UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 1, 1963

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127395.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127395.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127395-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127395-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127395-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127395-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127395-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127395-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127395-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127395.ris

Full Text

Array fe
Keep
off the
grass
THE UBYSSEY
Be a
grime-
stopper
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, BC, FRIDAY, MARCH 1, 1963
Ho. 59
AMS asks lawsuit
on discount cards
By ANN  BURGE
Student council is up in arms because a Vancouver firm
is using the name of the AMS to promote sales.
Acme Novelty (B.C.) Ltd. is sending discount cards carrying the name Alma Mater Society in letters to all students
listed in the student telephone directory.
'The AMS has nothing to do
Mid-term break
now up to deans
A committee of deans will
consider student council's -request for a spring - mid-term
break.
. Science president Don Parish said a.letter he wrote to
the senate requesting the Feb.
27-Mar. 1 break had been
passed  on to  the committee.
"We have had favorable
comment from the registrar
and from other University officials," Farish said. "I'm sure
the break will be given serious
consideration."
Council passed a motion in
January after a campaign by
The Ubyssey.
Nine of 10
students
back JBM
—Don Hume photo
RALPH THE MYSTERY PICKET
government stooges are working here
'Ralph' remains silent
Mystery picket
parades on campus
■-.  A mystery picket picketed the administration buildings for
alinost one hour Thursday.
The man, dressed in heavy
trenchcoat and old fedora, paraded before the building's main
doOr in silence.
The placard he carried read:
"Government stooges work here.
Back Mac."
When a reporter asked him
why he was picketing the
building, he snapped: "Read the
sign. What does it look like."
He appeared to be protesting
the lack of support given Dr.
John Macdonald's fight with
the government by the board of
governors.
The only name the man gave
was Ralph.
He would not say where he
was from or who sent him.
Several secretaries returning
from lunch asked the mystery
picket whom he was calling
"stooges."
Ralph turned his back on
them and marched away.
Another secretary came out
of the building and asked him
what he was trying to do but
she received the same silence.
At about 2:30 p.m .Ralph suddenly stopped his march.
He put his sign under his coat
and ran towards West Mall
where a blue and white Chevrolet picked him up.
Other mysterious men have
showed up at plants and factories throughout the Lower Mainland during the last year.
UBC students want more
leadership from student council.
Nine out of 10 students polled
by The Ubyssey said they backed UBC President John Macdonald's stand for more money
from the government.
All but one said they would
go on a trek if t h e situation
came to a showdown.
But most complained of lack
of leadership from student government.
"There should be better student leadership in this matter,"
said an Arts IV student. "The
students are too pacifistic about
this kind of thing."
A first-year arts student said
it was the job of the AMS to
take the lead in any student action.
"I'd like to see them do something," he said.
Another student said he
would like students to take an
active part in supporting the
president.
SEE: ACTION
(Continued on  Page 3)
with this," said Treasurer Malcolm Scott. "We know nothing
about Acme Novelty.
"But any student receiving
a card will assume that it is en-
-dorsed by the AMS.';
NOT ENDORSED
Scott said the AMS became
aware of the existence of fhe
cards only when cards sent to
students who had moved were
forwarded to the AMS.
"Our lawyer is now investigating Acme's use of our name,"
he said.
The Better Business Bureau
said Thursday they have had
no complaints to date by other
organizations of Acme's using
their name.-
."Acme Novelty is listed in
our files as a wholesale jdistri-
butor and importer," BBB officials said. "It has been in operation since 1955."
L. B. Jones, Manager of
Acme Novelty, said:" "Our firm
has a reputation above scrutiny.
"We run a wholesale warehouse, and to get into this warehouse one must own a business,
or be a member of a club,
legion, or society.
"We understand that everyone listed in the UBC telephone
book is a member of the Alma
Mater Society.
NOT UNDERHANDED
He emphasized that there was
nothing underhanded about
this, but his firm had something
to offer the student.
Jones said Acme sells such
items as diamond rings, and
party goods.
The discount card is printed
"Not   valid  unless   authorized."
In a space on the front, after
the words "authorized by" is
stamped the name Art Folliott.
Folliott is vice-president of
Acme Novelty, Jones said.
BENNETT SAYS
HES  WITH  US
Page   3
SEE:
FATHER BAUER
... Birds can win
Birds hope
to ice title
here tonight
Father David Bauer's hockey
team will contribute to the decentralization of higher learning this weekend.
Tonight they will conduct a
seminar on ice for the benefit
of the (University of Manitoba
Bisons at Kerrisdale Arena at
5:45 p.m.
A repeat performance will be
played in North Shore Winter
Club at 8:30 p.m. Saturday.
A win in either of the games
will give the Birds the Western
collegiate championship, and
send them to the national collegiate finals in Kingston, Ont.
later this month.
Birds don't expect much trouble. Manitoba hasn't won a game
this year.  .
As a special attraction, Thunderbird cheerleaders will ex-,
pose their legs for the hockey
fans for the first time this year
tonight.
And the season's first 'tween-
period broomball game will be
held between Nurses and Home
Economics,  Saturday.
This weekend will be the first
time UBC has played Manitoba.
Catch Club nets full house
They sang some catchy tunes
The Catch Club caught on
in spite of Odetta.
The folk-singing group,
second-billed by Special
Events to appear with top
American singer Odetta,
packed Brock Hall with a
floor-sitting audience Thursday.
*    •    *
Odetta didn't show. She cancelled the appearance because
of a New York recording session, her manager said.
Now her agents, International   Talent   Associates,   and
possibly Odetta's manager Al
Grossman, will automatically
have to pay the AMS damages
for  breach  of  contract.
AMS president Doug Stewart said the case would be
settled out of court.
"Odetta doesn't want the
loss of reputation," Stewart
said.
Odetta would have been
Special Events' main attraction in the gym Thursday.
Her contract, with the date
and amount filled in, was
signed     by     Special     Events
committee    chairman    George
Peters and sent to the singer.
A telegram confirming the
date was sent back.
•    •    •
AMS treasurer Malcolm
Scott said the telegram was in
effect confirmation that a contract had been made. "I'm
sure we have a case," he said.
He said AMS lawyers were
now investigating.
Special Events had no worries. The second billers did a
good job.
Brock
Long   before   noon,
lounge was filled.
Seats and chesterfields were
removed for atmosphere and
everyone sat on the floor.
Polished, technically skilled
and different, the group left
the stage to cries of "more,
more."
They were billed as singers
of spicy  16th century   lyrics.
Their repertoire of songs included everything from a parody on Spenser's "The Faerie
Queene' to a one-song anthold-
gy of "every song we know." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1,  1963
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy. 1961 and 1962
Winner of the Bracken Trophy. 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star Trophy, 1962
Authorized as second class mail by the Pest Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in .cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Kditor-in-Ohiel of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-324S,
Locals:  Editor—25;  News—23;  Photography—24.
