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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1978

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Array SSEY
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University
of British Columbia
yjA.M0:i
VANCOUVER, B.C., OCTOBER 17th, 1918
Number 1
FRESHMAN RECEPTION
DROWNED IN
THE SKEENA
"Frosh" Have the Privilege of
Shaking Hands with Important Personages.        ..'■■'/".'-•   -
ATHLETICS BRIGHTER
Prominent Athlete Met Death
.'this Summer
; y.Ys   everybody, knows;  .there, was   ;t
reception   on '^Friday.' iiight.'i.Octfibc'r.  11.-
' for the. U.R.C's latest acquisition.   \"ow
tliat   initiation-   rites .are.v.oyer... and ."the .
Frcshies really 'belong to- the-'college, we   .
thought 'that   we. could: afford -to -spend -'
a few hours .in being nice-to. them  lind  .
in.t'rying to'get them to,he, nice to'cacli. .
other.  'The guests were rcceivedby Mr. ■
Sutcliffe.  president   of   the^ Alma,; Mater
Society:   -Miss Evelyn McKay, president
of the 'Women's. Undergraduate" Society:
Mrs. Wesbrook,   Mrs.   Klinck. and '. Mrs.
Robinson.
The-, first  .part   of. the   evening   was .
- taken ■ up--w.ith    musical    selections,,   a
speech   from    Dr.   Sedgewick.   and,   of   -
, course,  with- introducing ■ everybody ' to   -
everybody  else.    Then  cards, and-danc-
■ ing  took  up. our  attention   until   twelve
o'clock,   when   it   was   decided   that "our"'
juvenile, guests-should all be .away.-hbme ,
in' their .little-heds.\   .     -.,-''     '"..''.-..■
.Upon" entering 'the   auditorium,  each
person,   was . given   a   numbered   card.
Each\*student' of -the upper years, after
having found the I'Yeshic whose .number
corresponded   to  his   own.  had  to   take
care of" that Freshie's happiness for the ■
rest of the evening.    If any of us were
inclined to be bored at first,- Mr. Fink's,
violin   selections    acted   as   a   complete   •
remedy     Dr   Sedgewick said-things, that v
made us laugh and things that made us   -
think    Being honorary president of Arts
'22   he spoke mainly to' the. members of
that  class     In  order  to  conform  with
what   seems   to   be   the   custom   at   this
University, he reminded the Fre'shies of
the   newness of   everything  around' the
(Continued on Page 3)"
;   RUGBY--AND  BASKETBALL
ENTHUSIASTS AT WORK
1
1
A Vancouver Rugby l.eagtte^lias been
recently formed in the city..' corisistin^nf
four teams:. "U.B.C," 'Firemen, Cough-
tan's, and .nondescript's: ^A schedule, .forth e coining-'season-has -Jiecn-.;drawn".'up.
Two -gaines^will be-pla'ye'd... every-Sat ur-
(lay. afternoon': at, 'P.rpck'toiv'JP<nntK the;,
first- bcihg.'.s.etMor Saturday..October''2(i..
■ The followers- of IR'ugby* in-the: University have been' working, overtime
lately, in order to i>c in shape for the
opening game of the season, but so far
the weather has not' been, favorable .fur
serious work.* As in other years, the
team will be very light; but the'spied
shown, especially, in the -back division,
will make up for-this., .-._-',
" AV'e can depend upon "our men to give
a good account of themselves: but it. is
necessary'that the faculty and the student body stand behind them 'and show-
some appreciation by turning out to the
games. The morale of a team is greatly
increased'with the knowledge that they
have active and enthusiastic supporters..
,,- Concerning the basketball this year,
we can only say that both teams a:c
handicapped owing to the.fact that they
are having difficulty in finding; .a gym-,
nasium in which,to practice. It is hoped
that some suitable arrangement will be
made soon, either-with the High School
or with the N'ormal.
t        nl
»  1   1'
I   i Ui
ii
I   I III    I     s
111,
r tun    I
I ni\   r
\rls    1 l
I <n
Old
who
Buy A Victory Bond
II7H.I..\RD,\G.' Mcl.KU
™ .McGill, University Coll
'17. He was a splendid
Rugby star.'as well as be.in^
lar among :the students and
their'activities.. In- his Soj:l
he enlisted -in ihe fanioi
Pats." aiul-'wa's wounded. * 1 il
. in., ('"ranee. ' UpoiK recovery 1
io .Vancouver, and continue I I
sity course its, a'junior with
-_,Very soon he adjusted hiinst.il i t'c
new conditions a"nd. became it. in u t
the 'leading spirits.'-of the- f II n. tlu
Arts men, at.the close'of-tlu linn tl it
ing him to be their presidmt
Early this-, summer he'was dr   tn
the Skecna. '      .
F'ew   men "ever  attended     itl er
McGill" or the University'»(  I'   I
were as much loved-as-".MKkn      I opu
lar with  students and faculty   aide     nl
'full of unbounded" enthusiasm   U Ii il l
-great  influence,-.oh; the :Collt j.        ml  hi
death lcaves-a Void jnjhe sprit    f th
University and/in'the jive    >i    II   »h
,kiicw; .him, even  ever'so slijjillv      I In.
personification   of vibrant   dvnmiK   lift
he seemed not to have hem    hern  for
dcath,^.and even yet it is bird t i re ib/e
that lie is gone forever.   It » t    loo  iIil
very "humanncss" of his ih incur tint
won for him his popularity  and    un us
as  a  leader—he  was  hiim in   n lure    in
his  failings and  virtues,  Ii  |t>  ind  di^
appointments; anguish and smceis
The- Recording Angel in his g ltlt.ii
book might write, him as on uliil \el
his fellow men", whose frunds were
legion and enemies few. \\ 1 I mo e
could a man desire?
* Vilest rag' turns sixty today
■-\
It has been suspended, banned, censored, censured, condemned; loved,
'cherished and; occasionally, lionbred. "It" is The Ubyssey, for 60 years a cam-
* pus tradition.^'  **" "" -y
, -When the Ubyssey first appeared 60 years ago today, the staid fraternity types
who produced it could-hardly have foreseen the torrid future the paper would
' have. „ :>.•,-•/.'. ---.   « '. «.       *-*,(■ :     , y „- >»■<     _,     *„* *  ►♦,.,*
Throughout its history as chief purveyor of news at UBC, the paper has consistently been a centre^ofjeontroversy. ,, »". ?   *      «*        .      1~    -*-
- Jnl955 the Rev. Ey C.* Pajppert, faculty atfvisor.'to'the student paper at
Assumption College in Windsor /Qnti, called The Ubyssey "the vjlestrag you'cab
imagine and the best argument for censorship that could be produced."      '*   .
. >* Later, ihjl963, the Vancouver Sun said ni an editorial.that; "During mostjof
The Ubyssey's 45 years of publication', it has been a blend of smut, satire," sensa-'
tionalism and underground irreverefice."   ~ f^   „    '>\ *, ""   ? v*.   lj*%
_ -But The^Ufeyssey survived"* the. attacks frorn its critics as'bne, of the*liveliest,
best-produced student papers in the country! ",^*  --"v ~~  I     "* *
, In the process the paper produced a legion of bright graduates who went on to
'fame and infamy as leaders in the worlds of journalism, politics," business and the
arts.     -- -,      ,-.    ~r- ' ir <     ' -^ ~    *.  > ._
In this sixtieth anniversary issue, the battle-scarred rag gets a pat on the back
irom its current staff, who chronicle its history in five parts, and from illustrious
former staffers, who contribute their reminiscences, y,^   ' '-„','' *< *>   '*}?<"
/ s Happy sixtieth,*Ubyssey> And many outrageous returns.    ^"',' "   '* ~z.'*\ <
r -.
Inside
THE^EARLY YEARS^with J. V. Clyne and
. Glen Schaefer,: \•... .*!  p. 2 and 3
THE DIRTYTHIRTIES, with Malcolm
v McGregor and Steve Howard  p. 4 and 5
THE WAR YEARS, With Pierre Berton, Eric •
iNicol, Les Bewleyand Tom Hawthorn p. 6 and 7
THE LOST YEARS,:with George Bowering and
,-MiKeBockingff. /..:'.!.;  p. 8 and9
THE MODERN, EELA, with Tom Wayman and
.,/Chris'Gainor.... ::.\.r:J. :  p. 10and 11
R<3GUE»S GALLERY, with everyone p. 13
: I IUBYSSEY 601
The Early Years; 1918-1929
By GLEN SCHAEFER
Get used to the name as soon as you can,
And say it correct like a good little man;
If you can say  "Odyssey" rightly and
good,
You'll quickly say "Ubicee" just as yOu
should.
The "Ubicee" began publication as a
monthly magazine in 1916. It printed student
essays, literary contributions and cute poems
like the one reproduced here. The only news
it published was letters from ex-students
fighting in Europe.
Prior to 1917the "Ubicee" was paid for by
voluntary subscriptions from students and its
financial position was as a result somewhat
tenuous.
The "Ubicee" got a steady source of
income in September, 1917 when the AMS
instituted mandatory $2 student fee to
support the publications board.
With this new lease on life the publications
board began work on a more ambitious
project — a weekly student newspaper.
Renamed "The Ubyssey", it first came out
in October, 1918. The first issue of The
Ubyssey gives an interesting picture of the
last days of the war era. The paper and the
student body it spoke for were caught up in
the war effort.
The Canadian Officers' Training Corps
had two parades a week for drills and
lectures. All male students took part in these
Tango
Befflnners may start any time,
Forenoon. Afternoon and Evening.
W tuners of and personally presented with RUDOIPH VAXJEH-
TINO Dance Trophy for being1
Vancouver'* best Instructors and
dancers.
Vaughn Moore
PRIVATE    DANCING    SCHOOL
518 Hastings West Sey. 7ff7
THE TANGO ... all the rage in '20s
exercises. Headlines exhorted students to
"Buy a Victory Bond" and "Remember the
Red Cross".
With the end of the war, the Ubyssey's
attentions turned to concerns closer to home.
The university was at that time housed in
temporary buildings at Fairview, the current
site of Vancouver General Hospital. A
campus at Point Grey had been promised but
the provincial government was not taking
any action to secure that goal.
An editorial appeared in the Ubyssey in
November, 1918 voicing that concern:
"Time must now be given to the consideration of many matters neglected during
the stress of war. Among these is the
question of the erection of new buildings for
the university at Point Grey."
With 908 students, the Fairview campus
was hopelessly overcrowded. Sports facilities
consisted of a playing field. Nearby high
school gyms were often used by UBC
athletes.
The student protest  for a  Point Grey
campus   continued   throughout   the   early
1920's and was probably the strongest and
most   unified   student   protest   in   UBC's
•history.
It reached a climax in October, 1922 with
the Great Trek. Students marched from the
Georgia viaduct to the unfinished Point Grey
campus but the trek was not an arduous
pilgrimage. It was, rather, the social event of
the season. Cars were brightly decorated,
booze was liberally consumed along the way
and, by all reports, a great time was had- by
all.
Shortly after the trek a delegation of
student polititians went to Victoria to present
its concerns to the provincial government.
The Ubyssey's headline describing that visit
optimistically read, "Government Gets the
Point".
The Point Grey campus was not completed
until September, 1925.
Complaints about inadequate facilities
were not the only thing occupying The
Ubyssey or the students. Social and sports
events were given extensive coverage in The
Ubyssey.
A report on the freshman reception of
October, 1918 relates how "cards and
dancing took up our attention until twelve
o'clock, when it was decided that our
juvenile guests should all be away home in
their little beds".
Jokes about being "home in their littl^
beds" were the most innocuous part of the
treatment freshmen received. The often
brutal practice of hazing was the subject of
much debate on campus and in The Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey took a stand against hazing in a
MISS   SALLEE  MURPHY   and   MISS   DOROTHY   WALSH,
Arts  '23,  our  first   women's   intercollegiate  debating  team,  which
leaves tonight  for Willamette University, Oregon.
DEBATING . . . often made page one in early '20s
1923 editorial and, to the relief of freshmen,
hazing was finally abolished in 1924.
In January, 1519 The Ubyssey received an
indignant letter complaining of improprieties
at the arts dance. The letter listed such indelicacies as "improper" dancing, smoking
in the ballroom and discourtesy to
patronesses. Of this last example, the writer
asked, "Have the students no respect for
themselves that they act uncivilly to the ladies
who so kindly act as our chaperones?"
Rugby was the major sport on campus and
UBC consistently fielded teams that brought
glory and honor to the university. The UBC
team played most of its games against
American universities, but the most popular
game was the annual game against Victoria
College. For these games, hundreds of UBC
students would go to Victoria for the
weekend to cheer on the home team. The
Victoria team was invariably trounced in
these contests, which probably accounts for
its popularity at UBC.
On general issues, UBC students in the
20's had opinions that ranged from profound
to ridiculous. A story about the abolition of
military training at the university of Toronto
in January, 1519 had the headline
"Militarism deposed in Eastern Universities
— is UBC to remain dormant?"
Students attended a lecture by an authority
J.V. CLYNE
I have been reminded that I was the sports reporter on the staff of
The Ubyssey in 1920 and the sports editor in 1921 and I have been
asked to give some of my recollections of the publication board in
those early days of the Fairview shacks.
We were housed in two small rooms at the end of a long corridor at
the entrance to what was then the auditorium. We were cramped in
our accommodation but nevertheless we managed to produce a fairly
lively magazine.
I don't suppose that the student enrolment at that time was more
than about 800 or 900 and we all knew each other as well as the
professors. The relationship between students and professors was very
close. The professors always used to come out for the main athletic
events and in fact participated in one of them which I remember.
A group of professors led, I think by Harry Logan, challenged the
students to a basketball game. It took place in the King Edward gym
and Dr. Garnett Sedgewick,the distinguished head of the English
Department, was cheerleader for the professors. He led his crowd in a
stentorian chant;
"Matthew, Mark Luke and John,
Help the brains to beat the brawn!"
There was not much specialization in university activities in those
days. People who played on the rugby team might also be members of
the Players' Club and the Letters Club. I remember being sternly
requested by President Leonard Klinck not to play in a rugby match
on Saturday afternoon as 1 was appearing in a university play at a
downtown theatre the following Monday evening and might have a
broken nose.
The job of sports reporter and editor was easy as everybody at
university was interested in athletics and turned out for the games.
There was always something spectacular to write about such as the
time when Lou Hunter kicked three field goals as UBC beat a strong
Stanford team in the rugby game at Brockton Point on Christmas
Day, 1920.
Then there was the time when a relatively inexperienced ice hockey
team won the senior amateur championship against the Towers, who
were the previous city champions. There was tremendous enthusiasm
for the final game, with each class seeing that its members all turned
out to give the team support and the rink was filled with wildly
cheering UBC fans. Pinky Morrison and Gee Ternan were our outstanding stars of that game in 1921.
The Ubyssey also occasionally got into mild trouble. Sir Henry
Newbolt had given an address on the subject of poetry to the student
body and had read from his own poem, "Drake's Drum." It was a
good address but it gave Geoffrey Riddehough the opportunity to
write in the Ubyssey a mildly satiric but funny poem entitled,
"Henry's Horn." Some people thought it was an insult and president
Klinck sent an apologetic telegram to Sir Henry who was by that time
in Toronto. Sir Henry, who had not seen Riddehough's poem, wired
back asking for a copy. I understand that when he received it he was
highly amused.
on Russia in February, 1919. One of the
opinions offered by this lecturer was that
"Bolshevism is a war sickness but it will
disappear."
A 1926 Ubyssey editorial on women's
rights said, "Women are crying out for
equality. Give it to them by all means, we
say. They have taken oVer what were
regarded as man's privileges; they drink and
smoke and swear."
Jokes were made in The Ubyssey that
reflected some undesirable attitudes held by
students. That the students of that era were
mostly from well-to-do backgrounds is made
clear by jokes in the paper about the intelligence of East End Vancouver residents
Minority groups suffered from stereotyped
images reinforced by cruel jokes in the
Ubyssey.
In November, 1921 a regular feature
called the "Muck-A Muck" was created. It
was a collection of what we would now think
of as rather juvenile jokes and stories.
Primarily because of Muck-A-Muck, The
Ubyssey was banned from Vancouver high
schools.
The 1920's were a carefree time for UBC
students. With the move to Point Grey in
1925, students lost the main force that held
them together and gave them direction. In the
late 1920's the major campus activities were
abusing the freshmen and necking in the
library stacks.
In their off hours, students watched
vaudeville shows at the Orpheum, attended
rugby games or simply drove around. The
first automobile ad appeared in The Ubyssey
in February, 1924, which suggests that
students could afford to buy new cars.
Politics was not something that interested
most students. In the AMS elections of 1927
less than 50 per cent of the students voted. A
few years before, while still at Fairview,
student elections generated more interest and
voter turnout.
Student politicians in the 1920's were good
public speakers. Oratorical skills were apparently a prerequisite for public office. The
Ubyssey often published comments about
particularly moving speeches made by the
AMS president ("Abe was in rare form at
Thursday's pep rally").
The concern for speaking ability carried
over to writing ability. Articles in The
Ubyssey weren't written in today's sparse
journalistic style; they consisted of long
paragraphs of flowery opulent prose.
