'll like this film.
It is billed as a comedy and
rightly so. Anthony Newley plays
Sweeny, an impoverished but
resourceful artist. Though he
spends his creativity on
illustrating mail-order catalogues,
Sweeny is quick to befuddle those
people in loftier and wealthier
positions than his own. After his ex-
wife marries a rich, unsophisticated building contractor,
who backs a mayoralty candidate
in order to get some kickbacks,
Sweeny kidnaps the politician and
his wife in an extortion attempt.
Although the plot may sound
intricate and exciting, that is not
the drive in the movie. It is the
comic and absurd situations which
carry the audience through the
flick; and at a madcap pace too.
There is Sweeny's mother-in-
law, Julia (Yvonne De Carlo), who,
worried that her beautiful house
will be razed to make way for a
modern office building, never
hesitates to shoot people coming
onto her property.
There is a party for the
mayoralty candidate, Sinclair
Burton (played by Trudeauish
looking   Lloyd   Bochner   with   a
moniker that brings to mind
Gordon Sinclair and Pierre Berton,
two heavies in the Canadian letters
scene. And that might be Trent and
Main giving a little slight to the
oligarchy of Canadian culture.)
Sweeny gets his sculpturing friend,
Moriarty (Isaac Hayes), to bring
all his blown, freaky friends to the
party. They have fun there at the
expense of Sinclair Burton and his
party workers: wiring his
microphone so water squirts in his
face when he goes to talk into it,
and the like. Also, Burton gets cast
in plaster. This happens after he's"
been held in a secluded cabin by a
trained bear. Moriarty, wanting to
incarcerate Burton, molds him in a
plaster cast so Sweeny can get the
ransom money for his, ex-wife's
release, even though she is in
cahoots with Sweeny.
These are just a few of the many
colorful and funny scenes in It
Seemed Like A Good Idea At The
Time. And, not only are the scenes
hilarious with the comic situations,
but the quick and witty dialogue
carries everything along as well.
JULIA (Yvonne De Carlo) is
surprised by Sweeny's (Anthony
Newley) rear guard action. He
just  wants  to  visit her, but she
shoots any intruders because of
her paranoia of building
developers who want to tear
down her old home .. .
The odd time I felt some of the
lines were very contrived,
developing a long time before you
heard them. But as it turned out
you couldn't help laughing
anyway. It's like a Peter Seller's
movie: you know what's going to
happen, but, because of the
character involved, you have to
laugh.
Technically, and this is usually
the difference between American
films and others, It Seemed, . .
was flawless. The cuts were gentle
and unobtrusive and the sound was
great (two things which marred
Duddy Kravtiz).
Together with the flawless
technical detail and the excellent
(primarily British and American
cast) acting, this "Canadian" film
has a good chance of becoming a
major hit, both here and south of
the border.
The movie was filmed for a
million bucks in Toronto, which
isn't very much these days
although the trend is moving
toward less costly budgets. The
only time in the film you'd know
you were in T.O. is when there is a
scene in the city's Garbage Truck
depot. So the setting of the city is
not critical to the film.
All the bullshit aside — its minor
script flaws; its almost too
breathless pace; and its definition
of "Canadian" — It Seemed Like A
Good Idea At The Time is a good
way to kill an hour and 40 minutes.
A Nation Unaware by H. Hardin     $6.95
Peoplemaking by V. Satir      $5.50
Foxfire No. 3 $5.50
919 Robson 684-4496       670 Seymour 685 3627
Paperbackcellar   681-8713        1050 W.Pender 688-7434
4560 W. 10th      224-7012       Arbutus Village Square   266-0525
JAZZ
NOW PLAYING
Jack Dejohette's
Directions
- IN THE BACKROOM
"Heart"
COMING ATTRACTIONS
SEPT. 22
HORACE SILVER QUINTET
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752THURLOW
RESERVATIONS
683-7306
r-Mda£ '■ SepeWfcer'-' l#,°f $75
ttfF     0 B'YS'S'EY
p*msmM$:5 *
* *
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Tomorrow and Sunday there will
be a seminar on Canadian
literature featuring Margaret
Atwood, Graeme Gibson, Harold
Horwood, Robert Kroetsch and
Audrey Thomas. They will discuss
their problems and others in
writing in Canada. To register
phone the Centre for Continuing
Education, 228-2181, local 219.
