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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 5, 1976

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Array Housing
• I
battle rages on
By LEN MACKAVE
Food services director Robert
Bailey and a Canadian Forces
brigadier-general are among the
candidates for permanent head of
UBC housing and food services,
The Ubyssey has learned.
Confidential   sources   disclosed
that   the  12-member  selection
committee has cut down the list of
more than 90 names to four which
will be submitted to administration
president Doug Kenny next week.
Bailey's application caused an
initial stir within the joint student-
faculty-administration committee
when it was discovered that one of
his references was a member of
the selection group.
Committee member Allen
Baxter, UBC's treasurer, was
listed on Bailey's first group of
references submitted. Ubyssey
sources say Baxter was requested
to drop his name from Bailey's list.
But when the formal applications
—matt king photo
STARK REALITY of UBC campus is graphically illustrated in negative shot of tree growing on UBC
campus. Generations of students have sat through lectures on Point Grey since seedling first poked
through ground, but new recruits are always arriving.
Women rally for action in Victoria
were submitted not only was
Baxter's name still there but also
that of administration vice-
president Erich Vogt, Bailey's
current boss.
The committee is directly
responsible to Vogt and submits
the short list to him for consideration.
It has been learned that committee members simply ignored
both Vogt's and Baxter's names on
the Bailey application.
The head "plans and directs the
operational, financial, personnel
and administrative activities of the
University's Housing and Food
Service organization," according
to the ads.
Applicants for the position were
expected to have a foundation in
business principles by either a
bachelor's degree or other
education combined with experience. The date of appointment
and salary are negotiable
depending on qualifications.
The committee was formed in
October and has sifted through
over the 90-odd potential candidates and their resumes before
narrowing down the list. Screening
and personal interviews for the
remaining few began a few weeks
ago.
The list of candidates had
originally consisted of 46 names as
of Jan. 20 but one week later 37 new
applicants' names were received.
(More were received later.) On
Jan. 27, 29 applications were kept,
a list which was further cut on Feb.
3 to 19 names. Further scrutiny
boiled the list down to seven.
Besides Bailey and the general,
D. W. J. Carr, other applicants
currently being screened are
acting UBC housing head Michael
Davis and J. F. Daviault, a
university administrator from
Quebec.
The position, vacated after
Leslie Rohringer's sudden
resignation in early September,
was first believed to be filled
permanently  by   another   UBC
By SUE VOHANKA
Women from throughout B.C.
will be rallying on Monday and
again March 22 to demand action
from provincial legislators.
Monday's rally, which will be
held from noon to 2 p.m. in front of
Vancouver's courthouse, coincides
with International Women's Day.
The rally will provide information to women about the
March 22 women's rally for action,
which will take place in front of the
legislative buildings  in  Victoria.
Groups of women have arranged
appointments with their MLAs on
March 22, and will present MLAs
with copies of a brief which
suggests a framework for ongoing
and positive action on various
issues of concern to women.
Carol Nielsen, a member of UBC
women's office and financial coordinator for the rally, said
Thursday hundreds of women from
all over B.C. are arranging
transportation to Victoria for the
rally.
The issues include funding for
women's centres in the province,
childcare, equal employment
opportunities for women, non-
sexist education, health care and
the Maternity Protection Act.
The rally and the briefs also
propose provincial government
implementation of the recommendations of the Berger commission reports on family and
children's law.
And the rally will ask for re-
establishment of the office of the
provincial status of women coordinator.
The office was closed and its five
members were dismissed in
January when provincial secretary
Grace McCarthy discontinued its
funding.
McCarthy's closure of the office
drew a storm of protest from
women's groups and other groups
throughout the province.
During the March 22 rally, when
tents will be set up on the lawns in
front of the legislature, groups of
women will report on what happens in their meetings with MLAs.
"There are specific groups of
lobbyers who have appointments
administrator. However word
'from the president's office reveals
the two jobs will be combined so
the search began in January.    .
Advertisements outlining the
desired qualifications and job
duties were placed in all major
newspapers and university
publications across Canada, as
well as in the U.S. and the United
Kingdom.
The remaining five candidates
(one of whom has since requested
his name be dropped from the list)
were finalized Feb. 17.
Of the four candidates left,
Bailey is a strong choice to take the
vacant position, according to
Ubyssey sources. As director of
food services since the summer of
1974 (succeeding Ruth Blair),
Bailey is a local UBC administrator and has some
background and experience
required to take on the job. Bailey
came to UBC from a job in the U.S.
and as of recently he commuted
daily to his home in Blaine.
Acting director of residences
Davis could also be seen as a
possible candidate to contest
Bailey as far as local boys are
concerned. Davis has been at work
since September and was former
housing head Rohringer's
assistant for a number of years.
He has direct experience with
the problems at hand in the
housing department but his
qualifications to take on the additional chores of food services
director are being questioned.
Of the two other candidates
being considered both are from
eastern Canada and their
credentials have also impressed
the committee.
Daviault is currently the director
of housing and food services .at the
University of Montreal, According
to reports out of U of M, he submitted a list of recommendations
on housing and food services
conditions when applying for the
job".
See page 23: FINAL
Ubyssey greetings
Hi folks. You may have noticed there isn't a booth or display set up
by The Ubyssey. That's because Ubyssey staffers don't exactly have a
lot of time for that sort of thing. The reason is that we are too busy
putting out the greatest'student newspaper west of Blanca three times
a week.
So if youread the paper, consider this our "booth."
Inside, on page 7, you'll find Page Friday, The Ubyssey's weekly
arts, review and comment supplement. This week's feature is a
sampling of the creative writing (and photographs) by UBC students.
And on page 5, Heather Walker writes about this here display
called Open House. An advertisement detailing some of these events is
on page 5. Enjoy yourself.
with their MLAs — they'll be the
only people going in the building,"
said Nielsen. "There will be
reports from these people
throughout the day."
The lobbyers will all present
their MLAs with copies of the brief,
which was put together from
material contributed by the former
provincial status of women coordinator, women's groups and
centres and individual women in
B.C.
Dianna Bissell, another rally
organizer, said Thursday appointments have been confirmed
with 14 of-the 54 MLAs.
She said letters have been
written to all MLAs requesting
appointments, and though more
than 14 have agreed to meet with
the women, not all of them
specified a time.
Bissell said women are currently
phoning the other MLAs to confirm
appointment times, and said most
MLAs will receive briefs from
women connected with the rally.
Nielsen said rally organizers
See page 2: CARLOADS
■ "P1
BOOB TREE? That's what it looks like,
Phyllis Green called her crochet work,
gallery in Main library basement.
—doug field photo
right? Well that's what artist
It's on display in Fine Arts Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976
Carloads of women
due from interior
From page 1
don't know how many women will
attend the Victoria rally. "We're
hoping hundreds or thousands, but
who knows. We're hoping for lots."
She said a large number of
women from the Victoria area are
expected to attend.
And she said Monday's rally in
Vancouver, which will  inform
women about the Victoria rally,
should attract Vancouver women
to the March 22 demonstration.
Some women's studies classes at
various Vancouver colleges have
decided to cancel their classes at
their colleges and instead "hold
them in Victoria" March 22.
Nielsen said rally organizers are
selling buttons and ribbons supporting the rally to raise money for
transportation costs from women
in northern and interior B.C.
She said carloads of women are
expected to drive to Victoria from
as far away as Prince George, and
added "we'll be chartering buses if
there's a demand. We've got
women bus drivers all lined up."
Nielsen said the demand for
legislative action on the issues
which will be raised during the
rally will not end at the rally.
"It's not just going to be done
March 22 and then dropped."
She said women will follow up
the Victoria rally with letters and
appointments with MLAs in their
constituencies to find out what
action is planned on their
demands.
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SUBMARINES
PIZZAS
Come on down . ..
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BUILDING
IN SUB BASEMENT
OPEN HOUSE
SPECIAL
SLIDE DUPLICATES
126 and 35 mm Only
25c each
reg. 35?
PENSIVE MOMENT in snow as
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bright spring sunshine. Thoughts,
like the weather, appear to be
frozen in time.
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Special Extra Performance
SPRING'S AWAKENING
by Frank Wedekind
SATURDAY MATINEE, March 13
2 p.m.
Student Ticket Prices: $2.00
Box Office: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Room 207
Reservations: 228-2678
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
U.S. perpetuated Angola war
By MARCUSGEE
The continued civil war in Angola
is the fault of intervention by the
U.S. and South Africa, not the
Soviet Union and Cuba, a black
American author said Thursday.
Tony Thomas told an audience of
20 in SUB the U.S. support of the
South African-backed National
Front for the Liberation of Angola
(FNLA) and National Union for the
Total Independence of Angola
(UNITA) has perpetuated the
conflict.
Thomas called "lies" the U.S.
government's justification for
funding the two groups — that it
wanted to counterbalance Soviet
backing of the Popular Movement
for the Liberation of Angola.
U.S. officials have said support
for the FNLA and UNITA is intended as a counterbalance to
Soviet backing of the Popular
Movement for the Liberation of
Angola.
But Thomas said the real reason
the U.S. supports the two groups is
to protect its assets in Angola and
bolster the racist regime in South
AFrica.
"The U.S. claim that it has no
economic interest in Angola is
crap," he said.
The U.S. companies own oil
fields, diamond mines, copper
mines, iron ore and numerous
other resources in Angola Thomas
said. He said U.S. interest in the
area is rooted in its desire to exploit the plentiful resources in
Angola, which he said may become
one of the world's leading oil
producers.
Angola also has strategic
military importance to the U.S.,
Thomas said.
"The U.S. is really concerned
that Angolan ports are key to the
defence of South Africa. The
supposed fear of Soviet intervention is hogwash."
Thomas said U.S. backing of the
FNLA and UNITA has been far
more substantial than U.S. officials have claimed. He said the
U.S. has spent five to six times the
$15 million it has claimed spending
to support the groups.
The U.ST military has mounted a
drive to recruit mercenaries to
fight with the FNLA and UNITA in
Angola, Thomas said. He said both
current U.S. military personnel
and Vietnam veterans have been
incited to join the South African-
backed movements.
Thomas also lashed out at the
Vietnam seeks unification
through new constitution
By SUSAN ALEXANDER
Vietnam is in the process of
forming a constitution for a united
Vietnam, UBC history prof
Alexander Woodside said Thursday.
Woodside, considered an expert
on Vietnam's history, spoke on the
present phase of the Vietnamese
revolution emphasizing the social
struggle.
In December, 1975, a
reunification congress of 276
people met in Saigon. Representatives from the many ethnic
groups and political affiliations
met to discuss the problem of
unification, Woodside said.
Many of the more important
government officials are South
Vietnamese, said Woodside.
Pham Hung, perhaps the most
important man in Vietnam today,
is South Vietnamese, he said.
The government will be holding'
general elections in April.
Woodside described the Vietnamese as an "intensely literary
society," but said there is a high
illiteracy rate,  especially  in the
press for its "distorted" coverage
of the Angolan conflict. He said the
press has devoted much attention
to the role of Cubans and Soviets in
Angola but ignored Chinese and
Korean support for the FNLA and
INITA.
Thomas defended Soviet intervention in Angola because he
said it is necessary to counteract
South Africa's invasion of Angola.
But he added the Soviets'
reasons fpr intervention were not
entirely altruistic.
"The Soviet Union is trying to
increase   its   prestige   in   Africa
WOODSIDE .. . notes interaction
south. There are now 850,000 adults
attending literacy schools in the
south.
The government has destroyed
most of the grade 12 history texts
and some of the literature texts.
"Hanoi is supplanting the Vietnamese literary worship of
western literature and theatre with
a purification of Vietnamese
cultural borrowing from the west,"
he said.<&»
"Literature is the key to politics
in Vietnam," said Woodside. In
order to stimulate the Vietnamese,
who are making great personal
sacrifices for the reconstruction of
South Vietnam, the government is
circulating much of the guerrilla
literature of the south, he said.
Woodside said the number of
people unemployed in the south is
about three million, most of whom
are concentrated in the cities.
There are also about four million
il literate South Vietnamese.
There has been a fair amount of
interaction between the North and
the South, Woodside said. The
phosphate fertilizers of the North
are being used in the southern rice
fields. Millions of tons of building
material are being sent north.
An important problem in North
Vietnam is that the expansion of
industry cannot keep up with the
population growth, which has risen
from 16 million in 1960 to 24 million
today, he said.
North Vietnam is also going
through an agricultural revolution,
Woodside said. The farm cooperatives are being enlarged in
size and reduced in number, he
said.
Woodside said Vietnam is not
following the "utopian ideals" of
China. "People don't fight as much
about them (historical questions)
to the same degree as in China," he
said.
He said the ideological range of
Vietnam is narrower than China's
because Vietnam does not have to
deal with the capitalist restoration
threats that China had with
returning overseas university
students.
Woodside said he thinks
reunification will go smoothly.
' 'The problem is sectarian rather
than regional. There are 36 different ethnic groups in Vietnam
and seven language groups," he
added.
He said Vietnam is eager to
establish diplomatic relations with
the west, which is reluctant to
respond.
Canada, which has recognized
the Vietnamese government, has
not followed up on it, he said. "I
think the Trudeau government has
belatedly   discovered   austerity."
Woodside said the government
had a choice in setting up an embassy in either Hanoi or Bucharest.
They chose Bucharest.
Although he acknowledged that
the government may have had
good reason for choosing
Bucharest over Hanoi, he called it
a "stupid decision."
where many states see China as a
more progressive force. They
probably also hoped to receive use
of trade and naval facilities in
Angola," he said.
There is no way the MPLA will
become a "puppet" of the MPLA
when the movement gains full
control of Angola, Thomas said.
"The MPLA will ask the Cubans
and the Soviets to leave as soon as
South Africa is out. The MPLA has
the right to ask for the support of
the Soviet Union and others when
threatened with invasion."
The Soviet presence in Angola
has more justification than U.S.
intervention because the Soviets do
not want to take control of the
Angolan economy, Thomas said.
"The Soviet Union is not trying to
own Angola. The United States
already owns the resources of
Angola."
Thomas discounted the
argument that the U.S. intervened
in favor of UNITA and the FNLA
because these were the least extreme of the three movements to
liberate Angola from Portuguese
rule.
GRAD   CLASS   MEETS
but   not   enough   showed   up
natt    king    photo
Grad class to vote funds by mail
By GREGG THOMPSON
The lack of quorum which forced
cancellation of Thursday's general
graduating class meeting means
voting on grad class financial
disbursements will be done by a
mailed preferential ballot.
Grad class president Wayne Gill
said only 200 grads turned out to
the meeting which was to have
decided on how $15,000 in grad
class funds are to be allocated. The
needed quorum is 375.
"The grad class constitution
i • ' .    •
allows for the decisions to be made
by a mailed preferential ballot.
Rather than try to call another
meeting hoping to attract quorum
we decided to go with the mailed
ballot," he said.
Gill said that even if the needed
quorum had been reached, the
meeting could have been invalidated because notice of intent
to receive applications for grad
class funds had not been published
in' The Ubyssey, as is required by
the constitution. This means that
Gallery to nix pix?
UBC photo society members are
outraged about a plan to close
down a photosoc exhibit in SUB art
gallery Saturday to make way for
an exhibit of professional artists'
paintings.
Photosoc treasurer Richard Ruf
said Thursday the move by the art
gallery programmes committee to
replace the photo exhibit would
violate a verbal promise made by
one of the committee members to
leave the exhibit up Saturday.
"We were promised that show,"
Ruf said. "People are upset. But
the consensus is we will try to stay
in there."
Ruf said the gallery committee
should leave the photo exhibit up
Saturday so visitors to Open House
can see the work of UBC students.
Photosoc members are angered
that the committee would eject the
student exhibit in favor of a
professional one during a
university event.
"Artists from downtown Vancouver are coming up here and this
seems to be against what Open
House is about. They inferred that
we were not professional or good
enough for them. This stood our
hair on end."
But gallery committee member
Art Philips Thursday denied that
the plan to display off-campus
artists is an insult to the photo
exhibit's professionalism.
Philips said Open House
organizer Alan Jaing asked the
committee to arrange an exhibit in
the gallery that reflected the
committee's work.
"He requested we set up a show
of our own work. Most shows we
put on, we organize and we set up.
We are not at all involved with
Photosoc. Their show doesn't
represent our work."
The committee has offered
Photosoc two compromises to the
exhibit conflict, Philips said. It can
either relocate the photo exhibit in
the lower alcove of the gallery or
move it to Brock Hall, he said.
And Philips said the committee
may decide at a meeting today to
let the photo exhibit stay during
Open House.
