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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1987

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Array the Ubyssey
Report sparks debate
By Ross McLaren
The second draft of a UBC
sexual harasssment committee
report drew a mixed response from
the university community this
week.
The AMS president and a
member of the AMS Women's
Centre criticized the report. The
faculty association as yet has no
"official reaction" but has voiced
several concerns.
Others, including the
Women's Centre on campus, have
given the report top marks.
The report, a comprehensive
document with a definition of sexual harassment, guidelines for
mediation, investigation, and
hearing of complaints, was released October 23 in UBC Reports
by a president's ad hoc advisory
committee on sexual harassment.
The committee was established in June 1986 to "assist in
the development of a policy on
sexual harassment". Vice president  academic  Albert  McClean
chairs the committee and is assisted by three faculty members.
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont said the report "suffered from a lack of student input"
because there were no students
sitting on the advisory committee.
The report had other problems, including the method of
choosing sexual harassment officers, Nevraumont said.
"I don't know if they will be
students or faculty, appointed or
elected? Nevraumont said about
the officers who will provide complainants and respondents with
advice and assistance on how to
deal with harassment cases.
A member of the AMS
Women's Centre blasted the administration for its delay in finishing the report.
The length of time taking to
finish the report "shows the archa-
icness of UBC, and shows up the
staid old boys network, UBC
(administration) doesn't think a
sexual harassment report is im
portant? said a woman who identified herself as Patricia.
Others on campus were delighted with the draft.
The director of Women Students, June Lythgoe, said, "as
policies go, it is a good policy, and
has a thorough procedure. A few
steps in the procedure the committee may want to review, but they
will only know as they work with
the policy and as officers report to
the committee?
But the university faculty
association has several problems
with the report.
The chair of the committee
drafting a reply to the report said
the faculty association supports
the report and believes such a
document necessary at a university.
But professor Harry Edinger
of the personnel services committee is concerned that the sexual
harassment draft is "setting up a
new set of disciplinary procedures."
Folk singer Michelle Shocked serenaded the Commodore last Sunday
B.C. premier declares war
say union representatives
mandel ngan photo
By Justine Hunter (Victoria CUP)
Premier Bill Bander Zalm has
declared war on unions and government employees in a privatization plan that will see $3 billion
worth of public assets up for sale, a
spokesperson for BC Government
Employee's Union says.
This isa reaction to the weekend announcement of Phase One
of Vander Zalm's plan that could
"restructure" the jobs of 30 per
cent of the union's membership
over the next year.
The sale of two Crown corpo-
rations and 11 government
operations which will directly affect 7240 workers is part of Phase
One, and is only the beginning,
Vander Zalm promised party
members at the Social Credit convention in Vancouver Friday.
Union members acknowledged the move Monday by placi ng
a large "For Sale " sign on the steps
of the Provincial Legislature.
"We are extremely distressed
by this radical move? said John
Shields, president of the 35,000
member BCGEU. "We are going to
fight this. We feel that war has
been declared on us, and we will
respond accordingly."
Vander Zalm referred to
labour issue in his speech to
Socred delegates, although he was
careful not to link the issue with
the privatization announcement.
"We've paid a costly price for
our labour-management reputation world-wide. Billions of foreign investment dollars, new in-
"The faculty has an agreement with the administration to
cover possible (disciplinary) hearings. Cases where faculty members are disciplined are different
in the sexual harassment report.
Are both processes necessary?"
Edinger asked.
McClean said the sexual
harassment report calls for a
Hearing Committee to review the
facts of a sexual harassment case
and recommend discipline before
the UBC president (or appropriate
university officer) decides on disciplinary action.
Under the present collective
agreement, a Hearing Committee,
if requested by a faculty member,
will review the facts of a case after
disciplinary action has been
taken.
McClean said the change was
made to prevent people from having to give evidence "two or three
times".
"Our report does not tie in
neatly with faculty and union. But
it is a matter of coordination and
reorganization" to solve the problem, McClean said.
Dr. Nadine Wilson, amember
of the ad hoc advisory committee,
said the committee had two big
sessions with the faculty association, once before the first draft and
once between the two drafts.
"In the classic harassment
case, it is the faculty doing the
harassment. We emphasized the
advocacy role of sexual harassment officers. They worried a lot
about that. We have made changes
(to address their worries)? Wilson
said.
Nevraumont also criticized
the report for its lack of a definition of evidence.
"Evidence has to be given to
get a hearing. But there is no delineation in the report of what is
evidence. Is someone's word evidence?" asked Nevraumont.
McClean said allegations
would be judged on "the standard
of probabilities" usedin non-criminal litigation cases. But he said
concerns had been raised that the
standard of proof was too low and
the committee would modify this
section if needed.
The committee is accepting
submissions to the report. Interested persons can contact
McClean or the AMS.
Province attacks
welfare cheating
By Greg Davis
Vancouver social service
groups are angry at the provincial
government for trying to stop
cheating in the welfare system by
employing social workers to investigate receipients.
Stephen Learey, of the Downtown East Side Resident's Association, believes the number of
cheaters is miniscule. "It's no
holiday to live on welfare. Some
people live in ratholes, go days
without food, and can't even afford
to take the bus to look for a job?
Learey said.
Jean Swansen, coordinator of
the End Legislative Poverty organization, said invesigation into
cheating is a waste of time. "Social
workers will become tied up by
hounding people (in their investigations). They'll become cops instead of providing useful services,"
she said.
But a spokesperson for the
Ministry of Social Services said
fraud investigations are not the
Ministry's main concern.
"It is estimated that there is
five per cent fraud at present, but
that's just an educated guess. We
have inspectors working to make
sure applicants are legitimate?
said public information officer Art
Scott.
The Downtown East Side
Resident's Association places the
welfare rate at 40 per cent of the
poverty  line.     End  Legislative
Poverty claims it is slightly higher,
at 60 per cent, but still insufficient
to live on.
The government does not
deny or confirm these statistics.
"There are a great number of poverty lines established? said Scott.
"It all depends on the group making the assement."
Welfare recipients are only allowed to make a maximum of $50
per month to supplement their allowance. If they make anymore
they are taken off welfare.
"If they could make up to
$200-300 a month extra it would
help them to slowly get back into
the work force by starting with
small jobs," said Learey.
Scott said the government
emphasises training programs
rather than extra cash in order to
get welfare recievers into the work
force.
But Swansen finds fault in the
government's reasoning.
"The jobs aren't there. The
government is trying to push
75,000 welfare receipients to compete with 169,000 already on Unemployment Insurance? Swansen
said.
She said the correct course of
action for the government would
be to "raise the minimum wage to
$6 per hour, which is the poverty
line, create jobs, and ensure Ministry training programs teach
people what their rights are as
employees."
dustries, thousands of jobs have
gone elsewhere? as a result of
labour disputes, Vander Zalm
said.
But Shields warned the plan
would not settle a volatile labour
climate. "I think prospective buyers will know they are getting an
em pty shell if they don't have the
support of the employees."
Vander Zalm told reporters
the president of the BCGEU was
out of touch with his members, and
most employees had responded
positively to hotlines that had
been opened to their questions.
Although the premier admit
ted the sell-offs "will significantly
reduce the size of government," he
said no employees will be forced
onto welfare or unemployment
insurance.
"There will be considerable
impact on employees, but not
negative? he said.
Shields disagreed emphatically. "I don't believe that any
more than anything else he has
been telling us. The government
plan is a basic abandonment of the
concept of public service, and the
tradition of serving the public. We
see that what they are doing is
see page 3; No jobs
Volume 70, Number 20
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Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
November 13,1987 Carneyval time
Trade protects identity
The free trade agreement will
lead to more job opportunities for
Canadians inside the U.S., said
minister for international trade,
Pat Carney.
At SUB ballroom Thursday,
Carney said transportation, enhanced telecommunications and
computer services, tourism and
architecture will be among industries participating in free trade of
labour.
Hiring of university faculty is
still subject to current restrictions
and in order for policies on the
hiring of American professors to
change, "the people have to get
together and decide? said Carney.
The federal government will
not call an election specifically on
free trade, said Carney, "but the
next election will clearly be fought
on the free trade agreement but
also on Meech Lake, the economy
and social programs."
Carney assured the audience
that the unique Canadian identity
will be maintained. "The free trade
agreement exempts cultural industries," Carney said.
Carney said she has dealt
with people concerned about the
adoption of American values but
that "since eighty per cent of our
trade already moves without tariffs, the extra twenty per cent will
not mean a great change in this
Pat Carney ponders platitudes of free trade
No jobs guaranteed
under new program
from page 1
threatening health, education,
safety, transportation, and social
services, all for the sake of profit."