The Ubyssey in the 1920's was more
discriminating in its reportorial staff. In
place of today's desperate pleas for new
reporters, The Ubyssey of the 1920's announced a contest every September to select
new reporters. Six were chosen each year and
losers were curtly dispatched.
The latter part of the 1920's had as their
main issue the question of whether American
football rules should be instituted in place of
rugby rules for UBC sports. This characterized the lack of concern for broad social
issues on the part of students.
The Ubyssey and the students it served
were too interested in the simple pleasures of
life.
Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 IUBYSSEY 601
Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH  12th, 1925
No. 19
Freshmen Win
Province Cup
Fast Frosh Rugby Squad
Defeats Victoria
Varsity Freshmen won tihe B. C. Intermediate Rugby championship Saturday at Brockton Point and retained
their undefeated record when they
met Victoria's best in the final. Scoring six points and blanking the Oak
Bay Wanderers, the Freshmen made a
try in each half. They should have
made a better score but were unable
to finish off several fine runs.
Harry Seed scored the first try after
a twenty-five yard run when he secured from loose scrum formation and
dashed away. He fell over the line
smothering the ball as he was tackled
after diving through the Victoria defense.
Gordon Shields carried the ball over
the line after a fine run at the end of
the three-quarter rush. The Victoria
defense knocked the ball away from
him before he could place it down
and Hundal following up to advantage
fell on the ball and scored a try.
The Freshmen brought the only
rugby championship to Varsity that
was secured this year by the collegians.
T. G. Wilkinson New
President of A. M. S.
Scenes of wild joy and ecstatic enthusiasm featured the announcement
of the election of Tommy Wilkinson.
Ag. '2fi, to the presidency of the Students' Council for the 1925-26 term.
I'pon Tommy's shoulders will fall the
duty of guiding student activities in
i:ll thrfr phases during transition,
and possibly the most trying period
in the history of the University of
British Columbia, and he is fully
qualified for the position. Coming to the I'niversity with the
class of '25 he remained out for
a year to teach and returned to Ag.
'26 in which year he is a student, in
Animal Husbandry. His part in uni-
(Continued on Page   7)
NEW PRESIDENT OF A. M. S.
TOMMY WILKINSON
BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Tommy Wilkinson       Coach Bryson       Fred Newcombe
Swansea Peck Harold Henderson Dal Grauer
Dad Hartley Buck Buchanan Heilly Arkley Arnold Henderson
SENIOR "A" WIN
CHAMPIONSHIP
Provincial Title Captured By
Varsity Basketers After
Thrilling Game
For the first time in the local history of basketball, Varsity's Senior A
squad have brought the Provincial
Championship to the I'niversity. Six
hundrffi wildly enthusiastic spectators saw Coach Bryson's boys take
the long end of a 26-24 count at Duncan last Saturday night. Although
the score indicates a very closely
played game, it does not tell the whole
story.
With the team upset by Swansea
Peck's sudden removal to the hospital,
just prior to the game, Bryson decided
on a defensive game for the first half.
This was a good move, for the slippery floor made offensive tactics
highly dangerous. There was, however, no let up In speed, for the Duncan boys, accustomed to the floor,
(Continued on Page 3)
PROV. TITLE AT
STAKE SATURDAY
Canadian Ruggers To Battle
With St. Mark's For B. C.
Championship
On Saturday, at 2:45 p.m. at Athletic Park, the V. B. C. Canadian Rugby squad will draw up in battle line
against, the formidable mob of ecclesiastics called St. Marks', and while Anderson rips off machine gun signals
they will attempt to carry away a
laurel wreath, the championship of
the  province.
Big, long, red-headed Lever Bates
will'be there with his queer skull-cap,
and Ken Noble with his excess poundage, and Winn will attempt to hurdle
all obstacles, while Hockin will "drop
on 'em." Numerous others will assist
in smothering fellow human beings,
notably Morris, McPhee, Woodworth,
MacLurg Evans, Seed, Demidoff,
Fleet, Sliultz, Hall, Saunders, Brennan, Morgan and even Todd, yelling
(Continued on Page 3)
Concert To Be
Given Friday
Spring Performance Of Musical
Society At Wesley
One of the major events of the college year takes place tomorrow, Friday, March 13th, when the Musical
Society will present their ninth annual Spring Concert in Wesley Church
at 8:15 p.m.
The Society this year has attained
a higiher standard than ever before,
and_ with the assisting artists, Miss
May Taylor, contralto, and the Misses
Una and Joy Calvert, pianiste and
violiniste, will offer a splendid programme.
With Mr. Wilbur G. Grant as conductor, the programme will consist
of a variety of ensemble numbers by
the Glee Club and Orchestra, in addition to those selections contributed
by  the assisting artists.
Special student tickets at 50c are
being sold in the main hall this week.
The general admission is 75c and $1.,
(Continued on Page .2)
A. E. Birney '26 To
Head Publications
At the regular meeting of the Students' Council on Monday evening, A.
Earle Birney of Arts '26 was appointed Editor-in-Chief of the Publications
Board, to succeed T. W. Brown, who
graduates this year.
Earle has been on the staff of the
Ubyssey for two years_ serving as reporter last year, and as associate editor for the past session. The experience he has had in these positions,
and the capable way he has handled
his work fit him admirably for the
position he will hold next year. He
is a well-known member of the Letters Club, and takes an active part in
the badminton and swimming clubs.
Earle is a first-class English Honors
student, and has a good all round record at the University. It is expected
that Mr. Birney will be a very successful as a respresentative of the
Publications Board on the Council.
NEW EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
A. EARLE BIRNEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page- 3 UBYSSEY
The Dirty Thirties: 1930 -1938
By STEVE HOWARD
During the 1930s The Ubyssey continued
to be an active campus social centre. This was
reflected both in its content and staff hierarchy. The Ubyssey gave wide, light coverage
to everything, and the paper, like the
students was definitely at play.
For all the coverage it received, a reader
would scarcely know there was a depression.
UBC students, (it seems) were too deeply involved in campus life to notice. Even the
debating club debates on political subjects
were at an unreal level of abstraction. It was
acceptable to discuss political theories, but
not to criticize people in power.
The nearsightedness of the students can be
seen in the comment of a UBC debater returning from the University of Saskatchewan,
who was quoted as saying the outstanding
feature about that institution was the absence
of fraternities.
In October 1937 another UBC student, a
native of the Punjab, India, said, "I am appalled by the lack of political movements
amongst the Canadian youth. They are far
behind the youths of other countries in this
respect."
Sports got the best play, taking up the top
half of the first page, as the decade began.
The Ubyssey continued to appear twice a
week, with either four or eight pages, and in
1931 the paper switched from an eight-by-11-
inch page to a three-quarters sized page,
larger than the current half-size tabloid.
The sports themselves have changed little,
hut the students' affections have. In those
days rugby was the kicker, and all sports were
covered closely by The Ubyssey. Once the
SOOTHING SYRUP
Campus Crab
CAMPUS CRAB
■ • • one of many columnists
students held a police-escorted, two-
hundred-car parade through downtown the
night before a game. In November 1936,
5,000 students turned out to see UBC win the
Hardy Cup rugby match, and the Ubyssey's
advance story had this headline across the
top of page one: SASKATCHEWAN TEAM
HERE FOR BIG GAME.
Enthusiasm for sports was running so high
that a subscription drive for a new stadium,
started in 1931, was a big success. The new
stadium opened in 1937 on the present site of
SUB.
But the students were at play at this small
campus, where in 1932 only 1,576 were
enrolled.
Other indicators of the times were the yearly "frosh" initiations. First-year students
had to wear green for a week and endure
other forms of ritual humiliation. During a
frosh snake dance downtown in October
1936, one student spent two hours on the
operating table after his hand was injured
when he tried to stop a car from breaking
through the line.
In September 1931, the initiation was
highlighted by the blindfolding of 200
freshmen. They were herded together and
smeared with mercurochrome, lamp black,
grease, kalsomine and plaster. Hair clipping
was banned that year, but the baseball bat
was applied by some overenthusiastic
sophomores.
Elitist sentiments among students can be
seen in the decade-long debate, mostly
among seniors, about whether seniors should
begin a tradition of wearing academic gowns.
This, it was supposed, would teach the frosh
some respect.
-A-MU
MUCK-A-MUCK . . . literary logo lasted through decade
The Ubyssey had a lively literary tradition.
Poetry and fiction were published in a
creative writing page entitled Muck-a-Muck.
Jokes and serialized stories were also
popular. Chang Suey, written by various
students, ran intermittently for more than 10
years.
A few of the regular columnists wrote with
classical pretension. Nancy Miles contributed
Prancing on Parnassus and Reg Jessup wrote
The Crackling of Thorns. Other wits appeared under the labels Mickles and Muckles,
Peeps' Diary, Beer and Skittles, Fanny
Freshettes Diary and Campus Explorer.
Alongside news of student council, clubs
and fraternities, The Ubyssey managed to
squeeze in stories about debates, speakers,
and occasionally issues such as university
budget cutbacks. When writer Stephen
Leacock spoke in January 1937, he riled the
science students by calling arts students "the
soul of the university."
The paper had a history of toeing the line,
and when it printed a mildly anti-government
editorial in February 1931, administration
president Leonard S. Klinck suspended
editor Ronald Grantham for two weeks.
After a meeting with student council Grantham was forced to resign and columnist
Himie Koshevoy took over. Koshevoy, later a
columnist for the Province, resigned in October because outside interests restricted the
time he could devote to the paper. The
Ubyssey fought Klinck's interference with
editorials and cartoons about death of
freedom of the press, and tried unsuccessfully to convince a lazy student council to back
Grantham. Klinck was much more durable
than Grantham. His 25-year term as president ended in 1944. In the Fairview grove
near the new engineering building a plaque
on a stone honors him.
In 1930, The Ubyssey supported pacifism,
a controversial issue throughout the decade.
A September, 1937, editorial said: "During
the last few years, pacifism as a creed has suffered severe setbacks.. . Canada, along with
all the other nations of the world, is becoming resigned to the idea that a world war is inevitable ... British pacifists also find that the
church has deserted them. Last week the Archbishop of York asserted that 'it can be a
Christian duty to kill', while his colleague,
the Bishop of London, stated that 'the real
dangers to the peace of the world today are
pacifists'. It seems inconceivable that
anyone, let alone a religious leader, could
combine belief in the above statements with
Christianity."
The sense of impending war grew as was
approached. Editorials discussing the chance
of war appeared in February 1936, and the
Muck-a-Muck page ran a fiction piece,
datelined Abbys Addaba, Nov. 4, 1945,
which imagined the trials of a war correspondent in a desert war.
The pacifism issue swept the nation, and in
February 1937 Canadian University Press
moved a story announcing a national anti-
conscription campaign, originating in Montreal.
English department head Garnett
Sedgewick and economics head Henry
Angus, both of whom gave their names to
buildings, publically debated in January
1937, whether the League of Nations was too
idealistic.
Debates were an important campus tradition. The 1937 debating year was highlighted
by the McGoun Cup competition, an annual
series of confrontations among students from
western Canadian universities.
In 1938, war v;as just around the corner. A
story from the national convention of the
Canadian Union of Students in January 1938
reports that the delegates decided that
fascism was preferable to communism.
Next month communist leader Tim Buck
was ejected from McGill University, where he
was about to speak, but Canadian fascist
movement leader Adrien Arcand was allowed
to speak. Buck's ejection made page one in
The Ubyssey.
That same month The Ubyssey accepted an
openly-racist, anti-Japanese advertisement
from the Vancouver Sun. The ad, previously
an editorial, was intended to promote Sun
circulation. It was headlined 'This is a White
Country'. The ad said, "If more people continue to be smuggled in, in 50 years there will
be more Japanese in British Columbia than
white Canadians . . . this is a white country.
We are going to keep it white. We have
pioneered and developed it and we are not
going to permit Japanese to sneak in here and
steal the profits."
The depression did make itself felt at UBC
through a budget reduction, which resulted
in cancellation of many courses. After the
proposed 45-per-cent reduction was announced by the provincial government in the
winter of 1932, students turned out in force
to protest > By spring a strong letter-writing
campaign had begun. The Ubyssey argued
that a cut in the budget would only worsen
the effects of the depression.
In February, 1937 a reporter visited a
forest development camp for the unemployed
and quoted a supervisor as saying how proud
he was about the absence of communist
agitation at his camp. "The continued existence of relief (camps) in 1937 is a sad
reflection on modern society," said The
Ubyssey editorial.
In January 1938, it was announced that
tuition fees would increase greatly. Fees for
arts and science, which were $100 for the
winter session throughout the thirties, were
increased to $150. The Ubyssey jumped right
in and protested the increases.
Names from the era include Reginald and
Mildred Brock, who died in an airplane accident at Alta Lake in 1935. Lt.-Col. Brock's
funeral was held with full military honors. As
dean of applied science from 1915 until his
death, he was the inspiration for the campaign for a new student building, Brock Hall,
which began in 1936, at the time of UBC's
big 21st birthday celebration. The building
was completed in time for the 25th birthday
celebration, opening in January 1941.
Earle Birney, a former Ubyssey staffer
travelling in Germany in December, 1935 on
a University of Toronto fellowship, was
beaten by storm troopers for not saluting the
Nazi flag they were carrying.
In February, 1938, a photo of a young-
looking Big Man On Campus, and science
men's undergraduate society president graces
the front page. The cutline says that Jack
Davis will lead his engineers to victory at the
sciencemen's ball that weekend. Davis
recently resigned as provincial transport
minister and was convicted of fraud.
As I leaf through my file of The Ubyssey
(1929-1931), the memories are revived and I
am impressed by the differences between the
Golden Age (i.e., when I was an
undergraduate) and this one.
Consider The Ubyssey's present luxurious
home, its expensively furnished suite of offices, reminiscent, to be sure, of a porcine
abode. Contrast this with the bare cupboard,
known as the Pub, in the northeast corner of
the Auditorium, that we occupied. The
Editor occupied a desk; the rest of the staff
occupied a desk.
Two superannuated typewriters served our
amateur but willing fingers. Here I learned to
type, not so professionally as to satisfy Personnel but so effectively and so accurately
that in 1931 I could hammer out my own
M.A. thesis. In those days, literate Editors
insisted on literacy in the staff: we wrote accurate English and we could spell (we
NEVER misspelled proper names, especially
Scottish names). Errors (rare, of course)
brought scathing and public denunciation.
Twice a week senior members spent the evening and half the night at the printer's shop,
where they wrote headlines and read proof. It
is possible that the present staff visit the
printer; I wonder how they spend their time.
I began as a reporter (addressing the
Editor, naturally, as Sir or Madam) and
reached the culmination of my career as
Sports Editor, a post that I clung to
tenaciously for two years. Sport on the campus has never had such coverage. Page 4 was
wholly ours, with its own heading. Every
sport received attention, every result was
published, along with appropriate stories. At
frequent intervals a Varsity game provided
the lead story on p.l (more often than not
this concerned the soccer team, for which, by
coincidence, I played): this, to be sure, led to
a certain coolness in my relationship with the
Senior Editors. I contrast our policy with the
current execrable coverage of sport.
The Ubyssey examined the University's life
comprehensively. We could do this because it
did not occur to us that it was our responsibility to save the world from oppression or
the University from the robber-barons and
the wicked administration.
Today the fumes of beer permeate The
Ubyssey's palace and pages. We were more
refined: we specialized in wine (we were very
advanced) and tamales. We kept the tamale-
house on Robson Street in business; now we
have gone and so has it.
The Pub was the birthplace and headquarters of the most secret and arcane
organization to which I have belonged, the
Society of Thoth. My oath prevents my
revealing its awful secrets; but we were the
first habitues of what is now Wreck Beach.
Membership was confined to men: after all, it
was a Secret Society. But once a year, when
we produced our annual pantomime for
Homecoming Night, we allowed the ladies to
prepare scenery, sew the costumes, apply
makeup, and serve as camp-followers, a
privilege that they appreciated.
We were also the first defenders on the
campus of freedom of the press. In February,
1931, the Editor, having been forbidden by
the President "to publish any criticism,
editorially or otherwise, of the University,
the Faculty or the Government," disregarded
the order and was promptly suspended (we
had immediate discipline in those days). We
promptly suspended publication. It was a
measure of our distinction that our action
was looked upon universally as a dreadful
punishment to impose upon the students, the
Faculty and the Administration. An
honourable settlement resulted.
We in the F*ub looked upon ourselves,
quite justifiably, as the elite. In the Golden
Age it was recognized that every flourishing
society must have an elite. There were those
who suspected us as iconoclastic radicals and
they were convinced by our clash with
authority.
My own radicalism has been well known on
this campus, especially by The Ubyssey. I was
trained in the Pub and, manifestly, I learned
my lessons well.
I address these reminiscences to The
Ubyssey, and I remind the Editor that my
surname has no "a" and that "honourable"
includes a "u".
Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 IBYSSEY
F00TBAU- ®h? Hbgfl0£|| SPEC1AL
VOL. XVI.
Issued Twice Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1933
No. 13
BEARS DOWN VARSITY
BRAIN AND BRAWN
Newspaper A Curse Of
Age: Debaters Verdict
BUTTERFIELD  AND  BOUCHETTE, STAR ATTRACTIONS,  UNABLE TO
DEBATE
The  resolution,   "the  newspaper   is   torts a fact at least two othc»*5 Rive
curse of the age", was carried by
a majority vote two to one, at a debate held in Arts 100 on Tuesday.