Photosoc has rejected both the
compromise solutions offered by
the gallery committee.
the closing date for applications
has been extended to March 19.
The original closing date was Feb.
27, Gill said.
This is the second year in which
grad class financial disbursements
have run into trouble due to
procedural error.
In 1975 the grad class council was
taken to student court over the
matter of quorum. The resulting
decision ruled that a Feb. 7
meeting of the grad class was null
and void because voting had taken
place without proper quorum.
He said the preferential ballots
will go out in the mails March 23
and grads will be asked to return
their completed ballots by March
30.
At an earlier general meeting of
the grad class, it was decided to
return three dollars per student to
undergraduate societies to pay for
composite photographs or any
other undergraduate function.
That meeting also lacked
quorum", Gill said, but the motion
passed because no one bothered to
challenge quorum.
As of March 4, some 10 campus
groups had applied to the grad
class for financial gifts.
These include the UBC daycare
council, asking for $6,000 for a
playground expansion, physical
education asking $5,000 for
whirlpool facilities, the UBC
rowing team for a $3,000 racing
shell and the UBC rugby team
looking for $6,000 for a sports tour
to Japan.
Other applicants include
Speakeasy, Walter Gage Student
Aid Fund and the Agriculture,
Engineering and Forestry Undergraduate Societies, asking for a
$5,000 reflecting pond for Fairview
Grove. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5,  1976
What you WON'T see at Open House
Welcome to the beautiful
University of B.C. campus.
(If you're a regular student here
please ignore the opening line.)
Today marks the beginning of
UBC's triennial Open House, a time
when the university gates part to
welcome in the community.
The idea of getting the average
taxpayer or prospective students
onto the campus to see some of the
things which are being done here is
good. UBC is full of smart people
(students and profs) who are
working on things the public will be
interested in at the various faculty
and club displays.
But this is only part of the UBC
story. Open House organizers admit
that the two-day event is not trying
to portray everyday life on the
campus, but rather the 'good sized'
— assorted projects and exhibits
people have spent their time
working on.
So since no one else is going to
be presenting some of the
day-to-day nitty-gritty of attending
university, The Ubyssey offers this
list of what you WON'T see at
Open House:
• you won't see overcrowded
classrooms, especially for first-year
courses, which pit one poor prof
against sometimes 300 students. It
certainly isn't the best way to learn
and it's a long way from the little
one-room school house;
• you won't see education
minister Pat McGeer — he's afraid
to come out here;
• invisible will be the university
bureaucracy of rules and regulations
(red tape) which keep students
perplexed about the miracle of
education from the day they, arrive;
• out of sight will be the
university senate and board of
governors, the formal
decision-making bodies on the
campus.    Senate    is   often   full   of
academic windbags who like to
debate. They form committees to
investigate things and sometimes
lose them in the confusion (i.e. a
teacher evaluation committee
formed in December, 1974 that
they spent more than a week
looking for this year).
The board has monthly meetings
open to the public which are a
farce. It also has closed sessions
which deal with meatier issues but
the real initiative on the campus lies
at     the    faculty     level,     in    the
president's   office    and    with    the
committee of deans.
• you won't see some of the
really good profs teaching on this
campus (sometimes in their grad
gowns) who are not only great
teachers but excellent scholars.
They are in the minority, however.
• you won't see many women
in high administration positions at
UBC nor will you see equal pay
scales for men and women, nor will
you see fair faculty promotion;
• you    won't    see    too    many
problems in the libraries. Students
are lucky to have helpful,
competent people working in the
libraries who can help research
topics as obscure as the meaning of
blood in Shakespeare.
Yes, those are some of the
things you won't see during your
visit out to our cosy campus
confines. But we wish you could.
So pop around sometime and
see our day-to-day operation.
Things won't be so nicely laid out
but they'll be at least as interesting.
Letters
Great
tribute
The Ubyssey seems to be
collecting a lot of flack lately for
various reasons such as their
editorials and opinions. Undoubtedly those who disagree with
these opinions have the right to
oppose them and the paper should,
and does, reproduce their letters
verbatim.
Unfortunately, it seems those
unfortunates upon whom The
Ubyssey fix their editorial gun-
sights are so unnerved that far
from rallying to their own defence
by way of logical and convincing
written argument, they hurry to
decry the paper as radical, vulgar,
biased and irresponsible.
Furthermore, rumor has it that
many of these same unfortunates
are threatening the paper with
financial ruin if The Ubyssey does
not:
• cut with the nasty comments;
• stop saying "shit" or
"frump";
• just print "nice" things of
"interest" to students;
• reflect the "mood" interests
and "opinions" of the students;
What these unfortunates want, I
conclude, is that The Ubyssey
serve as a mouthpiece for
whatever political trivia and
bullshit they wish to strew about
the campus.
Secondly, if The Ubyssey ever
stooped to merely reflecting
students' views, moods and interests, we would cease to have a
newspaper.
The prevalent student 'mood' is
one of complete apathy towards
anything not affecting their personal pocketbook.
I, myself, am in favor of that
dog-eared phrase 'freedom of the
press'. Thus I cannot but give my
hearty approval to any newspaper
which, along with accurate and
factual reporting, expounds its
opinions to the fullest according to
their particular viewpoint.
Keep it up!
David S. Manery
science I
David S. Manery is not a
pseudonym for anyone remotely
connected with The Ubyssey. This
letter has warmed the hearts of
every Ubyssey staff member who
toil and sweat for hours every day.
— Staff
Adieu
treasure, and who have helped me
to crystallize my perception of the
world.
Bye to all who remain. As
Groucho Marx once commented:
"Pleace accept my resignation.
I can no longer belong to an institution that would have me as a
member."
Bob MacKay
commerce 4
As I sit here and muse about the
near completion of an abysmal six-
year career at this institution, my
mind balks at the meaning of it all.
I'll gladly part with petty campus
politics, institutionalized learning,
and the nearly seven-foot high pile
of accumulated textbooks and
lecture notes I have.
I will miss the liberties (even
licences) that the motto Tuum Est
affords and I will always
remember a selected few
professors who possess a genuine
sense of enthusiasm and thirst for
knowledge and who are living
proof of the fruits that education
can bear.-
I take with me the friends gained
here,   who   will   be   a   lifetime
Art
The letter which appeared over
my signature in your Jan. 9 issue
contained several allegations
concerning the Art Gallery
Program Committee and its for
mer chairperson, Margaret Annett.
Regrettably, this letter was
composed some months before the
printing, when the matter was in
question. Due to several factors,
including the AUCE strike and
Christmas break, the letter did not
appear until much later.
The seeming differences over
this matter have long been
resolved, and in fact the misunderstanding of the situation with
respect to the Art Gallery Committee was a result of apparent
misinformation that, it has now
been discovered, was unfounded.
I had no way of knowing that
such was the case, and indeed
THE UBYSStY
FRIDAY, MARCH 5,1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Garv Coull
The scene: Rome Coliseum. The time: 27 B.C. As thousands of
howling Romans drooled, the two young innocent troublemakers Ralph
Maurer and Sue Vohanka were dragged kicking and screaming as the
crowd howled in delight. Gladiators Gary Coull and Doug Rushton
insisted that the one survivor should be set free but Lionkeeper Chris
Gainor insisted his charges were hungry (just like their master).
Groundskeeper Marcus Gee was tied up putting bricks to sleep. Heather
Walker cowered in fear at the thought of writing up the spectacle for her
Classics prof. But before the main event, chariot racers Gregg Thompson,
Matt King, Susan Alexander, Doug Field, Anne Wallace, Len MacKave
and Paisley Woodward whirled around the track. "This ain't the
Coliseum we're used to," quoth Coull to the hapless Maurer. As the
action heated up, apprentice gladiators Robert Diotte, Merilee Robson,
Greg Strong and Bruce Baugh flashed their gleaming swords at Peter
Cummings, Tom Barnes, Bob Rayfield and Susan Borys. And as for the
bloody climax, we're still waiting .... Dave   Wilkinson    screamed.
handled the situation as I perceived to be the best interests of
the society at that time based on
this information.
In actual fact, the Alma Mater
Society Art Gallery Program
Committee, under the chair-
personship of Ms. Annett conducted itself in a manner consistent with the established
precedent of the committee with
respect to security, lighting,
minute-taking, budget submissions
and administration of the Brock
Hall Collection.
Regrettably, the efforts of Ms.
Annett, a committee member for
three years, including those of
restoration of the collection,
thereby saving thousands of
dollars of student money, was not
reflected in the letter.
I therefore regret any embarrassment my prior letter may
have caused Ms. Annett.
Dave Coulson
AMS treasurer
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. * Friday, March 5, 1976
UBYSSEY
Page 5
i real world!
says Flack Fair
By HEATHER WALKER
Today, besides being the first day of the rest of your life, is the
first day of a strange UBC custom.
It's called Open House, and is a two-day extravaganza which takes
place at this venerable institution every three years.
All the tribal peoples here come out of their dark classrooms and rat
(or laser beam) infested laboratories, wash their faces and comb their
hairs, smile a lot, and pretend to show "the general public" what happens
It's a potentially awe-inspiring sight — professors and students
stumbling out of the groves of academe, wiping the lotus petals off their
lips as they come. .
Open Houses have been an important part of UBC s social scene, not
to mention public relations s c e n e, for the last 30 years. The first one
took place in the late 1940's and was instigated by students, according to
administration spokesman Jim Banham.
Students, by the way, instigate lots of things at UBC. Such as the
remarkably ugly building called the Student Union Building, commonly
known as SUB, which is located near the centre of campus and is at the
moment filled with displays put on by various groups which live in it.
Students you see, wanted a building they could call their own, and
they were willing to pay for it. Nobody else was particularly willing, so
every student who comes here pays $15 each year for the building.
But there's a 45-year lease on SUB, and after that, the university
administration owns it.
And on the south side of SUB there's a very large hole, called the
Aquatic Centre, also instigated by students and partially paid for with
student money. We don't know when it's going to be finished, but
everybody connected with it says it's going to be really great when it is —
all $4.7 million of it.
The Open House '76 committee is composed entirely of students, but
they are not the only people involved in planning and organizing the gala
affair The staff, faculty and administration of UBC are also involved.
Committee members interviewed Thursday were unanimous in
saying the purpose of Open House is to show people what is happening at
UBC.
As they said, this is a worthwhile purpose.
People in the community are p a y i n g this university through
taxes, and they have a right to know what is done with their tax money.
But consider some of the events.
Is an imitation French cafe a vital part of the university's French
department?
Do Asian Studies students spend their time here writing people,s
names in Chinese, Japanese or Hindi?
What about Chemistry's Chemical Magic show? And Animal
Science's display of mother sheep with their children, and young cows,
not to mention the ever-popular laboratory rat? And, for Heaven's sakes,
a "functioning artificial rumen!'
Parts of the program for faculty events at this year's Open House
read like the come-on for a carnival.
Poultry science, for example, incites eager spectators to "see how an
egg is made by a chicken, peer inside the shell of a partially incubated
egg, then try and break an egg between your hands. (What, and destroy a
partially incubated chick? Murder!)
Open House committee chairman Robin Ensom, a third year pharmacy student,described the pharmacy department's display as "good as
far as classes go."
It includes displays of dispensing, tableting and manufacturing
drugs, and a display of what a drug does at its site of action.
All this is at least studied in pharmacy, but, again stressing Open
House's carnival atmosphere, pharmacy's description of its display says
"a special breed of hairless mice" used in dermatological research will
highlight the display."
And yet in a letter to "those who are interested in Open House,"
Ensom says "Open House is not a carnival. It is an attempt to show what
the university is all about, and how it is a vital institution in the community."
But it is impossible to show what really happens here in a day and a
half of jollity, free food, (see the agriculture students for-free barbecued
chicken and "the cheapest ice cream in town") and displays. Buchanan
building, where UBC's arts faculty hangs out, is going to look more like
an ethnic festival than a part of a university.'
What does Open House actually accomplish?
One thing, definitely — cheap public relations. Open House isn't
expensive, surprisingly. The whole thing only costs $14,000, which is
cheap compared to most things here — take faculty salaries, for example.
Nobody who works on it is paid, and thousands of people come out and
see UBC.
They see UBC dressed up as something resembling the PNE, not as a
university.
And in most cases they go away happy after an interesting day of fun
and displays.
But they don't know any more about the university than they did
before they came.
College
Printers
Ltd.
PRINTERS OF THE UBYSSEY
SERVING THE UBC
CAMPUS FOR OVER
35 YEARS
■ Try
~. "3   n-- ■ ~m "mm
'. VI     r+rf-V,        I XT'! rV'i
m&, i h=r   >m    >fei
2015 West 12th Avenue
Telephone Vancouver, B.C.
736-4401-2
V6J 2C3
OPEN HOUSE 76
SPECIAL EVENTS
FRIDAY, MARCH 5
12:30 p.m. C.B.C. RADIO will be broadcasting from the main concourse of the Student Union Building until 3:00
p.m.
1:00 p.m. VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB will be demonstrating mountaineering techniques outside the Main Library
and the Student Union Building until 4:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Some Biological Aspects of Chemistry: a Shocking Tale." Dr. D. G. Clark.
Chemistry 1 50.
PHYSICS LECTURE: "Quark! Quark!", typical first year Physics at the University. Prof. E. Vogt and Prof. D.
Beder. Hennings 201.
3:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Diamonds and Other Forms of Carbon." Dr. J. G. Hooley. Chemistry 150.
MEDICAL FILMS OF GENERAL INTEREST WILL BE SHOWN IN Lecture Theatre 4 of the Instructional Resources
Centre continuously until 7:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m. PHYSICS LECTURE on typical first year Physics at the University. Prof. R.Johnson. Hennings 201.
4:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Chemiluminescence: Lights in the Night." Dr. F. McCapra. Chemistry 1 50.
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Images and Medicine." Prof. V.  Doray. Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional
Resources Centre.
4:30 p.m. ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY LECTURE on "Introducing British Columbians to Indian Culture:
anthropology in the classroom." Dr. J. V. Powell. Buchanan 222.
PHYSICS LECTURE: "Quark! Quark!", typical first year Physics at the University. Prof. E. Vogt and Prof. D.
Beder. Hennings 201.
5:00 p.m. MEDICINE LECTURE on "What was the Gypsy's Curse?" — Metabolic diseases in Children. Prof. D.
Applegarth. Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional Resources Centre.
7:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY GLASSBLOWING DEMONSTRATION. Mr. S. Rak. Chemistry 200.
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Biochemical Research and the Prevention of Mental Retardation." Prof. T. L. Perry.
Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional Resources Centre.
7:30 p.m. GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY LECTURE on "Big Bang or Continual Creation?" Prof. W. McCrea and
Prof. M. Ovendon will describe the universe as seen by modern astronomy, and will start a discussion of the
present status of theories of cosmology. Geophysics and Astronomy 260.
SCHOOL OF LIBRARIANSHIP PUPPET SHOW for the young and the young at heart. Student Union Building 207.
8:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY MAGIC SHOW. Dr. A. W. Addison and Dr. D. H. Dolphin. Chemistry 150.
GERMANIC STUDIES LECTURE by Nobel Prize winner Heinrich Boll's translator, Leila Vennewitz, with a
discussion panel of poets, writers and translators. Buchanan 100.
HABITAT DISTINCTIVE LECTURE SERIES on "Human Settlements in a Compationate Landscape." Humphrey
Carver: author, planner and architect. Lecture Theatre 4 of the Instructional Resources Centre.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES PLAY, "Un drama de Calderon," a modern Spanish comedy by P. Munoz
Seca. International House.
PHYSICS LECTURE entitled "In Mackenzie's Footsteps: The Story of the 1975 U.B.C. - S.F.U. Expedition along
Sir Alexander Mackenzie's Overland Route from the Fraser River to the Pacific Ocean." Prof. R. R. Haering
will discuss the expedition and the physics of obsidian fingerprinting. Hebb Theatre.
SATURDAY, MARCH 6
11:30 am. ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY LECTURE on "Recent discoveries in the Archaeology of B.C.'' Dr. R.
G. Matson. Buchanan 222.
12:00 noon CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Some Biological Aspects of Chemistry: a Shocking Tale." Dr. D. G. Clark.
Chemistry 1 50.
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Cataracts." Prof. G. R. Douglas. Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional Resources
Centre.
1:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Diamonds and Other Forms of Carbon." Dr. J. G. Hooley. Chemistry 150.
