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The Ubyssey Nov 10, 1972

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 DJs canned for 'slander'
By LINDA HOSSIE
Two CYVR disc jockeys were fired by UBC's
radio station Saturday for what music director Dave
Clemens called a "slanted slanderous show directed
against the Alma Mater Society executive."
Clemens, also CYVR's chief announcer, said
Thursday the two DJ's, Stuart Foster and Bob
Bakshi, were "ridiculously childish" in the way they
handled the broadcast.
"We tape a jock once or twice during the year
when he doesn't know it, so he can hear the tape and
find out his faults — just generally to improve his
style," Clemens said. "We taped these guys for two
weeks in a row and Saturday was the last straw."
CYVR president Dean Cooper said the tape was
quite good in some places, "but once you get onto
personalities you're in a totally different area."
The tape, played privately for The Ubyssey, included an insinuation that AMS president Doug
Aldridge was embezzling funds with treasurer Dave
Dick.
The tape also accused Aldridge and AMS vice-
president Gordon Blankstein of "urinating on the
soccer field" and getting together with Dick to form
a "a colony of queers".
The broadcast called the entire AMS "associated
mother fuckers."
"It's not an issue of good and bad taste as much as
it is an issue of slander," Clemens said.
Cooper said a lawsuit could close the station for
the rest of the year.
Said Blankstein: "We're very disappointed in the
people involved. They were very immature. I don't
think they understood what they were doing. They're
very liable for slander but we don't want to take
them to court. I would like an apology either over the
radio or in The Ubyssey."
He said it was important for the two DJ's to
realize what they've done.
If a public or personal apology is not made
Blankstein said he would consider suing for slander.
The suit would not involve the station as a whole
but only the people who were involved in the
broadcast.
Neither Foster nor Bakshi were available for
comment Thursday.
WS UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV. No. 17 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1972
48    228-2301
Students urge
loan changes
CLIFFS UNDER old Fort Camp area of UBC are succumbing to wave
and tidal action of the sea. Despite attempts to save the cliffs, erosion
—ed dubois photo
has removed earth up to the old fence. Only remnants of the fence
remain but a new one has been built nearby.
Poli sci grads seek undergrad support
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Graduate students in the political
science department have called for the
support of undergraduate students in
their effort to obtain improvements in
departmental structure.
Poli sci grad student Jack Millar said in
an interview Thursday the group does not
want to stir up trouble, but wants to improve conditions for future grad students.
Millar said the grads have scheduled a
Nov. 18 meeting at the graduate student
centre to discuss alternatives to current
problems.
"Undergraduates are definitely
welcome at the meeting," he said.
Grad students, at an earlier meeting
voted  to  boycott  student-faculty   com
mittees until something more democratic
could be established and indicated undergraduate support was not welcome.
Millar said he feels the issue of student-
faculty parity on committees is superficial.
He said one of the things he is most
concerned about is the lack of an intellectual community in the political
science department.
"At present there is no possibility of
discussing issues which are not described
in the specific courses," Millar said.
"For instance, the ecology question is
very important right now and political
scientists should be looking at the environment, something that is not now
being done.
"We are looking for ,a creative alternative which we hope will be supplementary to the department rather than
in conflict with it," he said.
Millar declined to speculate as to what
would emerge from the next grad student
meeting.
"Essentially, so far we have opted out
of existing structures and now we want to
find out where all this goes," he said.
He said he did not believe the opting out
would lead to a policy of confrontation.
"Confrontation has been tried since 1966
and it hasn't worked. We want to find
some meaningful alternatives.
"Grad students are not a monolithic
body and until we meet and find out what
kind of response we are getting we can't
plan anything," Millar said.
By BERTON WOODWARD
Wide-ranging changes in the
Canada Student Loans plan are
badly needed, the newly-
formed B.C. Association of
Student Unions says in a brief
to the federal government this
week.
The brief, prepared by UBC
Alma Mater Society treasurer
David Dick and Simon Fraser
University student society
president John Maffett, calls
parts of the plan "arbitrary
and irrational" and other parts
"inefficient  and  inhumane."
It also notes that no figures
have been produced backing
up government claims that
falsified forms made it
necessary to change former
loans regulations and suggests
that administering the new,
more stringent checking
system may be more costly
than losses incurred under the
old system.
The brief says "considerable
evidence" shows the new
regulations have resulted in a
decline in the number of applicants and in the amount of
(money disbursed, despite the
government's decision to raise
the maximum annual loan to
$1,400 from $1,000 which it says
"would seem to be an
acknowledgement of increased
need."
The brief recommends:
• The current verification
procedure under which applicants must present
photostats of personal
documents including their last
income tax return, or that of
their parents if they are
dependents, be dropped
because the system is
discriminatory, ineffectual
and an invasion of privacy. It
should be replaced by a "more
efficient and less costly
method, such as a well-
publicized program of spot
checking of selecting applications."
• The summer earnings
contribution table, a complex
system determining need
which the brief says
discourages legitimate appeals
permitted by the regulations,
be replaced by "a simple
question regarding the
financial resources of the
applicant."
It notes the B.C. government
has unilaterally adopted the
Alberta summer earnings
table as a more equitable
range for students here.
9 The repayment term be
extended by at least four years
because the overall maximum
amount to be loaned has
almost doubled while the
repayment period remains at
10 years.
See page 13: BRIEF Page 2
THE       UB.YSSEY
Friday, November  10,  1972
Muck
a consumer column
By VAUGHN PALMER
The centre for continuing
education's reading improvement
course is not subsidized one cent, says
Don Mosdale, reading education
director at the centre.
The Evelyn Wood reading dynamic
people are on campus this week
plugging their $195 course. The explanation they give for the $165 difference in cost between their course
and Mosdale's is: "Universities are
heavily subsidized whereas we are a
private organization."
Mosdale says the only help his
course receives from the university is
free space, "but we usually break
even."
The centre provides roughly the
same amount of lecture time as the
Reading Dynamics people, they pay
decent wages, neither course
provides   much    in    the  rway    of
materials, and both charge adults $30
extra.
Does building rent make up the
difference between the approximately $4,000 the Evelyn Wood
people collect for each 20 person class
and the approximately $800 the centre
collects for a class the same size?
* * *
If you've ever visited your prof's
office no doubt you've been impressed
by a ceiling to floor set of shelves
crammed with books.
One of the sources of these is
complimentary copies.
Why would textbook publishing
companies bother to give away copies
of their unprofitable textbooks to
insignificant professors?
Because university professors are
the number one textbook salesmen.
It is the professor who selects the
number of texts you must buy. He
chooses the editions and if he wants to
ask he can find out the price.
This is not to say the bookstore does
not screw up; but a large measure of
the cost students pay for texts is the
responsibility of the professor.
Economics 200 students buy
Economics, by Paul Samuelson and
A. D. Scott, which is frequently
revised, each time making obsolete
and unsaleable the previous edition
owned by last year's students.
Science students usually pay more
for single texts, but then they use
them more as well.
Arts students on the other hand are
familiar with having to buy several
expensive paperbacks which they use
for a few weeks then do not need
again.
Yet arts dean Doug Kenny
recently sent a memo from a faculty
committee     report,     suggesting
possible improvements in bookstore
service.
Bob Smith, assistant manager of
the bookstore, says that he feels the
store should not have to stock any
book which isn't absolutely necessary
to a student.
All other books on reading lists
should be available in the library on
two-hour or one-day loan. Yet how
many profs bother to stress this?
Smith says he believes standardization of editions, and insistence
that course reading lists remain
consistent for at least three years
should be applied. This would ensure
that all books would be resellable till
they wore out.
Yet in how many arts department
courses do the reading lists change
every year?
Improvements, Dean Kenny, begin
at home.
Quebec college students may strike
MONTREAL (CUPI) —
Quebec community college
students may strike this month
to protest repressive provincial laws against community
college students.
The issue is expected to be I
raised at a meeting of the
general assembly of the Front
Etudiant du Quebec scheduled
for Quebec City Friday to
Sunday.
The laws would result in
limiting CEGEP enrolments to
students who could afford it
without performing outside
employment during the school
term.
The Quebec government also
wants compulsory weekly
class time increased to 45
hours. It plans to reduce the
credit given to humanities and
philosophy classes from two to
one and increase the science
credit to two.
The time increase would
force students working to
finance their education to quit
their jobs. The move would
limit enrolment to middle-
class students.
The result would contradict
the original concept of the
CEGEP's which was to move
toward universal accessibility
to higher education. The
government now charges no
tuition fees to CEGEP students
which results in a solid
working class student
population.
Another government
proposal would give CEGEP
administrators the right to
exclude students they dislike.
The proposal comes from
, student strikes last spring
after the general strike by the
common front of labor unions
in Quebec.
The government wanted
students to make up the days
missed because of the common
front   strike   which   included
CEGEP teachers. Students at
the Rosembnt CEGEP in
Montreal walked out in protest
and the FEQ organized walkouts across the province. The
government backed down in
the face of organized student
opposition.
The FEQ was formed mainly
through the desires of CEGEP
students to have a provincial
organization capable of
fighting their provincial
battles. The Union Generale
Des Etudiants Du Quebec fell
apart in March, 1969 leaving
Quebec students without a
provincial organization.
The first FEQ national
congress was held in Trois
Rivieres in January, 1972.
After three days, delegates
decided to accept the concept
of regional representation
which means Quebec is divided
in regions for the purpose of
allocating front delegates.
The Front's supreme
power rests in the national
congress general assembly.
The General assembly
establishes the Front's
priorities and decides financial
matters. It meets only a few
times a year, so it delegates
some of its power to the comite
de co-ordination national
(national co-ordinating
committee).
The system of regional
representation rather than
representation by population
arises from the concept of
regional needs. The system is
designed to provide decentralized government and to
guarantee, respect and
recognize the automony of
each region of Quebec.
Quebec school's insistence on
regional representation led to
the Quebec delegates walkout
from the National Union of
Students founding conference
Psych ideas 'bunk'
Institutions for the criminally insane are nothing more than
prisons which administer inhumane punishment, author Dr.
Thomas Szasz said in an on-campus lecture Tuesday.
Insanity pleas in court cases are frequently the route into
such institutions, Szasz said.
Appearing as part of a speakers and education committee
series, the physician said an aquittal on the grounds of insanity
just leads to imprisonment anyway.
Szasz distinguished between two aspects of psychology:
concepts, words and theories and on the other hand social
policies.
Szasz called the theories "bunk". The idea of mental illness
came as an afterthought to the social policies like involuntary
committment in bedlam, Szasz said.
The social policies "are the inquisition."
"Calling someone mentally ill is like calling a TV broken,
because you don't like the program."
in Ottawa last weekend. Most
delegates opted for a modified
rep-by-pop formula.
The Front has defined itself
as "the grouping of Quebec
students which undertakes to
defend the political, social,
economic, cultural and
pedagogical rights of the
Quebec students as a social
class."
Both the acts of incorporation defining the
structures of the FEQ, and the
charter, defining its objectives, have been completed.
The acts of incorporation have
been approved and sent to the
provincial  government  for
rushant
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Joe Valachi told it alL.across the headlines
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R.W. McDONALD, B.C. Director 9:10
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KINGSY .i KNIGHT Theatre.   881   Granville   St.,   or  call
876-3045 688-2308. Friday, November  10,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Development no rip-off
SCENE: Lobby of Boughton, Street
and Co. waiting for an interview with
Bill Street. In walks a familiar figure.
As I sit struggling to remember
where I had seen the man before, u
minor commotion occurs. The law
firm's staff proceeds to greet Les
Peterson.
Peterson was employed with the firm
before he went into politics and became,
attorney-general in the Social Credit^
regime.
This interview with Bill Street Non-Partisan Assoc
iation mayorality candidate in the
election, is the second of a series
The development in I In- iIh-amIumii
core needs to coin enii.iii- mi ni.ikniL.'
the core live 24 h"Ui - j'l.i'. -i-.i-n il.r.-.
a week.
The quality of lilt- cm In- impm1.ed
with the False ( n-ek • it-\ I'lopint-ni mi
the north side and I'mieci l n I In-
south side.