The controversy has been
building up since rumours of a
major sell-out began circulating
months ago when Socred MLA's
went to Britain to study prime
minister Margaret Thatcher's
form of privatization.
This has been the first comprehensive announcement on the
program, but it still leaves much
open to speculation, as Vander
Zalm promised almost anything
will be considered for sale.
Phase One, detailed this
weekend, involves several sections of BC Hydro, including the
profitable gas division, parts of the
ministry of transportation and BC
System's Corporation
Government services, such as
the Queen's Printer, will also be
offered to the highest bidder, although employee bids will be given
a 5 per cent degree of preference.
Vander Zalm said employees'
jobs could not be guaranteed because it would be too restrictive to
the private sector. There are 2,500
job vacancies in the public service,
he said, jobs deliberately left open
over the past seven months to
create openings for those caught in
government restructuring.
A brochure sent to employees
last week states "many government programs could be better
delivered by the private sector.
Experience in this province and
around the world shows that when
government employees are given
mandel ngan photo
area.
Of Canada's high cost social
programs, Carney said, "as long as
we're willing to pay for them, we'll
still have them. If we have a
stronger economy (as a result of
free trade) well have more money
to pay for our social programs? she
said.
Other restrictions alleviated
by free trade include duty on goods
bought in the U.S. and brought
through customs.
Canadians will no longer have
to "smuggle stuff back from Bellingham" said Carney, "because
those goods will be available here.
Canadians will have to develop
some other national sport?
Economic doors widen
by Deanne Fisher
If the free trade agreement
goes ahead as planned in 1989, it
will spur the "immediate widening
of the trade doors," minister of
international trade Pat Carney
told a UBC audience Thursday.
Forestry, agriculture, wines,
automotive manufacturing, and
textiles will benefit from free
trade, Carney said.
For the lower mainland, free
trade means "within a two-day
truck haul, there is a market of 35
million people (in Washington,
Oregon and California)," Carney
said.
Canadians can also definitely
expect to see an increase in Japanese investment in Canada, Car
ney said. "They can see abig North
American market. They can actually produce Japanese goods
cheaper here than they can in
Japan. And they find Canada less
racially tense than some parts of
the U.S.? she said.
Carney asked opponents of
free trade to suggest an alternative. "Pacific Rim trade is still
coming along and Europe doesn't
leave a lot of room for us? Carney
said.
Carney referred to a similar
free trade agreement between
Australia and New Zealand as a
comparison and said "the larger
country gets a terrific boost but the
smaller country benefits more."
Bill 19 erupts
Labour law should be minimized
mandol ngan photo
the chance to do their work in the
private sector, free of government
constraints, services improve and
costs go down."
Efficiency aside, the
province's annual $850 million
deficit could be reduced $350 million through savings in interest
payments as well as operating
costs.
"We're still going to have
people say they didn't do a good
job, and if it were public it might
have been a better job? Vander
Zalm said.
"Just as people are now saying these government employees
aren't doing a good job, and if it
were private, it would be much
better."
"I think the province is moving in the right direction? he told
the convention.
Vander Zalm added, "unlike
other governments, were not following wherever the path may
lead, rather we're going where
there is no path."
By Kent Hill
Bill 19 is designed to frustrate workers in choosing a
union, and attempts to make
collective bargaining no longer a
policy, said the secretary-treasurer of the B.C. Federation of
Labour yesterday.
It's a "blatant piece of antiunion legislation? said Cliff An-
destein to about 40 students in
the law building.
Andestein said the conditions for the creation of labour
law have quickly changed from a
role of assisting unions to one of
controlling them.
"There is too much labour
legislation? said Andestein. "Bill
19 takes the intervention between employers and workers
even further."
The role of labour law should
be a minimal one to create political democracy in the work place,
he said.
He believes the role of labour
law is to reflect the policy statements of the government, and
also manage to assist workers to
bargain effectively with employ-
The full impact of Bill 19
won't be known until the Socreds
release their future privatization
programs, and the unions come |
up to the bargaining tables at the
end of the year, said Andestein.
But since union demands
have not changed since 1986,
Andestein said the "back to work'
orders and cooling off periods in
Bill 19 would cause many disputes and force unions to defy
court orders.
This raises the whole question of democracy - basing votes
on numbers, not wealth, and the
union determining its conditions
of work, said Andestein.
"The state is clearly not neutral, (it's) indistinguishable from
the employers? said Andestein.
Students should be looking
for ways to reconcile law legislation, the worker and the
employer.One option is the establishment of training programs in order to assist union
and worker negotiations, so they
can solve their own problems,
Andestein said.
November 13, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Ubyssey Staff Meeting
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NEXT YEAR MAKE TERUSALEM
YOUR CAMPUS
INFORMATION EVENING
of PROGRAMS FOR
CANADIAN STUDENTS
at the
HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF
JERUSALEM
WITH PROFESSOR DOV FRIEDLANDER
DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS OF
OVERSEAS STUDIES
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 19TH, 7:30 P.M.
at
Congregation Beth Israel (Maccabee Room)
4350 Oak St.
FREE ADMISSION, REFRESHMENTS
For more information
Call Dvori Balshine at Canadian Friends of Hebrew University - 263-0413
MARK THIS DATE ON YOUR CALENDAR AND BE THERE!
By Catherine Lu
People can enhance present
and future potential self-sufficiency if they sustain the environmental resource base, said UBC
Zoology professor Crawford
Holling.
Programs of action have been
initiated,usually independently,
by people acting at local, regional
and global levels.
Holling emphasized the solution does not lie in government or
in business, but "it's now in the
hands of the citizens and they are
doing something about it?
"300 years of the Industrial Revolution
and its impact on lthe
environment has led
us to this state of cri-
it
SIS.
Crawford Holling
People are becoming increasingly aware of th -> need for maintenance of opportunity for people
now and in the future through
sustainable development, Holling
said.
"Sustainable development is
development that meets the needs
of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs? he
said, quoting from a report by the
World Commission on Environment and Development called
"Our Common Future".
"This clearly concerns providing equity and benefit for people
around now, and it speaks very
strongly to the future generations? he said.
The environmental concerns
today of acid rain, global warming,
ozone depletion, widespread desertification, and species loss have
accumulated over hundreds of
years. "300 years of the Industrial
Revolution and its impact on the
environment has led us to this
state of crisis."
However, businesses and
politicians have a very short time
horizon. "How do you get the political system and the government
responding to this issue? That's
where individual people have such
extraordinary power now," he
said.
"The way you transfer a long-
term phenomenon into short-term
perception is by voters kicking the
bastards out if they don't pay attention," Holling said.
He is the first speaker in a
lecture series dealing with the
main concepts expressed in "Our
Common Future". The series is
sponsored by the Environmental
Interest Group. "The actual sus-
tainability of life is dependent on
the health of the environment?
said Joan Bratty, president of the
EIG. "We have to realize that the
earth is a living system. We're part
of that system—we can't remove
ourselves, and abuse it, and expect
it to still maintain itself? she said.
Andrea Finch, another member of the EIG, said that people
ignore the link between economy
and ecology. "The [WCED] report
says they can, they do, and they
should," she said.
Bratty stated people may
have to accept a lowering of our
standard of living, "but it's not a
choice, it's a necessity."
She said fifty years ago,
Ethiopia was the breadbasket of
Africa. It has since been reduced to
a site of environmental and consequently human poverty, initiated
by human actions.
Holling said poverty in Africa
rose mainly out of the application
of inappropriate methods of development introduced by developed
nations.
Speakers for the lecture series
include the director of the Centre
for Human Settlement, Peter
"We have to realize
that the earth is a living system. We're
part of that system-
we can't remove ourselves, and abuse it,
and expect it to still
maintain itself
Joan Bratty
Oberlander, and Dr. David
Suzuki. Holling will be speaking
on sustainable development at
7:30 p.m., on November 17 in the
Woodward Building, IRC Room 1.
At University Golf Club...
WE'RE OPEN ALL YEAR!
University Golf Club is your year-round golf, games and relaxation centre. Come and take
advantage of our Winter Program features!
Great Prices on Winter Golf.
New Winter rates are in effect starting November 1 st. The course is in excellent condition so come out and play!
Green Fees — Monday to Friday — $14.00
Students—    Monday to Friday — $9.00
Weekend Rate   —   $18.00
Drive Away!
The outstanding Driving Range facility at
University Golf Club remains open year
round featuring:
• 80,000 square feet of grass tees
• 10,000 square feet of bunker
• "100" compression golf balls
• Fully covered & lighted facilities
• CPG Pros available for
lessons
*,vnpO/
Driving range open
8 a.m. — 11 o.m.
daily
Thunderbird Lounge and
Grill.