MEDICAL FILMS of general interest will be shown in Lecture Theatre 4 of the Instructional Resources Centre
continuously until 7:00 p.m.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB will be demonstrating mountaineering techniques outside the Main Library and
the Student Union Building until 4:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m. PHYSICS LECTURE entitled "In Mackenzie's Footsteps: The Story of the 1975 U.B.C. - S.F.U. Expedition
along Sir Alexander Mackenzie's Overland Route from the Fraser River to the Pacific Ocean." Prof. R. R.
Haering will discuss the expedition and the physics of obsidian fingerprinting. Hebb Theatre.
2:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY glassblowing demonstration. Mr. S. Rak. Chemistry 200.
COMMUNITY PLANNING SEMINAR on "Public Housing — has it Failed?" Humphrey Carver: author, planner
and architect. Lasserre 211.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE EXTRAVAGANZA, a multi-cultural programme  involving U.B.C.  Student Clubs,
Vancouver ethnic groups, and Killarney high school students. Student Union Building Auditorium.
LAW GRAND MOOT COURT (mock criminal trial). Moot Court Room of the Law Building (Room 176).
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Who Needs Sunlight," (Vitamin D and you). Prof. O. Parkes. Lecture Theatre 2 of the
Instructional Resources Centre.
3:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY MAGIC SHOW. Dr. A. W. Addison and Dr. D. H. Dolphin. Chemistry 150.
3:00 p.m. FRENCH CLUB PLAY (a light and sound happening!). Buchanan 102.
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Biochemical Research; a first step toward solving Mental Illness." Prof. T. L. Perry.
Lecture Theotre 2 of the Instructional Resources Centre.
3:30 p.m. ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY LECTURE on "City of Vancouver — Transportation, Organization,
Life Style; how it affects you!" Dr. G. Gray. Buchanan 222.
4:00 p.m. MEDICINE LECTURE on "Death to the Stranger," (a laymans look at Immunity). Prof. C. F. A. Culling.
Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional Resources Centre.
PHYSICS DEMONSTRATION: a one hour demonstration of the glassblowing art by Mr. John Lees. Hebb
Theatre.
5:00 p.m. MEDICINE LECTURE on "Life and Breath." Prof. J. R, Ledsome. Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional
Resources Centre.
6:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY LECTURE on "Chemiluminescence: Lights in the Night." Dr. F. McCapra. Chemistry 150.
7:00 p.m. FRENCH CLUB POETRY READING. Buchanan Penthouse.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES SPANISH FIESTA, with singing and refreshments. Bring your own guitar.
Buchanan 204.
MEDICINE LECTURE on "Corneal Grafting." Prof. J. S. F. Richards. Lecture Theatre 2 of the Instructional
Resources Centre.
7:30 p.m. SCHOOL OF LIBRARIANSHIP PUPPET SHOW for the young and the young at heart. Student Union
Building 207.
8:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY MAGIC SHOW. Dr. A. W. Addison and Dr. D. H. Dolphin. Chemistry 150.
PHYSICS LECTUREon "The TRIUMF Project: Past, Present, Future." Prof. K. L. Erdman. Hebb Theatre.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL GAME (California Team vs. B.C. Best Team). War Memorial
Gym.
NOTE: Most lectures are thirty minutes in length with a question period following the lecture. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976
UBC
INTERSESSION
May-July 1976
The University of British Columbia Intersession
Evening Credit Courses Begin May 3 and 4.
For a combined Intersession/Summer Session
Calendar and Registration Form Call 228-2844.
General Information
Most courses are held two evenings a week, 7-10
p.m., Mondays and Wednesdays (M & W) or Tuesdays and Thursdays (T & Th.)
Classes begin May 3 or 4 and end July 28 or 29 unless otherwise indicated.
Courses may be taken for credit by anyone eligible
for admission to the University who has the necessary course prerequisites.
Fee for 3 units of undergraduate credit is $107 (including AMS fee).
Deadline for registration without late fee is April 16.
Registration by mail deadline is also April 16. In-per-
son registrations, with late fee, will be accepted until
May 6.
For a Calendar Supplement listing both
Intersession and Summer Session courses
and registration forms, telephone 228-2844,
or write to the Registrar's Office,
The University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5.
Evening Courses — UBC Campus
May — July
Anthropology
Introduction to Social Organization — M
& W
Indians of British Columbia — M&W
Religion and Society — T & Th
Archaeology of British Columbia —T &
Th
Asian Studies
History of Chinese Thought — M&W
Biology
Cell Biology I: Structural Basis — M&W
May 3 - June 14
Cell Biology II: Chemical Basis — M&W
June 16 - July 28
Classical Studies
Ancient History — M&W
200(3)
301 (3)
415(3)
420(3)
325(3)
200(1%)
201(1%)
331 (3)
100(3)
301(1%)
302(1%)
490(3)
301(1%)
302(1 %)
305(3)
310(1%)
311(1%)
331(3)
332(3)
336(3)
383(1 %)
405(3)
430(3)
432(3)
435(1%)
439(1 %)
472(1%)
473(1 %)
477(1%)
478(3)
481(1%)
482(1%)
489(3)
Economics
Principles of Economics — M&W
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis —
T & Th May 4 - June 15
Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
— T & Th, June 17 - July 29
Applied Economics — M&W
Education
Introduction to Education Psychology —
M&W May 3 - June 14
Introduction to Education Evaluation —
T&Th May 4 -June 15
Curriculum and Instruction in
Developmental Reading in the
Elementary School — T & Th
Growth and Development — T & Th
May 4 - June 15
The Nature and Measurement of
Learning — M&W May 3 - June 14
Human Development
— T&Th
Psychology of Adolescence —
Development and Adjustment — T & Th
Modern Theories of Education for Young
Children — T & Th
Selection of Materials — M&W
Curriculum and Instruction in the Primary
Grades — Advanced — T & Th
History of Education — M&W
Adolescent Psychology — T & Th
Introduction to the Study of Individuals
and Groups — Daily June 23 - June 30
Instructional Television: Principles and
Application of Non-Studio Techniques
— Th & Sat May 6 - June 10
Reading in the Secondary School
Classroom: Practical Implications T & Th
May 4 - June 15
Materials of Instruction in Reading
— M&W May 3 - June 14
Special Topics in Reading — T & Th
May 4 - June 15
Introduction to Teaching English as a
Second Language — T & Th
Introduction to Research in Education —
T&Th May 4 -June 15
Introduction to Statistics for Research in
Education — M&W May 3 - June 14
Applied Linguistics for Teachers
— M&W
494(1 %)     Communications Media Programs in
Schools — Motion Picture Film and
Television — Th & Sat May 4 - May 29
495(1 %)     Still Photography in Education — T & Th
& Sat May 25 -June 17
496(1 %)     Motion Picture Production in Education
— M & Sat June 7 - July 3
508(3)        Review of Research in Methods of
Teaching Specific School Subjects:
Music — M&W
544(1%)     Theoretical Bases for Reading Research
and Practice — M&W May 3 - June 14
598(3)        Field Experiences: Counselling
3 sections    — M-F May 3 - June 14
English Education
311 (3)       Children's Literature — T & Th
English
100(3)       Literature & Composition — M & W or
2 sections T & Th
202(3)        Major Authors to 1914 —M &W
204(3)        Short Fiction — T & Th
205(3)        Introduction to Canadian Literature — T
&Th
301 (1 %)     Practical Writing — M&W May 3 -
June 14
302(1 %)     Advanced Practical Writing — M&W
May 3 - June 14
303(3)        English Composition — M & W or T & Th
2 sections
309(3)       Modern English and its Background
— M&W
321(3)        Poetry —T&Th
325(3)        Studies in Major Authors — M&W
355(3)        Chaucer — T & Th
365(3)        Shakespeare — T & Th
429(3)       Contemporary Literature — M&W
452G(3)     Studies in American Literature:
Twentieth-Century American Poetry
— M&W
515(3)        Psychoanalytic Approaches to
Shakespeare — T & other TBA
Fine Arts
125(3)        History of Western Art — M & W
181 (3)        Studio I — M & W or T & Th
2 sections
335(3)       Renaissance and Mannerist Art
— T&Th
387(3)        Contemporary Techniques: Printmaking
— M&W
French
334(3)       French Civilization — T & Th
400(3)        A Survey of French Literature in
Translation — M & Th
Geography
350(1 %)     Introduction to Urban Geography
— M & WMay 3 -June 14
Geophysics & Astronomy
310(3)        Exploring the Universe — T & Th
German
430(3)        German for Reading Knowledge
— T&Th
History
315(3)        History of the Natural Sciences in Modern
Times — T & Th
326(3)        British North America, 1763-1867
— T&Th
329(3)        The Social Development of Canada
— M&W
405(3)        History of Imperial Russia, 1689-1917 —
M&W
407(3)        History of Modern Germany — T & Th
Home Economics
407(3)        Nutrition and Disease — T & Th
Italian
100(3)        First Year Italian — M&W
200(3)        Second Year Italian — T & Th
Latin
200(3)        Second Year Latin — T & Th
Linguistics
435(3)        Contrastive Linguistics — M&W
Mathematics
311(3)
318(3)
Elementary Number Theory and
Algebraic Concepts — M&W
Introduction to Random Processes
— T&Th
Philosophy
100(3)
201 (3)
214(3)
317(3)
410(3)
Introduction to Philosophy — T & Th
Problems in Ethics and Social Philosophy
T&Th
Introduction to Scientific Reasoning
— M&W
Philosophy of Religion — M&W
Philosophical Problems — T & Th
Physical Education
366(1%)
Physical Activities for Young Children —
M & WMay 3 -June 14
Political Science
202(1%)
407(3)
Contemporary Ideologies — T & Th
American Politics and Government
413(3)
100(3)
200(3)
300(3)
304(3)
305(3)
309(3)
316(3)
220(3)
270(3)
473(3)
474(3)
100(3)
200(3)
222(3)
— T&Th
South Asian Government and Politics
— M&W
Psychology
Introductory Psychology — M&W
Experimental Psychology — T & Th
Behaviour Disorders — M&W
Brain and Behaviour — T & Th
Theory of Personality — M&W
Cognitive Processes — M & W
Methods in Research — T & Th
Sociology
Sociology of Life-Styles — T & Th
Introduction to Sociological Theory and
Research: Comparative — M&W
Sociology of Mental Illness — T & Th
Professions and Occupations — M&W
Spanish
First-Year Spanish — T & Th
Second-Year Spanish — T & Th
Women's Studies
Women's Studies — M&W
Courses at Other
Locations
A few courses for teachers at off-campus
locations may be announced later.
Teachers should watch for announcements through their School District offices.
Guided Independent
Study
Credit Courses
Part-time students who wish to continue
their education may register at any time
of the year for independent study correspondence courses offered through the
Centre for Continuing Education.
The current Independent Study Calendar
lists a total of 35 courses which may be
taken for degree-credit at the University
of British Columbia or for transfer-credit
at other Universities and Colleges.
For a copy of the current Independent
Study Calendar and/or further information, write to Credit Correspondence
Courses, Centre for Continuing Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5, or telephone
228-2181, local 241.
Summer Session
As in the past, the majority of the Summer Session courses will be offered on
campus during the day. However, there
are a few evening courses being offered
again this summer. These courses meet
from 7:00 p.m. to 9:45 p.m., Monday
through Thursday each week for the 6-
week session. Summer Session commences on July 5th and ends on August
13th for most courses. For further details,
consult the Intersession/Summer Session Calendar Supplement. 'e-
'4
Page Friday
Arts Issue
w
'v* .-in^* §?<*»*,$*
„ %,-    - \^^#S^^S«S*!«^#**^e^
^^*1^^«^
The climber
There is no down.
up the rungs of these ladders
smeared into cities. No exits
leave the logic long. They are
portable, sails in specks
boat along the edge. I believe
in the presidents aboard
and the artists bemused
and relaxed as they dream of
muscular boys and the ladies
elegant in a warm violet haze.
These ladders, finger smudged,
are a tangle of rungs. t
Crossing all around me, I peddle
ladders, I call
to the climbers, "ladders, ladders,
I have more ladders,"
the climbers who cling to rungs
on vertical ladders and
ladders horizontal, ladders
turned at peculiar angles
to each other and bent into arches.
This is a difficult business,
my friend, selling ladders
as I climb among the climbers
and struggle for my own balance.
Pray for me.
ROBERT DIOTTE
doug field photo -deryl mogg photo
1. Poem for Onan
In the confines of this dark envelope
I cannot touch my own naked skin
without pain for your breast.
I dip my head to inhale the musk of my underarm,
the position of my elbow on my ribs,
my eyes flooded with the perfume between your thighs
and the persistent memory of your lips offered
on a motel bed in Delta,
the hair curled, lightly moist.
In the envelope of my skin
I hold speech with myself
stroking my flesh your image,
like Onan, a one handed lover
my banished seed on the desert floor, barren.
I am a bird-cage
A bone-cage
With a bird
The bird in my bone-cage
Is death making his nest
When nothing is happening
You can hear the rustling of his wings
And when you've laughed a lot
If suddenly you stop
You can hear him coo
At the bottom
Like a small bell
It's a bird held captive
Death in my bone-cage
Wouldn't he like to fly away
Is it you who would make him stay
Is it me
What is it
He cannot leave
Until he has completely eaten
My heart
Source of blood
With life inside
He'll have my soul in his beak.
Poem by SAINT-DENYS-GARNEAU
translated by Peggy Berkowitz
2. Poem for Onan
Three golden fish and my ghost
lay in the rippled skin of the water last night,
I the blind swimmer, the dreaming voyeur, walked the sand
my fingers driven to spread open the pink shells
and put my nostrils to the moist creatures of myth and longing
drinking the imagined odour.
The ancient drum beat hammered in my eyes
as they burned and were averted
from the golden flesh that lay in secret mermaid shadows
like slaves offered to an impotent sultan.
Inspired to self love by these copper images
the voyeurs pulse burst
in a brief surge of white foam.
In a single gull wing beat of blue cloth
he was lost to the rippled sea.
LES DUPLESSIS
Fossils
We unearth
what wants to stay buried:
stone tools, clay pots
occasional bone
old bone scratches in earth
uncovers desert
urn of complete ashes
after that
we fall short of resurrection
find: no retina
no vein
less than the whole man
shivered into dust
Forgotten ancient ways
to bake flesh onto ribs
to plant hair
to water it with blood.
LOISGUBBE
-peter cummings photo
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 -a. d. walker photo
Damn you Achilles
you and your big fat heel
just when I was learning to fight fair
and developing a nice sense
of swordplay
having practised on the gods
you had to turn
towards me
your vulnerability
"Strike me here
and I
bleed
to death."
I'm going to test
that famous heel of yours
it may be just
a myth
invented by your mother
to protect you
maybe
she didn't know
there's no protection
against the body blows
that love
delivers.
'On guard' Achilles,
and present
your heel!
MARGARET MURDOCH
Orbit
The austere god dances
his gold dance
steps light, breath
stars in his footprint . . .
spheres a stance, orbit
a motion, voiceless
song and slow, and
silver now, alchemy of
the slow, stately free
golden dance.
The auspicious god melds
his invisible partner,
queen of quicksilver . . .
message, rotation, and
an ocean, motionless
circle of bronze, dance
careful in his footsteps . .
solemn touch, dark
her cold glance:
He takes his chances.
EARLE PEACH
-doug field photo
Friday, March 5, 1976
Refuge
Touch me . . .
For I have
Lived the
Burnt-orange of the
Morning . . .Mourned the
Grey-ash of the
Afternoon, and I
Thirst with the
Effort.
Quench me with your
Warm
Summer rain.
Caress me . . .
That I may
Rest in
Your earth-brown
Arms.
DEB BROWN
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 theme stream VII
looking down the sidewalk
perspective distorts to powerful abstracts
the cocktail hour hangs over the street
like an Eastern summer afternoon
praying for an endless sunset
there's life in that never-birth
the lemon-orange sherbet flashes its ease
on a cool breeze
sleazy satin banners all at half-mast
bleeding Continentals smell insecurity roses
ambiguities slither charmless immobile in electric mauve
as numb fingers clutch for stars in the green . . .
little circles all in a row
MICHAEL BORDEN
peter cummings photo
The ivory mirror
Max Morath jingles
out of a west-end tenth floor
apartment nowadays. Gifts
arrive like guests
odds and ends that don't know
where to sit.
Your young academic taps his fingers
in the lamplight. Stumbles out
the name Husserl. Inquires how it must feel
to reach Seventy. You smile
and lean into a sonata,
all notes and fingers and pain.
(These discontinued worlds are all we have
songbird)
The hotel barflies at Moncton
knew the score. In the morning
from your window, you watched them
pull away. A smell and sound of horses
lingering still. A world of gypsies
slipping in the mud.
