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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1990

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Array the Ubyssey
N
"Gee, I could
almost get used
to this
n
Dan Andrews.
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, Monday, March 20, 1990
Vc   72, No 45
nEUSlettre offends campus groups
by Franka Cordua-von Specht
The racist, sexist and homophobic jokes within last week's
nEUSlettre have drawn cries of
outrage from the university community.
The nEUSlettre is published
weekly and is the Engineering
Undergraduate Society's internal
pipeline to its undergraduates.
An "Indian Application for
Employment" which took up most
ofthe fourth page ofthe newsletter
opened with the statement that it
was "not necessary to attach a
photo since you all look alike."
The "application" then followed with a series of questions
and multiple choice answers to be
ticked off.
Under the section "approximate estimate of income," the
application offered the choices of
"welfare," "theft," "unemployment" and "beer bottles."
Under "abilities" the choices
allowed were "demonstration
leader," "pimp," "evangelist,"
"rapist," "chief beer drinker,"
"sleeping in bar."
The rest of the application
form was filled with similar gross
stereotypes.
"At first I felt profound shock
and then hurt. I couldn't believe
this could happen in the 1990s,"
said Bev Scow, president of the
Native Indian Student Union.
"And then anger set in."
"[Degradation] is a tactic used
to illegitimize the role ofthe first
nations' people," said Scow. "It's
political and cultural genocide."
Arts student Ellen Pond, from
the Women's Centre, was disgusted by the newsletter.
"The EUS is not capable of
policing itself," she said. "The policy that engineers came up with
did not have any enforcement
mechanism."
Last fall the EUS approved an
editorial policy recognizing the
university's commitment not to
publish racist, sexist, or homophobic content.
EUS president, first vice-
president and the editor of the
nEUSlettre said the policy applied
to the newsletter and not merely
the EUS newspaper The Last
Chance. They also said the neuslettre was EUS-funded.
"We want to stand by our policy," said first vice president Evie
Wehrhahn, whose name appeared
as a contributor to the nEUSlettre.
Wehrhahn, who did not see
the newsletter before it was
printed, said engineers she talked
with said the material was offensive and shouldn't have been
printed.
UBC engineer Anthony
Berno, said the nEUSlettre "utterly alienated me." He was offended particularly by the implication in one joke that violence
against homosexuals was justified.
"The EUS is not representing
my interests," he said,
"They've lost me as an advocate of their cause. I think that
what happened is a good example
how racism, sexism and homophobia directly harms the EUS."
EUS president Darren Sanders said: "It was a mistake. We are
not trying to defend what's hap
pening, but are taking quick action."
Sanders said they received the
first complaints on Friday morning
and had an emergency meeting
that evening where the executive
decided to issue a letter of apology.
NEUSlettre editor Martin
Sikes said the jokes were submitted by The Frat, an unofficial engineering fraternity, and weren't
screened carefully enough. "[The
jokes were] a gross oversight which
shouldn't have happened."
Sikes said he did not see the
"Indian Application Form" before it
went to printed but did see the 1990
Gay Games joke at the bottom of
the same page.
"Previously, I'dbeenblackfelt-
ing out most of the jokes and clipping out some altogether," said
Sikes. "It's not my intent to offend
anyone."
The UBC administration also
denounced the nEUSlettre.
"Certainly, the people in the
[president's] office find it distasteful and disgusting and are asking
how can we stop this from repeat-
ingitself," said UBC vice-president
K.D. Srivastava.
Dean Axel Meisner, commissioned by Srivastava and President Strangway to investigate the
incident, said, "I do not consider
this publication a prank. And because it was produced by the EUS,
I hold the individuals responsible
for the publication."
Meisner is currently drafting
a letter to inform the president of
the incident.
In a motion passed last fall,
the Board of Governors authorized
the president to refuse to collect
fees for a society that publishes
racist, sexist, or homophobic material.
This means the administration might decide not to collect the
next year's EUS student fees,
which total $32,000.
Vice president of academic
and provost, Daniel Birch, said it
was too early to tell whether funding would be withdrawn and that
the matter would be referred to the
university committee on studenl;
discipline,     continued on page 3
60,000 Quebec
students strike
UBC open house participants.
McGill students occupy minister'soffice
By Kenneth King
Montreal (CUP) — Riot police
threw nine McGill students in jail
for overstaying their welcome at a
politician's office March 9th.
The Students, part of
McGiU's Coalition Against the
Privatization of Education
(CAPE) occupied Liberal MNA
Jacques Chagnon's office in protest of his support for a proposed
130 percent university tuition fee
hike. Riot police removed the students after almost eight hours of
negotiations.
Students demanded Chagnon arrange a meeting between
Quebec's education minister
Claude Ryan and student leaders
and that Chagnon initiate a parliamentary commission on the
underfunding of post-secondary
education.
The discussion between the
students and Chagnon was frequently confrontational. One
woman took offense at the tone
Chagnon used to address the students, particularly women.
"Maybe you're older and male,
but you don't have a right to be
patronizing and condescending,"
Paula Gunn said. Chagnon's reply
was "You can leave if you aren't
happy."
Chagnon said the students'
suggested alternative—a special
education tax on corporations—
was not viable.
"Corporations are sufficiently
taxed already," he said. "Why
shouldn't students in Quebec pay
as much as students everywhere
else in Canada?"
Chagnon maintained that the
corporation tax would hurt Que
bec businesses. "We have to keep
businesses competitive with
other provinces," he said.
"So you're saying industry is
more important than education?"
asked Schnarch.
"You're a genius," was Chagnon's reply.
When Chagnon refused most
of their demands, the students
announced that they would not
leave the office.
Police arrived at about 7pm.
The students gave themselves up
peacefully to arrest. As police
walked them outof the building, a
group of about 20 supporters
cheered and sang sarcastic songs
thanking Chagnon. The protestors were charged with mischief and released about two
hours later. They are scheduled to
appear in court July 10.
Montreal (CUP)
There will be more than
90,000 Quebec students on strike
today to protest the province's
plans to raise tuition fees.
About 42,000 students—including medicine, law and engineering students—at l'Universite de Montreal will begin a
three day strike today.
Students at l'Universite du
Quebec a Rimouski and College
are also out on an unlimited
strike. About 3,000 Dawson College students will join them.
Association nationale des
etudiantes et etudiants du Quebec executive Jeff Begley called
the student mobilization "historic".
"The strike should say to the
government, 'Let's start talking
seriously.'"
McGill students recently
voted to join in an unlimited
walkout if half the province's approximately 400,000 college and
university students come along.
Two molotov cocktails were
dropped from a nearby building
when Concordia students held a
one-day picket on its downtown
campus March 13.
The first exploded on- the
street, while the second struck
the hood of a parked car. Security
guards rushed to the scene with
fire extinguishers to smother the
flames. No one was hurt.
Montreal police constable
Jean Cadieux said police are not
linking the incident with the
demon strator s.
"It was a very well behaved
demonstration," Cadieux said.
"This is the first time Concordia students have been political in years," said Phil Toone, of
Concordia's ad-hoc anti-tuition
hike coalition.
Police slapped two motorists
with $65 fines for honking in support of the walkout.
Demonstrators gathered
around the parked motorists bellowing "Ryan is the real crook" as
police issued the tickets. Protestors also threw money into the
motorists' cars.
A group of nine McGill students were arrested March 9 after
occupying a local provincial politician's office in protest of the fee
hike, announced in December by
Quebec education minister
Claude Ryan.
Ryan said university tuition
fees—which.have averaged $517
per year since 1968—would be
allowed to rise 130 percent over
the next two years. Fees for full
time students would jump to $890
per year next fall, and rise to
$1240 in 1992.
Each university would also be
allowed to increase its fees an
extra 10 percent.
Ken Whittingham, director of
public relations at Concordia, serid
student efforts to pressure the
government by striking are futile.
"The demonstration came too
late because both the (provincial)
government and the university
made the decision to increase fees
and the increase is already in effect," Whittingham said.
"Our own fight has just begun," Toone said. "We plan to
cause so much trouble that the
government will have no choice
but to back down."
Toone said L'Association des
etudiants et etudiants du Quebec
(ANEEQ) backed Concordia's decision to strike.
Concordia students will demonstrate again tomorrow. CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4M0
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
11 ■ FOR SALE
12 SPEED BIANCHI ROAD BIKE, 21"
brand new, Suntour gears, alloy rims,
$250.00 Call Leslie 986-5057.
1982 RENAULT LA CAR, good cond. runs
well approx. 75,000 km. Black/with soft top
great mileage, asking $1950 call 273-0401
after 5.
1987 MINT COND. CHEV. SPRINTSport
model immaculate exc. gas mileage. Call
Dave 224-4470 ($6300 OBO).
20 - HOUSING
VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE for the
remainder of the 1989-90 academic year.
For further information, please contact the
Housing Office, 2071 West Mall or call 228-
2811.
VISITING SCIENTIST with wife and aged
cat wish to sublease 1 bdr. apt close to UBC
campus. Early May - late August "90. (606)
278-6655. RJ. Shephard.
25 - INSTRUCTION
THE PRINCETON REVIEW - LSAT prep
course. Class limited to 10 students. Book
now for May/June course, 261-2470.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN EARNING 1,000*9 this summer with our home
mailing program. For complete how to instructions, send $10 to Income Options P.O.
Box 48808 Dept. 177 Bentall Ctr. Vancouver, B.C. V7X 1A6.
30 - JOBS
ELEPHANT STUDENT PAINTERS
Now Hiring for Manager positions for summer '90. Top summer earnings $10,000+.
Learn valuable business and management
skills. Phone 685-8066.
TSUGA FORESTRY CONTRACTORS is
looking for healthy, ambitious individuals
for summer treeplanting in N. B.C. and Alta.
In business for 11 years - exclusively planting. Camp facilities & equip. 1st class.
Campfees $17/d. (compare with other companies at $20-25/d.). A company committed
to planters. Don't choose just any company,
come and check us out. Applications available at Can. Employment Centre - Brock
Hall. Experience preferred.