We need a plan Im Hie de>. elopim-m
,        of thecoresucha-ihi-mn-.'.i-iur.\ h.ivt-
for the West En>l
I get a little up-H v.lii-npi-nplr v..ml
to spend thousands ni ■lnll.ir- in ^.iw ;i
tree that is found in U- in iln- w.r. .i^ .i
result of developiin-ni
We'll plant huri'ln-iKni Im-i-- Im iti.it
money but well do it .iiier ihe
development hat- I■*-■-■ i Iirii—li*-«I
A tree after all I■.■'— .< lile ~-p.ni inn   il
dies you know.
'.;./'•-"•', QUESTION:    The   presi-m   eit\    ad
ministration has i'i-ci-i\c(l criticism lor
its welfare administration policies.
What are your \ie\\s on this-;
ANSWER: All I know ;il...ul Ihe
-criticism is thai as :i n-^ull nl Ihe
.recent civic strike many Iriiuils wen-
uncovered. Is lh.ii v.lul \iiii .in-
referring to?
QUESTION: No. \\h:il I w.is concerned
with is the presenl administration's
discriminatory |><>lie\ toward single
men.
Dec. 13 civic
by Christine
I find municipal politics more
challenging because they are closer to
people than anything else. I have
continued to be active in city hall affairs because that turned out to be part,
of my professional work as a municipal
lawyer.
I have gained a good deal of
Knowledge and then suddenly was
pressed by people to let my name stand
lor mayor.
Hopefully I can give leadership and ^'ANSWER: Well mhi m-c ihe smule
jjoI people working together and ;; unemployed men -Aim ,m- emploMiUe
lierhaps even see some electoral V.believe that the\ are entitled in
reform that I proposed many years welfare, and thai iiw> are tint required
"go- : to seek jobs.
QUESTION: What are your views on QUESTION: Sun-I\ with the iinein-
Ihe third crossing and the whole ployment statistics heiiiu as hiuh ;is si\
problem of transportation planning or, , per cent you are not Mi^nrsiiim dial
lack of it in the city? , people can get jobs.
WSWER:   The   issue   of   the   third /'ANSWER: Yes 1 am suuuestmu lh.il an
irossing may not be dead but it cer- "able bodied man wlm v. .mis .i |nli can
■kiinly is in a pretty deep coma right"   get a job.
now. I don't believe that the problem of ".   Statistics don't interest me — howl
transport  will  be  an   issue   in   this  ."many of those unemployed are looking|
election. .'for jobs?
Ql ESTION: What are your views on"      I've been told that when people havel
Iraffic   control   in   the   downtown "< been offered jobs by Canada Manpower!
peninsula?
VNSWER: I don't think this is our
greatest problem or that it is even a
ureat problem. But it can become a
problem if it isn't dealt with.
they  have   turned  them   down   andl
threatened to see Aid. Harry Rankin il
-they   are   not   given   their   welfare!
' cheques.
/QUESTION:   How   about   the   ad-1
Planning has been going on at all ministration of the police department?!
levels, but I suggest that real leader- ..ANSWER: The police department isf
ship has been lacking. ,, .administered by  the  police  com
QUESTION: What are your views on  ^mission,   made   up   of   upstanding:
development in the downtown penin- ^citizens, doing a fine job.
sula and the West End? y QUESTION: Does that mean you agree
VNSWER:     Development    is    notgjwith the arming of the police force?
necessarily   good  just   for   developJjiANSWER: Yes, I agree with giving!
ment's sake. There are some people||them protective equipment.
who think that development can't beCf. i do have two minds about riot sticks, i!
(controlled — I think it can be. i^don't know that they help very much.;
You ve got to have development lfta They are however a defensive piece
Is   there   any   connection   between^you are going to have growth. Growth;*^ equipment. So is the pistol.
Social Credit and NPA, I ask myself asMcan be controlled to some extent byA  i (jon't believe in hassling young
I go in for the interview?       " |gestablishing densities. lifaeople and I do believe that they have
UBYSSEY: Why are you running fori'-    Development with  social  planning   r      ■      -   * -                — •   ■
mayor? t^such as that proposed in the recent
STREET: I am running for mayor tos-%report on the West End can be very!
be elected. fjonn*
QUESTION:  Yes we know that, but
what motivates you?
ANSWER:  I have  always  been  in-'
?uV5l°?™fnLwJ*h social^ planning|Jeen hassled from time to time. This is)
'   *ur city though, and we are bigger than)
terested in politics from the time I took
political science at UBC and engaged in
student politics on the campus.
I took law with the idea I would be,
involved in politics and I have been
involved in politics since the day I
graduated from university.
I have held both provincial and
federal offices. At one time I ran for
city council and was elected and served
two terms.
;good.
When elected I would make sure that]
"guide lines would be implemented)
before any further development oc"
curred in the West End.
I would not be in favor of freezing the
whole thing — some of it does fit within
the guidelines.
Development per se is not bad. I
don't agree with this new thought that
because a person is a developer he is a
rip off artist.
You've got to have development; if
development is stopped you are going
to end up with nothing.
lem so they should get in line.
QUESTION: It has often been said that
city hall is run by the bureaucrats. Do
you think there is any validity to that
md if so what would you do to remedy
'the situation?
ANSWER: What we have in Vancouver!
is an able and dedicated group of full'
time officials, and a city council which'
is part time.
The council is responsible for all the
decision making.
The council is hampered by the fact
that the aldermen are part time. This
makes them less efficient.
As the council becomes less efficient
the officials pickup the slack and you
lave bureaucracy.
This doesn't mean the city is im-
>roperly operated. As a matter of fact
it operates rather well despite the
system.
UESTION:   You've   talked   about
Irestructuring council. Could you ex-
land on that a little?
(ANSWER: I think there should be an
;nlarged council around 25-30 mem-
>ers.
They would meet from time to time
|to discuss the proposals. The day to day
jjwork should be done by a full-time
Executive committee elected from the
lembers of council.
They would be assigned to specific
:ommittees and work closely with the
lepartment heads. It would operate
mch like the present legislatures.
(UESTION: What are your thoughts
»n a ward system?
NSWER: I believe there should be
iroper area representation I'll be
talking about it during the campaign,
ind don't wish to comment on it now.
•UESTION: Do you see any conflict
rising out of the role you have played
in   representing   big   developers   on
ouncil and the role you would be
ilaying as mayor?
NSWER: Not in general, although
there might be specific instances of
:onf lict in which case I would withdraw
..from the chamber.
' QUESTION: Who do you consider to be
-your most credible opponent?
ANSWER: I believe the campaign is
going to be between Art Phillips and
myself.
Phillips is the incumbent, he's been
running for a very long time and is well
known. Page  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November  10, 1972
Slander
Two staffers have been fired from CYVR radio.
The way they were fireS is elitist and undemocratic.
And the reason they were fired is absurd.
The problems result from the structure of the radio
station.
CYVR has an executive and department heads and
people to report to and people to order around and so on.
In other words, a hierarchy.
This hierarchy leads to the top handing down
decisions on the functioning of the radio station.
The top is made up of a six-person voting executive.
The recipients of their decisions are the
approximately 60 CYVR staffers not on the executive.
The decision to fire the two staffers was made by a
few people at the top. The other 60 staffers were not given
a chance to express their opinions.
Apparently the CYVR executive hasn't heard of the
concept of regular staff meetings to give staffers a voice in
decision-making.
These meetings would allow problems such as the
alleged slanderous broadcast to be discussed and, if
necessary, corrected by the entire staff rather than by just
a few executives.
We also don't think that slander is a very good
excuse for firing someone. There's nothing wrong with a
bit of slander now and then.
The only problem is we already know AMS heavy
Joe Wazz blows toads or licks dicks or both.
Therefore we request the slander be done with style.
It might even clear the muzak from the
canyons/windmills/smoke rings/blowholes of our minds.
1
♦.THIS  ISTH6 MeW£..."
Letters
Neither peace nor war
A letter to The Ubyssey re coverage of the political
science grad student meeting of Nov 1, 1972.
The graduate students in the political science
department did, in fact, have a meeting on Wednesday,
Nov. 1. The coverage in last Friday's Ubyssey is correct up
to this point. Thereafter, however, the reporting on the
front and editorial pages leaves much to be desired. As a
preliminary step in dispelling a number of inaccuracies, a
copy of the minutes from the meeting is submitted for
prin t.
Additionally three major points need clarification.
First, the action taken in the meeting was not designed to
"force the issue" of "student representation in department meetings," nor was it designed to "force
profs... to show their true colors." The decision to
withdraw from participation in committees was, rather, a
recognition of (1) the token role of grad students in the
departmental power structure, (2) the likely persistence of
this state of affairs due to faculty intransigence and
(3) the futility of expending time and energy in a battle
which has been waged annually since 1966.
There was widespread feeling that our energies could
be used more positively elsewhere. In recognizing that the
political science department leaves much to be desired in
terms of an intellectual community, people felt that the
establishment of some sort of forum or community
among students would be a worthwhile endeavour. This is
the purpose of the envisaged academic-social seminars.
The second major point of error in The Ubyssey
concerns    the   "boycott"    of   faculty-graduate    social
THE UBYSSEY
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
writer and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in
room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305;
advertising, 228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
The shorter the better, screamed Jan O'Brien and Mike
Sasges as the poet was quelched at the ink pot. Did someone say
pot, asked Berton Woodward and Sandy Kass who appeared
from no where. Where, John Andersen and Forrest Nelson
queried. Who's queer, Vaughn Palmer and Steve Brown wanted
to know. Linda Hossie and Christine Krawczyk couldn't tell
them, so they appealed to Davids Schmidt and Mars for help.
Help, yelled Gary Coull, Kini McDonald and Ed Dubois. Kent
Spencer needed it, though, because he forgot the jocks and th
list was suspended. No classes Monday, so next press day i
^Tuesday.
occasions. No such decision was taken in the meeting,
although there was much discussion to this point. It was
mentioned that one should be aware that there is little to
be gained in terms of "bridge-building" at these social
functions, and that one should not expect great things
from them. Also the term "boycott" implies a tactic used
to gain something. This is misleading since we have
effectively opted out of any struggle for "goods" which
the department is able to dispense. Our desire is centred
around the goal of an intellectual community of
scholars — something unavailable within the department
of political science at UBC.
The last point to be made is in regard to The
Ubyssey's totally inaccurate portrayal of the position of
undergraduate students. In setting up the proposed
academic-social seminars it was felt that the grad students
would have to take the initiative. In no way was it ever
suggested that undergraduate participation would be
precluded or discouraged. However, it is exceedingly
difficult to interest people in something that as yet does
not exist. After the initial structures are established mass
participation will not only be encouraged but actively
sought. Indeed, such is already occurring. In short, the
charges of "elitism" levelled against the political science
graduate students in last Friday's editorial are sadly
misdirected.
It is unfortunate that so much Ubyssey space was
used for so little purpose because of cavalier and
unresearched reporting.
What follows is the minutes of the Nov. 1 political
science graduate students meeting:
MOVED: Whereas we consider participation on the
development and liason committees meaningless when
divorced from participation in the actual decision-making
structures of the department, and whereas we therefore
are not department members, we resolve that graduate
students withdraw from all joint committees until such
time as voting representation in the faculty meeting is
attained.
The motion passed unanimously.
It was felt that there was a strong need for a sense of
community among students. It was agreed that we, as
graduate students, should begin working towards such an
end by promoting intellectual/social interaction amongst
ourselves. The first get-together is tentatively planned for
Saturday, Nov. 11. It was suggested that a seminar
entitled "Politics of Everyday Life in the department" be
held in the afternoon, followed by a social function in the
evening. All spouses, children, girl friends and boy friends
are invited to both the seminar and the party.
Allan Robbins will be looking after facilities and
refreshments. Bill Moul will generate a reading list for the
seminar. All suggestions for this and future seminars
should be communicated to Bill.
All those interested in helping prepare a brief to the
provincial   government   regarding   the  Universities  Act
should see Allan Robbins.