Relax and enjoy a delicious snack
or full course meal at the Thunderbird Lounge and Grill. Try our exciting new "live action" electronic
football and baseball games — QB1
and Diamondball. For the first time,
you can interact with "live" action via
satellite — as it happens!
Win a Trip "Down Under"!
Each time you play a round of golf
or purchase a menu entree at our
restaurants, you'll receive an entry
form for a chance to win a trip for 2
to New Zealand!
Draw date: March 31, 1988.
COMPLETE CONTEST DETAILS
AVAILABLE AT PRO SHOP AND
THUNDERBIRD LOUNGE AND
GRILL.
University Golf Club
4701 University Boulevard,
Vancouver, B.C.
224-1818 or 224-7513
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
November 13,1987 American and
British folk
fuse at
Commodore
By Ann Rogers
Alot of people look mighty sceptical when you
start raving to them about folk music. Despite
the inroads made by younger, less traditional performers like Billy Bragg and Spirit of the West, people still
labour under the misapprehension that folk is a genre
reserved for ethnic accordion bands and reedy ballads
about coal miners.
There is indeed a melodeon player—which almost
qualifies as an accordion player—in Britain's Oyster
Band, and when promoters emblazon lagends like 'the
cutting edge of English Roots music' across promo
posters, the notion that folk if for folkies is hardly dispelled.   It's too bad, because the Oyster Band should
appeal to a much broader audience than they actually
reach.
Michelle Shocked, on the other hand, has the right
idea. A catchy, kickass name, a punky flattop haircut
and the coolest black leather jacket in the world bely
her more traditional musical style. .It also helps that
she has a past that would make Woody Guthrie cry, a
smalltown east Texas girl who took to the road with her
father at an early age, smoking pot and crashing blue-
grass festivals. An English record exec recorded her one
night as they were sitting round a campfire at a Texas
folkfest where she was not even a performer, but a volunteer. The tapes were subsequently released, truck
noises, crickets and all, to much acclaim. Suddenly,
young 'Shel was the big new sensation on the folk
circuit.
MUSIC
The Oyster Band/Michelle Shocked
Sunday, November 8
The Commodore Ballroom
At the Commodore last Sunday, Michelle Shocked
proved to be shocking only in appearance. Her mellow
acoustic set mesmerised the Commodore audience, although her songs about strawberry jam, sweet potato
pie and volonteer fire departments had me nodding off,
boor that I am. Yes, her voice is lovely, her songwriting
poignant and her between-song banter witty, but as
someone remarked, 'she's so earnest that it gets to me
after a while.' Several people mentioned that she had a
winning smile, which only goes to show how charismatic
her performance is.
The Oyster Band, who opened the show, stormed
their way through a variety of musical styles, including
cover versions of British popster Nick Lowe's Rose of
England, sixties classic Not Fade Away, and an early
highlight, a quasi-heavy metal folk version of Bragg's
Between the Wars. Then tiddler/keyboardist Ian Telfer
picked up a sax and next thing you know the band had
swapped its British roots for Motown.
Unfortunately, the Commodore has a tacky new decor, complete with flashing lights, bubbles floating in
transparent tanks and linen tablecloths.  Most offensive
was the large contingent of tables deployed over most of
the famous springy dance floor—perticularly ironic
since the Oysters are hailed as a terrific dance band.
The final set, featuring both the Oyster Band and
Michelle Shocked, with her fiddle in hand, was a real
roots raveup where highland fling lessons would have
stood you in good stead. Too bad the management
didn't roll up the tables and clear that fabulous
dancefloor. What will they do when the Pogues perform
there on December 7th?
Oyster band's melodic melodeon
mandel ngan photo
FORUM
STEIN VALLEY
TUESDAY, NOV. 17th UBC SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30-2:30
Speaking On the Socio/Economic & Environmental
Implications of a Decision to Log.
JOHNCUTHBERT CHIEF FORESTER,
PROVINCE OF B.C.
JOHN MCCANDLESS CO-ORDINATOR: MT.
CURRIE + LYTTON
INDIAN BANDS
MICHAEL McGONIGLE RESOURCE ECONOMIST,
S.F.U.
TED MATTICE DIVISIONAL LOGGING
MANAGER, B.C.F.P.
U  Work Study HI
Students who have Work Study Authorization
forms and who intend to participate in the Work
Study program are encouraged to contact the
Canada Employment Centre in Brock Hall to
arrange their work placements. Work Study
Funds are limited, and jobs are available on a
first-come first-served basis. Act now to avoid
disappointment.
BC Student Assistance Program recipients who
wish to participate in the Work Study program
but did not receive a Work Study application
with their BCSAP Notification of Award form,
may wish to determine their eligibility for Work
Study by attending a Work Study Drop-in Session. Drop-in sessions are held in the Awards
Office, General Services Administration Building, Room 50; Tuesdays 2:00-3:30 pm and Fridays, 9:00-11:30 am.
...Conference
A  Screening,
^"1    Debate
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228 9114
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LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.-F'i. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4:X p.m. 9 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
WORDS TO
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Professional word processing
for resumes, reports,
correspondence and more.
kinko's®
Great coptas. Great paopte.
5706 Uim.rsiu Blvtl.
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MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
BRAINS &
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PLAY THE
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LIVE TV
COMPETITIONS
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For the first
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can actually interact with
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football
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players here and nationally
by anticipating live
quarterback plays.
MONDAY
NIGHTN.F.L.
FOOTBALL
LIVEAT
6:00 PM.
Also remember
Sunday, all day
football on the
big screen.
^%
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University Gow Club
5185 University Boulevard
Vancouver B.C. V6T 1X5
224-7513
November 13,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 party a little, party a lot
earl's place
10th Ave/Trimble
tel: 222-1342
fresh, fresh food
book now for free party room!
(party room seats 15-40)
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-10:00 p.m./Fri. & Sat. 11:30 a.m.-ll:00 p.m.
ATT;
U_ELC_
Students
presents
20%
0 Discount
On Any Entree or From the Sea
Present your valid Student Card anytime after 4 p.m.
oniy at 2805 W. Broadway location
New Menagerie
succeeds
By Mary Ainslie
A good film adaptation of a
play should attempt to
do two things. First, use
the camera to enhance the stage directions; second,
remain faithful to the author's intentions. Paul
Newman does both successfully in the most recent
film production of The Glass Menagerie.
Newman preserves the underlying rhythm of
the play with the techniques prescribed by Tennessee Williams: lighting and music. The stylized past
should dominate this memory play, and Newman
manages to capture its essence on the screen. He
MOVIE
The Glass Menagerie
The Bay Theatre
uses dissolves and lighting changes, instead of a
scrim, to connote the past.
Newman uses specifically filmic techniques,
such as the circular long take, to express the
claustrophobia of the apartment, and the emotions
of the characters. His use of 360 degree camera
movement around Laura exemplifies her feelings of
isolation and freakishness; while the rapidly edited
scenes between Amanda and Tom are a wonderful
expression of the heightening antagonism between
the mother and son. But the memorable acting
talents more than the technical luxuries, qualify
this production as a faithful rendition of The Glass
Menagerie.
Williams' Everyman characters, typified by
desperation and romantic ideals, are still relevant
to the 80's. The "ordinary truths" of Amanda and
Tom's lifestyle are performed with a subtle combination of humour and pathos which makes them
believable today. Joanne Woodward does a
wonderful job of playing an "ugly babbling old
witch" convincingly. Amanda
must be both pragmatic
(regarding her children's
futures), and idealistic (pathetically clinging to the exaggerated grandeur of the
past). Woodward gives a successful portrayal of
this duality within her character. If occasionally
she lapses into overly dramatic posturing, it is
more than compensated by her ability to portray
Amanda's charming side so well.  Her scenes with
Tom are her best; her sense of hope, and his
sense of hopelessness, blend together beautifully. ;
While Woodward faithfully represents the
desperation of the play, John Malkovich, as Tom,
personifies the depression of the era. He is
Amanda without a past of glory to make his
present bearable. His sense of loss is heightened
by never having -possessed anything to lose. He    j
has strengthened the illicit overtones of Tom's
"trips to the movies" with a suggestion of homosexuality.
But he excels most as the narrator. This
highly reflective, and expressionistic technique is
difficult on stage, and is nearly unheard of in
cinema. Yet Malkovich performs these private
monologues with the casualness of conversation.
