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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1986

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 PAYJIb  BAJIJIEHBEPr
L
His mission of mercy
reminds us
that a single person
can make a difference.
Dy
MICHAEL
GROBERMAN
WALLENBERG
'"12/
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i
I*.
Hundreds of Jews were being loaded onto railway cars
destined for Nazi death camps. It was the winter of 1944
and these Hungarian Jews, having marched 100miles from
Budapest, represented the last of the European Jewish
populations to fall under the Nazis. One of the men here at the
Hungarian/German border is the father of Martha Fogel. Both now
live in Toronto. Martha Fogel tells her father's story:
"He marched to the border and Wallenberg brought them back in
trucks. Wallenberg who was then first secretary of the Swedish legation in Budapest) asked who had Swedish passports. Nobody did. The
second question was, who expected a Swedish passport... A few did.
And the third question was, who had had a Swedish passport that was
taken away and torn up by the Arrow Cross (the Hungarian Nazis). So
my father really had nothing to lose. He stepped forward. Wallenberg
put him on one of the Red Cross trucks. My father sent us a note to
come to one of the Swedish safe houses (in Budapest)."
Raoul Wallenberg, credited with having saved the lives of thousands
of Hungarian Jews during the last months of World War II was arrested by the Soviet occupation forces in January 1945 as a suspected
spy.
The Soviet Union denied any knowledge of Wallenberg, except to
surmise that he had been killed in the street fighting during the Soviet
occupation of Budapest. In 1956 they stated Wallenberg had died suddenly in July 1947, in a Soviet prison, and his body had been cremated
without autopsy. But evidence provided by prisoners released to the
west since 1947 and as recently as 1978, suggests that Wallenberg is still
alive in a Soviet prison. In 1981 he was made an honorary citizen of the
United States. Last year he became an honorary citizen of Canada,
and of Israel.
On the January 25 weekend this year, in Queen Elizabeth Park, a
plaque recognizing the work of Wallenberg was unveiled. Attending
the ceremony were Martha Fogel, now a Canadian citizen living in
Toronto, and Per Anger, retired Swedish diplomat who was a friend
and co-worker of Wallenberg in Budapest. The plaque, located at the
base of the waterfall, reads: In honour of Raoul Wallenberg, the
Swedish diplomat responsible for saving tens of thousands of Jewish
lives in Hungary during World War II. His mission of mercy reminds
us that one man can make a difference.
In March, 1944, German troops invaded Hungary
to keep an eye on Horthy, and to initiate the final solution.
Adolf, Eichmann, the Gestapo leader who had already arranged for
the deportation or murder of most of Europe's Jews, moved into the
Majestic Hotel in Budapest. Over the next three months 600,000 of
Hungary's Jews were deported to Auschwitz. Only the 200,000 in
Budapest itself remained. They had already been ghetoized. Fogel
recalls: "We had to move out of our homes in April or May. We had
to move to an entirely different area. They selected around 900 apartments for all of the Jews. I knew as a child what was coming."
Per Anger recalls how he, and the others at the Swedish legation in
Budapest dealt with the situation. They had been aware of the deportations in the countryside, but as a neutral country in war-time, had no
precedent to follow in interfering with the activities of the combatants,
nor were they in any position, given the small number of legation
workers, to mount any protective effort. But when the deportations
reached Budapest, they decided to try something.
"We managed to save people by giving Swedish visas and certificates to those people who stated they were under our protection.
That impressed the Nazis, and we were encouraged to continue. But
the number only increased and we couldn't cope with it, so Raoul
Wallenberg comes into the picture."
Wallenberg was a wealthy son of a Swedish banking family. He was
31 in 1944, had been educated in the United States, and then went into
business, involving himself with international trade. He had spent
most of the war travelling about Europe on business. He was rather
bored with his privileged life.
In January, 1944, the Allies finally decided to take action specifically designed to stop or lessen the severity of the Nazi Holocaust. President Roosevelt created the War Refugee Board and supplied it with
unlimited funds. The board approached the neutral nations in Europe
and offered them the money for any project they might have. Sweden
was the only party interested. Their idea was to send a single diplomat
to Budapest whose job it would be to intimidate, bribe, and lie to the
Nazis: to somehow prevent the deportations. By the time Wallenberg
arrived in July 1944, only the Jews in Budapest remained.
Anger explains the choice of Wallenberg for this position:
"Then comes Wallenberg. He had no diplomatic background. He
was a businessman. I saw this possibility to let him act in a more unconventional way.
"I was negotiating with the foreign ministry but Raoul could go to
Eichmann, to Arrow Cross, to any authorities like that."
In the month prior to Wallenberg's arrival, King Gustav of Sweden,
on Anger's suggestion, had sent a strongly worded note to Horthy, the
Hungarian regent, insisting he assert his independence of the Nazis
and disallow any more deportations. Horthy did so and the Nazis,
8m |»m 2: WALLENBERG Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,1986
Wallenberg defends human rights
From page 1
careful not to destroy relations with one of their last allies,
gave in for the moment, much to
Eichmann's distress.
So when Wallenberg arrived,
things were relatively peaceful. The
Jews were subsisting in the ghetto;
the Nazis were dormant. His approach was to help the Jews immediately with food and medicine,
and to ensure their safety should
Eichmann remount the deportations.
Anger describes Wallenberg's initial work: "He invented the protective passport. He improved on
those issued, and made them more
spectacular". The passports, which
bore no legal authority, were colourful, bore the Swedish three-
crown symbol and the holder's picture, and were signed by
Wallenberg and other officials at
the Swedish legation. They stated
that the bearer was under the protection of the Swedish legation until
such time as the holder emigrated to
Sweden.
With the unlimited funds
Wallenberg purchased buildings
which he called "Swedish safe
houses", which flew the Swedish
flag, which were off-limits to Nazi
soldiers and housed holders of the
passports. Although only 4500
passports were allowed by the
Hungarian authorities, nearly
15,000 were actually issued, and
thousands more escaped into the
protection of the safe houses
without a passport.
Wallenberg formed a committee
of all the neutral legations in
Budapest: Switzerland, Spain, Portugal,   the   Vatican.   They   coor-
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dinated their activities and all issued
passports and organized safe
houses.
Budapest remained reasonably
quiet until October, 1944. Horthy
secretly made plans for an armistice
with the Soviets, and declared
Hungary's withdrawl from the war.
With this announcement, the Arrow Cross, with German assistance,
overthrew Horthy and the government. With the Arrow Cross in control and the deportations began in
earnest. Fogel remembers that day:
"There was a blood-bath in the
streets. You couldn't step out of
your place. They (the Nazis) wanted
to do everything in a rush because
they knew they had not much time
left.   My   father,   he   was   taken
awav."
Because they were so close to
defeat, the Nazis had to use their
only safe railway supply line for
troop transport. So, they began a
series of forced marches, through
the snow, 100 miles to the border
where the Jews would be herded onto railway cars and shipped off to
the death camps. It was during this
bloody period, while the Soviets
were bombing Budapest and the
Nazis deporting the Jews, that
Wallenberg acted with the creativity, the compassion, and the audacity which makes his story
memorable and inspirational.
Anger describes Wallenberg's
special talent: "He was an actor, he
acted when he was confronted with
Nazis. He used their voice, he yelled
at them, and he bribed them, and
he flattered them, and he used all
the means in the world to save people's lives. It explains how it was
possible for Raoul Wallenberg to
have the Germans obey when he
forced them to open the doors to
the railway cars, to save the Jews
during the death marches, and so
On."
Wallenbrg saved thousands of
Jews in this manner, until the
deportation stopped with the German withdrawal in December, prior
to the Soviet occupation.
In the chaos which ensued as the
Soviets got closer and closer,
Wallenberg left the quarters of the
Swedish diplomats, and joined the
Jews on the other side of the river in
order to deal with the Soviets when
they arrived. None of the Swedish
embassy staff ever saw him again.
The staff left for Sweden without
him. In 1956 the
Soviets announced Wallenberg had
died in prison in 1947. But the latest
evidence suggests he may still be
alive. A young Soviet Jew, having
immigrated to Israel in 1979, tells of
his friend's father, a senior KGB officer, who boasted that he had a
Swede under his charge who'd been
in prison over thirty years.
The question persists: why did
the Soviets arrest him? The answers
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are only surmise, but the most likely
is that they suspected Wallenberg to
be an American spy. The Soviets
were already paranoid of
Americans at the end of the war,
and Wallenberg, educated in the
States, totally funded by the
Americans, explaining how he intended to stay on in Budapest to set
up social services to relocate and reestablish Hungarian Jews must certainly have appeared suspicious.
Today the Wallenberg story is
more widely known than ever. It
represents more than intriguing
history.
Raoul Wallenberg did not act
alone, nor were the activities all of
his own device. But he assumed the
role of leader, and he played the
role with more style and flamboyance than anybody else. In addition, his disappearance before the
end of the war, arrested in error.
and before he could receive any
recognition for his heroism, deeply
offends our society's sense of
justice.
So it is Raoul Wallenberg we
recognize when we recall all the
work performed by the neutrals in
Budapest. It is that work which is so
important, so inspirational to us today.
The work of these neutrals was
selfless and humanitarian. It was
above the war, beyond the differences of the combatants. The
work represents a turning point in
international relations; in the interest one nation takes in the internal affairs of another.