Signed:
Jack Millar, Jim Hancey, Jaya Saravanamuttu, Jeremy
Wilson, Herman Bakvis, Chas. Kupperman, Rob Stevens,
Wolfgang Langenbacher, Art Katena, Don Lawrence,
Larry Waters, Carley Zitko, Bill Moul, David Winterford.
The points raised in the second paragraph of your
letter were covered in the story. It seems a contradiction
to say that the action was not designed to "force the
issue" when the motion (which was not circulated in the
department until after the Ubyssey account appeared)
contains the phrase "until such time as voting
representation will be attained." There was a considerable
amount of discussion about the effect of the decision to
withdraw from committees, and it was felt that if nothing
else the fiction of student participation was being
repudiated. Implicitly, faculty members sympathetic to
the cause of students who have been able to ease their
consciences through the existence of token committee
participation would no longer be able to rationalize in this
way. This was a point of some discussion although it did
not - and our story didn't say it did — form part of the
motion passed.
As far as the decision to boycott social occasions was
concered, our story reads: "The students at Wednesday's
meeting called on all graduate students to stop attending
faculty-sponsored social occasions ..." We didn't say it
formed part of a motion. However there was unanimity
on this point, as a question of personal preference, among
the students at the meeting, and the desire was expressed
that those not present would follow their lead and not
attend these functions.
On the question of undergrads, a specific proposal to
invite them to the proposed seminars was made and
rejected, although not by a formal vote. Three students
voiced opinions in favor of this proposal. Our story
quoted accurately the position agreed upon: "that 'at
least for the first three sessions' the seminars should be
open to graduate students only" and went on to say the
hope was that undergraduates would eventually participate. Meanwhile, some historical inaccuracies in the
story have come to light and The Ubyssey takes this
opportunity to correct them. The department has had
student representation on committees for only slightly
more than a year and was not one of the first to grant
students representation. In addition, the story implied
that since the demand for parity was not raised at the
meeting, it has never been raised by students in political
science. Student parity in departmental meetings has in
fact been one of their demands in previous years.
Finally, since there was no intention of anonymity in
the fact that the article was unsigned, and to dispel the
uncertainty and hopefully some of the bad feeling which
has arisen in the department, this reply is signed by the
writer. -
Paul Knox SLIPPERY LUNCH ol live goldfish slides down throat of aggie Doug Bernon, left, a
water. Similar idiocy will continue this week as aggies extol virtues of dung and hay.
By TOM STAFFORD
There are at least two rather
mysterious problems unfolding in
professor Edro Signori's
psychology department currently.
One is that Mike Humphreys
and Carol Marx, both junior
faculty in psych, are being fired
and many members of the
department are puzzled about the
reasons for their dismissal.
And two is that students are
not sure that acting department
head Signori believes that students
exist. Unsurprisingly, the two
problems are not unrelated.
Behind these somewhat
lighthearted hints of trouble
brewing in psychology there is a
record of serious student
discontent with the department
and unmistakable signs that psych
students are joining other grads
and undergrads in a fight to
change the university that has, in
the 71-72 term, centred around
what many students caU "the
anti-democratic and ^arbitrary
power of administrators and
senior-faculty." The scuffles, to
date, have largely been confined
within the boundaries of
departments (principally
anthropology-sociology and
English) in dean Doug Kenny's
troubled faculty of arts.
The reason students are
wondering about Signori's
psychological perception of their
existence is that they've sent him
three letters over a three-month
period and have yet to receive a
reply-
On Nov. 23, in a letter to
Signori, Ron Spence, co-chairman
of    the    psychology    graduate
Psychology
of an angry
department
:olleague Rick Bossley procures second course from
university stationery. (Wills used
the same harassment technique
against anthrosoc students
organizing in the Speier-Silvers
tenure dispute - a three-month
student-led fight thai resulted in
the department repudiating the
position of anthrosoc head Cyril
Belshaw when they voted, two
weeks ago; 30-8 in favor of Kenny
returning the cases to them for
full reconsideration. Anthrosoc,
by the way, is still waiting for
Kenny's decision.)
Signori's feudal indifference to
the wishes of psych students
extends beyond the unanswered
letters. In fact, student grievances
go far deeper than a squabble over
the Humphreys-Marx affair.
In
student association, informed the
head that "the matter of the
failure to renew the contract! of
Humphreys and Marx" was
discussed by students. The psych
students suggested that
inconsistencies existed in the
evaluation of Humphreys and
Marx and called the decision to
dump them "premature" md
urged reconsideration.
Psych students announced the
appointment of Bob Schwartz and
Maurice Shapiro to a committee
to investigate the Humphreys-
Marx puzzle.
The probe committee sent out
■ questionnaire to faculty, aid
though it received few replies -
not a surprise in a department
that considers it a breach of
protocol for students to want to
know why their teachers are being
fired — enough information was
gathered to warrant meeting! in
early December.
On   Dec.   7,   Spence   wiote
Signori again. From the
preliminary report of Schwartz
and Shapiro, "inconsistencies in
the consideration of Humphreys
and Marx for contract renewal
became very obvious. Because of
this, the graduate student
association unanimously agreed
that you should reopen the
cases."
Spence sent copies of his letter
to Signori to arts dean Kenny and
all psych faculty. Again, there was
no reply.
Spence wrote Signori again on
Jan. 3. "Since it seems
incredulous to me that you would
choose to ignore such a matter, 1
can only assume that you have
misplaced the letter," Spence told
his Kafkaesque head, perhaps
somewhat tongue-in-cheek.
Spence urged Signori to meet him,
and again sent a copy of his letter
to Kenny. Again, Signori refused
to respond.
However, Spence did hear from
the almost equally remote office
of Kenny (who, by the way, was
head of the psych department
before becoming dean).
Assistant dean Robert Wills,
Kenny's errand boy, warned
Dsvch    students    not    to    use
August, 1971, psych
students called for the removal of
Signori - "whose concern for
graduate education is perceived by
us to be non-existent and whose
decisions on related matters are
seen as antithetical to meaningful
education processes."
They saw Signori's departure as
the first necessary step in
remedying a grad program they
considered abysmal.
In their petition to the
department's advisory committee,
they said, "It remains
incomprehensible to us that a man
who does not have the confidence
of even a sizeable minority of,
graduate students and faculty
should remain in a position of
authority over them."
A series of proposals about
departmental decision-making,
curriculum and student funding
put forth by grad students Ron
Douglas and Schwartz received
little more than bureaucratic
runa round from Signori in his last
official acknowledgement of
student existence, a memo in late
August.
An open letter front grad
student Dave Patterson, publicly
7
H
u
8
y
s
s
s
y
Vol. UH, No. 31
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
TUBDAY,
JANUARY IB, 1972
^9&°" 22B-2UI
Page
Friday
The
Alternate
Press
posted Aug. 26, 1971, is the most
explicit account of the underlying
causes of student anger.
In a litany of grievances,
Patterson said:
"I have seen a core program
that in no way related to the
needs and interests of the
individual students it was
supposed to serve.
"1 have seen a group ol
Students and faculty work long
hours on curriculum and student
evaluation proposals. But it is now
a year later and nothing ha;
changed.
"I have seen a woman faculty
member who I have grown to love
and respect enter this depart men!
and within one year present one
See pate 2:    APATHY ,
page 2
iw**t       OUR SCHOOLS ARE HOTBEDS' OF
DISCRIMINATION
Autob
v
^George Films
Art-reality tension conies to SUB
If you are at all serious
about film don't miss SUB's
presentation of Performance
this weekend. It is a powerful
cinematic tour de force that is
fast becoming a classic. The
writer/director team of
Donald Cammell and Nicolas
Roeg (who later did
Walkabout), don't pull any
punches. The film is tough,
erotic, compelling and
frightening. Their exploitation of cinematic
techniques, especially their
innovative use of montage, is
brilliant.
Mick Jagger plays Turner,
an artist/musician who is in
self-imposed hiding from the
world in a large sensuously
appointed house in a black
London neighborhood. Anita
Pallenburg and Michele
Breton live with  him,   and
Performance. Directed
by Donald Cammell and
Nicholas Roeg, written
by Donald Cammell.
Starring James Fox and
Mike Jagger. At the SUB
auditorium this weekend.
together they form a society
that is decadent and insular,
but complete. The outside
world intrudes in the form of
Chad (James Fox), a vicious
gangster who is hiding from
the mob.
But the plot is incidental.
The core of the film is that
both Turner and Chad are
performers in their own
spheres who are deprived of
their audiences. So when
Chad arrives at the house,
they start to play to each
other using the two women as
intermediaries. Tension
builds between them until
they identify with the other's
performance and become
alter egos. Neither art
(Turner) nor reality (Chad)
triumphs, but both are
enlightened.
Scenes and images in the
film are juxtaposed
thematically and symbolically. Shot is related to
shot in a pattern that accents
essence and disregards time,
space and plot. The product is
a structure which escapes
from conventional linear
form. Performance is an
organic whole in which each
sequence echoes the entire
film, and the entire film
enhances each sequence. It's
a mind-blower.
*   *   *
Entertainment
"This profession isn't about
anything anymore," Hickey
tells Boggs. But in the
meantime they are broke. So
when the possibility of $25,000
reward pops up in their latest
case, they follow it. The trail
Hickey and Boggs.
Directed by Robert Culp,
written by Walter Hill.
Starring Robert Culp and
Bill Cosby. At the Odeon.
leads them on a violent safari
through the wilds of the Los
Angeles underworld. The trip
ROBERT CULP
. . . takes unsteady aim
is fast, exciting and entertaining. Hickey and Boggs
is one of the best private
detective movies in some
time.
The    plot    has    all    the
ingredients. A tough Chicano
Cinematheque has more
For those who aren't fully satiated by
Cinema 16 presentations — if you crave entertainment other than James Bond movies —
Pacific Cinematheque has a whole series of
fine new films. Showings are at 7 and 9 p.m.,
at 1155 West Georgia; cost is $1.
Next Thursday the theme will be Fantasy
and Comedy; Nov. 23, Drama and
Documentary. There are also regular
showings Wednesday and Friday nights,
showing contemporary French cinema and
international films. For the complete listing
see the November issue of Vanguard, the art
gallery's magazine.
Watch the Vancouver Art Gallery for
unexpected, ergo interesting, happenings. A
collection of recent Canadian films was shown
last weekend, complete with lecture by Anne
Michelson, New York art critic and professor
at New York University. Form and structure
in recent film was seen through the work of
Hollis Frampton, Ernie Gehr, George Lan-
dow, David Rimmer, Michael Snow and Joyce
Wieland. Although it wasn't what you could
classify under light entertainment, it was
interesting to watch audience reaction.
Joyce Weiland's La Raison Avant La
Passion, which Film Culture's P. A. Sitney
called "a lyric vision tempered by an
aggressive form and a visionary patriotism,"
was for me excruciatingly boring. Although
this may lead into a prolonged discussion of
the aesthetics of boredom, I'd just like to
suggest that with a little technical skill and a
lot of cutting it could be used in the Mannix
series.
But if you are really interested in seeing
excellent cheap films, try Pacific
Cinematheque.
Katrina von Flotow
woman attempts to sell
$400,000 in hot bank loot to a
money fence. A slick crime
syndicate claims the money,
and sends out some
"soldiers" to retrieve it.
Hickey and Boggs think they
are on a routine missing-
persons case, but discover
otherwise when they find a
body and hear about the
reward. The cops get interested after the first
casualty, and from then on
their prime concern seems to
be keeping Hickey and Boggs
from their (just) reward.
Hickey (Bill Cosby) and
Boggs (Robert Culp) are not
admirable guys. They are as
run-down as their profession.
Boggs wields a huge .45 , but
complains, "I've gotta get a
bigger gun. I can't hit
anything." Indeed he can't.
And neither is he or his
partner capable of inspired
detective work. They stumble
along gamely, missing
several breaks that sharper
detectives (in slicker movies)
would pick up. It's lucky that
they aren't killed halfway
through.
Obviously none of this is
original. It is the kind of film
that is totally up to the
director to make or break.