Ediier-in-chief:  Keith Bradbury
Managing Editor    Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor Mike Hunter
City Editor M. G. Valpy
Picture Editor      __  Don Hume
Layout Editor   Bob McDonald
Sports Editor  Ron Kydd
CUP Editor . _ Maureen Covell
Editorial Assistant '. ._ Joyce Holding
Critics Editor __   ...   '____ William Littler
REPORTERS: Ann Burge, Mike Horsey, Ron Riter, Richard
Simeon, na^en lVicConnachie, Heather Virtue, Graeme
Matheson, Greydon Moore.
SPORTS:   Donna  Morris,   Glenn   Schultz,   i^anny   Stoffman,
George Railton.
TECHNICAL: Robb Watt, Gail Kendall.
EDITORIALS
v ■ r   "
We pander to preserve our unity
It's a quaint tradition in this country for
the English to pander to the French in the
interest of, national unity.
French, for some reason, is one of our two
nationaWanguages.       72"
Consequently every publication which appears—-if it is to "be sfTruly national book—
must contain some French.
Every speaker, if he is not to offend Quebec- must say a few words in his best Saskatchewan French.
And to what end is this done?
To pacify a race that refuses to adjust itself
to reality; to mollify the hyper-sensitive feelings of a minority which has refused to assimilate like all Other minorities are expected to do.
The Frettch have for centuries been catered'
io and looked' up on as equals in this country.
These days to be 'Canadian'—as acceptable
to the Quebec Canadian—you have to devote
one-third or  one-half of any publication  to
French. Content of the French articles really
does not matter, the one-third is the most important thing.
If you are making a speech—especially on
television, or in Eastern Canada—you had betr
ter start out with your own rendition of two
sentences in Saskatchewan-French so that you
will pacify the maple-syrupers.
Any learned publication must be devote in
some part to the French Canadian problem.
But ask a French Canadian what the problem is—chances are he won't be able to tell
you.
He'll say "You're helping to solve it, just
by being interested."
The French are acting like children who
have to stamp their feet to gain attention.
But isn't it about time they grew up?
Not many seem to know just what the problem is.
The problem, it seems, is a massive persecution complex.
Sidewalks — but in the right places
We've' seen muddy thinking on the part of
tht> Buildings and* Grounds department in the
past, but the new' sidewalk building campaign
ranks with; the muddiest.
It was unnecessary to bisect the Library
lawn. Wire fences have worked in the past.
It seems ironic.^ but we have been on a
•campaign for a sidewalk in another place but
B and G has refused to build one.
Thousands of students risk their lives by
walking down the road on the way into campus
from C lot on East Mall.
They have the choice of walking on the road
or tramping through puddles.
This, if B and G must build permanent
sidewalks, is where one should be built.
Theres something about nicknames
There is something to be said for calling
political leaders by nicknames.
They do it in the U.S. For instance, Abraham Lincoln was Abe. as every American child
knows. And Eisenhower was Ike.
The names are easy to remember and, more
important, easy to spell.
Why couldn't Laurier have been  called
simply Wilf? It would have saved us some
embarrassment.
We know how to spell Wilf, but we obviously didn't know how to spell Wilfrid when
we wrote an editorial about him this week.
Future editorial writers will have an easier
time though. At least we've got John's name
down to Dief.
Harangutang
Gods political leanings suspect
By   BILL   WILLSON
What are Goo's political
leanings?
I have always suspected that
His sympathies lay to the
"right" of center since it must
be admitted there hasn't been
much change around the universe in the last millenium or
so.
The stereotype of a nice old
man with a long, white beard,
certainly resembles a contented capitalist much more than
it. does a revolutionary worker.
In fact, the more I think
about, it, the more I am inclined to think that He is a capitalist of the worst kind—a monopolist.
Certainly he has vested interests with big business and
no one can deny that His chain
of planets is one of the biggest.
•    •    •
Of course. His omnipotence
makes free enterprise rather
difficult. It would be hard to
imagine Him subcontracting
the earth to the highest bidder.
If He had called for tenders
at all, I am frequently led to
believe that through some kind
of collusion the lowest bidder
won out, resulting in the present mess.
Monopoly need always be
bad, however, since in many
cases we recognize the existence of natural monopolies. It
would have been a pretty hectic week, if He had allowed
everyone to get into the act on
those first seven days. Also to
His credit, He observed the
Sunday blue laws without
union pressure.
But what is most disturbing
about this whole thing is that
His    "rightist"    views    might
color His judgment when the
time  comes   to   point  the  omniscient thumb up or down.
•    •    •
I would hate to see some
John Bircher come out with a
better deal on Judgment Day
than a communist, just because
the communist happened to
hold different political views
than God. And not believing
in Him, isn't going to help
much either.
1 Even the communists should
be allowed due process and
all that.
The problem multiplies in
the case of a tie vote when
God must cast the deciding ballot against some poor fellow
traveller.
I imagine many of you are
still   skeptical,   so  I   can  only
suggest that John Diefenbaker
is a Tory and is always acting like God. We must conclude that the resemblance is
more than pure coincidence.
And I'm sure that if God had
a hero, it could be none other
than Charles De Gaulle.
There is an apt biblical quotation about man being made
in God's own image.
•    *    •
It certainly appears that
ownership of the means of production has become centered
in fewer and fewer hands.
All I can suggest for my leftist friends is that there remains
hope that He may become disgruntled and decide to cross
the floor. Until then, you can
only expect that the sun will
continue to rise in the east or
on the right.
Its back!!
Jack ORNSTEIN
I don't think you're sincere
She's only a rabbi's daughter
but you should see her prey.
I've just returned from the
U. of Minnesota to The Ubyssey and today is my 25th
birthday. What ELSE could
you ask for besides the end of
another school week?
I'd better explain my title
for today. After biting through
my lower lip and jaw, I engendered enough courage o
approach a. beautiful female
in the stacks (and so was she)
at the U. of M. "Why hello!"
and smile savoir fairley and
look like a foreign student
and "Who ARE you?" I attacked her with. Finally she
said "Sharon Schulman" and
I realized that besides her
beauty, my mom and dad
would be thrilled with her. To
test for Semiticity, I asked her
if she were Jewish. "Sort of,"
she hesitatingly mumbled.
HUH! It turned out that she
was a rabbi's daughter and
was quiet (as girls go) and,
God forbid, religious.
• •    •
To make a shevi story shorter, we went on ore date—
bowling—and soon I'm back
in Vancouver looking for the
last thing from a rabbi's
daughter.
So who among all the girls
in Vancouver do I end up dating? You're right—a rabbi's
daughter!