Cost: students $15, everyone else
$25.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is
sponsoring a series of eight free
evening lectures entitled Two
Decades. The series is being
conducted by artist/writer Jeff
Wall. He will discuss the main
tendencies in Art during the past 20
years. The series starts Sept. 24
and continues weekly until Nov. 12.
FANTASTIC
FANTASTIC
FANTASTIC
Mill
The Anna Wyman Dance
Theatre are inviting actors and
actresses to auditon. They ask that
prospects have some training in
contemporary dance, and a
classically oriented background
would be an asset. Auditions will
take place at 9:30 a.m. at the Anna
Wyman Dance Theatre studios, 656
- 15th Street, West Vancouver.
Applicants should, if possible,
forward resumes prior to
auditioning. For further information contact: Martin I.
Kagan, General Manager, The
Anna Wyman Dance Theatre, 656 -
15th Street, West Vancouver, B.C.,
V7T 2S7, or phone 926-8181.
The Actors' Workshop is
soliciting public support of their
proposal to take over the old #2
Firehall and convert it into a
workshop/theatre. They are going
to find out whether City Council
will turn the venerable building
into a parking lot for squad cars or
consider their proposal on Sept. 23.
For more information phone 681-
6636.
Try it
you'll like it
DELICATESSEN-RESTAURANT
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TAKE-OUTS - 738-2010
LICENSED PREMISES
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BS  2875  —  ATLANTIC   CROSSING  —   Rod
Stewart
SD 18140 — CUT THE CAKE — Average White
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SD 18130 — WELCOME TO MY NIGHTMARE
— Alice Cooper
CP 0151 — JUKE JOINT JUMP — Elvin Bishop
7ES 1004 — ON THE BORDER — Eagles
7ES   1036   —   TROOUBLE   IN   PARADISE   —
Souther, Hillman, Furay
7ES 1039 — ONE OF THESE NIGHTS — Eagles
SD 5068 — DESPERADO — Eagles
LD   3000   —   SILVER   MORNING   —   Kenny
Rankin
MC  66669  —  BRAIN  SALAD  SURGERY  —
Emerson, Lake & Palmer
MS 2206 — COLD  ON THE  SHOULDER  —
Gordon Lightfoot
BS 2822 — SABOTAGE — Black Sabbath
BS 2835 — STAMPEDE — James Taylor
SD 9040 — EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER
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ILPS 9250 — CISSY STRUT — The Meters
ILPS  9251   —  THIS   IS   REGGAE  MUSIC  —
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ILPS 9256 — BURNIN' — The Wailers
ILPS 9264 — BACK STREET CRAWLER — Paul
Kossoff
ILPS 9281 — NATTY DREAD — Bob Marley 8
The Wailers
ILPS 9286 — JESS RODEN
ILPS 9293 — GEORGIE FAME
ILPS 9294 — SNEAKIN' SALLY THROUGH THE
ALLEY — Robert Palmer
ILPS 9317 — SLOE DAZZLE — John Cale
ILPS 9313  —  RISING   FOR THE  MOON  —
Fairport Convention
ILPS 9180 — SHOOT OUT AT THE FANTASY
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MLPS 9202 — THE HARDER THEY COME -
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SKBO 3404 — THE BEATLES
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1967-70 — (2 Record Set)
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SMAS   11419   —   VENUS   &   MARS   —   Paul
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ST 1 1363 — I'M JESSI COLTER
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SWBO 101 — THR BEATLES DOUBLE WHITE —
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THIS WEEK
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LIMITED QUANTITIES! PRICES EFFECTIVE UNTIL THURS., SEPT. 25th
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556 Seymour St., 682-6144
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
UNTIL 9 P.M.
Page JZridayr.6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 19, T975 picturepaintingpicmrepaintingpictm
We end this issue of Page Friday on an
esthetic note. The paintings below and on
the left are exhibited in SUB gallery. The
pictures were taken  by  photog Andrew
Shearon. They are: left, A Man and a
Woman; lower left, A Child's First Step;
and below, an untitled work.
r
AMS SPECIAL EVENTS
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY,
OCT. 1st 8 p.m.
AT THE
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
l|^B W llltl     /Mill  Ji   Ji
& i« MOTHERS
Tickets Now available
at A.M.S. office in S.U.B.