Robert Culp, in his directing
debut, does an excellent job
with his material. His filming
is sensitive, intelligent, and
skillful. He develops a sharp
picture of urban despair:
used car lots, chili-dog
stands, bottomless bars and
anonymous street corners.
The affluent organized
criminals seem to be the only
people who have any comfort
or security in a desperate,
meaningless society.
But Culp does not labor any
of this. He doesn't make the
mistake of trying to stretch a
B grade story to create
sociological or philosophical
significance. Hickey and
Boggs is just a detective
movie; but it's a damn good
one.
*   *   *
Westerns
Burt Lancaster's screen
presence continues to be
impressive in Ulzana's Raid,
but it is largely wasted. An
Apache leader breaks out of a
reservation and sets about
killing, burning and raping. A
rookie cavalry officer played
ATTENTION ALL SWINGERS. . .
ROCK — RAP — REFRESHMENTS
TURN ON TO THE VIBES OF
THE FISHERMEN'S UNION
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16
7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
Information: 733-7067
Donation Sponsored by Charismatic Campus Ministry
ABRAXAS
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags • batik
l pottery • jewellery • macrame)
stained glass • candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon- Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri 'til 9:00
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Phones:
684-6910
684-4611
by Bruce Davison. [The
Strawberry Statement] leads
a company and two scouts
(Lancaster and an Apache) to
track down the murderin'
redskins. This is a classic
Western plot that has great
possibilities, but director
Robert Aldrich does a sloppy
Ulzana's Raid Directed
by Robert Aldrich.
Written by Alan Sharp.
Starring Burt Lancaster
and Bruce Davison.
job. The film does only a
haphazard job of developing
the relationships between the
two scouts and the officer.
It depends heavily for its
"appeal" on gory scenes of
explicity shown Apache
savagery. The Indians are
seen as inhuman members of
a brutal culture that must be
changed or wiped out. Even if
we do not expect social
significance from a Western,
we should not tolerate such a
grossly inappropriate portrayal.
—David MacKinlay
Alternate
Press
Alvin Balkind has some pressing business from next Wednesday to Dec. 2.
Alvin is the curator of UBC's
fine arts gallery, in the north
basement of the library, and
what's occupying his attention is
an exhibition entitled Alternate
Press.
"The aim of this exhibition is
to look at recent developments
in Canadian publishing both in
news services and books to
discover where and how such
activities are a productive
critique and act in constructive
opposition to the prevailing
order of things," says a gallery
press release.
The show includes not only
examples of such newspapers as
Georgia Straight, the Grape and
The Ubyssey, but the following
poetry-fiction publishing houses:
New Star Books, Intermedia
Press, Blewointment Press,
Talonbooks, and Toronto's
Coach House Press. The
Industrial Workers of the
World's Mother Earth Press, a
political group, is also
represented.
In conjunction with the
exhibition, a panel discussion on
The Publishing of Politics and
the Politics of Publishing will be
held at noon Nov. 23 in SUB
212, featuring people who have
been working in the alternate
press recently.
The exhibition opens next
Tuesday from 8 to 10 p.m. At
the same time, the gallery is
showing the results of a recent
effort by the fine arts
department to establish a study
collection of art at UBC.
*    *    *
Also in the world of art, if
you can make it up the hill to
SFU, is Venezuelan artist
Domingo Alvarez's Infinite
Images, described as "an
environmental corridor
constructed with wood, glass,
miror, mirropane and
spotlights". It runs to Nov.  17.
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 10, 1972 Books
Collapse of the community
So far away,
Doesn't anybody stay in
one  place   anymore?
. . . Travelling     around
sure gets   me down and
lonely,
Nothine    else    to    do
but lose my mind,
I sure hope the road
don't come to own me.
Vance Packard, in this
book of popular sociology,
pinpoints Carole King's hit
song as just one of the many
A  Nation   of   Strangers,
Vance Packard. [David
McKay Company, 1972,
$9.25]
popular tunes, which give
expression to the feeling
many people have that too
many of us are moving too
much. A Nation of Strangers
is about the virtues of
staying in one place.
Although Packard is
mainly concerned with
America as a nation of
strangers, he sees the
problem as not confined to
his own country. Mobility,
he claims, is increasing in
the rest of the world,
especially in Europe.
"The surging of people
across borders has not been
matched since the convulsion of the Second World
War."
If we doubt that B.C. is a
"high-mobile" area we have
only to consider the turnover of people in our neighborhood or in our home
town, or consider how many
times we or our families
have moved. In fact, B.C.
has been compared with
California and Florida as a
place of high population
instability.
The issues raised in A
Nation of Strangers are of
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Architectural chaos reflects non-community where only the trees have roots
perennial interest. Socrates,
for instance, was completely devoted to his city
Athens. In Crito he agrees
with the accusers that he
hypothesizes might rightly
call him to account for
leaving his city to avoid
death:
You never went out of
the city to a holy
festival, or anywhere
else at all, except
sometimes on campaign; you never made
any other journey
abroad like other
people; you had no
desire to see other cities
or to know other laws,
but we and our city were
enough   for   you:    so
completely you chose us
and agreed to live as a
citizen   under   us,   and
indeed get your family
in  the  city,   which  obviously pleased you.
How many of usr would
view death in Vancouver as
preferable to banishment to
Calgary?
George   Steiner,   a   contemporary   literary   and
cultural   critic,   takes   a
radically different view of
the matter:
Even if it be against his
harried       will,       his
weariness, the Jew — or
some Jews, at least —
may have an exemplary
role.    To    show    that
whereas    trees    have
roots,    men   have   legs
and   are   each   other's
guests. If the potential
of civilization is not to
be destroyed, we shall
have  to   develop   more
complex,       more
provisional       loyalties.
Steiner is writing not just
about       the       enforced
rootlessness of many Jews.
(A similar case in point is
the expulsion of the Asians
from    Uganda.)    He    is
promoting    rootlessness,
with     its     concomitant
Films
Upper class
depravity
"Behavior which would be
called madness in a
tradesman is considered
mild eccentricity in a lord,"
says Peter 0'Toole as the
14th Earl of Gurney. This
line sums up the theme'of
The Ruling Class and gets
right to the social and
political ideologies that lace
this film together. But that's
The Ruling Class, Staring Peter O'Toole,
Alastair Sim, Arthur
Lowe, written'by Peter
Barnes, directed by
Peter Medak. At the
Fine Arts.
only partly what it's about
and it almost defies
categorization. It's kind of a
comedy - farce - psycho -
terror - drama.
Director Peter Medak
(Joe Egg) pilots this movie
from extreme to extreme,
plumbing the depths of
upper-class depravity and
dancing like a vaudeville
hoofer along the fine line
between  mad   (zany)   and
mad (psychotic).
We're in The Land of Hope
and Glory and the British
nobility are blooming with
decadent power. The 13th
Earl goes out in a blaze of
nocturnal doings befitting
the weirdness of his family.
His son and heir is the
flower-child Jesus-freak
Jack (O'Toole) who seems
to have gone bonkers after
the rigors of Eton. Naturally
wanting to better himself,
he takes the next step up
from the upper class and
fixes on the delusion that he
is God ("just call me J.C.").
Jack is a harmless,
lovable nut and when he's
not clinging to his lifersized
cross in the drawing room,
he's spouting love and peace
and blessing everything in
sight. His logic makes
sense: "How do you know
your are God?" asks his
aunt. "It's simple," he
answers. "When I pray to
O'TOOLE
... just call him J.C.
God I find I'm talking to
myself."
All is fun and jollity until
the family's intervention
produces a doctor whose
cure for Jack turns him into
the model lord on the outside
while within he has become
a cunning, maniacal killer.
That sounds like a mixing of
moods and that's just what
we get.
The situation arises
wherein the audience is
seduced into the bliss of
comedy and then is faced
with violence and murder.
It's an unorthodox handling
and a mite clumsy but it's
not a bad thing. If you are
not too upset by the
deception or too sensitive to
the jolt of the abrupt shift,
it's a good device. The main
fault is that it's like cutting
twigs with a broadaxe — the
idea doesn't need that much
strength.
. O'Toole plays both Jacks
with his usual skill but his
work here won't make us
forget his roles in Lawrence
of Arabia and The Lion in
Winter. The part is too indulgent towards him and
needs (as does the whole
movie) some bold attention
from the cutting room.
The film has lots of excesses and it bounces your
feelings around. It also may
deeply upset you for what
appears fairly weak reasons
(the British upper class
can't be all that wicked).
But despite these faults and
a few scenes that bomb, it's
overall a highly entertaining
movie. A more timid approach probably would have
made it wilt on the screen.
Those Brits may live on
"a fly-blown speck in the
North Sea", but they still
make some pretty decent
flicks.
But it is time for another
masterpiece (or two) don't
you think?
—Clive Bird
"provisional loyalties" to
country, and therefore, by
implication, to city, as a
virtue which defuses the
venomous nationalism of
our age.
Vance Packard's point of
view (he has one, unlike so-
called value-free social
scientists) is closer to
Socrates' than to Steiner's.
While recognizing that a
limited amount of mobility
can be beneficial — to
escape frustration and
stagnation, to broaden one's
experience and employment
opportunities and to help
develop economically
depressed areas — he
delivers a sweeping condemnation of new nomadic
inclinations which see at
least a fifth of all Americans
moving one or more times a
year:
Rootlessness seems
clearly to be associated
with a decline in
companionship, a
decline in satisfying
group activities, a
decline in mutual trust,
and a decline in
psychological security.
It encourages a
shallowness in personal
relationships and a
relative indifference to
community problems. It
produces a loss in one's
sense of personal well-
being along with an
increase in both personal and social
malaise. And it contributes to a personal
sense of powerlessness
and insignificance.
Packard, for sociological
effect, offers not just an
exhaustive account of the
physical problems of
moving (his description of
what is involved in moving a
family to another town or
city is enough to make the
most eager-to-move pause
for reflection), but also a
description of the emotional
and     physiological
See page 8
Friday, November  10,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
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Kronstadt: '
By BERNARD BISCHOFF
Hurrah for revolution and more cannon-shot
The beggar on horseback lashes
the beggar on foot
Hurrah for revolution and cannon
come again
The beggars have changed places
but the lash goes on.
—Yeats
A government that does not abuse its power and
that is not oppressive, an impartial and honest
government acting only for the interests of all
classes and not ignoring such interests in exclusive concern for the persons at its head — such
a government is like squaring the circle, an
unattainable ideal . . . Equality and absence of
authority are the only conditions essential to the
morality of evert man. Take the most radical
revolutionist and place him up on the Russian
throne or give him dictatorial power of which so
many of our green revolutionists dream, and
within a year he will become worse than the
Emperor himself.
—Bakunin, 1870
The Kronstadt Uprising of 1921, despite its
relative obscurity is considered by many historians
to be one of the crucial turning-points of the Russian
revolution.
Kronstadt was a naval base, located on Koltin
Island, 25 miles offshore from Petrograd — present-
day Leningrad.
Three times in this century the sailors of this
naval base have revolted against the ruling government of Russia. They mutinied in 1905 in the abortive
revolution against the Czarist government.
They revolted again in 1917 and were instrumental in bringing Lenin and the Bolsheviks to
power. In the years immediately following the October revolution these Red Sailors were famous
through Russia and were considered a sort of
vanguard of the whole revolutionary movement.
They were to quote Murray Bookchin "regarded as
the most reliable and politicized elements of the
newly-established Soviet regime."
And then in the spring of 1921, following the Civil
War, they revolted again. The uprising began on
March 1, 1921 and ended approximately two weeks
later on March 17 when the Red Army stormed the
naval base and decisively crushed the rebels.
But this time the sailors had revolted against the
Soviet regine — the very same revolutionary regime
they had helped sweep to power four years before.
Why?