Per Anger notes: "It was a new
situation. We Swedes at the embassy, and the Swiss, and the Portuguese, Spain and the Vatican, we
had never, ever before found the
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Her dream was to coach high school football
Her nightmare was Central High. Friday, February 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Wage discrimination fires up AMS
By DUNCAN STEWART
The AMS plans to challenge the
constitutionality of B.C.'s
minimum wage laws. And a letter
from the federal ministry of labor
says the challenge could succeed.
Carol Pedlar, AMS coordinator
of external affairs said the
province's laws contravene Section
15 of the Canadian Charter of
Rights and Freedoms, which prohibits discrimination based on age.
Currently B.C. employers must pay
a minimum of $3 per hour to those
under eighteen and $3.65 per hour
to those eighteen or older.
Pedlar said the law are "simply a
means of providing a source of
cheap labour . . . there is no good
reason for it."
She added that even students
over eighteen are being hurt by the
current law, when large corporations hire those under eighteen who
are cheaper but not necessarily better qualified.
"I intend to talk to Terry Segarty, ministry of labor, about the
minimum wage laws, and see if he is
planning on changing them,"
Pedlar said, "if he is not, I want to
go ahead with the court challenge."
UBC law student Al-Farouk
Khaki, whom the AMS external affairs committee asked to examine
the feasibility of challenging the
constitutionality of the laws, said
the AMS had a good chance of winning.
Martin Cocking, AMS director
of administration, said "the
minimum wage law could be
described as exploitation." "Why
should those under eighteen be paid
any less?"
B.C. labor minister Terry Segarty
could not be reached for comment
and deputy minister, Graham
Leslie, refused to comment.
Parliamentary labor secretary,
Doug Mowat, said he has discussed
the two-level minimum wage controversy with Segarty.
Colin Ackroyd, acting director of
the policy and planning branch of
the ministry of labor, said the
original purpose of the bi-level
minimum wage law was "to provide
job opportunities for young and inexperienced people at entry-level
positions."
Ackroyd said the minister earlier
told him to research the constitutionality of the minimum wage
laws. He wouldn't say what
deadline Segarty had given him to
report by.
Certainly, federal minimum
wages pay 25 cents per hour less for
employees under seventeen, but this
provision will be abolished on May
26, 1986.
JUBILANT AQUINO SUPPORTERS celebrate end of Philippine tyranny    tory sign, woman's face expresses joy of Marcos departure from troubled
Tuesday outside Robson Square Media Centre. After 20 years of Marcos    archipelago,
disctatorship, Filipinos face new era of democracy. Flashing famous vie-
Peasants pick reggae over dogma
By PETER BURNS
Political elites use literacy campaigns to impose their dogma on
Third World indigenous population, a former Iranian education
minister said Tuesday.
Majid Rahnema told an audience
of educators at the Curriculum
Centre that literacy campaigns used
by elite groups impose religious or
political dogma on peasants while
neglecting the oralistic traditions of
most cultures.
The Catholic Church and the
Soviet Union run literacy programs
designed to enshrine those that are
literate while humiliating and
marginalizing those who are not, he
said.
The Catholic Church forced
Spanish on South American tribes
thereby eliminating indigenous
religious practices through the
power of the written word over that
of oralistic shamanism," Rahnema
said. "The literacy imposed on indigenous people is neither relevant
to their needs or responsive to their
own tribal beliefs."
Rahnema,   who   worked   for
UNESCO in Africa and Brazil said
a system of audiotheques rather
than libraries should be implemented to translate knowledge
into the native tongues of oral people.
"In Mali what struck me was
despite their poverty there were a
few tape recorders and the people
listened primarily to two
things ... a famous Mali
storyteller and Bob Marley,"
Rahnema said.
Rahnema said this should be extended so important information
relevant to the people can be stored.
Translating non-written languages
through tapes and cassettes is easier
than writing them down. Medical
formulas and shaman herbology
secrets have been distributed from
tribe to tribe this way, he said.
The program for audiotheques,
'a library for oral people', has
already been developed in various
African nations. The tribal chief
usually becomes the village librarian
and committees recommend what
should be taped as well as organize
listenings and classes, he said.
"Once they are brought to this
stage then they can extend their
literacy ... if they want to,"
Rahnema said.
He said the blueprints from
political and literate government
elites have enshrined colonizing
languages (like French in Mali)
while neglecting the hundreds of
tribal languages.
"This has left the illiterate
peoples of the world marginalized,
humiliated and powerless and the
goal behind literacy efforts to create
greater access to knowledge though
quite commendable, is now
politically impossible."
A letter anonymously leaked by
federal labor ministry officials and
written by federal minister Bill
McKnight to B.C. minister Segarty
gives the reasons for the federal
,government change.
The letter says the change was
made because the federal government employs few under seventeen
year olds, and those that are
employed earn wages which exceed
the minimum wage. "We also considered ... its (the minimum wage
differential) possible conflict with
the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms, which prohibits
discrimination based on age," he
added.
"This letter sets a very strong
precedent for the B.C. minister of
labor," Carol Pedlar said. If the
challenge is successful and the
minimum wage laws are changed,
Pedlar said, "it will make students
feel that they have a real voice.'
Engineers
expand
A $7.5 million allocation to
B.C.'s three universities from the
education excellence fund is good
news as long as it signals more
university funding next year, UBC
administration president David
Strangway said Thursday.
"Things are moving in the right
direction," said Strangway. "I'm
looking forward to the next phases.
The funding, announced Tuesday by post-secondary education
minister Russ Fraser, provides $4.5
million for engineering expansion
money and $3 million for "faculty
renewal," all to be allocated among
the universities by the Universities
Council of British Columbia, Dean
Goard, executive director of university services for the post-secondary
ministry, said Thursday.
He said the engineering money
will cover continuing commitments
to new programs at the three
universities, and added engineering
will receive money because that is
where universities have requested
funding in the past.
As of the March 26 provincial
budget, universities will get budget
details on a three year base, said
Goard. "The need for stability in
funding was a very big priority of
theirs (universities)," he said.
Strangway said he is pleased there
will be a three year funding window.
"Then we're not always responding to a crisis," he said. "It will
help us immensely in terms of planning."
He said he hopes recent polls
such as the ones commissioned by
B.C. faculty associations last year
have shown the people of B.C. want
to see universities properly funded.
Tory funding cuts increases stress
Research grants are not going up
and neither are beer prices in the pit
following Wednesday's federal
budget.
President Strangway said the five
year plan of the Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research Council
was not approved. NSERC grants
provide much of the funding for
research at UBC. "The research
and development activities were
really part of helping the economic
recovery," said Strangway.
He added the university business
and research community supported
the proposed NSERC five year
plan.
Greg   Macdonald,   assistant   to
Simon Fraser university's president,
said "less money will flow into the
province". He said the established
programs financing — federal
money earmarked for health care
and post secondary education —
suffered a reduction in its yearly
rate of increase.
"There was nothing in it (the
budget) for the student" said Steve
Williams, commerce 3. "The cost
of alcohol going up will make it that
much harder to cope with the
stresses of school."
Sandra Chiesa, commerce 3, had
a similar view. "Being a student, it
seems like every time you turn
around they're raising the cost of
something. If it's not your tuition
fees it's your social life that's going
to cost you more" she said.
Rodney Yates, music 5, stated his
view on the six percent increase in
tax on tobacco products by saying,
"I'm glad I quit smoking."
Alcohol taxes were also raised by
four percent while tobacco products
shot up by six percent. The new
taxes will not affect the price of
beer in the Pit or other campus
outlets until at least May.
"There will be no increases in
prices until the end of the term"
said AMS business manager Charles
Redden. "The same applies to
cigarettes" he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28, 1986
Budgetory intrigue
So the Tory honeymoon ended this year.
Life returned to senseless bickering over mundane matters like tuna fish.
And the federal government brought down a budget Wednesday which
starts to cut the deficit — just like they promised in the last election.
But they didn't do much about spending. Instead, they raised taxes considerably so they could avoid making any decisions about trimming.
Except one area. Established Programs Funding which transfers money
to the provinces for higher education and health care is being cut from
previously announced levels. And research funding, which is an area which
should reasonably be increased in a world so dependent on scientific and
technical knowledge, was kept to a small increase.
This may not seem like much, but the effect on higher education could be
very important.
And the research, university and business communities have all agreed
on the great need for increased funding for the Natural Sciences and
Engineering Research Council. In fact, they agreed to a NSERC five-year
plan which suggested doubling funding.
The Journal, CBC's nightly news feature program, ran a story Thursday
evening on the growing number of well-educated, middle class Canadians
faced with mid-life unemployment. The new poor, as the program labeled
them, are teachers, engineers, lawyers, scientists and business people who
played by the rules; went to university to get those good, high-paying jobs.
But after devoting themselves to study, found the rules had changed when
they got there. As the opposition parties are warning, Canada is losing its
middle class. University students today face unemployment and poverty as
real possibility in the future.
Deficit-fixated economic planning only postpones dealing with today's
unemployed.
Letters
Glad to be alive
milmfmmmm
But meanwhile
in ottawa
• ••
Letters
In the article "Suicidal students
should stop and seek help"
(Perspectives column, Feb. 13
Ubyssey), Duffy Cutler is trying to
be realistic about the problem of
suicide.
I'm glad he cares, and that he
brought the subject and help programs to the attention of readers.
But his attitude toward suicidal
people shows a lack of understanding of their state of mind and is
hurtful to those who are or have
been victims of that crippling condition.