James Naughton is wonderfully confident
and simple as the Gentleman Caller. This
amateur psychologist's character must be
charming and likeable—Naughton is both. In
fact, the only disappointing character in the film
is Karen Allen as Laura. Laura, as Williams
wrote the character, has an inner richness that
remains hidden if she merely appears cute, and
kind of shy. Allen looks and acts like the girl who
doesn't have a date for the prom, but Laura is the
girl who doesn't even know what a prom is.
Without Naughton's sensitive and subtle performance, the audience would never understand
the extent of Laura's problem.
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Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
nber13. 1987 Movie exposes more than     JA refreshing slasher
teenage angst and pimples
By Mary Ainslie
Less Than Zero addresses the question: What ifyou
are an LA teenager who lives in a mansion and
has your own platinum American Express card?
The movie attempts to show us that
this is not as wonderful as it sounds,
or, that being stinking rich
stinks.
The story revolves around
three high school friends who
separate after graduation. Clay
(Andrew McCarthy) goes to an
ivy league school and gives up
sex (Blair) and
drugs.
Blair
(Jami
Gertz) stays
in LA to
model, dabble with
cocaine, and sleep
with Clay's best
friend. Clay's best
friend Julian
(Robert Downey
disturbing portrayal of carefree teenagers attempting to
cope with adult temptations. These kids have screwed
up families, over privileged friends, and no ideals.
What's good about the movie is that is doesn't blame
them for their involvement. Instead, it tries to explain
MOVIE
Less Than Zero
Granville 7
Jr.) stays in LA to do crack, and sell his body to pay his
drug debts. Guess who dies?
Fortunately, this is not another brat pack film about
teenage angst and pimples. Rather, Less Than Zero is a
how easy it is to succumb to the craaazy life style of LA.
The movie is relentless and extreme in its portrayal
of wasted youth. This depiction is exaggerated by Clay's
reawakening when he returns to LA for his Christmas
break (the beginning of the movie). The viewer shares
Clay's astonishment at the glimpses of teenage LA
(Anyone who shops at the Safeway on Broadway has got
to see this "think pink" Christmas party to believe it.) It
is no wonder these kids have no sense of reality: there is
none in LA.
The performances are surprisingly good, though
McCarthy is too prudish and perfect. Gertz is very adept
as the beautiful poor little rich girl. Their sex scenes
convey a great sense of the thrill of adolescent sexuality,
which juxtaposes nicely with the adult pretension in the
rest of the movie.
The morals of this movie are generally oversimplified:
a little bit of coke
is okay; ifyou
have good sex
with your boyfriend you don't
need drugs;
parents are
shitty; and a red
corvette is the shining armour of modern day knights.
Still, the film convincingly presents a worthwhile
message about the dangers of heavy drug use, with all its
temptations.
By Steven Chess
Prince of Darkness is a cut above the slice and
dice movies so prevalent today. Amidst a glut of
teen slasher movies, it is refreshing to see a
horror film that relies less on gruesome special
effects and focuses more on originality and a
thoughtful, compelling story.
MOVIE
Prince of Darkness
Granville 7
Prince of Darkness opens with a priest lying
dead in a PhD level physics class where a professor,
looking an awful lot like a slightly demented David
Suzuki, lectures on the fallibility of our classical
knowledge of reality. The world of known science, he
suggests, is only a mirror image of the very real
world of shadows. With this idea fresh in their
minds, the students are invited by their professor to
spend a weekend in the church where the recently
deceased priest lived for the last thirty years of his
life, guarding a millennia-old secret.
In the church there is a strange and sinister
glass canister of swirling green amniotic fluid. The
priest who has summoned them to the church will
not at first reveal what he knows of the canister's
contents, kept in a subterranean basement of the
church.
You see, the Prince of Darkness, or Satan's son,
lives within the glass container, and should he
escape, evil will once again rule the world.   Christ
was an extra-terrestrial sent to earth by an advanced race of creatures to subdue evil and to spread
the now commonly accepted lie that our world was
created by the forces of good. The church has been
lying for 2000 years. The world was created by evil.
Can this group of scientists rout the forces of
evil and save the world from its evil origins? The
task is complicated when the fluid begins to leave
the canister and enter those in the church. Interestingly, the evil is spread through an exchange of
bodily fluids. Once someone is infected, they too can
shoot liquid into the mouth of another and infect
them with evil.
There are enough special effects and gory bits to
appeal to the typical slasher film audience, and an
intriguing story to appeal to people who want to see
a film work on more than one level.
mr
my
\        INTERNATIONAL
I        DEVELOPMENT
RESEARCH CENTRE
The International Development Research Centre (IDRC) in Ottawa was
established in 1970, by an Act of the Canadian Parliament, as an autonomous
public corporation, to stimulate and support research responding to the
priorities of Third World countries. This year, IDRC will be offering awards to:
YOUNG CANADIAN
RESEARCHERS
Objectives
To contribute to the growth of research capacity in
Canada that is responsive to Third World priorities
by supporting Canadians at various stages of their
academic and professional careers in research or
training undertaken in a Third World country.
Open to
• Canadian graduate students registered in a
Canadian university.
(a) At the doctoral level in the fields of
Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Sciences;
Communications/Media; Health Sciences;
Information Sciences, Social Sciences;
Energy; Earth Sciences; and Engineering/
Architecture.
(b) At the master's level in the fields of Health
Sciences; Information Sciences; Communications/Media; Finance; and Administration.
• Young Canadian professionals in the fields of
Communications/Media; Finance; and Administration.
• Doctoral or master's students in Social Forestry
are encouraged to apply to the John G. Bene
fellowship.
Program and Place of Tenure
Field research: Those awardees undertaking a
doctoral or master's degree in the above fields
must propose a program of field research in a Third
World country. Normally, this research counts as
partial fulfillment of a degree.
Professional placement: The professional place
ment for young Canadian professionals will take
place with a research organization or training
institution overseas. For candidates in the field of
journalism, the applicant should be affiliated to an
international or Third World newspaper or news
agency.
Formal training: For candidates in the Health
Sciences field at the master's level, the training may
be in a developed country as long as the institution
offers a solid program that is oriented toward the
health problems of the Third World. Preference is
given to those candidates who have previous
working experience in a developing country. For
those not having previous experience, an overseas
component of at least 3 months must complement
the training.
Duration of Tenure
Up to 12 months. Outstanding doctoral candidates
may request additional support for a 2nd year
Eligibility
• For graduate students:
(a) Canadian citizenship or permanent residence;
(b) Affiliation with an institution or organization
where the research, training, or placement
will take place;
(c) Excellent academic qualifications;
(d) Completion of course work by the time of
tenure;
(e) Thesis proposal accepted by appropriate
academic committee; and
(f) Student in good standing in a Canadian
university.
• For young professionals, conditions {a-c) must
be met.
Selection
Open competition. Final selection made by the
YCR Selection Committee.
Number of Awards
Variable.
Value
Up to $20,000 per award. In exceptional cases,
doctoral candidates will be considered for an
extension of 12 months with the total award not
exceeding $40,000.
Deadlines
• Mailing of applications: before January 1.
• Announcement of awards: April 1.
• Tenure: to be undertaken before March 1 of
the following year.
• Application forms are available from the
Fellowships and Awards Division of IDRC or
Deans of Research and Graduate Studies in
Canadian universities.
Further information and submission of completed application forms to:
Fellowships and Awards Division
Internationa! Development Research Centre
P.O. Box 8500
Ottawa, Ontario
K1G3H9
July 1987
CENTRE DE RECHERCHES
POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT
INTERNATIONAL
Le Centre de recherches pour le developpement international (CRDI) a
Ottawa est une societe publique autonome qui a ete institu.ee en 1970 par une
loi du Parlement canadien pour encourager et subventionner des travaux de
recherche sur les problemes prioritaires des pays du Tiers-Monde. Cette
annee le CRDI offrira des bourses a de
JEUNES CHERCHEURS
CANADIENS
Objectifs
Favoriser le developpement d'une capacite de
recherche au Canada qui soil attentive aux
problemes prioritaires des pays du Tiers-Monde,
en finangant les travaux ou les cours de formation
que menent, dans des pays en developpement, des
Canadiens qui en sont a differentes etapes de leurs
etudes ou de leur carriere.
Admissibility
• Les 6tudiantes et etudiants canadiens qui pour-
suivent des Etudes superieures dans une
universite canadienne:
a) au niveau du doctorat dans les domaines
suivants : sciences de I'agriculture, de
l'alimentation et de la nutrition, communications ou madias, sciences de la sante\
sciences de 1'information, sciences sociales,
6nergie, sciences de la Terre, g<_nie ou
architecture.
b) au niveau de la maitrise dans les domaines
suivants : sciences de la sant£, sciences de
['information, communications ou madias,
finances et administration.