This is the question Ida Mett tries to answer in her
book The Kronstadt Uprising. The book does not
purport to be unbiased; it is frankly written from an
anarchist point of view and so, of course, i:
hostile to the official Soviet account of the i
Here are the bare facts of the rebellion
emerge from her book:
During the winter of 1920-21 economic co
in Russia were unbelievably harsh. Suffer
particularly acute in the cities, especially Pe
because transport of food supplies from the
to the city had broken down. Here is an excei
the diary of Alexander Berkman an A:
revolutionary who was in Petrograd at tl
dated February 1921:
"The cold is extreme and there is intern
fering in the city. Snowstorms have isola.
from the provinces; the supply of provisioi
almost ceased. Only half a pound of bread is
issued now. Most of the houses are unheat
dusk old women prowl about the big woodpil
the Hotel Astoria but the sentry is vigilant. .
In late February factory workers in Pe
began going on strike. These strikes spread
and by Feb. 28 workers in almost a doze
factories, including the famous Putilov steel
had gone on strike. Understandably one
demands of the strikers was simply to ha\
food which they believed could be facilitated
the re-establishment of local markets, wl
Soviets had banned.
But Mett points out that many of the s
grievances were overtly political in natur
several factories were putting forwarc
political demands : freedom of speech an<
press, the freeing of working class prisoners
on.
And Berkman notes in his diary: "The
chny mill workers have gone on strike,
distribution of winter clothing, they comp
Communists received undue advantage over
partisans. The government refuses the gri
till men return to work."
It was only at this point that the Kronstad
entered the picture. On Feb. 26 they sent d
into Petrograd to find out what was going
days later the delegates returned to the nai
with a report very sympathetic to the stril
The same day the crew of the be
Petropavlovsk drafted a 15-point resojutio
most of the other Kronstadt sailors were ull
to adopt, and which became a sort of manii
the insurgents.
The main ones are these:
Immediate new elections to the Soviets
present Soviets no longer express the wil
people.
Freedom of speech and press for work
peasant.
Freedon to establish trade unions and
assembly.
KRONSTADT SAILORS... dare to struggle
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 10, 1972 Jurrah for revolution'
«BO/1fl PACCr1r1«
THE TRUTH ABOUT KRONSTADT
... 1921 Menshevik publication
No political party should have special privileges
for the propagation of its ideas or receive state
subsidies to this end.
The equalization of rations for all workers except
those engaged in dangerous or unhealthy jobs.
The initiation of mobile workers' control units.
Most of the other resolutions simply supplement
these. Mett argues convincingly in her book that the
first four resolutions stem from the growing conviction among the workers that the fierce dogmatism
of the Bolsheviks and the throttling stranglehold that
they exerted on the whole socio-political life of the
people constituted the complete negation of the
"freedom" that the Bolsheviks supposedly stood for.
It is this conviction that lies behind such demands
as the right to re-organize the Soviets and the one
demanding the release of all socialist and anarchist
political prisoners.
And the last two demands point out the workers'
belief that the Soviet government was not even attempting to build a classless society but was simply
substituting a new class of party-appointed
managers of the old entrepreneur class. In place of
managers foisted on them from above the workers
demanded the right to set up their own "mobile
workers' groups".
Mett takes great pains to point out that the
workers' and sailors' grievances did not stem
basically from the hardships of the winter (for which
the Bolsheviks could not be wholly blamed) but
rather from the additional hardships which the
Bolsheviks were imposing on the people. She says:
"To these partly unavoidable factors must be
added the bureaucratic degeneration of the administration and the rapacity of the state organs
of food supply — their role in 'feeding' the people
was actually a negative one."
"Point 14 clearly raised the question of workers'
control. Both before and during the October
revolution this demand had provoked a powerful
echo among the working class. The Kronstadt
sailors understood quite clearly that real control
had escaped from the hands of the rank and file.
They sought to bring it back. The Bolsheviks
meanwhile sought to vest all control in the hands
of a special Commissariat: the Rabrikin-Workers
and Peasants Inspection.
What Mett is hammering home is that the
Kronstadt sailors were not agitating for a more
moderate bourgeois parliamentary democracy, as
the western press thought, but rather were
demanding a more radical form of workers' control,
than Bolsheviks were willing to give them.
After the 15-point resolution things proceeded
very quickly. There was a mass meeting of the
Kronstadt Soviet March 2 at which two party functionaries Kalinin and Kouzmint tried to dominate the
meeting.
However they were voted down and the Soviet
came out overwhelmingly in favor of the 15-point
resolution. The two party hacks were arrested and
the Kronstadt fortress was placed under the control
of a Provisional Revolutionary Committee consisting
of ordinary seamen and dockworkers stationed at the
base. It is important to note that the Committee reiterated over and over again their willingness to
negotiate with the Bolsheviks.
But the Moscow government was in no mood to
negotiate and reacted with consummate ferocity.
They arrested and imprisoned families of the
Kronstadt sailors living in Petrograd as "hostages"
and promised to kill them if the two party functionaries were harmed. They moved swiftly to kill
the strikes in Petrograd, which were obviously in
sympathy with Kronstadt. They arrested the strike
leaders; locked out striking workers and bribed the
general populace with an unusually prompt delivery
of foodstuffs including such luxuries as white bread
and chocolate.
The Petrograd workers were left disorganized
and confused.
The Kronstadt sailors were encouraged to
surrender with such ultimatums as "Kronstadt has
neither bread nor fuel. If you insist we will shoot you
like partridges."
Leon Trotsky and Giorgii Zinoviev, the virtual
dictators of Petrograd, were the ones chiefly
responsible for directing the attack on Kronstadt
although Lenin must have been well aware of what
was happening. The Red Army began the assault on
Krontstadt on March 7.
Mett is superb in describing the military action
itsel. The soldiers were forced to advance across* the
ice in freezing temperatures to attack the fortress.
Worse yet, many of the Red Army units began to
mutiny, surrender or simply desert and join the
Kronstadt insurgents.
The regiments were hastily and drastically reorganized and crack troops frorry the Kirghiz and
Bakhir steppes, far removed from "the Kronstadt
frame of mind", were brought in.
Backed up by heavy artillery they began the final
assault.
The Kronstadt sailors, under-supplied, outnumbered and receiving no support from the
sympathetic but disorganized workers in the cities,
were bound to lose. After two days of hellish
struggle, the fortress was subdued March 17.
The book is obviously sympathetic to the Kronstadt rebels, and to the specifically anarchist
features of the rebellion. How valid the facts cited
are is difficult to determine.
Mett seems to make at the very least, a very
strong effort to be fair and objective. The Stalinist
historian Poukhov is one of her main sources.
Trotsky's writings, years after the events, in
which he tries to explain and rationalize the incident,
are referred to again and again.
Lenin's blistering vindictive attack in his article
The Tax in Kind is quoted almost in full and she,,
attempts to meet his charges.
On the whole, I think she answers very well.
Murray Bookchin's introduction deals only briefly
with the Kronstadt uprising and then becomes a
discursive statement on ways of writing history, the
reasons for the degeneration of the Russion
revolution, the state of Soviet society today — and so
on.
Bookchin says that although Capital brilliantly
delineates the emergence of industrialized from
mercantile capitalism the discussion ends precisely
where it must begin for us a century later. We can
see that the concentration of capital advances into
still another phase: the "statification" of capital.
The free market passes into the monopolistic and
finally the state-manipulated market.
Bookchin argues that the socialism achieved in
Russia is not socialism, but only state capitalism,
which he understands to be one of the final stages of
capitalist development. He argues that the
revolution was bound to fail, first because economic
conditions were not ripe for the implementation of
classless society, and secondly because the Marxists
had an incomplete analysis of the historical process.
Many of Bookchin's theories are presented only in
a bare skeletal form and suffer from lack of
evidence, but they, at least, constitute interesting
alternatives.
The anarchist interpretation of the revolution and
the Kronstadt uprising in particular present many
problems, but placed beside it, the official Communists accounts sound unrelievably wrong and
shallow.
Also Trotsky asks us to believe the annihilation of
the 3,000 Kronstadt sailors was a "tragic necessity"
so that the revolution would be preserved.
So that the revolution would be preserved. So that
Stalin would perpetuate the great purge trials, so
that Beria could be let loose upon the Russian people,
so that empirical biology could be suppressed in
favor of quacks like Lysenko, so that Krushchev and
other party leaders could have their luxurious
dachas by the Black Sea, so that Brezhnev could
have a collection of rare automobiles — for this the
Kronstadt sailor dies?
For this???
Surely, as the editor says in the preface: One
is entitled not only to ask . . .but also to suggest
the answer.
The Kronstadt Uprising, Ida Mett, with an introduction by Murray Bookchin. [Blacfe Rose Books,
1971, paperback $1.45]
LENIN and FRIENDS ... back from Kronstadt
Friday, November  10,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Drama
Audience well served
by Two Masters
Don't ever say there is nothing going on
in Vancouver.
Genesis theatre company is a very
young, extremely talented and very fun
Repertoire company just waiting for people
to entertain. They played at the Vancouver
art gallery last Tuesday night. I wish
everybody could have seen them; it was
excellent.
The script used was an old Italian
comedy, written in 1750 in the style of the
commedia de l'arte. Much like
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, Carlo
Goldino's Servant of two Masters, is a
timeless comedy.
The story goes roughly like this: Clarice
(Sharon Corder), a merchant's daughter
previously promised in marriage to a
business friend of her father's, is released
from this fate to the joy of marrying her
lover Sylvio (Allan Lysell). However,
complications ensue. The merchant friend,
who they had thought was killed in a duel,
returns to claim Clarice, to her horror and
her father's embarrassment. However —
and this is the great twist to the plot — it
really isn't her suitor but his sister
Beatrice, in disguise. Beatrice, (Seana
Carey), is searching for her lover Florindo
(John Linton), the victor of the duel, killer
of her brother, and fugitive from justice.
They are brought together because they
both manage to hire and indulge the same
servant, Truffaldino, beautifully played by
Byron Jacobs.
The play itself is witty and farcical and
the company's own anachronisms really
work. Everything moves smoothly, almost
breathlessly fast, with no lags; a pace that
only real technical competence can
maintain for two hours. The cast is together
in movement, mood and spontaneity; the
audience honestly overwhelmed, applauded the empty stage until they
returned for a second bow.
It was nothing to see the whole cast
juggling three oranges, or even four; to see
Truffaldino, (Jacob's movement was in
credible) rolling, flipping and somersaulting across the stage. Jacobs was able
to combine and use voice, mime and
movement to the fullest, taking Pan-like
delight in doing so.
The masks of the four masculine roles
were impressively used too. John Linton,
who played both the father and the lover,
(no Freudian complications), was versatile
enough to switch instantly from the role of
the lovelorn to the raging and bickering
father. If anything is really worth seeing, it
is the pained, and heart broken exits he
pulls off.
Another role well done was that of the
father-in-law, David Peterson. His
wheezing, furious, impotence was brilliant.
One of the few criticisms I have is that
perhaps he did not differentiate enough
between father-in-law and his second role
of innkeeper.
A minor role I admired, was that of maid
Smeraldino, (Ellen Matte). She underplays
it, beautifully and strongly enough to leave
a lasting impression. One of the most
difficult things to do.
Genesis is in need, like any young
company; but unlike any other is has been
existing entirely on its own since April.
Subsisting is a better word for it. The cast
rehearses regularly, five days a week, four
to five hours a day and still manages to
earn a living. Although they have hopes of a
government grant coming up, things are
tight until then.
The company is also looking, for new
talent, especially in the field of music and
choreography, which could add a whole
new dimension to their production. If you
are at all interested, go see them. They are
playing at the James Cowan Theatre,
Burnaby Arts Centre, from Nov. 16 to 25.
The company is doing another piece in
reperoire called Lifescenes—'a developed
theatre collage'. For further, information
and ticket reservations call 299-1116.
Katrina von Flotow
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 10, 1972 Poetry
Things look good
for Canadians
TRY
By PAUL KATRICHAKE
Poetry is enjoying a
renaissance in Canada, UBC
poet George McWhirter said
Monday.
"I don't know what it is but
there are a hell of a lot of poets
in B.C. Maybe its the rain that
makes them sprout up," said
McWhirter, co-winner of the
Commonwealth Poetry Award
for 1972 for his book Catalan
Poems.
In an interview with The
Ubyssey he said an increasing
volume of good poetry is being
published by small publishers
in Canada.