I insist that my apparent
fascination for (or fixation
upon) rabbi's daughters is
purely secular. And isn't it
healthier than being fascinated with their sons?
• *    •
But why do you look so disappointed? Did you expect me
to" advocate legalizing murder,
abortions, prostitution, gambling, peace and the violent
over-throw of our povern-
ment? No more the idealism of
yesteryear! 25 is an age to
start thinking REAListically.
Like, if you REALLY want to
Fee a nuclear war, vote for
Dief or Pearson—two men
dedicated to the ideal of pleasing the most people for the
most votes to get into office.
If this be democracy, you can
take it and . . . watch here
next week for a turn to less
seriou= matters, such as divorce  in Canada—or—7 ways
to fake adultery—or—how to
succeed at divorce without
really  trysting (sic).
P.S. , About me being the
prey of a rabbi's daughter—
I'd just like you to know that
SHE'S the prey and I'm praying—for a 26th birthday as
happy as this one.
Happy St.  David's day!
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Station
Dunbar  arid  30th  Avenue
CA 4-7644
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.        MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We   specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
S*. Timothy
Lutheran Church
11:00 Worship
10:00 Bible Study
Stardust Ball
remember the
Vogue
Flower Shop
gives
10% Discount On
All Student Corsages
RE 3-6322 EE 3-3021
2180 W. Broadway Friday, March 1, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
Just imagine how terrible it
would be if everyone were sincere!
I mean, people would have
to be frank and honest with
each other.
They wouldn't be able to
hide behind a different mask
for each different occasion.
Hypocrisy would have to
yield to honesty.
Everybody would be himself,
say exactly what he thought—
and actually mean what he
said.
Doesn't the wild idea make
you shudder?
I don't think our structure of
life could stand the strain:
society would completely collapse.
• *   *
Of course if we could make
the shift it certainly would save
time. For example, instead of
this  lengthy dialogue  .   .   .
Jack: "How goes the battle,
Joe?"
Joe: "Couldn't be better.
How about yourself?"
~Jack:    'Uust    great.    What's
the latest word?"
Joe:  "Well,  the  wife's  been
down with pneumonia for the
last week. The kids caught it.
yesterday and I guess I'm next
inlipe."
. . . we could have this:
Jack: "How goes the battle,
Joe?"
Joe: "Lousy. How, about
you?"
Jack: "Likewise."
• *    *
Amusing. However,  there is
another side, too.
Sure in a way it's fun, this
perpetual masquerade. It's a
simple game of deception, and
usually deception is relatively
free from malice.
But don't you ever get the
feeling you'd like to be the
real you, and be completely
honest with yourself and
others?
Wouldn't you rather have
people reacting to you than to
one of your false fronts?
I know it's ridiculous, idealistic and even impractical
dream to -hope for absolute
sincerity all the time, yet I
certainly can see no harm in
people being just a few degrees
less hypocritical in their daily-
lives.
One argues that nobody is
willing to take the first step;
the individual is afraid to let
down his mask in front of a
companion in case his friend
doesn't do likewise. .
One argues that this would
leave the hypocrite with an
advantage over the sincere
person.
• *    *
The non-hypocrite now is
himself; he acts the way that
deep down inside he feels he
should; he has no worries
about keeping up any particular front.
On the other hand, the mask-
master mustn't allow any letup
in the act—or rather, the acts;
he must be careful he doesn't
slip or let part of one disguise
overlap on another.
Some advantage.
You know, I often get the
feeling many people no longer
are able to say and do what
they truly mean.
They've become to engrossed
in strutting out their numerous
parts in life that they've completely drowned themselves in
their roles.
I ,think it's tragic.
'As soon as we can
Bennett pledges
action on Report
The government will act on President John Macdonald's
report on higher education.
Premier Bennett, speaking before the Legislature Wednesday night said, "We accept the Macdonald Report and will
put into effect all of it just as soon as we can."
He said the government would
Still
more
acclaimed
in 3rd slate
It's still election time and
positions are still being won by
acclamation.
University Clubs Committee
chairman received no nominations.
Men's and Women's Athletic
Association presidents both are
in by acclamation. They are
Jerry Devine and Pat Nichols.
AWS president candidates
are Brenda Butler and Carol
Fielder.
Applications are being re
ceived until March 8 for the
AMS position: Assistant coordinator of activities, secretary of
Brock Management committee
three Brock Management committee positions, games room
manager, games room supervisors, Mammooks business mana-
er, card room manager.
These applications should be
t-ubmitted to Kenneth O. Leitch,
Co-ordinator of activities-elect,
Box 73, AMS office, Brock Hall.
Student council is also looking for seven new bureaucrats:
College Shop manager, Frosh
Orientation committee chairman, Homecoming chairman,
Sjpecial Events chairman, Leadership Conference chairman.
World University . Service committee chairman, and editor of
Totem.
Applications for all positions
close at 3 p.m. March 4. All applicants will be interviewed by
student  council  that night.
amend the Schools Act to allow
for the establishment of junior
colleges.
FULL SUPPORT
The government intends to
give full support to the expansion of higher education, he
said.
"At this very session we will
set   up  three  universities."
Dr. Macdonald has been suddenly called out of town and is
not available for comment.
Professor G. O. Davies, assistant to the president, said he
is pleased with the Premier's
comments.
"It is extremely heartening to
bear that the government is taking steps to implement it," he
said.
Other officials were doubtful
that the Premier's promise
would be honored.
"The enabling legislation for
UBC was passed 25 years before
the University was built," said
an official. '" "
NO  MENTION
The premier made no mention
of the government's $1.8 million cut in UBC's request for
operating funds.
Without the additional funds
the University may find it difficult to operate next year.
While the University actually
received $980,000, all but $100,-
000 of this is already committed.
That leaves UBC $100,000 to
cope with the expected influx
of students.
As a result all departmental
budgets may have to be frozen
in  the coming year.
If extra money is not found
some of UBC's best professors
could be .lost.
The possibility of attracting
good men would also be lessened.
Parking lots haven
to unlicensed cars
Don't drive your car out of
the parking lot today if you
brought it here with 1962
licence  plates still on.
It's illegal to have a motor
vehicle on a public highway
without valid licences. The
1962 plates expired at midnight.
The parking lots* are the
only areas on campus where
a car is not considered on a
public highway.
Who Killed
Romance?
What's happened to old-
fashioned "love"? Read in
March Reader's Digest how
factual social scientists and
lurid writers have taken the
mystery and joy out of our
tenderest emotions. Get your
copy of Reader's Digest today
—»38 articles of lasting interest.
PLENTY OF PLASMA is readied
by captain of Nursing broomball team. Nurses expect to
maim Home Ec Homewreck-
ers between periods of Friday's hockey game at Kerrisdale arena.