BOONDOCKS RESTAURANT in Point
Roberts looking for cooks & waiters for now
& summer. Must be U.S. citizen or have a
green card. Phone Moe (206) 945-5422.
DUSSO-S ITALIAN DELI, Granville Island Market F/t & p/t positions open &
summer employment Apply with resume's
or phone 685-5921.
EARL'S IS LOOKING for proud & professional Waiter/Waitresses, Hosts/Hostesses,
Line Cooks, Prep Cooks for full & p't positions. Exp. is not necessary. Apply between
9-11 a.m. & 2-5 p.m. daily 303 Marine Dr.
North Vancouver, B.C.
PART-TIME JOB OPPORTUNITY
UBC Rugby Club Manager for the
1990/91 Season (Sept. 1/90 to April 30.0)
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
- attendance at all practices & games
- field preparation for gameB
- registration of players
- organization of clubhouse
- communication with Athletic Dept.
- ordering of team clothing
BENEFICIAL QUALITIES:
- ability to organize
- flexibility
- some knowledge of the game
- Bports administration background (helpful)
Honourarium available
Travel Possibilities
Please Contact Barry Legh 228-5858 or
Tanya 736-9160
50 ■ RENTALS
CHILD CARE NEEDED for 2 girls, ages 2
1/2 & 6 Full day alternate Monday.. Phone
224-1993.
PAINTERS - Foreman. Exp. an asset. $8-
14/hr. depending on exp. & position. Call
Maurice 983-2512.
ALUMNI PAINTERS REQ. Production
Manager. Approx. $3,000/month, need previous paint manager exp. Call 983-2512.
SECURITY ATTENDANT: part-time
available immediately at the Burnaby Art
Gallery. Weekends and some evenings.
Union position. Inquiries for interviews call
291-9441.
EARN $7-10 PER HOUR painting for College Pro Painters this summer - call 879-
4105 or pick up applic. at UBC Employment
Centre.
 35 - LOST	
A BLACK AND GREY FLEECE PULLOVER jacket lost near village. If found
please phone 738-4292 or 224-7803.
TYPEWRITER RENTALS $29/month.
Free delivery and pick up. All recent electric
models. 682-1535.
70 ■ SERVICES
RESUMES IN ON HOUR
Expanded Type for Titles
Doreen 683-1335
75 - WANTED
WANTED: TRANSCRIPTION from micro-cassettes to IBM - compatible disk. 875-
8757.
INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
SEEKING personnel work part time or full
time call 732-9703.
80 - TUTORING
EXPERIENCED ENGLISH Ph.D. student will edit your MS or thesis for spelling,
grammar and general style, 536-5137.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING 24 HOUR SERVICE. Essays,
papers, tapes-cassettes TRANSCRIBED.
Editing, proofing optional. 224-2310 any
time.
WORD PROCESSING
$2.50/dbl. sp. page. APA, MLA, CMS
COMPUTERSMITHS 3726 West
Broadway (At Alma). 224-5242.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Typeityourself... simplified instructions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look top quality. $7/hr. and 15 cents/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant; 228-5496.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
WORD PROCESSING, laser printer - thesis, reports, manuscripts (WordPerfect,
MSWord). $2/pg ds. Jeeva's Word Processing 876-5333, 201-636 W. Broadway.
TYPING QUICK. Right by UBC. All kinds,
editing, $1.50 pg. dspc. 228-8989.
QUALITY word processing laser printers,
studentrates. Phone Agnes 734-3928 Linda
736-5010.
WORD WEAVERS/THE TRANSLATION DESK - We are experts in thesis and
essay preparation. Is your resume ready for
a job interview? Good turnaround time,
comp. rates. We are also accredited translators in most major languages. Conveniently
located in Kerrisdale, 5660 Yew at 41st Call
us at 266-6814 or 263-7117 Facsimile 266-
6867.
TYPING BLUES? Term papers professionally prepared. Your hard work deserves
to look its best U Need our service. 272-
4995.
WORD PROCESSING, lazer quality, fast,
accurate, & reliable. Kits. Laura 733-0268.
IHOT
I   FLASH
The Philosophy Students' Association presents an essay writing competition for undergrads. $50.00 first prize for best essay in area of a recent Bio-ethical controversy. Specific
details announced at time of competition. Thurs. 22 March, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m., Buch. D330.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30PM, for Friday's paper is
Wednesday at 3:30pm. LATE
SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.
TUESDAY, MAR. 20
Institute of Asian Research.
Seminar: "Images of Japanese
in Korea and Images of Koreans
in Japan," Prof. Kamigaito, International Research Centre of
Japanese Studies, Kyoto. 12:30-
1:30, Asian Centre Room 604.
Narcotics Anonymous. A fellowship of men & women for whom
drugs have become a major problem. Members meet regularly to
help each other stay clean. 12:30
- 2:00 p.m. (24 hr. help-line 873-
1018). Room 311 (main floor -
through the lab medicine door)
U.B.C. Hospital (main entrance).
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Famous Hot Lunch.
Noon. Hillel House.
Biological Sciences Society (Bio-
Soc). Presentation by Dr. G.C.
Hughes on "Weeds, Seeds, and
History". Noon. Biology Building Room 2449.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Co-op Supper. 5:30 p.m. Lutheran Campus Center.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Bible Study. 10:00 a.m. Lutheran Campus Center.
Speakeasy - Outreach Program.
Information Service: Office for
Women Students. 11:30 -12:30.
(Speakeasy) SUB 100B.
Speakeasy - Outreach Program.
Information Service: AMS
Women's Centre. 12:30 - 1:30.
SUB 100B (Speakeasy).
New International Development
Service Organization organizational meeting. Everyone welcome, especially members of
Amnesty Int 1, WUSC, IDC, African Students Assoc., SFSA, and
Tools for Peace. See John
Lipscombe SUB 258 ifyou cannot
make it. SUB 260.
Student Environment Centre.
Information table about household toxics! 11:30 - 2:30. SUB
concourse.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 21
The Institute of Asian Research.
Seminar on Asian Development -
"Dynamics of Waste Recycling in
Urban China." Christine Furedy-
Speaker. ■ 3:30 p.m., Seminar
Room 604, Asian Centre.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Torah Study Group. Noon.
Hillel House.
Native Law Program. Discussion
meeting. 12:30 - 1:30. Room 177,
G.F. Curtis Bldg.
Menno Simons Centre Ministry.
Workshop "Your Personality -
How Are You Wired?" with Palmer
Becker author of You and Your
Options. Noon SUB 211.
U.B.C. Marxist - Leninist Study
Group. Political discussion: Political changes in Eastern Europe
and revisionist ideology. 7:00 p.m.
Buchanan D225.
Student Environment Centre.
Information table about household toxics. 11:30 - 2:30. SUB
Concourse.
THURSDAY, MAR. 22
Philosophy Student Association.
Kurt Preinsperg Ph.D. speaks on
"Social Justice as Mutual Advantage". 7:00 p.m. Grad Centre
Penthouse Library.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. End of Term Dinner Party.
5:30. p.m. Hillel House.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Hebrew Classes. Noon.
Hillel House.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Theological Discussion. Noon.
Lutheran Campus Centre.
International Socialists. Meeting
- Topic: National Oppression in
the Soviet Union. 7:30 p.m. SUB
215.
Speakeasy - Outreach Program.
Information Service: Student
Counselling. 12:30-1:30. SUB
100B (Speakeasy).
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship. Meeting: Rev. Harry Robinson (St. John's Anglican Church)
will be speaking on "The risk of
getting to know Jesus". Everyone
welcome! Noon. Family & Nutritional Science Building Rm. 30.
Sikh Students Association. General Meeting for club picture.
Noon. Buchanan D340.
Internationa] Association of Economic & Commerce Students
(AIESEC). Last General Meeting!
Noon. Henry Angus 425.
Philosophy Students' Association.
Essay writing competition for
undergrads. Topic is Bio-ethics
with specific question announced
at time of writing. $50prize. 12:30
-2:30 p.m. Buchanan D330.
Ski Club. Skating Party. 7:30-
9:00 p.m. Wintersports Center
Rink#l.
U.B.C. Scottish Country Dance
Club. Practice is cancelled this
week - see you all next week in
new venue. 7:30 - 9 p.m. SUB
125.
Student Environment Centre.
Information table about household toxics. 11:30 - 2:30. IRC.
Lesbian Discussion Group. Meeting: Topic: ;C6ming out etiquette
What are the dos and don'ts?
Noon. SUB Rm. 130.
FRIDAY, MAR. 23
Graduate Student Society. Guitar styUngs of Marc Coulombe. 6
p.m. Fireside Lounge, Graduate
Students Centre.
Graduate Students Society.
Ping Pong Tournament. 7 p.m.
Fireside Lounge, Graduate Student Centre.
U.B.C. Windsurfing Club. Fashion Fest. 2:30 p.m. The Pit.
SATURDAY, MAR. 24
Canadian Crossroads International. International Dinner -
service auction and dance to follow. (Fundraising Benefit Dinner for Crossroads). Dinner -
Doors open 6 p.m. - Dance only
(after 9 p.m.) Tix $5.00. Peretz
Hall, 6184 Ash St. (Cambie &
49th). Canadian Crossroads is a
non-profit organization which
sponsors cultural exchange program-between Canada and developing countries.
sawwassen Golf & Country Club
is now
HIRING
For The Season April 1 - October 15
• Cooks
• Prep-Cooks
• Cashier
• Hostess
• Bartender
Bar Waitresses
Banquet Waitresses
18 years or older
and
Dishwashers
Phone calls to the
PERSONNEL MANAGER
943-2288
2/THE UBYSSEY
March 20, 1990 NEWS
Lewis condemns first world lifestyle
by Mark Nielsen
The debt load industrialized
nations are imposing on the third
world is killing children according
to Stephen Lewis, former Canadian ambassador to the United
Nations.