"Larger firms like McClelland and Stewart Ltd. take
two or three years to publish
the poems and poets who like to
see their poems in print won't
wait that long."
McWhirter, an assistant
professor in the creative
writing department, said that
the developing media have
presented poets with new
forums for their poetry.
"There is a great deal of
experimenting in poetry in
both sound and the visual.
Concrete poetry is just one
example," he said.
"The media have bomr
barded everything. Whether
there  has  been  a  television
poem, I don't know, but the
possibilities  certainly  exist."
McWhirter criticized the
way poetry is presented to
students, especially noting the
lack of exposure local material
receives.
"Poetry has traditionally
been treated historically, but it
should reflect a sense of immediacy, of personal
relevance to both reader and
writer. At the high school level
poetry has been treated as
something special, apart from
everything else, the poet
develops the feeling that 'I'm
special'. Other students pick
this up and a gap is created
between poet and ordinary
people."
He said this was an artificial
gap, that poetry is not special
but a very natural part of
language.
"Poetry is a natural thing,
it's as natural for people to
play with words as it is for
them to play with mud-pies.
Poetry should be presented as
a language tool, a lever to open
new doors of expression."
McWhirter said some poets,
under the stresses of devoting
themselves to poetry, place
themselves in towers, apart
and above ordinary people.
"It's  a kind  of suicide  to
devote yourself to poetry.
There's a hell of a big risk for
very little back. A moderately
well known painter is much
better off than a moderately
well known poet.
"The truth is a writer's as
much influenced by Charlie
Chaplin as the ordinary Joe.
Poets are people like everyone
else. Misconceptions keep
them apart.
"People tend to consider
themselves normal and the
poet abnormal. Really poets
just wear their 'abnormality'
on the cuff," he said.
"All a poet does is clear a
way through his head. That's
what poetry is, a way of
scrambling about and finding
yourself."
McWhirter said "People in
the creative writing department are writing, that's the
main thing, that they scratch
each other both ways, leaving
marks or feelings of pleasure.
Interaction of the group is the
main thing.
"The department's function,
like that of the university, is a
limited one. A person can be
either sucked through or
deflect off it in various ways
but eventually the student
must get out and do things on
his own."
Cittf YUjfcbs Tfuatre
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See them all in a film about
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Nov. 9-12   SUB Aud. 50c
Fri. 7:00 and 9:30
Sat. 7:00 and 9:30
Sun. 7:00
chartered
accountant
We will be on campus November 20-24 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) to interview graduates interested in pursuing a career as chartered accountants. There are several positions available in the spring and summer
of 1973. At present a limited number of positions are also available
for Dec. 1972. Any Dec. 1972, April or August 1973 graduates
interested in public accounting who meet the minimum requirements for student registration as outlined in the "C.A. Handbook"
should see the Placement office for interview schedules.
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Friday, November  10,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 The grass is
never greener
From page 3
high-
ramifications    of
mobility.
Packard cites statistics
which show that increasing
proneness to coronary
disease, alcoholism, mental
illness, especially
schizophrenia, and growing
violence and crime result
from the instability and
fragmentation associated
with high-mobility.
Packard's shocking figures
state that the average
American moves about 14
times in his or her lifetime,
as opposed to eight times for
the average Briton and five
times   for   the Japanese.
Many react to
uprootedness by "doing
their own thing and
becoming indifferent to all
but a few fellow citizens",
and there is a tendency to
show "less concern for the
social consequences of one's
behavior and less sense that
anyone cares how one acts".
As mobility increases, so
does a reluctance to get
involved.
The family unit increasingly tends to disintegrate, children and old
people being the most
pathetic victims. Divorce
rates skyrocket. A sense of
continuity is lost. There is a
transmogrifcation of once-
stable neighborhoods and
communities into entities
more like airport terminals
or railway stations than
genuine communities.
Hordes of people retreat
to suburbs where "new
kinds of turbulent or
truncated communities and
pseudo-communities"
spring into being, many of
them being built around,
and finding their focal
points in mere shopping
malls. High-rise apartments
that cater to highly-mobile
people structurally encourage loneliness and
anonymity. Lonely people
look to television to fulfil a
"companionship substitution function" — David
Frost and Lucille Ball as
"instant neighbors". (I'd
die rather!)
Instant gregariousness
and intense privatism are
the two possible reactions to
a rootless situation, claims
Packard. This leads to a
"new widespread blandness
in human relations". Facile
attempts to regain community through encounter
group sessions and the
agency of other "purveyors
of human contact" are
made. Packard could have
included rock festivals like
Woodstock and Altamont in
his catalogue of fatuous,
band-aid solutions to
rootlessness.
But Packard offers other
more substantial solutions
to the problem. Companies
and governmental
organizations, he says,
should stop transferring
employees and personnel
unnecessarily or for mere
economic reasons. The
trend to community colleges
should be encouraged so
that people can live where
they study, because, according to Packard,
"colleges are perhaps the
greatest of all contemporary breeding
grounds of super-mobiles".
College students are just
some of the millions of
young people now leading
"life patterns of near
chronic movement". And
too many academics have
turned into "jet-setters"
who switch campuses when
they smell more money or
find a campus with more
prestige than their present
one or see opportunities for
higher rank-all of which are
of course spurious reasons
for moving.
According to Packard
many communities are
being consistently drained
of much possible, long-term
involvement in their affairs
and in their well-being
because an extraordinarily
large proportion of the most
highly educated — the
professional,   the  technical
and managerial talent of the
nation — is too footloose.
Uncontrolled technological growth must be
discouraged for it is "no
bargain if we lose the
natural human community
in the process". More
stability must be brought to
metropolitan neighborhoods. "New towns"
must be built which encourage, because of their
beauty and architectural
coherence, strong feelings,
of community, continuity
and loyalty.
That the grass is greener
somewhere else is usually
mere delusion. Packard
quotes Jack Nicholson at the
end of the film Five Easy
Pieces as saying: "I keep
moving not because I hope
things will get better but
because I know they will get
bad if I stay." But that's a
cop-out. How can any
community get off the
ground, how for instance
can Vancouver be tran-
formed into a beautiful and
congenial city if a strong
"sense of place" does not
exist amongst its
inhabitants?
In short, far too many
people move unnecessarily
and for many half-baked
reasons, causing enormous
problems not only for
themselves but also for both
their former neighbors and
fellow citizens and their
future ones. This is what A
Nation of Strangers is all
about.
But in the absence of real
human  communities   the
insight and the sentiment
expressed   at   the   end   of
David  Gascoyne's  little-
known poem Night Thoughts
seem to me admirable:
Greetings       to       the
solitary. Friends, fellow
beings,   you   are   not
strangers to us. We are
closer   to   one   another
than we realize. Let us
remember one another
at night, even though we
do not know each other's
names.       —Robert Perry
i—:THE PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY
r
Presents Alan Ayckbourn's
"HOW THE
OTHER HALF
n
TV
Previews      \
Luvtv
Nov. 10        \
& 11th            \
DIRECTED BY
at 8:30 p.m.      \
Sat Matinees
.          RICHARD
^^OUZOUNIAN^^
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Students and
at 2:30 p. m
Senior Citizens
OPENS MONDAY, NOV. 13th - 7:30
L Other Evenings — at 8:30 p.m. to Dec. 2
.       TICKETS AT FAMOUS ARTISTS IN THE BAY - 681-335
:j
I AM PART OF THE RUSHING AND CHANGING
. . . But You have neither hurried from me
nor changed Your ways toward me.
and Your presence and Your ways
are love
and compassion
and forgiveness
and strength for new possibilities
make me hurry, Lord
to find ways to use my fleeting days well.
And make me flexible,
willing and able
to change myself and my ways
to be
open-eared — to hear the cries
for help all around;
open-eyed — to see those who need
part of what You've given
to me in abundance;
open armed — to welcome those
who need companionship
and are lonely;
open-handed — to share with those
who have little or nothing
that of which I have more
than I need;
open-hearted — to receive and to give
the love that You implant
deep within men.
And one thing more, Lord:
Keep this prayer from being mere words —
and let me speak and act
remembering the Christ who loved
children who had been pushed aside,
and women who had been abused,
and men whose spirits had been broken,
and me. Amen.
Worship Lutheran Centre
5885 University Blvd.
SUNDAY AT 10:30
Theme "How to  become signs of contradiction when prophit-
making and consumer-values take the upper hand.
See them all in a film about
fantasy. And reality. Vice and
Versa.
Nov. 9-12   SUB Aud. 50c
Fri. 7:00 and 9:30
Sat. 7:00 and 9:30
Sun. 7:00
KING
BISCUIT BOY
TUESDAY NOV- 14      8=30 PM
SUB BALLROOM
$2.00    One Performance Only    $2.00
Tickets available at AMS Office
or at the door
Page Friday. 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 10, 1972 Friday, November  10,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
Brief seeks 'guide lines'
From page 1
• "More rational guidelines
be established" for dependent
and independent students since
currently "an applicant could
be 35 years old, have been
totally independent of his
parents for 20 years, during
which time he supported
himself by intermittent full or
part-time work to a total in
excess of 18 years, yet still be
required to submit his parents
Tl (tax) form and be
automatically considered to
have received their contributions to his finances."
The brief asks that the
requirements for independence of 21 years of age
plus one full year of work
before enrolling be cut back to
19 years with no mention of
work history.
An alternate independence
requirement — marriage —
should also be dropped from
consideration. Financial aid
N officers should only be
required to use their own
discretion when determining
dependence and independence
of applicants.
• The form be simplified.
The complexity, over-
inclusiveness and poor layout
of the form now used in B.C.
"renders erwrns-and omissions
highly likely and results in
much wasted time on the part
of applican£&/parents and
administrators*"
The briejt M.«ljate'd today, for
presentation...to the federal
plenary committee on the
loans plan, Dick and Maffett
have been Ottawa this week for
the committee hearings.
Dick was expected home late
Thursday and Maffett early
next week.
Student society spokesmen
at both campuses had only
sketchy information as to what
roles their representatives
would play at the hearings but
it is expected that Maffett will
present the brief.
Manpower begins
job-hunt course
Unions, private employment agencies and personal contacts are some of the ways of finding jobs discussed in a Canada
Manpower course about creative job searching.
Manpower spokesman Doug Tang said Thursday information' about the course beginning this month would be
available in the UBC student placement centre in a few days.
Tang said that unions are often able to help people looking
for jobs. Private employment agencies, meanwhile, charge the
employer a fee for matching people to his requirements, but
Manpower does not charge either the employer or the applicant.
Tang said that friends and relatives should be canvassed for
knowledge of any openings.
Tang said that in teaching people how to find a job, the
course stresses trying every possible source. He said those
looking for jobs should not sit home waiting for agency to do the
work.
Tang said 70 to 80 per cent of those using this "wide-
spectrum" approach to job finding get a job within four weeks.
Needle course considered
By GARY COULL
The centre for continuing eduction would
consider giving acupuncture courses if it
could find people who were knowledgeable
enough in the field to teach them, CCE program
director Sol Court said Thursday.
He added however, the possibilities of doing
so this year are highly unlikely.
Court was commenting on a report that UBC
administrators of extension courses were interested in offering acupuncture courses.
The rumor about the possibility of courses at
UBC started when Dr. Hermies Ton, director of
the short-lived College of Acupuncture and
Herbatic Medicine, phoned Court and offered to
show a film on acupuncture at UBC.
Court said he was interested in Tongs' offer
and discussed it with Dr. H. 0. Murphy,
assistant dean of continuing medical education.
"Courses in acupuncture could come to UBC
on two levels; an information course offered by
us and technical course offered in the faculty of
medicine," hwe said.
Faculty of medicine officials were
unavailable for comment.
Court said the centre has no plans at this
moment to offer courses but he thinks the
public would be interested.
"People would be interested in learning
about new modes of pain relief. After all, who
wants to suffer?" he said.
Court said he hopes to create a course in
medical information next fall. This would
consist of study of different areas of medicine.
Speakeasy
Are you confused, disgusted, pissed off?
Before heading off to the Pit, why don't you
drop in at Speak Easy? You could end up
drinking to celebrate rather than drowning
your sorrows.