ACTION
(Continued from Page 1)
Asked whether the leadership
should come from council, he
said, "I doubt if council is capable of doing it. They're not
that  representative.
"Students must take an interest in higher education,"
3aid an Education student. "It's
a matter of responsibility to the
community."
Said another: "We must back
up Macdonald. It's us, the students he's fighting for, isn't it?"
Some students criticized the
methods used by the president
to get the increase in funds.
"The students should be informed about where they stand
and what is going on. Nobody
can plan anything until we know
what the situation is," said one.
Other students felt a trek
would not accomplish anything.
"The AMS should participate in
a minor way, but I'm completely against a trek," said a law
student.
JACKETS
CRESTS
JACKETS, regular $15.95 $14.50
SCARVES, regular $3.35  $2.95
BLAZER CRESTS, regular $7.00.... $6.25
SWEATER CRESTS, regular $1.75..   $1.50
College Shop
Brock Extension        11:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Frido 1- 1963.
Eric Nichol's
New Play
"REGULUS"
.Directed by Dorothy Davies.
. March 6th to 9th inclusive .
8:30   p.m.   at  Peretz   School
Auditorium
45th and Cambie St.
Tickets $2.00 at A.M.S. Office
or at door.
WEST POINT GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
2685 Sasamat Street
Minister
Rev. Arthur J. Hadley, B.A.B.D.
9:45 a.m.—Young Peoples' Class
with    Dr.    Donald   O.
Anderson.
11:00 a.m.—"THE    CALL    OF
THE UPPER BOOM"
7:30 p.m.—"WHAT'S THE
NEWS?"
8:45 p.m.—All   students   invited
to meet with the Young
People  in  the  Watson
Room.
Flowers
10% discount given Students on
corsages. Order now for your
next formal.
VOGUE   PLOWEB   SHOP
BE   3-6323 — BE   3-3021
2180 W.  Broadway
THEATRE
Taste of Honey
wasn't too sweet
The first thing I'm faced with is tedious: to point out to
the reader that the advertising for A Taste of Honey, which
claims it to be in spirit contrary to he Angry Young Man
movement, is a mealymouhed falsehood.
The  old  thin  genteel blood
which one cannot help suspecting lurks behind everything the UBC Extension Department does, runs a little
colder every time it hears the
weather report and there's no
bulletin that the world has
stopped turning.
There isn't much to say
about this play; it is a small
thing well done, a small honesty, just a little relief from
the big lies that have sucked
in "major playwrights for the
past couple of decades.
*    •    •
If you were disgusted by
Rita Tushingham, the sham
ugly duckling, you will take
heart at the performance of
Jocelyn Thompson as Jo. She
is, on stage at least, quite plain,
in  the  dignified  way that  so
Miss Lisa
formerly of Evaline's
Beauty Bar has now
joined the staff of
Michelle's Beauty Box
2772 WEST  BROADWAY
RE 3-9222
ESBlliSffl
presents
Oscar Wildes comic masterpiece
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
Produced by the Cleveland Playhouse
MARCH 7 — U.P.C. AUDITORIUM — 8:30
TICKETS: A.M.S.
BEGINNING
TUESDAY
MARCH  5
The Bookstore
Will Hold Its
Annual Sale
of
Discontinued Texts
and
Art Prints
many European actors are. A
very intelligent performance,
nicely understated where the
rest of the cast too often took
too little account of the size of
the theatre they were playing
in.
She was not afraid to be
sharp, bitchy, unattractive
where the character calls for it.
This kind of humbleness is
crucial to some parts and impossible for most actors. She
was perhaps too restrained, almost to the point of dourness;
she needed more bubble and
surprise in her scene with Jim-
mie, who was very nicely and
securely done by Val Romilly.
Maybe he needed more force;
he has a light voice. But the
character has an evanescent
quality anyway, and the sensuality was there.
• *    *
Rae Brown as the mother
was maybe nervous on the
opening night and rattled
through the first scene particularly. Helen is offhand, but
not always; dramatic points
were missed and missed and
missed. Her fight scene with
Jo near the end did not come
off; it was physically stagey
and  emotionally  rushed.
This looked like a fault in
direction. (Incidentally, the
convention of facing the audience is intolerable and stupid
in a play where there are few
characters, so that we don't
care if we sometimes can't see
their faces.) Generally Rae
Brown was fine—she has the
sheer presence needed for the
part.
Phil Brown has looked like
Oedipus ever since he played
the part; he's too beautiful for
Geoffrey. Murray Melvin, being ratlike, had the advantage
of him. And he tended to slip
into Paul Newmanish beautiful poses. But his emotional
temperature was always right
•nd he was vocally subtle and
easy, demonstrating how much
can be done in the Freddy
Wood by an actor with control.
Boy Cooper could only have
done the mother's boyfriend
better if he had been drunk.
As it was, his performance only
suffered from his sometime
being too cautious to grab by
the horns a character who is
so crashingly, jarringly vulgar
that he must be played way out
beyond the limit of credibility.
• •    •
It only remains to praise
Arisiides Gazeias' set, which
made all the blocking look
easy, and to ask why the Freddy Wood did this play. I felt
no sense of occasion; this was
a reproduction of another production, or it was a record of
the play, or a rendering of
someone else's creation.
And this is the flavor of too
many Freddy Wood productions, too many Theatre Department shows. They are
done because they can be, not
because somebody had to. It
shows as an absence of style,
as a lack of a human being;
the play looks like a job done
by a committee of workers.
This is showing the forms of
love with no love in them.
—micbael matihews
To discover what sweet nothings Algernon Moncrieff doth
utter to the winsome Cecily Cardew prithee repair to ye
olde UBC Auditorium this seventh day of March. T'will be
a Wilde evening.
It's a farce, Earnest
Touring company
plays it wilde
The Cleveland Play House
touring company is a fairly
recent outgrowth of a well-
known theatrical organization. This is the third season
on the road for the troupe,
whose home base is the oldest
and one of the most respected
theatres in the United States.
The Cleveland Play House
touring company and Special Events presents Oscar
Wilde's The Importance of
Being Earnest March 7 at
8:30 in the auditorium.
In its three, permanent
theatres, the 47-year-old Play
House annually produces some
20 plays, both classic and modern. A salaried staff of 70,
half of whom are acting personnel, is in continuous activity from September through
mid-May. There are, in addition, a selected group of
apprentices and 300 youngsters enrolled in the Children's Theatre.
As a non-profit enterprise,
the Play House has a policy
of low prices for admissions.
There are special rates and
privileges for season subscribers, who comprise a nucleus of
the annual audience numbering more than 100,000.
The Play House Shakespeare Festival, oldest in the
United States or Canada,
plays each spring to some 20,-
000   students   who   come   to
Cleveland from throughout
Ohio, western Pennsylvania,
and western New York state.