PADDY MCCALLUM
(50 SOUTH,
TOUN6MAN!
Enjoy Southern
Comfort, smooth,
sweet satisfaction
from the South.
Mixes with everything within reason
and it's great all on
its lonesome. Try
some. Y'all love it.
Southern
Comfort
The Grand Old
Drink of the
South that
cant be
imitated.
^
Frustration
Thinking . . .
Confused as a muddy
puddle
where
No clear-cut gaze can pierce
or delve behind
The murky wall
of mystery which hides,
one thinks,
the secret,
Fairy-like,
But sure . . .
MARG RANSFORD
SOUTHERN COMFORT
Page Friday would like to
thank the many people who
contributed to this issue. Unfortunately, due to the lack of
space we were not able to print
all of the excellent material that
we received. The winner of the
award, a book, of poetry by
Robert Bringhurst, will be
announced in next week's issue.
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 Messages
By TIM STEPHENS
"But that doesn't mean I don't appreciate your
mind," he said, closing the door of their basement
suite. She was already halfway across the
livingroom, and he spoke to her shadowy, soft back
with a tone of conciliation which he had to partially
manufacture. He felt contrite but it seemed odd,
unmanly, to admit it. She turned the bedroom light
on; it planked across the livingroom and raised,
though begrudgingly, muddily, a strip of the red
carpet. He stepped through the beam, into the kitchen.
"Your mind, you know what I mean?" he called
out, shouting at the refrigerator. He poured a glass of
milk. He wasn't drunk; in fact, as the party had worn
on, his last couple of drinks had almost seemed like
innoculations against the first few. The kitchen, far
from offering any softness, seemed stark. He felt an
edgy, bright fatigue. And rather than appease his
hunger, the glass of milk only glued it into a stomachy
knot.
"I mean; when I watch your face, I feel a mind!"
He was still raising his voice. "Know what I mean?"
"Mmmm," he thought he heard, slightly raised at
the end, to reach him. He crossed the livingroom with
the milk's ball of cold in his throat. She was taking
this well, the "mmmm" had reassured him.
"I mean your mind's always the same — not the
superficial one, the one you think with, the real one,
it's got a kind of power, this steady dark,, this steady
bright power, to spread itself throughout your body;
it inhabits your gestures, the way you walk, even the
way yousit." He sat on the bed; the speech seemed to
remain in the air, complete in itself. He was just the
punctuation mark, plop.
She stared at herself in the mirror, holding her
breasts in their cups, the straps of the brassiere
taggling down. Gliding from self-absorption, along
the mirror's surface, her eyes saw his.
"Don't stare."
"Do I?" He knew he did.
"You know you do."
"Only because you — I can't understand your
flesh." He felt his checks itch with the sincerity of it.
"Well don't."
She sounded damped down, as the vibrations from
earthquakes are supposed to damp down the planet's
viscous interior. Geophysics 400, his science elective
last year. Now, as he stared at the pink brassiere
marks across her back, the awkward broadness of
her shoulders and the slender neck rising from them,
like a swan from Atlas — bent a little, the shoulders,
from some female burden, himself perhaps — he
remembered, as they passed tonight at the party, she
said, quickly and whispered: "Bastard."
He jumped up and undressed quickly, like a kid.
Naked on the cool bed, he watched her last few
movements, the quick elfin -graces of her elbow and
wrist, lifting to her hair, white fleshy glimpses as she
lifted her nightie to pluck off her panties and dron
them limp by the chair leg. Her pink nightgown
stretched momentarily into a tent as she knelt into
bed. It was old, stale with long use, it was one of those
transparent things you could just distinguish the
nipples through: he felt a tenderness, that she endured their student poverty, that she put her pretty
youth in the old underwear of their skimping. Love
quieted his mind. Though she didn't open the
blankets, and sat, pleasing him, on top of them,
simian-like, with her knees in the air and her back
against the headboard, she carefully drew the
nightgown over her knees, around her hips, in a
secret protest against his obstreperous nakedness.
She took a book from the tock-tock-balanced night
table and opened it solemnly (Hesse), and smoothed
it flat against her hilled knees. Her neck turned,
lightly, precisely; her eyes darted to his face, hung
there a moment, unrevealing, shot to his crotch, back
to his face.
"Don't," she said.
"What?"
"Don't stare at me that way!"
He lowered his eyes to the pink knobbly bedspread.
She started reading.
"Are you mad at me?" he said.
Ignoring him, she slowly smiled at something in the
Hesse book. She had serrulate teeth; they were small,
and even, but they were pointed, and they glistened
softly. He often noticed an animal hint in her face, a
dog, wolf, hyena, some sort of benign, weird, spiritual
thing. Like a person come from some other realm, to*-
speak to someone in him he didn't know.
"To think that a man spent his whole life writing
those careful sentences just to bore people to death
with his carefulness." Thomas Mann, Hesse, Goethe,
he didn't like the Germans; and he didn't like being
ignored.
But she didn't answer.
He watched her breasts: white shy full heavy
dawns, nipple-nosing at the sheer old nightie. In the
livingroom, both their knees hilled, watching the
black and white teevee, he would twist around during
commercials to cup them: like hefty clouds, or a
pocketful of soft change. Now, more self-conscious,
he felt only the scratchy rub of lingerie.
"Don't fondle me. Don't handle me."
He rose on one elbow in regretful surprise. Her eyes
were glistening. She put her book on the floor and lay
down isolated and silent on the bed, her back to him.
He lay on his back, thinking, pulling at the skin on his
chest where the hair didn't grow yet.
They'd left the party early. That tall amazon
woman in the snappy green dress, her face like a
pear, a graduate student, wide cheeks, the high,
plucked eyebrows, her quick, almost maniacal laugh,
her concentrated interest in him: Oh, is that right?
That must have been terribly — oh, ha, ha! I see.
What do you think about that? I want to pry into your
mind, she had said, lowering her head and her voice,
you have a curious sense of . . . good or bad? he
asked, laughing and blushing. A sense of . . . she'd
said, flirting, plucking his shirt sleeve, a sense of. . . .
Then in the car, secretly to disavow his giddiness,
secretly also to keep that woman, like a pleasurable
danger, on the edge of his words, he'd started talking
to Lilly about her mind. His theory was that Lilly's
mind was somehow integrated into her physical
essence; it was her gestures, her poise. (But the
truth; it was, after a year and a half of marriage,
almost his entire understanding of Lilly; the rest
remained completely, even blissfully dark to him.)
This sublimation, integralization, permutation, he
said, was a certain kind of genius. But Lilly hadn't
seemed very enthralled by his own enthraldom. His
praises had fallen on her opaque silence. He'd
compounded the/mistake of the flirtation by the
further disloyalty of talking too much, too eagerly.
He'd apologized too hard, not even knowing, at first,
that he was apologizing.
-f red scambati photo
He lay on his side and watched her rejecting back,
the pea pod of her spinal column.
"She was a witch," he said, taking a chance.
"Who?"
"That woman, at the party."
There was only her back, unmoving.
"I mean, the way she hypnotized me. I didn't really
like her — was that why you got a headache ?''
"I still have a headache," she said with a vastness
that inured him in a hollow: that deserted place given
to pests and fools. Then one of those anomalies,
paradoxes of marriage, came on him: a silken
discomfort crawled over his skin, cheeks, mind, an
emotional impotency, at the same time as he felt,
below, an erection nudge its way up between his legs.
He said softly, "I didn't like her at all. I mean I love
you. And all the time I saw you watching us."
"I wasn't watching you."
"I felt guilty," he admitted.
"Did you?"
"But Lilly, I thought, this is just a conversation,
why shouldn't I have a conversation, and. . ."
"Please stop talking." Somehow, this was one of
the sharpest insults in their gentle, conjugal code.
Somehow, his manhood centred in his words,
revolved around his easy, freewheeling didacticism.
She had broken one of his ribs. But the hard-on did not
go, it remained.
She sat up, demurely plucked out her nightie-nest
as before, and smoothed Hesse against her knees.
Smarting, he started at the dark, night-backed
window over their bed. Instead of the' moon, there
was only the reflection-of their bedroom lamp, and
the bedroom. Odd, she hadn't drawn the curtains. He
turned on his shoulder to watch her as a voyeur
might: the half=seen heavy globes of her breasts and
buttocks, the half-visible nipples, the cool, inward,
almost satisfied mask of absorption (Hesse) on her
face.
SeePFlO: MESSAGES
Friday, March 5, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 The Chicagoans
Chapter   1
Janell smirked. She wore her
usual night jeans and jersey shirt.
He wore salesman clothes:
tailored pants, flower-print shirt,
trim hair and an All-American
confidence that oozed dullness.
"I'd rather not."
"Would you like to guy that
lovely piece of chrome?"
Before he continued his sales
pitch, she asked if he were a
salesman.
"How'd you guess?"
Janell mimicked his voice, "It's
not a question of whether you can
afford this wonderful offer, but a
question of whether you can afford
to pass it up."
They laughed, he introduced
himself as Larry Johnson. He had
been a college man, left Tennessee
years ago but found women
preferred his Southern accent
when buying life insurance. He
talked about his younger years,
incessantly focusing on the
goodness of his mother.
"What about your father?"
"He's dead."
"How?"
"He was killed." Larry still
smiled white teeth. He sipped his
beer.
"Killed? How?" Janell pushed
an   excerpt
her drink aside, turned her body
towards him, offering sympathy.
He mimicked her facial expression; they both laughed.
"Come on," she insisted, "how
was he killed?"
"It's a long story you don't want
to hear."
"You're not going to pull that
line on me, long stories aren't long,
they're just personal."
He attacked Janell, "How come
all of a sudden I'm answering the
questions?"
"Because I asked and want to
know."
"No, you don't want to know."
"How was he killed?"
"He had his throat sliced open
and bled to death."
Larry ordered them both another
beer and began to discuss Chicago
and how entrancing the city was
and how well the sales meeting was
going.
"You didn't finish your story. It
isn't every day I run into someone
whose father had his throat sliced,
how old were you?"
"Two and a half."
His voice was even, his smile
faint. His father had owned a bar.
Three black guys were screwing a
whore in the back of his daddy's
bar. His daddy got up and went
back, "Please, I don't care what
you do in the streets, but please,
not in my bar."
One pulled a switchblade while
the other two backed him against
the wall. He grabbed an empty
beer bottle, but it did no good. They
got him. Kicked him a few times.
He died from loss of blood.
"My two uncles were in the bar,
both were big men, 6'8", 280
pounds and the other 6'5", 300
pounds, professional wrestlers.
They went into the back room. Two
guys are now dead. The third, you
know what a retarded person's
like?"
"How did that happen?"
"You know what happens when
you hit someone on the head over
and over again?"
"What about the woman?"
"The Woman walked out of the
bar and back into the streets."
"And your uncles?"
"They served time. Six years,
one got into a fight later and was
killed."
"And you?"
"Me? I was just a kid, I don't
remember any of it. We had to
leave our big house and live in
crummy apartments while my
mother worked hard to raise me
right. I had twin brothers, just nine
years old."
"Did she remarry?"
"No, I wish she had, it was dif
ficult bringing us up by herself.
I've owned a few bars since then,"
he said, redirecting the conversation.
- Janell sipped her beer and
smoked a cigarette. "What happened to them?"
"I got out when the money was
right."
Their conversation moved into
mundane details about each
other's lives. Janell looked for Lois
but couldn't find her.
"She left."
"She left? Without saying goodbye?"
"She didn't want to disturb us."
Janell moved restlessly on the
bar stool. She hadn't intended to be
with a man. Larry ordered another
round of drinks. Both slurred their
words and laughed. Larry bought
her beers she refused to drink but
drank because they sat before her.
She told him he needn't catch a taxi
to his hotel.
Janell led Larry to the bed-
couch, instructed him where to put
the cushions and rushed to the
bathroom. In two minutes she reentered the room wearing a deep
blue robe and carrying a watering
pot. "I have to water my plants, I
always do it at night, I'll just be a
minute." Like a horticulturist
executing a daily ritual, Janell
watered each plant in the room.
She returned the watering pot to
the bathroom.
"You haven't fixed the bed yet,"
she said as she walked quickly into
the room, lit a stick of patchouli
incense and began pushing him off
the couch to remove the cushions.
See   PF12:   CHICAGOANS
y
Exhibition of ceramic sculpture
by
Luigi Sabbadini
of Rome
Exhibits in Rome,
Florence, Paris,
Hamburg and North
America
Dr. Luigi Sabbadini
Born:. August  14.   1928 — Rome   Italy
He left his medical practise, to dedicate himself totally to the arts  He found
the  arts  to  be  a   natural  compliment   (A  natural  gift)   -His  knowledge  of
anatomy,  has helped  him  in the composition of his groups
Te classical studies, have helped him capture life and movements of his art
pieces.  In his work,  he transfers,  spirit and character especially.
The "Gallery Battaggis" in Via Nazianale in Rome, welcomed his first works
with great applause from the public, and very much appraise from art critics,
so much as that the writer and critic, Guiseppe D'arrigo, commissioned him
to do a series of pieces with Roman spirit to add to his private collection.
The architect, Panella. pleaded with him to do a mural composition, for the
entrance of the hotel in Via Quatteo
Fontane.
Many of his works are part of many
private collections, only a few are still
available
He met the poet Salvadore Quasimodo,
and his wife The poet said of Or ,
Luigi Sabbadini's art, that he has
captured the following:
"The ancient Egyptians, considered
the human body, as the prison of the
soul The Greeks, considered the human body to be perfection. While,
"Michelangelo", considered the human body to be a monument "El Greco",
transforms the human body in a mystic vision."
Luigi Sabbadini has been able to capture all this along with the sensation of
adding the movements of modern times together with romantic and melancholy, which is hidden in the deepness of the human soul.
Dr. Luigi Sabbadini's work can
 bQ seen exclusively at:	
Galerie Rattee
1527 West 10th   736-5132
EXCLUSIVELY REPRESEMED BY
E. G. ENTERPRISES LTD.
7\
a
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 Harbour lights
An iron drummer is this drizzle
rattling on the hulls of morning
anchored here in the raincoast harbor
full of tramps and grain freighters.
All riding at anchor in the early morning rain
of wet Vancouver winter with mist sweeping in
and ghostly foghorns unable to blow it out again.
Steel hulled tugs rust here retired
from their long greenriver shipping runs.
Rest from lugging miles of log-booms
down from those up-island ports of call
down into the arms of this mother of harbors
where bunkhouse ladies lie in waiting
for lonesome sailors not yet lost at sea.
The gulf air lies as thick as sleep as
it drips in salty among these raincoast islands.
Juan de Fuca's outer passage hides shrouded in fog.
Incoming ships looking for the light run blind and
come scraping past the coastal masts of high rigged fir
aimed long like missiles up at the invisable moon.
Built damp here in this harbor of ships and men
this iron rain now riveting the decking plates
is but a bridge out to the steel grey sea.
Here the early morning arcs wink out their sparks
from the wheelhouses as the Dry Dock yarders weld away.
Their bodies sold for hours they work in the wet sizzle
gouging out the hot flux and seartissue barnacles
building a new screw, a new keel, a whole new ship.
Sweating steadily in this rain the harbor's Graveyard
Shift whines and yammers away with their pneumatic muscles
grinding and patching the pride and the scraps of the sea.
Above the ribcage wickerwork of angle iron the arc lights
of the gantry crane's skull grins while slinging around
a dynamo winding dangling on the long end of its skeletal boom.
Throughout the foghorn morn the harbor lights flicker . . .
starting up electric under the lifting mist. This great harbor,
seeded in darkness, is a hardworking whore holding all
of the shipping in the world between her wet thighs made
slippery with rain. Red lights winking in the arc of the cutting
torches see the city beginning to breed people again.
This raincoast harbor mothers her children.
She sets them to work wet from their breakfasts.
For here the salty Pacific's deep-sea reach
of sailing memory shines its harbor light on
those ages of toil and sea^ago tradition. She continues
blessing all of the men who have gone down to the sea to work
or went sailing away in the early morningshine . . .
ERIC   IVAN   BERG
Ludhianna
rail-crossing
Black locomotives
choke the ochre sky.
Railtracks fly into
the industrial horizon.
Ludhianna walking bridge
black with venereal orphans,
mendicant faquirs, mystics of pain
squatting in the swelling heat:
The hissing sun makes tar.
Blue veins billow
on the back of
the beggars black hand.
An old man's
skeleton sleeps stretched
on a dirty grass mat.
Beside him
the boom echoes
in the hollow
of a big brass pot.