Speak Easy is designed for the sole purpose
of helping you. It is a student-run centre, a jack-
of-all-trades whose volunteer workers are
trained to handle crisis intervention, counselling and information inquiries.
It has been in operation since January 1970
and the experience gained during this time has
given Speak Easy workers some feel for the
problems and hassles characteristic of student
life.
At Speak Easy informality is a rule. We try
to keep the atmosphere as casual as possible
and try to relate to everyone on a personal
level.
When you contact Speak Easy you will be
able to talk to someone who will listen, try to
understand your problem of difficulty and offer
some suggestions on how to resolve it.
No files are kept on individuals using Speak
Easy and any information you give about
yourself is confidential. The only records kept
are about the general issues being dealt with
and are only for the use of other workers.
Speak Easy has the facilities to conduct
counselling on a short-term basis, which is
usually, all that is needed for the types of
problems brought to it.
If this is not sufficient, we can refer you to
other individuals or services better-equipped to
deal with you. There are many such specialized
services, both on and off campus, but the trick
is to know which one is best suited to help you.
That's where we come in: we maintain an
up-to-date file on referral agencies, clinics and
personal contacts in order to provide as effective a service as possible.
We also have available the services of a
social work student, who can handle coun
selling on a longer-term basis, if it is necessary,
and representatives of the campus ministry.
Speak Easy operates an information centre
in SUB, including the SUB information phone
(228-3777). Here you can find out about: activities (on and off campus), navigation
through the university (bureaucratically as
well as geographically), services available,
etc.
In addition, we have literature on: birth
control and abortion, drugs, medical and legal
problems, housing, tenants' rights, etc. If we
don't have the information you want, we can
probably refer you to some one who does.
The UBC tutorial centre also operates on the
Speak Easy premises. They match up people
who have know-how in university courses with
those who don't. If you fall into either of these
categories come and see the co-ordinator in
Speak Easy, between 12:30 and 2:30 weekdays
or phone 228-4557 anytime.
Speak Easy is open from 9:30 a.m. - 9:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday. During these hours
you can either phone in or drop by in person. We
are located on the main floor of SUB, in the
foyer next to the candy shop. Collar one of the
people at the counter —that's what they're
there for. Our phone numbers are 228-4557, 228-
*3777 and 228-3700 is the crisis line. You can also
write to us about anything you like. Letters
may be published in this column if it is permissible.
If you've got troubles of any kind, don't
hestate to get in touch with us. Keep Speak
Easy in mind, tell a friend about us; we can
only be effective if people know about us.
Right now, housing is a big problem. If you
have accommodation available, or know of
any, contact Speak Easy or Alma Mater
Society housing. If you're looking, get in touch
with us, we might be able to help. Also contact
us if you are willing to offer space for occasional one-night crashes.
ArrtAKinu   niuniLi
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FULL FACiLi IJES
WEEKDAYS $1.00
WEEKENDS <K1 50 "book now for
™"r\CtNLO  *>-3W YOUR CHRISTMAS  PARTY"
DQORS OPEN 9:00 661   Hornby St.    687-1547
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
"WILDROOT"
HAS A NEW HANGOUT,
SO   C'MON   DOWN   AND
BOOGIE   YOUR  BUNS   OFF  AT
"THE   GARAGE"
Jam   Sessions   Every
Sat.   Afternoon   3  p.m.   -   7  p.m. Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 10, 1972
Piano money
offered
The Kiwanis Music Festival will
award a $100 scholarship for the
best open piano concert
performance at the 50th annual
competition here April 9 to 17,
1973.
Entries close in January for
classes including ear arid sight
tests, orchestral instrurpeirjts, classical Bible recitations, vocalists,
choirs and bands.
Co-op films
Co-op films from London,
England will be featured at the
Vancouver art gallery, 8 p.m. Nov.
17.
British film-maker Annabel
Nicholson will present the films,
sponsored by the gallery and
Pacific Cinematheque. Admission
is $1.
Homosexuality
Today's noon experimental
college session will feature a
discussion about the role of
agression and homosexuality in
society led by college activist Karl
Burau.
The seminar, part of a continuing college series, will be held in
SUB 111.
Remembrance
Day
Three campus libraries will be
closed and all classes cancelled
Monday  as  UBC  commemorates
Hot flashes
the annual Nov. 11 Remembrance
Day. Ceremonies begin at 10:45
a.m. in war memorial gym Saturday.
Taking part in the ceremony
will be representatives of groups
including the University Employees Union, Canadian armed forces.
War Amputees of Canada and
Canadian Legion branch 142.
The animal resource ecology.
Crane and record libraries will be
closed Monday while the main
, and Sedgewick libraries open from
9 a.m. to 11:45 p.m. Most other
libraries are open from 9 a.ra to 5
p.m.
Scholarships
The deputy provincial secretary's office has established a
$5,000 annual scholarship for
graduate students at B.C.'s three
major universities.
The scholarship was founded
to commemorate Queen Elizabeth
ll's visit to B.C. in 1971. Applications are available from the
deputy secretary's office, legislative buildings, Victoria.
Ceylon faflr
Vijaya Wickrama, recently returned from Sri Lanka, Ceylon
will talk at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
about political repression in
Ceylon.
Sponsored by the arts undergraduate society and the Young
Socialists, the free lecture will be
held in SUB 207-209.
Council news
Alma   Mater   Society   council
'Tween classes
FRIDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Robin David on a socialist perspective of the U.S. election, 8 p.m.,
1208 Granville.
WESTWATER RESEARCH
R. Thoman> on decision making in
water  management,  3 p.m.  IRC  1.
CSA
Fondue party, 7 p.m. IH.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Freud and  Reich, noon, SUB  111.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, noon, IH upper
lounge.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Rev. French-Bagadei on apartheid, 8
p.m., Christ Church Cathedral.
STUDENT LOSERS
General meeting of campus Liberals,
noon, SUB 211.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Speaker from the local social work
association, noon, SUB 105B.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
Regatta    party,    vice-commodore's
house, 8 p.m.
SMC
Picketing    CAF    recruiting   centre,
547 Seymour, 1:30 p.m.
BAHAI CLUB
Initiation  party,  4892 Queensland,
8 p.m.
SUNDAY
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Film and discussion, 8:30 p.m., play
school     in    the    married    student
courts.
LUTHERAN CENTRE
Workshop 10:30 a.m., genetic
engineering 9:30 a.m., Lutheran
centre.
TUESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Discussion on ski club and Christmas party, noon, IH 404.
SMEGMA
Free gym night, everybody welcome, 8:30 p.m., gym B.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Talk on political repression in
Ceylon, 2:30 p.m. SUB 207-209
AUCM.
Eucharist and soup, 12:30 p.m.
Lutheran campus centre.
THURSDAY
GSA
Radical  therapist  Phil  Brown talks
about   new  psychology,  noon,  Bu.
204.
CHARISMATIC
Rock group, The Fisherman's
Union, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran campus
centre.
Wednesday ratified a $1,000 grant
from UBC to the fledgling
National Union of Students..
AMS secretary Sally Clark said
Thursday the money will be taken
from the undergraduate societies
budget, according to a formula to
be determined by undergrad reps.
Campus Styling Shop
m Lower SUB
Specializing in Longer Cuts
for app. 226-4636
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines. 1 day $1.0ff;add tt»nan*fte$, 2Sc;:
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in>
advance. Deadline is 11:30 urn., the dav before publication
Publications Office, Room 241S.U.B.. UBC, Van, 8. B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
LOSTBUTIERFLY PIN STERLING
mauve wings. - Reward, $10. Phone
299-2729.
Rides & Car Pools
14
TWO GIRLS NEED RIDE TO UBC
by 8 a.m., King-sway and Fraser.
Phone 872-1832.
Special Notices
15
ESSAY AND BOOK MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, spelling, punctuation, clarity. 263-6565.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original as you can get, cuz if we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the "White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it In. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?
EDITING SERVICE — ARE YOU
bugged by double negatives? Do
you suffer from verbal flatulence?
My forty years experience may
help you. Let DAN MURRAY
gather your dangling participles.
Phone 733-2337 for term papers,
theses, reports, etc.
HAIR SHAPING PROFESSIONALLY
done at UBC Beauty Salon, 5736
University  Blvd.,  Tel.   228-8942.
UBC BARBER SHOP (NEAR CAMPUS). Open Mon. to Sat. 5736 University   Boulevard.
EX SELKIRK COLLEGE STU-
dents! Time for a reunion. Abe
Dunn & Erling Close invite you to
a gathering of Kootenay Folk, on
Sat., Nov. 18th, at 7:00 p.m., room
207 & 209 in Student Union Bldg.,
UBC. Contact John Asun at 224-
0884 or 224-9535 for further info.
Refreshments provided.
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
16
Travel Opportunities
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1959 JAGUAR D.O.H.C., 3.4 LITRE
sedan. Automatic trans. Good
leather. Top shape. F78-15's snows
on rims. Asking $1000. Call Chris
at 681-0579 after 5 p.m.	
'63 VW WINDOW CAMPER. FULLY
equipped. Factory rebuilt engine.
$750 O.N.O.  681-6839, room 37.
'69 CORTINA GT, 4 SPEED, ONE
owner, 32,000 miles, radio, excellent
condition.   $1295.   733-3280.	
'62 MG MIDGET, VERY GOOD
cond., 40 m.p.g., very reliable. Asking $650, 988-1651.
35
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Photography
^tlje Hensi anb iMmtter
Cameras
DIMENSION
LENS SALE
28 mm F.2.8, was$95.i6
is 77.20
35 mm F.2.8/was $62.95
is 50.50
135 mm F.2.8, was $73.99
is 59.40
200 mm F.3.5, was $89.25
is 71.30
Many More Lenses to Choose From
While Quantities Last Only
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PDEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
Typing
40
TYPING! ! —ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
ports, etc. — Reasonable, 3 years
exp. — Good location, 2nd & Burrard.  Phone  Sheri — 732-7823.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. EXFERI-
enced. Elec. typewriter, carbon
ribbon.  Reasonable rates.  738-8848.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
PROMPT, EFFICIENT TYPING
(electric machine) of theses, essays,
examination papers, etc. Phone:
688-4027.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers. Theses. 41st and
Marine   Drive.   266-5053.
EXPERIENCED    TYPIST—ESSAYS
Theses,  etc.  Mrs.  Brown,  732-0047.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPIST AVAIL-
able for term papers, essays,
Theses. IBM Electric—Elite type.
Phone   327-5381.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35c a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.
TOP   TYPIST   —   35c   PAGE
Lindsay,  phone 434-5843.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INTERESTED  IN  SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB, after 2 p.m..
Communal Housing
85
VACANCY ON CAMPUS MEN'S
residence, St. Andrew's Hall, 224-
7720 or 224-5742.
Help Wanted (Cont.)
51
SUMMER   1973
CAREER-ORIENTED
SUMMER   EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
This competition is open to both
men  and women.
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Bio-Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Economics.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time university students in the above fields
who intend to return to university
in 1973-74. Canadian citizens have
statutory preference for appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a XJCPA application form (available from your
University Placement Office) and
a list of courses taken, to the Public Service Commission of Canada,
203—535 Thurlow St., Vancouver 6,
B.C. Apply before December 31,
1972. Please quote competition 73-
4200.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
63
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GETTING ENGAGED?
SID HARLING LTD.
Diamond   Importers
Watches and  Repairs
•
40%  Discount to University
Students on Diamond Rings.
SERVING  UBC  STUDENTS
SINCE 1954
543 Granville St.
Suite 800
QUAD AMP 33-303 LIKE NEW.
Also Pioneer AM-FM receiver SX-
990  Miracord  50H.   228-8875.	
FOR SALE 6 WEEK GERMAN
shepherd collie cross puppy, female.
Phone 433-3457.	
FREE! OLDER FEMALE KITTEN,
long-haired, affectionate, housetrained. Will pay for shots. Phone
872-1832.	
DYNASTAR MV2 SKIS 207cm SALO-
mon 505 bindings $145.00. One year
old 266-9236.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, KIT-
chen, facilities, $60 per month. 5745
Agronomy,   224-9549.	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR $45 MONTH
On campus, call 224-7736.