He describes suicide as a
melodramatic, selfish and stupid
act, tells people considering it to
"just think for a minute" about the
God says no to homosexual lifestyles
With respect to Tanis Sugden's
letter "Holier than thou view
outrages" (Ubyssey, Feb. 25), I
agree with rebuking a Christian
brother for being too judgemental:
Roman 2:1. However, your letter
leaves it open for people to believe
whether or not they have read Pennington's book, (which cannot be
located in any of UBC's libraries,
theological or not) that the practice
of gay sex is biblically sound. To
such people of this view I need only
refer to the biblical passages which
clearly indicate that gay sex is an activity which is looked down upon by
God: Genesis 19:1-13; Leviticus
18:22, 20:13; Romans 1:18-27; I
Corinthians 6:9-10. Please read
them carefully.
Further to this, it should be added that Sugden's view of Christians
working together with homosexuals
to overcome this form of sin is the
proper view: see Christianity To-'
day,  Aug.  9,   1985 article called
"The Homosexual Lifestyle: Is
there a Way Out?". Romans 3:23
indicates that we are all sinners. But
Romans 6:11-14 also states that we
are to support one another in repenting (turning entirely away) from sin
and following the greatest commandment of all: "Thou shalt love
the Lord thy God with all thy heart,
and with all thy soul, and with all
thy mind" (Matthew 22:37-38, emphasis mine).
Christians should not be condem-r
ning of the sinner.- (Hence the
phrase, "Hate the sin but love the
sinner".) Therefore, we should let
the condemning words of the Bible
to sinners speak for themselves, and
should work together to assist
homosexuals and all others who
have not experienced the power of
God to combat sin in their lives.
It is for these reasons that Christians, with loving respect, must
reach out to all people, whether or
not they are gay, to help them to
live the kind of lifestyle that would
meet with God's approval.
Warren A. Kowbel
law 3
Mussoc disassociates from Groberman
and celebrates anniversary with Grace
We, the executive of the UBC
Musical Theatre Society
(MUSSOC), wish to disassociate
ourselves from the "review" entitled, "MUSSOC's Fiddler is big,
brash, boring" (Ubyssey, Feb. 7)
While we recognize a reviewer's duty of expressing opinion, this piece
goes far beyond simple opinion, expressing   a   vindictiveness   and
THE UBYSSEY
February 28, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
A Cantata for Neil Lucente: — Type-out at the OK Corral. Powf Pow! Zing! Evil Lynne Jacob,
Ronald Stewart and Debbie Lo, rode out of their hideout. The sun blazed. Jennifer Lyall sprang out
from behind a cactus shouting "You can fly". Stephen Wisenthal, Duncan Stewart and Camitle
Dionne followed, bursting into strains of "Hello my baby, hello my darling" Sheriff Steve Chan said
"my wings are like a shield of steel". Michael Groberman shot back "Yes, but i AM a theatre critic. N.
Finberg and Peter Burns followed the hyenas to the hills and Ed Mou sobbed silently into his harmonica
while Corinne Bjorge flipped frantically through the yellow pages.
maliciousness aimed towards our
director/choreographer Grace Macdonald.
The tone of the review, revealing
the critic's hatred of Miss Macdonald, is inappropriate and only
the writer, Michael Groberman,
knows why. By stating what
Groberman believed should be included and excluded from
MUSSOC's production of Fiddler
On The Roof, he has displayed his
ignorance of the original Broadway
production.
By commenting on Miss Mac-
donald's alleged inappropriate
choreography, he has shown his
oversight in not familiarizing
himself with the original
choreography of Jerome Robbins,
the man who made Fiddler famous.
(It is Groberman's Freudian comments on the original Robbins'
"hip gyrations" of the male chorus
that are inappropriate and farcical.)
Having obviously not done his
homework, we can only conclude
that Groberman "does not care".
Miss Grace Macdonald, on the
other hand, does indeed care about
MUSSOC. For over 34 years, Grace
has helped our club to produce the
quality musical theatre productions
that we have become famous for.
Her expertise, care and attention to
this UBC group has made her name
synonymous with MUSSOC.
In fact, were it not for Grace and
her devotion to the club, MUSSOC
would not be celebrating its 70th
anniversary this year. We wish to
thank Grace for her 34 years of service and sharing with all MUSSOC-
ers and UBC.
We initially felt that it was better
not to acknowledge the publication
of such a review, but due to the
overwhelming response of our audience and supporters, we feel compelled to speak out now, as our
silence may have been misinterpreted as agreement with the
tone of the review.
We wish to apologize to Miss
Macdonald for any misunderstanding that our inaction
may have caused.
Walter Quan
president
UBC Musical Theatre Society
(MUSSOC)
3439 people who died from suicide
every year so that "maybe he or she
might see more clearly the
foolishness of becoming a
statistic," and portrays a superior
attitude toward "those who feel
that their problems are worse than
everyone else's."
The forces which can make people suicidal gradually shut out other
aspects of life, leaving them unable
to think clearly. Suicide appears to
be a better and better way to go and
the greatest danger exists when
suicide becomes, in those peoples'
minds, the only route out of their
despair.
Most suicidal people past
adolescence are beyond caring
about statistics or whether someone
might regard suicide as stupid and
selfish. Neither do they necessarily
feel that their problems are worse
than everyone else's.
The crippling aspect of suicide is
not .the severity of problems, but
the fact that there appears to be no
way out of them.
There are ways out of pain and
difficulties, but suicidal people are
often too oppressed mentally and
emotionally to be able to see or
believe anything but suicide. That's
one reason why help organizations
are out there.
I agree with Duffy Cutler that
suicidal students should stop and
seek help. Like many others, I've
been through it and am very glad
to be alive now.
Lois Sommerfield
arts 3
Silent student
panics populace
over peeling paint
I've been silent for too long. It's
time for somebody to make the
students aware of this issue and it
might as well be me. You see it on
handrailings around campus. You
see it on doors and disposal bins all
over. I'm talking about paint peeling from galvanized metal surfaces.
What every painter should know
is that the zinc coating dn galvanized metal reacts with alkyd paints
and this reaction underminds adhesion. But there is a simple solution
to our problem. The bare metal surface should be washed and under-
coated with a galvanized metal
primer. As a student painter, I feet
much better now.
Brian Mackenzie
commerce 3 Friday, February 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Ban sex in Ubyssey
Exploitation, pornography, and
obscenity. An X-rated adult movie?
A dirty magazine in a downtown
porn shop? . . . NO! The
Valentine's issue of the Ubyssey.
We are referring specifically to the
detailed excerpt in bold white on
black print, with the "censored"
heading.
This appears to be the paper's
latest attempt to capture the attention of its readers and perhaps its
future writers. How desperate is the
Ubyssey?
A university newspaper, like any
other medium, must change with
the times. The issues it deals with
must be current, relevant, and of interest to its readers. But whether or
not these issues have changed over
the years, readers should be able to
expect the same or higher levels of
journalism as were reached
previously by students.
Our paper should be a forum for
all campus groups to express opinions, views and campus "happenings". Its use as a medium for pornography is an abasement of its
purpose and respectability. By
publishing obscene matter under
the guise of a student newspaper,
the editorial staff is abusing a major
channel that students have for expression.
Instead of being used for this
purpose, however, the paper is turning intelligent readers and potential writers off journalism completely.
The majority of educated, open-
minded people would not want to
be any part of such a porn publication. There would be no need for
such desperate recruiting campaigns
as are run in every issue if the level
of printed matter was sufficient on
its own to draw in university talent
and interest.
Fifteen thousand copies of the
Ubyssey are published every Tuesday, and every Friday during the
academic year. They are available
not only to students, but also to the
rest of the community.
A university paper leaves a lasting
impression on any reader, and
reveals a good deal of information
about the institution and the people
who attend it. Is this the type of
representation we want — that provided by an issue such as last week's
Valentine's publication? Is that the
reputation we want the University
of British Columbia to carry? Even
more importantly, do we want to be
a part of ... do we want to pay to
be a part of such a publication?
We have no choice. Whether or
not we want to, we must pay the
AMS fee of $39.50 per year in order
to attend this acclaimed institution.
By paying this fee we are also helping to fund the Ubyssey. A total of
seventy-six thousand dollars is being spent on publications this year
by the AMS. Are we getting our
money's worth?
It would be valid to say that at a
public newsstand, to read or purchase pornographic material or not
to read it is up to the individual; in
that case the individual knows what
to expect.
The ultimate decision as to what
is to be published is in the hands of
the editor (or editors). The calibre
of material that the editors allow to
be printed speaks just as much of
them as anything they could write
themselves.
Obviously the editors of the
Ubyssey have made no attempt to
convey or publish information that
is of interest to the reader. They
have no "connection" with their
general audience.
This must explain the strange
event of their having published an
excerpt from a book which has been
banned by Canada customs. If the
country doesn't want this kind of
obscene literature, why does the
Ubyssey editorial staff feel compelled to print it in our newspaper?
Could this be because the articles
cannot stand on their own strength,
and need censored material in bold
reversed type with flashy headings
to attract attention? Or, perhaps,
are the articles themselves merely
disguises or excuses for the distribution of pornography?
The printing of that excerpt
seems to indicate that there are virtually no guidelines as to what the
Ubyssey will and will not print. Yet
when questioned, a member of their
staff promptly replied that, "of
course, if an article was badly written, it would not be printed." As
well, no racial or sexist material
would be tolerated. When asked
specifically about obscenity or por
nography, one member answered;
"We do not print pornography
because we consider it sexist."
Whether or not this excerpt was,
in a reader's opinion, "sexist", it
was undeniably pornographic.
Although a particular community
can reach a consensus on what kind
of literature it feels is pornographic,
federal law does not, as yet, clearly
define the word pornography.