Although both Mr. J. Butterfield
and Mr. R. Bouchette were slated to
appear, neither of them showed up
at the zero hour. Apparently both
of the two columnists were laid up
in bed wtih severe colds. Their places^
were filled by Prof. J. F. Day, affirmative, with Vic Dryer taking the
negative.
"The newspapers of today do not
present an unbiased viewpoint either
politically, economically, socially, or
morally," stated Mr. Day, "because
they obtain no financial support unless they make these deliberate .nis-
representations. Ar instance of ?his
was given when he described the
quashing of Ramsay MacDonald's
speeches in 1914 when he spoke
against the War.
As a further argument Prof. Day
advanced the case of the "scare headline." He quoted one which appeared
on the occasion of the Spanish-American War when all the papers in
the United States ran the following
headline, "Remember the Mayne."
This he said fanned prejudices when
they could well have been allowed to
die out. The time when this was
used to greatest advantage was when
it was essential that enlistments te
kept up.
"Consider  the comic question," Mr.
a contradictory view, and it only
takes a minimum of intelligence to
gather the true gist of the matter."
In the rebuttals which. followed.
Fox, exchange student, stated that
public opinion did not justify the
publication of moral filth. "The
(Please turn to Page 3)
But Blanket of Fog
Obliterates Play;
Exhibition Tilt Only
■   rV i    ■ ■ ■-    ■    ■ i i
Five' randred Spetttatbr* titutr Interference
As Alberta Wm» 8^3
Day continued. At first one picture'
appeared at a time, then in strips,
and now it is seemingly necessary to
nin eight pages of this trash in the
papers on this continent. I maintain
that this is detrimental to the minds
of children and is likely to present
low ideals and pictures of crime
which  are  entirely  unnecessary."
Vic Dryer in replying stated that
the newspaper acted as a mirror of
public opinion. For example, the
English people are staid and their
papers are staid, the Americans are
c^nrtipt and erratic and their press
is corrupt and erratic, Canada enjoys a position which is midway between the two.
"The buying public call  the tune
and the circulation depends on the
paper'
pte
said
did  de
stories
the ca
"As
tinned.
Pepsters Provide
Popular Program
Excitement reigned in the auditorium at the Pep Rally Thursday noon,
•as the audience rehearsed U.B.C. and
Alberta yells in prepartion for the
Intercollegiate series, between snappy
numbers by Gil Mullen and his Blue
Moon Orchestra. The program opened
appropriately with "You've Got to
be a Football Hero," played by Gil
Mullen and his boys. Following this,
Dr. Shrum mounted the platform to
speaK of the necessity of supporting
our team at the games, and urged
the students to turn out and yell fox-
Varsity as enthusiastically at both
games as at the Pep Meeting. After
some peppy yells by the audience, the
orchestra gave an appropriate rendition of "Who's Afraid of the Green
and Gold"? and Earl Vance, former
president of the Alma Mater Society,
urged   the   students    to   attend    the
games.
The»U.B.C. team then entered gloriously in a highly-decorated automobile, to the strains of "Who's Afraid
of the Green and Gold"? and the accompaniment of hearty yells. Captain Dick Farrington introduced the
team, who were greeted by loud applause.
Gordon Hilker then made announcements regarding the Homecoming
program and the W.U.S. tea-dance
after the game on Saturday.
Next the orchestra gave a snappy
number, "My, Oh, My," followed by
"Wabash Blues. After a skyrocket
for Alberta and an attempt at the
Alberta yell, the prairie team were
introduced by their captain, Freddy
Gale.    Archie, Dick, president of the
Arts-Aggies Brawl
Slated For Nov. 16
The Arts-Aggie Ball will be btid in
the Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel
Vancouver, Thursday next, th* lfith
of November, between the hoQis- rf
nine and one, it is officially' announced by Milt Owen, president of
the Men's  Undergraduate  Society,   ■
President and Mrs. Klinek, Dwrt-
and Mrs. Buchanan, Dean anflY KM,-
Clement, Dean Bollert, and C]W*eI-
lor McKechnie will extend their- pet-* ;
ronage. Bill Sargent, presid4tf "ii
the A.M.U S Dick Lock, presid«gt «f£< \
the Ag. M.U.S.; anc* the combined'■$**■
ecutives Will form the committee'"Mfc
charge.
There will be a formal supper and
the dance music will be furnished by
Harold King and his Home Gas Optimists. Harold King graduated from
U.B.C. with the Education Class of
'32 and is the author of our official
play Kendall scfnt a ball between the
posts for three points.
Points Not To Be Counted Toward  Cup—
Sudden Death Game Saturday
In what will undoubtedly go down in history as the most
unique, unusual and mystifying football game ever played on
the local gridiron the University of Alberta's Golden Bears
defeated the- U. B. C. Blue and Gold stalwarts by an 8-3 score
at Athletic Park last night.
After delaying the game for almost half an hour to see
if the fog would clear, officials announced that owing to the
pea-soup fog the game would be an exhibition only and that
the Western Canada Intercollegiate series would be decided by
a sudden death encounter on Saturday afternoon.
If you can imagine watching a game when three-quarters
oi the field Was invisible; if you can feature five hundred spectators crowding the poor helpless players into an area hardly
big enough to play tiddlywinks; and if you can visualize coy,
silk-stockinged, high-heeled co-eds running interference for
muddy musclfe-mfcn, you will have some idea of last night's
classic.
The prairie boys may have played
in sub zero weather on spowshpes,
and the local boys^ may b^ve^ p^fd
in a quagmire; bus «*v«r-WJere ta*
either team played a tyhote-
hemmed in on all sides by spectators
who romped gaily up and down the
field and actually mingled with the
contestants.
How It Started
It all started wKed: Announcer
"Home Oil" Earl Vance invited the
hitherto docile multitude to
down to the sidelines, so as "better to
peer through the fog. And: did' the
crowd accept his invitation! The grid-
ders would have had mbte room to
play in the stands.
U. B. C. Scores Fittt
As for the game itself, nothing conclusive can be predicted from it as
to the outcome of tomorrow's sudden-
death final. Under the restricted'playing conditions neither team really got
a chance to work its plays. Undoubtedly the visitors are a tricky, hardhitting outfit; and will need plenty
of watching. On the other hand the
U. B C. team functioned smoothly,
holding well on defensive and crashing the line for some big gains-
The Blue and Gold team kicked
ofr, and for the first minutes of the
game punts sailed back and forth as
the gridders were testing each other
out. Kendall received a punt and returned it five yards to give U. B. C.
possession on Alberta's 30-yard line.
In two plays the local students crashed through for yards, and on the next
Wiian Aatgan <tf"«Affierta recovered
ab Alberts punt a fe» riiftnutes later to
giVe the prtizie team first and ten on
U. B. C'8 35-yarfl lin« he started the
rally Hat ended in a touchdown. A
forward pass advanced the ball to the
5-yard line and Pete Rule went over
on the next play. Scott converted to
give the Bears a 6-3 lead. A forced
U. B, C. safety touch advanced the
Alberta lead to 8-3 and raided the
scoring.
Last Three Quarters Scoreless
' TOie lasd* three quarters proved more
of ai workout than a serious game.
Under the impossible conditions, both
teams merely played to amuse themselves and the crowd.
The crowd rapidly lost all sense of
giving the teams a break, edging
closer and closer; and the officials
•wisely decided to shorten the playing
time in each quarter. Nothing spectacular happened and the game ended
without further scoring.
The teams:
University of Alberta: W. Hutton,
B. Hutton. Lyle Jest ley, R. Zender,
Art Kramer. Fred Gale. (Capt.), Len
Parks, Don Gibson, E. V. Borgal, Bill
Haiigreaves, Jack Camoron, Reg Moir,
fete Rule, Guy Morton, W. Scott,
Don Wilson. Harold Richards, C. Malcolm, Ivan Smith, Pete Gordon.
University of B. C: Jack Bourne,
Harold Poole, "Doc" Nichol, Doug,
ikalcolm, "Lofty" Davis, Bill Williscroft, Ed Senkler, Russ Keillor, Char-
ie Campbell, "Spud" Ackhurst, Dick
King, Frampton Price, Gordy Snelling,
Wally Johnstone, Dick Farrington,
(Capt.), Fred Bolton, Doug. Mclntyre,
'-Tiny" Rader, Ed Kendall, Frank
Rush,  Milt Owen,
.   Coaches:   U.   of   A.,   Allen   Wilson;
V. of B. C Dr. Gordon Burke.
COMING   EVENTS
Friday, Nov. 10—
Alumni Supper, 6 p.m, in the
Caf.
undergraduate Theatre night,
8 p.m. in the Auditorium.
JGym Club, 12:10 in Room Z,
;j   Arts.
Saturday, Nov. 11—
U.B.C.   vs   U.   of   Alta.   2:30
pjn. at Athletic Park.
League of Nations    Society,
12:30,    luncheon   at   Hotel
Georgia,
2:30, afternoon session in the
lotel Georgia.
n.,   evening  sessic
Auditorium.
vs Adanacs, 8 p-i
l.C  Gym.
!.M. fireside, 8 p.m. at|
6th Ave.
ALBERTA'S IVAN SMITH
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"*   *'X^T "***>?*-i«H&^'
'M^v^y^twSes^UKiaM.
Undergrads Disport To
Grads In Skits Tonight
PLAYERS' CLUB, MUSICAL SOCIETY, SCIENCEMEN AND OTHERS VIE
IN ENTERTAINMENT
Tonight is theatre night. At 8:15
o'clock the student body and the
graduates attending the Homecoming
festivities are to witness an unequalled manifestation of the artistic ability to be found on the
campus. For the past few weeks
the auditorium has been ringing with
a never ending succession of dramatic oration in preparation for the
great event.
A series of short skits is to be presented interspersed with vocal and
instrumental    music.    The    program
Who's Afraid Of
Green And Gold?
The door slams. Bill Tremaine enters: "Hi, Boys," Chorus of male
voices ecstatically: "Hi'ye, Bill, old
kid. Hfye." BUI. "Say. boys, shall
we talk about women right away, or
shall we lead up to it." Deafening
chorus of male voices: "NOW—'My
girl's a Hullabaloo,' etc."
This typical Pep Club entertainment was interjected between the
orchestrations of Harold King and his
versatile Optimists, Radio Rally,
CKMO, Tuesday night. Among thu
numbers that they rendered: "Hail,
U.B.C.," Gordie Hilker's chorus of
male voices singing the chorus; waltz
medley, "Aloaha/' "Song of the Islands"; "Tiger Jtag"; violin solo by
Sonny Richardson, "Trees"; "Wabash
Blues."
"Say, boys, are we afraid of the
Green and Gold?"—Archie Dick. Ye
worshipful pep fathers: "Gosh, no—
Whose afraid of the Green and Gold,
Tra, la, la—la, etc.? (to tune of
"Whose Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf.)
The Pep Club rendered such yells
as: "Kitsilano,'* "Locomotive'' (new
U.B.C. yell), "Skyrocket" (benefit
Alberta).
"In staging an intercollegiate game
such as this, it <s necessary to raise
large sums of money to defray expenses. To help sell the tickets, we
must avail ourselves of all possible
publicity. In this connectioi I wish
to thank the Hudson's Bay Co. for
loaning us a display window to advertise the big game. Tickets may
be had from any University S*u -ei t
has already passed its final prepara*
tory test in gaining Wednesday night,
the approval of the critical Frosh.
The performance was in all respects
informal; it was in reality a dress
rehearsal. The Players' Club, Musical Society, Alumni Players' Club,
Sciencemen, Education Department,
Nuses. and Faculty of Arts all contributed to the program and the audience was unable to decide which
group provided the best entertainment. The same program is to be
presented tonight.
Anyone who can answer the following questions need not attend:
What will happen when the world
comes to an end? What do the student teachers do during their gym
periods? What do the Engineers do
at one in- the morning? How do the
nurses spend their spare time, if any?
What happened to one Sedgwick iic
relation to the good doctor it is
hoped) in the C.N.R. hotel? What
prominent ex-Junior Mcmbct asserted that he is not "the *i-vl of man
that fathers like? All this information   will   be  revealed   tonight.
Tickets will be on sale today noon,
at the auditorium box office and at
the door this evening.
emblamatic of Western Canada
Championship.
Doc. Burke, Varsity's famous coach,
gave a humorous air to his "speech"
before talking about football. "I always thought the members of an orchestra wore Tuxedo suits, acted
'just so' and were very formal. But,
here, I find one man has his lap full
of instruments of all types; another
is wearing a sweater; while Harold
King either has an old Ford horn or
Stu Keate's hat on the end of his
cornet. They all seem to be having
a good time; they're always laughing
at something. About the prospects
for the big game: Lisle Jestley, graduate of my rugby team, is an .assistant coach at Alberta this year. As if
that wasn't bad enough he had the
nerve to write and ask me to loan
him my only two books on Rugby—
one of them by Rockne—so he could
teach his team all the plays!"
Among the other gems of entertainment were: repetition of famous
scene of Cal Winter trying to sell
Frank Anders a portable bathtub and
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5 IUBYSSEY 601
The War Years: 1939 -1940
By TOM HAWTHORN
The UBC administration was
determined the university would
make a valuable contribution to the
Allied war effort when war was
declared in September, 1939.
While no one on the campus
realized it at that time, the war
would dominate events at UBC for
an entire decade.
When freshmen students arrived
at UBC in the fall of 1939, administration president Leonard S.
Klinck told them that a war basis
was being planned and that UBC
would evolve to meet Allied war
needs.
The Ubyssey was also fully
behind the war effort. In the first
issue of the new school year, the
editor published a letter written in
1917 by a UBC student about to be
sent to the front in France.
Throughout the six-year conflict,
The Ubyssey never faltered in its
coverage and support for the war.
But while battles raged thousands
of miles away in Europe, the
newspaper often placed a greater
importance on student social activities.
The Ubyssey's news format was
different then. The paper was 20
inches by 15 inches in size and was
as much a social calendar as it was a
news source.
The editor at the time made all
editorial decisions. Only once in the
'40s was there any dispute between
the paper and the university administration, and that occurred
after a Ubyssey photographer took
a picture of "two applied science
professors innocently clowning at
an engineer's banquet."
After pressure was exerted by the
dean of applied science, editor Ron
Haggart ran a blank space on page
one where the photograph would
have been, and explained why the
photo did not appear.
At the beginning of the '40s the
paper was published twice weekly,
on Tuesdays and Fridays. By 1947-
48, under editor Donald Ferguson,
The Ubyssey joined the Vancouver
Daily Province, the Sun and the
News-Herald as the fourth "daily"
newspaper in Vancouver, appearing
four times a week.
The Ubyssey relied on its
numerous columns and columnists
for the bulk of its copy. Regular
columns found in the decade include Shopping with Mary Anne,
College Collage, Chang Suey,
Folderol,   The   Last   Word,   The
NOTHINGMATTERSNOW
iuL
VICTORY
BONDS
Gospel According to Luke Moyls,
What is Your Opinion?, The
Children's Hour (by current
provincial court judge Les Bewley),
and Behind the Headlines.
The two most popular columns,
were Beauty On The Spot and The
Mummery by Eric Nicol under the
pen name Jabez. Beauty on the
Spot was a guest column by a
randomly chosen co-ed who had to
write a 300-word column on any
subject of her choice. The victim
received only a few days notice.
Jabez entertained Ubyssey
readers for almost a decade with a
The Ubyssey ....
Should it have been strangled at birth (abortion is generally ineffective
against true monsters)? Drenched in Lysol and blue ointment every day and
tolerated? Or hailed as a venerable, important, campus institution?
I dunno.
There is a good deal of evidence available to support each of those
judgments.
The Ubyssey gave me an opportunity to avoid lectures and a training in
the newspaper trade, 40 years ago, which later proved invaluable; plus 50
needed cents a column inch published in downtown newspapers. Creative
writing courses will never compare with that training.
It also cost me my first year, which had to be repeated; and a permanent
sense of irreverance about supposedly serious human affairs, which have
cost me much more than that.
When I was appointed a few years ago to the Board of Governors, The
Ubyssey greeted its scarred and heroic former senior editor as a "running
dog hyena of international capitalism" or some such fool thing. That was
about the time when it had stopped being an honest newspaper and had
become a house organ for Jerry Rubin, Eldridge Cleaver (the old one, not
the born-again one) and the Soledad Brothers.
1 remember going to the Ubyssey office to find out who wrote that, with
the announced intention of horsewhipping him — for no personal reason
— but because he was one of those who had turned my old, honest
newspaper into an ideological wall poster. The coward never showed up.
Probably over in Morocco, gloating with Cleaver.
The truth of the matter is, that The Ubyssey had, as one of its objects,
the training of honest or dishonest egotists who wished, despite themselves,
to become honest journalists, with all the ethics of that honourable trade.
Not, if you please, a dubious profession, but an honest trade.
From time to time, it has fallen into the hands of polemicists, who are
not, and never will be, truly, newspapermen. The students and the administration deserve better; and those in the wonderful position of causing
ink to be applied to paper, ought to know better.