Speaking to an audience of
more than 200 people at the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre as Oxfam kicked off
a weekend conference at UBC,
Lewis said such debts always take
a toll on the most vulnerable in
society.
"They always do no matter
what country you're in," he said,
"but there is no social safety net in
third world countries."
Instead, money that could be
used for children and infant health
care and building community systems throughout the third world is
being used to pay off interest on the
debt.
Lewis said industrialized nations were slammed for imposing
such a burden in the United Nations report on how third world
countries are dealing with the debt.
"They called it an outrage
against humanity and a shame in
the twentieth century and they
virtually accused the donor countries of murder, and not one took
issue with the arrangement because it was unanswerable," he
said.
In 1989 50 billion dollars were
transfered from the third world to
the industrialized nations, compared to 40 billion dollars being
sent the other way ten years ago, a
turnaround of 90 billion dollars.
"We can't allow that kind of
disparity to continue," Lewis said.
He also said that 29 countries
still spend more on defense than on
education and welfare combined,
and 61—the United States included—spend more on defense
than education.
"A five per cent reduction in
overall expenditures, which
amounts to about $50 billion ofthe
trillions spent on defense, and allocated   to   human   health   would
double the expenditure for the four
billion people of the third world,
providing enough resources to
immunize every single baby on the
face of the earth and bring fresh
water to every single village on the
planet within ten years."
Lewis opened his 60 minute
speech by referring to a 1978 conference the UNICEF held in the
USSR in which the over 100 countries attending agreed to health
for all by the year 2000.
As well, health was redefined
from the "largely generic North
American" definition of treatment
of illness on an acute basis to one
that "speaks of food, safe water,
education, adequate income, sus
tainable ecosystem, social justice
and peace."
Lewis said the new approach
amounts to "an ideological redefinition of the human condition."
Out of a number of trends in
relations with the third world has
emerged a "healthy community
movement."
"It is a movement which recognizes a framework to bring together health and the environment
in their broadest frames," he said.
"It recognizes that popular
perception is indispensable, and
that to improve environmental
conditions it is necessary to involve
people of the community in the
process."
Who gave me this life?
CHUNG WONG PHOTO
CiTR tries boost with Burns
by Rick Hiebert
Controversial local radio
broadcaster Pat Burns plans to air
two open-line radio talk shows on
UBC's radio station, CITR in the
next two weeks.
"I really am looking forward
to the shows on CITR. I think
they'll be lively and Fll do my best
to make them so," said Burns, who
starred on CJOR for many years
with his controversial open-line
show.
Burns said he was looking for
a couple of sample programs that
he could use as examples of his
work.
However, R.J. Moorhouse,
CITR's resident talk show host,
fears that Burns may not do well
on CITR, although he "wish(es)
him luck".
"I feel sorry for him," said
Moorhouse, "He doesn't realise
that with our archaic phone system and CITR's often apathetic
listenership, he won't be able to do
the show he's hoping to do.
"Our demographics as a college station are all wrong for him,"
he said. "Nobody knows he's doing
this, especially his fans. They're
all British bluehairs who are voting Reform and opposing bilingualism. They wouldn't usually
listen to CITR."
Burns said, "We approached
CITR because you couldn't very
well propose that idea to any commercial station. They would want
something more regular."
He added the shows would try
to examine "any topic under the
sun" as the format of his old radio
shows used to do. "I would imag
ine, though, that they will want to
talk about student issues, primarily on the second show. It should be
fun."
CITR president Lane Dunlop
said reaction of the students at
CITR, which is generally considered to be a unorthodox radio station, was "positive" about Burns'
shows.
"Most people feel satisfied.
They feel it's good publicity for the
station," he said.
"He's coming on the air
Wednesday from 11 to 2, doing an
open-line show on CITR, taking
calls from all our listeners. The
following Wednesday, the 28th,
hell be down in the SUB concourse
from 11 to one, with a member of
the university administration discussing student concerns on the
air," said Dunlop.
Glasnost devalues
women, says prof
by Effie Pow
Has glasnost been good for
women?
Not so, according to Barbara
Heldt, a full professor in Slavonic
Studies at UBC.
Heldt said glasnost is having
a negative effect on the representation of Soviet women's sexual
identity at a noon lecture in
Buchanan yesterday.
"One of the great ironies of
democratic change in the Soviet
Union and Eastern Europe is that
women seem to be losing even
what token representation they
had under the more authoritarian
regimes," said Heldt.
Her lecture on women and
glasnost criticized the visual images of Soviet women in the media.
Heldt said, the sexual symbolism
of glasnost leaves women of the
Soviet Union inarticulate.
"Television shows about
women are either just plain silly
or, when serious questions are
debated, women are formatted as
subservient background."
Heldt cited a television show
called "Perestroika: Problems and
Solutions"in which a panel of male
specialists were surrounded by
young women in booths who answered phone-in questions and
then typed typed them out.
"Periodically, [the women]
deliver the typed questions to the
armchairs. This all-female contingent is referred to as *our girls.'
"The format of this television
show seems not to strike any chord
of protest," she said.
Although glasnost lends a
relative amount of new freedom to
nEUSlettre _
Soviet media, the subservient and
decorative roles of women are still
perpetuated, but in new and more
disturbing ways.
"Women close to the earth and
saving the world isa very old linkage. Now this theme is being
served up with naked bodies,
thanks to glasnost."
Heldt examined the way the
sexuality of Soviet women is depicted in historic and modern
Russian literature.
Men in Russia have spoken
and written for women throughout hi story, and despite the advent
of glasnost, this practice continues.
"The patriarchal myth of the
pure nature and abstract goodness of the Russian woman has
endured," said Heldt.
A woman is often a strong
symbol of nationhood in a diverse
country like the USSR.
"The Good Mother is Russia,
but she is either dead or threatened with imminent destruction.
The Wicked Stepmother is the
Soviet Union who has taken heir
place and is destroying her children."
Glasnost allows writing to be
daring but it remains conservative
on gender issues said Heldt.
"Whether politics construct
gender or vice versa becomes a
chicken and egg question."
With the exception of a few
outstanding feminists, most Soviet women articulate their own
female sexual identity as a "mix of
social prudishness and self-indulgence or indulgence toward men
bordering on self-destructive-
ness," said Heldt.
continued from page 1
Sanders hoped the university
would not withdraw funding and
would take into account the speed
with which the EUS are trying to
rectify the problem.
Wehrhahn agreed and said,
"Withdrawing funding won't help
us be motivated to improve our
image."
And editor Sikes said, "They
should consider our record over
past year. This is becoming a rare
occurrence."
Said engineer Dave Hill, student representative on the board
of governors: "The nEUSlettre
went against everything we've
been trying to change all year."
AMS students' council will
hold an emergency meeting on
Wednesday, the international day
against racism, at 5 p.m. to decide
whether the issue will be forwarded to students' court.
March 20,1990
THE UBYSSEY/3 7 - PIECE REGGAE,
CALYPSO BAND
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 9PM
BANQUET ROOM
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
TIX $2.00 ADVANCE
$3.00 DOOR
INFORMATION
ON THE PROPOSED GST
AND STUDENTS,
■ Under the proposed GST*
most students will qualify for
the GST Credit and will be
better off than they are now
under the present Federal
Sales lax.
■ NO GST charged on fees
by publicly-funded colleges
and universities if the
courses lead to diplomas or
degrees.
■ NO GST charged on lab
courses and mandatory
computer courses leading to
a diploma or a degrea
■ NO GST charged on compulsory student-association
and athletic program fees.
*The GST legislation is
currently being considered
by Parliament.
Goods
and
Services
Tax
Information
for Students
Canada
■ NO GST changed for
occupational skill courses
such as secretarial schools,
trade schools and business
colleges.
■ NO GST charged on basic
groceries; food services
included in residence fees or
long-term meal-plans.
■ NO GST charged on
residential rents including
university residences and
boarding houses.
■ NO GST charged on
scholarships and bursaries,
loans and many other financial services; health and
dental care (including
prescription drugs, glasses
and contact lenses); and
municipal transit fares.
Call the GST Info Line toll-free now for the
informative pamphlet: Information for Students.
1 800 267-6620 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Telecommunications device for the hearing impaired: 1 800 267-6650
Canada's GST. Information you should know.
M     Department of Finance     Mmistere des Finances
Canada
Canada
Canada
REACH OUT
This year nearly 200
international
students will come to UBC.
It can be a bewildering
experience.
Or it can be a wonderful one.
It's up to you!
REACH OUT is a program sponsored by
International House in which international
students are linked up with Vancouver
correspondents who will write to them,
providing them with helpful information and
a local contact. Ifsagreatway to make new
friends and to learn about other countries.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, please
contact International Houaa aa aoon aa
possible, •Ithar in parson or by calling
228-5021. Both Canadiana and
Internationals walcoma.
A LENTEN SERVICE-
and Commemoration
ofthe Assassination
of
Archbishop
Oscar Romero
Tuesday March 27
12:30pm
near the Main Library
Clock Tower
All Welcome
Sponsored by:
United Church Campus Ministry
GMAT LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
CALL: 222-8272
(Sexton p
Educational Centers
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION^
"How can we
be just in a world that
needs mercy, and
merciful
in a world that needs
justice."
(Robert Frost, Last Letter,
written shortly before his death,
January 29, 1963))
University Hill Congregation
Ph 224-7011
United Church Campus Ministry
Ph 224-3722
S;i___i_S;
__
_«■ -A ,<-. ■■■:-•-
S\<.>\ .
SUB LOWER CONCOURSE 228-4388
Hate line ups?
HAVE YOUR CLASS
NOTES COPIED
before the
week of
March 26
.AT COPY RIGHT
_l
4/THE UBYSSEY
March 20,1990 NEWS
New cop camera to multiply
number of speeding tickets
by Nicholas lonides
Speeders in Vancouver may
soon be getting a jolt in their
pocketbooks.
The provincial ministry of the
solicitor general recently approved the use of $55,000 Mul-
tanova radar cameras in the fight
against speeders.