The Criminal Code of Canada
does, however, deem it an offense
to make, print, publish, or
distribute any obscene written matter. Section 159 states that any
publiction is considered obscene if
"its dominant characteristic is the
undue exploitation of sex."
The sexual exploitation so
graphically and explicitly depicted
in last week's Ubyssey goes far
beyond the bounds of acceptability
and propriety. The strategically
placed deletions and "censored"
label may have made this publication legal, but they did in no way
justify it.
Instead of the paper reflecting
our values, it is conditioning them
to its own negligible standard. The
danger comes in thinking that if it's
allowed in print it must be right.
If your conscience reacted to the
"love scene" shoved in front of you
by the Ubyssey, heed that warning
and take some action. Speak out,
write, defend your freedoms. If
they are being infringed upon now,
it is almost certain that they will be
further stifled in the future . . .
unless you act.
As intelligent, reasonable
students who pay our dues, we
deserve what is due to us: a university newspaper that relects our attitudes and ideas with the maturity
and scope of understanding that we
are striving for ourselves.
Susan Danielsen
Diane Haynes
arts 1
Riim Fkraured, Wine Dqjped
mrfQ J& fWTG MIT TI
The SodaHe Little Cioais
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
WMESDAY NIGHT
SUB SECURITY TEAM
Three positions are available. The Wednesday
Night Security Team will be responsible for patrolling the Student Union Building and enforcing SAC
policies throughout SUB.
Applications may be obtained from the Administrative Assistant's office, SUB Room 238.
Submit applications to SUB 238 no later than 4:00
p.m. on Friday, March 7, 1986
for Men & Women
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDRY
9.95
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
(reg. 12.95)
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Thru' Mar. 1st — Jim Derhouse
Mar. 3-8 — Rob Pietrie
CUECKER5
CHECKMATE
$5.95
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on a 10" bun
Share it with a
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overlooking English Bay
.1
# Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28, 1986
Stories shock senate
OTTAWA (CUP) — Ah ... To
be young again! Well . . . maybe
not.
Twelve senators say they got
quite a shock during hearings in 11
cities last year for the Special Senate
Committee on Youth. Youth from
Bell Island, Nfld., told them that of
146 people there between ages 15.
and 24, two had jobs. Kevin
Christmas, a participant in the
Union of Nova Scotia Indians, told
them "I do not have a brief
prepared. In fact, one was being
prepared but the chap who was
preparing it committed suicide three
weeks ago."
Their 109-page report, released in
Ottawa Feb. 19, is a chronicle of the
sad stories of Canadian youth. "It
is an intolerable situation," Quebec
senator Jacques Hebert, chair of
the committee, told reporters.
Hebert said about 20 per cent of
youth are a "lost generation" who
are out of school, unemployed and
without hope. "For many years
they look for a job and don't find
them," he said. "This is an incredible tragedy."
But youth thumbing through the
report, put together by a staff of
seven (beside the senators) for
$195,740,   might  be   disappointed
RED LEAF
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P.J.'s on 4th is
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after 10:00 p.m.
29U WesrAm. Avenue
JAMES
DEAN
OF EDE
Monday, March 3
7:30 & 9:45
SUB Auditorium
with the number of concrete suggestions to help youth. The specific
recommendations: don't address
the main problem—unemployment.
To create employment, there are
only general suggestions, such as:
"The Committee recommends that
various levels of government
establish or promote the establishment of foundations headed by
people knowledgeable about
business. The funds in these foun
dations would be used to finance
small businesses launched by young
people and to provide advice on
business techniques."
Other suggestions include
"Launching an urgent pilot project
to test the feasibility of work sharing" and a Young Canadians'
Community Service Programme
either by reviving and expanding
Katimavik or creating something
like it."
Savings
(say'vingz) n. 1. economical 2. any
reduction in time, expense, etc. 3.
sums of money saved 4. Kinko's
FREE SELF-SERVICE TYPING AVAILABLE
FOR A LIMITED TIME
IBM-SELECTRIC
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9  F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
I?*J«L XI/EEK
MARCH 3-7
Schedule
ISRAEL TABLE IN SUB CONCOURSE
Videos, Brochures, and Displays
On Mon., Mar. 3, Wed., Mar. 5, & Thurs., Mar. 6
11:30-2:00
DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED: ARAB-
JEWISH RELATIONS IN ISRAEL
Speaker:   Ami   Ruzansky,   Israel   Aliyah
Representative
FALLAFEL LUNCH & ISRAELI
Tuesday, March 4
12:30 Buch B 314
Wednesday March 5
12:30 SUB Party Room DANCING
All Welcome!
Thursday, March 6
12:30 Buch B 214
^^   VAN
DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED: INTEGRATION AND DISINTEGRATION
IN ISRAELI SCHOOLS
Speaker: Dr. Zemira Mevarech, professor
of education at Bar Ilan University Israel,
visiting professor University of Alberta.
DEMOCRACY IN ACTION
VANCOUVER B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
<>
North American
Jewish Studenis'
Network
224-2512
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GRADUATION,
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If you're graduating this year and you've
■ accepted career-oriented employment
at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
the American Express Card.
That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
good up to 12 months after you
graduate.)
Why is American Express
making it easier for you to
get the Card right now'? Well,
simply stated, we recognize
your achievement and we
believe in your future. And as you go up the
ladder, we can help-in a lot of ways.
The Card can help you begin to establish
a credit reference. And, for business, the
Card is invaluable for travel and restaurants.
As well as shopping for yourself.
Of course, the American Express Card
is recognized around the world.
So you are too.
So call 1-800-387-9666 and
ask to have a Special Student
Application sent to you. Or look
for one on campus.
The American Express Card.
Don't leave school without it™
American Express Canada, Inc. is a registered user of the trade marks owned by American Express Company '^Copyright American Express Canada, Inc. 1986 All Rights Reserved Friday, February 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
&&&&Q&3&
Rauschenberg and
Twombley Impress
By N. FINBERG
Transferred Impressions is an exhibition of works of Robert
Rauschenberg and Cy Twombley
currently on display at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The collection
comprises a (presumably representative) survey of both artists' works
from the early 1960's to the present.
The artists' mutual point of
departure is the genre of their work:
both are constituent of the abstract
expressionist group, Rauschenberg
being more well known than
Twombley. Also, both attended the
New York Art Students League and
later Black Mountain College in
North Carolina. Both are concerned with the assimilation of relatively
diverse subject matter into a
coherent form of expression.
Rauschbenberg, whose base is
New York, is very American in the
bold directness of his imagery. Subject matter is assimilated from the
social, political, cultural and
technological mosaic of his environment and extrapolated onto his canvas.
Materials are gathered from the
physical environment and are used
to build the canvas. Thus a viable
and relevant expression is effected.
In a seemingly arbitrary manner
Jackie Kennedy, a Fiat Ritmo, and
the Notre Dame cathedral are juxtaposed, yellows, reds, and
chromes — amongst others — wash
over the given imagery.
Many works present in the show
reflect Rauschenberg's preoccupation with technology: the elemental
role it plays in the perpetuation of
American mythology juxtaposed
with its erosion of humanistic
possibility.
"Sky Garden" (1969): a cross-
sectional scheme of the Apollo II
flanked by similarily treated subsections. The top of the painting is
washed over in blue and the bottom
in red — the fire of human initiative
surging outward, into the sky. The
interplay of color is simple and
natural, but the canvas it covers is
dry, analytical, and, de-humanized.
The most interesting works in
Rauschenberg's exhibit are the
several members of his Hoarfrost
series, created in the early 1970s.
According to the artist, the "Hoarfrost series is done on silk, cotton,
and cheesecloth presenting the im
agery in the ambiguity of freezing
into focus or melting from view."
These works were created by layering fabric over an arrangement of
collage materials on the bed of a
lithographic press, spraying over
solvent, and driving the fabric
layered over with padding through
the press. This process causes the
ink patterned on the collage
material to transfer onto the fabric.
Hence, "transferred images".
Shadows of images delicately
hold sway over the actual underlying images.
"Bud", with the remnant of a
Budweiser case attached to its upper
left-hand corner, focused upon two
crudely intertwined garden pails,
and random border of newspaper
collage, evokes the dispersion of the
suburban cultural milieu.
Preview 1974 is more flamboyant: frontal views of two 1940's
automobiles flanking, one on each
side, a statue of an Egyptian
pharaoh. The enormous divergence
of sources is offset by the work's
textural coherence. Again, an interesting cultural statement.
Twombley's works are altogether
different. Various forms of graphic
communication are brought
together and orchestrated in a
minimalistic fashion. Some of his
works are serialized and highly
repetitive in form. Six Latin Writes
and Poets, for instance, consists of
the names of six different ancient
Roman writers and poets, each
written out on a different canvas.
Other series replicate a clean pattern of scrawling, with virtually no
variation. More interesting is the
series Natural History, Part I,
Mushrooms, in which precise sketches of various species of
mushrooms are brought together
with random crayon scrawling.
The precise is juxtaposed with the
imprecise, polarized forms of expression are integrated in a cohesive
manner. Clearly, any number of
dualistic interpretations may be
drawn from these works.
Twombley's work are introspective
pieces, in contrast with
Rauschenberg's: expressive, in a
different manner.
Transferred Impressions continues at the Vancouver Art Gallery
until March 23.
CANUCKS with YUCKS
By PETER BURNS
Ohe Frantics are a group of boys who like to make people laugh ....
sometimes they succeed, other times they don't.