A noteworthy list of former
Play House actors has enriched the cultural life of the
United States and, includes
such luminaries as Thomas
Gomez, Howard da Silva, and
Eleanor Parker.
Unproduced plays, ■ with
their unknown potential
always have been a vital part
of the Play House operation.
Fifty plays had their world
premieres at the Play House
including works by Ben
Hecht, Elmer Rice, Tennessee
Williams, Maxwell Anderson,
Eugene O'Neil and a large
number of lesser-known playwrights.
The University of B.C. can
thank the Special Events
Committee for its action in
bringing this theatrical organization to the campus.
The Auditorium will play
host to one of the best farces
in the English language,
Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest." Wilde
was a stimulating writer
whose wit and elegance of
style have given him a place
among the best-known creators of dramatic literature. Of
all his writings, "The Importance of Being Earnest", an
intellectual farce written in
1895 and frequently revived
since then, stands as his masterpiece. THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
INEO
>od guy
ipped in
ihe Budd
Billy Budd, with the possible
-ception   of    The    Reluctant
aini, is one  of  the most entertaining films   that   I   have
>seen   for   quite   a   while.   It
doesn't  have much  to  recommend it as good cinema but it
j,    nevertheless,    good   enter-
ainment for an evening. Tho
dim     is      currently     playing
downtown     at     the     Studio
lieatre.
I
*a the story Budd, innocent,
;d child-like  meets the  evil
Master-at-arms,      Claggarl.
aboard    the    Avenger.    Since
- both characters are representa-
tive-r-one of absolute good and
'ie other of absolute evil—the
ory becomes one of struggle
iietween good and evil and the
1 eventual triumph of evil.
•    •    *
The ignorant and innocent
Billy is plotted against by
"Claggart whose motive is
perversion and whose nature
is intrinsically evil. Herman
Melville has this to say about
the  character of Claggart:
j "Claggart was ... of an evil
nature, not engendered by
vicious training or corrupting
books or licentious living, but
born with him and innate, in
short "a depravity' according
to nature,."
The understanding of Clag-
gart's nature is essential to the
understanding of the story. It
is not a practical motive at all
that leads Claggart to hate
Billy, it is simply something
inside him. As a result, the
portrayal of Claggart in the
film must be done by someone
who can put over this sense of
ftinate evil.
* • •
In my opinion, Robert Ryan
fails in his task. He manages
#b show Claggart simply as a
man driven by jealousy. It is
not altogether his fault,
though. The scenario provides
situations by which Claggart
can become jealous of Billy
which do not exist in the
book. I would give Ryan some
credit, since I think he merely does not understand his
role.
The main asset of Billy
3udd is the casting of Terence
Stamp in the title role. Stamp
s able to emanate a feeling of
ibsolute good by means of his
figelic visage alone. He manges also to put on a fairly
ood performance as Billy
tiidd for which he has re-
eived a nomination for best
importing actor in the annual
.cademy Awards  spectacle.
• • •
Playing Captain Vere, Peter
r&tinov manages to give his
sual excellent performance
r the film. Captain Vere is
oth a fatherly master and a
rict disciplinarian and Usti-
DY skilfully portrays both assets of Captain Vere's per-
inality.
One of the best examples of
stinov's craftmanship is in
e final scene during Billy's
ietution. The scene can easily
Overplayed or underplayed
; Ustinov manages both the
The pot of gold more or less
hit England's Terence Stamp
on the head when he was
signed for the title role in
his first movie, Billy Budd,
reviewed at left by Graham
Olney.
right .emotion and enough restraint to pull it off. Perhaps
it should have been Ustinov
who received the nomination
for best supporting actor instead of Stamp.
There are a few faults' with
Billy Budd but these are relatively unimportant. One fault
is the use of staged sequences
in the film. The other fault is
the over emphasis on dialogue
in a few scenes. Otherwise the
film is quite enjoyable and
well worth the time spent to
see it. Peter Ustinov directs.
—graham Olney
c
R
I
T
I
C
s
Editor:
William  Littler
BYE BYE, BIRDIE
All Amercia loves
to face the musical
Nothing can be said about the production of Bye-Bye
Birdie that has not already been said in the local papers or
by Scott Douglas in his letter to the editor of The Ubyssey.
It was only a bunch of lusty kids having fun, certainly not a
polished and professional performance.
Betty Irwin was sexy, John
How to get a Job
7 easy steps
It's easy to get the job you
want, if you know how to
"sell" your abilities. In March
Reader's Digest, a top job-
counselor outlines f'Seven
Steps Toward Getting a Job".
ny Sparks was charming, the
cast was vital. Everybody
likes musicals.
If   someone   hasn't   already
done  it,   some  intrepid  young
sociologist    or    anthropologist
should   undertake   a   study   of
the musical comedy as a reflection of the American cultural
scene. Musical comedies somehow manage  to  please  everyone but the most ardent of intellectual and aesthetic purists
•    •    •
. Ostensibly   cultivated   Europeans  are  crazy about  musicals, and some of them consider
musicals    the    only    valuable
contribution   that   the   United
Slates has given to world culture.   And  the  reason  is  that
the  musicals  are  not  serious,
do  not pretend to be  serious,
and  aim  to  do  nothing  more
than   to   entertain   with   loud
music,   color,   movement,   and
laughter.
While   attacking   mass   cul-
THEATRE
UNDER THE
STAIRS
A conversation between Don
Cumming of the Cellar and
Ken Hodkinson, free-lance
writer.
K. H. The Cellar has been
noted for jazz for the past
seven years. Why are you
now going into drama?
D. C Why not? Actually we
have presented plays in the
past but not for some time
now.
K.    H.    Theatre    Under    The
Stairs, eh?
D.   C. Right.   We're   trying  to
introduce a new atmosphere
—coffee  house   rather  than
night club, you know?
K.  H. What  sort  of  program
do you have in mind, drama-
wise?
D.   C. We're   currently   showing    a    short    play    called
"The    Red    Socks.' ' It's a
comedy  about  a  rapist  and
is being well received. Next
we've a crazy play about a
New York couple who keep
a horse in their apartment.
After that, a play by George
Bowering called "Home For
Heroes"    and   also    a    play
called "Straws In The Wind"
about a straw man . . .
K.  H. A straw man was  suspended   from    the    Burrard
Building   a   while   ago   and
Jack Wasserman linked this
with  a  play  about  a  straw
man. Any comment?
D.   C. I   think   Wasserman   is
talking   through   his   straw
hat.
K.  H.  Are you  getting much
support for  your  new venture?