If, after 60 years, my old, dear, damned Ubyssey, and the successive
young geniuses and idiots who inherit the institution, do not realize its true
function and its raison d'etre, it deserves to be drenched in Lysol every day.
Or be strangled.
Otherwise, honored.
Page 6
column that was the undisputed
best-read section of the paper.
But the war and the effects of the.
sudden return of scores of veterans
to the university generated the
greatest number of stories in The
Ubyssey.
In the early years of the war, the
paper religiously followed the
battles as they happened through
British United Press dispatches.
Military training became compulsory for male students in 1940
and more than 1,700 UBC students
formed the contingency. All officers and cadets contributed their
training pay to the corps fund,
which was used to finance the
construction of the armory in 1941.
War work was made compulsory
for women in 1942 at the request of
the women's undergraduate
society. Training was given in
physical fitness and on possible war
emergency work.
The Ubyssey reprinted a 1928
Ubyssey cartoon comparing the
Canadian Officers Training Corps
with militarism, and included the
caption;. "No further remarks seem
to be necessary at a time such as
this."
While the paper generally
conformed to administration
dictates so as not to disrupt morale
on campus, the biggest political
debate of the decade took place
over the treatment of Japanese
Canadian students.
The Ubyssey was editorially in
favor of allowing Nisei (native born
Japanese citizens) to continue
studying at UBC and even printed a
front page photo of a Japanese
Canadian in military uniform on
campus.
Considering that most Japanese
Canadians were being interned in
the Lower Mainland at the time, it
was a bold move for The Ubyssey
to label the move racist.
The debate continued after the
war. Most students thought
Japanese Canadians should return
to UBC. But not every student was
convinced.
"If we are going to start giving
these minority groups freedom, we
should do it by granting rights to
those which have not antagonized
us," one student said. Others
openly admitted their racist attitude
towards Japanese Canadians in a
Ubyssey poll.
In most aspects UBC students
faced the same shortages as the rest
of Canada did. There were cutbacks of B.C. Electric service to the
campus. And The Ubyssey had to
be rationed in 1944, when paper
shortages forced the newspaper to
peg its circulation at 2,400 despite
Dedicated to Victory
The entire B.C. Electric organization of more
than 4,000 employees, on the mainland and
on Vancouver Island, in transit, light, power
and gas service, is dedicated to complete
victory for the Empire and the United
Nations. Fighting on the home front, the
B.C. Electric pledges itself to maximum aid
towards Canada's war production.
IT WAR MVIm» «TAMPS AT AMY l.C. ELECTRIC TICKET OFFICE OR STORE
B.C. ELECTRIC AD . . . Johnny Canuck saves democracy
the demands of an ever-increasing
student population.
Male students were also concerned about failing courses,
because doing so would lose a
student his draft ineligibility.
And a shortage of gas in 1943
forced the university to close its
doors for five days.
Despite the shortages, the war
years saw the beginnings of major
building on the Point Grey campus.
In 1941 Brock Hall was officially
opened The Ubyssey moved
into the basement.
A province-wide campaign was
begun to construct a gymnasium
dedicated to B.C.'s human war
losses. The plans for War Memorial
Gym were first published Feb. 2,
1946, in The Ubyssey. Students
donated $5 yearly to the Alma
Mater Society for the construction,
while a variety of fund raising was
held to finance the original
$500,000 construction estimate.
The end of the war signalled a
new era of growth on campus, with
the returning veterans swelling the
enrolment from 2,254 in 1944-45 to
5,621 the year after.
The influx all but paralyzed the
already crowded campus, and army
huts to be transported to the
campus under the organizing efforts of Gordon Shrum and John
Lee.
See page 19: POLITICS
$;
We called it The Pub, then. Its inhabitants were
Pubsters. They lived in disused and abandoned —
especially abandoned — parts of the Auditorium
Building. I did not live with them. I was too shy. I went
into the Pub to deliver my copy, but the Pubsters
therein, terribly sophisticated people, said to drink gin
and kiss each other on the mouth; they looked at my
bicycle clips and I felt Out Of It.
In it, up to their hips, in that time of the late Dirty
Thirties, were persons like Pierre Berton, Allan
Fotheringham, Jack Wasserman and others who were
even more sophisticated than the rest of the Pubsters
because they had chairs to lounge in. Berton in particular was a master lounger. It can be revealed now,
and here, that Berton did not study Canadian history
at UBC. Nor did Fotheringham study political science.
Nor did Les Bewley study law. They all studied the
same thing: women. For them, the university year
began with the registration of women reporters, none
of whom needed to know how to type, and closed with
the convocation of The Pub Party. I went to a Pub
Party once. As promised, it was an education. I flunked, suma cum lavatory.
Majoring in women, the Pubster had little time for
the interruptions of putting The Ubyssey to bed. That
was why so many of us became columnists. It was the
easiest way to get our BMOC (Big Man On Campus)
without doing work. Most of us have never violated
that principle. Today, I am told, The Ubyssey has few
columnists. It has developed a regrettable identification with journalism. Pity. Grand old traditions
deserve better.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 IUBYSSEY 601
DEBATE TODAY
NOON
Stye libgssrg
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
DEBATE TODAY
NOON
VOL. xxn.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1939
No. 1
War Basis Planned For University
"THEY CARRY ON"
<
■;f   If   ■      ifc
Frosh Take Offensive
For First Time
In History
"We Are Disillusioned," Say Frosh
As Sophomores Accused
Of Dereliction
Traditional blood and thunder of the frosh-soph battles has
been missing this year, as the outnumbered sophomores have
stayed well out of sight for the past week. The green garbed
freshies, who constitute about a quarter of this year's enrollment,
managed to "dunk" several second-year men in the lily pond, but
apart from this, and a few minor skirmishes, the Frosh have had
to 'be content with a "bloodless victory."
By A FRESHMAN
Whan I first came to University, I was warned to watch out
for sophomores. I received the
impreaajon that Sophs were violent individuals who preyed on
freshmen  like   Dracula   preyed
By A. N. UPPERCLASSMAN
Viewing (from a distance) the
Frosh-Soph engagements of the last
week has led us to speculate just
how these things start. Formerly the
scraps have been the rebellion of
persecuted Frosh against tyrannical
Enlistments
In C.O.T.C.
{University Policy To Evolve
On War Needs of Allies
ooar
Rush of Students
Oversubscribes
Unit
Equipm'nt Lacking
Added Provisions
May Be Provided
Soon
Sergeant-Major Smith's new uniform and unusual activity in the
D.T.C. orderly are vivid campus reminders that Canada is at war and
that many Varsity students are anxious  "to  do their bit."
Recruiting is more than satisfactory and the authorized strength of
the corps has already been exceeded.
However, if recruiting continues at
the present rate it is probable that
larger government grants will be
forthcoming to enable the corps to
accommodate the new members.
Therefore those who contemplate
enlisting are urged to do so at once.
It has been suggested that credit
be given for C.O.T.C. work and definite word about this will be available
in a day or so. The probable plan
is to give exemption from an elective 3-unit subject to those who earn
their lieutenant's qualifications.
This is not being considered, however, as an inducement to potential
recruits but rather to relieve pressure on those with a full programme
of work who wish to take military
training as well. It is possible that
the ranks of the Corps may be filled
to capacity before this suggested
new regulation becomes effective.
Colonel  Shrum,  commanding  offi-
All University Resources at Disposal
Of Canadian Government
President Klinck States
By  3.  D.  MACFARLANE
An evolving policy to be determined by the needs of
Canada and the Allies will chart the course of the affairs of
the University of B.C. for the duration of the present conflict,
President L. S. Klinck told some five hundred freshmen last
Friday in the university auditorium.
In a considered and far-reaching address the president
minced no words as he warned the students that the session of
1939-40 would be a war session in which only a policy of
"carry on," and not one of "business as usual," could be followed.
All the facilities of the university, manpower, brains, and
- research potentialities would be mobilized in the service of the
country, he intimated as he outlined the policy of the university during the period 1914-18.
Already university authorities have made unrestricted
offers of assistance to the Government, he revealed.
"We are all in this thing, and tpgether we must see it
through," he declared. "The call is for considered action in
every department of university life."
FOB DURATION
"For how long?   For the duration—and beyond."
"Everywhere things should be and will be different—
very different—and in many ways," he said.    "Universities
cannot be conducted, and have no desire to be conducted normally in abnormal times."
"There is as much uncertainty in the minds of the staff
and students as in the minds of the general public," the president stated. "These are stern days and the thoughts of the
conflict are uppermost in our minds."
Reviewing the activities of the war years of 1914-18 as
possibilities of the future he recalled to his audience the fact
that during that period all male students were required to
take, as a part of their degree work, two years military training in the U.B.C. contingent of the Canadian Officers training
corps, training to which two hours a week were devoted.
"At that time also many contributions were made by the
staff who rendered invaluable service in conducting researches
bearing directly on war problems, as technical advisors to
Governments, and as authorities in matters pertaining to food
Scholarship
Committee
Succeeds
As a result of the National Scholarship Campaign conducted by the
Canadian Student Assembly last year
the Federal Government has provided a grant of five thousand dollars
for the assistance of thirty-five British Columbia students.
At the beginning of last year the
local Canadian Student Assembly*
headed by Clarence Idyll as chairman
and Val Bjarhason as secretary, set
mp a Scholarship Campaign Committee representing a broad crow
section of the student body. The object of the Scholarship Campaign
was to impress the Federal Government with the need for assistance to
needy students of high academic
standing.
All campus dignitaries and professors were approached and among the
score of thoge-vho endorsed the bJuji
were President Klinck. ar3 Dean
Buchanan. Students' Council and
most of the campus clubs threw their
support behind the scheme, as did
the Senior Board of Trade, Service
Clubs, prominent citizens including
Dr. Weir and almost all B.C. Members of Parliament, and many other
organizations.
CAMPAIGN SUCCEEDS
At the same time this bustle of activity was being enacted on other
campi. The campaign was climaxed at a student conference at Ottawa
PIERRE BERTON
I don't know how it is now, but in my day it was very
difficult for a young undergraduate to be accepted as a staff
reporter on The Ubyssey. Would-be campus journalists
were treated with sneers, indifference and open contempt
when they arrived at the publication board offices.
To get noticed at all, much less accepted, you had to be
patient, tenacious and imaginative. It was, I think, a sound
approach by the editors since a good many misguided
students believed (quite wrongly) that the job of campus
reporter was glamorous and required little work.
There were also tempting rumors of sex orgies and other
unmentionable scandals behind those frosted glass doors.
But the editors wanted toilers, not dilettantes — people who
actually wanted to be professional journalists when they
grew up.
I was one such. My whole reason for going to the
University of British Columbia was to learn the newspaper
business. I knew that senior editors of the paper
automatically got jobs in city newsrooms.  I was quite
prepared to skip lectures, fail exams and outwait the editors
in order to become a campus reporter.
I sat in the publications office day after day for almost two
weeks without a single assignment. Finally, I was handed a
list of books that had been acquired by the UBC library and
asked to prepare a one paragraph report on the subject. I
struggled for four hours writing and re-writing this important story.
After I'd finished I believe somebody else rewrote it again
before throwing it away.
In all that time only one person spoke to me — or at least
smiled at me. I was so bowled, over that I married her (some
seven years later). That was the year that everybody on the
paper married somebody else on the paper. Many of them
have stayed married, too, which tells you something about
patience and understanding.
At last, I decided to take matters into my own hands. If I
wasn't to be given an assignment I would make my own. I
searched the campus for a likely scoop but found nothing.
The answer, when it came to me, was childishly simple: I
would make news myself and report it objectively.
And so it came about that a group of heavily masked
students from Salisbury Lodge (a boarding house on campus
where, by coincidence, I myself was staying) lay in wait for
some theological college undergrads, leaped from the bushes
and roughed them up ever so slightly.
I had my scoop. Masked men attack theologs. It was the
main page one headline in The Ubyssey that week. The
editor offered his congratulations. Senior editors and
associate editors even spoke to me and bought me beer in the
Georgia Tavern.
Other assignments followed once I was actually given a byline. The following summer I got a temporary job on a
Vancouver daily paper and this led to more permanent work.
I came very close to failing my final year at the university but
I didn't care for my real training group was The Ubyssey.
I should have kept the mask as a momento but I prudently
burned it. I have never had occasion to wear one since.
FROSH
BALL   GAMERS
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Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 UBYSSEY 601
The Lost Years: 1950-1962
By MIKE BOCKING
The words which best describe The Ubyssey and the
university in the fifties are "hoo-rah, siss-boom-bah." UBC
was a playground. In stark contrast to the seething political
turmoil in the world around it, the university was protective,
insular and apolitical.
While Canadian soldiers, some of them UBC students and
graduates, slugged out a long, tedious war in Korea; and,
while United States senator Joseph McCarthy persecuted
hundreds of innocent Americans in Washington and
California; and while the cold war brought the world the
closest it has ever been to annihilation; UBC students played.
The '50s were the hey-day of fraternities, homecoming
parades and mardi gras celebrations with the ever-present
nubile, young "frosh" queens — pageantry fondly
remembered by many of UBC's older guard.
The rivalry between engineers, artsmen, frosh and The
Ubyssey received excellent coverage, usually on the front
page. A continual war between certain Ubyssey columnists
and the engineering undergraduate society was maintained,
indeed encouraged, by the paper.
The verbal barbs directed at the gears by Allan
Fotheringham in his column Campus Chaff, were answered
by more crude rebuttals in the form of pool dunkings and
numerous kidnappings. The engineers once chained
Fotheringham, who also served as Ubyssey editor from 1953-
54, to the Birks clock at Granville and Georgia.
The principal result of these stunts was to give
Fotheringham a Big-Man-On-Campus reputation with little
honest toil.
In keeping with the mood of the decade, the sports section, which often encompassed several pages, was one of the
strongest parts of the paper.
There were frequent front page spreads urging students to
attend a football game or pep rally — appeals which were
usually answered with mammoth turnouts. An editorial in
-*-     By WI UPROOT
r you ce.T CQHRPeNCE ev
HAVING A COOO /±JPPtA&ANCe
USE WIUPROOT CR6AM-OK.
t^oyoucAMee-GOMFtc'aNT ■
OOUR (-VMR WIH. ALWAYS
iooK,i-r& eesTi^AAjy
ilMHI     SITUATION i
. tv/uxaoor ca&w-eyc
> &I/BS WUCO^f¥CierVC£f
NATURE^ RNEST IAAIP. ANP SCALP CONPmOiEB.
Campus Queen, Glamour Queen!
you're Figure-Perfect in
ecause...
There's an EXQUISITE FORM
for every occasion and every
figure! Shown top: No. 195 —
"Equalizer", 4-section stitched
cups, built-in contour. Satin or
Broadcloth. A cup. 30-36;
B cup, 32-38. $3.00. Below:
No. 415-"NEW LOOK" bra
with high rounded look. Diamond stitched undercup. Junior
AA cup 30-36; A cup 32-36; B
cup 32-38; C cup 32-40. $1.50
the Oct. 19, 1950 issue captured the rah-rah spirit of the
times. "The giant bonfire to be staged in the south field
tomorrow night as send off for the football team offers us a
chance to keep the ball rolling. (It also offers students a
chance to have a hell of a fine time).
"A good turnout will reassure the football team and turn
them loose ready to kick the blazes out of Linfield (College)
on Saturday.
"And a good turnout will be a spur to bigger and better
ballyhoo and razzle-dazzle and restore Joe College to his
status of a walking time-bomb in the eyes of the public."
The UBC T'Birds lost that game 46-0.
In spite of the minor setback, it was the age of the football
hero, an imperial Alma Mater Society presidency and an
upbeat Ubyssey newspaper which more often resembled a
public relations tabloid or an AMS information sheet.
But The Ubyssey also had its serious side. It covered AMS
politics like a blanket but was often under that blanket with
student politicos.
Indeed, The Ubyssey was so closely integrated with the
AMS and its internal politics that it was often difficult to
separate the staffers from politicians. Various student
politicos in the early '50s, particularly the AMS president
and treasurer, were even permitted to run articles unedited in
the news pages of the paper.
Student council meetings, whether they were important or
not, were without exception relegated to the front page,
usually with banner headlines.
The incestuous affair between the society and the paper
was particularly evident in 1956 when both the editor-in-
chief, Stanley Beck, and staffer Don Jabour (now a well-
known North Vancouver lawyer) ran for president of the
AMS.
They both polled considerably higher than a third candidate not connected with the paper, and Jabour edged out
Beck to capture the post. Beck then returned to his position
as editor.
Ubyssey staffers and student politicos were members of
the same elite and together they ran student politics. One of
the underlying ties which bound them together was the
strong Greek system. Many Ubyssey staffers then belonged
to fraternities as did their AMS counterparts.
Politics was rarely based on ideological grounds. Student
government was principally service-oriented and the most
contentious issues centered on how to best provide services.
But there were rebels who did not fit the mold. Les Armour, the 1951-52 editor was one of these. In early
December of  1951,  the student council demanded the
BOWERING
In the late '50s and early '60s UBC was still a place for
gentlemen brinkers, whatever they are; well, they were a
bunch of guys in bennies (called elsewhere overcoats) and
wool scarves, who put together the Thursday critics' supplement to The Ubyssey, and spent the rest of the time drinking
home-made sake. We were mature and witty, we were stars
of the arty-farty table at the caf. We wrote about each other
a lot in the paper, and worked diligently to make each other
famous, middle-size men on campus. The Thunderbirds
never gave us any competition. A young girl from Ladysmith
had to be nice to us if she wanted a good review of her Blanche DuBois in the Players' Club production of the Spring.