$4.00 STUDENT
NON-STUDENTS $5.00
L
Friday, September 19, 1975
TH.E      UBYSSEY
PageSriday^T* Page  14
U  □   I   O O t   I
'!•
Hot flashes
Mental patients
and the law
A free course examining the
law as it relates to those
designated mentally disordered
will be held by the Vancouver
People's Law School.
Sid Filkow and Judith Lewis
will look at the rights and lack
of rights of the mentally
disordered under both criminal
and civil law as well topics such
as the Patient's Estate Act,
immigration and marriage and
divorce.
The course will be held Sept.
.-22, 23 and 24 at Kitsilano
Secondary School, 2550 West
Tenth from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. each evening. To register,
call 681-7532.
Socialist
' Nigel Harris, a member of the
British International Socialists,
will be in town Wednesday to
give two lectures.
Harris   is   an   expert   on   East
Indian   affairs,   and   has travelled
in China, India and Japan.
He will lecture on socialism in
China at noon at Simon Fraser
University and will lecture on
racism and the Indian worker in
B ritain at 8 p.m. at the
Fishermen's Hall, 138 East
Cordova.
Alt can speak
The Sierra Club will hold its
first free public lecture of the
season Tuesday.
Minister without portfolio Alf
Nunweiller will present a B.C.
government view of northwestern
development.
Upcoming lectures in the
club's program will also focus on
environmental and development
issues in B.C., particularly in the
northwest where the government
is considering locating industrial
development projects.
Tuesday's lecture will be at 8
p.m. at the Vancouver
Planetarium, 110 Chestnut.
Handicapped
Got some spare time? Would
you like to help handicapped
children?
The Douglas Park Teen Club
desperately needs volunteers on
Wednesdays from 3-7 p.m.
Drop in at the club at 801
West Twenty-second, or phone
876-3371 days, 731-1206
evenings.
Victoria
Western Canada's Victorian
Studies Association will hold its
fourth annual conference on
campus this weekend.
The conference will discuss
literature and culture of the
Victorian period. Meetings will
be at 9:30 a.m. today and 10
a.m. Saturday at Cecil Green
Park and the faculty club.
Registration information and
details are available from English
professor Ian Nadel at Buchanan
tower  508,  or phone 228-4254.
'Tween classes
worth
Gran-
noon,
lounge.
speaker
campus
TODAY
FENCING CLUB
Practice sessions, 7:30 p.m., winter
sports centre, gym E.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
General   meeting,   noon,   Bu.   3259.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Discussion — is democracy
fighting for? 8 p.m., 1208
vi I le.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
Organizational     meeting.
International   House  upper
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Meeting    to    arrange    fall
schedule,   noon,   Lutheran
centre.
MUSIC
Faculty recital, Loren Marsteller,
trombone, and the Pacific Brass, 8
p.m., Music building recital hall.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Swimming at Vancouver aquatic
centre, 7:30 p.m., meet in observation gallery. Hot chocolate at
Stickey's, 9:30 p.m., 206-1946
York. Phone 736-1928 or
325-7700 if you need a ride.
SCI-FI  CLUB
Organizational meeting, all executive positions open, noon, SUB
213.
SUB ART GALLERY
Brock Hall collection of prominent
Canadian artists work, SUB art gallery until Oct. 3, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Monday to Friday.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting and first jump
course, noon, SUB 215.
UBC CURLING CLUB
People who haven't signed up call
Colin or Bruce at 734-1504. Starts
Oct. 6, 7 and 8.
PRE-MED SOC
Films, exhibits and information,
10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., SUB main
mall.
AUS
Campus-wide dance with Zingo,
8:30 p.m.-12:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
SATURDAY
UBC  KARATE  CLUB
Practice, 10:30 a.m., gym E,
physed complex.
SAILING CLUB
Skipper's tests, bring a change of
clothes, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Jericho
sailing centre.
VOC
Long hike, get together party,
Whistler cabin.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting, 8 p.m., Vancouver Community College, 100 West Forty-
ninth.
PRE-MED SOC
Party,   8  p.m.,  SUB  party  room.
SUNDAY
SAILING CLUB
Novice training, new members welcome, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Jericho sailing
centre.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting, 2:30 p.m., Vancouver
Community College, 100 West
Forty-ninth.