Young ones search
every face that hurries by
trying to share a swell of pain.
Groaning locomotives
earth convulsions,
black .bridge trembles.
In a fit, the old man awakes.
Black Iron monsters
rage in a pant.
Syphilitic tissue covered eyes
roll in the heated holler
of noon.
NIRMAL SIDHU
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Friday, March 5,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Lenin and the question of women
Lenin in porcelain, waving his cloth cap;
calm, grim, resolute, bald. Mr. Clean.
Lenin in his naked study, thinking
deep red thoughts. Krupskaya in the kitchen
watching the cabbage boil.
Lenin in love (ah, Krupskaya,
my little bookish sausage). Lenin on ice
in exile, pirouetting down the frozen river,
calm, grim, resolute, eyes twinkling
yet always thinking, thinking deep red thoughts.
Lenin picking his nose.
Lenin shouting at his wife
as she burns the potatoes again.
Krupskaya weeping. "She looks like a fish"
Lenin's sister says. History shrugs its wrinkled shoulders. Women!
Lenin scratching himself. Lenin a long time in the toilet.
Lenin angry, raw, writing
"I advise you to completely remove number three demand by
women
forfreelove" (ohhorrors) "What can it mean?"
Not tonight, Krupskaya, your dumpling is tired.
Lenin baffled. Lenin assertive. Lenin
laying it down for all time.
"The issue is the objective logic of class relations
in matters of love." Which means, comrades,
that fucking is largely out.
Lenin giving a speech. Fanny Kaplan appearing out of nowhere
to smoke nervously in the shadows. A liberated woman
with a gun! Karl Marx! Bang! A poor shot, her eyes & motives
dimmed by years in a sour prison, arisen
to avenge her shattered revolution.
Lenin stubbing his toe. Lenin signing
the execution orders. Lenin liquidating
the Kronstadt sailors. Lenin in bed: *
"Have Fanny Kaplan shot"
andshe was, in the back of the head.
Lenin in wax on a bed of stone,
Krupskaya a cold presence
at his passionless side.
Now the revolution rests on ten million dead
and Frankenstein has a Marxist bride.
RON BINNS
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;:'£i-   if
"» .**^..**
.m,*"^
The misshapen dwarf
in the side show
loudmouthed, clumsy clod
tripping over his own feet.
Ever the target of practical jokers.
The crowd snickers at his deformity,
sadistically enjoying
this grovelling creature
with his twisted frame
and his pranks aimed at self-abasement.
satiated, they swagger into the night,
venomous mirth dripping from their open mouths.
A few
suddenly stop
racked with uncontrollable shuddering.
The great mirror blocks their path
large and compelling.
Staring in with glass eyes
they see themselves,
broken bleeding bodies
wounded with their own barbs.
SUSAN ALEXANDER
When the lights are 01
the curds in Lynne's stomach
are like the moon
and have invisible wires
attached to her toes
which uncurl
when the lights are out.
she sees them
as horizontal wires
not one
but a series
that stretch like hurdles
over which
the cookies must pass.
I, however,
scion of rabbis
who tormented labour unrest
see the curds in Lynnes stomach
like a big mutzah ball,
like the moon.
P.S. Lynne asked me to change her
name to protect the innocent.
GORDON ROBACK
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 - /
** \t.-
—dave Wilkinson
This is her process of unfolding:
first
with fingernail
she strips the orange
of its skin
balancing each piece
carefully
within another
like a blossom
then
she separates
the fruit
with both thumbs
into halves
and
each half
into sections
pinching the tip
of each section
between thumb
and forefinger
she raises it
to her mouth
her teeth
explode
inside the orange
the juice springs
to the corners
of her lips
where she slides
her tongue
from side to side
to catch each
drop
naked and bald
she delivers herself to this orange
piece by piece
she emerges
whole
DIANA SCHUTZ
Big joke
Our lovemaking lacks
the wispy blue beauty
of dragonflies mating in air
or of fish brushing life
into the sand with their tails.
Like peripatetic jokes
we are made to hump
like goats.
LOIS GUBBE
Let sleeping bags lie
By MERRILEE ROBSON
I am playing a flute. The music floats
over the trees into the purple-grey sky. My
friends are sitting on either side of me. The
flute is only a shiny metal tube with no holes,
a piece of junk I found in the grass. The
music is my voice, Michael hands me the
bottle and I lay down the flute to take it. We
are drinking wine.
We are in the far corner of the garden but I
can still see the lights from the road. We
have just left our room, a small one with
blue walls. The lights are on in the big room
next to ours but I can't see anyone because
the window panes are coloured and tiny. I
try to remember the faces of the people
staying there. I can remember the pattern
their sleeping bags make on the floor; there
is a red one near the door, then a light blue
one, a dark blue, light green.
Richard sits up as I put the cold wine
bottle on his brown stomach. Richard is my
oldest friend.
Our window is dark. We're lucky to have
that room to ourselves, just the three of us.
It is really only a corner of the big room that
has been walled in. Richard and I found it
first. It has a little cupboard in it and a
mirror on the wall. It's a good room, very
private.
Richard was jealous of Michael at first. I
met him one day on the hostel's fire escape
and asked him to share our room. Richard
found Michael's sleeping bag in there and
almost threw it out before I told him. Then
he wouldn't talk to me all day. Now Richard
likes Michael too.
We'd already finished one bottle of wine in
our room. But it was too hot in there. So we
came outside, down the broken back steps to
the grassy yard. Michael opened the second
bottle. I played the flute and Richard lay on
the Grass, his blue shirt open to show his
brown belly. Now Michael says that the wine
is gone and I lie back too, against the log
that separates us from the gravel of the
parking lot. Michael picks up the metal tube
and pretends he has a telescope.
Michael wants to go back to the liquor
store and Richard doesn't think we're too
drunk. I go upstairs to get my sandals. They
are dusty and two straps are broken. My
feet are dirty, brown and warm. Michael
throws the silver cylinder under the tree and
I go to the wine store with Richard and
Michael.
"What's this?" Michael asks. The windows of the wine store are unlit. People are
walking down the sidewalk. "Stop!" I say,
holding up my hand like a cartoon traffic
cop. "Can you tell us where there's another
liquor store?"
There's three of them, two guys and a
woman. One guy says, "That's where we're
going, we'll show you." I look at the other
two. I'd seen them this morning, on the other
side of the street, looking very pleased with
themselves. Then Richard says, "Hey, I saw
you two this morning." They are both tall,
with hair the same blond shade, like twins.
The other one is shorter, dark and thin. He
tells me his name is Doug and I introduce
myself and Michael. Richard is talking to
the blond ones, Joan and Peter. Doug walks
with Michael and me. After a while Michael
moves up beside Richard.
I tell Doug about the mouse Michael found
today. It must have been someone's pet; it
was so friendly. It had big, round ears.
Michael held it in his hand and it would try
to run up his sleeve. The people from the
hostel said we couldn't keep it there.
Michael wanted to let it go outside but
Richard and I were afraid it would die.
Richard named the mouse Clarissa and we
found a box for her. But she kept getting out.
Besides, we've decided to leave tomorrow.
Michael is coming with Richard and me. But
we couldn't take the mouse.
There's a little store across the street
from the hostel that sells pottery and leather
things. We had been in there before and the
guy that worked there looked like the kind of
person who would care about a mouse. So we
took Clarissa over there. There was a girl
there too.
"Oh sure, we'd like a mouse, wouldn't
we?" shesaid, looking back at the buy when
we showed Clarissa to them.
"No, we can't have a mouse. Don't be
stupid." We'd been wrong about him,  I
thought.
"Oh please, I'd really like to keep her."
"No!"  We gave him  dirty looks  and
Richard put the lid back on Clarissa's box.
Michael looked embarrassed.
"Then we could give the mouse to Miss
Lamour. She'd like it."
"Miss Lamour would not like a mouse.
Well, maybe she would but you're not going
to get her one."
"She could have a mouse. She had a kitten
once."
"She did not. Miss Lamour never had a
kitten. Why don't you shut up."
We started to leave. The girl followed us to
the door. "Do you know who Miss Lamour
is?" she said, laughing. "She's my cat."
We finally let Clarissa out in the back
yard. She ran into a hole between the bricks
in the barbecue. She might be all right there.
I'm concerned now, even though I didn't
think about it while we were drinking in the
garden. Doug is sympathetic.
The liquor store is pretty exciting. The
light is strange, though, making the bottles
shine with weird brilliance. The shelves are
silver. There are bottles of everything, clear
green or crystal bottles with bright contents.
Richard and I try to pick a bottle of wine
while Michael contemplates the vodka.
Doug stands beside us. He says, "Why
don't you come to my place. We're having a
Tittle party." Richard wants to go but we
have to ask Michael first. We call him over,
trying to convince him that he can't afford
vodka. Richard and I won't drink it. Michael
thinks he will drink the whole bottle himself.
Michael wants to go to Doug's house but we
have to buy the wine first. Peter and Joan
call us impatiently and we leave.
Doug lives in the basement of a brown
house. We have to go through the main part
of the house to get to his room. "The guy that
lives up here is a faggot," Doug says,
looking at Richard. We seem to be making a
lot of noise. Doug unlocks the. door to his
room. The bathroom is across the hall; we
might need it later.
Joan and Peter put the things on the
kitchen table, getting out a large bowl to mix
them in: vodka, wine, grape pop and
Welch's grape juice. Doug scoops some out
in tea cups and hands and we lick it off but
our hands are still stained with it. Doug sits
down on the bed and I sit beside him, with
Michael next to me. Richard is in the armchair opposite the bed, watching us. Joan
and Peter stay at the table on the other side
of the room.
SeePFll:LET
Friday, March 5, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 9 Messages
From PF5
In a surge of restless dissatisfaction, he jumped to his knees and
stared     at     the     blackness.
He cupped his hands against the
window.     There,     under     the
basketball hoop,  in front of the
garage, in the tiny asphalt court
that formed like a "p" at the back
of the house, sat their old white
Volkswagen;   and ducking  away
behind it, at a run, bent over his
unnaturally   long   legs,   was "the
landlady's son. in the madras shirt
with the sleeves too shart for his
arms.   A   shoulder   blade   disappearing with the grace of a bird's
wing — as graceful, as slender,
George   mused,   as   the   boy's
probably   massive   desire   could
appear, to him, George. He didn't
turn to Lilly right away, his quiet,
secretive,   cloistered  Lilly,   Lilly
perched on the bed as though she
were   daintily   going   to   the
bathroom,   in   that   vulnerable
posturehe liked, it gave the thighs,
the  belly,  all the  same  smooth
roundness, Lilly perched on their
bed in her pink lackadaisical see-
through nightgown with the waxen
beautiful nipples beneath, his Lilly
who held his hand on the street and
at parties and visiting friends, until
one day sitting disconsolate and
irritated   with   some   little   spat
between them at a bus stop bench,
waiting   for   the   North   Van-
Lonsdale 30, at night, under the
bluish purple of the streetlight,
he'd said, Look, even when we fight
we're holding hands,  and she'd
said, Yes, that is strange, in such a
tone, not quite scientific, that he
knew   she  was  seriously   contemplating it, until tonight, at this
parry, they hadn't held hands, he
couldn't   remember  now,   who'd
first secretly or carelessly not held
hands — Lilly who always without
comment drew the curtains before
she undressed. . . .
"I just saw the landlady's son,"
he said.
"You should have closed the
curtains," she said.
"Lilly. . . You always close the
curtains."
"I forgot."
Her candid as candid eyes
lighted on him, quiet as a cat's
mouth.
He jumped up and pulled the
curtains closed. He lay on his side,
away from her.
"Don't be silly, George."
"He is down here all the time. I
know he likes you."
"George!"
"He tenses when he sees you."
"Yes, he does," she said with the
same scientific curiosity as when
they had held hands all through the
argument at the bus stop. He found
something pleasing in discovering
this tone inner,'now; but then, with
the fogginess of suspicion, he found
something unsettling in it.
"He tenses and he hovers,"
George said more firmly.
He saw the boy now, in exact,
particular image, hovering in their
livingroom, his face blank, startled, receptive and overheated, his
posture the image of that posture
he had on the little basketball court
outride. She must know the boy
desired her. Was this neglect with
the curtains, then, a bit of revenge
for the party? He turned over onto
one elbow and gazed at her, saddened. He couldn't ask her. But
then he thought how ridiculous it
was for him to think such a thing.
He felt a prick of guilt, then a self-
strangeness, and awe that he could
be so suspicious. And into this awe,
which was a kind of emptiness,
shot a sudden image of the boy on
top of Lilly. He started at the
ceiling — half, he suspected,
because he could not stare at her
and entertain such a gross vision.
Himself she would permit to enter
only gradually and carefully, her
eyes half shut, her mouth opened in
a little "O," ready to cry out. Afterward she would bend in half, her
knees up around her ears, to investigate herself.
He pictured a basketball attempting that pleasingly little,
dotingly guarded, irritable orifice.
But the image's absurdity contained its own salve.
He shut his eyes. A nervous gold'
and blackness shimmered on his
retina. He opened his eyes. Lilly's
head hung over his, her thick little
lips smiling, elfin, the blue eyes
like a cat's, mischievous, saying,
"Tit. For tat."
He didn't watch her turn out the
light. ...
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION
Special advanced group
meditation for all
meditators on Mon.
Mar. 8th, at 12:30 p.m.
in Woodward I.R.C. G42.
He hugged her possessively,
squeezing his hard-on against her
backbone.
He didn't sleep for hours. It
frightened him how easily he'd
fallen for the vibrant woman in the
snappy green dress. And with a
slight, subtle terror he lay,
passively, waiting for the future
with Lilly. One, one baby from his
darling Lilly. He couldn't trust
himself. How easily he'd flaunted
all this. And how easily he might
leave her some day, without even
wanting to. But how even more
terrible it was to love her, to
pretend he had the strength, the
bluntness needed to be sane,
father, husband, human denizen.
His wife's face was a mystery to
him, and when he stared into it to
see her depths, all he saw was
beauty, and a reflection of all the
reworkings of himself that his
staring searches had gotten him.
He thought and thought about it,
and he finally decided that it was a
good thing he was happy, considering.
Hillel House Presents
A Casino Evening
to be held at
1997 West 35th Ave., Vancouver
Saturday, March 6
Admission $1.00
Refreshments Available
STARTING AT 8:00 P.M.
(^apri f-'L
ipn ^
and
izza
Free
Campus Delivery
i PHONE 1
224-1720
I 224-6336 |
4450 W. 10th AVE.
J^teak ^hrt
oude
Fully Licensed
Pizza in 29 Styles
Choice of 3 Sizes
Special Italian Dishes
STEAKS - SEA FOODS
Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. - Sunday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
BRITAIN
VANCOUVER-
LONDON
MAY   6
- AUG. 31
	
$389
MAY 14
- AUG. 23
—
419
MAY 15
- JULY   2
—
409
MAY 15
- SEPT.24
—
429
MAY 21
- JULY   9
—
409
MAY 21
- SEPT.  6
—
419
JUNE   1
- AUG. 24
—
429
JUNE    1
- SEPT.  7
—
429
JUNE   7
- AUG.   9
—
439
JUNE 28
- AUG. 31
—
469
JULY    1
- AUG. 31
—
489
AUG. 27
- DEC.  9
—
459
SEPT.  3
- DEC. 16
—
429
DEC. 16
- JAN.     2
—
409
DEC. 16
- JAN.     9
—
409
DEC. 16
- APR. 28
—
409
Many more departures are available from 2
weeks to 10 weeks in duration.
The price on the above ABC flights DO NOT
include trip cancellation insurance or Canadian
airport tax.
NEW ZEALAND
The New Zealand Work Exchange is a programme that
A.O.S.C. offer in conjunction with the New Zealand
Universities Student Association (NZUSA). Fifty successful
applicants will be provided with work permits in New
Zealand for a 3-month period, May 15 to August 25.
COST: From Vancouver $783.00
DEPARTS: May 15, 1976
RETURNS: August 25, 19?6
Cost Includes:
* Return     air     transportation     from    Toronto     or
Vancouver and return
* Work permits
* Orientation programme in Canada and New Zealand
* Information on job opportunities in New Zealand
* 1  night's accommodation in Auckland upon arrival
Eligibility:
This programme is open to full-time students enrolled
at member colleges and universities of A.O.S.C.