For a few years the Frantics have provided CBC radio with the few
; the CBC can afford (the World At Six not withstanding). Now the
Frantics (Paul Chato, Rick Green, Dan Redican and Peter Wild) have
jumped — or rather stumbled onto CBC television and have something of a
minor, comedic cult hit on their hands.
The Frantics
CBC Thursdays, 7:30 p.m.
With their cast of irreverant and silly characters (Mr. Canoehead et al)
the Frantics have produced a CBC series that works quite well . . . though
only the Frantics know at what.
Using high production values (ie. lots of CBC money) and a combination
of low and high brow humor, "4 On the Floor", their appropriately titled
series brings some bizarre stuff to Yellowknife, Rocanville and Vancouver
Less self-conscious than most silly comedy (in the tradition of the
Goodies or Dick Emery) the Frantics are more Pythonesque in their self-
indulgence — thus they don't mind if they're the only ones having fun,
making their material less contrived and more natural in delivery, though
not in substance.
The sketches come at a breakneck speed and at that pace they often miss
the mark, but when they do hit it's some of the finer lunacy around.
During actual filming of a street sketch involving Rick Green singing
Nobody Likes Me accompanied by Paul Chato in drag playing sax,
business people near the downtown Toronto location coughed up $12 in 15
minutes to the 'street musicians'.
Pieces like a live tortoise-Maple Leaf hockey game or a business executive and the mini-drama on his answering machine are examples of
Frantic idiocy that hits home, as are any of the sketches involving the
superhero and detective, Mr. Canoehead.
Mr. Canoehead is integral to the Frantics' style of humour. This
superhero's legend was born out of a Canadian camping trip gone awry.
Our hero was struck by a near fatal lightning bolt while portaging his
aluminum canoe. This act of nature (and great writing) permanently welded a two person canoe to the head of our friend and has endowed him with
a tinny (aluminum) echoing voice and a desire to stamp out crime in Canadian shopping malls. Disguised as a bird, a sign post or a mole, Mr.
Canoehead must be seen to be believed.
of the
By RONALD STEWART
I should have disliked this play.
Crimes of the Heart, a Master of
Fine Arts thesis production is an
emotional — sometimes overly sentimental and melodramatic — comedy/drama. The play focuses on a
brief but important period in the
lives of the three Magrath sisters.
Lenny (Cynthia Ford) the oldest,
never really left home; she still
looks after the family house and her
ailing grandfather, while slowly
trudging down the road of
spinsterhood. Meg (Sue Elworthy)
the wayward black sheep, has left
her defunct singing career in
California to return home for the
family crisis. Babe (Johnna Wright)
the youngest, married the richest
young man in town, and shot him
shortly before the play begins.
From these simple, rather cliched
beginnings, the play evolves into a
complex mosaic of plot twists and
revelations.
Some of the production's problems stem from this. The number
of incredible complications in the
characters' lives often made the
play seem like a soap opera; how
could one family have so many problems?
The play has almost as many problems as the Magraths. Both the
comic timing and comic content
often fail to connect.
Because a play is set in the
American South (this one is
Mississippi), the playwright always
seems to feel obliged to include a
self-righteous, Scarlet O'Hara-style
prig-
Furthermore, the down-home accents,  at times,  take  a hike  to
dramatic limbo.
The main problem is the emotional, sentimental story. You'll
laugh, you'll cry, goes the old
claim; and what better story to do
so than that of three charming,
vulnerable Southern belles, learning
to cope with their problems and
each other? As I said, I really
should have disliked this one.
So why the heck did I enjoy it so
much?
Because, all the problems just
mentioned were balanced by
beneficial qualities elsewhere.
Unlike most plays with
melodramatic tendencies, this one
still showed a concern for
character.
Each of the three sisters were
likeable and attractive characters.
Every dark secret or problem gave
them depth and complexity,
transcending the shallow initial impressions each character gave. The
complications also ensured that the
play was never dull.
The three lead actors take advantage of the gradual deepening of
their roles. As the play progresses,
they play off each other better, acting more and more like real sisters
Okay, so Crimes of the Heart is
sentimental; how could the emotional reunion of three sisters of the
South be anything but? Besides,
everyone enjoys a good, mushy
story every now and then. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28,1986
Waterloo parades virgins
WATERLOO (CUP) — The
president of the University of
Waterloo is determined to maintain
the university's 15-year old Miss
Oktoberfest   beauty   pageant,
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy Puce Blorgs on this tiny
island kingdom quaked in their
shoes Wednesday after yet more
threats to their very survival. Scabby Flow was reported'temporarily
panic-stricken by appearance of
menacing pair denying the validity
of precedent as acceptable policy
and declaring intentions of a future
bloody coup. General consternation
soon abated with the realization
that it is all bunk but Avid Vermin
is still nervous. Pooch Cassidy and
the Sundeck Kid looked on in
fraternal horror.
despite a letter campaign and
1500-name petition protesting the
sexist nature of the pageant.
In a letter to the university's
Women's Centre, Doug Wright said
he is concerned that if the administration gives in on the issue, it
will "expose the University to
pressures of every sort in favour of,
or in opposition to, political and
ethical opinions" from a variety of
interest groups.
"I have concluded that it would
be improper for the university to
ban such an event on this campus,"
Wright said in the letter. "A university is ill-equipped to establish itself
as a censor or moral judge, nor
should it ever be in that position."
Members of the Women's Centre, however, were unhappy with
Wright's decision. "It was a cop-
out," said Stacey O'Sullivan.
"He is saying that the University
can't make a moral judgement,
which has been done in the past,
with Enginews for example," said
O'Sullivan.
Enginews was a controversial
monthly tabloid published by the
engineering society until late last
semester. It stopped publishing due
to pressure from the university administration and women's groups
over its sexist content.
The Women's Centre is scouting
around for an off-campus venue for
the pageant, held each fall.
Women who want to be in the
Miss Oktoberfest pageant must
have never lived in a common-law
relationship, have never had an
abortion and must be unmarried.
"The message is if you're not
pure and virginal, you're not a real
woman; you're not desirable," said
O'Sullivan.
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
DENTIST
CU&C Health Service Society is seeking a dentist to operate
its first dental clinic. A salary or lease arrangement is open to
negotiation, in either case an attractive income is assured. The
clinic should open in June, however it can be scheduled to suit
the availability of the successful applicant.
Please submit resumes to:
General Manager
CU & C Health Services Society
22 East 8th Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.    V5T 1R4
TEMP**
ps&tysj<xnopV3tij\ti/\
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food at
Vi price
after 10:00 p.m.
®1i^y$£nd,
«f;'fr:V.T.yji;'Jii'i'i;;i<;i:v;nn)
on**"*-
BRUNEI:
GABON:
EAST MALAYSIA:
WEST MALAYSIA:
NIGERIA:
THAILAND:
TUNISIA:
All disciplines.
All disciplines.
Junior, Senior and Graduate Students (with emphasis on Bumiputras)
in Mechanical, Chemical Instrumentation, Electrical (Power) Electronics (communication), and Petroleum Engineering; Petroleum
Geology, Welding, Corrosion, and Quality Assurance.
Junior, Senior and Graduate Students (with emphasis on Bumiputras)
in Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, Mathematics, Physics,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Finance, Accounting, Economics,
MBA and Marketing.
Geologists/Geophysics,    Engineering   and
M.S.    or   Ph.D.    level
Computer Science.
Senior and Graduate Students in Mechanical, Electrical, Petroleum and
Chemical Engineering — Computer Science. Masters in Business
Administration.
Senior and Graduate Students in Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil
Engineering; Physics, Mathematics, Geology, Computer Science,
Finance, Accounting, Economics, and MBA, Ph.D. in Geophysics.
RESUME FORMS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE - UBC
PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN BY 18 MARCH, 1986
CAMPUS VISIT 1 APRIL, 1986
RECRUITMENT FOR
ROYAL DUTCH/SHELL GROUP
COMPANIES OVERSEAS
A service furnished to overseas Shell companies
by SCALLOP CORPORATION (A Royal Dutch/Shell Qroup Company)
OPPORTUNITIES ONLY FOR NATIONALS FROM THE FOLLOWING COUNTRIES
WHO WISH TO RETURN TO THEIR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN
SCALLOP  CORPORATION will  be on campus to interview graduates of the following
nationalities and disciplines:
WESTERN EUROPE: M.S. or Ph.D. level in Petroleum, Chemical, Mechanical, Electrical
(Power and Control) and Civil/Structural Engineering, Chemistry,
Geology, Physics, Geophysics, Mathematics, Statistics, Computer
Systems Analysts and Operations Research Specialists. (Applicants
should be prepared to work outside their country of origin.)
BRAZIL: Masters  in  Business Administration and  Graduates in  Marketing,
Chemical Engineering, Economics, Agricultural Economics, Law and
Personnel Management/Industrial Relations.
UBC
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This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
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This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
J^fcAEL WEEK
DEMOCRACY CHALLENGED:
Arab-Jewish Relations in Israel
Speaker: AMI RUZANSKY
Israel Aliyah Representative
TUES., MAR. 4
12:30
Buchanan B 314
JOBS JOBS, JOBS
*/
BoathousE
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WANTS YOU!