D. C. We're getting the audiences.   What  we  want  now
are    actors,    directors,   and
playwrights to come out of
,  hiding     and    help    make
"Theatre Under The Stairs"
the big success it ought to
:   be.   Anyone   interested   call
■  me at Mu 3-1460.
ture, mass expression, etc., the
musical comedies still maintain a "healthy" attitude to
middle class values.
As a case in point, Bye Bye
Birdie satirizes such manifestations of mass taste as the
rock-and-roll singer and Ed
Sullivan. It touches vaguely
and lightly on the social problem of race (the hero's mother
is against his marrying a Spanish girl, Rose Alvarez). And
yet, the great desire of the unhappy (but not too unhappy,
couple, aside from the making
of money, is to retire to t h e
quiet life of the small community English teacher's family.
•    •    •
Something for the intellectual, something for the slob,
something for the bourgeois,
something for the American
brand of social-reformer.
The comedy of the musical-
comedy is of the same type as
the comedy of the popular television program. The ineffectual
and confused male confronted
with  a  world  of practical  females who save him from himself. Something for the sophisticates — a popularization of
Freud—the mother of the hero
threatens    to    gas    herself   to
death if he gets married to
Rose. In order  to become a
man, the hero must exchange
one type of master for another—the dear American family.
*    •    •
What the musical does is to
present all this with a grain of
salt,   and without  a  speck  of
seriousness.   Those  who  go   to
musicals are bound to be amused,  because  each  person  goes
with a different set of attitudes
which he can apply.
All the way through the
show, the sociology student
who sat beside me muttered
phrases like "intercultural
penetration."
—james reid
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Robinson's
Jewellers ltd,
1045 Robson
MU 1-4616
•
Watch  Repairs
Watches  can   be
mailed  in  if you
can't bring them in.
Enclose your phone
number.
Free  Estimates
25% DISCOUNT ON ALL
SALES  TO  STUDENTS!
THE FLATTED
FIFTH
3623 W. Broadway
nr. Alma
"Vancouver's Youngest Jazz Club
.    .    .    Offers  an  Aggressive,
Modern   Music  Policy."
—Bob Smith, Jazz Critic,
Vancouver Sun.
Presents
THE
CLARE LAWRENCE
QUARTET
Fri., Mar. 1; Sat., Mar. 2
". . . Highly Ambitious . . ."
Angus Ricker, Ubyssey
Opens at 9 Fri. and Sat.;
8:30 Sun.
Phone: 738-6412
IS COIN-OPERATED DRY CLEANING
NEW TO YOU ?
Our Hammond machines clean TO lbs. in
30 minutes for only $2.00
Try it with our skilled attendants to
help you - they are always on duty
SOME TYPICAL LOADS ARE:
2 MEN'S SUITS AND 2 SWEATERS
3 LADIES' SUITS
2 OVERCOATS AND 1 PAIR SLACKS
6 WOOL  SLACKS
10 WOOL DRESSES
16 SWEATERS
OR COMBINATIONS OF THE ABOVE
Kerrisdale Automatic   Valet
2293 WEST 41st AVENUE, (at Vine)
TELEPHNE: AM 3-3331
Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Weekdays
9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday
Closed Sundays and Holidays Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March
Freshmen's
dance
The Frosh class'. annual
dance has been cancelled for
lack of support.
Paul X>anyliu, Fros-h president, blaiKed the cancellation
on the' Royal Towers hotel,
where the dance was originally
to be held and Mamooks, the
campus sign-making organization.
250  NEEDED
At least 250 couples were
needed to make the dance pay.
Thursday afternoon, less than
100. tickets had been sold.
"We had ordered the publicity posters for Thursday of
last week," said Danyliu, "But
they were not delivered by
Mamooks until Monday. Few
people knew or had Jime to
think about the dance."
The hotel was blamed because
Danyliu said it cancelled a
reservation  to  have  the  dance
tn.?££.
■    §he   affair   was   rescheduled
for the Armory.
«*nd nobody wants to go to
an*"" on-campus dance," complained   Danyliu.
The frosh president said he
had talked, to the .Royal Towers
about the dance last term and
that they had agreed to hold it
there.
FORGOTTEN
"Then, when I phoned to
confirm the dafte at the beginning of February, they said
they had .forgotten about a previous booking, and so could not
hold the dance.
"They never even told me
about it."
Malcolm Scott, student treasurer said Frosh would lose
money even if the dance was
cancelled.
"They could lose between $50
and $250. If they had gone
through they could have lost up
to $800, Scott said.
Scott said the loss would be
earried over on to next year's
frosh budget. '".,.'
.BILL to establish junior colleges is being prepared by
provincial government, says
chancellor  Phyllis  Ross.
Chancellor says
Financial troubles:
old story at UBC
By RON RITER
UBC's current financial problems are nothing new, says
chancellor Phyllis Ross.
•'There hasn't been a year when UBC received the budget
it asked since the university
Chem Students
Learn   the   elements   of   the
odic   Table   in   their   proper   L
(and   rememher   them)   this
simple     way.     Send     $1.00
MURRAY,    P.O.   BOX   234,    OI
REMONT,   P.   QUEBEC.
Summer Classes
Typing - Shorthand
8:15 a.m. - 1.15 p.m., May 1
Advance Business College
AL 5-3727 or CY 8-3822
IH sponsors
discussions
A special program on the
role of International House in
the University and Community
will be held in IH Saturday.
The program begins at 1:30
p.m. Cecil Wakely, chairman of
the board of directors for IH
will be general chairman.
At 1:45 p.m. there will be a
panel on role and function. A
round table discussion will follow at 2:45 p.m. and at 3:45
p.m. there will be reports from
all groups connected with the
house.
The evening panel program
on program and services begins
at  6:30 p.m.
Meet wants bang
out of world affairs
International House annual symposium will be held
Sunday.
Theme will be "Is there a
dynamic role for a non-nuclear power in world affairs
today."
The symposium will feature Dr. Walter Young, of the
political science department,
and Dr. John Wood, extension  department.
was started in 1915," Mrs. Ross
said Thursday.
"The only difference this
year is that UBC is undergoing
a   tremendous   expansion.
Dr. Ross was re-elected Tuesday by acclamation to a second
term of office.
Regarding the provincial government's   operating   grant   for
UBC  she said:
HOPES FOR FUNDS
"We hope to get sufficient
funds to carry on the work of
the university on a satisfactory
basis."
UBC asked for a $2.8 million
increase of the provincial grant,
but received less than $1 million.
Dr. Ross said she is hopeful
the legislature will bring down
legislation initiating the proposed junior college program
during the current session.
"Premier Bennett is preparing an act to initiate the junior
colleges,' she said, "I hope the
legislation will be passed, in this
sitting of the legislature.'
UBC GRADUATE
Dr. Ross graduated from UBC
in 1925 with first class honors
m economics and political
science. She received her M.A.
and Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr
College,   Pennsylvania.