The camera made its debut in
Vancouver in 1987, and nabbed
350 speeders during a 2 1/2 week
trial period.
The camera records the time,
date, and speed of the car, and
tickets are mailed to the registered owner ofthe vehicle. To top it
all off, you're awarded with ahefty
fine on your birthday from ICBC if
you've accumulated more than 4
points in that year.
Some birthday present.
The Multanova consists of a
camera, radar, and a computer
mounted on a tripod. Two will be
used in B.C.
Constable Bohemier of the
Vanvouver police department said
that because the Multanova can
only take photographs of license
plates, the registered owner (who
is not necessarily the driver) will
not receive points, but will be fined
because they are assumed to take
responsibility for the car.
Some of the newer and more
costly radar detectors on the market can pick up the Multanova's
Ka photo radar, but Bohemier sai d
they're ineffective.
"Conventional radar travels
parallel to the street and the camera's travel across. By the time it
warns the driver it's too late."
"The camera will be placed
where conventional radar is ineffective (such as) the Stanley Park
causeway and over Bridges. The
Knight St. Bridge is a place where
many accidents occur," said Bohemier.
Marine Drive and Highway
99 are likely places for it. Signs
displaying "SPEED LIMIT ENFORCED WITH RADAR CAMERA" have already been placed on
Highway 99.
"An advantage to the camera
is that it shoots 2 frames per second and 400 feet of film can be put
in at a time. A police officer can
give out (only) 25 to 30 tickets in a
day."
The top legal speed in the
Vancouver area is 60km/h. According to Constable Bohemier of
the Vancouver police department,
"Most accidents are caused by
speeding. Ten-thousand tickets
are issued each month, and more
than half of those are for speeding." There were 55,000 speeding
tickets issued in 1988 alone.
In 1989 there were several
new fines introduced for various
driving offences, including 75 dollars and three points from ICBC
for disobeying the speed limit.
* Pleas* know your team number or letter when placing your orders.
VANIER
Phyllis Ross
AkJyen Hamber
Cariboo
Kootenay
Okanagan
6 Robson
7 Sherwood Left
8 Tweedsmuir
9 Margaret Mackenzie
10 Dorothy Mawdsley
TOTEM
11 Dene Brothers
12 Haida Brothers
13 Kwakiutl Brothers
14 Salish Brothers
15 Nootka Brothers
16 Shuswap Brothers
TOTEM
17 Dene Sisters
18 Haida Sisters
19 Kwakiutl Sisters
20 Salish Sisters
21 Nootka Sisters
22 Shuswap Sisters
GAGETOWERS
N tower    S tower    E tower
Floors: A1-4 E1-4      11-4
Floors: B5-8 F5-8      J5-8
Floors: C9-12 G9-12    K9-12
Floors: D 13-16 H 13-16 L  13-16
GAGE APARTMENTS
23 Lower 2 floors
24 Upper 2 floors
THE Ftl&T YEf\K
STUDENT
NtpqMM
is looking for
FROSH CO-ORDINATORS
For 1990-91
If you are active, involved
and care about the future
of U.B.C, look us up.
Box 113 SUB, Office 216A
Return all applications by
Tuesday, March 20th, 1990.
CLOSEST BYCYCLE SHOP TO UBC
i
RED TAG
SALE DAYS
AT
5
BICYCLE STORES
OPEN TUESDAY TO SUNDAY
4387 West 10th Avenue
 222-8200	
TWELVE STORES TO SERVE YOU.
WE ALSO HAVE A FULLY STOCKED SERVICE DEPARTMENT.
TIME TO PARTY!
at
Every Wednesday is Student Night
free admission to the club with student ID
rock with DAWN PATROL
932 GRANVILLE 684-7699 doors open 7pm, get here early
Make money and have fun. If you want to raise
money for your club, charity or team, the Roxy
has a great idea.
Call Blaine at 684-7699
March 20,1990
THE UBYSSEY/5 Iril*. /VJKIw
Flies swarm around pig's head
The moral is that the shape of a
society must depend on the
ethical nature of the individual
and not on any political system
however apparently logical or
respectable."
"Ifyou had met me before World
War II, you would have found me
to have been an idealist...We
thought all you had to do was to
remove certain inequities and
provide practical sociological solutions (to) have a perfect
paradise on earth. From World
War II we learned something...It
taught us not fighting, politics or
the follies of nationalism but
about the given nature of man."
—William Golding
FILM
Lord ofthe Flies
Opened Last Friday
by Chung Wong
I asked several people about
Sir William Golding's Lord ofthe
Flies. Some people loved the
book, some hated it. Some gave
strange political interpretations—maybe inclined to their
politics. But the response which
hit me the most came from a
colleague who told me, "Don't
you see? I am Piggy."
It was then I realized I had
translated Piggy's role, and perhaps the whole book, too literally.
Having already read two
malignant reviews on the latest
movie, I opted to experience the
matinee. For adults it could have
been a movie of symbolic association; for kids, it became a chill.
Though in the book a war is
happening in the adult world,
and a group of English kids are
dropped in a capsule from a
plane onto a paradise island for
refuge—the movie contemporizes
the microcosmic situation with a
group of American cadets plane
wrecked on an island.
There are no adults—save
the unconscious pilot who
becomes increasingly insane and
eventually disappears.
The movie is simple and at
times slow, but the continuing
challenge is to interpret the symbolism. And it is a challenge.
We begin to spy the figures
of each kid washed ashore on a
raft. All donned in similar
apparel—blue cadet uniforms
which symbolize order—only one,
obtuse lad with thick glasses
immediately stands out from the
rest. The other cadets label him
Piggy.
Soon an athletically built
Ralph establishes a rational objective: to get rescued. Others
look to him for direction.
Piggy finds a conch and suggests that whoever holds the
conch will be allowed to speak
while others must listen. His
practicality indicates his innate
sensible adult mannerisms. But
despite the established system
for equal say, the others do not
listen to what is said when Piggy
holds the conch.
Two schools of thought begin
to establish themselves: One
which strives to reconnect with
civilization—the other which
strives to adapt a value system
to this isolated island.
Jack, a cocky blond cadet,
has an ideology which clashes
with Ralph's rationale. He
adamantly believes there will be
no rescue, and relishes the
thought of having no rules. The
pig hunt becomes a religion for
Jack but causes a missed rescue
which angers Ralph.
Jack's craving ego motivates
savagery in him, and his need for
witnesses to his deeds and his
increasing possessiveness signal
his digression into savagery.
Magnetically, the strongest characters internally vie against each
other. The refusal to concede to
faults marks the beginning of a
breakdown of order and the cultivation of irrational hatred. Jack
can no longer take Ralph and
forms another faction of hunters
which has a cult like appeal.
In time Jack's values are
supported more and more by the
environment. Kids are beginning
to eat lizards, feeling more compelled to adapt to the environment.
Jack tempts all but Ralph to
eat his meat which is symbolic of
intellectual food.
Granted greater recognition,
Jack adapts a new meaning to
political correctness. Naivete is a
liability: When a little kid does
something foolish, he is lashed
and whipped.
The hunters' assembly—their
dance—becomes the epitome of
their degenerative state. Their
chants at first are subtle—later
terrifying. There is a continuum
of aggressive behaviour and compulsion to poke fun and jest.
Gradually, we see the empowerment of disorder. The dance
involves a person pretending to
be a pig while others poke at it.
The film successfully achieves a
hypnotic effect with a squirming
body entangled in poking spears.
The hunting slogans act as
elements of pressure and intimidation for mass manipulation.
Sam n' Eric are the symbolic
twins. Not being able to tell them
apart verbally and visually leaves
a terrifying impression. They represent the fall of individual integrity. Their characters deviate into
sappiness when they choose to
uphold the grain of the dominating politic. They symbolize all of
Jack's troupe. With the slight exception of Roger there is no delineation of individual character.
They look the same and spew off
the same behaviour—abandoning
and disassociating themselves
from their own values.
Paranoia sets in each individual as Jack confirms the existence of a monster in the dark
cave. The leave a pig's head on a
stick for the monster.
Simon, a quiet angelic boy,
belonging to neither faction, sees
the pig's head surrounded by
flies. In the cave, he discovers
the truth about the monster—it
being the dying pilot—and
rushes to tell the others. The
hypnotic dance and darkness
distort the vision of the hunters.
Jack points at Simon and yells,
"It's the monster!" Several
hunters in vain urgency blindly
run toward the swiftly approaching dark figure and collectively
jab at it with their spears.
Moonlight shines on Simon's
white body perforated with
bloodfilled spear holes as it is
washed to the sea. Simon is the
symbol of truth and innocence.
The physical in the film is
symbolic of the intellectual and
social. The visual display of
physical feasibility effectively
justifies in a symbolic manner
Grolding's theme: If humans were
granted paradise—by sheer
human nature—they would not
get along and society would
degenerate.
The movie, however, is only
an hour and twenty minutes and
fails to capture the essence and
indignifying spirit of corruption.
The savagery is not boiled and
there is inadequate character
tension. Action is too slow, lacks
intensity, and may test your
patience. Though the film has an
impressive screenplay—it wants
everywhere else.
First: Operation Magic Carpet Returning Jews from Yemen to Israel
Second: Operation Moses Returning Jews from Ethiopia to Israel
——^—————^—   Now:   —^-^^-^————
OPERATION
SNOWBALL
Returning Jewish students and young
adults from across Canada to Israel
5 weeks in Israel for only
$1249
(3 weeks optional)
Departing May 2, 1990
Sponsored by:
W.Z.O. Student Department
under the personal guidance of Shlomo Gravitz
Network Canada
For more information:    Melinda Kenig 273-3262
6/THE UBYSSEY
March 20,1990 THE ARTS
Concerto stirs
Oprheum seats
by Roger Kanno
ALTHOUGH Corey Cerovsek
may look like Doogie
Howser, he sure doesn't play the
violin like anyone I know named
Doogie. With a combination of
youth, technical skill, and
brashness, Cerovsek draws
attention whenever he performs.