If you're energetic, personable and
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APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED
TUES. NOON AT BROCK HALL
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Intramural Sports 1986-87
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Apply by Friday, March 7, 1986
Intramural Office Rm. 66,
Lower Sub Plaza
Sports Program Positions
Student Directors (4)
Assistant Directors
Promotion Managers
Sport Editor
An    opportunity    to    work    in    one    of    the    following
leagues/programs: Fort Camp Hockey League, Runs/Cycle
Program, Cross Volleyball League, Co-Rec Program, Nitobe
Basketball League, Contract Program, Handly Cup Soccer
(Term I), Floor Hockey League (Term 2), Racquet Sports
(Tennis, Squash, and Badminton, or Special Events).
A dministra tion Positions
Finance Director Sport Publication
Awards Director Editor in Chief
Advertising: Marketing Director     Assistant Editors (2)
Journalists (3)
Assistant Director (Marketing Research)
Photographers (4)
Advertising Production Personnel (4)
Graphic Artists (2)
Sport Ventures Positions
(Merchandise Department)
President Finance Manager
Vice-Presidents (4) Promotions Managers (9)
Marketing Manager
Details on all positions and honoraria available may be obtained from
the office.
L/luC iKjfojam/tfiJw...       /ot, good sports! Friday, February 28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Hero's influence
From page 2
situation where you tried to help the
lives of people belonging to another
country."
Sweden assumed responsibility
for the lives of Hungarians. Anger
recognizes as the work became
more difficult, and more life-
threatening, it changed:
"It became much more international work. Not just Swedish, but
a general humanitarian mission."
Today we pursue ideals like
human rights, and we show a concern for the mistreatment of individuals in other nations. Because
we have a sense of responsibility to
those others. We hardly recognize
how recent is this international
sense of responsibility.
Anger recalls that before the war
"people never spoke of 'human
rights'. There is a new sense of the
legal basis now for the fight for
human rights." Today we have
Amnesty International, and U.N.
relief organizations. The recent fundraising for the starving in Africa is
another example of our international humanitarianism. Anatoly
Shcharansky, imprisoned in the
Soviet Union for nearly a decade
because he applied for an exit visa,
gained world attention, and his
plight became a topic at all major
east west summits. He was finally
released last month, a tribute to the
patience and persistence of those
who sought his release.
Wallenberg too has been, and
will .continue to be, a topic of
discussion between the United
States and the Soviet Union. President Jimmy Carter revealed that he
had raised the subject with Leonid
Bresznev, with no response except
that Wallenberg died in 1947. But
the west must remain patient, and
vigilant.
Until we receive proof of
Wallenberg's death, we must follow
his own example and accept respon
sibility for the treatment of a
foreigner in a foreign country. The
Canadian government recognized
this responsibility when it made
Wallenberg its first honourary
citizen. We are responsible to see
him released, a fellow citizen of
Canada; a fellow citizen of the
world.
Jeno Levai, Wallengerg's first
biographer, explains the
significance of Wallenberg: "Of
greatest importance is the fact that
the Nazis and Arrow Cross men
were not free to run amok. . .They
were unable to act with impunity. .
.Wallengerg was the world's observing eye, the one who constantly
demanded the criminals' conviction."
Our memory of Wallenberg's
work, and our concern for his
welfare, implore us to assume this
role of the "world's observing
eye", and never to rest so long as
anyone in the world suffers unjustly.
And k> m do not Indood coinprohamj iho practical unconditional nacaaMty ol tha
moral imperaiiva, yal wa do nimprahand Its incamprnhamlbHny which ■• all thai
can ba fairly itamandvd al a phHoaophy which in na prkiclplai wiriwrja lo raach tfw
HlMt of human raaaan-
- I Kant
land wa can't aitlMrr
Students: no booze, no limit
"\ YOU PONT UAYE.TO £E ABIG^
SP£K/DE£TO TfcEAT AFClENO
To AfiOPEfcfiWlGER AU&
KINGS HEAD.
& BRING IN TU15 AD AMP TRY
ONE OF OUR SENSATIONtVL S/3
POfltfD BURGERS AT RETG. PRICE
- AMP6ET ASECONDOF EQUAL VAIDG
FOR li)SIA..^^$
ST. ANNE DE BELLEVUE,
Que. (CUP) — The campus pub
that serves John Abbott and Macdonald Colleges is hoping to cut
back on drunk driving by offering
participating students unlimited
non-alcoholic drinks.
Bar manager Bernie Bonenberg
says he proposed the designated
driver programme for the Ceilidh
pub after losing friends in alcohol-
related accidents. Participants are
given badges that give them free access to soft drinks and fruit juices,
providing they drink no alcohol and
agree to drive their friends home.
"Students can use this to their
advantage. By coming to the bar in
groups and appointing a different
designated driver each week,
everyone involved will be assured a
safe ride home," he said.
Bonenberg said the programme
will be expensive, but the price is
worth it. "The price of life is worth
much more than a few bottles of
beer," he said.
"If someone was killed in an accident driving home from my bar, I
couldn't handle that on my campus.
I'd get out of the bar business in ten
minutes," he said.
OFt=E«.
EXPIRES
MAYSl/tb
CREATIVE   FOOD t. BEVERAGE CO.
I«e> Yew st • i'/j BH.6 ftom Mrs Beach 733-3933
SEr\^m IWtt yew St • I'/i Blks from kjts ■
cm**
rFEG> (bOODAKT/OAY UMTit
Crisp (SLSchnappy
^WifW
■'wi/VU/sr^
After your favourite activity schnapp over to a couple
of fresh alternatives. Peppermint Schnapps and new Orange Schnapps,
two cool blasts of freshness. So what are you waiting for?
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS
TASTE THE DIFFERENCE
albion books
alphabet sale
20% off all authors whose names
begin with the letter of the day.
March
a
i
b
c
d
e
f
0
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i
12
i
k
1
15
m
n
o
p
q
2i
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21 .
s
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2A
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28
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RECORDS
AT REGULAR LOW PRICES
523 Richards St.
Vancouver • 662-3113
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents
AS YOU
LIKE IT
By William Shakespeare
Directed by
John Brockington
MARCH 5-15
• Special Previews      *
• MARCH 5 & 6       *
• 2 for 1/reg. admission   *
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Thurs. Mat. Mar. 13, 12:30
Student Tickets: $4.50
FIEKRIC W06I THSA1US
Box Office       Room 207
Support Your
Campus Theatre Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28, 1986
"^
<'iJ00ft
TODAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bowling night, 6-9 p.m.. SUB gam« room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunch hour m—ting, noon. International houae
lounge.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Regiatration for unlimited winter dance claim:
your choice of any or alt for only M6. noon, SUB
208.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Rim allowing: Apocah/pee Now. 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
HEALTH SCIENCES STUDENTS COMMITTEE
Lecture: A.I.D.S. knpHcatione for health care
profeeaionale. noon, IRC 6.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
FUm thowing: Pee Wee's Big Adventure, 7 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
THE UBYSSEY
Big staff meeting, 3 p.m., SUB 241K.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden, 4:30 p.m., SUB 206.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lecture: Stephen Lewis, UN ambassador, 10:30
a.m.-noon.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Speaker: Prof. Petro on human rights in eastern
Europe, noon, SUB 212.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Guest speaker, 7 p.m., UBC daycare gym, 2845
Acadia Rd.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops: introduction to ballet dance, March 15. Registration 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., International house office.
SATURDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Remember: career planning seminar, 8:30 a.m.
-6 p.m., Holiday Inn Harbourside, Vancouver.
UBC SAIUNO CLUB
Rescheduled spring thaw regatta, 10:30 a.m..
Jericho sailing dub.
( STAMP CLUB
Stamp IphHatWcl exhibition, 7:30 p.m. - 12:30
a.m.. International houae, room 400.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Guest speaker, 7 p.m.. UBC daycare gym - 2B46
Acadia Rd.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Navigational raHy, 1 p.m., old bus loop (in front
of the new bookatore).
UBC RUM SOCIETY
Rim showing: Apocalypse Now, 9:30 p.m., SUB
eudftorium.
UBC RUM SOCIETY
Film showing: Pee Wee's Big Adventure, 7 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship terv.ee, 10 a.m., UBC daycare gym
-2846 Acadia Rd.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Pancake breakfast, 12:15 p.m., St. Mark's college basement.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film showing: Pee Wee's big adventure, 7 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Game, everyone welcome, 11 a.m., 2Bth and
Camosun.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film showing: Apocalypse Now, 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Regular practice ntte, newcomers welcome, will
be discussing details for general meeting on
March 10, 7:30 p.m.. Armouries.
MONDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Annual general meeting and election of officers,
noon, SUB 211.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops:  introduction to pallet, March 8, introduction to bel-
Are you too embarrassed to ask
your friends who this Marcos guy is
anyway? Are you wondering just
what's so bad about South Africa?
Do you ask yourself what all the
commotion is over Nicaragua?
International Development Days
on March 3 to 6, could provide you
with some answers. The World
University Service of Canada is
sponsoring a week of events including a film on Bolivia at noon on
Monday in BUCH B212. At 7 p.m.
there will be a forum on the current
refugee situation in Africa, with
three African refugee sponsored
students and the U.N. public relations officer from Ottawa. On
Wednesday Oxfam is holding a
slide presentation on Nicaragua, at
noon in BUCH A205. Watch for
more events and take this chance to
educate yourself.
Are you pulling your hair out in a
fit of anxiety over mid-term exams?
Do you only have five pages for
your 25 page paper? Read about
pressure on UBC students in a
report "Learning Under Stress —
Are There Alternatives?" presented
by Students For A Democratic
University. Copies are available for
25 cents from the Alma Mater
Society business office, SUB 266,
Speakeasy and UBC counselling
services.