• Les jeunes professionnels canadiens qui
travaillent dans les domaines des communications ou des madias, des finances et de
1'administration.
• Les candidats a la maitrise ou au doctorat en
foresterie sociale peuvent faire une demande de
bourse John G. Bene.
Programme et lieu des travaux
Recherche les boursiers entreprenant un
doctorat ou une maitrise dans les disciplines
susmentionnees doivent proposer un programme
de recherche dans un pays du Tiers-Monde. Cette
recherche constitue habituellement un element du
programme d'etudes.
Stage : le stage des jeunes professionnels
canadiens a lieu au sein d'un etablissement de
recherche ou de formation a l'6tranger. Les
candidats du domaine du journalisme doivent etre
rattach^s a un grand quotidien ou une agence de
presse internationale ou du Tiers-Monde.
Formation universitaire : les candidats au niveau
de la maitrise dans le domaine des sciences de la
sante peuvent entreprendre leur formation dans un
pays industrialise a condition que I'etablissement
choisi offre un solide programme nettement
onente vers les problemes de sante des pays du
Tiers-Monde. La preference est acoordee aux
candidats qui ont deja travaille dans un pays en
developpenent Les candidats qui ne possedent
pa_ cette experience doivent inc lure, a leur
programme de formation, un sejour d'au moins
trois mots ..; 1'etranger.
Duree des travaux
Douze mois au maximum. Les etudiants exeep-
tionnels du niveau du doctoral peuvent solliciter
une aide supplemental pour la deuxieme annee.
Conditions de candidature
• Pour les etudiants aux etudes superieures :
(a) etre citoyen canadien ou resident permanent ;
(b) etre affile a I'etablissement ou se deroulera
la recherche, la formation ou le stage ;
(c) avoir obtenu des notes excellentes durant
les Etudes universitaires;
(d) avoir termini la scolarite des etudes su
pe>ieures avant de commencer les travaux
finances par la bourse ;
(e) avoir fait approuver le projet de these par le
comite" universitaire responsible ; et
(0 etre inscrit en bonne et due forme a une
university canadienne.
• Pour les jeunes professionnels, ils doivent
re"pondre aux criteres (a k c).
Selection
Concours public. Le Comity de selection des JCC
prend la decision finale.
Nombre de bourses
Variable.
Montant de la bourse
20 000 $ au maximum. Dans des cas exceptionnels,
les candidats au doctorat pourront voir la duree de
leur bourse prolonged, la bourse ne d^passant pas
le total de 40 000 $.
Dates limites
• Les candidatures doivent 3tre postees avant le
lcr Janvier.
• Annonce des bourses : le ler avril
• Travaux : doivent commencer avant le ler
mars de I'annee suivante
• On peut obtenir des formulaires de candidature
aupres de la Division des bourses du CRDI ou
des doyens de la Recherche et des eludes
superieures, dans les universites canadiennes.
Pour obtenir d'autres renseignements et
soumettre les formulaires de candidature,
s'adresser a
Division des bourses
Centre de recherches pour le
developpement international
CP asoo
Ottawa (Ontario)
K1G 3H9
November 13,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
. . . presents . . .
The Collected Works of Billy The Kid
by Michale Ondaatje
November 18 - 28
Special Previews - Nov. 18 + 19
2 for the price ofl regular admission
Curtain: 8 pm
Matinee - Saturday, Nov. 21 @ 2 pm
Box Office * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
PRICES
SLASH
AGAIN!
Have your
paper
UNBOUND
and save
$$$
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lower level
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3504 W 4TH AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C.  732-4535
Chronicles	
The psychology deparfmenf role reversal
fc*perWrvr qets out of hand.
Suspect tries
the audience
By Katherine Monk
Take one lawyer, two murders, a handful of suspects, and a pinch of
forbidden romance. Place ingredients into one large courtroom,
let simmer for two hours. Et
voila!  Murder mystery a la
Hollywood.
MOVIE
Suspect
Granville 7 and Oakridge
Cher and Dennis Quaid star
in Suspect, 	
the latest of
Perry Mason
re-writes.
Cher plays
the burnt-out
public
defense attorney who does
it all for the
"one Joe who
didn't do it?
and ends up
defending all
the misun- !	
derstood
souls who can't afford their own
defense lawyer, or were twenty
years too late for Perry and Delia
to save their skins.
Cherry Mason's newest case
is the plight of a homeless deaf-
mute Vietnam veteran who has
been accused of murder. Through
jury selection she meets Dennis
Quaid, a sleek Washington
lobbyist who will do anything to
get the vote. Together they
slowly unravel a predictably
sordid tale of corruption within
the federal justice system. But,
wait a minute, the lawyers and
the jurists aren't supposed to
talk to each other, let alone... you
know, kiss into a fade-out, which
is as far as their screen romance
Cherry Mason's
newest case is the
plight of a homeless deaf-mute
Vietnam veteran
who has been accused of murder.
is allowed to progress.
Together they walk into the
required amount of deserted
alleys, abandoned buildings, and
empty streets, without any
means of protecting themselves.
Surprise, surprise: these two
geniuses who go out to find
psychotic killers with nothing
more than good manners solve
the case.
Cher's performance is
strong, especially if you consider
that she's playing an Irish lass
by the name of Kathleen Riley,
and Dennis
Quaid does
what he can
with a poor
script, but
there's something missing
between them...
love? Or maybe
just sex.
Best
performance,
however, must
go to the
    computer
screen in the
courtroom which speaks for the
traumatized war veteran.
There are some good heart
stoppers, and the film even tries
to embrace social problems such
as the rising amount of irrational;
violence, and the plight of the
homeless.  At one point the
prosecuting attourney asks the
jury if "the price of life has
become so cheap, that all its
worth is the nine dollars which
the victim had in her wallet at
the time of her death?" Maybe
life is worth more than nine
dollars, but unless you're a real
thriller devotee, or else really
bored, Suspect doesn't warrant
more than three on a cheapie
Tuesday.
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OPEN SUNDAYS 10 AM - 6 PM
3355 W. BROADWAY    733-1612
SALE ENDS NOV. 30, 1987
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
November 13,1987 Gordimer dismantles apartheid
By Carolyn Sale
A Sport of Nature, the latest novel
from white South African writer
Nadine Gordimer, is a complexly-
crafted portrait of Hillela Kgomani.
Gordimer traces Hillela's evolution from
thoughtless, careless teenager to an
activist for the black revolutionary cause.
Hillela arrives at her political
commitment along a circuitous route. Her
roots are diverse. Her father, Len, is a
Portugese Jew. Her mother, Ruthie,
spent her nights in clubs dancing with her
lover, and eventually danced away from
both husband and daughter, shirking all
familial connections and responsibilities.
Her father then foisted her upon her two
aunts, Olga and Pauline who take turnabout raising Hillela. Through them,
Hillela experiences two different aspects
of the white bourgeois South African
world. Olga resides in a palatial establishment, waited upon by her servant,
Jethro.- She reaps all the benefits of life
as a white South African and has the
money to remove herself from all the
problems. She knows nothing about the
oppressive political machinery of her
country - and doesn't care to. She is perturbed, almost antagonistic, that her
sister helps her husband Joe, a civil rights
lawyer, defend imprisoned blacks, and
give political fugitives temporary shelter.
Pauline runs an emotionally-charged
household, often taking out her frustra
tion at being unable to change South
Africa in any real way upon her son and
husband. When she comes upon her son
Sasha and Hillela sleeping together, she
feels as if Sasha has switched his allegiance. Hillela cannot remain. She drops
out of school, drops out of the family,
attaches herself to journalist Andrew Rey
(who she is unaware is an informer for the
South African government) and begins to
run in highly political circles.
At first she is very much a fringe
figure. She flees the country with Rey
after he rigs a tearing-apart of their
cottage, and claims to be in danger of
arrest. When he abandons her at Tamarisk Beach, she is without money, without
family, without friends, and without any
beliefs or values. Shell sleep with any
man she can pick up on the beach merely
to have somewhere to sleep at night.
Prom this 'nofcning', this state of complete
and utter disassociation, emerges a
woman of intense, fierce political commitment, a commitment that is born of love
for black revolutionary activist, Whaila
Kgomani.
Unfortunately, Gordimer holds
Hillela at a distance from the reader,
keeping her as a specimen under a glass
jar, a sport of nature to be examined. We
watch her sun tanning on Tamarisk beach,
and strolling through the fruit markets at
Accra, her jeans and life held together
with a safety-pin; see her startled reaction
when a black head emerges obsidian-like
from the surrounding blue of the Indian
Ocean, and she meets the great love of her
life; driving through the African bush to
deliver food and medicine to the victims of
war i n the Frontline States; lectunng at
rallies in the States; and yet, somehow,
Hillela eludes us. These images of Hillela
flit past like film-footage of an unfocussed,
undefined figure, a gray shadow in a sea
of black and white.