MUSIC
The Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra
March 17th, 1990
Orpheum	
Originally from North Vancouver, Cerovsek now resides in
Bloomington, Indiana. He
attends the Indiana University
where he is currently working
towards his doctorate in music
and math. He will be 18 years
old in April of this year.
Before Cerovsek made his
appearance on stage, the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra performed Beethoven's Leonore
Overture No. 3. Taken from
Beethoven's only opera, Fidelio,
the overture is a majestic piece
and was interpreted well by
guest conductor Christof Perick,
who specializes in opera. The
orchestra responded to Perick's
direction and played the piece
with conviction and vigour.
The orchestra also performed Regei^s Variations and
Fugue on a Theme of Mozart. It
is difficult to imagine how
anyone could improve on or even
match Mozart's technical or expressive
genius. Although
Reger's orchestral
variations are a
respectable piece of
work as a whole, less
than favourable comparisons to Mozart's
work are unavoidable.
Cerovsek then
took the stage. As the
orchestra played the
opening notes of
Tchaikovsky's Violin
Concerto in D major,
Cerovsek prepared to
give the audience
what they had been
waiting for.
The first moments of Cerovsek's
performance were tentative; he
stumbled on several occasions
during the first movement. It
wasn't until the cadenza near the
end of the first movement that
Cerovsek got his rhythm. The
closing, frenzied moments ofthe
first movement played intensely
by Cerovsek then foreshadowed
the raucous nature of the final
movement.
The second movement was
the highlight of the concert as
soloist and orchestra came
together to perform as one. The
lyrical andante featured the
woodwind section of the orchestra which played almost as
passionately as the soloist. The
orchestra's notes hung weight-
lessly in the air as they intertwined gloriously with
Cerovsek's soulful playing.
The difficult third movement
is also characterized by woodwinds, juxtaposed with the solo
violin and the string sections of
the orchestra. The furious climax
alternated between Cerovsek
and the orchestra, both building
to a fantastic crescendo to end
the concerto.
From the lilting opening
moments of the first movement
to the whirlwind close of the
final, Tchaikovsky's violin
concerto combined with
Cerovsek's youthful enthusiasm
provided an entertaining evening
of music.
Nuns *tins wild
by Michael Booth
ALTHOUGH the Monty
Python comedy troop
stopped making movies in
1983, their sassy and irreverent attitude is resurrected
in the assorted film projects
attempted by the group's
alumni. In recent years such
films as A Fish Called
War.da, The Adventures of
Baron Munchausen, and
Eric The Viking have all
continued Python's offbeat
spirit.
Nuns on the Run
Opened Last Friday
The tradition lives on in
the latest release by ex-
Python members, Nuns on
the Run, which fires its
satirical cannons on England's favourite scapegoats,
the Catholics.
In the film, Eric Idle and
Robbie Coltrane portray two
gangsters seeking to leave
their chosen craft. Since
such a career change is
usually followed by a
funeral, the two decide to
rip off their gang and head
for that haven of British
mobsters, Rio de Janeiro.
When their getaway car
runs out of gas, the two unwittingly seek refuge
through the first open alley
door. The doorway leads to a
convent, and the movie,
along with the humour,
really takes off.
Jonathan Lynn's script
takes no prisoners as every
Catholic stereotype, replete
with imbibing nuns and
lecherous priests, is pushed
to the limits of absurdity.
Perhaps the funniest
scene comes when Col-
trane's character (a Catholic) has to explain the
Catholic theology ofthe
trinity to Idle (a protestant).
While this is funny in itself,
it receives its Pythonesque
touch when Idle is then
required to teach this new
found wisdom to a roomful
of students.
Lynn's direction moves
the film along at a quick
pace which, coupled with the
superb comedic acting of
Idle and Coltrane, adds to
the manic edge of the plot.
Throw into the mixture
Janet Suzman and the
result is one ofthe funniest
films to hit the screen since
A Fish Called Wanda.
You are cordially invited to attend the
'90 AMS/UBC
Medical & Scientific Equipment Trade Show
Wednesday, April 4th and
Thursday, April 5th
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom & Partyroom
2nd Floor
Student Union Building
UBC
EXHIBITORS
'**>«
Bio-Rad Laboratories (Canada) Ltd.
Nalge Company
Canberra Packard Canada Ltd.
Infrascan Inc.
Corning Science Products
Hadley Tekscience
Wild Leitz Canada Ltd.
Barnstead/Thermaline Inc.
Pharmacia (Canada) Inc.
FGR Steinmetz Inc.
Caltec Scientific Ltd.
MilliGen
Waters
Millipore
Hitashi Denshi
Carl Zeiss Canada Ltd.
Culligan Water Conditioning (Vane.)
Ingram & Bell Scientific
Costar Nuclepore
Narco Scientific Ltd.
Brinkman Instruments (Canada) Ltd.
Gelman Sciences Inc.
Bio-Can Scientific Inc.
Orion Research
Precision Scientific and Pandex
CanLab - Division of Baxter
BDH Inc.
Applied Bio Systems
Mandel Scientific Company
Western Scientific Services; Ltd.
Hewlett Packard (Canada) Inc.
Beckman Instruments (Canada) Inc.
Fischer Scientific Limited
Carsen Medical and Scientific Co. Ltd.
Media Preparation Services
Door prizes donated by: Fischer Scientific Limited; Canlab Division of Baxter; AMS/UBC.
WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU
AT THE SHOW.
P
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii	
APPLICATIONS FOR FIVE POSITIONS ON THE 1990-1991
AMS ART GALLERY
COMMITTEE
...ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
The Committee provides an opportunity for UBC student artists to display their work and to bring UBC
students in contact with contemporary Canadian works
of art. The purpose of the Committee is to ensure that the
AMS Art Collection is properly maintained, and utilized,
and that Art Gallery policies are implemented.
These positions are open to UBC students. Application forms are now available from the AMS Executive
Secretary in SUB room 238.
Applications must be returned by
4p.m., Friday, March 23,1990.
nn
_n
J
Thinking of
Europe?
Space is filling up quickly on
all flights and tours. If you
want to travel this summer
... YOU BETTER BOOK NOW!
LONDON FLIGHTS  from $639 return
TRAVELCUTS
GolngYourWay!
See 228-6890
March 20,1990
THE UBYSSEY/7 CAUTION!
DANGER AHEAD!
PRICE WAR!
r%%%
$Pom$
UBC athletes honored
w^mzm
New Enhanced 101 Key
Keyboard
$40<-»o
ALL MODELS FEATURE
D Hercules Compatible Mono Graphics Video Board
D 101-keys Enhanced Keyboard
D 12" Amber Monitor with Swivel
□ User's Manual
□ 1 Year Parts/Labour Warranty
□ Turbo AT Case with Keylock, Turbo & Reset Switch
.■:■?•?
I
VGA ALERT!
ATI VGA WaitJor (16-bit. 256K)     S22_00
ATI VGA Wonder (16-bit. 512K) .. S2M.00
VGA CARDS:
Oak VGA (16-bit. 256K) .... J11B.0O
Trident (16-bit. 256K) (149.00
VGA COLOUR MONITORS:
Hyundai (640*480, .31 DP)  $457.00
Relysis RE9513 (640*480, .31 DP) *457.00
TVM 2A (800*600, .31 DP) $510.00
Amazing CM-8484E (1024*768, .28 DP)  $450.00
TVM 3A (1024*768, .31 DP) $610.00
NEC 3D (1024*768. .28 DP)  $798.00
Relysis RE1520 (1024*768, .31 DP, non-interlaced) $810.00
ACCESSORIES:
Sendfax $148.00
Faxmodem $398.00
Complete Campus 386SX
with Monitor
Intel 80386SX • SV*" 1.2MB Floppy Disk Drive
Microprocessor • Combined Floppy/Hard
1MB FLAM Controller
16 MHz Clock Speed • Serial/Parallel Ports
$114600
Complete Campus 286
with Monitor
• Intel 80286 • 5V4" _.2MB Floppy Disk Drive
Microprocessor • Combined Floppy/Hard
• 640K RAM Controller
• 12 MHz Clock Speed • Serial/Parallel Ports
$79800
UPGRADE 1 MB *50°°/WD 40 MB Hard Drive »350°°
Options For 286 & 386SX
20MB (38ms)       40MB (28ms)     104MB Connor
$26500   $42800   $87500
Call Ahead For
Best Selection
COME SEE US AT UBC
Campus
Computers Lid.
2162 Western Parkway, Vancouver, B.C. V6T1V6
HOURS: 9:30 AM-5:30 PM Mon-FRI.,
10 AM-4 PM SAT.
FAX: 228-8338
Tel:
228-8080
by Wayne King
Two of UBC's top volleyball
performers were recently honored
for their exceptional play during
the 1989-90 season.
Both Sarah Cepeliauskas and
Rob Hill are deserving recipients
of their rewards as they have been
the backbone of their respective
T-Bird teams all season.
Cepeliauskas, who led the
Canada West Conference in blocking for the second consecutive
season, guided the T-Bird's
women squad to their best
showing in over a decade, finishing fifth at the CIAU championships.
She was honored by being
invited to play for the National
team at the Canada Cup competition later this year at Saskatoon.
The meet will feature the two top
teams in the world, China and
South Korea, as well as the fourth
ranked U.S.
Cepeliauskas is following in
the footsteps of her older sister
Lisa who herself was once a national team player.
Hill, who was UBC most consistent player throughout the T-
Bird's Canada West season, was
selected as a CIAU second-team
all-Canadian.
Hill led the T-Birds in kills for
many of their matches this season
and by virtue of his solid, consistent performances was honored as
an all-Canadian despite the T-
Bird men's squad not making the
Canada West play-offs.
Both players have CIAU eligibility remaining and will most
certainly be returning to help their
respective additions ofthe T-Bird
volleyball program in years to
come.