The UBC Stamp club is holding
it's third annual exhibition at International House (room 400) Saturday, 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Free
stamps will be given to budding collectors and experienced help and information about the collection will
be given. Everyone is welcome and
admission is free.
FIRST RfcAUZATioO
that Ev6feTn4«aG Wv/e
6£6i0 TAOGfAT IS AUI6
LSAT & GMAT
PREP TRAINING
Centers across Canada and the U.S.A.
• Taught by Professionals & Educators
• Lecture Format • Low Tuition
• Local Offices & Staff
• Application Essay Assistance
• Flexible Hours • Practice Tests
• VISA Accepted • Tape Library
Weekend courses (Fri. evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
Sexton ii
Educational Centers f
B.C. & Yukon
(604) 684-4411
Alberta
(403) 278-6070
414-1200 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2C7 Ontario
(416) 968-9595
belly dance, March 15. Registration 8:30 a.m.
-4:30 p.m.. International house office.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film: Dominga - a film on Bolivia, noon, Buch
B212.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Forum: The current refugee situation in Africa.
Guest speakers UNHCR public relation officer
and three UBC student refugees, 7 p.m., SUB
205.
NETWORK
Israel info table, 11:X a.m. - 2 p.m., SUB concourse.
TUESDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 211.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 302.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Nominations for 1966-87 executives must be in
by today at 1 p.m., SUB 249 6.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops: introduction to belly dance, March 15, limited
space. Register 8:X a.m. - 4:30 p.m.. International house office.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
NETWORK
"Arab-Jewish relations in Israel" Ami Ru2ansky,
noon, Buch B314.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorials, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.. Brock hall 350.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, 94.00 and 66c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS	
SPRING CRUISE! Five days luxurious adventure in the Gulf Islands — May 1-5,
post-exam R & R. Meet new people and get
valuable sailing experience. $135. Contact
John, 263-9678/228-4231.
THE   BEST WAY TO  LEARN  FRENCH?
In a small town, not far from Paris, near the
coast, in one of the most picturesque
regions of France. Living with a French
family or in a historical mansion (10
bathrooms!). REAL IMMERSION with intensive and semi-intensive teaching for
English speaking people only. The French
American Study Center has 10 years of experience and does a great job. University
credits — special rates for Canadians.
Winter Program on the Riviera. Trip paid for
Counsellors.
MEET the Program representative on Saturday, the 1st of March between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m.
AT: Apt. 4, 1366 West 13th, Van. or phone
731-2639 evening Feb. 28th.
PHRATERES PRESENTS "Vintage Fashion
show" 2-4 p.m., March 2 at Isabel Mclnnes
Lounge, Gage Towers. Admission is by
donation to food bank. Everyone welcome!
30 - JOBS
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE
FEE
REFERENDUM
FEB. 27&28
■ Undergrad lounge bldg. fund
■ Improve Science Week
■ Speaker Series
■ Improve Newsletter
■ Black & Blue Review
■ More & Better Student Events
VOTE IN HEBB THEATRE
&CHEM. 250
11:25-4:25 p.m.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Mr. Stephen Lewis
Canadian Ambassador to
the United Nations
THE UNITED NATIONS:
WHAT DOES THE
FUTURE HOLD?
Saturday, March 1
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, 8:15 p.m.
Free
CARETAKER  NEEDED  for  remote  island
lodge  up  coast.   A  chance to write or
mediate.    Couples    preferred.    Stipend!
bonus. Call Woldy 926-1237 bet. 7-10 p.m.
BABYSITTER NEEDED immed. 3-5:30 p.m.
M-F. Involves some driving & meal preparation. Must have own car. Karen, 228-0583
after 6 p.m.
THE KEG RICHMOND will be reopening
late March. We are now accepting applications for all job positions. Please apply in
person at Brock Hall Tues. Mar. 4 at noon.
See Display ad.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
10 SPEED, Raleigh Record, blue.
$95, 000-0000.
74 NOVA, red, V8, auto., P.S., P.B.,
97,000 mi., radio/cass., $1350 obo.
734-1678.
STEREO — Must sell — Receiver, tuner,
amp — 25WPC, turntable, speakers, headphones. $150 (new $4501. Call 732-5991.
1978 TOYOTA COROLLA. 2-door, 4-speed,
excellent condition. $2900. 222-1564.
20 - HOUSING
INEXPENSIVE room and board, located on
campus. $350/month (double occ).
$400/month (single). Includs TV, VCR,
washing facilities, IBM computer and a
sauna. Call 222-4470. Ask for lan.
FURNISHED ROOM for rent for n/s female at 26th & Dunbar. Laun. fac. avail.
Mar. & Apr. only. $237.50/mo. util. incl.
Questions? Call Shannon, 228-9085.
25 - INSTRUCTION
"GREAT EXERCISE", great fun! English
riding lessons at new facility with indoor
riding ring. Located in Delta 2 min. thru tunnel. Phone stable a.m. 946-2590 or evgs.
856-8735.
LEARN TO SAIL. UBC Sailing Club will
be offering lessons beginning Mar. 8.
24 hrs. instruction, Sign up SUB 58.
35 - LOST
MEN'S WHITE GOLD ribbed ring in SUB
or close by on Feb. 20. Reward. 228-2747 or
224-1228. Barb or Dave:
40 - MESSAGES
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free tests—confidential help.
PREGNANT &  DISTRESSED? We are a
childless couple desiring to adopt. Perhaps
we can assist each other. Please respond in
confidence with your name & address to
Pauline, P.O. Box 48552, Bentall Centre,
Vane, B.C. V7X 1A3.
TO THE PERSON who took off with my
black & white check coat at the Figi suitcase party last Wednesday. Return it to the
lost & found of the new HMEC Bldg. No
questions asked.
What do you think?
What do you know?
Experience the thrill of creation &
acknowledgement. Have your thoughts,
hopes, feelings or ideas published in a book
celebrating the character of the people of
B.C. What a gift to Vancouver's Centennial!
All you do is send your contribution along
with a $5 cheque (to cover costs) £t a
S.A.S.E. to CEE Communications, P.O. Box
91980, West Vane, B.C. V7V 4T2. Keep it
short! Include your name if you want your
work credited. Spread the word — tell your
friends. (Non-published works only. We
reserve the right to edit or reject contributions).
ALL ARTS UNDERGRADS
Submit Your
Short Stories, Poetry. Scripts,
Drawing or Photography
for
Publication in the
1986 ARTS REVIEW
Magazine
Until Feb. 28. 1986
Buch A107
70 - SERVICES
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings at
10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology.
6060 Chancellor Boulevard
YOUR PARTIES GOT NO HUM to their
drums? Pick up the beat by calling
228-3017. CITR mobile sound delivers the
best dance music Et rock 'n roll cheap.
70 - SERVICES
PARTY??
Complete Music & Lighting
System for only $175.   For
more information call
Skylines Mobile Music
324-4983
75 - WANTED
APPLICATIONS
for
A.M.S. ART GALLERY
1986-87 SHOWS
are now being accepted.
Deadline Mar. 15
To receive an application
send a self-addressed
stamped envelope to:
Box 23
AMS Art Gallery Cttee.
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vane, B.C. V6T 2A5
80 - TUTORING
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U & Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: WordPerfect. Call
Kerry Rigby, 876-2895. 12th & Commercial.
TYPIST will type essays, theses, etc.
$1.00/page. Min. notice req'd. Call
222-0150 after 6:00.
TERM PAPERS & resumes. Minimum notice. 222-4661. Wed., Thurs., Fri. Noon-5
p.m. Weekends before noon.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech., equal., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING. Student
discount. High quality work. 10th &
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333      (hrs. 9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703 Friday, February 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
In radio news this week . . . Enjoying lots of
airplay lately at CITR are locals, Slow who
have great songs out on Zulu . . . Also enjoying extensive airplay are the Marshmellow
Overcoats with 'Hell' ... PI L with 'Rise' and
the Subterraneans with soon-to-be classic
'Hell Is a Microwave' . . . CITR is presenting
Moev, Grapes of Wrath and 4th Floor in an all-
ages event at the Sub, March 7th .. . March is
benefit month at CITR as the Savoy hosts a
CITR benefit every Monday night in March.
Among those appearing will be No Fun, Big
Electric Cat and Subterraneans . . . The cave
unleash the Lords of the New Church 18th at
the New York Theatre - Shanghai Dog will
support .
P.B.
Jz>cUbtfc
Luminous Sites, a Western Front/Video
Inn project, 10 video installations take place in
a plethora of galleries and city spaces from
now until April 4, the first being Tomiyo
Sasaki's Spawning Sockeyas, Feb 25
-March 23 at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
Starting today is Barbara Steinman's
Cenotapha, at Presentation House (333
Chesterfield Ave., North Van.).
Naw Children's Gallery Exhibition of
work by elementary school students, Vancouver Art Gallery (750 Hornby St.
682-5621). until April 27.
In Vancouver, New Works by lan D.
McLeod, Granville Island Graphics (I860
Johnston St.. 687-8914), until Fab. 26
-March 22.
Extraordinary Scianca with Ordinary
Stuff, a four session workshop for young
children, of experiments with ordinary
household objects, held on Saturdays, March
1, 8, 15 and 22. Art* Sciance and
Technology Contra (600 Granville 687-8414).
Philippe Raphanol, an exhibition of new
paintings, Diana Ferris Gallery (third floor
166 Water St., Vancouver, 687-2629), March
1 -16.
A Measure of Consensus, Canadian Architecture in transition, at the UBC Fine Arts
Gallery. February 1 - March 1.