(Jordimer's surrealistic style -
employed very successfully in her short
stories - does not serve her well in the
much broader scope of the novel. Her
narrative style of speaking of Hillela as if
she were a dead historical personage and
denies the reader an emotional response
to the character, which is highly ironic
since Hillela's response to her world is
entirely sensual and emotional. She loves
Whaila for his magnetic personality, the
power he embodies, a power drawn from
the singleness of his purpose and his
unmitigated loyalty to his people's cause.
Gordimer's men have a vitality, a
'roundness', a soul, that her women do
not. Sasha is a sad figure throughout. He
remains in love with Hillela - his Hillela,
the teenage girl with whom he covertly
slept under his parents' roof - while the
real Hillela is a much changed, mature
woman, with whom he cannot even get in
touch. He, more than any other character
in the novel, is Gordimer's mouthpiece.
Much of the novel's political dialectic is
summarized in his words - his conversations, letters, journals - which makes him
stand for that generation of white South
Africans who must come to terms with the
uprising taking place around him, must
realize along with the rest of the white
bourgeois that the violence will not end of
its own accord, and will not be suppressed
by a violent clamping-down on the part of
the South African government. If apartheid is not dismantled 'death will continue to breed death', and the black forces
will turn, finally, to 'soft targets', to white
people in the streets, white children in
their playgrounds. Each must choose
where his loyalties lie and must realize
that non-action is support for the status
quo, that their parents' attempt to change
the system from within, was ineffectual.
Gordimer seems to believe that this
generation will see the end of apartheid in
South Africa. In fact, the novel's final
scene is of the public celebration of the
installation of the first black president of
South Africa. When men, both black and
white, are willing to risk imprisonment
and death for a cause, the cause,
Gordimer would argue, cannot help but
eventually succeed. Those people who are
sports of nature - who have the strength
to question and to transform the status
quo - shall decide it.
U2 goes for soft sell
By Mike Gordon
It's 1986 and Korean youth are rioting
in the streets amid the Asian games.
Two years earlier in Chile, 16 year-old
Carmen Gloria Quintana and her friend
Rodrigo Rojas, back from his studies in
the U.S., took part in a work stoppage to
oppose the fascist rule of Gen. Augusto
Pinochet. The group was attacked by a
truckload of soldiers who set the two of
them on fire, and knocked Quintana's
front teeth out with a rifle butt as she
tried to douse the flames. She is permanently scarred and lucky to be alive. Rojas
is dead.
All around the world, young people
are caught in crossfire of foreign intervention, civil war and state violence — or are
willingly putting their lives on the line in
the struggle against military occupation
and authoritarian rule.
Tonight, in Canada, the ghettos,
prisons and unemployment lines are
overflowing with young people — black,
white, native, Oriental — who have no
direction, no future, no apparent hope or
power to change things.
Last night, in Vancouver, the largest
gathering of youth was at BC Place, to
hear "the biggest rock band in the world,"
U2.
Power and hope. They are words that
are not often used in the same sentence to
inspire people to take control of their
lives. For example, each election time the
percentage of people who registered to
vote express their will through the ballot
and hope that this year's package of
corporate and private political power that
will improve the country's lot. Reality,
unfortunately, proves otherwise.
Unfortunately, as well, our schools,
commercial media, and other government
institutions cement over our grass roots,
leaving us despairing and confused.
Youth, they say, is the hope of the
future. Unfortunately, those who have the
power to inspire hope in young people
don't often utilize it.
U2 are certainly no exception.
Here is a band that emerged from
Dublin, on the frontline of Northern
Ireland's struggle for independence. In
fact, many thousands of North American
teenagers carried U2's echoing impressions through shopping malls and high-
school dances, throats and t-shirts ablaze
with "Sunday, Bloody, Sunday? or the lamenting "Pride (In the Name of Love)?
But, as with ambitious politicians,
smoke rises, and fire dies.U2 has whith-
ered slowly into the realm of ethereal
spirituality, filing what edge they held to
a soft sell.
There's pride in political inspiration,
but (here's money in records — lots and
lots of records, and t-shirts, and videos...
This is not to deny the band's musical
talent. U2 has put out some good music,
and given pleasure (and maybe hope) to a
grear, many people. But to what end?
A Georgia Straight writer recently
put it that U2 is a not in fact divine
benediction, but just a rock band. The
first part is definitely true, but the latter
denies the band's power.
Bono and the boys stand at the
pinnacle of the mainstream rock world for
millions. But instead of using that
incredible prominence to take a stand,
they are merely putting on biiiiggg shows.
Compare the message those millions
are hearing to That Petrol Emotion's
"Agitate, Educate, Organize"; or Peter
Tosh's "Get up, stand up, stand up for
your rights.."" or DOA's "General Strike?
or vTalk-Action=0'; or Billy Bragg asking a
generation, "Which Side Are You On"?
How many of those people who paid
thirty bucks to see U2 will pay a few to
hear Bolero Lava play at a benefit for
AIDS Vancouver, or went to see Animal
Slaves at the recent one for the alternative magazine, Open Road? How many
will protest uranium mining in B.C., the
loss of the Stein and other irreplaceable
wilderness, or cuts to welfare payments
they, or friends or relatives, may rely on?
Many, I hope, will be empowered to
do so...
• • • •
TVie Commodore --"^v.
1WT^-«Tl>TllDGr    *•»    . Bv presenting 5o«r .
N    Saturday V*^".:
NovembeE>A^—
*   jam
D-4RRV MAJOR
ALFIE GALPiN
•'Ol WQWK
ta^^ DARBY
S£?£D_-*INS
HORK OLAFSON
»"»••» PhiTsSKS^U^
4444.
NOVEMBER
UBC BOOKSTORE
Are you a reader? A bookworm?
A bibliophile? A bibliotaph? Or do you just
ike books?
Answer yes to any of these questions and our
sale is for you!
Enjoy our usual unusual selection of
remainders and specially-priced
books, bargain books and discard
records from the UBC Library, sale-
priced textbooks, and 'hurts' from
some of the finest publishers.
Sale runs from November 14 - 28.
Bookstore Hours
Mon , Tues., Thurs.. Fn.    8:30 am - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Saturday
8:30 a.m. -8:30p.m.
9:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m
NOV. 14-28
<___gfc BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd., Van., B.C. 228-4741
November 13,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Overdue report
surfaces
Finally the administration is getting
close to implementing a sexual harassment policy that is years overdue.
With the release of the second draft of an
ad hoc advisory committee report, the
president could conceivably release a
standing policy by April.
Of course, that probably won't happen.
On this sensitive issue the administration
will try to placate the faculty association,
the board of governors, members of the administration, campus unions, women's
groups and possibly students.
Probably the most pressure to change
the report will come from the faculty
association and understandably so. Faculty will bear the brunt of harassment
complaints, complaints sometimes justified, and sometimes not. Threatened by a
policy that will upset the status quo, the
faculty association will likely move to
make more specific the report's definition
of sexual harassment and strengthen the
requirements for admissible evidence.
But if the administration radically
changes the present document, to placate
faculty or other groups, they would be
making a mistake. Yes, the report has
problems, most noticeably the omission of
exact numbers of students who will sit on
the president's permanent advisory
committee and the Hearing Panel. But the
ad hoc committee's report is a good document.
Quote of the week
" You'll either go on to do well or
you'll go into politics."
Pat Carney on her
move from city editor
for The Ubyssey to
minister of
international trade.
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 13, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
An aura ofweirdness pervaded the news chamber. Laura Busheikin, dancing on the head
of a chocolate chip cookie and weaving what she called "a sort-of-narrative" out of cooked
spaghetti, smiled cheerfully and offered Aiex Johnson a stick of herb-flavoured chew ng
gum. Peter Francis displayed his jealousy by baring his teeth and snarling. Laura gave
him a stick of gum, and he was happy again. The tights, usually flourescent, turned into
wild shades of red, blue, and green, flickering in synchopatic rythms to Mozart's
"Fledermaus", being performed in the corner by Adam Jones on electric guitar, Kart Hall
on bass, Cathy Chung on synthesizer, and Ross McLaren singing all the vocal parts. Pat
Carney, suspended upside down from the ceiling (to "drain her brain", as she put it)
chanted quietly to herself about "damn Brian, damn Ron, and damn double damn Johnny
and Eddie!" Corrine Bjorge, having finally "found herself", happily tapped away at the word
processor: "Oh, this story's soooo boring — maybe I'll add a paragraph and fake an
outrageous quote..." she giggled mischievously. "How about," suggested Lisa Langcrd,
"having him say'Oh, oh, oh, hang on a minute, I need a drag from my Thai stick', and then
have him drag out a huuuuge joint and offer it to everyone at the press conference ... and-
then end the story by saying that everyone got really stoned and was really happy for a
while." Chris Wiesinger, listening intently, nodded:"Yeah... and then have him confirm
— while he's stoned — that he really does have a fetish for making love in a chocolate
filled whirlpool." Katherine Monk's eyes lit up with anticipation: "D'you suppose it's in
the budget to get a whirlpool for the office if we don't print photos for the rest of the year?"