Skibirds place ninth
by G. Taylor
The UBC men's Alpine and
Nordic ski teams faced stiff opposition at the NCSA National Championships, March 7-10 at Water-
ville Valley, New Hampshire.
In the first event, the giant
slalom, Jeff Wilson was UBC's top
finisher in 22nd place, five seconds
off the pace. Mark Batho of the
T-irds finished 37th.
In the slalom, the UBC team
placed ninth in the team standings
lead by Batho's eighteenth and
Wilson's 20th place finish three
tenths of a second behind.
In the overall Alpine team
standings UBC was tenth.
The Men's Nordic team also
competed in three events against
17 other teams from around the
U.S.
UBC's Terry Delong placed
39th ahead of teammates Simon
Koch (52nd) and Jono Lineen
(56th). In the ten kilometre classic
event, however, Lineen was the
team leader with an impressive
24th placing followed by Delong
(33rd) and Koch (40th).
Finally the team raced the
three by ten kilometre relay and
finished an impressive 12th.
Both teams, though not entirely disapointed with their performances, felt they had peaked
earlier in the season at the regional finals at Mt. Bachelor.
UMiK^iifiuc3fe^Mi:^»araDsaac^ii^
COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE (SUB 260)
• Monday at 5:00 pm
STUDENTS' ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION - SAC (SUB 224)_
• Monday at 5:00 pm
STUDENTS FOR UNITY AND EQUALITY
COMMITTEE (SUB 260)
• Tuesday at 5:30 pm
OPEN STUDENT FORUM #2 (SUB 206)
• Wednesday at 12:30 pm
Bevond the Audit: Ensuring AMS Integrity
CODE AND BYLAWS COMMITTEE (SUB 260)
• Wednesday at 5:30 pm
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS PROGRAM
COMMITTEE - FYSP (SUB 216C)
• Thursday at 6:30 pm
exeSjMIM
3H^ffi_H*^iiilll
KURT PREINSPERG, President
Sub Rm. 256 228-3972
JOHANNA WICKIE, Vice President
SUB Rm. 248 228-3092
ROMA GOPAUL-SINGH,
Director of Administration
SUB Rm. 254 228-3961
JOHN LIPSCOMBE, Director of Finance
SUB Rm. 258 228-3973
JASON BRETT, Coordinator of External Affairs
SUB Rm. 250 228-2050
This is your executive. Ifyou have any questions
or concerns about the AMS, these are the people
to ask.
EVENTS IHISI/VEEK;
The following motion was passed at last Wednesday's Council meeting.
WHEREAS the $30 collected by the University on
behalf of the Society for the Student Recreation
Centre is a part of the Annual A.M.S. Fee; and
WHEREAS Students Council, as the Board of
Directors of the Alma Mater Society, has a legal
obligation u nder the Society Act to account for any
monies collected on behalf of the Society; and
BE IT RESOLVED that Council formally requested the Board of Governors, pursuant to
Section 27(l) of the University Act, to pay over
those fees collected on behalf of the University, to
the A.M.S. forthwith.
Action: President to write to the Chair of the Board
formally requesting the Recreation Centre fees.
WORKING^
8/THE UBYSSEY
March 20,1990 7w^ -v.      rT-_
JUKI I£!**■>
Say goodbye to
UBC postal station
The future of your postal service is in jeopardy. We have just
received information that strongly
suggests that the UBC bookstore
will be operating a Canada Post
franchise in the near future. The
result will be a deterioration of
postal service for the university
community.
Currently, Station "IT, in the
administration building, provides
postal service for the UBC area.
It's a top notch service run directly
by Canada Post. But, the quality
and reliability of this will decline if
it is franchised out.
It is highly unlikely that the
UBC administration will continue
to lease out space to Station U,
while at the same time operating
their own franchise. The actions of
U.B.C. will, therefore, directly
result in Station U being closed
down.
Our experience with franchises! is not a positive one. We
have noted a lack of staff, a lack of
training, and a lack of security.
Moreover, since the profits from
the franchise will be going into
UBC's pockets instead of being
ploughed back into the postal serv-
ice, there will be less money to
maintain and improve Canada
Post. No matter where you live,
the franchising out of postal service will hurt you.
Tuition fees, the price of
books, lab costs, etc., will not decline as a result of the UBC bookstore operating a Canada Post
franchise. It is not going to help
students, faculty or staff. It will
hurt everyone.
We, the Canadian Union of
Postal Workers, want this franchising stopped. We urge you to
join us to save Station U. Please do
one or more of the following:
1) Phone Dr. David Strangway,
President of UBC, at 228-2121 and
tell him that you don't want your
University taking a Canada post
franchise;
2) Write a letter to the Board of
Governors and tell them the same;
3) Write Harvie Andre, Minister
in Charge ofthe Post Office, at the
Parliament Buildings in Ottawa.
It doesn't require a stamp.
4) Phone or write our Union at
685-6581,1079 Richards St., Vancouver for further information or
to join in our campaign.
Marion Pollack Tyler
Vancouver Local
Verily,
thus sayeth
Brayshaw
So Ed Hewlett is offended by
the English Department's refusal
to let him read what he likes. Poor
Ed. I think his time would be
much better spent conducting an
analysis of his "Christian belief
than writing petulant letters to
The Ubyssey, because the assumptions underlying his argu
ment have holes in them big
enough to drive an eighteen-
wheeler through.
Ed says he finds it wrong to
read books that explicitly describe
sexual immorality. Last time I
looked, the Bookstore wasn't putting little XXX warning stickers on
its wares, which leads me to conclude that, unless Ed's done a lot
more reading than I think he has,
someone else is doing his thinking
for him. My guess is that Ed has
been provided with a definition of
"sexual immorality" and a list of
literary no-nos. If Ed's version of
"sexual immorality" includes
things like rape, sex between
unmarried people, impure
thoughts and the like, he won't be
reading Greek tragedy, Aristophanes, Joyce's Ulysses, much of
Shakespeare, and the work of
modern greats like Salinger and
Burroughs.
Ed doesn't think his restrictive definition of literature should
hamper his efforts to become an
English teacher. I disagree. Anyone who is ready to write off all of
Canadian literature on the basis of
its perceived immorality should
not be in an English literature
program, let alone at university. If
Ed had true conviction in his
"Christian" values, he could read
anything—no matter how repulsive he might find it—without
fearing that its content might corrupt him.
Ed asks if devout Moslems
should be asked to read Rushdie's
Satanic Verses. My answer is yes.
If more Moslems had done so, instead of blindly repeating the
words of their religious leaders,
the furor surrounding the novel—
not to mention the resulting violence and death—might have been
averted.
Ed is entitled to his values,
and to the free expression of them.
However, if he is not willing to
have them challenged or called
into question, then it seems to me
he is wasting time—both his own
and that of the English department.
Chris Brayshaw
Arts 3
Wilson is naughty
It is no surprise that B.C.
Attorney General Bud Smith is
taking the federal Tory government to court for cuts to transfer
payments for post-secondary education and other programs. For
years the federal payments have
been the prime source of operating
funds for our decimated PSE system. Reducing those payments
means the Socreds may actually
have to start spending their fair
share to operate our colleges and
universities. God forbid! That
would mean having less to spend
on pre-election goodies to shore up
sagging Socred support before the
next provincial election, which
could likely be this year.
The payments were meant to
be Ottawa's way of contributing to
post-secondary education funding, which, under our constitution,
is the responsibility of the provinces. But since the early '80s and
that wonderful proponent of neo-
conservatism, Bill Bennett, PSE
has been left short because of Social Credit's reluctance to spend
money to fulfil its end ofthe deal.
On the whole, Premier Bill
Vander Zalm's policies for funding
our post-secondary education system have been little better than
those of his predecessor, who
slashed it to the bone in the name
ofthe unsound restraint program.
Now it looks like it may be
time to pay the piper. But don't
count on it. Count instead on
rapidly escalating tuition fees and
further caps on enrollment, despite the fact that the provincial
coffers are in strong shape. Ignore
the BS about the BS fund, our
province's strong economic performance of last year means the
provincial government has collected loads in taxes andean afford
to make up for the decrease in
transfer payments.
However, that still doesn't
excuse the federal Tories for cutting back on the payments—there
are numerous other ways to reduce the deficit, including forcing
large corporations and wealthy
individuals to give up more of their
massive profits through truly
equitable taxation. The Tories
love an excuse to whip out the
carving knife just as much as the
Socreds do.
When are both the Conservatives and Socreds going to realize
that a properly educated
workforce is an essentia] ingredient of a sustained strong economy?
My guess is never. It's time to look
for alternatives to both parties.
Brian Shaw
Arts 2
"Management students
are people who are learning
to manage—and what they
are learning how to manage
is other human beings.
Managers are parasites who
create and produce no
wealth, but rather live on
the back of people who do.
I find it strange that living on
other people's backs is a legitimate academic subject.
At our next upheaval, these
people will get their due
and I won't be
sorry....Revenge is part of
the whole process."
—Richard Flint, editor,
The McGill Daily, 1982-
83
Smash
the bourgeoisie.
Join The Ubyssey.
Room 241K, SUB.
r. Soee-4>
ORDER TODAY!
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TUES. MAR20-ROOKIE NITE!
8 PM ALL SEATS $3.50
WED. MAR 21 - SPRING BACCHANALIA
8 PM SEASONAL COMEDY X-TRAVAGANZA
THURS. MAR 22 - SLICE OF LIFE
8 PM - YOUR LIFE ON STAGE
STUDENT TIX $5.00
(EXCEPT WHERE NOTED)
NOW 2 SHOWS
FRIDAY 11:30 PM • SATURDAY MIDNIGHT
ARTS CLUB REVUE THEATRE ON GRANVILLE ISLE.
LICENSED-TIX AT THE DOOR
AM6 Art Gallery Committee
Applications are now being accepted by the
AMS Art Gallery Committee for Exhibitions in
the 1990/91 school season in the AMS Art Gallery
in SUB. Shows range a week in length and applicants must submit ten slides of current work, a
small explanation of their work and a twenty-five
dollar deposit with their application. Applications
are available from the AMS Executive Secretary
in SUB Room 238 and must be returned by 4 p.m.,
Friday, March 23rd., 1990. UBC students are
given priority but all applications are considered.