FENCING  CLUB
Practice session, 2:30 p.m., winter
sports centre, gym E.
MEDIEVAL SOC
Music and dance, organizational
meeting,  1:30 p.m., SUB 212.
MONDAY
LIBRARY
Help for handicapped students having problems with getting library
materials, call 228-2076 for help, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday to Friday.
FOLKDANCE WORKSHOP
Teaching and dancing of folk-
dances from the Balkans, Hungary,
Poland, Israel, Rumania, England
and elsewhere, 7:30 p.m., SUB
212.
PAKSINS  FUTGA CLUB
Practice, 4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom or party room.
TUESDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner at 6:30 p.m., round-the-
table discussion and lecture on the
symbol of the cross, Lutheran campus centre.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, conference room, Lutheran campus centre.
PRO-LIFE SOC
Organizational   meeting,   new  members welcome, noon, SUB 211.
PRE-MED SOC
Film on history of medicine, noon,
IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
KARATE CLUB
Demonstration,  everyone welcome,
noon, SUB party room.
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOC
Transcendental meditation program,
free introductory lecture, noon,
Bu. 104.
THURSDAY
UBC MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
First practice and registration-, all
welcome, 5-7 p.m., Place Vanier
ballroom.
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu) '
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
=FREDERIC WOOD theatre-
HELD OVER
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
MONDAY, September 22
TUESDAY, September 23
WEDNESDAY, September 24
8:00 p.m.
MUST END WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
Student Ticket Prices: $2.00
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
===== Reservations: 228-2678 =========
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS
THAT THE
First Instalment Is Due On Or Before
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1975
BENEFIT FOR THE
RECONSTRUCTION OF
VIETNAM
Sunday, Sept. 21st - 2-4 p.m.
at the
Playhouse Theatre
649 Cambie — Vancouver
From Vietnam: MR. TRUONG TAN, Representative of the
Ministry of Information and Culture, Provisional Revolutionary
Govt, of South Vietnam, and MR. BUI BA BINH
CONCERT PROGRAM
Admission: $1.00 at the door
This Benefit is sponsored by the Canadian Aid for Vietnam Civilians, to
whom donations to help rebuild the war-devastated areas of Vietnam
may be sent at Box 2543, Vancouver, B.C. For further information
phone 731-3048.
TH€ CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional fines 25c.
Commercial — 3 tines, 1 dey $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance: Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 24T7S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
DARKROOM COURSES. Color, black &
white, or Citaachrome prints from
slides. Students 10% off. Enroll at
Ampro Photo Workshops, 117 West
Broadway. Phone 876-0501.
AQUA SOC General Meeting, Friday,
12:30, SUB Room 125 All interested
divers welcome. Free film.
TONITE!    IT'S    ROCK   'N    ROLL   at   its
finest with Zingo! Plus beer & wall-
bangers! SUB Ballroom. 8:30-12:30.
Tickets $2. Available  at  AMS  office.
10— For Sale — Commercial
30 — Jobs
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone  681-9816  for   appointment.
ARE YOU INTERESTED in making
extra money. Openings for students
on a part-time basis to promote
records for a well known recording
company. This is a ten week assignment. Hrs., Thurs., Fri. 5 p.m.-9 p.m..
Sat. 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Must be able to
deal with public interviews. Will be
held at Polydor Ltd. Mezz, 805 West
Broadway,  7 p.m., Sept.  24/75.
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE !
Send for entertainment pack of 25
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other attractions..
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.50
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V«B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
35 - Lost
40 — Messages
SUSY Q. Sorry I missed you last nite.
Meet me tonite at Zingo Dance at
SUB at 9 p.m. Booker T.
50 — Rentals
60 — Rides
CLEARING! Re-packs & demos. Scientific calculators. $50 & up. Call Marv
738-5851.
11 — For Sale — Private
'63 FORD GALAXIE. Good condition.
$350 or best offer. Phone 731-2017.
1970 SPORT SATELLITE. 318 V-8, automatic, p.s., p-b., radio, tape, extras.
$2500. Phone 325-9783, PhU.