AUSTRALIA
VANCOUVER
-SYDNEY
MAY    1
- AUG. 30
JUNE 29
- SEPT.  3
MAY 15
- AUG. 20
JULY 31
- AUG. 20
MAY 27
- JULY 30
DEC. 16
- JAN.     3
MAY 29
- SEPT.  3
EUROPE
VANCOUVER - AMSTERDAM
MAY 5
MAY 5
MAY 12
MAY 19
MAY 24
MAY 25
JUNE 9
JUNE 29
JULY 1
AUG.    4
JUNE 3
JULY 1
JULY 22
JULY 29
SEPT. 7
JULY 30
AUG. 11
AUG. 30
AUG. 24
SEPT.  2
$758 Return plus $8 Canadian Transportation Tax.
VANCOUVER - FRANKFURT
MAY 10   -   JUNE 14 -   $419
JUNE 23 -   AUG. 23 -     499
JULY   5 -   AUG. 17  -     499
Many more departures are available from 2 weeks to
10 weeks in duration.
The price on the above ABC flights DO NOT include
trip  cancellation   insurance  or  Canadian airport tax.
CULTURAL PROGRAMME IN PARIS
Departures:     MARCH    25,    APRIL     1,    APRIL    15,
APRIL 29 and weekly until SEPTV30, OCT. 22.
Cost:  $380 — Jan.  to  May  and Sept. to' Dec. $440
— June, July and August.
INCLUDES:
© Return transportation Montreal to Paris
Q Transfer upon arrival, from airport to hostel
o Six   nights  accommodation  in  a  hostel  or similar
type of accommodation
o Coach tour of Paris
. © Service of an A.O.S.C. representative
SAILING
Depart Montreal
(on the Alexander Pushkin)
May 19  September 8   October 9
"THE ONLY WAY TO CROSS." It's cheaper than you think. Rates are based on students sharing a
4-berth cabin and include all meals, the usual shipboard activities — in fact just about everything
except alcohol — and it's duty free. Port taxes and gratuities are not included.
Depart New York
(on the Mikhail Lermontov)
April 30 September 25
June 2 October 27
Eligibility: Student sailings are available to full-time students in possession
of an International Student Identity Card.
Westbound Sailings Also Available at the Same Prices
To:
Prices*
Crossing Time
Le Havre
$280.00
8 days
London
295.00
9 days
Bremerhaven
310.00
10 days
Leningrad
350.00
14 days
New York Departure tax: $3.75; Montreal: $2.50.
Disembarkation Tax:   Le Havre $10.00; London $9.00; Leningrad   $2.00
TRAVEL
Room  100P Student Union Building,
University of B.C. 224-0111
STUDENTRAIL/EURAIL PASSES - BRITRAIL PASSES
CAR RENTALS, LEASES    TOURS
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT IDENTITY CARD
STUDENT FLIGHTS TO THE FAR EAST, INDIA,
AFRICA AND WITHIN EUROPE
Page Friday, 20
HE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 Let sleeping bags lie
From PF 9
Doug picks up his guitar and
starts to sing. "This is for Joan and
Peter and their kid, man. They just
found out this morning. That's
really going to be some kid."
Michael starts to bang on the end of
the bed. That means that Richard
and I have to do our imitations of
the Chinese Opera singers we saw
once. We start to wail. Joan and
Peter bank on the kitchen pots.
We think that our song sounds
beautiful and we sing it for ten
minutes. We laugh. Joan says, "We
didn't really want you to come but
now I'm glad you did." We're
filling the teacups again and
everyone's laughing. Michael
kisses me and then Doug kisses
me. Richard watches jealously.
Doug leans toward him. "You
know, I went to bed with the guy
upstairs once but I'd rather sleep
with women," he says. I smile at
Richard, my look saying, "Aha, I
win."
Joan and Peter are hugging.
Then I'm sitting on Richard's knee
and telling him I love him and he's
saying that he loves me. I'm sort of
aware that Doug is kissing Michael
and I'm confused because Michael
is the heterosexual one. Then Doug
takes my hand. "Come on," he
says. I look at Richard and we both
shrug.
Doug leads me into the bathroom
and closes the door. It is dark and
quiet here. The bathroom is larger
than most. He tells me to wait and
goes to the corner by the toilet. I
watch while he urinates. I'm sitting on the cement floor. He comes
back and sits beside me. We kiss.
I'm thinking that we should
" make love. And he asks, "Why
don't you stay here tonight?" So I
say, "Okay, but what about
Richard and Michael?" Doug says
that they can stay too, so I will. I
never go anywhere without
Richard, and now Michael is one of
us.
"Why don't you stay here for a
while?" he asks.
"I can't," I say, "we're leaving
tomorrow."
"Why?"
"I don't know, we just decided
to."
"Well, you can change your
mind, can't you?"
"I guess so but you don't really
have room for us."
"I didn't ask them to stay, just
you."
"But then I really can't stay."
I'm getting upset because I really
don't have any reason for leaving
tomorrow. Richard and I rarely
plan things. But now we do have a
plan and Michael is part of it.
Besides, I'd never go anywhere
without Richard. And now we have
Michael to worry about and plan
with. Michael thinks he's in love
with me. I begin to feel guilty about
sitting on the bathroom floor with
Douglas who is beginning to undo
the buttons on my blouse.
But I know that Richard wishes
he were here with Doug so it
doesn't matter that Michael wishes
he were here with me. I love
Richard but Doug is kissing me
and my blouse is undone and of
course I never wear a bra. I know
that Richard wants Doug but that
Richard loves me.
Then Doug says that my watch
has scratched him. He undoes the
clasp and takes it off my wrist. The
watch is shiny in the light from the
window. He puts it on the edge of
the bathtub. I notice the absence of
the ticking I never hear, never feel
on my wrist. "No, I'll forget it," I
complain, reaching for it.
"You won't forget it. I'll remind
you." He's lying on the floor now,
pulling me down, and the floor is
cool.
"But I want it."
"I hate it if people leave their
watches on when they're making
love."
I tell him that I don't to make
love. I'm mad at him for making
such a fuss. But still I feel like a
cat, wailing and scratching,
protesting in a ritual that makes it
more exciting.
Then he says, "Christ, I suppose
you think I'm trying to steal it. It's
only a cheap watch anyway." But
this is a watch that Richard has
given me. Richard and I both work
as little as possible and this makes
the cost of the watch more impressive. This watch is chosen with
Richard's own rather odd, very
good taste. Richard knows how
important order is to me, and
having plans.
I cry and scream Richard's
name. Doug is standing in front of
the door, keeping me in. I can
vaguely realize that he is trying to
be kind, to calm me down. I don't
want him to be like that. "Okay,
okay," he says, opening the door.
I've expected too much from him.
But Richard is outside the door so
I'm hugging him and crying, "I
love you, I love you." Joan and
Peter are looking worried;  Doug
looks embarrassed.
. Richard tells me that Michael
has gone back to the hostel. I worry
about hurting him. Then I'm angry
at his possessiveness and realize
that he can't really be a part of this
friendship.
We're leaving. Peter and Doug
stay downstairs. Joan comes up
with us. It has been raining. She
picks dark red begonias from the
front yard and when she gives
them to us the colour remains on
her hands. I think of asking for
their address but I'm sober enough
to realize that I would never write
to them. My hands are stained
from the purple drinks and the red
flowers. That seems permanent
enough.
Richard and I are embracing, a
necessity if we are to hold each
other up. We climb the stairs to our
little blue room. Michael is not
there. I say I wish I'd screwed
Doug. Richard knows what I mean.
We start to laugh. I knock him
down onto the sleeping bags and we
mock wrestle, laughing, releasing
sexual tensions. Richard wants to
make love but I say no, knowing
that sex would spoil the perfect
sadness of this friendship. Then I
change my mind'but this time it is
Richard who protects us. We're
still laughing, making fun of even
Michael. Richard starts to throw
his sleeping bag out but I say not
to. Because we are leaving
tomorrow. We still have to decide
what to do about Michael.
SATURDAY NIGHT REALLY LIVE!
A Special Midnight Show
GEORGE
CARLIN
SPECIAL FEATURED GUESTS
TRAVIS SHOOK & THE CLUB WOW
QUEEN ELIZABETH" THEATRE
Saturday, March 13, at MIDNIGHT
Tickets:     $5.00,    $6.00,    $7.00.     Available
Woodward's      Concert      Box
information call: 687-2801.
Offices.      For
' 'Seven words you can't say on
television"
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THMFTT*S
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A Portrait Of
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Friday, March 5, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 11 Chicagoans
From PF 6
He asked to see the stick incense
because it was foreign to him. She
stuck it under his nose and then
inserted it into a- little vase. She
continued removing the cushions.
He watched. She pulled the mattress out, sat on the edge of the bed,
set her alarm clock for seven a.m.
"I'm sorry, I'm a bitch about
getting my sleep and it's past one
already."
"Can't you slow down, can't you
be a bit romantic?"
Janell sighed. "I put on my
favorite perfume while in the
bathroom, I've lit incense for you
and am about to light a candle,
what more do you want?"
"I want you to slow down, there's
no hurry, if you want to sleep, we
can sleep."
"You know I don't want to just
sleep. Do you want to smoke a
jay?"
Larry joined her on the bed.
They smoked two jays in silence
before Larry kissed her. She was
slow and easy under his hands. He
held her, touched her, talking
between kisses. She didn't remove
her robe. They stretched out and
into each other, moving gently, as
two good friends still enjoying the
conversation begun hours ago.
Larry's body, a new body, a new
man, pleased Janell. He talked
about his past, working on river-
boats, getting into fights, selling
insurance and real estate. He
kissed Janell long and deep,
touching her gums with his quick
tongue. He wakened her
femaleness, her soul reaching for
his touch, to meet him on the other
side of their bodies.
He was a perfect one-night
stand: from out of town, country
voice, single, wealthy, strong and
funny. His sensuous hands appreciated what he held and treated
it exactly as it needed, wanted and
could only receive from strangers.
The warm glow of a new man,
like a new sunrise, heated her
body. A new man, tall and strong,
supposedly unmarried, hard and
wise, clever and kind, like most
SeePF 13: CHICAGOANS
,./fTiMP@i¥ii)))	
.•""     . VFROM   THE   WOSLG S   OLDEST   DtSTIlliRY^y   /     S'   '   ';..
In the Backroom
THE WADE BROTHERS
WITH JOANI TAYLOR
'til March 6
Upstairs
THE BEST OF FRIENDS
'til March 6
Lounge
Meg Walker Quartet
March 8-JAZZ ROOM
Gary Burton
Quintet
COMING EVENTS
March 15-20
Anthony Braxton
with Dave Holland
March 8-13-
in the Backroom
Willie Wild &
The Wild Bunch
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW
RESERVATIONS 683-7306
Add a taste of Irish laughter
to your coffee.
Old Bushmills rich, original, emphatic taste
adds gusto to piping hot coffee. Sipping it through
cream makes it delightful.
Moisten rim of 8 oz. stemmed glass with
Old Bushmills Irish Whiskey. Dip glass into sugar.
Pour Yli oz. of Old Bushmills Irish Whiskey. Add 1 tsp.
brown sugar, strong black coffee and top with spoonful
of whipped cream. Serve and watch the smiles.
,■" t'
ITS A COMEDY FULL OF LOVE . ..
Elliott Gould     a     Diane Keaton
"I WILL, I WILL, FOR NOW'
MATURE
Vogue
SHOWS AT: 12:40, 2:55, 5:05       »1» 6R.ANVH.LE
7:20,9:35 6S55434
MATURE
Odeon
A DYING DAUGHTER'S LAST GIFT BECOMES THE
j^CHQES
that u
SHOWS AT: 7:30, 9:30
OFACUMMEfl   Km
■ill linger in K^Wiiour iiea/1 tureivr. ^^^^^g
AN ASTRAL FILMS RELEASE
RICHARD HARRIS
876-2747
FRANCOUS TRUFFAUT
THE
STORY
OFADELEH.
SHOWS AT: 7:30, 9:30^
MATURE
Dunbar
2247151
DUNBAR at 30th
GLENDA JACKSON — Two time Academy Award Winner
„„_m   . *-,„,„„„,-.    — New York Film Critics a
BEST ACTRESS OF THE YEAR   -National Society of Fifcn Critics |
ilv/i ATtJ R F — National Board of Review
Some nude and
| suggestive scenes.
-R. J. McDonald ,,. iriniP
B.C. Director aitsw  10th
I SHOWS: 7:30.9:30 4375 W  10,h
THE DEVIL I
A WOMAN
Varsitu
977
cbuffm
la radio pas
comme les aurres
(in French of course)
"AU BUCHANAN 106"
LES 5 ET 6 MARS
VENEZ VOIR NOTRE CIRCUIT
FERME DE TELEVISION FRANCAISE
NOUS OFFRONS LE CAFE
«#.*%«».
«<C
w
JJ) Society Radio-Canada
Radio Canada B.P. 4600 — Vancouver 5
700 Rue Hamilton — Tel. 665-8039
Page Friday, 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 Chicagoans
FromPF 12
men the first time even if they all
were one-night stands.
They undressed each other
gradually. The gentle whirlings of
incense smoke circled their bodies
as they moved together. Larry's
gentleness frightened Janell. She
hung onto the love flos, her flesh
trembling, until he noticed and
slowed his pace to keep her next to
him.
She hid her heart and encouraged him on. He let go with his
firm body that did kill a man on the
riverboat, Mr. Insurance Man,
smiling, country-boy, burying
himself in her, buying her drinks,
slurring his words.
He lost himself in their
lovemaking, taking her with him
by some uncanny touch. They both
moved with the quickness of the
act almost completed, the painting
almost, just almost done, the right
■-, strokes here, over there, your turn
■-. to paint, now, yes, now and there,
yes and right there and yes . . .
They breathed with their mouths
open. They waited for their hearts
to relax. They had come, to the
meeting ground, like warrior Indians, given the greeting and all
was well, the fire still burned, the
peace pipe still shared. They
watched the light fade into the
distance as their breathing
returned to normal.
"You're really good," he said,
"yes, you're fantastic."
"As good as my lover."
"You make me feel sooo good, is
there any chance I can convince
you to come back with me to St.
Paul?"
"No."
"I'll fly you back to Chicago?"
"No."
"I'd love cominghome to you."
"You're a fine man," she said as
she touched his face and pushed
back his dark hair.
Janell rested her head on Larry's
shoulder. He held her securely,
their bodies entwined, warmth
flowing between them like two
dying stars.
Janell woke constantly
throughout the night with the taste
of lust in her mouth. She wanted to
wake him, to do it over and over
again till she absorbed all of his
flesh. The alarm woke them both.
"I wanted you during the night."
"Why didn't you wake me?"
"You needed your sleep."
"I'm awake now."
Morning light filled the room as
they loved again. Morning love was
less romantic for Janell but more
needed. To feel Larry surround her
again, to be there again, in the
morning when they could see each
other and remember the night
before and chose once again, to do
it all over, from beginning to end,
all that was important to Janell.
They dressed like college
roommates,
"What are your plans for the
day?"
"I hope all goes well."
"That's a nice shirt you have
"I like your dress."
"Thank you."
*      *      *
They left each other. Janell
walked towards the El, amazed at
her cold feelings and the dread that
he might call. But he was single,
she reassured herself. It had been
fun, no matter how she viewed it in
daylight.
/P
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Friday, March 5, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 13 .29
SERIES
7E 1052 - Greatest Hits -
Eagles
.29
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KELLY'S
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QUANTITIES LIMITED, SALE ENDS MARCH 11th/76
OCLP.5003 - Love To Love
You Baby - Donna Summer
• 29
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•29
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MCA.2144 Don't Cry Joni
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• 29
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SP.9020 - Greatest Hits
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rS\
Page Friday, 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1976 •VISTA
By ANNE WALLACE
Ever noticed how drama,
both filmed and live, runs in
trends? Of course you have! In the
summer it was sharks and this
week the Playhouse Theatre
Centre of B.C. is keeping up with
the current trend set by Jack
Nicholson.
They will be opening with
Back to Beulah, a Canadian play
about the attempts of a well-
meaning psychiatrist to cure three
mental patients by taking them out
of their hospital, Beulah, and
making a half-way house for them
in her basement.
The Calgary Herald" critic wrote
of the play: "It proved to be one of
those rare productions that tickle
the funny bone while stimulating
the brain cells. In short, it is entertainment of the finest kind."
The play opens Tuesday and
curtain time is 8 p.m.
In the west when one speaks of
French Canada, it's usually in
reference to hockey. This weekend,
Simon Fraser University will show
another contribution of the French
to our culture by presenting the
play Les Belles Soeurs. Written by
Michael Trefnblay, this is the first
English production of the play in
Western Canada. It is a very funny
comedy written in the rough style
of the French working class. Les
Belles Soeurs is playing at Studio II
(adjacent from the SFU theatre)
tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $1.50 for students.