Aaron Drake calculated: "Uuum.yes, but don't forget that we need several months supply
of chocolate as well... so ... .mmmm ... if we sell the type-setting equipment... and .he
PMT machine ... yeah ... we can do it!" Greg Davis ventured: "But we need a supply of
drugs as well... maybe it's just too impractical." "How about renting the Aquatic
Centre???!!!" shouted Steven Chess hopefully. Catherine Lu pointed out that they might
not like having chocolate in their whirlpool, and Ann Rogers reminded everyone that we
still didn't have the requisite amounts of chocolate. "What kind of chocolate?" ventured
MaryAinslee, timidly. "It don't fuckin' matte r what kind of chocolate," blasted an annoyed
Victor Chew Wong. "We don't have the gawwdamm money to get chocolate!" "You don't
have to get so damn hostile," snapped Carolyn Sale. "Swiss costs more than Canadian,
and Canadian costs more than cheap Dutch chocolate, ya fuckin' idiot." A brief perod
of violence ensued, but the changing hues of light, Laura's dancing, and the performance
of "Flcdcrmaus" soon calmed everyone.   But the problem remained unsolved...
m
ONE GOOD REffiON TO AVOID HOSPITALS
WHICH ARE STAFFED BY HORSES
WELL GOLLY, A./?.FELTGlX
Letters
Hey, thief!
On the evening of Saturday, November 7, a blue
sign labelled "Students
Helping Students", located
at the Speakeasy desk on
the SUB concourse, was
mysteriously removed. Alot
of time, effort, and money
($50.00) went into creating
this sign. A prompt return
would be most appreciated
(no questions asked).
Janet Woo
Speakeasy Volunteer
Stein forum
My name is Annette
Garm, a month ago I wrote
an article for your perspectives column on the Stein
Valley entitled "Logging
Valley Ignores Economy"
(Oct 9 Edition)
The responses I received to my letter were less
than favorable. Many
people thought my economics were naive or just plain
wrong. So I rechecked them
and yes I was naive in a few
areas but still much of what
I had to say was and is very
valid. Yet doing more research on the Stein Valley I
became aware of how complex and unclear many of
the issues are. It seems to
me guys we all need more
education.
So myself and a few
members from the two envi-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libellous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring them,
with identification, to SUB 241k.   Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
romental groups on campus
decided to arrange a non
bias forum on the Stein
Valley to provide university
students the opportunity to
listen and understand both
sides of the issue. We have
composed an expert panel
of four speakers. On behalf
of logging there will be John
Cuthbert, Chief Forester
from the Ministry of Forests
and Ted Mattise from B.C.
Forest Products Ltd. On
behalf of logging there will
be John McCandless, coordinator of the Lillooet Tribal
Council and Dr. Michael
McGonigle, a resource
economist from SFU.
I would like to take this
opportunity to invite all
students to come and listen
and participate in this public forum. It will be held
Nov. 17, atl2:30intheSUB
Auditorium.
Annette Garm
Nursing 4
Vitriol Ilk  looney left, rabid
right;  reason please!
From the Ombudsoffice:
A message to students
who own motorcycles
and park outside the
SUB. If you have received a parking ticket
please contact the Ombudsoffice for more information!
We're in SUB 100A
and our phone number
is
228-4846
Greg Lanning clearly
misunderstood my letter of
Nov. 6. Gosh, maybe the
"hick" humour threw him
off! My apologies! But what
misdirected vitriol! What
frenzied vituperation! In
his excited response of
Nov. 10 Lanning tars himself liberally with his own
brush, casting "froth" and
generalization about recklessly. Sadly, his style fits
the cause.
My point was that extremes of ideological
thinking, both Left and
Right, are at once laughable and dangerous. I can
only speculate from
Lanning's abusive and
humourless response that
his position is threatened
by such a statement. I
admit that there is both a
looney Left and a looney
Right. However, I also
admit that the existence of
a legitimate non-looney
Left (and, reluctantly, of a
legitimate, non-looney
Right.) Does Lanning's
view allow intellectual
space for a Left apart from
a "looney" Left? One wonders. Such arrogant intellectual exclusivity is dangerous. (History bears me
out on this 'un, Greg!)
This myopia plagues
extremes of Left and Right,
and evidently Lanning too.
Why personally, I'd be will
ing to bet that there are
several (heck, lots!) of
people on the Left who
don't habitually slander
and misquote. No, Mr.
Lanning? I'd go so far as to
say that there are people
on the Right who don't either (though Lanning sloppily misquotes me on the
word, "democratically":
tsk, tsk, Greg, watch out
Yer Arthur Schlesinger!)
As to rigour,
Lanning's broad allegations about Allende in particular and the Left in
general leave much to be
desired if he chooses to
present them seriously in
public. Some angry statements and a couple of book
titles do not make an argument. Lanning's is merely
reckless opinion. And no
purpose other than hyperbole is served by calling
something "McCarthyist".
One ought always object to
the misuse of inflammatory terms: eg. fascist,
Nazi, Hitlerian, etc.
My point was and is
that one should avoid insult, intolerance, and hyperbole. Simply a request
for a reasoned critique instead of a blitzkrieg. Just
another "Leftist myth"?
No friggin' way, I say.
Peter Halewood
"Would-be" Law
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
November 13, 1987 Blair Longley recently had his day in court. The
charge: possession and cultivation of marijuana. On
Oct. 30, 1987, a provincial court judge acquitted
Longley on the grounds that the evidence presented
to the court was "inconclusive and lacked continuity".
Longley, who had been prepared to defend himself on
the basis that the laws against marijuana were unconstitutional, said that the prosecutor fumbled the
case by deliberately dismissing one of his prime
witnesses — the RCMP officer who had sealed the
envelope to be sent to the analyst, containing
Longley's marijuana.
On the surface, Longley feels the court was lenient because it was a Friday
afternoon and Longley, dressed in a three-piece suit (like a decent hippie), had
brought his wife and young son along. The deeper reason, he suspects, is that the
court didn't want to open the can of worms that his constitutional argument would
entail. The following is the condensed version of his argument.
Canada and Cannabis
Blair Longley
By Blair Longley
Canada was the first country
in the world to make drug use a
crime. In particular, our marijuana laws are the harshest in the
western world, and we have the
highest per-capita criminalization
of our citizens for cannabis offenses (more than 200 000 and
counting).
By the federal government's
own best estimates, the black
market for pot is several billion
dollars, there are at least one million Canadians who use marijuana regularly, and perhaps as
many as three or four million who
use it occasionally.
This black market is so big it
has become inelastic and is determined by the overall mass demand
and not by supply. 'The price of a
single joint has \	
stabilized   at   a j
rate comparable '
to   a   bottle   of
beer.) I	
Hundreds of thousands of
cannabis consumers are now
middle-aged and most of these
expect they will have to wait until
old age to see the laws change;
that is, wait until all those with
prejudice against cannabis have
died.
For five years, various people
have been trying to prove that the
current criminality of cannabis is
unconstitutional; so far none of
them have been able to get to first
base, and thus their arguments
have not been heard. How long
this can go on is anyone's guess.
What the government might do if
the courts ever do strike down the
current legislation is an even
wilder speculation.
Fifteen years ago the Le Dain
Royal Commission published its
report on cannabis. In its conclusions and recommendations it
found that the penalties for cannabis offenses were "grossly excessive" and stated: "There is no
doubt that the law on the books is
at extreme variance with the
facts." Gerald Le Dain now sits on
the Supreme Court of Canada.
Will he ever get a second chance to
express his opinion about
Canada's cannabis laws?
In the Le Dain report it was
observed that the major studies on
marijuana done during the last 75
years all came to the same conclusion that cannabis was relatively
harmless, and that all of these
scientific studies have been completely ignored in government
policy.