15 —Found
20 — Housing
ROOM & BOARD in faculty home in
return for preparation of evening
meal & some supervision of children,
14, 11 & 9, from 3:15-7:00 p.m. Mon.-
Fri. Non-smoker, 224-5056.
FREE ROOM & BOARD, plus renum. in
return for some babysitting and light
housekeeping. Suitable for 1st or 2nd
year student. Ph. 263-9948 after 5:30.
70 — Services
65 — Scandals
ZINGO   IS   COMING   TO   ROCK!   So   be
there   to   roll!   Tonite!   At   SUB   BaU-
room.
80 — Tutoring
MAN WITH TEACHER'S TRAINING will
tutor students in French, German &
Italian (reasonable rates). 669-6619.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
tw*»
25 — Instruction
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Friday, September  19,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Winning 'Birds meet mad Huskies
By TOM BARNES
This weekend it is either
welcome to the real world for the
UBC football Thunderbirds or else
Frank Smith is going to be in
danger of having to buy new
helmets to fit the swollen heads of
his charges.
The 'Birds leave today for
Saskatoon to take on the defending
Canada   West   champions,   the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies. Most observers had
picked them to be the class of the
Canada West conference. If this
isn't bad enough, the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs made the
Huskies mad by handing them a 21-
17 defeat in both team's seasonal
opener last week.
The 'Birds are going
their hands full.
to  have
Still, the UBC squad has a few
things going for them. Most important is the two-game winning
streak they possess. Coming off a
38-7 victory over the University of
Manitoba Bisons and a 42-0 win
over the Royal Military College
Redmen, it is doubtful that they
won't be ready for the Huskies.
UBC also has a sound passing
game and Gordon Penn. Penn is
the 200-pound Thunderbird
fullback who has rambled for over
330 yards while seeing limited
action in the first two games.
With 26 players returning from
last year, the 'Birds are a mature
team. There is not much chance of
a loss upsetting their poise for
future games. At the same time,
one more win won't render them
uncoachable.
Rugby 'Birds set for season opener
Thunderbird rugby coach Donn
Spence knows his team is good, but
an indication of just how good they
are will come this Saturday afternoon at 2:30 when his squad
takes on the UBC Old Boys.
Made up of past Thunderbird
players, and formed just a year
ago, the Old Boys have quickly
proven themselves to be one of the
finest club sides in the province;
James Bay and the Thunderbirds
being the other two.
Last year the 'Birds were 20-2,
but it was the Old Boys in their
season opener that saddled them
with one of the losses. The Old Boys
have been practising since mid-
August, so the 'Birds are going to
have  their  hands  full  trying   to
avoid starting the season as they
did last year.
With shifty speedster John
Billingsley, the awesome Ro
Hindson, along with diminutive
scrum half Preston Wiley all
returning to key the wide open
offense the 'Birds are famous for,
UBC should be putting lots of
points on the scoreboard.
Along with Hindson, Spence can
rely on veterans Frank Carson and
Dave Eburne to give size to a well-
balanced team.
"At the moment, our main worry
is a lack of props with first division
experience," says Spence. Spence
lost both Warwick Harivel and the
little publicized Chris Hinkson to
graduation last spiring. It remains
to be seen how well their positions
will be filled this season.
Also lost to the 'Birds this year is
David Whyte, a good ball handler
who possessed an ability to run the
'Birds out of trouble on those rare
occasions when they found
themselves in difficulty. This year
Whyte is playing for Llamelli of
Wales.
Although last year was one of the
finest a UBC rugby team had ever
enjoyed, Spence should have no
problem motivating the team to
even greater heights this year. For
the first time, UBC will be taking
part in the First Division, at least
for the first half of the season. Thus
there is another title for the team
to shoot for.
A grand slam of sorts was won by
the 'Birds last year as they captured the Canada West title, the
North West Intercollegiate title,
the McKechnie Cup, and the World
Cup, a performance that prompted
some observers to label them the
finest rugby side on the continent.
While the 'Birds' debut in
Thunderbird Stadium will.not be
until their November 11
McKechnie Cup encounter with the
Fraser Valley Reps, they will play
two matches on UBC pitches prior
to that. On September 28 they take
on the Trojans and on October 8
they will meet the Georgians.
Weekend karate and kung fu action
The UBC War Memorial Gym
will be the stage for this year's
version of the B.C. Karate and
Kung Fu championships, Saturday, sponsored by the North
Burnaby Butukukan Karate Club.