There was David Bromige, an English draft-dodger poet,
who is now a renowned California poet. There was Mike
Matthews, a terrible actor and great writer, who now teaches
theatre as literature at Malaspina College. There was Lee
Mackenzie, a man who never took off his bennie, even while
lying in the urinal at the Georgia pub, who is a school teacher
in one of the nameless hamlets of Vancouver Island. There
were others, but who needed others?
We never spent any time on the Salvation Army furniture
of the Ubyssey office. For one thing, it was a depressing
place, filled with editors and staff writers who were flunking
their years in philosophy and sociology. For another, the office was downstairs at Brock Hall, and who wanted to hang
around Brock Hall? It was at that time the headquarters of
the fraternity set, and maybe that argues for continuity, as it
is now the digs of the creative writing set.
We hung out instead at the arty-farty table, with the actors
and Mussoc people, and oh you know the poets, and the
young girls from Ladysmith who never had the gumption
and the clear skin it takes to hang around with the frat boys.
Damn, we were good! The downtown papers read
everything we had to say, and quoted us whenever they needed any wit to support their columns. Matthews was the ne
plus ultra of the hyperbolic rant. Bromige brought with him
an acerbity learned in British schools and Saskatchewan
loony bins.
I loved the power and freedom of my arts column called
Placebo. I loved the responses and smirks I received the rest
of the week, in classrooms and in the Georgia. I loved the
free tickets to plays and jazz concerts. And I loved the way
those tickets and my flashy note-taking impressed my date.
I remember thinking over and over: Oh God, if I have but
one life to live, I hope this is it.
resignation of Les Armour because "a majority of students
on this campus do not agree with Armour's point of view.
They are, in fact, fed up with him. They want him out," said
one councillor.
In reply, the entire Ubyssey staff, which included
Fotheringham and sports editor Alex MacGillivray (now
Vancouver Sun assistant managing editor), threatened to
resign. The matter was finally resolved at a special general
meeting of the AMS.
Armour was perhaps the most controversial editor of the
50s as his attacks on racial prejudice, campus military
officer training programs, athletic scholarships and commie-
baiting, went against the conservative mood which then
instilled politics at UBC.
The 1952-53 term under editor-in-chief Joe Schlesinger
(now the CBC's European correspondent) included Walter
Hardwick (now education deputy minister).
The following year saw Allan Fotheringham at the helm.
Under Fotheringham the paper began an attack against
racial discrimination policies of fraternities, an attack the
paper revived sporadically until the early '60s.
Pat Carney, now the Progressive Conservative candidate
in Vancouver Center, worked on the paper that year.
Editor Sandy Ross, from 1956 to 1957 introduced more
political controversy into the paper, often attacking the
Socred government of the day under W.A.C. Bennett for
education cutbacks.
During this period, the paper served as a farm team for the
downtown daily newspapers. As many as 12 staffers would
work summers for the Sun or Province. The most controversial and most difficult period of The Ubyssey's history
occurred during the Great Purge of 1959. In the spring of
that year the staff published a lampoon issue on some
aspects of religion, especially the observance of Easter. The
outburst of hostility directed at The Ubyssey was the greatest
the paper has experienced.
In the weeks that followed the faculty council — the
campus disciplinary body — suspended editor Al Forrest and
senior editor Rupert Buchanan from the university. They
also suspended from participation in campus publication the
rest of the editorial board and three senior staff members.
The Ubyssey ceased to exist.
Shortly after the Great Purge, Bill Rayner, now news
editor at the Sun, started weekly jaunts to The Ubyssey
office offering tips and advice on how to put out a paper. On
Sun-paid overtime he helped put The Ubyssey back on its
feet.
The arrangement worked well for both parties involved
and The Ubyssey began a steady rise to the top and in 1961-
62, under editor Roger McAfee, The Ubyssey won the now
defunct Canadian University Press Southam Trophy as the
best student newspaper in Canada for the first of seven
consecutive years.
The early sixties saw profound changes in the university
and the paper. The Ubyssey was unquestionably a better
paper and greatly expanded its coverage from the narrow
confines of AMS politics to encompass provincial and
federal government policies which affected UBC students.
The paper became more critical of the AMS, the university
administration and the Socred government.
The paper under editor Keith Bradbury in 1962-63
established a solid tradition of investigative reporting after
uncovering RCMP surveillance of political activities of UBC
students. Tim Padmore (now Sun science writer), Hall
Leiren (Victoria bureau chief for the Sun) and Michael
Valpy (now Ottawa correspondent for the Sun) worked on
the paper that year. It was a farm team.
The activism of the sixties began in the spring of 1963 with
the Back Mac protest, named after administration president
John Macdonald.
More than 3,500 students marched from UBC on March
14, 1963 to downtown Vancouver to protest the stingy
education policies of the Bennett government. The protest
attracted massive public support and pressured the government into releasing more funds for higher education.
The editorship of Mike Hunter in 1963-64 saw the
beginning of the sexual revolution which was to transform
North American society in the late '60's. The first assault on
pre-'60s moral standards at UBC took the form of a controversial movie called The Bitter Ash.
The film, produced by Larry Kent and members of the
UBC drama club, attracted considerable adverse reaction
from downtown film critics and many phone callers who
protested the showing of a film at an educational institution
which portrayed a sex scene.
The Ubyssey defended the showing of the film despite
considerable opposition from within and outside the
university.	
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 I UBYSSEY 601
STUDENT  COUNCIL  DEMANDS
LES  ARMOURS'  RESIGNATION
The Ubyssey
VOLUME XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1951
NO. 30
PREPARING LAST ISSUE Ubyssey staffers gathered around editor-in-chief Les Armour for a last minute page one con- •
ference. Senior Editors Sheila Kearns and Elsie Gorbat and assistant Patsy Byrne go over dummies while other staffers
stand by working out story details. —Photo by Walt Susiel
We Plead
Our Case
Councils Action Forces
Scribes' Resignations
It is perhaps human for a man who feels that he has
been unjustly attacked to attempt to silence his critics.
But a little reflection should show that such a procedure is neither a sound defence nor a morally justifiable act.
It may preclude further discussion; but it certainly cannot
pmve"either side right.
Less than two weeks ago, Student Council, by a vote of 6 to 0,
voted confidence in the policies of the Ubyssey. Friday afternoon,
by a. vote of 7 to 3, the same council demanded ,the resignation of
the Ubyssey's editor-in-chief and threatened to institute dismissal
proceedings if his resignation were not forthcoming by 10:30 this
morning.
In tlie period between the votes, seven councillors found two
Hlitorials to which they took exception. One was the professed opinion of the Editorial Board, the oilier the signed opinion ol the
editor-in-chief. Both attacked four councillors for their "ridiculous"
tactics in student council meetings.
In presenting such un argument, they proclaimed the principle
that an editor ought to present to the student hotly opinions which
that body already holds. Any other opinion, lliey implied, was not
in the best interests of the society.
Want ONE Opinion
'Their argument, of course, asserts that they, as student government, are the fit judges of sound opinion, fair comment, and
right thinking. It asserts that only one opinion ought to prevail and
that opinion alone is worthy of presentation in a student newspaper.
It is true that an individual editor-in-chief is unlikely to take the
trouble.
Vet we feel that the principle involved transcends 4oth tbe
significance of both the, editor-in-chief and the councillors in Question.
Should the ,principle be allowed to stand The Ubyssey will
cease to exist as tbe students' only staifeguard against their govern.
hi ent.
Should it be allowed to stand, a tradition of frSedom of expression, buth up oveT thirty-five years, will be lost.
The effect of the action will be subtle and Insideous. Student
Council wiU stoutjy deny that it intends to" act as a tooaird of
censors'. Bat each and every time a dispute between council and an
alitor arises, couacillora will remetntier that they have, on at least
one occaadon, asserted their right to remove an editor because they
disagreed with his opinion* and the editor will be threatened, by
implication, with similar action.
It should be remembered that no attempt has been made to
prove the incompetence of the present editor-in-chief.
In the words of Mr. Ted J-.ee, mover of the motion of dismissal;
"The Ob,yts«y this year has been technically superior to any produced in recent years. But that has nothing to do with the prese&t
discussion."
Paper Guards Students
STOP   PRESS
Following a petition of 140 students. Student Council has called a Special General
Meeting of the Alma Mater Society for this
Thursday at 12:30 noon in the Armories to
discuss the dismissal of the editor-in-chief
of The Ubyssey.
More than 30 of the petitioners turned
out at Monday night's Student Council
meeting to protest the motion.
Councillors remained unmoved, however,
and voted 7 to 4 in favor of re-affirming
their stand.
AMS Asks Students
To  Pay Gym Pledges
AMS President Vaughn Lyon has issued a plea to all
students who have not yet paid up their War Gym pledges to
do so now. •$ '—
On, the strength of student promises to contribute to the War Memorial Gymnasium $60,000 has
been spent finishing off the Gym
so that it can be used. This loan
must    be -paid off by Christmas.
Approximately $15,000 was pledged toward paying Jh is amount last
year-hut so far these pledges have
of $4.000: On the strength of the
marvellous record of the students
we are appealing to other groups
to help us pay off the rest of the
loan.
The Alumni Association has al
ready contributed $5,000. We can.
not expect further support unless
the   students   do   their   part   Mid
only   been honored .to   the   extent! honor their promises.
Editor-in-Chief  Faces
Dismissal  Today
Student Council.will institute dismissal proceedings against
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief Les Armour if he does not submit his
resignation by. 10:30 this morning.
A-council  resolution,  moved   by^~
Junior  Member Ted  Lee  and  sec
onded by Women's' Undergraduate Society President Mary Lett,
demanded the editor's resignation
Friday afternoon after two hours
of   heated   discussion.
It passed by a vote of 7 to 3.
Lee, in introducing the motion,
maintained tlwit"* "a majority of
Htudents on this campus do not
agree with Armour's point of view.
They are, in fact, fed u.p with him.
They  want  him out.
SUPERIOR   UBYSSEY
He conceded that "The Ubyssey
has been technically superior this
yer to anything we have seen in
recent   years.
"But that is not the question.
Treasurer Phil Anderson, defen.
ding the editor, said: "I firmly believe that Armour has done a good
job. Your only motives in this
thing boil down to personal animosity."
SPARLING   ANGRY
Men's Athletic Directorate President Bill Sparling accused Armour of. releasing "matter which
was discussed by this council in
connection with the editorial statement of Nov. 27 that Sparling had
accused the Ubyssey of misquoting
Athletic   Director *Bob   Robinett.
WUS president Mary I-ett charged Armour with failure to implement the recommendations of the
Publications Committee appointed
lest spring by Student Council.
Questioned as to what recommendations bad not been Implemented, she replied. *I don't know
off hand. I haven't a copy of the
report. But I understand there were
several."
LYON  DEFENDS
AMS President Vaughn. Lyon
stepped down from the chair to
defend Armour.
He said: "Lps Armour is a man
who makes people think. He does
not merely give students back the
opinions they already hold.-
"He has probi-bly done more
than most' of our teaching staff
to make this Institution into what
a university ought to be: he has
stimulated discussion oh the issues
th&t  really  count.
"The Ubyssey has given council
full co-operation In all its worthwhile projects. It has co.operat-
ed to the best of its ability in all
campus activities.
ANDERSON   EXPLODES
Vicepresident Phil Dadson re
peated his sentiments.
Treasurer Anderson exploded
several times against what he
tailed: "caucus government by a
few."
"You people have come here
with your minds made up. You
want Armour out and you afe not
even   prepared   to   make   a   case.
STAFF  GOES
Editors
Support
Armour
All members of the Ubyssey editorial board have declared that they will resign
if Editor-in-Chief Les Armour is fired.
"Student Council has attacked Armour while patting the
rest of the staff on the back,"
said Managing Editor Doug
Heal. "If they think they can
keep -j.- staff by these tactlcti,
they   are   much   mistaken."
Heal termed Armour "a competent newspaperman and the
only person qualified at this
time to carry on as editor-in-
chief."
FREEDOM  OF OPINION
Al Goldsmith, executive editor, said, "I refuse to be a part
of any organization which does
not represent freedom of editorial opinion.''
Joe Schlesinger, senior editor; "The editorial board thtt
will he set up if certain el*\_
ments in Student Council have
their own way, will be bound
in principle to jump and da. ice
according- to the whims of the
council or any other group
which chooses to interfere with
the editorial policy of the board.
TACTICS UNFAIR
Ctty EdW Dennis Blake: "I
consider' the tactics of student
council unfair."
Senior Editor Elsie Gorbat:
"I am resigning because, if the
motion goes through, the Ubyssey will become a tool of student council."
Sheila Kearns, Senior editor:
"This is a question of freedom
of the press."
Alex MacGiHvray, sports editor: "As far as the sports department is concerned, Mr. Ar.
motir has been an inspirational
lea-der and we could not possibly continue to do our work
under a puppet rule."
You just sit there with smug looks
on  your faces."
Voting in favor of the motion
were: Ted Lee, Bill Sparling, Bill
Xeen, Jack Lintott, Mary Lett,
Joan MacArthur and Dianne Livingstone.
Opposed were: Phil Ander
son.   Phil   Dadson   and   Anita Jay.
COUNCILLORS' STATEMENT
• i
The. policy which permits any
J'reseyt guest editorials aiul which
editorials unless they express the
Hoard has effectively cleared The U
l«. the effect that its editorial col inn
expressioiiof'his personal opinions.
Students should further realize
ofgeer iB tt nieQLtW. .of. l'»e  £<Htoi
(Continued on Page 2)
student or faculty member to
forces every editor to sign his
policies ai" the en!ire Editorial
bys-sey of long-standing charges
s were simply a pulpit for the
I hat council's public relations
iul   Hoard  und  accordingly  has
8EE OURXASE
Attack On Armour 'Unfair
As members of Suiilt'iils'
Council who have hail a great
deal of contact, with the Editor-in-Chief and the sti.ff of
Hit1 Ubyssey during our terms
of office, we wish to dissaso-
ciate ourselves from the ac-
I ion taken by Students' Council at their meeting on Friday
afternoon.
At that time Students' Council fired the E<>il.:>r-in "Chief
iiul, at the same lime, expressed confidence in tlu1 rest
of   the  staff  of the   Ubyssey.
We feel that the attack on
Mr. Armour is unfair, based
on personal prejudice, anil not
in the best interests of the
Society which we feel requires*
a newspaper which has an Editorial Board free to criticize
/Students' Council individually
or collectively.
The attack Is unfair because
it is ancttempt to place the
entire responsibility for the
editorial 'policy of tbe Ubyaeey
on Mr. Armour, when In point
of Tail. Mr. Aimmiv is hound by
lhi> decisions of the Editorial
Board.
This is recognized by the
J'.oani which is supporting Mr.
Armour and accepts responsibility with him for the paper's
policy.
Mr. Armour has had the collage to express unpopular political beliefs and as a result he
has. of course, won )w>th friends and enemies.
Making J he attack on the
Editor-in-Chier rather tha-n on
the Editorial Board is an attempt to gain the support of
those who believe that the
best way to deal with someone
with whom you disagree is to
shut him up.
The attack Is further unfair
in that Mr. Armour was
given only three hours notice
of the intention to bold the
meeting to  remove him from
office and had during that time a!    Councillors    were   carrying
noxopportunily to confer with
the members of his staff or to
prepare any kind of defense
ag.' ;nst the slanderous attack
directed   at   him.
His request that he be given
time to prepare a case in defense of himself and the "Ubyssey" was ignored by the meeting to whom the majority of
councillors had come already
committed to the "out Armour
move."
The only points raised at our
meeting on Friday were two
editorials which appeared in
the Ubysey. Both or these editorials criticized Students'
Council individually &-nd collectively.
We do not necessarily agree
or .disagree with the editorials
but we maintain that the Editorial Board of the "Ubysey"
had a perfect right to publish
them and show the student's
what they thought of the way
in which Council and indivldu-
Dii   the   bus iess   of   the   Aim;,
Mater   Society.
Apparetly other members of
Council do not think so. They
are out to stifle this criticism
by attempting to remove Len
Armour from office. v
We wonder at the advisability of removing the Editor of
the Ubyssey for criticising"
Council when no such action
was even suggested when the
"Ubyssey'* ha-s criticised the
President. of the University.
The University Board of Governors and the. Faculty Council.
We suggest that certain persons are overcome with their
own importance and are out to
remove &• sharp tongned critic
by use of authority which was
given them to act in tha best
interests of the society and
not to satisfy personal grievances.
Continued on Page 3
SEE STATEMENT
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 II BYSSFY 601
TheModern Era: 1963-1978
By CHRIS GAINOR
One night a couple of years ago, a janitor
shoved a couple of wood scraps and a molded hand clutching a roll of paper, its metal
badly chipped, out of The Ubyssey
newsroom on the end of his broom.