Eastern Eyae/Westem Lenses, Chinese-
Canadian artist Mary-Ann Liu pulls off a cross
cultural feat in an exhibit of sculptured heads
at the UBC Aaian Contra. All heads report
March 2 to 16 (head info 681-5833 or
688-7139).
Arts. Sciences and Technology Centra
presents Mad Hatter's Haberdashery. Sunday March 9,1-4 p.m. A drop-in workshop led
by Margaret Bootsma who invites the public
to come on down and make a mess of equipment and paints they supply (for a nominal
fee). You can keep the hat.
Kids Build Kites. David Tuttle of the
prestigious Vancouver Kite Flyers Association
leads a do-it-yourself kite workshop. Space
cadets will be welcomed at the Arts,
Sciences and Tochnology, Saturday,
March 1,1-3 p.m., Sunday, March 2,1-3 p.m.
Gallery in the Park, at the Arts Contra.
Queen's Park Tuesday through Sunday, noon
to   3  p.m.   featuring   Jean   Cho.   In   New
Westminster .
. info.: 525-3244.
Hmi'c
The Vancouver Opera Club and Surray Art
Gallery invite you to an illustrated preview of
Mozart's The Magic Flute on Wednesday,
March 5, 8:00 p.m. held at the Surray Arts
Centre (13570-88 Avenue, Surrey). Tickets
are $2.00 general admission and $1.00 for
Opera Club members.
Surrey Art Gallery presents the refreshing
sounds of The Woman's Bluaa and Jazz
Band in concert, at the Surrey Arts Centre
(13750-88 Ave.). Sunday March 9, at 2 p.m.
The concert is being held in conjunction with
an exhibition of paintings and collages by
Wendy Dobereiner, February 13 - March 9.
Admission is free of charge.
Rank and File, a Los Angeles cowpunk
band, will appear at the Town Pump Saturday, March 8.
Tha Jonathan Kally/Carla Smith
Quintet will be appearing at The Classical
BUCK
■HipafycKI u» Toipcud Or
GREAT NEWS!
Mon. thru Thurs.
in March & April
P.J.'s on 4th is
offering all food al
Vz price
after 10:00 p.m.
?%£ (Hr&r4m. Avenue
Joint. (Carrall Street, Gastown) Friday,
February 28 and Saturday March 1, with 3
sets beginning at 9:30 p.m. each evening.
The Vancouver Bach Choir presents In
Celebration of Whales, Friday February 28,
8:30 p.m. at the Orpheum. The concert
features conductor Bruce Pullan and
Knowlton Nash as narrator, and international soloist, Judith Forst. Tickets are on sale
at CBO/VTC outlets or call 280-3311 or
280-4444 to charge by phone.
The Alexander Quartet with Michael
Newman. Guitar will be playing the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse Tuesday, March 11 at
8:30 p.m. For more information call 988-6131.
U.B.C.'s Dr. Robert Silverman, pianist
will perform music by Beethoven, Ravel, and
Prokofiev at the UBC Recital Hall, March 4
at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $5.00 for the general
public, free to students.
V&s
The Hot Jazz Society presents the Grand
Dominion Jazz Band, Friday, February 28
and Saturday March 8 at the Hot Jazz Club
(2120 Main Street). Tickets are $12.00 in advance, $15.00 at the door.
Mr. Dave Returns — Devid Lindley end
El Rayo-X return to the Town Pump (66
Water Street. Gastown; 683-6695), Monday,
March 3 through Thursday March 6.
Tha Magic Flute opens March 8 at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre 280-4444 or
280-3311 and continues on March 11, March
13 and March IS. Performances are at 8 p.m.
with ticket prices ranging from $16-$48
(Saturdays), $12-$40 (Tuesday/Thursday)
and Student/ Senior advance tickets $5 off
Tuesday/Thursday only. Stand by seats $5,
half hour before curtain time.
Vancouver Folk Music Festival presents
David Campbell, bringing songs from
Guyana, to the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (1896 Venables), March 2, et 8:00
! p.m. Tickets are $8.00.
Cantata for Vancouver by composer
Peter Barring and featuring BUI Reid as narrator, with work by Canadian poet, Earle
Birney, will be performed at the Museum of
Anthropology on Thursday, March 6, at 8:00
p.m. Two additional performances will take
place at the Arts Club Theatre. Granville
Island on Sunday March 9 and Sunday
March 16 at 8:00 p.m. For ticket information
call 921-1
Resistance: Love In A Bitter Time, a
new work by the Dance Brigade the Vancouver Eaat Cultural Centra and the Folk
Music Festival join forces to bring five new
dances, at the Cultch (1895 Venables
254-9578), Merch 18-22.
Mysterious Objects, a multimedia performance installation and exhibition by Andre
Petterson, at the Cultch (254-9578).
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE II
How to
leave
home
without
wony.
Choose a Wardair Contiki
holiday and relax. It's a holiday full of fun,
adventure and excitement. You'll have a
wonderful time.
And if your folks start to worry, tell them
not to. Tell them it's a Wardair Contiki tour.
Tell them Contiki has been taking people
your age around Europe for 25 years. They'll
know about Wardair's great reputation, but it
can't hurt to play it up. Make sure they know
that there's an experienced tour manager
on every trip so you don't have to take care
of hassles with customs, currency and
accommodation.
Now with any little worries out of the way.
you can concentrate on the good time you'll
have. You'll travel with a group that shares
your interests and your age (18-35s only).
Wardair's Contiki tours draw young people
from around the world, so you're sure
to meet an interesting range of new friends.
No one's going to force you to traipse
around endless old, cold buildings either—
Contiki tours are planned to appeal to your
interests, and if you'd rather plan some of
your own activities, that's okay too.
Tours range from 13 to 65 days, and can
cover most of the high spots of Europe and
Britain. A Wardair Contiki tour is as much
fun as you can handle!
Your Travel Agent has the new Wardair
Contiki brochure and all the information
you'll need to plan to leave home on the
trip of a lifetime.
4Wardair Holidays
ES Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 28, 1986
Battered women need transition houses
By EVELYN JACOB
The Women's House Saving Action Group will end their eight
month occupation of Vancouver's
Transition House following a Vancouver City council move to seek
funding for a city operated House.
"The city has taken on the
responsibility of saving the Transition House to the best of their
abilitiy, but the real fate of the
house relies on funding from both
the federal and provincial governments who are notoriously slow,"
said Action Group official Megan
Ellis.
If the funding isn't provided, a
large proportion of battered women
and their children will have
nowhere to go for protection, she
said.
The group has been occupying
the house ever since June to protest
the provincial government's decision to close it. Ellis said they are
trying to pressure the province to
recognize its responsibility to battered women.
Ellis said the group has managed
to avoid a situation where women
would not have a place to go, adding it is time governments "lift the
responsibility from the shoulders of
the occupiers."
Peter Waring, executive assistant to
the B.C. human resources minister,
could not comment on government
plans to help fund Transition
House.
"I have no idea about the
ministry's plans regarding Transition House. We are just getting our
feet wet", said Waring, referring to
recent cabinet shuffles appointing
Jim Neilsen human resources
minister.
One of the main criticisms of
Transition House and shelters in the
lower mainland is a shortage of
beds: Transition House contains 10
beds, while the Salvation Army's
Kate Booth House houses a mere
twelve.
According to Ellis and City
Council social planner Vicki Mor
ris, Vancouver has fewer beds
available than any other major city
in Canada. Quebec funding for
transition houses, for example, increased 30 per cent last year.
"Even with an additional ten
beds, Vancouver will still be worse
off than any other city in Canada",
Morris said. "City Council has not
yet settled on an exact number of
beds the new Transition House
should contain, but it is clear we
need more", she added.
Jan Ford, spokesperson for
Women against Violence against
Women, said battered women have
nowhere to go even with referrals to
other centres and shelters. "Most of
the time these places are full, and so
the only option is emergency services which do not provide a supportive atmosphere."
She said social workers at the
ministry realize the need for more
beds but will not speak up in case
they lose their jobs. Ford added
since the closure of Transition
House in June, the number of calls
to her centre have been
"astronomical" and are increasing
steadily. But she said help for battered women is not the centre's
focus, adding they don't possess the
necessary legal expertise battered
women often need.
Ford said she would be reluctant
to refer women to some shelters
because women occupying them
often have drug and alcohol related
problems, or are ex-psychiatric patients. "These centres are too institutionalized for women," Ford
said. She added that battered
women should not be labelled as
"crazy".
Meanwhile, City Council's Social
Planing department is developing
an outline for the future of Transition House, Morris assures.
"We are presently asking
ourselves what we want money for,
and which services are necessary."
However Morris would not specify
details of their plan before Council
enters into negotiations with the
Federal and Provincial governments. But the essentials of the program will include:
• twenty-four hour staffing.
• Provision for child care.
• Some means of providing
women with legal assistance.
"I feel positive that we will get
funding from both levels of government," Morris said, not specifying
an amount Council will ask for. She
added she feels "absolutely and
conclusively" that there is a need
for an additional transition house in
Vancouver, pointing out the
ministries involved must respond to
that need.
Morris will recommend a
minimum of ten beds be included in
the new Transition House, and that
the new centre be moved from its
existing location.
WARNING: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked — avoid inhaling. Average per Cigarette-
Export "A" Light Regular "tar" 10.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg. King Size "tar" 10.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg.
Export "A" Extra Light Regular "tar"' 8.0 mg., nicotine 0.7 mg. King Size "tar" 9.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg.

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