Elimination rounds will start at
11 a.m. and the finals at 7:30 p.m.
on the same day.
Featured in this year's competition will be last year's free-
sparring black-belt grand
champion and lightweight division
title holder, Dan Anderson.
Anderson will be showing the
speed and kicks he is famous for,
and which also won him the title a
year ago.
Next on the list will be Mark
Kaliciuk who was outkicked last
year by Anderson in the lightweight division finals. ♦
Anderson, considered by some to
be one of the top 10 karate experts
in his weight class, displayed his
back kick early in last year's title
bout and scored first to take an
early lead, 1-0. Kaliciuk came back
scoring with two punches to go
ahead 2-1. Anderson then evened
the score with a quick front kick,
only to have Kaliciuk score again
with yet another punch. Kaliciuk's
lead was cut short when Anderson
scored thrice in quick succession to
claim the title.
These two will be joined by other
top competitors in the Pacific
northwest area.
Apart from this there will also be
exhibitions of Kung Fu, Karate,
Tae Kwon-do.
Tickets are on sale now at all
Vancouver Ticket Centre outlets
and Eaton's stores.
The UBC soccer team went down
3-1 to the Royal Oak Astors Wednesday night for their second loss
of the two-game-old season.
The team will now leave their
problems in the B.C. league for the
time being and head south for
exhibition games in St. Louis,
Kansas City and various places in
Colorado.
love is
T-Shirt Tree
CUSTOM SCREENING
&
IRON-ON TRANSFERS
OVER 400 DESIGNS
kEb!.
WE PRINT ANY THING
Custom Designs For
Fraternities, Intramurals,
Teams, Clubs, etc.
27 W. Cordova ^VZv)683"2933
■ sharing a shirt
People who ride bikes are
very quiet, don't mess up
the air, and stay skinnier
and sexier. So ride a
bike. We'll peddle
you a neat one.
»-the Peddler.
620 E. Broadway
^874-8611
peddler
bicycle centre
UBC PAKSING FUTGA
KUNG FU CLUB
instructed by
MASTER RAYMOND LEUNG
Classes on Mon., Wed.
4:30 - 6:30 p.m.
at    Ballroom    or    party    room    of
Student Union Building
Students won 150 trophies in last 2 years
including West Coast Kung Fu Karate Club
Champ.' North American full contact Kung
Fu Champ. Seattle open champ etc.
NEW MEMBERS WELCOME!
In two games last year, the
Huskies outscored UBC 85-11.
Smith doesn't give them much
hope of repeating that feat.
This game should be the one
where it can be seen just how much
progress UBC has made. The
Redmen had no business being on
the same field as UBC and the
Bisons played badly, some say, but
there will be no such excuse for the
doubters after Saturday.
There is no guarantee that UBC
will win, but there is every
prospect of a good game.
PANGO-PANGO — As the great
red sun of the east became seasick
and turned green, the tiny island
republic came to life with a big
burp.
The balding and very respectable chairman of the board, Jacob
Vanier von Stoke-on-Tyent, was
carried ceremoniously to the
Butchers' Ball by a group of finger-
sucking tricycle makers.
Having paid the fare and added a
generous tip of two coconuts and a
peach, Jacob Vanier von Stoke-on-
Trent proceeded to crown the new
Miss Cheesecake, Tammy
Douggel.
UBC ATHLETIC SOCIAL CLUB
DANCE
SEPT. 20
SUB BALLROOM
8:30 - 12:30
BAND & FULL FACILITIES
TICKETS $1.50
%e's Sport io ltd.
Cross Country
SKI SALE
Skis
Fischer
Korhu
Madshvs
Schwendener
Cross Country Boots
Poles
Knicker Suits
Accessories
Down clothing and sleeping l?ags.
Backpacks, Kastinger, Galibier, Rieker,
Hiking Boots.
Savings from 20%-40%
WHILE QUANTITIES LAST
Sigge's Sport Villa Ltd,
Open Daily 9:30-6:00 p.m. Thurs. & Fri. 9:30-9:00
2693 W. Broadway        731-8818
Across from Jon's Pizzerama
Chargex & Mosterchorge Welcome rage  io
the return of a
bestseller
^iiiii..... 	

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