They were the last fragments of the
Southam trophy, donated to the best university newspaper in Canada each year at the annual conference of Canadian University
Press. It had arrived in The Ubyssey's Brock
Hall premises just after New Year's Day,
1962, and remained until its decayed remains
were swept out on that night not too long
ago.
The Ubyssey won the Southam Trophy
seven years running and in 1968 the annual
award was ended by CUP, which was
fighting against elitism. But the trophy stayed
with The Ubyssey until too many trips by air
across the office and numerous other indignities led to its demise.
The fate of the Southam Trophy is symbolic of the history of The Ubyssey during
the most recent era.
A look through Ubysseys of the 1960s will
not reveal many long-haired students and/or
hippies of the now tiresome stereotype. The
Ubyssey was an egotistical and for most part
stolid rag, filled with photos of bosomy
young co-eds and stories on Alma Mater
Society and national student politics.
Stirrings of discontent with society in
general began to show up on The Ubyssey's
pages in 1967 and 1968, but it wasn't until
Mike Finlay took the reins of The Ubyssey
along with an impressive band of journalists
in 1969 that The Ubyssey's radical-left
"golden age" began.
It was in the summer of 1968 that The
Ubyssey moved into its current premises in
room 24IK of SUB from its cramped
quarters in the Brock Hall basement, affectionately known as the "pub".
But before we get into the golden age, let's
go back to the early '60s, The Ubyssey's fat
and sassy period.
The paper was reeling from the disastrous
1950s as the decade began. But as the new
decade began, Bill Rayner, than a staffer at
the Vancouver Sun and now its news editor,
began dropping into The Ubyssey's offices
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ARN SABA'S MORALMAN . . . strip had students laughing in '60s
and training staffers in writing, editing and
layout skills.
Rayner made The Ubyssey a Sun farm
team in the early 1960s, and left the paper
late in the decade. Both parties are still
benefiting. Rayner is now training budding
journalists at Vancouver Community College, and staffers trained by Rayner passed
their skills on to younger staffers who passed
their skills on, etc etc. The staffers trained in
this manner, often got part-time jobs at the
Sun to pay their way through university.
And so for the last 16 or 17 years, senior
staffers at The Ubyssey have been, in effect,
full-time journalists. By 1961-1962, The
Ubyssey's transition was complete when the
Southam trophy came to UBC for the first
time. At the same time, staffers turned back
an attempt by the Alma Mater Society to
control the paper, and since then, the paper
has been uncensored by people outside of the
staff.
Roger McAfee, the editor that year, went
on to become a lawyer and is best known to
TOM WAYMAN
It's hard for me to imagine The Ubyssey as
60 years old. It was so important a part of my
youth, I always think of it as something
young.
I started on The Ubyssey as a reporter in
1963, when I was in
second-year arts. My first year at UBC I had
decided not to take part in any extracurricular activities until I knew if I could handle
university or not.
When I did pass first year, I managed to
get hired in the old Sun newsroom in the old
Sun Tower (that's how far back I go) that I
first met various Sun staffers — people .hired
like me for the summer, who later were to be
my on-campus editors, informal journalism
teachers, and good friends.
The Ubyssey was then located in the north
basement of Brock Hall. That year,
1963-1964, Mike Hunter was editor-in-chief.
But the comings and goings from the editor's
glassed-in office were somewhat beyond my
concern. I was busy learning how to write a
story.
My Sun training, during a month or so on
the rewrite desk typing phoned-in stories
from other reporters, had largely consisted of
listening to the rewrite chief Gar MacPherson
graphically describe Vancouver newspaper
life in the 1930s. Then I was transferred to
the church page for the rest of the summer,
after someone discovered I was still a practicing Boy Scout (Rover Scout, actually).
So I still had much to learn about how to
write a simple news item. But the Ubyssey city editor, Mike Horsey, with infinite patience
kept making suggestions and making corrections until at last I could produce something
acceptable to.the paper.
Later that fall came my first big break.
One of the editors had the idea of sending an
expedition to the top of Burnaby Mountain
to "discover" the proposed site of the long-
planned Simon Fraser University. Since I was
a Boy Scout (Rover Scout, actually) I was
selected for this assignment.
In those days, it was Ubyssey style to call it
Simon Fraser Academy, so we could mention
it in second reference as SFA. And so, with
appropriate fanfare, on a certain day that fall
photography editor Don Hume and I drove
off in search of the elusive SFA.
There is a photograph of us departing in
the doughty Hupmobile — Don's ancient
vehicle, of more interest to automotive
historians than to anyone seeking reliable
transportation on an overland mission of
discovery.
See page 12: WAYMAN
today's students as the co-author (along with
former AMS president Grant Burnyeat) of
the Engineering Undergraduate Society's
proposed new constitution, which would,
among other things, give the AMS power to
muzzle The Ubyssey.
Rayner's heirs continued to run the paper
smoothly, and in 1963, a bright young student named Tom Wayman joined the paper.
In his first year, Wayman made a well-
publicized jaunt to the new Simon Fraser
University. In 1965-66, he became editor.
As The Ubyssey's style guide, the bible of
Ubyssey staffers, notes in its history of the
paper's last 20 years, Wayman "started to
turn the paper into a medium of comment,
analysis and opinion."
But the following year, Gabor Mate announced he was discontinuing his column,
the last to appear regularly in The Ubyssey.
The paper, he said, "is concerned with trivia,
with matters that are unimportant, insignificant and unreal."
Mate's missive was the beginning of a more
outward-looking paper. Editor John Kelsey
wrote a position paper which called for a left-
wing, ideas-oriented Ubyssey.
The paper appeared the same — outwardly. The news stories, the frat boss pictures
and the cheesecake photos were still there.
But staff democracy and the atmosphere of
the time was transforming The Ubyssey. An
editorial in early 1967 attacked the Vietnam
war and featured grisly pictures of children
maimed in the fighting.
The big issue up to that time was what was
going to replace Brock Hall. Wayman and
others fought expensive proposals, but it was
all for naught as construction went ahead on
SUB, which will be handed to the university
in the next century under a deal linked with
the university.
The university was changing. Enrolment
grew rapidly, many new buildings and
residences went up, and the long reign of
Norman Mackenzie as administration president ended. By the end of the decade, John
Macdonald, Kenneth Hare and Walter Gage
had occupied the president's office. The
Ubyssey fought W.A.C. Bennett's tight-
fisted financing of universities, joined by
others such as Macdonald and, ironically
enough, then-Liberal MLA Pat McGeer.
The money fight at the time was waged on
more elitist terms than now, but The Ubyssey
also stood against rising book prices and
elitist zoning regulations, which squeezed
students out of Point Grey.
In October, 1968, U.S. student activist
Jerry Rubin crossed the border and led a
crowd of UBC students into the faculty club,
which they occupied overnight. A teach-in
and growing student demands for reform
followed.
The Ubyssey still followed a relatively orthodox layout and story policy, although the
amount of analysis had risen. During the late
60s, Page Friday experimented with way-out
formats and shocking, heavily political articles.
When Finlay and other golden agers such
as Paul Knox, Nate Smith, John Twigg, Fred
Cawsey and John Anderson took over the
paper in 1969, articles of left-wing analysis
and polemical layouts appeared on the front
page. The changeover was complete.
The papers of the 1969-70 and the next
three years are standard by which all years
since have been measured.
The previous year, 1968-69, besides being
the first year The Ubyssey was produced in
SUB, was also the first year it was produced
on cold-type. Gone were the linotypes on
which the paper had been set for 50 years,
except for page numbers and the classified
ads. Under Al Birnie's direction, the paper
moved leftward.
In the next few years, feature stories on the
front page condemned the Vietnam war.
looked at Americans in Canadian universities and the growing women's liberation
movement, attacked UBC faculty leaders
who tried to separate UBC from the community administrators at Simon Fraser
University who purged left-wing faculty
members (prompting years of student
unrest).
Tenure battles became standard fare in
The Ubyssey's pages. Mock ads attacking
W.A.C. Bennett and corporate profiteers
decorated the pages. The Ubyssey stood
against prevailing public opinion during the
See page 17: RITUAL
Pag* 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 i
[along with
irnyeat) of
Society's
ch would,
5 power to
i the paper
young stu-
the paper,
ie a well-
ion Fraser
editor,
ie bible of
ory of the
started to
comment,
Mate an-
s column,
: Ubyssey.
vith trivia,
, insignifi-
of a more
hn Kelsey
for a left-
outward-
s pictures
till there,
sphere of
yssey. An
: Vietnam
f children
what was
■man and
but it was
ahead on
aniversity
iked with
nrolment
ngs   and
reign of
on preside, John
Iter Gage
ice. The
's tight-
Dined by
ironically
Geer.
vaged on
Ubyssey
ices and
squeezed
'. activist
nd led a
ilty club,
teach-in
' reform
:ively or-
ough the
i the late
way-out
itical ar-
;ers such
igg, Fred
over the
analysis
the front
the next
all years
les being
duced in
sroduced
types on
50 years,
classified
he paper
es on the
un war.
i univer-
beration
leaders
he com-
Fraser
faculty
student
fare in
ittacking
profiteers
:y stood
iring the
IIBYSSKY
Jerry
who?
VOL.LNO.20
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1968
228-2305
PROF CLUB INVADED
JERRY RUBIN, portrait of a rebel. See stories and pictures inside.
17, 1978     ; y Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 BY SSI V
Wayman climbed to SFA
/
From page 10
But in fact we didn't go
anywhere. A series of photographs
was taken one afternoon and then
for a week or more on press days 1
would descend into the Ubyssey office, find an unused typewriter, and
invent another episode in a continuing saga. Then my story would run
with one of our previously-taken
pictures.
People seemed to like the yarn,
although fellow inmates of the Fort
Camp residences where I was then
living seemed surprised that I
wasn't really bivouacked half-way
up the precipitous slopes of Burnaby Mountain.
Even our final, victory
photograph was a hoax. It showed
me shaking hands with then-SFA
chancellor Gordon Shrum seated at
a desk perched atop the Mountain.
Actually the photo had been taken
of Mike Hunter and 1, and then a
little of Hume's wizardry with
cutting and pasting had been
employed in the Ubyssey
darkroom. But nobody seemed to
mind.
1 spent the rest of 1963-64 as the
reporter assigned to cover Alma
Mater Society meetings. Then,
when city editor Horsey ascended to
take over as editor-in-chief for
1964-1965, I applied for and was
appointed to his old position.
That year passed for me in a blur.
A city editor was responsible for all
on-campus news, plus the training
of new staff. It's an impossible
task, though 1 was lucky enough to
have as an assistant city editor Lorraine Shore — who has since gone
on very far in journalism
downtown.
And 1 was equally fortunate to
have as news editor — my immediate superior — Tim Padmore.
Padmore was then, and is now, a
genius. For example, he topped his
graduating year at UBC in both arts
and sciences; they say the two deans
flipped coins to see which of them
would give him the medal. Padmore
eventually collected a Ph.D. in low
temperature physics, before returning home to journalism by becoming the Vancouver Sun's science
reporter. So in 1964-1965, besides
giving me a good deal of help with
my city desk problems, he was also
extremely useful in coaching me
through a physics course 1 had
foolishly signed up to take.
The fall of 1964 was also the
beginning of student protest, as the
free speech movement got underway at the University of California
at Berkeley. Back on Point Grey,
however, we didn't know much
about that. As city editor, 1 was
busy exposing one more time the
living conditions in the old army
huts that still made up Fort Camp
and Acadia Camp student
residences — 20 years after the war.
But it was the start of the '60s. 1
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday    jAM N|GHT W|TH
DON OGILVIE
Wednesday
ALL THAT JAZZ
Thursday
DAVE ROBERTS JASSBAND
Friday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Sal li r day
KANSAS CITY FIVE
Wed./7hurs. — FREE tor members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 872-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — $3.00   __
remember working away on the
paper one Thursday afternoon
when somebody came running into
the Ubyssey office and said: "You
better come upstairs. Something is
going on."
It turned out a band from San
Francisco had been hired by a campus group to provide music for a
noon-hour dance in Brock Hall — a
band with the unlikely name of The
Jefferson Airplane. They handed
out buttons that said: "The Jefferson Airplane Loves You," set up
more amplifying equipment than
any band anyone had ever seen, and
then began to play.
This was the pre-Grace Slick
Airplane, but it was still a
devastating experience. Nobody
even danced. We all just stood or
sat there, overcome by the amazing,
staggering, volume and quality of
sound. And we watched the old
hardwood floor come rippling
toward us from the amplifiers
across the room.
"That's the other side of this life,
I've been livin'. . .," the vocalist
was screaming into the microphone.
And it was a new side of life for us,
too.
Meanwhile, though, we still had a
paper to put out. At this time The
Ubyssey was printing 11,000 copies
three times a week (Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday), which made us
the sixth largest paper in B.C. And
by a vote of the editorial board in
the spring of 1965, 1 was named
editor-in-chief for 1965-66.
That summer, perhaps influenced
by a sense of the era, the national
Canadian Union of Students decided to come out in favor of the concept that everyone has a right to
higher education regardless of
financial status — universal accessibility, they called it.
One of the focal points of a national day of action they planned
was to be Vancouver, where various
officials of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of Canada
happened   to   have   planned   a
meeting that day at Bayshore Inn.
The Ubyssey swung behind the
idea of a march to the Bayshore to
show UBC's support for the CUS
program. That's how we looked to
the outside world, anyway, as with
editorials, news play, and the acid-
sharp pen of cartoonist Jeff Wall
we hammered away at popularizing
the idea that a university education
shouldn't be restricted to members
of a financially-privileged group.
A percentage of our journalistic
wrath was also directed at the
fumblings and bumblings of the
then-president of UBC, John Bar-
foot Macdonald.
Before long, we were in trouble
from many directions: factions of
the student government who
weren't all that keen on walking
down to the Bayshore, the UBC
president — who fulminated right
back at us in various speeches, and
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Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
Tuesda UBYSSEY 60|
Let us now praise famous men.
And some women. And ourselves.
By RALPH MAURER
Aside from its role as
campus bulletin board and gossip sheet,
The Ubyssey has from its beginning filled two
roles readers are less conscious of.
It has always, to varying degrees,
been a training ground for
would-be journalists, providing an
atmosphere simulating that
of a newspaper out in the real world.
It has also, at various times
in its 60-year history, been an exclusive club,
the way fraternities try to be,
and provided its members with an
Old Boys network they can fall back on
once away from UBC.
In the 1930s, the newspaper even had
reporter tryouts, on the basis of
which the den heavies would
decide whether or not you were good
enough for them.
If Canada's business community
and its spokesman, Maclean's editor
Peter Newman, have their way,
the most powerful, if not the most famous,
Ubyssey alumnus, John Turner,
will be prime minister of Canada.
But Hardial Bains, an early contributor to
Page Friday, will, as head of the small,
unpopular, but dogged and well-organized
Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-
Leninist), expend his efforts on
finding a way to prevent such an eventuality.
Ex-staffers dot the political spectrum
between the poles represented by Turner
and Bains. Pat Carney
is the Conservative Party's candidate
in the next federal election for
Vancouver Centre, where the Liberals are
vulnerable. Ray Perrault, government
leader in the senate,
is perhaps the most boring person
ever to last a year on the newspaper.
John Twigg, Dave Barrett's press
secretary until the 1975 provincial
election, and currently a Saskatchewan
government appointee; Milton Harrell, the
man who, as city licensing inspector,
was mayor Tom Campbell's right hand man
and implement during Campbell's
war with the Georgia Straight a decade ago;
and Ron Andrews, the North Vancouver
mayor and Social Crediter who died in 1977,
are all Ubysseyites.
The Ubyssey of the last dozen years or
Turner is touted
as a future
prime minister
so has tended toward a radical
(some say Commie-pinko) political
outlook, but it was not always thus.
The business community, those
cheering loudest for corporate lawyer
Turner's ascension, is dotted with
former staffers.
UBC chancellor J. V. Clyne,
an early sports editor, presided over
MacMillan-Bloedel during the years it
grew to be a forest giant. Former B.C. Hydro
boss Hugh Keenleyside is another
early staffer.
Roger Odium and Ralph Brown, business
managers during the 1920s,
' -^
Clynes directorship
made Mac Bio
a forest giant
went on to form the investment firm
Odium, Brown and T. B. Read.
One-time military editor C. P. Leckie
later headed  a major commercial  fishing
company bearing his name.
Law schools have always
been full of Ubyssey staffers who have
decided that journalism is no life
for them. Many of these
now get their names in the paper '
more frequently than most reporters do.
They include B.C. Supreme court chief
justice (and former chancellor) Nathan
Nemetz, and provincial court
judges Nick Mussallem and Les Bewley,
the, shall we say eccentric,
judge who displays his bile elsewhere
in this issue.
Donald Jabour, who interloped
on the Ubyssey in the fall of 1955,
received a lot of free advertising recently
when the B.C. Bar Association gave him hell
for advertising his practice. Roger
McAfee, the former Vancouver chief prosecutor and one of the architects
of a new constitution some Alma Mater
Society Old Boys are trying to foist
on students, was a Ubyssey editor
in 1961-62 and Canadian University Press
president the following year. He was
also student body president and
there are few people who will
bet that this ambitious man won't be
heard from again.