Applications
are now being
accepted
FOR THREE (3)
STUDENT-AT-LARGE POSITIONS
on the
Ubyssey Publications
Committee
Applications Forms
Available
in SUB room 238
Applications shall be
received until 4pm on
Monday March 26,1990
APPLY NOW!
SUB OFFICE SPACE,
LOCKERS &
PARKING SPACES
All AMS Clubs and Service Organizations
may apply for the above in the Student
Union Building. Application forms and
information available at SUB 238.
Deadline: Friday, March 30, 1990.
Due to limited space,
late applications will
not be accepted.
March 20,1990
THE UBYSSEY/9 : ^Ag>
Corporate
environmentalism?
This week Vancouver is host to Globe 90, a
world environmental conference. It is nice to see
that concern for the environment has hit corporations, the government and the mainstream media.
It might seem like a time for back patting all round.
But not this time.
The frontline of environmental struggles have
always been fought by community activist groups,
but these groups are conspicuously absent from
those at the conference this week. A quick perusal of
the lists of speakers reveals a dominance of corporate-types and government bureaucrats or politicians. Activists have not been asked to speak.
Nor will they probably be prominent in the audience, registration being $500 a pop, a little prohibitive for your average activist.
Environmentalism is in the process of being
safely co-opted by those with power in our society.
This is apparent when the focus ofthe conference is on combining of economic sustainability,
growth, with achieving environmental sustainability. The Globe and Mail calls it "Development the
planet can tolerate." It all sounds great until you
examine the underlying assumption.
The assumption is that we need to maintain a
growth economy.
Capitalism maintains itself only through exponential growth and unlimited consumption. This is
why corporations are unwilling to give up the idea
of growth.
Yet the biggest problem we have is the growth-
oriented mentality. It is the root ofthe majority of
our planet's environmental problems. So long as we
continue to try to produce more, more efficiently and
at less expense we are going to do more and more
damage to the earth. As The Globe put it perfectly
it is testing the planet's tolerance.
Sustainable development is an easing for the
conscience for those in the First World. We desperately want it to succeed because it means we can
save the environment and still own 2.2 cars each. It
tells us that ecological catastrophe can be averted
without impinging on our consumer habits. And,
after all, that's what really matters right? The
freedom to consume.
At a very basic level the two ideas—capitalism
and environmentalism, economic growth and ecological survival-are contradictory. Producing more
and more is putting a greater strain on the planet.
Doing it more efficiently and at less cost means an
even greater strain.
Isn't this how we got into this mess in the first
place?
the Ubyssey
March 20, 1990
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey
is published with the proud support ofthe Alumni Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University
Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301;
The store room burned down and Keith Leung was pleased he could
see the bright moon, which shone on Nadene Rehnby. latest two-
word poem "Chris who?" that she wrote on the press release and
flung out into the Pacific. Rick Hiebert, the news hound, raced after
it only to discover
that it had burned down with the storehouse. So Paul Dayson wrote
another stanza, only to be shunned by Joe Altwasser and Franka
Cordua- von Specht. "You need to put some beat into it", cried Martin
Chester,"it'seasy". ButKatherineMonkwasn'timpressed. "Getme
out of this underworld", shedemanded, along with Wayne King. Dan
Andrews and Hao Li petitioned the administration to take away all
funding from people who dared to write such nasty literature as
poetry.
"Oh", said Chung Wong, "is this why poets starve?" "Nonsense", said
Effie.'poetry is just the result of over-editing". If this is the case,
thought Ernie Stelzer, I wonder what the whole story is on Mary and
her lamb? "IVegotapoem", saidTed Aussem, "get yourassesingear,
so I can get outta here". "Yeah, yeah", said Mark Nielsen and
Nicholas Ionides, "put it to music".
The waterrushes forth like lava down into the dark, dank pool below,
which ripples with ecstasy upon receiving the blessed downpour.
Deep within the depths ofthe pool, slimy creatures writh and wallow
upon the muddy floor, where they feed upon fleshy plants and
amorphous gelatins. Yum.
Joe Altwasser
Nadene Rehnby
EDITORS
Franka Cordua-von Specht
Chung Wong •  Keith Leung
Ft OP IE./
Irne ewtTM
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/{ryj   I'TAVCE ACTioU
fr~T   A*- WOW /
-y^\At I-AV.5T gM-1
/tAwsT fige-rcte
Slop Cv\TTlN-l DOWt-4
?W DlAFfc-RS AND CcC*!?
BY 6oD \j&'$
BoYctfff        ,
11
/,'.'
ReMetABe?..-
we CAH PO IT.
THE EARTH cAt-J
**y£j>KteoJ
THAUKS   Fbfc X_iAR TIME-
Letters
'Geers
apologize
The EUS would like to
apologgize for the offensive
content of the Neuslettre
dated March 14th, 1990. We
do not want to reinforce
negative stereotypes. However, failure to properly edit
this issue may have conveyed racist sentiments.
This was not our intent, and
we would like to apologize to
those whom we have offended.
Submissions to the
Neuslettre come from engineering clubs in the form of
prepared pages ready for
printing. The Neuslettre
editor's job is to inspect and
edit and edit these pages
according to our editorial
policy of Sept. 1989. In this
instance, we were grossly
negligent and sent a page
for printing without checking for offensive material.
The result was the
printing of some highly offensive material, in particular the article entitled 'Indian Application for Employment'. Unfortunately,
this article was overlooked
before printing and "slipped
through the cracks." After
distribution, we, upon reflection, realized that this
submission was definitely
not appropriate and should
not have been printed.
We will be taking steps
to prevent this from happen-
ing again. Firstly, we will be
assigning an executive to
oversee the Neuslettre content. Due to the turnover of
EUS executive this week,
this was not the case for the
issue. In addition, draft
material will be presented
to other executives for approval before printing.
Printed copies of the Neuslettre will be sent to heads
of all engineering departments for their comments.
Over the last few years
we have been trying to improve our image and form
freindly relationships with
other groups on campus.
This   goodwill   has   been
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters which are not typed will not be accepted. Letters over 200 words
may be edited for brevity. Please be concise. Content which Is libelous, slanderous, racist, sexist, homophobic or
otherwise unift for publication will not be published. Please bring letters, with Identification, to our editorial office,
Room 241K, SUB. Letters must Include name, faculty or department, year of study and signature.	
demonstrated by the ending
ofthe Lady Godiva ride. We
will now welcome people to
help us put together the
Neuslettre. Bring your submissions to the Cheeze Factory (2235 Engineering
Road) by 2:30pm on Tuesdays. Ifyou have complaints
about our publications,
come talk to Daren Sanders
(President) or Evie
Wehrhahn (Vice-President)
in person at the Cheeze
Factory.
Daren Sanders, EUS
President
Evie Wehrhahn, EUS
Vice-President
Martin Sikes,
Neuslettre Editor
Natives issue
demands
First Nations members
ofthe UBC community have
formed a committee to address the hate literature
contained in the engineering students nEUSletter of
Wednesday, March 14,
1990. While we are concerned with the over all
content of the nEUSlettre,
we are specifically addressing the so-called "Indian Application for Employment"
which uses violent and denigrating language, and
which entrenches stereotypical views of First Nations peoples. The creation
of stereotypes is a means of
creating an 'other' who may
stand as mainstream society's opposite. In other
words, if First Nations
people are, as this nEUSlettre suggests, alcoholics, lazy, promiscuous, and
uneducatable, therefore the
mainstream society is not.
The creation of this binary
opposition of "us" vs. "them"
refuses the reality of who
First Nations people are.
We are participants as
students and/or teachers
with many Faculties such as
Arts, Science, Law, Commerce, etc. We are a people
who come from distinct societies that have a cultur
ally based means for dealing
with inappropriate behaviour and making ammends.
This is accomplished
through community accountability. Public disrespectful behaviour requires
public shaming for retribution.
Therefore, the committee is publically inviting the
engineers to apologize to
their peers, the engineers
whose sentiments are not
represented in this nEUSlettre; the UBC community; and the First Nations
people.
The First Nations UBC
students invite the engineers, both the editors ofthe
nEUSlettre and the representatives of EUS on
Wednesday March 29,1990
at 12:30, to the NITEP Hut,
6375 Biological Sciences Rd.
We have invited First Nations elders to accept the
apology on our behalf and
we invite Dr. Strangeway
and the Dean of Engineering to attend as witnesses.
This apology would
only deal with the immediate behaviour of those who
have published this material, and only addresses one
way of making ammends
with one particular community.
This apology does not
absolve the other members
ofthe university community
from following up on their
responsibility to take action
against those who promote
Hate Literature on this
campus.
As stated under Student Discipline in the University Calandar "The
President of the University
has the right under the
University Act(Secion 58) to
take whatever disciplinary
action deemed to be war-
rented by a student's misconduct." We call on Dr.
Strangeway to act on this
regulation.
Furthermore, In Sept.
29, 1989 "the Board of Governors approved in principle
the withdrawl of all or part
of a fee collection of any
University society by the
President if he determines...
that a society publication is
contradictory to the University's Mission Statement
providing for an environment free of dicrimination,
prejudice, and harassment
of any kind." We call for
action against Hate Literature on UBC campus.
The long term existence
of the nEUSlettre or versions of it, in this UBC community is one manifestation
of the need for long term
changes, within the University i tself concerni ng r aci sm
and sexism. Real change
does not come from reacting
to isolated incidents, but
requires proactive measures, such as:
1) a First Nations Studies course designed to create
understanding by focussing
on the historical and contemporary relations on this
land. This would be a core
course for all UBC students.
These courses would be
developed and implemented
by the First Nations.
2) an Anti-Racism
course designed to create
understanding about the
sources, impacts, and results of racism in our society.