Plus de choses francais . . .
Quebec 75 ends this weekend at the
Vancouver Art Gallery. This is a
survey of art in Quebec in the past
five years, with looks at current
trends and tendencies in painting,
sculpture, printmaking, video and
cinematography. For further information, call the gallery at 732-
5322.
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
is presenting something a little
different in the music s*cene this
week in their fourth concert by the
group Days Month and Years to
Come. The concert will be in two
parts, the first half involving the
use   of   electronics.   Music   will
feature an amplified flute and a
solo piece for percussion and tape.
The second half will be no less
unique, featuring harpsichord
music. Here is a rare chance to
sample something out of the ordinary. Concert time is 9 p.m. on
Sunday and tickets are $2.
This week the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra will also
present something which is a little
different for them. None other than
Larry Adler, mouth-organ virtuoso
extraordinaire, will be playing
with VSO. This is the third concert
in the duMaurier Pops series with
conductor Kazuyoshi Akiyama.
Concerts are 8:30 p.m. tonight and
Saturday at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre. It should be an interesting
concert if only to hear what the
Concerto for Harmonica and Orchestra sounds like.
If you're sick of paying $3.50 a
shot to see a movie, there are
alternatives. Every weekend there
are showings at the Centennial
Auditorium, with one buck tickets.
This week it's Oh, What a Lovely
War, starring Sir Laurence
Olivier, John Mills^ and Vanessa
Redgrave, among other
distinguished stars. Directed by
Richard Attenborough, it is a
"witty indictment of the
chauvinism responsible for the
wholesale slaughter of World War
I." Films show Friday and
Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 2
p.m.
"Are you packin' a rod or are
you just glad to see me?" Did that
lady have style! These words
belong, of course, to that
provocative blonde of the thirties,
Mae West. She returns to the silver
screen with that epic line Monday
at 8 p.m. at VECC. Appropriately
enough, the movie title is "I'm no
Angel" It also stars Cary Grant,
and Eddy Arnold, and cost is $1.25.
Next Thursday at noon, UBC
students will be honored by a visit
from W. S. Mer.win, a highly acclaimed poet and author of many
books. This noted poet has received
numerous  awards,  among them
A whole
new way to save!
NOW
A SUPER SPECIAL
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s76
Travel anywhere you like on Greyhound and participating carriers' routes
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it's all up to you!
Other Ameripass travel-freedom plans:
15 days $125.
30 days $175.
60 days s250.
7-day Ameripass Is on sale only until March 31, 1976. 15-day Ameripass until April 30.
Call your local Greyhound agent for other qualifications and information.
GREYHOUND CANADA
. .. Leave the driving to us.
Looking for summer employment? Try Greyhound.
the Pulitzer Prize and the National
Book award. He will appear noon
Thursday in Buchanan room 106 to
give poetry readings from his
works. This guy is big stuff and not
to be missed.
Another interesting up and
coming event for noon is Noon-
tunes. This is sponsored by the
UBC arts undergraduate society in
conjunction with Valley Productions and will consist of three
noonhour concerts. Performers
will include the Pied Pumkin
String Ensemble, Eagle Beaver,
and Joani Taylor with Tons of Jazz.
It might be a good idea to keep
these noons free to catch this first
class entertainment. More information next week.
If you want a sneak preview of
some of these entertainers, you can
drop into the Lutheran Campus
Centre coffeehouse tonight. Eagle
Beaver   will   play   their   unique
brand of folk music, and all the
members of the band are UBC
creative writing students. The
Coffeehouse opens at 8:30 p.m. and
runs until 1 a.m. with admission
charge of $1. All Open House
visitors are welcome.
There is another unique little
Coffee Shop in Vancouver that you
might take the time to discover.
It's called the Lane Inn Coffee Shop
at 1644 West Broadway. It's not
easy to find because it's in the lane
behind the street but then, the best
places never are out in the open.
It's not very big either but for $2 a
person, you can get a sumptuous
East Indian dinner and then sit
back and enjoy a little chess, some
music, pleasant company, all that
stuff that is so hard to find in the
big city. When you stop by, say
hello to Terry, he's the proprietor,
and tell him The Ubyssey sent you.
W. S. MERWIN... winner of
Pulitzer Prize, National Book
Award, Yale Younger Poems, will
appear on campus March 11,
12:30 p.m. in Buchanan 106.
s
exuii Restaurant Dining Room
WELCOME TO U.B.C.
SPECIAL "WESTERN" SMORGASBORD
5:00 P.M. to 8:30 P.M.
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rain sale
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open 10 a.m.-10 p.m. seven days a week
Friday, March 5,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, IS Page 22
UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 26,   1976
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2803 W. Broadway (& Macdonald) 736-7771 Page 23
Quebec workers meet
5,000 mull general strike
CUSO INFORMATION NIGHT
Canadian University Press
Five thousand Montreal area
workers and students assembled at
the Paul Sauve arena Wednesday
night and gave the leader of the
three union centrals forming the
Front Commun a mandate for a
general strike.
The union leaders, representing
the Quebec public sector unions —
Confederation des Syndicats
National (CSN), Federation des
Travailleurs du Quebec (FTQ) and
the Conseil d'Enseignants (CEQ)
— called the meeting to gauge
rank-and-file        feeling in
preparation for an orientation
committee meeting this Sunday
that will decide on the general
strike action.
The workers at the meeting who
are employed in the public service
were obviously enthusiastic when
the possibility of a general strike
was discussed.
Chants of "solidarite" and "unis
nous vaincrons" interrupted
speakers and filled interludes.
Michel Chartrand, president of
the Montreal central of CSN, read
the mood clearly and was loudly
cheered when he insisted on
"solidarite avant tous." Chartrand
said there was little difference
between the government of Quebec
as an employer and the worst of
private industry.
The CSN-Front Commun coordinator, Jacques Desmarais,
said the Quebec government's
ceiling on public sector wages and
the concurrent cutback of public
services, is part of a world-wide
trend to "rationalize" government
services by reducing cost.
"But it doesn't reduce the cost
for the taxpayer, because in the
long run the taxpayer — the
worker that is — has to pay more
for private enterprise to supply
these services," he said.
Public sector employee demands
lay behind the 10-day general
strike that hit the province in 1972.
At that time the common front of
the three union centrals joined to
press for a minimum $100 a week
wage for all public and "para-
public" workers.
This year, the workers are
asking for a $65 a week minimum
as well as a package of fringe
benefits including maternity leave
and daycare facilities.
Meanwhile, teachers in Montreal
and other Quebec schools are
trying to negotiate a new contract
that would bring them into parity
with teachers in the other
provinces.
Desmarais has said that if the
Final decision next week
From page 1
His superiors were so impressed
that he was hired almost immediately and appointed to the
combined posts.
In addition to being bilingual,
Deviaulthas the qualifications that
would enable him to fill the
position, sources have indicated.
A brigadier-general from Ottawa, Carr has been working for
the Armed Forces' personnel
department. He is also a former
commanding officer of the CAF
base in Chilliwack.
There was a curious split when
committee members were
requested 10 remaining applicants
in January.- In most instances
when scoring for Bailey was very
high, Davis was low in points. And
when committee members rated
Davis at the top, Bailey received
little support. This difference could
indicate an interesting division in
the committee's final decision.
The committee will give a list of
the four candidates in order of
preference to Vogt after personal
interviews conclude Tuesday.
The final decision as to who will
be the permanent head of housing
and food services next year is not
expected to be announced by the
president's office until late next
week.
AFGHAN
HOUSE
^^4
HAND EMBROIDERED
100% COTTON PRODUCTS
Patch Skirts - Shoes
Harem Pants Imported
Direct From Afghanistan
,953 DENMAN ST.
ALL EX-MALASPINA COLLEGE STUDENTS
YOU ARE INVITED TO
A REUNION & NEW CAMPUS TOUR
FRIDAY-MARCH 5, 1976
4:00-8:00 P.M.
PLEASE DROP BY!!!
For Further Information Contact:
GEORGE MAPSON
Malaspina College
375 Kennedy Street
Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2J3
Bourassa government's economy
moves outlined in Bill 64 are
adopted, "almost half of the Front
Commun's 185,000 public and para-
public sectors' workers will be
condemned to living below the
poverty line."
"The boss (the Quebec government) said the $100 a week demand
was ridiculous back in 1972," said
Desmarais. "But some weeks
later, after the general strike,
without fanfare, they thought
again and discovered that the
workers' demands were
reasonable."
Desmarais concluded that "for
the first time, in 1972 we were able
to negotiate a wage based on
workers' needs."
It was clear from the literature
of the Front Commun, as well as
the banners and placards of the
workers attending the meeting,
that more than the public sector
demands would be involved in a
general strike. Many banners
protested the "Trudeau law" that
froze wage increases to 10 per cent
per annum. Chartrand, Desmarais
and an ETQ speaker all urged
revocation of the freeze in their
speeches.
Universite du Quebec students
from the Montreal, Chicoutimi and
Rimouski campuses plan to walk
out indefinitely in support of the
Front Commun public sector
workers.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Mt). 56
(NECHAKO)
School District representatives
will be conducting interviews
with prospective teachers for
the District at and on the
following:
University of British Columbia,
March 18 & 19, Hyatt Regency
(during A.G.M. session) March
29, 30 and 31.
Campus candidates are asked to
arrange for appointments
through their respective
campus agencies. Candidates
wishing a specific appointment
time for the Hyatt Regency
should contact in writing:
Wm. Maslechko, Dist.
Superintendent of Schools,
P.O. Box 680, Vanderhoof,
B.C. VOJ 3A0.
on
AFRICA
Slide presentations and discussion with Returned Volunteers and
Host Nationals.
Review of job opportunities.
Tuesday, 7:30 - March 9th, 1976
402/404 International House U.B.C.
As Part of Open House
the Students of the
School of Community Regional Planning
and
the University Committee for Habitat '76
invite all interested in housing issues
and the role of public initiative to hear
HUMPHREY CARVER, OTTAWA
Planner, Landscape. Architect and
former CMHC Advisory Board Chairman
Public Lecture: Friday, March 5,
IRC 4 at 8 p.m.
"HUMAN SETTLEMENTS IN A COMPASSIONATE
LANDSCAPE"
Open Seminar: Saturday, March 6,
Lassere 211 at 2 - 3:30 p.m.
"PUBLIC HOUSING - HAS IT FAILED?"
Only CP Rail ferries have
to Nanaimo.
Sail from downtown Vancouver to
downtown Nanaimo aboard a Princess
ferry. Just pick a convenient time from
three sailings a day, any day of the week.
Then call and let us know you're coming.
On board you'll enjoy excellent
dining, a spacious lounge and
spectacular Gulf Islands' scenery from
the observation decks.
Leave
Vancouver
4:00 a.m.
Noon
8:00 p.m.
Arrive
Nanaimo
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Leave
Nanaimo
8:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
Midnight
Arrive
Vancouver
10:30 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
2:30 a.m.
Call 665-3142 for guaranteed sail-away service.
When we sail, you sail.
X^JtSL
CPRail
\
H
THE BOOKSTORE
WELCOMES   YOU TO
.8
SERVING THE STUDENT NEEDS IS OUR SPECIALITY
Textbooks   —  Reference   Books   —  Leisure   Reading  —  Magazines
Art  Supplies   —  Stationery  —  Calculators   —  U.B.C.   Sportswear
Rings   —   Campus   Souvenirs   —   Giftwear
Greeting   Cards   and  Sundries
THE BOOKSTORE
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hours: 8:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. - Monday to Friday
Phone 228-4741 Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 20,  1976
10 SAC spots
sought by
23 aspirants
Applications for membership on
the Student Administrative
Commission (SAC) closed Wednesday with 23 applicants vying for
the 10 available positions on the all-
powerful body.
SAC is the administrative arm of
the new Student Representative
Assembly (SRA), and will be
responsible for a number of things,
most important being the
disbursement of some $180,000 in
student funds.
The positions to be filled are a
director of finance, a director of
services, and eight commissioners.
The 10 successful candidates will
be selected by a seven-member
committee drawn from the parent
body SRA.
Selection committee chairman
Dick Byl, law 1, said Thursday
successful candidates will be those
who have experience in areas
applied for and show an ability to
get along with people.
"The most important thing to
consider is experience in student
affairs and in administrative
work," Byl said.
"Another requisite will be an
ability to inspire people to work
together and as a unit with club
people and with SUB and Pit
managers," he said.
Applicants for the position of
director of finance are: Peter Bull
and David Christie, both commerce 3, Herb Dhaliwal, commerce 4, and Bob Goodwin,
commerce 1.
For the position of director of
services are candidates Brian
Ferstman, arts 2; Watson Seto,
arts 3 and Brent Tynan, science 1.
There are 16 applicants for the
eight commissioner positions, who
will be interviewed collectively on
Tuesday.
Byl said the selection committee
will conduct separate interviews
with each of the applicants for the
director of finance and director of
services positions beginning
Monday.
Byl said he hoped the selection
committee would have the results
ready for presentation to the SRA
at its next weekly meeting Wednesday .
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
DAVID ABLETT
Editor, Editorial Pages
The Vancouver Sun
PARLIAMENT VS.
CONGRESS-A
JOURNALIST'S LOOK
Mr. Ablett will call on his
experiences as a correspondent in
Ottawa and Washington to
compare the legislative systems of
Canada and the U.S.
SAT., MARCH 6, 8:15 P.M.
Vancouver institute
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional resources
centre
admission to the general
public is free
I
I
CAMERAS   •   PROJECTORS  •   STEREOS
LIMITED QUANTITIES - MANY ONE-OF-A-KIND
SAVINGS up to 50% & MORE!
MINOLTA SRT 101
Fast f/1.7 or f/1.4
Rokkor lens. Full
command view-
finder. Wide open
lens exposure
control with
advanced C.L.C.
(Contrast Light
Compensator) meter
system.
ARGUS STL f/1.7 with Case
SRT-101 f/1.7
Mfg. Sug. list $399.50
SRT-101 f/1.4
Mfg. Sug. list $449.50
CLEARANCE PRICE
CLEARANCE PRICE
SRT-102 f/1.7
Mfg. Sug. list $439.50      CLEARANCE PRICE
SRT-102 f/1.4
Mfg. Sug. list $489.50      CLEARANCE PRICE
s22888
5258M
$254M
*284*
Mfg. Sug. list $270.00
CLEARANCE
PRICE
134
MINOLTA SRT CUSTOM CASE
Mfg. Sug. list $20.00
CLEARANCE PRICE    lO
LENSES
MINOLTA ROKKOR 200mm f/3.5
MINOLTA ROKKOR 28mm f/3.5
MINOLTA ROKKOR 300mm f/4.5
MINOLTA ROKKOR 35mm f/1.8
NIKON 135mm f/3.5
NIKON 85mm f/1.8
SUN 85 • 210mm f/4.8 ZOOM NIKON
VIVITAR 135mm f/2.8
For   Canon,   Konica,
Minolta   &  Nikon.
VIVITAR 200mm f/3.5
For   Canon,   Konica,
Minolta  &   Nikon.
VIVITAR 28mm f/2.5
For   Canon,   Konica,
Minolta   &  Nikon.
Model EC-2000. Maximum results
with a minimum of fuss. Fast
f/1.7 lens, double thru-the-lens
Cds electric-eye, spot focusing,
built-in self-timer plus many other
deluxe features.
WEBC0R AM/FM/8 TRACK STEREO
Mfg. Sug. list $179.95       $
CLEARANCE PRICE
Model 12-5000. Deluxe SO watt,
solid state receiver with lighted
blackout slide rule AM/FM dial,
stereo light & flywheel tuning. 8
track stereo player with manual &
automatic change plus repeat
programming & lighted digital
readout.
WEBC0R AM/FM STEREO 8 TRACK
Mfg. Sug. list $339.95
CLEARANCE PRICE
154
Model 12-8S00. Deluxe 130 watt
receiver. Flywheel tuning. 8 track
stereo tape player. Built-in
Garrard 4-speed professional
automatic turntable with
diamond needle, auto shut-off
and custom dust cover.
WE ACCEPT
MOVIE CAMERAS
MINOLTA 8D-6 SUPER 8
MINOLTA 8D-10 SUPER 8
YASHICA 800-E SUPER 8
KODAK XL-10 MOVIE OUTFIT
KODAK EKTASOUND D-130 sound camera
KODAK EKTASOUND D-140 sound camera
KODAK XL-55 SUPER 8
MOVIE PROJECTORS
ELMO VPC SUPER 8
KODAK EKTASOUND 245Z
SOUND
projector
KODAK EKTASOUND 235Z
SOUND
PROJECTOR
KODAK 425 DUAL 8 MOVIE DECK
665 W. BROADWAY STORE ONLY Friday, February 20,  1976
$25,000   a   year
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 25
is   too   much
Big bucks debated down
By PAISLEY WOODWARD
Two UBC students who argued
that no one in Canada should earn
more than $25,000 a year won this
year's English 100 debating
competition Thursday.