There is a relatively simple
historical explanation. The origin
of the laws against cannabis is in
racism. In fact, in Canada, the
whole of the narcotics law edifice
was erected upon hatred for the
Chinese. Since cannabis was
originally and especially Chinese,
it was originally and especially
made criminal in Canada. From
1923 the House of Commons (1)
passed the Chinese Immigration
Act, which effectively ended Chi
nese immigration into Canada,
thus making the Chinese the first
and only people to be excluded on
the basis of race, and (2) put cannabis on the Narcotics Drug schedule in order to imprison and deport
Chinese.
The laws were so discriminatory and racist that in 1923, Parliament also passed the Hemp
Bounties Act, which paid a penny
and a half per pound to white
farmers to grow cannabis, the
same plant that the Chinese were
being imprisoned and deported
for!
In 1938, inspired by the example in the United States of
America, ( where Mexican immigrants were the "problem") Canada finally made cultivation of
cannabis a crime, after the Great
Perspective
Depression had wiped out all but
a few of the farmers who had been
subsidized by the government to
cultivate cannabis.
The same lies were retold
then that originally had been told,
"Cannabis is a dangerous narcotic,
addictive and fatal." What until
that time had been a common
garden plant, was to be eradicated. Nothing significant in the
law has been changed since then.
These then were the two
phases of cannabis laws in Canada. From 1923 until 1938, possession of cannabis was a crime
which was not enforced against
anyrespectabel whiteman. From
1938 until the present, after first
It is no coincidence that in
the 1960's, hippies perceived themselves to be
"voluntary coloured
people". The civil rights
protests were perhaps
naive insofar as they
thought that truth and
justice could win, but in
their sense of what had to
be done, they were not
mistaken.     	
waiting six months and compensating those few farmers who were
now to be forced out of the business
that the government had originally sponsored them to get into,
cannabis was declared illegal.
The tables have completely
turned. What started as the
opium laws, and which later had
cannabis appended into it, presently has the irony not to be enforced against opium poppies, but
only against cannabis. The laws
against cultivation and possessing
opium poppy flowers are exactly
the same as those against marijuana, but they simply are never
enforced.
Many people, including the
present author, have    diligently
researched these facts, most of
which come straight out of the
Legislative Record itself and are
impeccable evidence. But, all of
the facts are ignored.
It has never been demonstrated that making drug use
criminal is a good idea. "»Vhat actually happened in history is that
very serious racial conflict became
transformed into a druj problem,
with all of the tools of persecution
that are the drug laws; we know
today originally created to attack
racial minorities.
Itis no coincidence that in the
1960's, hippies perceived themselves to be "voluntary coloured
people". The civil rights protests,
were perhaps naive insofar as they
thought that truth and justice
could win, but in their sense of
what had to be
done, they were
not m.staken.
Tr roughout
the 1930's 40's
and oO's there was practically no
problem in Canada with cannabis,
because it was very easy to imprison and deport unwanted Chinese. But in tho 1960's Trillions of
mainstream Canadian ) ouths voluntarily started to find out what it
is like to be discriminate d against.
These youths have not gone anywhere, they have just gotten older.
They may have different lifestyles
and they certainly have different
opinions, but the multioillion dollar marijuana business exists because of them.
The current Progressive Conservative government of Canada
makes an ardent show of concern
for human rights all over the
world. However, this only becomes hypocrisy when we examine their total disregard for violations of basic human rights at
home. Prejudice can never perceive itself for what it is. Rather,
prejudice often pretends to be its j
opposite. The government claims
to be concerned for the health and
welfare of our society when it
keeps cannabis on the Narcotics
Control schedule. This is an outright lie and an aggravated insult
added to all the injuries caused by
the criminal prosecutions.
Every time a Canadian citizen is made a criminal because of a
cannabis offense, bas c human
rights are violated. If there is light
at the end of this tunnel of darkness, then it is still a-ound the
bend. The magnitude and irrationality of the prejudhe against
cannabis can not be anderesti-
mated.
When a harmless green plant
has its cultivation and even its
seeds made illegal. be.ause one
race of men hates another race of
men, it is not difficult, at least to
imagine, what the converse case
could mean. Maybe ir. the year
2000, when all those youths who
experimented with Marijuana
become the elders of society, the
truth will be spoken.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run
for election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO Students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (including at least one
from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of
nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S.
Office (Room 266 S.U.B.) and in the offices of the Studenl
Undergraduate Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 4,1987.
LO
H7_
ST A
DID  VOIR
PARTY   SING
OH HOLY MGHT
WHEN   THE   Bll
FOR   LAST  YEAR'S
ANNEAL CHRISTMAS
PARTY   ARRIVED'.' THIS
FESTIVE SEASON WHY NO
DECK THE HALLS \T FOGG V SI DS.
WE CAN ACCOMMODATE FROM
10- l jO  AN I)   CI ARANTEE
)ANC1N(I   RESERVATIONS  AT  VOIR
WORITE MGHT CLl B SO VOL   CAN
ROCK AROl'lMD THE CHRISTMAS TREE. SO
HAVE YOURSELF A MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS
BILL THIS YEAR WITH THE BEST VAM E SOI TH
)F THE  NORTH   POLE.   ENJO\   THE SPIRITS OF
IRISTMAS AT  ANY OF Ol'R THREE CONVENIENT
lAHONS: KITSILANO 7:.2-:.377: BROADWAY c* CAMBIE
NCL1S1I BAY 68:?_337. THE MANAGEMENT AN!)
W 1SI1   .01    AND  Vol RS
SFASOXS EATING &
-Xl'LD  l,\\G  l)l\K
FROM FOGG V SI DS
RFSTW RAM S.
MERRIEST
November 13, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 UBC BOOKSTORE
500    *«}
OFF BARBARIAN
BARBARIAN
SPORTSWEAR
COUPON DAY
MON., NOV. 16
Redeemable towards regular priced
merchandise valued at more than
$15.00.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
J OFF
CANADIAN
GRAPHICS WEST
COUPON DAY
TUES., NOV. 17
Redeemable towards regular priced
merchandise valued at more than
$15.00.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
%
OFF
FUJI
HLM
CSPOKI-tKLLf wooucmows 1»«4
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
20,
SHEAFFER
PENS OVER $10
Includes Targa, TRZ, Lady Sheaffer
&
DESK
SETS
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
CROSS
PENS
Includes Chrome, Black Matte, 10K
and 14K Pens.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
$CQQ (glhgim
w/OFF
CALHOUN
SPORTSWEAR
COUPON DAY
WED., NOV. 18
Redeemable towards regular priced
children's, infant's, and adult fashion
wear valued at more than S15.OC.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/37.
5^ -3-*-*
0FF n/letou,'
VICTORY
SPORTSWEAR
COUPON DAY
THURS., NOV. 19
Redeemable towards regular priced
athletic fleecewear valued at more than
$15.00.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
JJC 00 raveps Hpit
RAVENS KNIT
SPORTSWEAR
COUPON DAY
FRL, NOV. 20
Redeemable towards regular priced
athletic fleecewear valued at more than
$15.00.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
OFFlfyMOiV
OUTBOUND
TAYMOR BACKPACKS
COUPON DAY
SAT, NOV 21
Redeemable towards regular priced
merchandise valued at more than
$15.00.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
10
%
OFF
%
OFF
SWATCH
WATCHES
All models.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
20
PARKER
PENS
Includes Parker Arrow, Classic, Jotters
and Vector.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
AVAILABLE
IN THE GIFT
SECTION:
Christmas Boxed Cards and
Accessories. Christmas Ornaments and
Gifts.
30
%
OFF
FRAMED PRINTS
MASTERS OF ART
ALL MANET
BRUSHES
Watercolour, oil, and acrylic
brushes including Kolinsky Sable.
Quantities Limited.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
Lithographic reproductions by renowned artists Renoir, Picasso and many others.
Mounted and framed, prices start at
Reg. starting at $69.95
iec artists tvenoir, nca:
$39.95
CANADIAN PRINTS
Beautifully double matted and framed prints. Artists include Helen Hunter, Brent
Heighton and Don Li Leger. $ | \j   U EZ
Reg. $24.95
SALE PRICE
Say Merry Christmas with a 'Master your Art' gift set. Sets available from beginner
to professional. Set quanitities are limited so hurrv and pe,; YQUrtr r'*dav.
NC240-2AA
RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES
REG. $25.95
SPECIAL
PRICE
$
21
95
EACH
DURACELL
BATTERIES
AA, AAA, C,D,9V only.
1 COUPON PER ITEM.
EXPIRES DEC. 23/87.
DON'T MISS THIS GREAT OPPORTUNITY
TO GET SOME CHRISTMAS SHOPPING DONE!
mm BOOKSTORE
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
November 13, 1987

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