3) all Faculty and staff
of this University participate in inservice anti-racism workshops.
4) the private funders of
UBC accept responsibility
and find out what their
funds contribute to, to ensure that they are not contributing to racism and oppression in society.
5) Individuals take responsibility day to day to
counter racism. The UBC
Motto is "TUUM EST" or
"It's Yours" meaning the
University is yours therefore, so is the responsibility
for changing it.
The First Nations students at UBC call for direct
action now. We invite all
people of the UBC community to accept their responsibility.
Beverly Scow
UBC Native Indian Student Union
10/THE UBYSSEY
March 20,1990 'Geers are bad
As a student at UBC I would
like to comment on an item that
recently appeared in undergraduate engineers newsletter under
the title "Indian Application for
Employment." The item in question appears to be intended as
humour.but consultation with a
lawyer confirmed my suspicion
that it is in contravention of the
Canadian Charter of Rights and
Freedoms. For the edification of
the readers of this paper, the article strings out numerous stereotypes—all negative— of Indians,
"You all look alike"; "place of birth:
Charity hospital  back alley	
ditch back of car_ free public
hospital;" "Abilities: demonstration leader Pimp evangelist	
rapist    chief  beer   drinker	
sleeping in bar." I don't want to go
on. Suffice it to say, such "humour", when directed at a struggling minority group, is like an
agent of destruction, a crude sort
of bludgeon.
I wonder if your recent bow to
women— Godiva rides, no more—
has somehow stung your means
sense of pride. We all know your
profession takes great pride in its
various triumphs over nature,
trips to the moon, and all that, but
UTTERS
I'm beginning to wonder if a few
individuals from your fold haven't
adopted an ideological stance in
opposition to nature. In my first
year here, I remember a group of
undergrad engineers stomping
and marching through Sedgewick
Library, singing songs about their
sexual desires for their mothers,
and spaying beer wherever possible. Perhaps some individuals
see their mothers, and by association all women, as symbols of the
creative forces of nature, that very
nature they wish to triumph over
through engineering feats. Perhaps those same individuals also
see the end is near for the time
when they can get away with the
constant abuse of women. Well, if
you think you can now turn your
destructive—as opposed to constructive— energies on the native
Indian community here at UBC
and go unmol ested, you're wrong. I
think your rather adolescent efforts at humour are reprehensible
to say the least. I also think your
editor owes all native Indian students, staffand faculty at UBC an
apology. And I call on the seemingly quiet majority of undergrad
and graduate student engineers to
censor your errant colleagues.
Ron Hamilton,
3rd year Arts
IHOT
■flashes
On Monday, March 19th at 7:3pm,
the fraternities and sororities off UBC
will present the 51st Annual
Songfest competition at the QE
Theatre. Proceeds will go the the
Vancouver Children's Hospital.
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BOOKSTORE
UBC Computer Shop • 228-4748
••ANIVl-RSARY
M-Th 8-9
F8-6
Sat-Sun
11-6
low low prices
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jpi-y*^- laser printing
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224*225
Friday Evenings
at the Fireside Lounge
Ping Pong Tourney, 7:00 pm
and...
Marc Coulombe Peter Huron
March 23rd, 6:00 pm    March 30th, 5:00 pm
Fireside Lounge Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 3:00-11*00pm
Friday  3:00 pm-1:00 am
Everyone Welcome!
Graduate Student Centre
CHILD     SEXUAL    ABUSE
The Problem and the Legal Responses
Appearing:
March 21, 11:30-2:30
Jean Hiady - Director of Child and Family Services of
the Children's Hospital and an expert on therapy
with sexually abused children.
Gail Way - Psychologist who specializes in therapy for
adult survivors of sexual abuse.
Wendy Harvey - Crown prosecutor specializing in
criminal prosecution of abusers.
Megan Ellis - Lawyer who has worked on civil damages
cases and researched sexual offence sentencing.
LAW BUILDING,   1822 East Mall,   Room 101/102
HOW ARE YOU SPENDING THIS SUMMER?
EUROPE $2126
31 DAYS
ON YOUR OWN
18 nights in crowded youth hotels
miles from anywhere, endless hours
with a heavy backpack looking for a
vacancy, 6 nights in stuffy train
corridors, 4 nights in cheap hotels and
3 nights in a decent hotel to get some
sleep, several trips to the local
swimming pools for a hot shower,
31 breakfasts ranging from broken
biscuits from the bottom of your
backpack to costly sidewalk cafes,
24 crummy dinners, 5 expensive
dinners as a treat and 2 expensive
dinners by mistake, rail pass,
insurance, expensive taxi fares from
central stations to youth hotels which
are rarely 'central', one month's worth
of batteries for your walkman to keep
you company, three maps, a dozen
guide books to find your way round,
several phrase books the locals refuse
to understand, payment for sightseeing tours of cities and a cable home
for more funds.
EUROPE $1810
31 DAYS <f\  ,  „
WITH     g&fcS
30 nights in special places like our
Chateau in the Beaujolais region of
France, the Medici's 13th century villa
in Florence, our Pallazzo in Venice, 4
sun drenched days on the beautiful
Greek island of Corfu, 1 night partying
on the Adriatic Ferry, 24 superb
dinners, 31 delicious breakfasts, the
best sightseeing in Paris, Florence,
Barcelona, Rome, Vienna, Saltzberg,
Venice, Amsterdam, loads of free time
to explore on your own and meet
locals, entrance to the Palace of
Versailles, boat trip to Capri, water trip
in Venice, night out in Bavarian Beer
Hall, trip to the Olympic complex in
Munich, Vaduz (capital of
Liechtenstein) lakeside drive around
Lake Lucerne, insurance, luxury
transportation around Europe, terrific
night life in the most happening places
like 'The Red Garter' in Florence. The
company of a great bunch of 18 - 35
year olds from Europe, Australia, New
Zealand, U.S.A., & Canada, who will
probably become a world-wide
network of friends you can stay with
for free on your next overseas trips!
Visit your Travel Cuts Office today for a copy of our video & Brochure.
The Holiday featured above is on page 24. Note: Some Holidays are
already soldout. Please book now to avoid disappointment. Or Phone:
593 4873 Toronto
1-800 387 2699 Ontario
1-800 268 9140 Canada
** TRAVELCUTS
HOLIDAYS ** Goin-S^HirWay!
for 18-35s
18-35 Ways of doing it differently!
March 20,1990
THE UBYSSEY/11 NEWS
UBC 'Geers take design prize
by Nicholas lonides
UBC engineers won the entrepreneurial design category
while Quebec geers designed an
environmentally-sound aerosol
can in the sixth annual Canadian
Engineering Competition (CEC)
held at UBC over the weekend.
UBC engineers John Bruce
and Alan Jonsson won a cash prize
of $750 and calculators from Hewlett-Packard for their hydrofoil-
equipped windsurfer.
According to the information
booklet on the competition, "The
addition of front and rear lifting
surfaces to this prototype design
will lift the board clear of the water, thus reducing drag and improving performance,"
UBC engineers are planning
to market the windsurfer in conjunction with 2 MBA students. The
expected cost is $400 per unit.
The CEC attempts to find the
RACIAL
MINORITIES
ISSUE
WRITERS
CALL
228-2301
best engineering projects from
universities in Canada and allow
the public to view activities of engineering students.
The Universite du Quebec a
Chicoutimi won the Environmental Awareness category ofthe
competition for their Propair—an
ecological aerosol can which releases no harmful by-products into
the environment.
"Companies have looked to
replace fluorocarbons with other
gases or simply with manual
pumps. These new pumps however are non-biodegradable and
are, in fact, trading one environmental problem for another," according to Marlene Paul, an engineer who worked on the project.
"Our product which remains
comparable in size and weight
uses only compressed air. No
harmful by-products are released
into the atmosphere. In addition to
this, our product is reusable."
UTT
Wednesday, March 21,
11:00-2:00 pm
CiTR presents an open line talk
show with guest host Pat Burns
Wednesday March 28,
11:00 -1:00 pm
CiTR presents Pat Burns LIVE in
the SUB conversation pit - come
down and participate in this
open forum on student issues
SILKSCREENING
(1 W99k delivsty on Mock «m|
?_«»»	
OYE SPORTSWEAR - DESIGN
• T-SHIRTS    7.35 EACH
• SWEATSHIRTS    13.50 EACH
• POLO SHIRTS    13.95 EACH
PLUS MANY MORE STYLES ...
(Based on 25 untls per styierdesrgn}
PRICE INCLUDES: 1 colour print, garment., set
up. screen _ artwork ... putf printing, _ Hash cure-
ing (.33 extra) .... solid coloured tabncs may vary
in price .... additional colour printing by qurtation.
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 875-6879
Monday - Saturday    A .... ....   .. p...
Open Saturdays/Sundays/Evenngs by appointment
The winning UBC design.
The reusable aerosol can
would cost $1.30 and the recharger
would cost $33.00. Products now
sold in spray pumps could be purchased in returnable containers
with a deposit like milk or beer
bottles currently have.
The judging was based on difficulty and suitability ofthe problem, originality, technical feasibility, economic feasibility, and
presentation of the project.
The CEC is divided into 4
categories consisting of Editorial
DAN ANDREWS PHOTO
Communications, Explanatory
Communications, Corporate Design, and Entrepreneurial Design. Three special awards were
given in areas of Social Merit,
Technical Excellence, and Environmental Awareness.
If your travel plans include a trip that will put an ocean
between you and your studies, visit Travel Cuts.
Travel Cuts offers students American Express'Travellers
Cheques COMMISSION FREE.
With American Express Travellers Cheques you need only make a
telephone call to get hand delivered refunds - virtually anywhere
in the world:" Or call the Express HelpLine' which offers a full range
of emergency services including medical and legal referrals, phone
translation and message relay.
So the next time you plan to travel, visit a participating Travel Cuts office
and get your commission free American Express Travellers Cheques.
"iS*-     f
12/THE UBYSSEY
March 20,1990

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