She has been vice-president
of the UBC Alumni Association,
a member of the Senate, and a
member of the Board of Governors before her appointment
as Chancellor in November,
1961.
As Chancellor, Dr. Ross is
chairman of the Board of Governors.
Whatever "became of:
Jess E. James,
CLASS OF -67?
A life-long student of transportation systems, James will be best remembered for
his provocative major thesis "Iron Bosses
I Have Broke In." Working towards his
doctorate, he formed a research team
with his brother and toured the West,
'aking copious quantities of notes as
hey went. Soon the whole country was
talking about the James boys and they
were in great demand as guests of honour
at civic parties (neckties to be worn).
Despite a reputation which grew by leaps
and bounds (mainly on to passing trains)
Jess E. James remained an elusive, retiring
person who spurned formal gatherings no
matter how pressing the invitation. A
superb horseman, Mr. James had a way
with colts. His untimely end came when
he was engaged in breaking in a new
one — a 45, to be exact.
Keep your sights on success VIJM D |\ M M"
by forming a good banking   m\   Oil I ill
connection — a "must" for   to3mumamm®
success in any profession or
business.
nip
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK WHERE STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS ARE WARMLY WELCOMED
Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
There is no charge for our services
modern travel limited
4345 Dunbar Street Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone 224-3110
BOOK-TIME
BREAK-TIME
DATE-TIME
NEW
FILTER
M£Uf&£6
...the best-tasting
.filter cigarette Friday, March 1, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC on trial
in Saskatoon
this weekend
According to the  old  saying,
possession is nine points of the
' law.
So,  if  old sayings  have  anything to do with it, UBC should
.   pick    up   three   more    1962-63
WCIAA titles this weekend.
For UBC will be defending
champion in all three of the
meets that take place today and
Saturday in Saskatoon; badminton, fencing, and curling.
DIFFICULTY
But old sayings may not mean
too much this weekend. UBC's
fencing team, which is made up
largely of newcomers, may
have a hard time retaining their
title.
And UBC's curling squad is
without Jack Arnett, who won
the title for the last three
. years, and also without Dale
Gregory, the skip who won the
UBC title this year.
Gregory, after winning the
title, found he was unable to
male the trip, so his rink p'.cked
up another skip—Gerry Wade
-—to play third. Gregory's regular third, Howard Prout,
moved up to  skip the rink.
Ron   Anderson   and   Stewart
, Mold will throw lead and second rocks  respectively.
TWO  CHAMPIONSHIPS
UBC's badminton team has a
hectic weekend scheduled. Not
only do they have to defend
their WCIAA title in Saskatoon,
but they also have to send 14
team members to Victoria for
the   B.C.   Championships.
The badminton team won the
top  division   of  the   Vancouver
and    District    tournament    this
. year,  and also were runners-up
, in   the   Racquets   Club   Invitational tournament.
Team     members     are     Eric
Sandstrom,   Hugh   Rothe,   Geoff |
_. Atkinson,    Ann    Knott,     Barb
North,  and  Sheila  Ledingham.
—Bob   Flick   photo
SHOOTING FOR Western Intercollegiate basketball championship is rookie Thunderbird Ken McDonald. He will start at
guard when UBC meets Saskatchewan Huskies tonight in
Saskatoon in first of two games UBC must win to take its
fourth straight title.
Hoopsters
tiecf for lead;
Will *Arii#iKt7
By  RON  KYDD
SPORTS
SHORTS
Vikings to host
UBC rugger squad
The UBC Thunderbirds rugby team takes off on a 50-mile
hike of its own this weekend
IN  GYMNASTICS:  The UBC
squad    will    host    Washington
State   University   tonight   at   8
p.m.    in    the    War    Memorial !
gym.
Saturday,   at   1   p.m.,   a  gymnastics competition open  to  all
'gymnasts under 19 years of age
will be held in the gym. Spectators are  welcome.
•k     *     *
IN SQUASH: UBC's team will
'play their last scheduled match
this year Saturday at the Vancouver   Racquets   Club.
Their opponents are Victoria
College.
Any  spectators  are welcome.
"No   charge   is   made,   and   the
games run from 2 to 5 p.m. The
Racquets Club is located at 25th
.and Oak.
Squash   on    campus   will   be
featured     on     "UBC    Reports"
Channel 8, 1:30 Saturday.
*     *     *
IN VOLLEYBALL:  The UBC
team  will  travel  to  Seattle  for
'jx match with the University of
Washington    tomorrow    at    11
a.m.
Saturday the Birds play Western Washington Vikings in Bell-
ingham. This will be the first
time the two teams have met
this year; a game scheduled last
month against the Vikings was
postponed due to bad weather.
The lineup for this game will
be almost the same for the injury-free Birds as the game in
the World Cup series against
California.
McKECHNIE CUP
Next weekend UBC is hoping
for a fill-in game against either
Trojans or Ex-Brits. The following weekend the McKechnie Cup
final features the Birds against
the Vancouver Reps.
March 21 and 23 the UCLA
Bruins are in town for two exhibition games against the UBC
15. The week after California
will be here to round out the
World Cup series on the 28 and
30.
LACK  OF  SUPPORT
The Birds final rugger match
of the year will be played against
the touring Japanese team on
April 4.
In other games this weekend,
the Braves play Trojans at Wolfson field and Physical Ed collides with Ex Gladstone.
Lack of support for the  two
Frosh teams has forced them to
drop out of league play. Only a
handful of players showed up at
regularly-scheduled games last
weekend.
These teams have now been
repaced by Richmond, Burnaby
and Ex Technical.
FOR SALE
RUSSIAN
BALALAIKAS
C A 4-3167
1963--SUMMER SESSIONS ABROAD
University of San Francisco
GUADALAJARA, Mexico—June 29-Aug. 3
$240.00 includes tuition, board and
roo.rt,  and  activities.
VALENCIA, Spain—lune 28 - August 21
Savaral plans to fit individual requirements from $625.00 including
tuition, board and room, activities,
and ROUND-TRIP BY PLANE NEW
YORK-MADRiD-VALENCIA.
PALMA de MALLORCA, Spain—July 6-
August 24
Several plans to fit individual re-
quiroments from $i?S.OO including
tuition board and roo.n, activities,
and ROUND-TRIP BY PLANE NEW
YOniC-MADRID-PALMA.
INFORMATION: Dr. Carlos G. Sanchez
University of San  Francisco
San  Francisco  17,  California
The UBC Thunderbirds are
collegiate basketball champions.
Or, at worst, co-holders of
the  championship.
UBC coach Peter Mullins announced yesterday that the
league executive committee had
ruled against Calgary in a disputed game with the Edmonton team.
The ruling removes one
victory from Calgary's total.
Instead of ending the season
with a 12-4 record, they will
finish up with an  11-5  total.