Room & Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area Phone
224-9684.
Use
Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE
Automobiles—Parts
23 Friday, November 10,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Three make team
Rick Hughson, Ken Elmer and Rick Woods will represent
the Canada West University Athletic Association at the
Canadian Inter-collegiate Athletic Union Cross Country
Championships at the Royal Military College in Kingston,
Ontario Saturday.
At the CWUAA Championships held on the UBC campus
Saturday, UBC won both the men's and women's team titles.
UBC's Rick Hughson won the individual honors with a time of
34:26.6 over the 10,000 metre course. Ken Elmer placed third
and Rick Woods was 5th.
The other members of the seven man team are: Mickey
Graham (University of Saskatchewan), Bill McBlain
(University of Alberta), Jim Thorne (University of Victoria),
and Rick Nicoud (University of Calgary). Named as team
Coach is Brian McAlder of the University of Alberta, with
Elmer, the assistant coach.
UBC women placed 1st, 3rd and 6th to capture the CWUAA
Championships held Saturday on campus. Thelma Wright, an
experienced international runner, covered the three-mile
course in 20:14 for first place.
Showdown
The UBC soccer team will be
looking for its first win in
league play this season when
they take on the New Westminster Blues Sunday.
The team lost to Victoria 2-1,
in their only league game
played so far but'disposed of
Vancouver Sporting Club, 2-0,
in an exhibition game.
The team looked strong in its
game against VSP, winning
easily despite using many
second    stringers.
Letter
Football
Re: Football article in the
Ubyssey of Tuesday, Nov. 7.
There are three points that
are lacking in the article and I
should like to call your attention to them.
1. The game between the
Seattle Cavaliers and the UBC
Thunderbirds was exciting and
entertaining.
2. The Seattle Cavaliers are
a good football team and their,
quarterback was one of the
best, and most exciting,;
quarterbacks you will ever see
play in Thunderbird Stadium.
3. In the second half of the
game, the UBC Thunderbirds
conducted themselves in such
a manner as to be worthy of
being called a football team.
Respectfully submitted,
Jack Maze
botany
We're having a hard time
understanding your letter,
especially in view of the fact
there was no football game
report in Tuesday's Ubyssey
sport section.
But if you want to argue
about Saturday's game against
the Cavaliers, here's our view:
The game was neither exciting or entertaining, mainly
due to the fact that UBC's
offense showed little or nothing
throughout  the   game.   The
Intramurals
The next two happenings in
women's intramurals are ice
hockey and volleyball.
There will be two nights of
hockey while volleyball will go
for three weeks. The volleyball
schedule is as follows: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday — 4:30-6:30 p.m. in
Gym A, and Thursday 12:30-
6:30 p.m. in Gym A.
There will be a meeting for
all women's intramural unit
managers Friday at 12:30 p.m.
in War Memorial Gym 213.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Everybody fuck off please —
splorgs dept.
'Birds' points came for the
most part after Cavalier
mistakes in their own end on
UBC drives that were
somewhat less than exciting.
Jim Tarves did not have a
good day at quarterback for
UBC, throwing many poor
passes and missing receivers
that were wide open, to wit,
underthrowing Henry Thiessen
late in the fourth quarter on a
play that should have gone for
a touchdown. —
Tn Tact, other than Gord
Penn's great 95 yard kickoff
return, the game was quite dull
from a UBC standpoint.
Also, you seem to think that
we don't consider the 'Birds
are worthy of being called a
football team. As a matter of
fact, we think that a football
team is always a football team
as long as the players are
playing football, and not
running around kicking each
other or emptying the benches
for a mass rumble at mid-field
as seen in the game with the
Alberta Golden Bears played
two weeks ago.
Finally, as to your view that
the Seattle Cavalier's quarterback Bob Cason was one of
the most exciting quarterbacks
we'll ever see playing at
Thunderbird Stadium, we
disagree. UBC's Jim Tarves is
many times more exciting —
when he's playing at his best.
'Pros' disappoint
table tennis fans
By DAVID MARS
The Formosan table tennis
team took the best of nine
matches against the American
team Tuesday night.
The two professional teams,
each having three men, played
before an audience of less than
65 at the Commodore
Ballroom. Among the titles
held at some time by the
Formosan players are
professional titles from Libya,
Uraguay, and Tahiti.
The American teams boasts
the only professional left-
handed player in the United
States. None of the players on
the two teams have ever held a
major amateur title.
The Formosan team won five
games while the American
team took two.  Both of the
Rowers meet
The UBC rowing crew needs
three more coxswains, the man
who sits in the back of the
rowing shell.
If you weigh 115 pounds or
less, then come to the meeting
at 12:30 p.m. in SUB 213.
Sports goofs
The UBC Alumni Association
does not give out scholarships
to university athletes as was
reported in Tuesday's edition
of the Ubyssey.
The scholarships in question
were in fact offered by the
Scholarship Committee, an
independent group of alumni
not connected with the Alumni
Association.
Quilchena defaults
The UBC golf team now has a
-ecord of one win, one loss and
jne tie after winning by default
over Quilchena.
In previous games UBC had
tied with the assistant
professionals and lost to Pitt
Meadows. The team's next
game is on Nov. 12, against
Fraserview.
Players on the team this
year are Al Defoe, Dave Mick,
Gerry Kitsom, "hot shot"
Lance MacGregor, Brian
Martin, Blacke Whitely, Jim
Hill, Jack Grank, big Bing Chu
and Tom Rippon.
The team is coached by Tom
Whittle.
rushant
** CAMERAS     *
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NEVER UNDERSOLD!
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
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FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
FRI. oVSAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
American wins were by Tom
Ruttinger, captain of the
Seattle Sockeyes. The
professional games are won by
the first player to reach 31
points, rather than the 21
points standard in amateur
play.
The match was at best
mediocre, particularly so when
compared with the outstanding
performance given by the
Chinese and Canadian
amateur teams in the spring of
this year in Vancouver.
The lighting was grossly
inadequate; the table was in
shadows and the entire playing
area was poorly illuminated.
The match organizers allowed
photographers to set flashbulbs off less than ten feet from
the players; temporarily
blinding them during the
course of a game.
This type of interference
would not be permitted even at
a provincial amateur championship event; it disturbs
players and spectators.
The referee was second-rate
and frequently corrected by
the players.
The ceiling in the ballroom is
only 15 feet high in some spots
over the table, despite
publicity that the players hit
the ball 25 feet in the air.
Professional table tennis has
a lot of improvements to make,
both in the quality of players
and in the playing conditions,
before it can draw the crowds
from the amateur performances.
If the drawing power of these
two teams holds up they may
go broke before they can
subject local sports fans to
viewing another of their
second-rate performances.
2 vl _»
■5P
72 - 73 Recreation
UBC
— students — faculty — staff —
badminton - volleyball - basketball
floor hockey - indoor tennis
trampoline & gymnastics
circuit training & weight lifting
Women's Keep Fit
all equipment available 7 days a week
instruction if desired
Recreation UBC card may be purchased
($3.00-72-73) at the AMS Office or
Rec. UBC Office - Rm. 203 Memorial Gym
to reserve facilities
further information
'    call 228-3996 - 9:30 A.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Brochure available Nov. 14th
NOTE: gymnasiums will be open this holiday weekend. Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November  10, 1972
KELLY'S
Stereo
Marts
540 GRANVILLE"—
ONLY
GOES AU OUT WITH THEIR
&
*fc.
#i
Kelly's has completely renovated their store at 540 Granville Street, and added a new floor — the "Rock and Roll
Room". It is now the largest record store in Western Canada! The best selection, and the best prices.
The Audio department is now twice as big and twice as modern as before to give you a better opportunity to hear the
true sound of stereo.
Hundreds of genuine bargains are available in all departments. Don't miss this sale! Your friends are going to talk
about this sale for months!
KELLY'S SUPER DOOR CRASHER SPECIAL! . .
DUAL 1219 save '50 I DYNACO A-25's s59
Previously
Marked
Dual is a West German Company with years of
experience building high quality automatic
record players. Dual's top model was the 1219,
which has a full size platter, a huge motor, and
every possible convenience and record-saving
device. You could not buy a better record player.
The 1219 was previously marked at $200 with a
walnut base and a tinted plexiglas cover. Kellys
sale price, while they last, is $150.
A top-quality turntable, at a rock bottom price
from Kellys.
$99.50
Dynaco A-25 speakers have been highly rated by just
about everyone. A leading consumer magazine even
rated them the number one speaker value, regardless of
price! Speaking of price, the Dyna A-25's were
previously marked at $99.50 each Kellys price, while
they last, is $59.
A top-quality speaker, at a rock-bottom price from
Kellys.
JUST A FEW EXAMPLES:
* 4 AR AR-4x 8" 2 way PM $94.50.Sale $79. * 4 KLH33 10" 2 way speakers $140. * 2 KLH5. 4 speaker - 3 way spkrs. $260 * ISOPHONE
SPEAKERS PM $129.95. Sale $95. * 4JBL $99 - SC99 JBL spkr. PM $366. Sale $268. * 2 JBL L-IOOwith covers CENTURY. Previously marked
$375. Sale $289. * 6 KLH 38 speakers, their newest. $95. * 2 KLH 17 2-way 10" speakers. $105. * 14 LSP-303 Speakers. 12" woofer. PM $69.96.
Sale $55. * 3 ELECTRA ED60 12-inch speaker kit, box etc. Special $69. * 8 ELECTRA ED 3-Spkr. 5x7-3". 10 watt PM $24.95. Sale $14.88. * 21
ELECTRA ED-4X spkr. 61/2" 8 watt. PM $19.95. Sale $12.88. * 8 ELECTRA ED-8X spkr. 8"+5"+3" 20 watt PM $49.95. Sale $29.88. * 7
ELECTRA Mini 5'6" cube speaker, 45 watts. Sale $10 each. * 2 No. 195 Steima-Danish-Excellent speaker, 2 way 15 watt PM $59.95. Sale $39. * 5
No. 500 Steima-Danish-Excellent speaker, 3 way, 35 watt PM $129.95. Sale $89. * 8 ELECTRA ED308K 8" speaker kit with box, instructions. PM
$45.94. Sale $29. * 6 AKAI SW-175 5-way 6-speaker 80 watt. $299.95. * 2 AKAI SW-155 4-way, 4-speaker, 50 watt. $194.95. * 6 AKAI SW-135
3-way, 3-speaker, 30 watt. $149.95. * 2 AKAI SW-131A speaker. $13.95. * 4 AKAI CSS 8 bookcase 10 watt speaker $26.95. * 6 AKAI NDS70 six
hexagonal speakers. $67.95. * 5 AKAI NDS-80 omnidirectional hex. spkrs. $144.95. * 2 AKAI ASE-20 headphones $25.95. * 2 AKAI ASE-22
headphones $29.95.
PLUS HUNDREDS OF OTHER BARGAINS! HURRY!
■fi-.-m.
fv *)  m  fs  f>:-n&L.-.
AR
TUNER
Previously    „.
Marked        *69595
Acoustic Research is an American Company
that was a pioneer in the development of the
first HI-FI systems way back in the fifties. AR
has continually developed their components to
keep them superior. AR's Receiver has been
rated highly by virtually every stereo critic and
testing organization. It has one of the finest FM
tuners that money can buy. Its amplifier is
extremely powerful and has a very low
distortion factor to give you true clean sound.
The AR receiver was previously marked at
$659.95, but Kellys has a few (with full 2-year
warranty) for only $499.
A top-quality receiver, at a rock-bottom price
from Kellys.
SHURE
M91ED
ONLY$29-00
Shu re cartridges are well known for their
high quality sound, long needle life, and
reasonable price. A leading consumer
magazine rated Shure cartridges as the
number one and number two cartridge
values. Shure's newest cartridge is the
M91ED and it has received rave reviews
from virtually every HI-FI Magazine, at
its previously marked price of $54.95.
Kellys discount price is only $29. A
top-quality cartridge, at a rock-bottom
price from Kellys.

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