Of the Ubyssey hacks who made names for
themselves as writers, Pierre Berton,
who could start his own book-a-month
club, and Earle Birney, poet and frequent
subject of CanLit gossip, are the best-known.
Eric Nicol and Alan Morley both
wrote books on Vancouver.
Tom Wayman, working-class poet and
former Kenworth truck assembler, was
one of the most imaginative and
best Ubyssey editors ever.
Not surprisingly, the newspaper biz
is loaded with Ubyssey staffers.
Peter Worthington, here in the middle 1950s,
is currently in Dutch with the
federates because the newspaper
he is managing editor of,
the Toronto Sun, released some top secret
information last year which
the RCMP claims tipped off a USSR
spy ring that somebody was wise.
Andrew Snaddon, editor of the
Edmonton Journal, is working harder
than ever now that the Edmonton Sun, a
spinoff from Worthington's product,
is encroaching on the Journal's monopoly.
Meanwhile, the Vancouver Sun is fairly
riddled with Ubyssey alumni,
starting at the top with publisher Stuart
Keate. Assistant managing editor Alex
MacGillivray, assistant news editor Lionel
Salt, columnist and contributing editor
Allan Fotheringham, all got their
first experience at the Ubyssey.
Science writer Tim Padmore,
Ottawa correspondent Michael Valpy, and
business reporter and miser Mike Grenby
are current Sun writers who
have gained some measure of respectability.
Two important fixtures at the Sun in
its glory days in the 1960s and
early 1970s, former managing editor Bill
Gait, who died in 1974, and close friend
Jack Wasserman, who died last year,
were Ubyssey staffers.
Bewley s behavior
as provincial judge
gets him headlines
While on the Ubyssey Gait met
Ubyssey editor Marion Dundas, whom he
later married. Marion Dundas for
many years wrote the Sun's Penny Wise
column.
Another ex-Ubysseyer prominent in the
Sun's heirarchy until a few months
ago was editorial pages editor
Dave Ablett. Considered one of, the FP
newspaper chain's great white hopes,
Ablett abruptly left the Sun coincidental
with rumors that Keate would stay on as
publisher past his 65th birthday. Ablett was
appointed to the Privy Council
in Ottawa.
Worthington
released secret papers,
got in trouble
Some staffers made it as talking
heads. Norman Depoe, a conservative on
campus when it was more fashionable to be a
pinko, and Joe Schlesinger, his
Cherman accent stronger than it ever was,
are CBC television news reporters.
Others have made it behind the cameras.
Norm Klenman is one of the heavies
behind CKVU. Ron Haggart is executive
producer of CBC's Fifth Estate.
Keith Bradbury, former senior editor of
BCTV's News Hour, was last heard
of as backer of the aborted attempt
at a B.C. magazine, WestWord.
The  university  administration's  distrust
and even hatred for this
newspaper can be explained by the fact
that several former staffers are now on their
side, so they are wise to us.
Assistant arts dean Peter Remnant,
retired classics head Malcolm McGregor,
public relations men Jim Banham and Al
Hunter, financial aide officer Byron Hender
and theatre prof John Brockington, all
put in time on the Ubyssey.
Other well-known alumni include
Sadie Boyles, board of governors member
and writer of high school French texts who
now hates The Ubyssey, apparently
because it doesn't run stories about
homecoming queens anymore.
Bill Millerd, who briefly assisted on layout in
the early 1960s, is now artistic director
of the Arts Club Theatre.
Stan Persky, now a teacher at Northwest
Community College, ran against Clyne
in the chancellorship election earlier this year
and garnered 29 per cent of the vote,
a feat comparable to running a close second
as the opposition candidate in a
Brazilian election.
There have always been many women on
The Ubyssey's staff. Many held responsible
editorial positions, and some became
editors. Yet few have become famous.
We haven't come nearly as far as we're
often told we have, and
it's still a man's world. There are
few famous women, period.
Then as now, women were encouraged to
sacrifice their own ambitions for Hubby,
Wendy and Junior.
If they became famous, it's as Mrs. Fred
Somethingorother. Even those that lived
their own lives usually changed their names
and are difficult to keep track of.
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 13 'Tween classes
TODAY
MUSSOC
Auditions for Cabaret night, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB main lobby.
CSA
Sports night, 7:30 to 9 p.m., T-Bird gym A.
FtLMSOC
Production meeting for Annie Hall, noon, SUB
247.
SOUTH AFRICA WEEK COMMITTEE
Film on South Africa: A White Laager, noon,
SUB 207.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Don  Johnson speaks about his  South  Africa
travels with supper for $1-,  6 p.m.,   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
CREATIVE/CONTEMPORARY
DANCE WORKSHOP
Free   dance   workshop   open   to   all   with   experience, Tuesdays 5 to 6:30 p.m., Armory 208.
UNIVERSITIES LECTURE COMMITTEE
University of Massachusetts professor speaks on
Form  and  content  in  German  expressionism,
noon, Buch. 205.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i faith, noon,
SUB 113.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB main lobby.
SUB ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Meeting and election of chairman, noon, SUB
art gallery committee room.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
SOUTHERN AFRICA WEEK COMMITTEE
Studio 58 play called The Biko Inquest for $2, 8
p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC professor Mike Wallace speaks on False
Security: South Africa and the West, noon, SUB
207.
PSYCH CLUB
Guest  speaker  on   Psychology  Today,   noon,
Angus 110.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 200.
THURSDAY
FILMSOC
Production meeting and extras needed for trailer,
noon, SUB 247.
MUSSOC
Theatre make-up workshop, noon, SUB 115.
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB main lobby.
Judith Brocklehurst speaks on What is a Prisoner
of Conscience, noon, Buch. 106.
CSA
Social evening, 8 to 10 p.m., SUB 212.
Disco dance class, 6:30 to 8 p.m., SUB 212.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Dan Kaseji speaks on Kenya and its International
Relations, noon, Angus 104.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General  meeting and discussion,  noon,  SUB
212A.
SOUTHERN AFRICA WEEK COMMITTEE
Campus meeting of UBC organizations regarding
South Africa policy, noon, SUB 207.
GAY PEOPLE
Gay  Alliance  Towards  Equality  representative
will discuss Vancouver Sun legal battle, noon,
SUB 2211.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Discussion of current medieval life, noon, SUB
113.
FRIDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Form letters for prisoners of conscience, noon,
SUB mail lobby.
UBC HANG GLIDING
Slide show and meeting, noon, SUB 111.
GRADUATE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Annual   general   meeting,   noon,   Grad   Centre
Garden room.
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
STUDIES COMMITTEE
Nathan    Rosenberg    speaks   on    Marx   and
Technology, noon, Buch. 104.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
SUNDAY
CSA
Badminton   tournament  with   registration   this
week in SUB 235, 1 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
Hot flashes
H rock 'ii' roll
is just noise...
Charlie Brown's friend Schroeder
might celebrate Beethoven's birthday but UBC's music department
and three members of the Vancouver Symphony will mark the
150th anniversary of Franz
Schubert's death with a special performance.
The Schubert Commemorative
Concert will be held at 8   p.m. on
Oct. 24 in the Recital Hall at the
university.
Anthony Elliot, Paula Elliot and
Alex Nichol of the VSO will perform
in the concert.
Witch trials '78
The Ubyssey is holding a public
forum today at 7 p.m. in the student council chambers. All students
with gripes or suggestions for improvement in your newspaper are
welcome to attend.
U.B.C.
Gates
Hair Fashions
228-9345/
1613
4603-5 W. 10th Ave.
PUDLIC
228-6121
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FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
r\
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS           $1-25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
<
SPORTS CENTRE
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
JOAN JAMES
"A Charismatic Approach
to Inner Healing"
Thurs., Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre
Investigate an Outstanding
INVESTMENT TRAINING PROGRAM
with one of the largest
Insurance Companies in North America
Information Session on October 18
Henry Angus Building Room 326
12:30 ■ 1:30 p.m.
The Great-West Life Assurance Company
ROOFTOP PARKING
224-4912
HAIRWORLD
(W Oh AVE & SASAMAT
VANCOUVER
T*
RUNNING ON
EMPTY
From Oct. 24th to Oct. 27th the AMS will be
asking you for a $2 fee increase to continue
such valuable programs as Intramurals, Bus
Passes, Concerts, Ubyssey, and so on and
so on . .
WE'RE YOUR AMS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
CREATIVE Contemporary Dance Workshop, Tuesdays, 5-6:30 p.m., Armoury
208 upstairs. Free — open to anyone
interested in creative dance, improvis-
tion, composition and performance.
For information call, Marcia Snider,
224-0826.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. ExceUent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
Creative Clothes at
Reasonable Prices
3619 W. Broadway
(at Alma) 734-5015
11 — For Sale — Private
CLEAN 1966 Chevelle Wagon. $550. 283
motor, automatic trans., inspected.
263-3440 or 228-3039.
20 — Housing
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Double
rooms, $75 each per mo., singles $125-
$150 per mo.; kitchen facilities. Rent.
discounts possible. 2280 Wesbrook,
ph. 224-9679, Mike or Greg.
25 — Instruction
LEARN FRENCH in France. Get sure
results with total immersion method.
For info meet 12:30, Wednesday,
Buch. 319 or call 731-9966.    ,
30 — Jobs
JAPANESE-English, perfectly bilingual,
cultured person for occasional editorial assignments. Possibly leading to
part-time publishing work. Call Mr.
Lyndon, 733-4822.
DO SOMETHING with the Graduate
Students Association. No experience
required. By-election nominations
close Friday. For info call 228-3202.
DOWNTOWN Record Store requires
part-time help. Must have good knowledge of classical music. Reply Box
203, Ubyssey,  S.U.B.  241 K.
35 - Lost
LOST — Man's gold watch, in the area
of B lot. Engraved on back. Reward.
278-1908.
LOST — HP-21 CALCULATOR, Oct. 4,
CPSC 201. Call Gord, 224-3475.
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 after
6:00 pjn.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING — Correcting
IBM!  Selectric.   254-8365.
YELLOW PENCILCASE containing gold
engraved pen, about three weeks ago.
Sentimental  value.  Reward.   228-8866.
40 — Messages
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS is a fellowship of men and women who have
a common problem — overeating. Do
, you qualify? There is hope for you.
Meetings are every Tuesday at 7:30
p.m., West Point Grey United Church
Hall, Tolmie and 8th, near U.B.C.
gates.
65 — Scandals
GAY DISCO DANCE — AB women and
men welcome. October 6, Grad Centre, Garden Room, 9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.
$1.50  with  AMS   card,   $2.00   visitors.
THE    GRAD    SUDENTS   ASSOCIATION
just gave $1,000 to the Association of
Teaching Assistants. Find out why at
the G.S.A. Annual General Meeting,
Friday, 12:30, Grad Centre Garden
Room.
TOTAL    LACK   OF    RESPECT   for   the
law. That's "SMOKEY AND THE
BANDIT" this week at SUB.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST on campus,
dropoff, 70c per page. Essays, theses,
term papers, etc. Ph. 253-0336 after
5:00 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary, 224rl567.	
90 - Wanted
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY —We require
statistician and public relations person for 1978-79 season. If interested
please contact coach Bert Halliwell,
228-4196.  "Support the T-Birds".
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
^tf4^fjLsLTD|
1 ^ 4558 W 10th
.224-9112 or 224-5858.
^r=Jr=Jp=ir=nT=rr=Jp=Ji
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM	
:=lr=Jn=Jr=Ji=l
Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 IBYSSEY
Sweaty parties taught sex
From page 12
even the Vancouver Sun — whose
publisher was then'on the UBC
board of governors and who
therefore took a dim view of our
activities.
Eventually, the Sun even ran an
editorial to say that this year's
Ubyssey was the worst, ever.
But we kept on, careful to never
neglect the usual campus news and
bright reporting that keeps any
university paper lively and interesting. For my personal
newspaper idol is, as you might
have guessed, William Randolph
Hearst. Not for his politics, but for
his belief that a newspaper might as
well lead a few crusades openly,
since its effect anyway is to shape
public opinion.
Internally, though, we had
troubles. The strain of our campaign led to some political polarization on staff; there were a few
outright resignations. Through it
all, however, I had the steady and
very welcome support (along with
much-needed criticism) from my
tireless news editor Ron Riter (currently editor of the Vancouver
Sun's Leisure magazine) and my
no-less-tireless   associate   editor
George Reamsbottom (who is now
a public relations officer with the
NDP government in
Saskatchewan).
Finally, the Day came and 3,000
students duly marched through the
rain down Georgia Street to the
Bayshore with banners and black-
and-white buttons that read: We're
Concerned. It was hardly a militant
slogan, but it was taken fairly
seriously at the time.
The rest of my year as editor we
continued to try to lean on the
university president for various
policies of his we considered
misdirected. And we also attempted
to confront the AMS over the issue
of the plans for the new Student
Union Building. The details don't
matter now, but a little research had
shown us that an enormous railroad
was underway with regard to the
SUB, and the student body was as
usual being taken for a financial
ride (if I can continue my
metaphor).
You can judge for yourself the
results of our efforts to stop the
building of SUB by taking a close
look at what stands just east of the
Main Library on campus.
Not   that    1965-66   was   all
publishing and no play. Between
Christmas and New Year's more
than a dozen staffers attended the
annual Canadian University Press
conference in Calgary. It was
40-below, so most of us spent most
of our time holed up in our rooms
in the Highlander Motel — "A
Place Ye Canna Forget" as their
advertising quite rightly had it. The
liquor store was just across the
street; otherwise, it seemed impossible for anyone to survive in a
climate like that.
The Ubyssey that year as usual
won all the trophies then awarded
by CUP for general excellence, cartooning, editorials, sports coverage,
etc. Immediately following the
presentations, we all donned gaudy
yellow sweatshirts we had brought
along for the occasion. The
Ubyssey, they said on the front, in
our logo. And on the back:
Canada's Greatest. Who could
argue with us?
Day-to-day life on The Ubyssey
was always much more than a
newspaper experience, too. We used to refer to The Ubyssey as the
Campus' only co-ed fraternity —
because of the parties we had and
See page 17: BETTS
S»T0D\O  S8    p*e»ent*
THE BIKO INQUEST
\MEO.,OCT. 18   8-OOph
AODVTOISIUM
U.oo
SPOHSOREV UV:  LutliiAan Student Movement,   Lutheran Campui fUjtiitV!,
Co~opeiative ChHAj>tLan Campu.s  u,ini&tAij, Student
ClilyUtian Movement,  Southe.ln  \6nica Action Coatition,
Pan Afitican Union,  Canadian UniveiAity Se.ivicei Ovetieai
Dot represents
land occupied by
mining (.013%)
The dot
on the map
that's worth
billions to B.C
On a map of B.C., you'd have a hard time making out the area taken up by our
various mining operations ... because all of B.C.'s mines together account for
only .013% of our provincial land surface.
By way of comparison, provincial roads and highways take up roughly ten times
that amount of land, and saleable forest reserves occupy 20% of the land.
While mining is a relatively small speck on the map, it looms large in economic
terms. It is B.C.'s second largest industry ... and contributes abort a billion
dollars each year to the provincial economy. That total is made up of mining
payrolls, the purchase of materials and sen/ices, plus taxes and dividends. Each
year the mines of the Placer group ... Craigmont, Gibraltar and Endako ...
contribute more than $100 million by themselves.
They are part of an industry that may be the biggest little enterprise B.C. ever had!
ra
PLACER
DEVELOPMENT
LIMITED
STARTS THURS. oll„Tt   .
„_ SUB Theatre
| FfLSaLSun7:00*9:30 »I.UO
Note: two shows on Sunday)
eh
1000
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Aspects of Printmaking
The University Branch of the B.C. Teachers Credit
Union, located at 2150 Western Parkway, (in the
University Village) is extremely pleased to present this
exciting show of prints by outstanding Canadian artists,
October 17 - October 28 during credit union business
hours. All are welcome to attend.
Detail of etching by Marie-Anna Schmidt
This exhibition includes examples of etchings, screen-
prints, lithographs, monoprints, cast paper relief, prints,
a woodcut, photosilkscreen, photolithograph, photo-
etching and an acquatint relief. As well as attempting to
present this variety of techniques, the selection was
made with a view to representing a wide range of styles
from realism to abstraction. There is something for
everyone.
"Aspects of Printmaking" is the first art exhibition
organized by B.C. Central Credit Union. It has been
undertaken to ensure that art acquired by B.C. Central
remains accessible to the public.
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 15 It Sounds
Incredible
,»o,
./
®
BUT EVELYN WOOD GRADUATES CAN READ
JAWS IN 41 MINUTES
At That Speed, The 309 Pages Come Across
With More Impact Than The Movie.
In Living Blood, You Might Say.
You can do it. too. So far almost l.OOO.OOO people have done it.
People who have different jobs, different IQs. different interests,
different educations have completed the course. Our graduates are
people from all walks of life. These people have all taken a course
developed,by Evelyn Wood, a prominent educator. Practically all of
them at least tripled their reading speed with equal or better comprehension. Most have increased it even more.
Think for a moment what that means. All of them—even the
slowest — now read an average novel in less than two hours. They
read an entire issue of Time or Newsweek in 35 minutes. They don't
skip or skim. They read every word. They use no machines. Instead,
they let the material they're reading determine how fast they read.