TIE FOR  CROWN
UBC has already won 11
games, and they still have two,
more left to play—tonight and
tomorrow night, in Saskatoon,
against the Huskies. So^ even if
Eirds should lose both games
this weekend they will still salvage at least a tie for the
crown.
"But if we can't beat Saskatchewan this weekend, we don't
deserve to go back east for the.
Canadian championships," Mullins said. "We want to win this
title, not have it handed to us."
TOO   MANY   PLAYERS
The dispute between Edmonton and Calgary arose when
Calgary took 12 players to one
of their games in Edmonton.
League rules say that the visit-
once again the Western Inter*
ing team may dress only 10
men.
Mullins, meanwhile, is still
looking for a center to replace
injured Mike Potkonjak. He
has his three forwards picked
out—John Cook, Keith Hartley, and Ron Erickson—but he
hasn't figured out yet which
one will play center.
Hartley started this year at
center, and Erickson was playing" second-string; center, but
lately Mullins has been experimenting with Cook in the pivot
spot.
"He's looked real good, too,"
Muliins added.
Thunderbirds, tired from
their long prairie trip, dropped
a 70-52 decision to the Seattle
Pacific Falcons Monday night.
West Point Grey
United Church
"Just Outside the  Gates"
4595  West  Eighth  Ave.
Minister: Rev. Wilfred Fearn
Services: 11 a.m. & 7:38 pnn.
Young Peoples Union. to
which all students are invited meets Sundays at 8:45 p;m.
Choir practice Thursdays
at 8:00 p.m.
Glenayr
FINE
BOTANY WOOL
SWEATERS
ARE MACHINE
WASHABLE!
Yes, put them through the automatic . . . appearance, beautiful;
touch, warm and gentle! Kitten
superfine Botany wool sweaters are
easier than ever to care for!
THE SWEATER: —Chic roll
collar % sleeved dressmaker cardigan, raglan full-fashioned, in exciting new shades for Spring . . .
3 1-42, at $10.98.
THE SKIRT:—Superbly tailored
100% wool worsted, dry-rlcanable.
Colours perfectly match all Kitten
Botany sweaters. 8-20, SI 4.98. At
better shops everywhere.
Without this label
it is not a genuine KITTEN. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 1, 1963
'tween classes
i
NDP deputy boss speaks
David   Lewis,   NDP   Deputy
Leader, and Tom Berger, speak
noon today, Bu. 100.
'.'. .\ *    *    *
KOERNER LECTURE
Tl. A. Skelton, superintendent
of the map room, British Museum "Milestones in Mapping,"
Monday, 3:30 p.m., FG  100.
* *     *
Donald Denman, production
manager', Crown Zellerbach,
speaks on forestry, noon today,
Bu. 102.
,'      , *     *     *
TJN CLUB
Annual spring seminar Sunday, 1:30 - 9:30 p.m., IH. Theme:
"A -Dynamic Role for the Non-
nuclear Power in International
Affairs". Price $2.50 including
dinner, entertainment and transportation "to and from International House. Apply Rm. 404,
JH or phone AM 1-6274.
\   . *     *     *
CUSO
Dean Neil Perry of Commerce:
"The Problems of Giving Foreign Aid to Under developed
Countries," noon, Monday, Bu.
104,
* *     *
LUTHERAN) STUDENTS
Rev. K. Finnestad, chaplain of
the deaf and dumb, Saskatoon:
"The Deaf Hear", noon, Monday,
Bu. 100.
NDC
Dr. Leonard Marsh: "The Cold
War: How to End It", noon today, Bu. 220.
SCM
T. S. Eliot's "The Wasteland"
with Peter Quartermain, noon
Monday, Arts 100.
* *     *
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Joe Lewis, blind member of
CNIB: "The Problems and Role
of the Blind Person in Society
Today", 12:30 Monday, Bu. 202.
* *     *
GERMAN CLUB
Color film: "The Age of European Rococo," and one other art
film, noon today, Bu. 203.
* ■x       It
BIOLOGY CLUB
"Canada Goose Studies on
Lower Columbia River," by Fred
Zwickel, noon today, Bio. Sc.
2321,
.   *     *     *
IHC -
UBC students who have recently visited Israel show slides
and give their impressions on
Israel, noon today, Bu. 104.
Israeli Night tonight. Film on
contemporary Israel, folknsing-
ing, Israeli dances. Starts 7:30
Free.
•k      -k      "k
JR   CHEM CLUB
Films in Ch. 250, noon today,
everyone welcome.
*     *     *
AWS
Nominations for AWS executive open Monday, Mar. 4 and
close Tuesday, Mar 12 at 4 p.m.
—vice president, secretary, treasurer, Executive member, and
PRO. Elections will be held at
meeting on Wednesday, Mar. 13.
WUS
Japanese exchange scholar,
Shyn Hasegowa: "Student Life
in Japan," noon Monday, Bu.
217.
Students interested in scholarships to Japan please attend.
* *     *
RIDING CLUB
Lecture:   "The   Principles   of i
Riding," noon Monday, Bu. 220. |
* *     *
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER
MUSIC
Student tickets for Remat Gen
Chamber Orchestra QE Theatre,
Mar. 30, and New York Woodwind Quintet, QE Playhouse,
Apr. 10, now available at AMS
Box Office.
GETTING ENGAGED?
40% Discount pins 3 Tears Insurance
on fine Quality Diamond rings.      -
Also B5% Discount on Famous Brand
Name  Watches.
Phone  Mel   Battensby,   So.   4
FA 7-9589
Evening's and Weekends
~"«i
;ijFOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
$
en
Ofticd
We  use  GENUINE   CORECTAL   lenses
Clear from EDGE to EDGE
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discount to Undergraduates
Established 1924
fto>$iitf*l>ag dampjMg
INCORPORATED   2*9    MAY   IS70.
Been down to the Bay's
second floor CAREER
AND CAMPUS SHOP
lately? Great! Then
you've noticed the expansion . . . more space,
more selection, more
depth in the clothes you
like. For instance,
there's a neat, new line
of SNAP-TAB sport
shirts like this one . . .'
placket front, tapered
fit, pleat at back. Top
patterns, colours . . .
just 6.95.
TAKE  NOTICE
THAT ACME NOVELTY (B. C.) LTD.,
WHO HAVE BEEN CIRCULARIZING
MEMBERS OF THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY, HAVE NO AUTHORITY TO USE
THE NAME OF THE A.M.S., HAVE NO
CONNECTION WITH THE A.M.S. AND
THAT THE A.M.S. IS IN NO WAY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ACTIVITIES OF
THIS FIRM.
M. G. Scott,
Treasurer,
Alma Mater Society

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127395/manifest

Comment

Related Items