Winners Daphne Gray-Grant and
Bruce Thorsen won a $50 prize for
their efforts, defeating Brent
Tynan and John Comparelli, who
argued against the resolution.
Gray-Grant opened the debate
calling for the instigation of a
guaranteed annual income for
Canadians, subsidies for research
in the sciences and arts and an
equitable distribution  of wealth.
She said although it has not been
accepted in the past that the rich
should support the poor, "accepted
beliefs aren't always right. People
used to believe the earth was flat
and you were supposed to bleed
people to rid them of disease."
Tynan was the first to debate for
his side. "It's pretty well accepted
by everyone that only one per cent
of the Canadian population is
making over $25,000 a year," he
said.
If this extra wealth was
redistributed over the other 99 per
cent of the population, each individual would receive only $150
more per year, 41 cents more per
citizen per day, he said.
Thorsen replied the individual
must be free to be what he chooses
and not what he is forced to be.
"The acquisitive nature of man
must be governed," he said.
"The wealthy see freedom as
making money at the expense of
the poor," he said. "There should
be less class conflict and more love
and concern," he said.
Comparelli, arguing the negative
view, said if there is less income, it
will result in less income tax and
less government spending.
"There will be no money for
benefits," he said.
Comparelli  also  stressed  that
matt king photo
THORSEN, GRAY GRANT . .. winners
SUBFILMSOC was tempted into presenting
(X)
was never i\6)
like this.   ftfFCT
(x)       m^1
Lets you feel good
without feeling bad.
(a clean pornoflick)
this Thur., Sun — 7:00
Fri., Sat. -7:00/9:30
SUB AUD.
7Rr-   & AMS
,alr   Card
THE COLLINS RACQUET
INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMME
OFFERS
FREE TENNIS LESSONS
MARCH 15-19 and 22-26
12:30 - 1:30-p.m.
IN THE ARMOURY
Open to students, faculty and staff -
beginner and intermediate levels
Register at Room 203
War Memorial Gym
there will be less incentive if
people are paid less. "What doctor
would repair as many bodies if he
got paid half as much?" he asked.
Gray-Grant and Tynan
presented the rebuttals for their
respective teams.
Tynan said people must see
beyond shortsighted ideals, and
said the opposing team's proposals
would probably increase the
disparity between the rich and
poor.
Gray-Grant replied her team's
proposals are strict but not
unrealistic. She also rejected
Tynan's statement that only one
per cent -of the population earns
over $25,000 per year. "He did not
quote a source," she said.
She also maintained that money
is not the only incentive to make
people work.
Three UBC professors who
judged the debate were unanimous
in their verdict.
Gray-Grant was highly praised
by English professor Jan de Bruyn
who delivered the verdict.
"Daphne did an excellent job,"
he said. "She had a well organized
approach and her points were
succinct but telling."
Tynan was criticized by de
Bruyn for excessive use of notes
and for speaking too quickly. De
Bruyn did say the substance of
Tynan's argument was "excellent."
International House & The
Malaysian-Singaporean Students Association
Present An
OPEN HOUSE DANCE
with the
INTERNATIONAL BRASS BAND
Singles Couples
$1.50 members $3.00
$2.00     non-members     $4.00
Sat., March 6
9 p.m. - 1:00 a.m
All Students & Community Are Invited
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
Internationally Trained
Hairstylists
Open Tues. - Sat.
9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
4605 W. 10th AVE.
lili
228-9345
Compliments and Congratulations
to the
University of British Columbia
and it's visitors —
Be sure to see our
professional pharmaceutical
display window
UNUSUAL ARTIFACTS
University Pharmacy Ltd
•5754 University Blvd. — 224-3202
IN THE VILLAGE - V/2 Blocks East of the Pool
Looking for a
Special Gift
and short of time
Try us
AMS Co-op—Basement of SUB
Open Mon. thru Fri.     8:30-4:30 Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 20,  1976
Guatemalans
need help
The earthquake that recently
shook       Guatemala, killed
thousands of people and left the
survivors in ruins.
A group of young Canadians
on an exchange program in the
stricken country stayed on after
the quake to help the survivors
build  up  their  shattered  homes.
These members of Canada
World Youth, who come from all
parts of Canada, need help to
help the Guatemalans. They are
still there, trying to do their bit
to help a people desperately in
need.
Hot flashes
Contributions can be sent to
the Canada World Youth
Guatemala relief fund at 2524
Cypress. And remember, folks, it
would be practically apolitical.
Prizewinner
American poet W. S. Merwin,
the winner of numerous awards,
including the Pulitzer Prize, is
coming to UBC this Thursday.
Merwin will read from his
works at noon in Buch. 106.
Besides his volumes of poetry,
Merwin has translated major
works from other languages and
has written plays.
Poop
Watch out. "Canada's Top
Pooit," alias "Captain PF," alias
Eric Ivan Berg will be reading his
poems (pooitry) Sunday at 2:30
p.in. at the Burnaby Art Gallery,
6344 Gilpin.
Reading after Eric's inimitable
rantings and loonie tunes ('tuff
act to follow) will be Judi
Morton, Ed Varney and Beth
Jankola. Top Pooit (hint: poo as
in poop!) will be recording all of
it for instant replay on
CFRO-FM Co-op Radio. 'Nuff
said.
'Tween classes
TODAY
BAHA'I  CLUB
Talk    on    equality    of     men    and
women, noon, Gage 182.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Nous aider a  Open  House au  SUB
le midi et demain de dix heures.
SKYDIVING
General   meeting  and   open   house,
rioon, SUB 215.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Rock ensemble Eagle Beaver, 8:30
p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
SUN NIGHTSIDE
Arrival     of     coffee    wagon,     9:30
p.m.,   11:30   p.m.,   2250  Granville.
SUNDAY
MUSIC   DEPARTMENT
Graduation recital, pianist Harald
Krebs, 3:30 p.m., recital hall,
music building.
MONDAY
SIMS
Advanced group  meditation, noon,
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
I RC G42.
HISTORICAL DANCE CLUB
Dance      practice,   ' new     members
wanted, 5 p.m., SUB 207.
UBC   KUNG  FU CLUB
Practice, 4:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
TUESDAY
PRE-MED SOC
Lecture  on   psychiatry,  noon,   IRC
1.
WEDNESDAY
SIMS
Introductory   lecture,   8   p.m.,   Bu.
32 5.
THURSDAY
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
John     Hodges     speaks    on     man's
response, noon, chem. 250.
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
LAND CLAIMS
Representatives from native groups
on the Northwest Territory Land Claims issue
March 8 - 7:30      Lutheran Campus
Centre
March 9 - 12:30 SUB 207
"Whose Land"
"Whose Pipeland"
Sponsor C.C.C.l\
"Whose North'
The Original
Hand Crafted
4?-
mm
Boots
Don't be disappointed
by imitations. When
you ask for "Frye" be
sure you get "Frye".
* . v
AWta
Ptawfaip$h>
Many Styles
Available in Mens and
Womens in a variety of
colours. From $70 - $85.
516 W. HASTINGS      770 GRANVILLE
Mens and Womens Mens Only
CHARGEX - MASTER CHARGE - AMEX
Welcome to U.B.C.
ELD
or
First Lady Coiffures -Tenth A\enue Ltd.
for the time of your life.
SEE OUR COMPLETE LINE OF ZASMIIM PRODUCTS
Cleansing Products — Tonics — Nourishing Creams, Vitamin C
Vitamin F — Protective Creams — Special Products for the Face
Products for the Body & Famous'Zasmin make-up products.
4554 W. 10th 224-5636
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming  Events
10 — For Sale — Commercial
VISIT   RHODES
Western Canada's finest selection of
sound equipment. 3 sound areas for
undisturbed listening, knowledgeable
staff, highest quality—lowest prices.
Featuring — Marantz, Pioneer, Kenwood, Sony, Technics, Teac, Tannoy,
Dual, Thorens, Leak, Wharfedale,
Klipsch, Nakaimchi, etc.
2699 W.   Broadway 733-5914
"The  Finest  for  Less"
11 — For Sale — Private
ELAC MIRACORD turntable for sale
$100.    731-7948   or   324r3986.
CASSETTE CAR STEREO — Pioneer
KP-333, auto-reverse $65. Phone 363-
0743  after 6 p.m.
15 —Found
20 — Housing
$20 REWARD for bright one bedroom
apt. near UBC. young married couple
Apr    15   or  30.   266-6843.
STUDENT TO SHARE four bedroom
house with three others. Near 13th
Cambie.   Ph.   879-0305.
FRATERNITY HOUSE on campus, 860.
per month. Kitchen privileges, room
only. Phone 224-9679 evenings, manager.
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
UNIQUE AQUATICS
OPPORTUNITY
Staff are now being hired for cooperative staffing of two pools in
the Central Interior of the province. We are seeking well trained, highly dedicated and motivated
people. Applicants should possess
one or more specialties in aquatics
(skin diving, water polo, etc.) which
they would be responsible for offering in both communities. Positions
are for the period May 1 to Sept. 6.
Apply to: Bruce Curtis, c/o 5885
University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C.,
V6T IK7 or phone 224-1614 between
5 and 7 p.m., Monday to Friday.
Applications accepted to March 19,
interviews beginning Sat., March 13.
50 — Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
65 — Scandals
DENNIS
STILL   LOVES
VERNA
SUBFILMSOC IS "ITCHING" to present Emmanuelle this Thur. & Sun.
7:00. Fri. & Sat. 7:00/9:30 in the
SUB Aud. Please bring AMS card,
75c. Warning: this movie could
arouse audience. Reassurance: no
violence and hardcore pornography.
70 — Services
EXPERIENCED     MATH     TUTOR     will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basis. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
CUSTOM CABINETRY & woodworking.
Renovations, additions, new conduction done anywhere. Guranteed work,
free   estimates.   689-3394.
80 — Tutoring
BOGGLED   MINDS   &   WISDOM   HEADS:
Call the Tutorial Center, 228-4557
anytime or see Ian at Speak-Easy,
12:30*2:30' p.m. $1 to register (refundable).
85 —Typing
BFFICIENT     TYPING     DONE     in    my
home,   IBM   Selectric   —   reasonable
rates.   Phone:   224-3936.
35 - Lost
GREEN LOOSE-LEAF binder. Contained Economics 345 notes. Lost in
region of Sedgewick, Buchanan or
bookstore. If found please phone
Richard 731-3706.  Reward  offered.
CROSS COUNTRY SKIS and poles on
Wesbrook. Reward. No questions
asked.   Dave,  731-1024.
LADY'S GLASSES, brown frames. Vicinity Main Mall via parking lot B. If
found please call 325-1365.
FAST,    EFFICIENT    TYPING.    Essays,
thesis,   manuscripts.   266-5053.
90 - Wanted
APARTMENT OR TOWNHOUSE required for graduate student during
summer school. No children. Please
reply E. Harrison, Faculty of Education, Secondary Division, University  of Alberta,  Edmonton.
99 — Miscellaneous
rr^r=ir=Jr=Jr=Jr=]r=in=Jr=IriEIriEI
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr=if=Jr=Jp=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr= Friday, February 20,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 27
SPOR TS
'Birds do well without crowds
By TOM BARNES
To the outsider the image of
athletics at UBC is simple and
straightforward — right up there
with the B.C. Lions, right?
A consistent string of losing
seasons, marred by the occasional
winner, right?
Wrong. UBC teams usually have
relatively good records.
The   1975-76   season   has   been
different because UBC's teams
have not been winners as often as
usual. Still there has been one
national champion — men's
volleyball — and one national
runner-up — women's volleyball.
In addition rugby, judo,
wrestling, women's track and field
and women's cross-country have
all won Canada West conference
titles.
Men's basketball, cross-country,
fencing, swimming and women's
field hockey were all second in
their conferences.
Football, hockey, soccer, men's
gymnastics and track and field
along with women's basketball
finished third.
The only team on campus with a
losing record this season has been
—bob tsai photo
'BIRDS HOCKEY TEAM . . . plays West German Olympic team 8 p.m., Monday at Winter Sports Centre.
Wrestlers head for Nationals
ByBOBRAYFIELD
The Thunderbird wrestling team
competed in the National Intercollegiate wrestling meet in
Thunder Bay, Ontario on Saturday,
finishing with two out of six wins.
The Canada West team was
composed of six representatives
from UBC, five representatives
from the University of Alberta and
one from the University of Saskatchewan.
The Six from UBC were Jose
Machial (118pounds), Rob Hansen
(157 pounds), Mike Richey (167
pounds), Clark Davis (177 pounds),
George Richey (220 pounds) and
Kyle Raymond (heavyweight).
The 'Birds only won two matches
at the meet because the competition was so tough.
UBC was at a disadvantage
because their wrestlers were all
freshmen. With the exception of
George Richey and Kyle Raymond
the UBC team was competing in its
first intercollegiate meet.
George Richey was not expected
to attend the meet because the
World Cup was also being held the
same day and Richey was one of
the Canadian representatives.
Fortunatejy the World Cup was
cancelled so Richey could wrestle
for UBC.
UBC's two victories went to
Richey in the 220-pound class and
Raymond in the heavyweight
class.
UBC lost the other close matches
by decisions. The Intercollegiates
were valuable experience for the
freshmen on the UBC team
because of the competition they
faced.
The Canada West team came
second in the meet with 38 points.
The team from Ontario won the
meet with 45 points. They were
favored to win the meet because of
the size of the team. There were 12
weight classes and Ontario had two
men entered in each weight class.
The Thunderette track and field
team won the Canada West title in
Saskatoon last Saturday with 81
points.
Sheila Currie of UBC was ranked
the   outstanding   woman   athlete Caroline  Van  de  Polle  placed
taking first place in the 1500-meter, third in the 1500- and 800-meter
800-meter, and placing third in the race while Virginia Fisher placed
300-meter run. first in the high jump and shot put.
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SCHWENDENER F.G. MOHAIR
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the Thunderbird soccer team.
Since 1970 UBC has won national
championships in men's and
women's basketball, volleyball,
soccer and gymnastics.
There have also been numerous
individual national and world class
athletes from UBC.
Hardly a losing tradition.
The problem of the UBC athletic
program has been one of image.
This is rooted in the lack of two
things: budget and support. One is
related to the other.
As it is, there is barely enough
money to cover costs. With air fare
and other transportation expenses
rising much faster than budgetery
totals, the attainment of even that
modest goal is nearing the impossible.
Little is left over for advertising.
Student support of athletics is
right up there with student interest
in everything else — non-existent.
Thus for the most part attendance is dismal at any given
event.
The downtown media is not inclined to extend more than token
coverage to something that the
public shows no interest in. In any
case, professional sports are where
it's at.
The UBC athletic office is left in
a precarious position. With no
money to use to advertise and
create interest and fan support and
with no fans, there is no way the
program can augment its budget
on its own through admissions and
concessions.
The most immediate solution
would seem to be some sort of
direct funding by either the
university or the province, such as
at Simon Fraser University.
However, with the Socreds
running the education department
in a "businesslike manner," it is
highly unlikely such funding is
imminent. The budget would never
balance.
There is, however, some hope
that the situation is improving of
its own accord.
The Thunderbird hockey team
has been consistently drawing
good crowds, despite often
dreadful lack of publicity. The
basketball team also has its core of
supporters, although its numbers
are about half those of the hockey
crowd.
But the brightest spot has been
the "glory" sport, football. Under
the dotage of coach Frank Smith
the team has turned itself around
during the past two seasons. This
year they were fighting for the
league championship in the second
to last game.
Attendance grew with the
number of wins. So did the interest
of the downtown press.
The interest is beginning to rub
off on the rest of the program.
So one can be optimistic about an
improvement in fan support.
Unfortunately, one must be more
guarded about the budget.
APPLICATIONS FOR
INTRAMURAL EXECUTIVE POSITIONS
1976-77
Applications are being accepted for positions of Directors and
Associate Directors for each of the following programs:
Men's Intramural Program
Women's Intramural Program
Co-Recreation Intramural Program
Deadline for applications is 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 8, 1976.
Please make applications and direct queries to:
N. N. Korchinsky,
Intramural Co-ordinator,
Room 208F,
War Memorial Gymnasium. Page 28
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