And mark this well: they actually understand more, remember
more, and enjoy more than when they read slowly. That's right!
They understand more. They remember more. They enjoy more.
You can do the same thing—the place to learn more about it is at a
free speed reading lesson.
This is the same course President Kennedy,had his Joint Chiefs of
Staff take. The same one Senators and Congressmen have taken.
Come to a free Speed Reading Lesson and find out. It is free to
you and you will leave with a better understanding of why it works.
Plan to attend a free Speed Reading Lesson and learn that it is
possible to read 3-4-5 times faster, with  better comprehension.
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING-LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
50 to 100% on the spot!
Today & Tomorrow
5:30 p.m. or 8:00 p.m.
Student Union Building
Room 125
(NEXT TO CAFETERIA)
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 BYSSKV
Ritual hoax stories haunt rag
From page 10
1970 October crisis. A former student who became a university
benefactor after making large profits from war-related contracts was
put under scrutiny.
Since 1973, when students and
The Ubyssey cooled from the passions of the preceding five years,
news stories have dominated the
front pages and features are found
inside. But the basic political orientation and dedication to analysis of
the issues remain, although the
dedication to these ideals has varied
from year to year.
The traditions established since
The Ubyssey moved to SUB remain. Most important is staff
democracy. The Ubyssey operates
as a collective. Editing positions
continue, but all people, including
the editor, are totally and exclusively responsible to the staff.
The Ubyssey is a place for fun,
which often finds its way into print.
Year-end goon issues satirizing the
Provincial, Torts Illustrated, the
Rolling Clone, Scientific Armenian
and others have become a staple of
campus life. Staffers enjoy
manufacturing an annual hoax
story, which confuses students (and
the downtown media) who don't
look at the whole story. Several
radio stations carried the story of
Patty Hearst's visit to UBC (before
they found out it was fictitious),
and students believed for weeks that
the Bill Bennett Socreds had approved a mammoth housing
development for the elite on the
University Endowment Lands.
Betts found Sunshine
From page IS
because of the friendships we formed during the long days at the desks
and typewriters in Brock Hall and
the long nights down at the printers
proofreading and making sure
everything fit.
Which brings me to my photo
chief, Norm Betts. Betts, then a
gung-ho second lieutenant in the
campus ROTP (Reserve Officer
Training Program), used to enveigle
co-eds down to The Ubyssey
darkroom and get them to take off
their shirts for photographs. We
never ran those photos, but Betts
insisted (these were the days before
women's liberation) that every issue
have at least one amply-endowed
co-ed pictured doing something interesting like sitting on the grass.
If you go to Toronto today and
pick up a copy of the Toronto Sun,
you'll find in every issue a similar
photograph of a well-built young
woman. These are the infamous
Sunshine Girls, and chances are the
photo will be by the Sun's photo
editor, a man called Norm Betts.
Who says university doesn't
prepare you for life?
For me personally, there also remains the influence of the craft we
all practices — journalism. I
sometimes think I owe my decision
to pursue creative writing to never
having gotten over the excitement
of having my own newspaper to say
and do with almost anything I
wanted. I became a writer — a poet,
but one still committed to telling the
truth about the contemporary
world as clearly as I can.
Perhaps this ideal of journalism
is the most significant thing The
Ubyssey gave me . . . along with all
I learned, the madness, the tedium
and  the sense of accomplishment.
KORRES
^J'MOVING AND fc:
111 TRANSFER LTD. H
"STORAGE
Big or
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IN WINNIPEG, WE ARE INVOLVED IN DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND MANUFACTURE OF COMPUTER
PERIPHERALS. IF YOUR GOAL IS TO BE A PROFESSIONAL WHO CAN MEET THE CHALLENGES OF ADVANCING TECHNOLOGY, TAKE THE TIME NOW TO
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AND GET YOUR RESUME TOGETHER!
INTERVIEWS ARE SCHEDULED VIA PRE-SCREENING
ONLY.
Burroughs wTj
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BUSINESS MACHINES LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
One of the best stunts in this
paper's long history occurred in
February 1975. Staffers came across
copies of the engineer's Red Rag a
week before they were due to be
distributed. Within 48 hours, the
staff had produced a Maoist Red
Rag which was distributed two days
before the real Red Rag came out.
The Ubyssey rage was identical in
layout to the gears' rag, and its
maoist slant poked fun at the
engineers' sexist, racist and elitist
leanings.
Despondency reigned in the
engineering undergraduate society
office, and angry engineering reps
tried to get Ubyssey staffers to pay
for the stunt (how it was financed is
still a wonderful secret).
Although the traditions they
established survive in today's
Ubyssey, the golden agers of the
'60s might have cause to shiver if
they walked into the newsroom today. One of the city editors was
born in 1960.
A shot
the dark
:v;.'v^tttli
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UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
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•Central Data Systems Ltd. registered owner of certified mark
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17 bulletin #2 CAMPUS RECRUITMENT
PRE-SCREENING
Employers With UCPA Deadlines Oct. 18-Nov. 9
DEADLINE
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 20
Oct. 20
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
Oct. 24
Oct. 24
Oct. 24
Oct. 24
Oct, 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 26
Oct. 27
Oct. 27
Oct. 27
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 31
Nov. 1
Nov. 2
Nov. 2
NAME OF EMPLOYER
ONTARIO HYDRO
(CANCELLED TIL
JAN/79)
Oct. 20       STELCO
BANK OF MONTREAL
PANCANADIAN
PETROLEUM
MITEL
CORPORATION
ARTHUR
ANDERSEN & CO.
THORNE, RIDDELL
(VICTORIA)
PROCTER &
GAMBLE CELLULOSE
JARRETT,
GOOLD-ELLIOTT
WESTINGHOUSE
LIMITED
NORANDA MINES
LIMITED
HUDSON'S BAY
OIL & GAS
THORNE, RIDDELL
(VERNON)
PRICE WATERHOUSE
(VICTORIA)
COOK, BRYAN &
HUTTON
SASKATCHEWAN
MINING DIVISION
PETRO-CANADA
EXPLORATION
CANADIAN
INGERSOLL-RAND
BELL NORTHERN
RESEARCH
AMOCO CANADA
CHEVRON CANADA
LTD.
PLACER
DEVELOPMENTS
DILLINGHAM
CORPORATION
PNC EXPLORATION
CANADA
B.P. CANADA LTD.
FIBERGLAS
CANADA LTD.
HONEYWELL
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
CANADIAN
SUPERIOR OIL
IMPERIAL OIL
(ESSO)
SUN OIL CO.
Nov. 3
Nov. 6
Nov. 6 COMINCO LTD
NORCEN ENERGY
RESOURCES
CAMPUS
VISIT
Nov. 9, 10
Nov. 22, 23
Nov. 23, 24
Nov. 27,
28, 29
Nov. 9, 10
Nov. 6, 7,
8, 9
Nov. 20
Nov. 16, 17
Nov. 23, 24
Nov. 14
Nov. 8, 9
Nov. 14,
15, 16, 17
Nov. 10
Nov. 16
Nov. 17
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 22, 23
Nov. 27
Nov. 27,
28, 29
Nov. 15, 16
Nov. 23, 24
a 30 and
Dec. 1
Nov. 24
&29
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 27,
28,29
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 15
Nov. 22
Nov. 23
Nov. 30,
Dec. 1
Nov. 9        ALBERTA GAS
TRUNKLINE
Nov. 27, 28
Nov. 27
Nov. 20,
21, 22, 23
Nov. 24,
27, 28, 29
Nov. 30,
Dec. 1
-     BRIEFING
SESSION
Nov. 21 at
7:30 p.m.
H. Angus,
104
Oct. 27 at
8:30 a.m.
H. Angus,
110
Oct. 19 at
12:30 p.m.
CEME,
Rm. 1202
FACULTIES REQUIRED
ENG: Elect., Mech.
COMMERCE & ENG:
Mech., Elect., Civil,
Metall.
B.Com. Finance,
Acctg., B. A.
Economics
Engineering,
Computer Sc, (Bach.
& Mast. Geology El-
Geophysics)
Summer: ENG.
Elect. Eng., Acctg.,
M.B.A. (Resume &■
Transcript reqd.)
C.A. Students
C.A. Students
ENG: Chem., Mech.,
Elect, and M.B.A.'s
C.A. Students
ENG: Elect., Mech.
Chem. Engineering
*others were in by
Oct. 10th.
Engineering only
Pre-Screened
C.A. Students
C.A. Students
C.A. Students
Geology, Earch Sc,
Mining Eng., Home Ec, Dietetics
Engineering, Hon.
Geology,
Hon. Geophysics
ENG: Mech., Civil,
Chem.
Elect. Eng., Comp.
Sc, Solid State
Physics, (Special
arrang. Mast., Ph.D.)
Engineering only
Permanent: Geology,
Geol. Eng., (Bach. Ef
Mast. Geophysics)
Summer: 3rd Yr.
elig. for Mast.
Summer: Geology
&■ Geophysics
ENG: Civil (Const.),
Mech., Elect.
Summer: 3rd/4th
Yr. Geology El-
Geophysics
Permanent: ENG:
Mech., Chem., Geolog.;
Masters
in Geology/Physics.
Summer: Geology/
Physics
Mech. Engineering
Any grad interested
in sales
Permanent: All
degree levels in:
Engineering,
Commerce, Science
(Chem., Computer
Sc, Geology,
Geophysics, Math,
Physics)
Summer:
Engineering,
Humanities/Social
Sc, Physical Science,
Commerce
Geology Er
Geophysics
Mineral Geology
Permanent: ENG:
Chem., Mech., Elect.,
Civil, Mineral,
Metallurgical
COMMERCE:
Accounting, Finance.
Summer: 3rd Yr.
ENG: Chem., Mineral,
Metall.
ENG: Civil, Elect.,
Mech., Metall.
DIRECT SIGN-UP
Employers With Opening Dates Oct. 23-Nov. 14
OPENING
DATE
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
NAME OF EMPLOYER
LABATT BREWERIES
LTD.
ERNST Et ERNST
CLARKSON, GORDEN
(VANCOUVER)
HUDSON'S BAY OIL
ErGAS
CAMPUS
VISIT
Nov. 1, 2
Nov. 6, 7, 8,
9, 10
Nov. 6, 7,
8,9
Nov. 6
Oct. 23       TOUCHE, ROSS
Oct. 23       THORNE, RIDDELL
(VANCOUVER)
Oct. 23       TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
Oct. 23
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Oct. 30
Nov. 6
Nov. 6
Nov. 6
CLARKSON, GORDEN
(VICTORIA)
CANADA-CITIES
SERVICE LTD.
PRICE WATERHOUSE
(VANCOUVER)
FACTORY MUTUAL
ENGINEERING
GREAT WEST LIFE
LIFE
MACMILLAN BLOEDEL
LTD.
ELI LILLY CANADA LTD.
TORONTO-DOMINION
BANK (TORONTO)
AMOCO CANADA LTD.
FACULTIES REQUIRED
C.A. Students
C.A. Students
Geophysics only
Nov. 6, 7, C.A. Students
8,9
Nov. 6, 7, 8,       C.A. Students
9, 10 and 14
Nov. 7 Bach. & Mast.
Geophysics, Geography,
Physics, Math.,
Computer Science
C.A. Students
BRIEFING
SESSION
Nov. 10 at
12:30 p.m.
CEME, 1202
Nov. 7, 8
Nov. 10
Nov. 15,
16, 17
Nov. 14
Nov. 14, 15,
16, 17
Nov. 14, 15,
16, 17
Nov. 14 & 17
Nov. 14
Nov. 15,
16, 17
Geophysics, Geology,
Geophysical Eng.
C.A. Students
Bach. Er Mast, in:
Mech. & Chem.
Engineering
Any interested in
Pharmaceutical sales
M.B.A. students only
Hon. Math. & Hon.
Physics with Geology/
Geophy. Minor
Permanent &■ Summer
Oct. 18 at
12:30 p.m.
CEME, 1204
B.C. AUDITOR GENERAL       Nov. 27, 28
NATIONAL DEFENSE
HEADQUARTERS
DILLINGHAM
CORPORATION
ALCAN SMELTERS
Nov. 6 ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA
Nov. 6 AQUITAINE OF CANADA
Nov. 6 CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
Nov. 6        CANADA LIFE
ASSURANCE
Nov. 14      VANCOUVER POLICE
DEPT.
Nov. 14       LONDON LIFE INS.
Nov. 14      TORONTO-DOMINION
BANK (VANCOUVER)
Nov. 20,
21,22
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 20,
21, 22
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 20, 21
Nov. 23, 24
Nov. 23, 24
Nov. 29, 30
Nov. 27,
28,29
Nov. 27,
28,29
Any interested grads
Any interested grads
Any interested grads
Any interested grads
Bach. 8- Mast, in:
Commerce & Economics
Nov. 16 at
12:30 p.m.
Computer
Sc, 200
1. CHECK WITH THE CANADA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 214
BROCK HALL TO BE SURE YOU GET ALL THE LATEST
INFORMATION AS IT BECOMES AVAILABLE.
2. ALL FURTHER INFORMATION WILL BE PUBLICIZED
ONLY AT THE CANADA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE AND
BULLETIN BOARD IN THE S.U.B.
3 READ THE COMPANY LITERATURE AVAILABLE IN THE
CANADA EMPLOYMENT OFFICE PRIOR TO YOUR
SIGNING UP FOR AN INTERVIEW.
4     SUPPLY A PERMANENT FILE COPY OF THE UCPA FORM
'    TO THE CANADA EMPLOYMENT CENTRE, AND HAVE A
SEPARATE ONE FOR EACH COMPANY INTERVIEW.
I*
CANADA EMPLOYMENT
CENTRE   ON   CAMPUS
A NEW EXPANDED EMPLOYMENT SERVICE FOR STUDENTS
LOCATION: BROCK HALL, ROOM 214
HOURS; MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 - 4:30
Page 18
Fl
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978 IUBYSSEY 601
Politics gripped the campus
from page 6
University Branch 72 of the
Canadian Legion quickly became
the most powerful club on campus
and a column called Legionettes
was also found in The Ubyssey.
The end of the war also saw the
beginning of the great political
clubs battle. A January, 1946,
survey in The Ubyssey indicated
that almost 75 per cent of UBC
students were against a full-page of
political events in the student
newspaper.
The organization of political
clubs was dealt a bad blow in
February when students tried to
ban political parties from the
campus by a 1,558 to 611 margin.
It wasn't until October, 1947,
that the AMS reversed the move,
but soon afterwards accusations
and counter-accusations began to
fly over communist parties and
sympathisers at UBC and their
infiltration of the Canadian
Legion.
The pandemonium began after
AMS president Grant Livingstone
charged that an "insidious
Communist   minority  within   the
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
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688-2481
Don't miss
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^a  new   kind   of  musical/
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AXIS MIME THEATRE
AND
THE DUMP TRUCKS
[Till Oct. 21 at Spratt's Ark)
/(formerly David Y.H. Lui Theatre)(l
1036 Richards Street
Tickets: V.T.C. 683-3255
or at the door
SHOWTIMES:
8:30 p.m.
Sat. 7:00 p.m. & 9:00 p.m.
Wed. Matinee 2:00 p.m.
TREVOR
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campus branch of the Canadian
Legion is attempting to disrupt the
veteran's organization."
A list of newsmakers during the
1940s reads as a veritable Who's
Who of current Vancouver political
figures.
Bob Bonner won the McGoun
Cup for debating in 1941-42. The
Ubyssey also reported that he was
wounded while fighting in Italy.
Bonner is currently the chairman of
B.C. Hydro.
Former Vancouver mayor Tom
Campbell (alumni association
president), recent board of
governors appointee Alan Eyre
(War Aid Council chairman),
"candidate for mayor Bruce Yorke
(labor democrat leader in 1943
mock parliament), and sports
magnate Herb Cappozi (basketball
star) were among those who appeared in The Ubyssey.
From The Ubyssey staff came
late Vancouver Sun columnist Jack
Wasserman (sports editor),
Province columnist Eric Nicol
(author of The Mummery column)
and novelist Pierre Berton (city
editor).
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Vermilion blorgs of this tiny island
kingdom danced in the streets on
the umpteenth anniversary of the
day they exchanged their swords for
pens.
SCIENCE STUDENTS!
Worried about the Future?
Dr. MacDowell: "Is there a Future for
Science in Canada?"
WED. OCT. 18 — 12:30-1:30
Chem 225
Sponsored by the SUS
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/
Financial advice
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Bank of Montreal has a
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Our FirstBank™
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booklet is full of ideas
and advice to help you
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Drop into any
branch aiid ask for
your free copy of
our booklet.
Your Campus Branches
STUDENT UNION BUILDING    -    Stuart Clark, Manager 228-9021
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING - George Peirson, Manager 224-1361
Tuesday, October 17, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19 vjta
A $56 * value for only $46
* Based on 5 round trips per week
Pass Valid Oct. 15-Dec. 31   <77 d°vsm-*")
— Unlimited Travel, Good 7 Days a Wk —
— Good in Zone A & Common Zone —
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Available now until Oct. 27 in the AMS Business Office,
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Don't Delay! It takes time to process your Bus Pass application
- CASH OR CERTIFIED CHEQUE -
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WE'RE YOUR AMS
Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 17, 1978

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